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Sample records for henle pisces elasmobranchii

  1. PISCES Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: PISCES-A facility; PISCES-B facility; PISCES-C facility; fast scanning probes; spectroscopic diagnostics; PISCES laboratory data acquisition system; SEM EDX facilities; vacuum outgassing facility; evaluation of bulk-boronized graphites; chemical sputtering of C-C composites; D-retention in redeposited carbon; TEXTOR-exposed graphite; oxygen plasma reactions with graphite; gaseous divertor simulation; experimental; proof of RF-limiter; H-mode transition by DC-biasing; edge-plasma physics experiments in the CCT-tokamak; and He-spectroscopy for edge-plasma diagnosis.

  2. PISCES 2 users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Terrence W.

    1987-01-01

    PISCES 2 is a programming environment and set of extensions to Fortran 77 for parallel programming. It is intended to provide a basis for writing programs for scientific and engineering applications on parallel computers in a way that is relatively independent of the particular details of the underlying computer architecture. This user's manual provides a complete description of the PISCES 2 system as it is currently implemented on the 20 processor Flexible FLEX/32 at NASA Langley Research Center.

  3. Morphological Aspects of Oral Denticles in the Sharpnose Shark Rhizoprionodon lalandii (Müller and Henle, 1839) (Elasmobranchii, Carcharhinidae).

    PubMed

    Ciena, A P; de S Rangel, B; Bruno, C E M; Miglino, M A; de Amorim, A F; Rici, R E G; Watanabe, I

    2016-04-01

    The oral denticles of some elasmobranchs are found on the surface of the oral cavity and are homologous to those on the body surface, being well developed, independent and non-growing, with varying morphology and distribution depending on the species. The structural and three-dimensional characteristics of oral denticles from the rostro-ventral surface of the sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon lalandii were described following imaging by both light and scanning electron microscopy. The light microscopy results showed that the triangular shape of the denticles consisted of a base and an apex. Picrosirius staining showed the arrangement of collagen fibres and oral denticles, and a predominance of type-I collagen was found in both structures under polarized light. There was a broad homogeneous distribution of denticles on the ventral surface, forming a leaf-like shape with the cusp facing the caudal region. Interlocking, hexagonal, geometric structures on its rostral side and ridges on the rostral side of the oral denticles were observed under increased magnification. We concluded that the denticle morphology found in R. lalandii differ of others analysed species, and the descriptions of these structures therefore provide important information for the classification of the species. In this species, the main functions can be assigned to help reduce hydrodynamic drag, particularly by this being a species that uses ram ventilation, and to protect the epithelium of the oropharynx of abrasion and parasites. PMID:25898917

  4. Update on PISCES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Don; Hamm, Dustin; Kubena, Brian; Weaver, Jonathan K.

    2010-01-01

    An updated version of the Platform Independent Software Components for the Exploration of Space (PISCES) software library is available. A previous version was reported in Library for Developing Spacecraft-Mission-Planning Software (MSC-22983), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 7 (July 2001), page 52. To recapitulate: This software provides for Web-based, collaborative development of computer programs for planning trajectories and trajectory- related aspects of spacecraft-mission design. The library was built using state-of-the-art object-oriented concepts and software-development methodologies. The components of PISCES include Java-language application programs arranged in a hierarchy of classes that facilitates the reuse of the components. As its full name suggests, the PISCES library affords platform-independence: The Java language makes it possible to use the classes and application programs with a Java virtual machine, which is available in most Web-browser programs. Another advantage is expandability: Object orientation facilitates expansion of the library through creation of a new class. Improvements in the library since the previous version include development of orbital-maneuver- planning and rendezvous-launch-window application programs, enhancement of capabilities for propagation of orbits, and development of a desktop user interface.

  5. Biogeographic patterns in the cartilaginous fauna (Pisces: Elasmobranchii and Holocephali) in the southeast Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Caro, Carolina; Bennett, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    The abundance and species richness of the cartilaginous fish community of the continental shelf and slope off central Chile is described, based on fishery-independent trawl tows made in 2006 and 2007. A total of 194,705 specimens comprising 20 species (9 sharks, 10 skates, 1 chimaera) were caught at depths of 100–500 m along a 1,000 km transect between 29.5°S and 39°S. Sample site locations were grouped to represent eight geographical zones within this latitudinal range. Species richness fluctuated from 1 to 6 species per zone. There was no significant latitudinal trend for sharks, but skates showed an increased species richness with latitude. Standardised catch per unit effort (CPUE) increased with increasing depth for sharks, but not for skates, but the observed trend for increasing CPUE with latitude was not significant for either sharks or skates. A change in community composition occurred along the depth gradient with the skates, Psammobatis rudis, Zearaja chilensis and Dipturus trachyderma dominating communities between 100 and 300 m, but small-sized, deep-water dogfishes, such as Centroscyllium spp. dominated the catch between 300 and 500 m. Cluster and ordination analysis identified one widespread assemblage, grouping 58% of sites, and three shallow-water assemblages. Assemblages with low diversity (coldspots) coincided with highly productive fishing grounds for demersal crustaceans and bony fishes. The community distribution suggested that the differences between assemblages may be due to compensatory changes in mesopredator species abundance, as a consequence of continuous and unselective species removal. Distribution patterns and the quantitative assessment of sharks, skates and chimaeras presented here complement extant biogeographic knowledge and further the understanding of deep-water ecosystem dynamics in relation to fishing activity in the south-east Pacific Ocean. PMID:24918036

  6. The loop of Henle as the milestone of mammalian kindey concentrating ability: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Koulouridis, Efstathios; Koulouridis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    The first description of the renal tubules is attributed to Lorenzo Bellini in 1662 and four years later Marcello Malpighi described the glomerulus. In 1842 Sir William Bowman described the capsule that surrounds the Malpighian body and its connection with the renal tubule and introduced the "excretory" hypothesis of urine formation. In the same year, Carl Ludwig introduced the "filtration-reabsorption" hypothesis of urine formation. Bowman's hypothesis was accepted by the so-called "vitalists" and Ludwig's hypothesis by the so-called "mechanists". In the middle of this confliction, Jacob Henle described in 1862 the homonymous "U" shaped loop but his discovery has neglected. In 1942 Werner Kuhn, a physical chemist, proposed that the loop of Henle may be the natural analog of the hairpin countercurrent multiplication system which concentrates urine in mammalian kidneys. In 1951 Kuhn, Hargitay and Wirz showed experimentally that the loop of Henle was the most important part of the countercurrent multiplication system of urine-concentrating mechanism in mammalian kidneys. The new theory was accepted by English-speaking scientists later, in 1958, when Carl Gottschalk and Margaret Mylle published their experimental work and proved that Kuhn's theory was correct. Gottschalk summarized the evidence of the accumulated knowledge in 1962, three centuries after the first description of renal tubules and one century after description of Henle's loop. PMID:25811694

  7. PISCES: Developing New Design, Materials and Technologies for Sustained

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Larson, William E.; Duke, Mike; Schowengerdt, Frank

    2008-01-01

    PISCES, the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems. This paper describes the PISCES development plans, particularly in the areas of In-Situ Resource Utilization, Robotics and Education and Outreach.

  8. Shigella infection of Henle intestinal epithelial cells: role of the bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Hale, T L; Bonventre, P F

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial cell infection by Shigella flexneri 2a was studied in an in vitro model system. Using the Henle 407 human intestinal epithelial cell line as host cells, a standardized experimental protocol which allowed quantitative measurement of infection was developed. Intravellular residence of infecting organisms was confirmed by indirect fluorescent-antibody staining of unfixed and methanol-fixed (Henle 407) cells and by quantitative bacteriological culture of disrupted host cells after infection. The process of shigella entry into cells was evaluated by chemical or physical modulation of the bacterium under controlled experimental conditions. Shigella were subjected to mild heat, ultraviolet radiation aminoglycoside antibiotics, and immunoglobulins raised against S. flexneri 2a. The data show that heat-stable antigens on the bacterial surface are not solely responsible for infectivity of S. flexneri 2a. Furthermore, it was shown that physiological and synthetic functions of shigellae are required for entry into host cells. PMID:381204

  9. A checklist of helminth parasites of Elasmobranchii in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Merlo-Serna, Aldo Iván; García-Prieto, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A comprehensive and updated summary of the literature and unpublished records contained in scientific collections on the helminth parasites of the elasmobranchs from Mexico is herein presented for the first time. At present, the helminth fauna associated with Elasmobranchii recorded in Mexico is composed of 132 (110 named species and 22 not assigned to species), which belong to 70 genera included in 27 families (plus 4 incertae sedis families of cestodes). These data represent 7.2% of the worldwide species richness. Platyhelminthes is the most widely represented, with 128 taxa: 94 of cestodes, 22 of monogeneans and 12 of trematodes; Nematoda and Annelida: Hirudinea are represented by only 2 taxa each. These records come from 54 localities, pertaining to 15 states; Baja California Sur (17 sampled localities) and Baja California (10), are the states with the highest species richness: 72 and 54 species, respectively. Up to now, 48 elasmobranch species have been recorded as hosts of helminths in Mexico; so, approximately 82% of sharks and 67% of rays distributed in Mexican waters lack helminthological studies. The present list provides the host, distribution (with geographical coordinates), site of infection, accession number in scientific collections, and references for the parasites. A host-parasite list is also provided. PMID:27047240

  10. A checklist of helminth parasites of Elasmobranchii in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Merlo-Serna, Aldo Iván; García-Prieto, Luis

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive and updated summary of the literature and unpublished records contained in scientific collections on the helminth parasites of the elasmobranchs from Mexico is herein presented for the first time. At present, the helminth fauna associated with Elasmobranchii recorded in Mexico is composed of 132 (110 named species and 22 not assigned to species), which belong to 70 genera included in 27 families (plus 4 incertae sedis families of cestodes). These data represent 7.2% of the worldwide species richness. Platyhelminthes is the most widely represented, with 128 taxa: 94 of cestodes, 22 of monogeneans and 12 of trematodes; Nematoda and Annelida: Hirudinea are represented by only 2 taxa each. These records come from 54 localities, pertaining to 15 states; Baja California Sur (17 sampled localities) and Baja California (10), are the states with the highest species richness: 72 and 54 species, respectively. Up to now, 48 elasmobranch species have been recorded as hosts of helminths in Mexico; so, approximately 82% of sharks and 67% of rays distributed in Mexican waters lack helminthological studies. The present list provides the host, distribution (with geographical coordinates), site of infection, accession number in scientific collections, and references for the parasites. A host-parasite list is also provided. PMID:27047240

  11. Pisces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Fishes; abbrev. Psc, gen. Piscium; area 889 sq. deg.) A northern zodiacal constellation which lies between Pegasus and Cetus, and culminates at midnight in late September. Its origin dates back to Babylonian times and it is said to represent Aphrodite, the goddess of love in Greek mythology, and her son Eros, who jumped into the Euphrates to escape from the multi-headed Typhon and were turned...

  12. Planetary In Situ Capillary Electrophoresis System (PISCES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. A.; Stockton, A. M.; Mora, M. F.; Cable, M. L.; Bramall, N. E.; Jensen, E. C.; Jiao, H.; Lynch, E.; Mathies, R. A.

    2012-10-01

    We propose to develop PISCES, a 3-kg, 2W, flight-capable microfluidic lab-on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis analyzer capable of ingesting solid, liquid, or gas samples and performing a suite of chemical analyses with parts per trillion sensitivity.

  13. Fluid reabsorption in Henle's loop and urinary excretion of sodium and water in normal rats and rats with chronic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stumpe, Klaus O.; Lowitz, Hans D.; Ochwadt, Bruno

    1970-01-01

    The function of the short loops of Henle was investigated by micropuncture technique in normal rats, in rats with spontaneous hypertension, and in the untouched kidney of rats with experimental renal hypertension. All animals received a standard infusion of 1.2 ml of isotonic saline per hr. With increasing arterial blood pressure (range from 90 to 220 mm Hg), a continuous decrease in transit time of Lissamine green through Henle's loop from 32 to 10 sec was observed. Fractional water reabsorption along the loop declined progressively from 26 to 10%, and fractional sodium reabsorption decreased from 40 to 36% of the filtered load. The fluid volume in Henle's loop calculated from transit time and mean flow rate also decreased with increasing blood pressure. There was no change in superficial single nephron filtration rate but there was a slight increase in total glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Sodium and water reabsorption in the proximal tubule remained unchanged. Urine flow rate, sodium excretion, osmolar clearance, and negative free water clearance increased with increasing blood pressure. The osmolal urine to plasma (U/P) ratio declined but did not fall below a value of 1.5. It is concluded that the increase in sodium and water excretion with chronic elevation of arterial blood pressure is caused by a decrease of sodium and water reabsorption along the loop of Henle, presumably as a consequence of increased medullary blood pressure. PMID:5422022

  14. Mechanism of exaggerated natriuresis in hypertensive man: impaired sodium transport in the loop of henle

    PubMed Central

    Buckalew, Vardaman M.; Puschett, Jules B.; Kintzel, James E.; Goldberg, Martin

    1969-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of saline loading on distal sodium reabsorption in hypertensive man, studies were performed during both water deprivation and water diuresis in eight hypertensive subjects, and the results were compared to data obtained from similar studies in normal subjects. All hypertensive patients exhibited an enhanced excretion of filtered sodium (CNa/CIn) at any level of distal delivery of sodium compared to normal controls. Free water reabsorption (TcH2O) during hypertonic saline loading was quantitatively abnormal in the hypertensives at high levels of osmolar clearance (COsm), and also the curve of TcH2O vs. COsm leveled off above a COsm of 18 ml/min per 1.73 m2 in the hypertensive group in contrast to the normal controls in whom TcH2O showed no evidence of achieving an upper limit. Sodium depletion exaggerated the abnormality in TcH2O in hypertensives, and resulted in a positive free water clearance (CH2O) during hydropenia. During hypotonic saline loading in water diuresis, changes in free water clearance per 100 ml of glomerular filtrate (CH2O/CIn) were less at any given increment in urine flow per 100 ml of glomerular filtrate (V/CIn) in the hypertensives compared to normal controls (P < 0.001). This abnormality in CH2O/CIn in the hypertensives in conjunction with the defect in TcH2O observed during hydropenia indicates that sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle was abnormal at any given rate of distal delivery of sodium in hypertension. Furthermore, these abnormalities in TcH2O and CH2O coincided temporally with the development of the exaggerated natriuresis. Although the distal defect in sodium transport, in large part, accounted for the augmented natriuresis in hypertension, evidence was present also for enhanced rejection of sodium in the proximal tubule during saline loading in the hypertensives. Additional studies utilizing acetazolamide which increases distal delivery of sodium without extracellular fluid volume expansion showed only

  15. Architecture of kangaroo rat inner medulla: segmentation of descending thin limb of Henle's loop.

    PubMed

    Urity, Vinoo B; Issaian, Tadeh; Braun, Eldon J; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2012-03-15

    We hypothesize that the inner medulla of the kangaroo rat Dipodomys merriami, a desert rodent that concentrates its urine to more than 6,000 mosmol/kgH(2)O water, provides unique examples of architectural features necessary for production of highly concentrated urine. To investigate this architecture, inner medullary nephron segments in the initial 3,000 μm below the outer medulla were assessed with digital reconstructions from physical tissue sections. Descending thin limbs of Henle (DTLs), ascending thin limbs of Henle (ATLs), and collecting ducts (CDs) were identified by immunofluorescence using antibodies that label segment-specific proteins associated with transepithelial water flux (aquaporin 1 and 2, AQP1 and AQP2) and chloride flux (the chloride channel ClC-K1); all tubules and vessels were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin. In the outer 3,000 μm of the inner medulla, AQP1-positive DTLs lie at the periphery of groups of CDs. ATLs lie inside and outside the groups of CDs. Immunohistochemistry and reconstructions of loops that form their bends in the outer 3,000 μm of the inner medulla show that, relative to loop length, the AQP1-positive segment of the kangaroo rat is significantly longer than that of the Munich-Wistar rat. The length of ClC-K1 expression in the prebend region at the terminal end of the descending side of the loop in kangaroo rat is about 50% shorter than that of the Munich-Wistar rat. Tubular fluid of the kangaroo rat DTL may approach osmotic equilibrium with interstitial fluid by water reabsorption along a relatively longer tubule length, compared with Munich-Wistar rat. A relatively shorter-length prebend segment may promote a steeper reabsorptive driving force at the loop bend. These structural features predict functionality that is potentially significant in the production of a high urine osmolality in the kangaroo rat. PMID:22237592

  16. A mathematical model of rat proximal tubule and loop of Henle.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Alan M

    2015-05-15

    Proximal tubule and loop of Henle function are coupled, with proximal transport determining loop fluid composition, and loop transport modulating glomerular filtration via tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). To examine this interaction, we begin with published models of the superficial rat proximal convoluted tubule (PCT; including flow-dependent transport in a compliant tubule), and the rat thick ascending Henle limb (AHL). Transport parameters for this PCT are scaled down to represent the proximal straight tubule (PST), which is connected to the thick AHL via a short descending limb. Transport parameters for superficial PCT and PST are scaled up for a juxtamedullary nephron, and connected to AHL via outer and inner medullary descending limbs, and inner medullary thin AHL. Medullary interstitial solute concentrations are specified. End-AHL hydrostatic pressure is determined by distal nephron flow resistance, and the TGF signal is represented as a linear function of end-AHL cytosolic Cl concentration. These two distal conditions required iterative solution of the model. Model calculations capture inner medullary countercurrent flux of urea, and also suggest the presence of an outer medullary countercurrent flux of ammonia, with reabsorption in AHL and secretion in PST. For a realistically strong TGF signal, there is the expected homeostatic impact on distal flows, and in addition, a homeostatic effect on proximal tubule pressure. The model glycosuria threshold is compatible with rat data, and predicted glucose excretion with selective 1Na(+):1glucose cotransporter (SGLT2) inhibition comports with observations in the mouse. Model calculations suggest that enhanced proximal tubule Na(+) reabsorption during hyperglycemia is sufficient to activate TGF and contribute to diabetic hyperfiltration. PMID:25694479

  17. PisCES: Pis(cine) Community Estimation Software

    EPA Science Inventory

    PisCES predicts a fish community for any NHD-Plus stream reach in the conterminous United States. PisCES utilizes HUC-based distributional information for over 1,000 nature and non-native species obtained from NatureServe, the USGS, and Peterson Field Guide to Freshwater Fishes o...

  18. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF THE PISCES OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Shectman, Stephen; Thompson, Ian B.; Preston, George W.; Simon, Joshua D.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Gould, Andrew; Ivezic, Zeljko; Sesar, Branimir

    2009-11-10

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of the 'Pisces Overdensity', also known as 'Structure J', a photometric overdensity of RR Lyrae stars discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at an estimated photometric distance of approx85 kpc. We measure radial velocities for eight RR Lyrae stars within Pisces. We find that five of the eight stars have heliocentric radial velocities within a narrow range of -87 km s{sup -1} < v{sub r} < -67 km s{sup -1}, suggesting that the photometric overdensity is mainly due to a physically associated system, probably a dwarf galaxy or a disrupted galaxy. Two of the remaining three stars differ from one another by only 9 km s{sup -1}, but it would be premature to identify them as a second system.

  19. PISCES and ALT-II: Juelich PSI papers

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.; LaBombard, B.; Moyer, R.; Goebel, D.M.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Corbett, W.J.; Lehmer, R.; Ra, Y.; Tynan, G.; Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H.; Hardkte, A.; Kohlhaas, W.; Wolf, G.; Vandenplas, P.; Messian, M.; Van Oost, G.; Weynants, R.; Franconi, E.; Miyahara, A.; Sagara, A.; Gauster, W.B.; Koski, J.A.; McGrath, R.T.; Watkins, J.G.; Malinowski, M.E.

    1988-08-01

    This publication comprises papers from the PISCES and ALT-II Programs at UCLA which were presented at the International Plasma Surface Interactions Meeting held in Juelich, FRG, on May 2-6, 1988. A list of publications from the PISCES and ALT-II contained in this report are: Deuterium pumping and erosion behavior of selected graphite materials under high flux plasma bombardment in PISCES; Erosion and redeposition behavior of selected NET-candidate materials under high-flux hydrogen, deuterium plasma bombardment in PISCES; Presheath profiles in simulated tokamak edge plasmas; Boundary asymmetries and plasma flow to the ALT-II toroidal belt pump limiter; ALT-II toroidal belt pump limiter performance in TEXTOR; and An in-situ spectroscopic erosion yield measurement with applications to sputtering and surface morphology alterations.

  20. Henle Fiber Layer Phase Retardation Changes Associated With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    VanNasdale, Dean A.; Elsner, Ann E.; Peabody, Todd D.; Kohne, Kimberly D.; Malinovsky, Victor E.; Haggerty, Bryan P.; Weber, Anke; Clark, Christopher A.; Burns, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify and compare phase retardation amplitude and regularity associated with the Henle fiber layer (HFL) between nonexudative AMD patients and age-matched controls using scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) imaging. Methods. A scanning laser polarimeter was used to collect 15 × 15° macular-centered images in 25 patients with nonexudative AMD and 25 age-matched controls. Raw image data were used to compute macular phase retardation maps associated with the HFL. Consecutive, annular regions of interest from 0.5 to 3.0° eccentricity, centered on the fovea, were used to generate intensity profiles from phase retardation data and analyzed with two complementary techniques: a normalized second harmonic frequency (2f) of the fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis and a curve fitting analysis using a 2f sine function. Paired t-tests were used to compare the normalized 2f FFT magnitude at each eccentricity between the two groups, the eccentricity that yielded the maximum normalized 2f FFT between paired individuals across the two groups, and curve fitting RMS error at each eccentricity between the two groups. Results. Normalized 2f FFT components were lower in the AMD group at each eccentricity, with no difference between the two groups in the maximum normalized 2f FFT component eccentricity. The root-mean-square (RMS) error from curve fitting was significantly higher in the AMD group. Conclusions. Phase retardation changes in the central macula indicate loss and/or structural alterations to central cone photoreceptors in nonexudative AMD patients. Scanning laser polarimetry imaging is a noninvasive method for quantifying cone photoreceptor changes associated with central macular disease. PMID:25525166

  1. HALO VELOCITY GROUPS IN THE PISCES OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Vivas, A. Katherina; Duffau, Sonia E-mail: zi@u.washington.ed E-mail: sonia.duffau@gmail.co

    2010-07-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of five faint (V {approx} 20) RR Lyrae stars associated with the Pisces overdensity conducted with the Gemini South Telescope. At a heliocentric and galactocentric distance of {approx}80 kpc, this is the most distant substructure in the Galactic halo known to date. We combined our observations with literature data and confirmed that the substructure is composed of two different kinematic groups. The main group contains eight stars and has (V{sub gsr}) = 50 km s{sup -1}, while the second group contains four stars at a velocity of (V{sub gsr}) = -52 km s{sup -1}, where V{sub gsr} is the radial velocity in the galactocentric standard of rest. The metallicity distribution of RR Lyrae stars in the Pisces overdensity is centered on [Fe/H] = -1.5 dex and has a width of 0.3 dex. The new data allowed us to establish that both groups are spatially extended making it very unlikely that they are bound systems, and are more likely to be debris of a tidally disrupted galaxy or galaxies. Due to small sky coverage, it is still unclear whether these groups have the same or different progenitors.

  2. Carl Ludwig, Jacob Henle, Hermann Helmholtz, Emil DuBois-Reymond and the scientific development of nephrology in Germany.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K

    1994-01-01

    Medical science in the 2nd half of the 19th century proceeded in a stepwise fashion, when the development of new techniques permitted the evaluation of living processes by direct microscopic or endoscopic inspection, as well as by quantitative measurements of the underlying physical and chemical forces. Ludwig, Henle, Helmholtz and DuBois-Reymond all contributed in different ways to the evolution of medicine and physiology into natural sciences, freed from romantic, philosophic speculation. Nephrology benefitted from this development and from the contributions of the non-nephrologists to natural science. PMID:7847467

  3. LiPISC: A Lightweight and Flexible Method for Privacy-Aware Intersection Set Computation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiyong; Ren, Yi; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Privacy-aware intersection set computation (PISC) can be modeled as secure multi-party computation. The basic idea is to compute the intersection of input sets without leaking privacy. Furthermore, PISC should be sufficiently flexible to recommend approximate intersection items. In this paper, we reveal two previously unpublished attacks against PISC, which can be used to reveal and link one input set to another input set, resulting in privacy leakage. We coin these as Set Linkage Attack and Set Reveal Attack. We then present a lightweight and flexible PISC scheme (LiPISC) and prove its security (including against Set Linkage Attack and Set Reveal Attack). PMID:27326763

  4. LiPISC: A Lightweight and Flexible Method for Privacy-Aware Intersection Set Computation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Huang, Shiyong; Ren, Yi; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Privacy-aware intersection set computation (PISC) can be modeled as secure multi-party computation. The basic idea is to compute the intersection of input sets without leaking privacy. Furthermore, PISC should be sufficiently flexible to recommend approximate intersection items. In this paper, we reveal two previously unpublished attacks against PISC, which can be used to reveal and link one input set to another input set, resulting in privacy leakage. We coin these as Set Linkage Attack and Set Reveal Attack. We then present a lightweight and flexible PISC scheme (LiPISC) and prove its security (including against Set Linkage Attack and Set Reveal Attack). PMID:27326763

  5. Mechanism of sodium and chloride transport in the thin ascending limb of Henle.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, M; Kokko, J P

    1976-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies have disclosed that the thin ascending limb of Henle (tALH) possesses some unique membrane characteristics. In those studies we failed to demonstrated active transport of sodium chloride by the tALH, although it was shown that the isotopic permeability to sodium and chloride was unusually high. However, we did not examine the mechanisms by which the apparent high permeation of sodium chloride occurs. Thus the purpose of the present studies was to elucidate the mechanism of sodium chloride transport across the isolated tALH of the rabbit by conducting four different types of studies: (1) comparison of the observed chloride and sodium flux ratios to those predicted by Ussing's equation under imposed salt concentration gradients; (2) kinetic evaluation of chloride and sodium fluxes; (3) examination of the effect of bromide on the kinetics of chloride transport; and (4) experiments to test for the existence of exchange diffusion of chloride. In the first set of studies the predicted and the theoretical flux ratios of sodium were identical in those experiments in which sodium chloride was added either to the perfusate or to the bath. However, the observed chloride flux ratio, lumen-to-bath/bath-to-lumen, was significantly lower than that predicted from Ussing's equation when 100 mM sodium chloride was added to the bath. In the second set of experiments the apparent isotopic permeability for sodium and for chloride was measured under varying perfusate and bath NaCl concentrations. There was no statistical change in the apparent sodium permeability coefficient when the NaCl concentration was raised by varying increments from 85.5 to 309.5 mM. However, permeation of 36Cl decrease significantly with an increase in Cl from 73.6 to 598.6 mM. These events could be explained by a two component chloride transport process consisting of simple diffusion and a saturable facilitated diffusion process with a Vmax = 3.71 neq mm-1 min-1. In the third set

  6. The PISCES 2 parallel programming environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Terrence W.

    1987-01-01

    PISCES 2 is a programming environment for scientific and engineering computations on MIMD parallel computers. It is currently implemented on a flexible FLEX/32 at NASA Langley, a 20 processor machine with both shared and local memories. The environment provides an extended Fortran for applications programming, a configuration environment for setting up a run on the parallel machine, and a run-time environment for monitoring and controlling program execution. This paper describes the overall design of the system and its implementation on the FLEX/32. Emphasis is placed on several novel aspects of the design: the use of a carefully defined virtual machine, programmer control of the mapping of virtual machine to actual hardware, forces for medium-granularity parallelism, and windows for parallel distribution of data. Some preliminary measurements of storage use are included.

  7. Methods for design and evaluation of parallel computating systems (The PISCES project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Terrence W.; Wise, Robert; Haught, Mary JO

    1989-01-01

    The PISCES project started in 1984 under the sponsorship of the NASA Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) program. A PISCES 1 programming environment and parallel FORTRAN were implemented in 1984 for the DEC VAX (using UNIX processes to simulate parallel processes). This system was used for experimentation with parallel programs for scientific applications and AI (dynamic scene analysis) applications. PISCES 1 was ported to a network of Apollo workstations by N. Fitzgerald.

  8. PISCES program plasma-surface interactions research: Summary of research, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    This paper discusses the following about the Pisces program: Major objectives of the program; Staff in the PISCES program at UCLA; Highlights in the program; Collaborations with other institutions; PISCES-A facility; PISCES-B facility; Fast scanning Langmuir probe; Omegatron mass spectrometer; Spectroscopic diagnostics; Data acquisition system; Redeposition effect on carbon chemical erosion; Erosion of carbon tokamakium from TFTR; Effect of boron-doping on carbon chemical erosion; Radiation enhanced sublimation of carbon; Surface analysis of TEXTOR titles; Spectroscopic analysis of carbon impurities; Biased limiter and divertor; Biased divertor channel; Gaseous divertor experiments; Presheath profile measurements; Particle transport in CCT tokamak; and Biased divertor experiments in CCT.

  9. Ultrastructure of dermal denticles in sharpnose shark (Rhizoprionodon lalandii) (Elasmobranchii, Carcharhinidae).

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, M E; Guimarães, J P; Amorim, A F; Rotundo, M; Rici, R E G; Mari, R B

    2015-10-01

    The presence of denticles in the external surface, oral cavity, fins, and clasper of Elasmobranchii has been widely reported. These structures, called body denticles, may be observed on the body surface of sharks. Dermal and oral denticles are made up by a basal plate that is embedded in the dermis, forming a peduncle that grows from the base to the crown. These denticles may protect the skin against abrasion, and improve hydrodynamics and gill arches function. Rhizoprionodon lalandii is a widely distributed and very common species in Brazilian coastal areas. The aims of this study was to compare the morphology of oral and body denticles of R. lalandii to understand the implications of these structures in the behavior of these animals. Morphological analysis showed that there are differences between dermal and oral denticles, which are related to their role in different body regions. Body denticles have three cusps, and well-defined crests and ridges, and literature data suggest that suggest that hydrodynamics is their main function. Most of the oral denticles have only one cusp, and their morphology and distribution showed that their main functions are preparing food to be swallowed and protecting the oral cavity against abrasion. PMID:26239942

  10. Role of Prox1 in the Transforming Ascending Thin Limb of Henle's Loop during Mouse Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-mi; Kim, Wan-Young; Nam, Sun Ah; Choi, A-Rum; Kim, Hyang; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Kim, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is critical to the development of many embryonic organs and tissues, although current understanding of its expression in the developing renal medulla is limited. We examined the functional role of Prox1 during mouse kidney development with particular emphasis on the developing loop of Henle. Our data show that Prox1 is expressed in the transdifferentiating region from the NKCC2-positive thick ascending limb, into the CLC-K1-positive ascending thin limb of Henle’s loop beginning at embryonic day 18. From 1 to 14 days of age, Prox1-positive cells gradually disappeared from the papillary tip, and remained in the initial part of inner medulla after 21 days. In this transforming area, no Prox1 was observed in cells undergoing apoptosis but was expressed strongly in the remaining cells, which differentiated into ascending thin limb epithelial cells. In vitro and in vivo approaches showed that Prox1 expression increases where the osmolality is near optimal range, but decreases at below- or above-optimal ranges. Renal hypoosmolality induced by furosemide (NKCC2 inhibitor) inhibited Prox1 expression and delayed maturation of the ascending limb of Henle’s loop. Together, these studies suggest that Prox1 appears to be a critical stage specific regulator of specifying ascending thin limb cell fate and that its expression is regulated by osmolality. PMID:25993027

  11. Expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Thick Ascending Loop of Henle Attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Heather A.; Gousette, Monette U.; Storm, Megan V.; Abraham, Nader G.; Csongradi, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Kidney-specific induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) attenuates the development of angiotensin II (Ang II) -dependent hypertension, but the relative contribution of vascular versus tubular induction of HO-1 is unknown. To determine the specific contribution of thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) -derived HO-1, we generated a transgenic mouse in which the uromodulin promoter controlled expression of human HO-1. Quantitative RT-PCR and confocal microscopy confirmed successful localization of the HO-1 transgene to TALH tubule segments. Medullary HO activity, but not cortical HO activity, was significantly higher in transgenic mice than control mice. Enhanced TALH HO-1 attenuated the hypertension induced by Ang II delivered by an osmotic minipump for 10 days (139±3 versus 153±2 mmHg in the transgenic and control mice, respectively; P<0.05). The lower blood pressure in transgenic mice associated with a 60% decrease in medullary NKCC2 transporter expression determined by Western blot. Transgenic mice also exhibited a 36% decrease in ouabain-sensitive sodium reabsorption and a significantly attenuated response to furosemide in isolated TALH segments,. In summary, these results show that increased levels of HO-1 in the TALH can lower blood pressure by a mechanism that may include alterations in NKCC2-dependent sodium reabsorption. PMID:22323644

  12. PISCES: A "Stepping Stone" to International Space Exploration and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe T.; Henley, Mark W.; Schowengerdt, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) was initiated by the Japan/US Science, Technology and Space Application Programs (JUSTSAP) to advance research and education in space exploration technology and systems working closely with the State of Hawaii. Hawaii has a heritage with space exploration including the training of Apollo astronauts and testing of lunar rover systems in some of the most realistic terrestrial sites available. The high altitude dry environment with greater solar insolation, and the dry lunar regolith-like volcanic ash and cratered terrain make Hawaiian sites ideal to support, international space exploration technology development, demonstration, education and training. This paper will summarize development and roles of PISCES in lunar surface analogs, simulations, technology demonstrations, research and training for space exploration technology and systems.

  13. β3-Adrenoreceptors in the thick ascending limb of Henle and in principal cells of the collecting duct work to concentrate urine.

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel G

    2016-09-01

    β3-Adrenoreceptors and their importance to increase sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle and to increase water reabsorption in principal cells of the collecting duct are, for the first time, described here. This is an integrated brain response to dehydration perceived by osmosensitive cells in the hypothalamus and triggering through vasopressin axonal and dendritic release a coordinated response implicating vasopressin V2 receptors and β3-adrenoreceptors on the luminal membrane of cortical collecting duct cells. PMID:27521107

  14. Planetary Basalt Construction of a Launch/Landing Pad - PISCES Project Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    Provide a briefing on the progress of a joint project between the PISCES and NASA to develop and demonstrate technologies associated with planetary robotic construction using basalt: called “Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement” (ACME).

  15. Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST/AFTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Hilton, George; Perrin, Marshall; Sayson, Llop; Domingo, Jorge; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a prototype lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey TelescopeAstrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRSTAFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC). We will present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the compatibility to upgrade from the current 1k x 1k detector array to 4k x 4k detector array. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  16. Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST/AFTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Mcelwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Hilton, George; Sayson, Jorge Llop; Perrin, Marshall; Demer, Richard; Tang, Hong; Kern, Brian; Ferdosi, Janan

    2015-01-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope/Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST/AFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) cofigurations. We discuss why the lenslet array based IFS is selected for PISCES. We present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the specific function of our pinhole mask on the back surface of the lenslet array to further suppress star light introduced speckles. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  17. Prototype imaging spectrograph for coronagraphic exoplanet studies (PISCES) for WFIRST/AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Hilton, George; Llop Sayson, Jorge; Perrin, Marshall; Demers, Richard; Tang, Hong; Kern, Brian; Ferdosi, Janan

    2015-09-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope/Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) configurations. We discuss why the lenslet array based IFS was selected for PISCES. We present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the specific function of our pinhole mask on the back surface of the lenslet array to reduce the diffraction from the edge of the lenslets. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  18. KINEMATIC DISCOVERY OF A STELLAR STREAM LOCATED IN PISCES

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Charles; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Grillmair, Carl

    2013-03-10

    We report the kinematic discovery of the Pisces Stellar Stream (PSS), at Galactic longitude l Almost-Equal-To 135 Degree-Sign and -39 Degree-Sign < b < -36 Degree-Sign . We originally identified this halo substructure from velocities of red giant branch stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, and confirmed its presence in turnoff stars from SDSS photometric data. The PSS is a narrow, kinematically cold tidal stream, with {sigma}{sub v,0} Almost-Equal-To 8 km s{sup -1}. Its metallicity is [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -2.2, with {approx}0.3 dex dispersion. The color-magnitude signature of the stream turnoff, combined with our measured metallicity, places the PSS at a distance of 35 {+-} 3 kpc. The PSS is the same as the previously announced ''Triangulum stream'' and part of the proposed ''stream a''. We rule out an association of the PSS with other previously known Milky Way substructures in the same region of the sky.

  19. An Overview of Recent PISCES Program PMI Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, George; Doerner, Russell; Abe, Shota; Baldwin, Matthew; Barton, Joseph; Chen, Renkun; Gosselin, Jordan; Hollmann, Eric; Nishijima, Daisuke; Simmonds, Michael; Wang, Yong; Yu, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    The PISCES Program is focused on fundamental PMI studies of Be and W-based solid plasma facing components under steady-state and transient conditions. We will show results from studies in W, Be and mixed W-Be material systems. Topics of investigation include formation of near-surface nanobubbles from He plasma ion implantation, growth of W-fuzz from these bubbles in steady-state and transient conditions, D retention in Be and W and development of a D-retention model for both H/D isotope exchange and displacement damage experiments. Initial studies of PMI in displacement damaged W are also presented, showing the effect of damage and exposure temperature on D retention, D diffusion, W thermal conductivity. Be-based results include morphology evolution under high plasma flux exposure, Be erosion mechanisms, and retention in Be-based materials. Future plans and connections to fusion energy system requirements will be discussed. This work supported by grant DE-FG02-07ER54912.

  20. Uromodulin Retention in Thick Ascending Limb of Henle's Loop Affects SCD1 in Neighboring Proximal Tubule: Renal Transcriptome Studies in Mouse Models of Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Horsch, Marion; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Rathkolb, Birgit; Wolf, Eckhard; Aigner, Bernhard; Kemter, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Uromodulin-associated kidney disease (UAKD) is a hereditary progressive renal disease which can lead to renal failure and requires renal replacement therapy. UAKD belongs to the endoplasmic reticulum storage diseases due to maturation defect of mutant uromodulin and its retention in the enlarged endoplasmic reticulum in the cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TALH). Dysfunction of TALH represents the key pathogenic mechanism of UAKD causing the clinical symptoms of this disease. However, the molecular alterations underlying UAKD are not well understood. In this study, transcriptome profiling of whole kidneys of two mouse models of UAKD, UmodA227T and UmodC93F, was performed. Genes differentially abundant in UAKD affected kidneys of both Umod mutant lines at different disease stages were identified and verified by RT-qPCR. Additionally, differential protein abundances of SCD1 and ANGPTL7 were validated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. ANGPTL7 expression was down-regulated in TALH cells of Umod mutant mice which is the site of the mutant uromodulin maturation defect. SCD1 was expressed selectively in the S3 segment of proximal tubule cells, and SCD1 abundance was increased in UAKD affected kidneys. This finding demonstrates that a cross talk between two functionally distinct tubular segments of the kidney, the TALH segment and the S3 segment of proximal tubule, exists. PMID:25409434

  1. Understanding pain and improving management of sickle cell disease: the PiSCES study.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wally R.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Penberthy, Lynne T.; McClish, Donna K.; Levenson, James L.; Roberts, John D.; Gil, Karen; Roseff, Susan D.; Aisiku, Imoigele P.

    2005-01-01

    Until recent decades, sickle cell disease (SCD) was associated with recurrent, disabling pain, organ failure and death in childhood or early adulthood. SCD treatment advances have now decreased pain and prolonged survival, but episodic or chronic pain may still require substantial analgesic use and frequent hospitalization for pain episodes. This pain is poorly characterized and often poorly treated. Adult patients may face barriers to comprehensive SCD care, stigmatization of their care-seeking behavior by providers and lack of family support, forcing them into maladaptive coping strategies. The Pain in Sickle Cell Epidemiology Study (PiSCES) attempts to develop and validate a biopsychosocial model of SCD pain, pain response and healthcare utilization in a large, multisite adult cohort. PiSCES participants complete a baseline survey and six months of daily pain diaries in which they record levels of SCD-related pain and related disability and distress as well as responses to pain (e.g., medication use, hospital visits). PiSCES will advance methods of measuring pain and pain response in SCD by better describing home-managed as well as provider-managed pain. PiSCES will assess the relative contributions of biological (disease-related), psychosocial and environmental (readiness to utilize) factors to overall pain and pain response in SCD, suggesting targets for biobehavioral interventions over time. Importantly, PiSCES will also identify "triggers" of SCD pain episodes and healthcare utilization in the moment of pain, suggesting targets for timely care that mutes pain episodes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15712781

  2. Trophic ecomorphology of Siluriformes (Pisces, Osteichthyes) from a tropical stream.

    PubMed

    Pagotto, J P A; Goulart, E; Oliveira, E F; Yamamura, C B

    2011-05-01

    The present study analysed the relationship between morphology and trophic structure of Siluriformes (Pisces, Osteichthyes) from the Caracu Stream (22º 45' S and 53º 15' W), a tributary of the Paraná River (Brazil). Sampling was carried out at three sites using electrofishing, and two species of Loricariidae and four of Heptapteridae were obtained. A cluster analysis revealed the presence of three trophic guilds (detritivores, insectivores and omnivores). Principal components analysis demonstrated the segregation of two ecomorphotypes: at one extreme there were the detritivores (Loricariidae) with morphological structures that are fundamental in allowing them to fix themselves to substrates characterised by rushing torrents, thus permitting them to graze on the detritus and organic materials encrusted on the substrate; at the other extreme of the gradient there were the insectivores and omnivores (Heptapteridae), with morphological characteristics that promote superior performance in the exploitation of structurally complex habitats with low current velocity, colonised by insects and plants. Canonical discriminant analysis revealed an ecomorphological divergence between insectivores, which have morphological structures that permit them to capture prey in small spaces among rocks, and omnivores, which have a more compressed body and tend to explore food items deposited in marginal backwater zones. Mantel tests showed that trophic structure was significantly related to the body shape of a species, independently of the phylogenetic history, indicating that, in this case, there was an ecomorphotype for each trophic guild. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the Siluriformes of the Caracu Stream were ecomorphologically structured and that morphology can be applied as an additional tool in predicting the trophic structure of this group. PMID:21755165

  3. The PISCES Project: How Teacher-Scientist Partners can Enhance Elementary Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, C.; Oechel, W.

    2003-12-01

    The PISCES Project (Partnerships Involving the Scientific Community in Elementary Schools www.sdsa.org/pisces) is an innovative program that brings high quality standards-based elementary science curriculum and hands-on laboratory materials into San Diego County's classrooms. The project is funded by the NSF Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) program. The project was designed and is administered through cooperation among faculty at San Diego State University and the Science Department of the San Diego County Office of Education. Undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in science programs in San Diego area universities including San Diego State University, California State University San Marcos, and University of California San Diego partner with elementary school teachers. Through this partnership, the scientist brings scientific expertise to the classroom while the teacher delivers the lesson using current pedagogic methods. This is accomplished during a 3 month partnership in which the scientist joins the teacher in the classroom a few days each week to complete professional kit-based curriculum such as that available from FOSS (Full Option Science System) and STC (Science and Technology for Children). The teachers remain in the program for two years during which they have continuous access to the kit-based curriculum as well as two to three partnership cycles. Teachers receive assistance outside of the classroom as well attending professional development institutes three times a year to establish and maintain effective science teaching methods. The San Diego Science Alliance and other community and industry supporters provide the additionalfunding necessary to provide this teacher professional development Currenty, PISCES is present in over 40 schools and is able to provide partnerships to over 100 classrooms each year. In addition to the work done in San Diego, the project has expanded to Barrow, Alaska with plans to expand to La Paz

  4. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Dwarf Galaxies Hydra II and Pisces II and the Globular Cluster Laevens 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Simon, Joshua D.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2015-09-01

    We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of stars in the recently discovered Milky Way satellites Hydra II, Pisces II, and Laevens 1. We measured a velocity dispersion of {5.4}-2.4+3.6 km s-1 for Pisces II, but we did not resolve the velocity dispersions of Hydra II or Laevens 1. We marginally resolved the metallicity dispersions of Hydra II and Pisces II but not Laevens 1. Furthermore, Hydra II and Pisces II obey the luminosity-metallicity relation for Milky Way dwarf galaxies (< [{Fe}/{{H}}]> =-2.02+/- 0.08 and -2.45+/- 0.07, respectively), whereas Laevens 1 does not (< [{Fe}/{{H}}]> =-1.68+/- 0.05). The kinematic and chemical properties suggest that Hydra II and Pisces II are dwarf galaxies, and Laevens 1 is a globular cluster. We determined that two of the previously observed blue stars near the center of Laevens 1 are not members of the cluster. A third blue star has ambiguous membership. Hydra II has a radial velocity < {v}{helio}> =303.1+/- 1.4 km s-1, similar to the leading arm of the Magellanic stream. The mass-to-light ratio for Pisces II is {370}-240+310 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ . It is not among the most dark matter-dominated dwarf galaxies, but it is still worthy of inclusion in the search for gamma-rays from dark matter self-annihilation. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Feeding habits of the bluemouth, Helicolenus dactylopterus dactylopterus (Delaroche, 1809) (Pisces: Sebastidae) in the Portuguese coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Ana; Sequeira, Vera; Paiva, Rafaela Barros; Vieira, Ana Rita; Gordo, Leonel Serrano

    2012-06-01

    In order to investigate the feeding habits of Helicolenus dactylopterus dactylopterus along the continental Portuguese coast, a total of 619 individuals were sampled of which 60% contained food in their stomach and 35% had more than one prey item. Among the 81 prey items that were identified in the stomachs, benthic and benthopelagic prey prevail on this species diet. Acantephyra sp, Pasiphaea sp, mysidacea, and teleostei n.i. were the prey with the higher percent index of relative importance (%IRI) value. Three length groups (5-20 cm, 21-27 cm, and 28-48 cm) were defined through cluster analysis of the mean abundance of prey items. A permutational MANOVA detected significant differences in the diet and stomach fullness index for TLG, season, and maturation stage. Smaller fishes had a generalized diet, feeding mainly on mysidacea changing their diet above 20 cm TL, where a major consumption of natantia was found. The larger individuals, >28 cm TL, present a less generalized diet with pisces as dominant prey group. Seasonally, natantia and pisces were the principal prey groups during spring and winter, respectively, while mysidacea and other crustaceans were predominant during the rest of the year. Mysidacea were also the main prey group for immature individuals while natantia and pisces were the principal prey groups to the other maturity stages. The results of this study indicate that H. d. dactylopterus has a diverse diet focused on small crustaceans such as misyds and as specimens grow shrimps and fishes become more consumed, with larger specimens having a more specialized diet. The different nutritional needs during spawning season also seemed to influence the feeding habits of H. d. dactylopterus.

  6. H I observations of two new dwarf galaxies: Pisces A and B with the SKA Pathfinder KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Libert, Y.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; Jarrett, T. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tollerud, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Pisces A and Pisces B are the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy out of 22 Hi clouds identified in the GALFAHI survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. Aims: We derive the Hi content and kinematics of Pisces A and B. Methods: Our aperture synthesis Hi observations used the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), which is a pathfinder instrument for MeerKAT, the South African precursor to the mid-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-MID). Results: The low rotation velocities of ~5 km s-1 and ~10 km s-1 in Pisces A and B, respectively, and their Hi content show that they are really dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrr). Despite that small rotation component, it is more the random motions ~9-11 km s-1 that provide most of the gravitational support, especially in the outer parts. The study of their kinematics, especially the strong gradients of random motions, suggest that those two dwarf galaxies are not yet in equilibrium. Conclusions: These Hi- rich galaxies may be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability. However, such gas-rich dwarf galaxies will most likely never be within the virial radius of MW-type galaxies and become subhalo candidates. Systems such as Pisces A and B are more likely to be found at a few Mpc s from MW-type galaxies. The final FITS cube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/L3

  7. Target Selection for the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David W.; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Jones, Michael; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS) is a new large targeted HI survey now underway using Arecibo's L-band Wide receiver system. A major goal is to constrain models of the Pisces Perseus infall, producing 5-σ detections of infall motions ˜500 km s-1. We are targeting sources that are likely to be at the PPS distance, but that are just below the the HI mass detection threshold of the ALFALFA survey. We expect to identify ˜800 objects of mass ˜108—9 M⊙ which will alllow us to constrain the lower mass end of the HI mass function in this infall environment.We have pursued a multi-pronged approach to target selection for this survey. Sources from ALFALFA, SDSS, and the GALEX GCAT single source catalogs were matched and intercompared via multi-band color photometry, surface brightnesses, and appearance in SDSS images. Final target selection based on visual inspection of SDSS images was found to correlate well with a color-selection technique based on GALEX/NUV - SDSS/r. Along with the details of the source selection we will discuss the facilitation and implementation of this process via a multi-institution collaborative website, and early results from the APSS survey.This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  8. PISCES Program: Plasma-materials interactions and edge-plasma physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.

    1992-07-01

    This program investigates and characterizes the behavior of materials under plasma bombordment, in divertor regions. The PISCES facility is used to study divertor and plasma edge management concepts (in particular gas target divertors), as well as edge plasma turbulence and transport. The plasma source consists of a hot LaB[sub 6] cathode with an annular, water-cooled anode and attached drift tube. This cross sectional area of the plasma can be adjusted between 3 and 10 cm. A fast scanning diagnostic probe system was used for mapping plasma density profiles during biased limiter and divertor simulation experiments. Some experimental data are given on: (1) materials and surface physics, (2) edge plasma physics, and (3) a theoretical analysis of edge plasma modelling.

  9. The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Survey: An Undergraduate ALFALFA Team Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Jones, Michael; Craig, David; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The Milky Way's position in an outer filament of Lanieakea affords us a striking view of the Pisces-Perseus Supercluster (PPS) arcing roughly from 22h to 4h and 0° to +50° concentrated between cz = 4,000 km/s and cz = 8,000 km/s as a "wall" parallel to the plane of the sky. It is bounded by voids both between Laniakea and PPS and beyond PPS. Within this box, the 70% ALFALFA survey has detected 4,800 galaxies within cz = 8,000 km/s. Of these, 80% have masses greater than 108 M⊙. At the distance of the PPS, galaxies with MHI ≤ 108 M⊙ are below the ALFALFA detection limit. Thus to further explore this rich diversity of galaxy environments and the adjoining voids, the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team is in the process of using the L-band Wide receiver at Arecibo Observatory for the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS). We will observe galaxies with 108 M⊙ ≤ MHI ≤ 109 M⊙ chosen from the SDSS DR12 and GALEX catalogs. We are limiting our observations to the PPS ridge in 21h 30m to 3h 15m and 23° to 35°. Since this region lacks SDSS spectroscopy, targets have been selected using photometric criteria derived from SDSS and GALEX observations for galaxies detected by ALFALFA. The results of these observations will allow us to constrain the HI mass function along the PPS ridge. Application of the Tully-Fisher relation will allow a robust measure of the infall velocities of galaxies into the filament. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  10. An Extended View of the Pisces Overdensity from the SCUSS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. D.; Smith, M. C.; Belokurov, V.; Fan, X. H.; Fan, Z.; Irwin, M. J.; Jiang, Z. J.; Jing, Y. P.; Koposov, S. E.; Lesser, M.; Ma, J.; Shen, S. Y.; Wang, J. L.; Wu, Z. Y.; Zhang, T. M.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, Z. M.; Zou, H.

    2015-09-01

    The South Galactic Cap u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS) is a u-band photometric survey covering about 4000 square degrees of the South Galactic Cap, reaching depths of up to 23 mag. By extending around 1.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) single-epoch u data, SCUSS is able to probe a much larger volume of the outer halo, i.e., with SCUSS data blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars can trace the outer halo of the Milky Way as far as 100-150 kpc. Utilizing this advantage we combine the SCUSS u-band with the SDSS DR9 gri photometric bands to identify BHB stars and explore halo substructures. We confirm the existence of the Pisces overdensity, which is a structure in the outer halo (at around 80 kpc) that was discovered using RR Lyrae stars. For the first time we are able to determine its spatial extent, finding that it appears to be part of a stream with a clear distance gradient. The stream, which is ˜5° wide and stretches along ˜25°, consists of 20-30 BHBs with a total significance of around 6σ over the background. Assuming we have detected the entire stream and that the progenitor has fully disrupted, then the number of BHBs suggests that the original system was similar to a smaller classical or a larger ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. On the other hand, if the progenitor still exists, it can be hunted for by reconstructing its orbit from the distance gradient of the stream. This new picture of the Pisces overdensity sheds new light on the origin of this intriguing system.

  11. Missense Mutation of POU Domain Class 3 Transcription Factor 3 in Pou3f3L423P Mice Causes Reduced Nephron Number and Impaired Development of the Thick Ascending Limb of the Loop of Henle.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Alexandra; Kemter, Elisabeth; Kumar, Sudhir; Popper, Bastian; Aigner, Bernhard; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    During nephrogenesis, POU domain class 3 transcription factor 3 (POU3F3 aka BRN1) is critically involved in development of distinct nephron segments, including the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL). Deficiency of POU3F3 in knock-out mice leads to underdevelopment of the TAL, lack of differentiation of TAL cells, and perinatal death due to renal failure. Pou3f3L423P mutant mice, which were established in the Munich ENU Mouse Mutagenesis Project, carry a recessive point mutation in the homeobox domain of POU3F3. Homozygous Pou3f3L423P mutants are viable and fertile. The present study used functional, as well as qualitative and quantitative morphological analyses to characterize the renal phenotype of juvenile (12 days) and aged (60 weeks) homo- and heterozygous Pou3f3L423P mutant mice and age-matched wild-type controls. In both age groups, homozygous mutants vs. control mice displayed significantly smaller kidney volumes, decreased nephron numbers and mean glomerular volumes, smaller TAL volumes, as well as lower volume densities of the TAL in the kidney. No histological or ultrastructural lesions of TAL cells or glomerular cells were observed in homozygous mutant mice. Aged homozygous mutants displayed increased serum urea concentrations and reduced specific urine gravity, but no evidence of glomerular dysfunction. These results confirm the role of POU3F3 in development and function of the TAL and provide new evidence for its involvement in regulation of the nephron number in the kidney. Therefore, Pou3f3L423P mutant mice represent a valuable research model for further analyses of POU3F3 functions, or for nephrological studies examining the role of congenital low nephron numbers. PMID:27420727

  12. Missense Mutation of POU Domain Class 3 Transcription Factor 3 in Pou3f3L423P Mice Causes Reduced Nephron Number and Impaired Development of the Thick Ascending Limb of the Loop of Henle

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Alexandra; Kemter, Elisabeth; Kumar, Sudhir; Popper, Bastian; Aigner, Bernhard; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    During nephrogenesis, POU domain class 3 transcription factor 3 (POU3F3 aka BRN1) is critically involved in development of distinct nephron segments, including the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL). Deficiency of POU3F3 in knock-out mice leads to underdevelopment of the TAL, lack of differentiation of TAL cells, and perinatal death due to renal failure. Pou3f3L423P mutant mice, which were established in the Munich ENU Mouse Mutagenesis Project, carry a recessive point mutation in the homeobox domain of POU3F3. Homozygous Pou3f3L423P mutants are viable and fertile. The present study used functional, as well as qualitative and quantitative morphological analyses to characterize the renal phenotype of juvenile (12 days) and aged (60 weeks) homo- and heterozygous Pou3f3L423P mutant mice and age-matched wild-type controls. In both age groups, homozygous mutants vs. control mice displayed significantly smaller kidney volumes, decreased nephron numbers and mean glomerular volumes, smaller TAL volumes, as well as lower volume densities of the TAL in the kidney. No histological or ultrastructural lesions of TAL cells or glomerular cells were observed in homozygous mutant mice. Aged homozygous mutants displayed increased serum urea concentrations and reduced specific urine gravity, but no evidence of glomerular dysfunction. These results confirm the role of POU3F3 in development and function of the TAL and provide new evidence for its involvement in regulation of the nephron number in the kidney. Therefore, Pou3f3L423P mutant mice represent a valuable research model for further analyses of POU3F3 functions, or for nephrological studies examining the role of congenital low nephron numbers. PMID:27420727

  13. The Absolute Age of the Globular Cluster M15 Using Near-infrared Adaptive Optics Images from PISCES/LBT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monelli, M.; Testa, V.; Bono, G.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Fiorentino, G.; Arcidiacono, C.; Massari, D.; Boutsia, K.; Briguglio, R.; Busoni, L.; Carini, R.; Close, L.; Cresci, G.; Esposito, S.; Fini, L.; Fumana, M.; Guerra, J. C.; Hill, J.; Kulesa, C.; Mannucci, F.; McCarthy, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Quiros-Pacheco, F.; Ragazzoni, R.; Riccardi, A.; Skemer, A.; Xompero, M.

    2015-10-01

    We present deep near-infrared J, {K}{{s}} photometry of the old, metal-poor Galactic globular cluster M15 obtained with images collected with the LUCI1 and PISCES cameras available at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). We show how the use of First Light Adaptive Optics (FLAO) system coupled with the PISCES camera allows us to improve the limiting magnitude by ˜2 mag in {K}{{s}}. By analyzing archival Hubble Space Telescope data, we demonstrate that the quality of the LBT/PISCES color-magnitude diagram is fully comparable with analogous space-based data. The smaller field of view is balanced by the shorter exposure time required to reach a similar photometric limit. We investigated the absolute age of M15 by means of two methods: (i) by determining the age from the position of the main-sequence turnoff (MSTO), and (ii) by the magnitude difference between the MSTO and the well-defined knee detected along the faint portion of the MS. We derive consistent values of the absolute age of M15, that is, 12.9 ± 2.6 Gyr and 13.3 ± 1.1 Gyr, respectively. Observations were carried out using the Large Binocular Telescope at Mount Graham, AZ. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; the Ohio State University; and the Research Corporation, on behalf of the University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  14. HST Imaging of the Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies Pisces A and B: Prototypes for Local Group Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-08-01

    We present observations of the Pisces A and B galaxies with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. Photometry from these images clearly resolves a red giant branch (RGB) for both objects, demonstrating that they are nearby dwarf galaxies. We describe a Bayesian inferential approach to determining the distance to these galaxies using the magnitude of the tip of the RGB, and then apply this approach to these galaxies. This reveals the distance to these galaxies as {5.64}-0.15+0.13 {{Mpc}} and {8.89}-0.85+0.75 {{Mpc}} for Pisces A and B, respectively, placing both within the Local Volume but not the Local Group (LG). We estimate the star formation histories of these galaxies, which suggests that they have recently undergone an increase in their star formation rates. Together these yield luminosities for Pisces A and B of {M}V=-{11.57}-0.05+0.06 and ‑12.9 ± 0.2, respectively, and estimated stellar masses of {log}({M}* /{M}ȯ )={7.0}-1.7+0.4 and {7.5}-1.8+0.3. We further show that these galaxies are likely at the boundary between nearby voids and higher-density filamentary structure. This suggests that they are entering a higher-density region from voids, where they would have experienced delayed evolution, consistent with their recent increased star formation rates. If this is indeed the case, they are useful for study as proxies of the galaxies that later evolved into typical LG satellite galaxies.

  15. Materials erosion and redeposition studies at the PISCES-facility: net erosion under redeposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Goebel, D.M.; Conn, R.W.; Leung, W.K.; Campbell, G.A.

    1986-05-01

    Simultaneous erosion and redeposition of copper and 304 stainless steel under controlled and continuous plasma (D,He,Ar) bombardment has been investigated in the PISCES-facility, which generates typical edge-plasma conditions of magnetic fusion devices. The plasma bombardment conditions are: incident ion flux in the range from 10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 18/ ions/sec/cm/sup 2/, ion bombarding energy of 100 eV, electron temperature in the range from 5 to 15 eV, plasma density in the range from 10/sup 11/ to 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, target temperature in the range from 300 to 900K, and the total ion fluence in the range from 10/sup 20/ to 10/sup 22/ ions/cm/sup 2/. The net erosion yield under redeposition is found to be significantly smaller than the classical sputtering yield data. A first-order modeling is attempted to interpret the erosion and redeposition behavior of materials under plasma bombardment. It is pointed out both theoretically and experimentally that the mean free path for electron impact ionization of the sputtered material is the key parameter to control the overall mechanism of erosion and redeposition. Strongly modified surface morphologies of bombarded targets are observed and indicate a retrapping effect.

  16. Mixed Material Plasma-Surface Interactions in ITER: Recent Results from the PISCES Group

    SciTech Connect

    Tynan, George R.; Baldwin, Matthew; Doerner, Russell; Hollmann, Eric; Nishijima, Daisuke; Umstadter, Karl; Yu, Jonathan

    2010-05-20

    This paper summarizes recent PISCES studies focused on the effects associated with mixed species plasmas that are similar in composition to what one might expect in ITER. Formation of nanometer scale whiskerlike features occurs in W surfaces exposed to pure He and mixed D/He plasmas and appears to be associated with the formation of He nanometer-scaled bubbles in the W surface. Studies of Be-W alloy formation in Be-seeded D plasmas suggest that this process may be important in ITER all metal wall operational scenarios. Studies also suggest that BeD formation via chemical sputtering of Be walls may be an important first wall erosion mechanism. D retention in ITER mixed materials has also been studied. The D release behavior from beryllium co-deposits does not appear to be a diffusion dominated process, but instead is consistent with thermal release from a number of variable trapping energy sites. As a result, the amount of tritium remaining in codeposits in ITER after baking will be determined by the maximum temperature achieved, rather than by the duration of the baking cycle.

  17. [Reproduction of the fish Gymnothorax equatorialis (Pisces: Muraenidae) in Jalisco and Colima, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Lucano-Ramírez, G; Ruiz-Ramírez, S; Rojo-Vázquez, J A; González-Sansón, G

    2008-03-01

    Reproduction of the fish Gymnothorax equatorialis (Pisces: Muraenidae) in Jalisco and Colima, Mexico. A total of 707 Gymnothorax equatorialis were collected monthly in the Jalisco and Colima coast, Mexico, from December 1995 to December 1998 and from August to November 1999, in order to determine their reproduction patterns. Females outnumbered and had longer bodies (mean length 54.7 cm) than males (52.1 cm). The minimum, maximum and mean values of total fecundity were respectively 9 660, 99 992 and 32 029 eggs. The total body length at which 50 percent of individuals have ripe gonads (L50) was 43.7 cm for females and 42.7 cm TL for males. Ovaries had two main types of oocytes: small inmature in cromatin nucleolus phase (85.1 microm) and large mature in secundary vitellogenesis phase (701.6 microm). High numbers of spermatozoa were observed in the seminal tubes of ripe testicles, which presented a lobular development. Based in gonad features and temporal changes in the gonad-somatic index, it is concluded that G. equatorialis has two relatively short reproduction periods (at the middle and at the end of the year). PMID:18624233

  18. [Size composition and reproductive cycle of Pseudupeneus grandisquamis (Pisces: Mullidae) in the Central Mexican Pacific].

    PubMed

    Lucano-Ramírez, G; Ruiz-Ramírez, S; Rojo-Vázquez, J A

    2006-03-01

    Size composition and reproductive cycle of Pseudupeneus grandisquamis (Pisces: Mullidae) in the Central Mexican Pacific. From June 1995 to December 1998 we used shrimp trawl nets to capture 492 Pseudupeneus grandisquamis in soft-bottom grounds off the central Mexican Pacific (Jalisco and Colima). The ength-weight ratio indicates allometric growth (p = 0.0035L(3.46) y r2 = 0.97). The total sex ratio was 1:1.15 (females: males). Mean total length was 153.8 mm (range 77-236 mm). A progression in length was found: the highest means were observed at the end of 1996 and during 1997. The mean length of females (162 mm) was longer than in males (150 mm). Four gonadic maturity stages were observed in both sexes; in females the most frequently stage was stage IV (mature gonads, 48.6%), while in males it was stage III (gonads in maturation, 45.0%). Seven microscopic oocyte development stages were identified. Oocyte development seems to be asynchronous. The mature testicle showed sperm inside the lobular lumen and in the duct. The highest values of the gonadosomatic index, as well as the largest percentages of individuals with mature gonads (at macroscopic and microscopic levels), were observed during winter and summer, suggesting that this species has two reproduction peaks by year. The length at which 50% of the individuals show gonads in maturation (L50) was 183 mm for the females and 181 mm for the males. PMID:18457188

  19. TWO LOCAL VOLUME DWARF GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN 21 cm EMISSION: PISCES A AND B

    SciTech Connect

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Stern, Daniel E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two dwarf galaxies, Pisces A and B, from a blind 21 cm H I search. These were the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy of 22 H I clouds identified in the GALFA-H I survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. They have properties consistent with being in the Local Volume (<10 Mpc), and one has resolved stellar populations such that it may be on the outer edge of the Local Group (∼1 Mpc from M31). While the distance uncertainty makes interpretation ambiguous, these may be among the faintest star-forming galaxies known. Additionally, rough estimates comparing these galaxies to ΛCDM dark matter simulations suggest consistency in number density, implying that the dark matter halos likely to host these galaxies are primarily H I-rich. The galaxies may thus be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability that are comparable to the faint satellites of the Local Group. Because they are outside the influence of a large dark matter halo to alter their evolution, these galaxies can provide critical anchors to dwarf galaxy formation models.

  20. An RR Lyrae family portrait: 33 stars observed in Pisces with K2-E2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Szabó, R.; Moskalik, P. A.; Nemec, J. M.; Guggenberger, E.; Smolec, R.; Poleski, R.; Plachy, E.; Kolenberg, K.; Kolláth, Z.

    2015-10-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of 33 RR Lyrae stars in Pisces observed with the Kepler space telescope over the 8.9-d long K2 Two-Wheel Concept Engineering Test. The sample includes not only fundamental-mode and first-overtone (RRab and RRc) stars but the first two double-mode (RRd) stars that Kepler detected and the only modulated first-overtone star ever observed from space so far. The precision of the extracted K2 light curves made it possible to detect low-amplitude additional modes in all subtypes. All RRd and non-modulated RRc stars show the additional mode at PX/P1 ˜ 0.61 that was detected in previous space-based photometric measurements. A periodicity longer than the fundamental mode was tentatively identified in one RRab star that might belong to a gravity mode. We determined the photometric [Fe/H] values for all fundamental-mode stars and provide the preliminary results of our efforts to fit the double-mode stars with non-linear hydrodynamic pulsation models. The results from this short test run indicate that the K2 mission will be, and has started to be, an ideal tool to expand our knowledge about RR Lyrae stars. As a by-product of the target search and analysis, we identified 165 bona fide double-mode RR Lyrae stars from the Catalina Sky Survey observations throughout the sky, 130 of which are new discoveries.

  1. Catoessa boscii (Crustacea, Isopoda, Cymothoidae) parasitic on Carangoides malabaricus (Pisces, Carangidae) from India. Taxonomy and host-parasite relationships.

    PubMed

    Trilles, Jean-Paul; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Rameshkumar, Ganapathy

    2012-06-01

    Catoessa boscii (Bleeker, 1857) (Crustacea, Isopoda, Cymothoidae), is redescribed according to the type specimen observed by Schioedte and Meinert (1884) extant in the Rijksmuseum von Natuurlijke Historie, Leiden (RMNH) and from many additional specimens recently collected in India from Carangoides malabaricus (Pisces, Carangidae). This study allows an updating of the diagnosis of the genus Catoessa and of the species Catoessa boscii. Some parasite-host relationships were studied during the year. Prevalence and sex ratio of parasites varied according to the month, and the sex and size of hosts. PMID:22807055

  2. Structural studies of haemoglobin from pisces species shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) at 1.9 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Pandian; Sundaresan, S S; Sathya Moorthy, Pon; Balasubramanian, M; Ponnuswamy, M N

    2013-11-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) is a tetrameric iron-containing protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues and carbon dioxide from tissues back to the lungs. Pisces are the advanced aquatic vertebrates capable of surviving at wide depth ranges. The shortfin mako shark (SMS) is the pelagic, largest, fastest and most sophisticated species of the shark kingdom with well developed eyes. Mostly the pisces species are cold blooded in nature. Distinctly, the SMSs are warm-blooded animals with an advanced circulatory system. SMSs are capable of maintaining elevated muscle temperatures up to 33 K above the ambient water temperatures at a depth of 150-500 m. SMSs have a diverged air-breathing mechanism compared with other vertebrates. The haemoglobin molecule consists of four polypeptide chains, namely two α chains, each with 140 amino acids and two β chains each having 136 amino acids. The SMS Hb was found to crystallize in monoclinic space group P21 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. The crystal packing parameters for the SMS Hb structure contain one whole biological molecule in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 47%. The SMS Hb quaternary structural features interface-interface interactions and heme binding sites are discussed with different state Hbs and the results reveal that SMS Hb adopts an unliganded deoxy T state conformation. PMID:24121325

  3. Discovery of an Ultra-diffuse Galaxy in the Pisces--Perseus Supercluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, David; Läsker, Ronald; Sharina, Margarita; Toloba, Elisa; Fliri, Jürgen; Beaton, Rachael; Valls-Gabaud, David; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Chonis, Taylor S.; Grebel, Eva K.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Gallego-Laborda, J.; Teuwen, Karel; Gómez-Flechoso, M. A.; Wang, Jie; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaisin, Serafim; Ho, Nhung

    2016-04-01

    We report the discovery of DGSAT I, an ultra-diffuse, quenched galaxy located 10.°4 in projection from the Andromeda galaxy (M31). This low-surface brightness galaxy (μV = 24.8 mag arcsec-2), found with a small amateur telescope, appears unresolved in sub-arcsecond archival Subaru/Suprime-Cam images, and hence has been missed by optical surveys relying on resolved star counts, in spite of its relatively large effective radius (Re(V) = 12″) and proximity (15‧) to the well-known dwarf spheroidal galaxy And II. Its red color (V - I = 1.0), shallow Sérsic index (nV = 0.68), and the absence of detectable Hα emission are typical properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and suggest that it is mainly composed of old stars. Initially interpreted as an interesting case of an isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the local universe, our radial velocity measurement obtained with the BTA 6 m telescope (Vh = 5450 ± 40 km s-1) shows that this system is an M31-background galaxy associated with the filament of the Pisces-Perseus supercluster. At the distance of this cluster (˜78 Mpc), DGSAT I would have an Re ˜ 4.7 kpc and MV ˜ -16.3. Its properties resemble those of the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) recently discovered in the Coma cluster. DGSAT I is the first case of these rare UDGs found in this galaxy cluster. Unlike the UDGs associated with the Coma and Virgo clusters, DGSAT I is found in a much lower density environment, which provides a fresh constraint on the formation mechanisms for this intriguing class of galaxy.

  4. Hydrothermal Systems on Kermadec Arc Volcanoes Revealed by PISCES V Submersible Dives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; de Ronde, C. E.; Massoth, G. J.; Wright, I. C.; Butterfield, D. A.; Clark, M. R.; Chadwick, W. W.; Lupton, J. E.; Malahoff, A.; Rowden, A. A.; Stott, M.; Evans, L. J.; Greene, R. R.; Opatkiewicz, A.; Roe, K.

    2005-12-01

    An interdisciplinary team of scientists from New Zealand and the United States conducted seventeen dives with the PISCES V at eight Kermadec arc volcanoes (seven were the first exploration) in April and May of 2005. The dive sites were selected based on the results of water column and multibeam surveys conducted by the New Zealand research vessel Tangaroa between 1999 and 2004. Five of the sites (Monowai, Macauley, "W", Brothers and Healy) were in calderas or on young cones within calderas. Two sites were on the summits of stratovolcanoes (Rumble V and Clark) without calderas and one site was in a summit crater (Giggenbach). A planned dive site on Monowai Cone was cancelled due to safety concerns based on its history of recent volcanic activity from hydroacoustic monitoring, mass-wasting and surface observations of sulfur slicks and CO2 bubble columns made in the October 2004. Hydrothermal systems were found at all of the sites but they differed in the style of venting. Three factors appear to determine the character of venting on the Kermadec Arc volcanoes. First, depth exerts important boundary conditions on the style of venting because of its control of the boiling point of seawater. The sites range in depth from less than 100 m (Giggenbach) to 1800 m (Brothers caldera wall). At the shallowest depths, degassing and boiling were observed (Giggenbach Volcano at 180 m) commonly accompanied by the precipitation of elemental sulfur (340 m at the bottom of the summit crater at Macauley Cone). At greater depths such as the northwest wall of Brother's volcano, higher temperature vent fluids alter near-surface country rock and have precipitated massive sulfides on the seafloor. Second, some of the volcanoes (Monowai, Brothers and Macauley cones and Giggenbach crater) have likely had recent magmatic/eruptive activity which could result in the enhanced degassing. Finally, outcrop-scale fracturing that mimics larger-scale regional tectonic lineaments appears to focus the

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 33 RR Lyrae observed in Pisces with K2-E2 (Molnar+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L.; Szabo, R.; Moskalik, P. A.; Nemec, J. M.; Guggenberger, E.; Smolec, R.; Poleski, R.; Plachy, E.; Kolenberg, K.; Kollath, Z.

    2016-03-01

    Kepler observed a stellar field around the vernal equinox point in Pisces (centre coordinates: RA=359°, DE=-2°) between 2014 February 04 and 13. The primary goal of this K2 Two-Wheel Concept Engineering Test (hereafter K2-E2) was to test the performance of the telescope in fine guidance mode. As well, the observations of nearly 2000 targets were made available for the scientific community. We identified 33 potential RR Lyrae stars in the K2-E2 sample and extracted their photometric data with the pyke software, developed for the Kepler mission by the Kepler Guest Observer Office (Still & Barclay, 2012, Astrophysics Source Code Library record ascl:1208.004). (6 data files).

  6. The PISC parametric study on the effect of cast austenitic steel macrostructure on the capability of ultrasonic examination

    SciTech Connect

    Maes, G.; Hansoul, B.; Dombret, P.

    1994-12-31

    Within the framework of Action 4 (Austenitic Steel Testing) of PISC 3, a parametric study was carried out on a set of centrifugically cast stainless steel samples, representative of the main coolant piping of pressurized water nuclear reactors. The samples are obtained from different manufacturers, and feature various grain structures and dimensions. Artificial and realistic flaws were used to assess the detection and sizing capability of ultrasonic examination techniques. The paper analyzes the data as a function of the metal structure and of the main parameters of the testing techniques, which include TRL contact probes and immersion focusing transducers. Guidelines are deduced as to the selection of inspection techniques, in relation with the metallurgical structure of each specimen. In addition, the influence of the presence of a weld across the wavepath is evaluated, as well as the similarity, between the responses obtained from crack-like machined reflectors and mechanical fatigue cracks.

  7. PISCES Program: Plasma-materials interactions and edge-plasma physics research. Progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.

    1992-07-01

    This program investigates and characterizes the behavior of materials under plasma bombordment, in divertor regions. The PISCES facility is used to study divertor and plasma edge management concepts (in particular gas target divertors), as well as edge plasma turbulence and transport. The plasma source consists of a hot LaB{sub 6} cathode with an annular, water-cooled anode and attached drift tube. This cross sectional area of the plasma can be adjusted between 3 and 10 cm. A fast scanning diagnostic probe system was used for mapping plasma density profiles during biased limiter and divertor simulation experiments. Some experimental data are given on: (1) materials and surface physics, (2) edge plasma physics, and (3) a theoretical analysis of edge plasma modelling.

  8. The WSRT ZoA Perseus-Pisces Filament wide-field HI imaging survey I. HI catalogue and atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramatsoku, M.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Schröder, A. C.; Jarrett, T. H.; Elson, E. C.; van Driel, W.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Henning, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present results of a blind 21cm H I-line imaging survey of a galaxy overdensity located behind the Milky Way at ℓ, b ≈ 160°, 0.5°. The overdensity corresponds to a Zone-of-Avoidance crossing of the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster filament. Although it is known that this filament contains an X-ray galaxy cluster (3C 129) hosting two strong radio galaxies, little is known about galaxies associated with this potentially rich cluster because of the high Galactic dust extinction. We mapped a sky area of ˜9.6 sq.deg using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in a hexagonal mosaic of 35 pointings observed for 12 hours each, in the radial velocity range cz = 2400 - 16600 km s-1. The survey has a sensitivity of 0.36 mJy/beam rms at a velocity resolution of 16.5 km s-1. We detected 211 galaxies, 62% of which have a near-infrared counterpart in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey. We present a catalogue of the H I properties and an H I atlas containing total intensity maps, position-velocity diagrams, global H I profiles and UKIDSS counterpart images. For the resolved galaxies we also present H I velocity fields and radial H I surface density profiles. A brief analysis of the structures outlined by these galaxies finds that 87 of them lie at the distance of the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster (cz ˜ 4000 - 8000 km s-1) and seem to form part of the 3C 129 cluster. Further 72 detections trace an overdensity at a velocity of cz ≈ 10000 km s-1 and seem to coincide with a structure predicted from mass density reconstructions in the first 2MASS Redshift Survey.

  9. Impurity transport and retention in a gas target divertor: simulation experiments in PISCES-A and modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.; Blush, L.; Chevalier, G.; Lehmer, R.; Hirooka, Y.; Chia, P.; Tynan, G.; Conn, R. W.

    1992-12-01

    Impurity retention in the gaseous divertor regime is investigated in the PISCES-A facility at UCLA. We report measurements and 1 1/2D fluid modeling results of impurity transport for typical tokamak divertor plasma parameters (10 18≤ ne≤3×10 19m -3, kTe≤20 eV). The neutral hydrogen density close to the (simulated) divertor target is 10 20≤ n0≤3×10 21 m -3. Gaseous trace impurities (argon, neon) as well as low- Z and high- Z materials sputtering carbon, tungsten) are studied. It is observed that the impurity retention in a gaseous divertor is substantially improved as compared to conventional divertor operating regimes. The modeling results suggest that the retention of neutral and ionized impurities is mainly due to collisions with hydrogen (deuterium) neutrals and ions streaming towards the divertor target a a velocity of 0.25-0.5 cs. A low level of residual impurity transport, observed at high neutral density, is attributed to a plasma flow reversal close to the radial boundary. Sputtering of a tungsten sample by intrinsic impurities has been shown to decrease substantially for target electron temperatures kTe<5 eV.

  10. Structural studies of haemoglobin from pisces species shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) at 1.9 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Pandian; Sundaresan, S. S.; Sathya Moorthy, Pon.; Balasubramanian, M.; Ponnuswamy, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) is a tetrameric iron-containing protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues and carbon dioxide from tissues back to the lungs. Pisces are the advanced aquatic vertebrates capable of surviving at wide depth ranges. The shortfin mako shark (SMS) is the pelagic, largest, fastest and most sophisticated species of the shark kingdom with well developed eyes. Mostly the pisces species are cold blooded in nature. Distinctly, the SMSs are warm-blooded animals with an advanced circulatory system. SMSs are capable of maintaining elevated muscle temperatures up to 33 K above the ambient water temperatures at a depth of 150–500 m. SMSs have a diverged air-breathing mechanism compared with other vertebrates. The haemoglobin molecule consists of four polypeptide chains, namely two α chains, each with 140 amino acids and two β chains each having 136 amino acids. The SMS Hb was found to crystallize in monoclinic space group P21 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. The crystal packing parameters for the SMS Hb structure contain one whole biological molecule in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 47%. The SMS Hb quaternary structural features interface–interface interactions and heme binding sites are discussed with different state Hbs and the results reveal that SMS Hb adopts an unliganded deoxy T state conformation. PMID:24121325

  11. Atmospheric deposition impacts on nutrients and biological budgets of the Mediterranean Sea, results from the high resolution coupled model NEMOMED12/PISCES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richon, Camille; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Dulac, François; Desboeufs, Karine; Nabat, Pierre; Guieu, Cécile; Aumont, Olivier; Palmieri, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition is at present not included in regional oceanic biogeochemical models of the Mediterranean Sea, whereas, along with river inputs, it represents a significant source of nutrients at the basin scale, especially through intense desert dust events. Moreover, observations (e.g. DUNE campaign, Guieu et al. 2010) show that these events significantly modify the biogeochemistry of the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea. We use a high resolution (1/12°) version of the 3D coupled model NEMOMED12/PISCES to investigate the effects of high resolution atmospheric dust deposition forcings on the biogeochemistry of the Mediterranean basin. The biogeochemical model PISCES represents the evolution of 24 prognostic tracers including five nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, silicate and iron) and two phytoplankton and zooplanktons groups (Palmiéri, 2014). From decadal simulations (1982-2012) we evaluate the influence of natural dust and anthropogenic nitrogen deposition on the budget of nutrients in the basin and its impact on the biogeochemistry (primary production, plankton distributions...). Our results show that natural dust deposition accounts for 15% of global PO4 budget and that it influences primarily the southern part of the basin. Anthropogenic nitrogen accounts for 50% of bioavailable N supply for the northern part. Deposition events significantly affect biological production; primary productivity enhancement can be as high as 30% in the areas of high deposition, especially during the stratified period. Further developments of the model will include 0D and 1D modeling of bacteria in the frame of the PEACETIME project.

  12. Tidal Signatures in the Faintest Milky Way Satellites: The Detailed Properties of Leo V, Pisces II, and Canes Venatici II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, David J.; Strader, Jay; Willman, Beth; Zaritsky, Dennis; McLeod, Brian; Caldwell, Nelson; Seth, Anil; Olszewski, Edward

    2012-09-01

    We present deep wide-field photometry of three recently discovered faint Milky Way (MW) satellites: Leo V, Pisces II, and Canes Venatici II. Our main goals are to study the structure and star formation history of these dwarfs; we also search for signs of tidal disturbance. The three satellites have similar half-light radii (~60-90 pc) but a wide range of ellipticities. Both Leo V and CVn II show hints of stream-like overdensities at large radii. An analysis of the satellite color-magnitude diagrams shows that all three objects are old (>10 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -2), though neither the models nor the data have sufficient precision to assess when the satellites formed with respect to cosmic reionization. The lack of an observed younger stellar population (lsim 10 Gyr) possibly sets them apart from the other satellites at Galactocentric distances >~ 150 kpc. We present a new compilation of structural data for all MW satellite galaxies and use it to compare the properties of classical dwarfs to the ultra-faints. The ellipticity distribution of the two groups is consistent at the ~2σ level. However, the faintest satellites tend to be more aligned toward the Galactic Center, and those satellites with the highest ellipticity (gsim 0.4) have orientations (ΔθGC) in the range 20° <~ ΔθGC <~ 40°. This latter observation is in rough agreement with predictions from simulations of dwarf galaxies that have lost a significant fraction of their dark matter halos and are being tidally stripped. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile and the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  13. TIDAL SIGNATURES IN THE FAINTEST MILKY WAY SATELLITES: THE DETAILED PROPERTIES OF LEO V, PISCES II, AND CANES VENATICI II

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, David J.; Strader, Jay; McLeod, Brian; Caldwell, Nelson; Willman, Beth; Zaritsky, Dennis; Olszewski, Edward; Seth, Anil

    2012-09-01

    We present deep wide-field photometry of three recently discovered faint Milky Way (MW) satellites: Leo V, Pisces II, and Canes Venatici II. Our main goals are to study the structure and star formation history of these dwarfs; we also search for signs of tidal disturbance. The three satellites have similar half-light radii ({approx}60-90 pc) but a wide range of ellipticities. Both Leo V and CVn II show hints of stream-like overdensities at large radii. An analysis of the satellite color-magnitude diagrams shows that all three objects are old (>10 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx} -2), though neither the models nor the data have sufficient precision to assess when the satellites formed with respect to cosmic reionization. The lack of an observed younger stellar population ({approx}< 10 Gyr) possibly sets them apart from the other satellites at Galactocentric distances {approx}> 150 kpc. We present a new compilation of structural data for all MW satellite galaxies and use it to compare the properties of classical dwarfs to the ultra-faints. The ellipticity distribution of the two groups is consistent at the {approx}2{sigma} level. However, the faintest satellites tend to be more aligned toward the Galactic Center, and those satellites with the highest ellipticity ({approx}> 0.4) have orientations ({Delta}{theta}{sub GC}) in the range 20 Degree-Sign {approx}< {Delta}{theta}{sub GC} {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign . This latter observation is in rough agreement with predictions from simulations of dwarf galaxies that have lost a significant fraction of their dark matter halos and are being tidally stripped.

  14. The WSRT ZoA Perseus-Pisces filament wide-field H I imaging survey - I. H I catalogue and atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramatsoku, M.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Schröder, A. C.; Jarrett, T. H.; Elson, E. C.; van Driel, W.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Henning, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present results of a blind 21cm H I-line imaging survey of a galaxy overdensity located behind the Milky Way at ℓ, b ≈ 160°, 0.5°. The overdensity corresponds to a zone-of-avoidance crossing of the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster filament. Although it is known that this filament contains an X-ray galaxy cluster (3C 129) hosting two strong radio galaxies, little is known about galaxies associated with this potentially rich cluster because of the high Galactic dust extinction. We mapped a sky area of ˜9.6 deg2 using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in a hexagonal mosaic of 35 pointings observed for 12 h each, in the radial velocity range cz = 2400-16 600 km s-1. The survey has a sensitivity of 0.36 mJy beam-1 rms at a velocity resolution of 16.5 km s-1. We detected 211 galaxies, 62 per cent of which have a near-infrared counterpart in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey. We present a catalogue of the H I properties and an H I atlas containing total intensity maps, position-velocity diagrams, global H I profiles and UKIDSS counterpart images. For the resolved galaxies we also present H I velocity fields and radial H I surface density profiles. A brief analysis of the structures outlined by these galaxies finds that 87 of them lie at the distance of the Perseus-Pisces Supercluster (cz ˜ 4000-8000 km s-1) and seem to form part of the 3C 129 cluster. Further 72 detections trace an overdensity at a velocity of cz ≈ 10 000 km s-1 and seem to coincide with a structure predicted from mass density reconstructions in the first 2MASS Redshift Survey.

  15. Thick Ascending Limb of the Loop of Henle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The thick ascending limb occupies a central anatomic and functional position in human renal physiology, with critical roles in the defense of the extracellular fluid volume, the urinary concentrating mechanism, calcium and magnesium homeostasis, bicarbonate and ammonium homeostasis, and urinary protein composition. The last decade has witnessed tremendous progress in the understanding of the molecular physiology and pathophysiology of this nephron segment. These advances are the subject of this review, with emphasis on particularly recent developments. PMID:25318757

  16. Temperature influence on deuterium retention for Be-W mixed thin films prepared by Thermionic Vacuum Arc method exposed to PISCES B plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepu, I.; Doerner, R. P.; Baldwin, M. J.; Porosnicu, C.; Lungu, C. P.

    2015-08-01

    Beryllium-tungsten thin films with well controlled elemental composition were prepared using Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) technique and subsequently exposed to steady state, high ion flux (5.5 - 9.8 × 1022 ions m-2 s-1) deuterium (D) plasma in the PISCES-B facility to consistent fluences of 2.3 × 1026 m-2. Six types of layers were studied, ranging from pure Be, composite Be-W, having the atomic ratios of 9:1; 7:3; 1:1; 3:7; to pure W with a total deposited layer thickness of 2 μm. The sample exposure temperatures, namely 300 K, 473 K, 573 K and 773 K, respectively, were measured in situ with a thermocouple placed on the back of the sample. Morphological and structural examinations were undertaken before and after plasma exposure. Results show an influence of temperature on the subsequent morphology of the surface. Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS) spectra showed a change in the D release behavior for different Be-W ratio for a certain exposure temperature.

  17. Mitochondrial genome of the ringstraked guitarfish Rhinobatos hynnicephalus (Elasmobranchii: Rajiformes).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Ai, Weiming; Shi, Xiaofang; Gao, Tingwei

    2015-08-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the ringstraked guitarfish Rhinobatos hynnicephalus is firstly presented in this study, which is also the first representative in the family Rhinobatidae. It is 16,776 bp in length and contains 37 genes and one control region as the typical gene arrangement and transcriptional direction in vertebrates. The overall base composition is 31.7% A, 26.8% C, 13.5% G and 28.1% T. The 22 tRNA genes ranged from 67 bp (tRNA-Ser2) to 75 bp (tRNA-Leu1). The origin of L-strand replication (OL) sequence was identified between tRNA-Asn and tRNA-Cys genes. The termination associated sequence (TAS) and the conserved sequence blocks (CSB 1--3) were recognized in the control region. PMID:24090007

  18. Feeding habits of the speckled guitarfish Rhinobatos glaucostigma (Elasmobranchii: Rhinobatidae).

    PubMed

    Lara-Mendoza, R E; Márquez-Farías, J F; Román-Reyes, J C

    2015-08-01

    The stomachs of 464 speckled guitarfish Rhinobatos glaucostigma were sampled from the south-eastern Gulf of California (GC) to determine diet composition. Numerical indices and prey-specific index of relative importance ((%I)PSIR ) were used to determine the feeding strategy of the species. An analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) was used to determine differences in diet with respect to sex, season (dry or rainy) and maturity stages (immature or mature). The diversity and niche breadth (by sex, season and maturity) and a general trophic level were determined. The overall diet was dominated by shrimps ((%I)PSIR  = 43.47), amphipods ((%I)PSIR  = 18.89) and crabs ((%I)PSIR  = 18.07). ANOSIM demonstrated differences in the diet by maturity and season, but not by sex. Rainy and dry season diets were dominated by shrimps and amphipods, respectively. Immature specimens fed mainly on amphipods, whereas mature fish preferred shrimps and crabs. Rhinobatos glaucostigma showed a narrow niche breadth with an intermediary trophic level (TL  = 3.72) and can be considered as a secondary consumer in the soft-bottom demersal community of the south-east GC. Understanding the feeding habits and trophic level of R. glaucostigma is vital to help identify the segments of the population vulnerable to overfishing by artisanal and industrial fisheries, and to aid in conservation and management of this elasmobranch. PMID:26148839

  19. Early development of Brycon orthotaenia (Pisces: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rafael Zeferino; Sato, Yoshimi; Rizzo, Elizete; Bazzoli, Nilo

    2013-02-01

    Brycon orthotaenia is an important fish for commercial and sport fishing and may reach 7 kg in body weight; it is endangered in some regions of Brazil's São Francisco River Basin. Breeders were subjected to spawning induction to analyse the early development; oocytes and semen were obtained by manual extrusion and fertilization was carried out using the dry method. After fertilization, eggs were kept in incubators at 24°C. Egg samples were collected every 10 min until hatching in order to monitor embryonic development and were analysed and photographed. Larvae samples were collected daily until the seventh day to analyse the larvae development; larvae were fixed in Bouin's fluid and subjected to routine histological and histochemical techniques for glycoprotein and glyco-conjugated detection. Oocyte extrusion occurred 6 h after the second hormone dose at 26°C. The recently extruded oocytes were spherical, dark green and non-adhesive, with a diameter of 1479.67 ± 53.18 and 3094.60 ± 80.34 μm after hydration. The blastopore closure occurred within 7 h 30 min of fertilization and the fertilization rate was 50.0 ± 5.5 % at 24°C. Embryonic development was completed within 21 h 30 min of fertilization. Complete yolk sac resorption and mouth opening occurred on the third day after hatching, at which time an adhesive organ with mucosubstances was observed. On the third day, an olfactory chamber with cilia and intense cannibalism amongst the larvae was observed. The complete differentiation of the digestive system occurred on the fifth day and the nervous and sensorial systems differentiation occurred on the sixth to seventh days. PMID:21733293

  20. Redescription of Gymnorhynchus isuri (Cestoda: Trypanorhyncha) from Isurus oxyrinchus (Elasmobranchii: Lamnidae).

    PubMed

    Knoff, Marcelo; Clemente, Sérgio Carmona de São; Pinto, Roberto Magalhães; Lanfredi, Reinalda Mariza; Gomes, Delir Corrêa

    2007-09-01

    Specimens of the elasmobranch, Isurus oxyrinchus Rafinesque, captured in 1999 in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, were parasitized with the poecilacanthoid trypanorhynch cestode Gymnorhynchus isuri Robinson, 1959, that is redescribed here. New details of scolex and proglottid morphology are given. These details are mainly related to tentacle armature, terminal genitalia and observations of external morphology of proglottids. PMID:19245192

  1. Mitogenomic sequence and phylogenetic placement of the Hortle's whipray Himantura hortlei (Elasmobranchii: Dasyatidae).

    PubMed

    DeHart, Hayley M; Yang, Lei; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2016-07-01

    Chondrichthyans are a class of fishes threatened with habitat destruction and fishing pressures. The current study presents the complete mitochondrial genome sequence (17,688 bp) of the vulnerable Hortle's whipray, Himantura hortlei. The mitochondrial genome arrangement is consistent with that seen in most vertebrates, containing 13 protein-coding, 22 tRNA, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 control region. Phylogenetic analyses were performed based on mitogenome and ND2 sequences. Under our taxon sampling scheme, Himantura hortlei was found to be most closely related to H. fai. PMID:26016876

  2. The complete mitogenome of the cow tail ray Pastinachus atrus (Macleay, 1883) (Elasmobranchii; Myliobatiformes; Dasyatidae).

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Croft, Laurence J; Meekan, Mark G; Gan, Han Ming

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitogenome of the ray Pastinachus atrus was recovered from a partial genome scan using the HiSeq sequencing system. The P. atrus mitogenome has 18,162 base pairs (61% A + T content) made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a 2516 bp non-coding AT-rich region. This mitogenome sequence is the first for a ray from Australian waters, the first for the Genus Pastinachus, and the 6th for the family Dasyatidae. PMID:25103432

  3. Reproductive biology of Raja clavata (Elasmobranchii: Rajidae) from Southern Black Sea coast around Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglam, Hacer; Ak, Orhan

    2012-06-01

    Specimens of Raja clavata were monthly collected at the coast of Havaalanı (Trabzon/Turkey) from January 2009 to December 2009 at depths between 20 and 40 m. A total of 230 individuals of thornback ray (131 females and 99 males) were collected by bottom trawls during research cruises. Using logistic regression, it was determined that TL at 50% maturity of males was 718 mm TL and of females 746 mm TL. The ovarian fecundity ranged from 27 to 60 yellow follicles in both ovaries. Females carrying egg cases were found in July and October. Variations in the gonadosomatic and hepatosomatic indices indicated a continuous reproductive cycle during the year.

  4. Evolutionary origins and development of saw-teeth on the sawfish and sawshark rostrum (Elasmobranchii; Chondrichthyes).

    PubMed

    Welten, Monique; Smith, Moya Meredith; Underwood, Charlie; Johanson, Zerina

    2015-09-01

    A well-known characteristic of chondrichthyans (e.g. sharks, rays) is their covering of external skin denticles (placoid scales), but less well understood is the wide morphological diversity that these skin denticles can show. Some of the more unusual of these are the tooth-like structures associated with the elongate cartilaginous rostrum 'saw' in three chondrichthyan groups: Pristiophoridae (sawsharks; Selachii), Pristidae (sawfish; Batoidea) and the fossil Sclerorhynchoidea (Batoidea). Comparative topographic and developmental studies of the 'saw-teeth' were undertaken in adults and embryos of these groups, by means of three-dimensional-rendered volumes from X-ray computed tomography. This provided data on development and relative arrangement in embryos, with regenerative replacement in adults. Saw-teeth are morphologically similar on the rostra of the Pristiophoridae and the Sclerorhynchoidea, with the same replacement modes, despite the lack of a close phylogenetic relationship. In both, tooth-like structures develop under the skin of the embryos, aligned with the rostrum surface, before rotating into lateral position and then attaching through a pedicel to the rostrum cartilage. As well, saw-teeth are replaced and added to as space becomes available. By contrast, saw-teeth in Pristidae insert into sockets in the rostrum cartilage, growing continuously and are not replaced. Despite superficial similarity to oral tooth developmental organization, saw-tooth spatial initiation arrangement is associated with rostrum growth. Replacement is space-dependent and more comparable to that of dermal skin denticles. We suggest these saw-teeth represent modified dermal denticles and lack the 'many-for-one' replacement characteristic of elasmobranch oral dentitions. PMID:26473044

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of the blacknose shark Carcharhinus acronotus (Elasmobranchii: Carcharhinidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Matthes-Rosana, Kerri A; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the blacknose shark Carcharhinus acronotus has been determined in this work. It has a length of 16,719 bp and consisted of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 control region. The gene composition and genome organization was similar to other vertebrates. This study represents part of an ongoing effort to obtain mitochondrial genome sequences for chondrichthyan species in order to better estimate their phylogenetic relationships. PMID:24450722

  6. Notes on the reproductive biology of the Brazilian electric ray Narcine brasiliensis (Elasmobranchii: Narcinidae).

    PubMed

    Rolim, F A; Rotundo, M M; Vaske-Júnior, T

    2016-07-01

    This study provides information on the reproductive biology of Narcine brasiliensis based on 105 individuals (72 females and 33 males) sampled in São Paulo State, Brazil. The total length at maturity for females was 318·9 mm and for males was 279·8 mm; pregnant females were observed only during summer and autumn. The peak of the gonado-somatic index for females and condition factor for males in the spring suggest a preparation for pregnancy and a mating period during this season. The capture of immature individuals indicates a need for management of the species in this region. PMID:26377171

  7. Mineral homeostasis and regulation of mineralization processes in the skeletons of sharks, rays and relatives (Elasmobranchii).

    PubMed

    Dean, Mason N; Ekstrom, Laura; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Ballantyne, Jim; Witten, P Eckhard; Riley, Cyrena; Habraken, Wouter; Omelon, Sidney

    2015-10-01

    Sharks, rays and other elasmobranch fishes are characterized by a skeletal type that is unique among living vertebrates, comprised predominantly of an unmineralized cartilage, covered by a thin outer layer of sub-millimeter, mineralized tiles called tesserae. The mineralized portion of the skeleton appears to grow only by apposition, adding material at the edges of each tessera; maintenance of non-mineralized joints between tesserae is therefore vital, with precise control of mineral deposition and inhibition at the many thousands of growth fronts in the skeleton. Yet, we have only scattered evidence as to how the elasmobranchs mineralize and grow their skeletons. In this review, we take an "environment to skeleton" approach, drawing together research from a vast range of perspectives to track calcium and phosphate from the typical elasmobranch habitats into and through the body, to their deposition at tesseral growth fronts. In the process, we discuss the available evidence for skeletal resorption capability, mineral homeostasis hormones, and nucleation inhibition mechanisms. We also outline relevant theories in crystal nucleation and typical errors in measurements of serum calcium and phosphate in the study of vertebrate biology. We assemble research that suggests consensus in some concepts in elasmobranch skeletal development, but also highlight the very large gaps in our knowledge, particularly in regards to endocrine functional networks and biomineralization mechanisms. In this way, we lay out frameworks for future directions in the study of elasmobranch skeletal biology with stronger and more comparative links to research in other disciplines and into other taxa. PMID:26546857

  8. Evolutionary origins and development of saw-teeth on the sawfish and sawshark rostrum (Elasmobranchii; Chondrichthyes)

    PubMed Central

    Welten, Monique; Smith, Moya Meredith; Underwood, Charlie; Johanson, Zerina

    2015-01-01

    A well-known characteristic of chondrichthyans (e.g. sharks, rays) is their covering of external skin denticles (placoid scales), but less well understood is the wide morphological diversity that these skin denticles can show. Some of the more unusual of these are the tooth-like structures associated with the elongate cartilaginous rostrum ‘saw’ in three chondrichthyan groups: Pristiophoridae (sawsharks; Selachii), Pristidae (sawfish; Batoidea) and the fossil Sclerorhynchoidea (Batoidea). Comparative topographic and developmental studies of the ‘saw-teeth’ were undertaken in adults and embryos of these groups, by means of three-dimensional-rendered volumes from X-ray computed tomography. This provided data on development and relative arrangement in embryos, with regenerative replacement in adults. Saw-teeth are morphologically similar on the rostra of the Pristiophoridae and the Sclerorhynchoidea, with the same replacement modes, despite the lack of a close phylogenetic relationship. In both, tooth-like structures develop under the skin of the embryos, aligned with the rostrum surface, before rotating into lateral position and then attaching through a pedicel to the rostrum cartilage. As well, saw-teeth are replaced and added to as space becomes available. By contrast, saw-teeth in Pristidae insert into sockets in the rostrum cartilage, growing continuously and are not replaced. Despite superficial similarity to oral tooth developmental organization, saw-tooth spatial initiation arrangement is associated with rostrum growth. Replacement is space-dependent and more comparable to that of dermal skin denticles. We suggest these saw-teeth represent modified dermal denticles and lack the ‘many-for-one’ replacement characteristic of elasmobranch oral dentitions. PMID:26473044

  9. Analysis of food habits of skate Rioraja agassizii (Elasmobranchii, Rajidae) from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Motta, N S; Della-Fina, N; Souza, C C A; Rodrigues, E S; Amorim, A F

    2016-06-01

    Catches and exports of skate Rioraja agassizii place this species as "vulnerable to extinction" on the IUCN Red List; therefore, biological and ecological knowledge becomes an important instrument for its conservation control. This study described and quantified the diet composition of R. agassizii by means of stomach analysis contents in the periods 2005-2006 and 2012-2013. We analyzed and quantified stomach contents in terms of abundance (%N), weight (%M), frequency of occurrence (% FO), and index of relative importance (IRI). The results showed differences in the food rates between the periods. However, the groups of food items were the same: Teleostei fish, decapods, and mollusks. In 2005-2006, the diet consisted mainly of shrimp, however, in 2012-2013 it consisted of fish, followed by decapods, especially shrimps. The differences in diets may be attributed to shrimp abundance, which do not characterize a change in the eating habits in 2012-2013, because, in addition to fish, shrimps were also important food sources. The presence of a certain prey is more related to its availability rather than the feeding preference of skate. The amount of ingested items is associated to biological and environmental factors, so that further studies relating diet with capture area, seasonality, depth, and other factors should be conducted. PMID:26959951

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the giant electric ray, Narcine entemedor (Elasmobranchii: Torpediniformes).

    PubMed

    Castillo-Páez, Ana; Del Río-Portilla, Miguel Angel; Rocha-Olivares, Axayácatl

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the giant electric ray is 17,081 bp long (GenBank accession KM386678) and includes 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA, 13 protein-coding genes, an origin of replication, 2 non-coding regions. The mitochondrial gene arrangement is similar to that found in other batoids. The control region possessed a set of tandem repeats. Start codon ATG and stop codon TAA/T were found in most protein-coding genes. The base composition of the genome is 36.2% A, 29.9% T, 21.9% C, and 11.9% G. PMID:25269001

  11. Fish remains (Elasmobranchii, Actinopterygii) from the Late Cretaceous of the Benue Trough, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vullo, Romain; Courville, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Selachian and ray-finned fish remains from various Late Cretaceous localities of Nigeria are described. Each locality has yielded only a very few specimens and the diversity is therefore very low. However, some taxa are recorded for the first time in Africa. The Ashaka locality in the Upper Benue Trough (northeastern Nigeria) has yielded a small but interesting late Cenomanian assemblage of microremains, including teeth of “Carcharias” amonensis, Rhombopterygia zaborskii sp. nov., Hamrabatis sp., “Stephanodus” sp., and a possible ionoscopiform. A large prearticular dentition coming from the early Turonian beds of this locality is assigned to the large pycnodontiform Acrotemnus, a poorly known genus here regarded as a senior synonym of Macropycnodon. In the Lower Benue Trough (southeastern Nigeria), several localities ranging in age from the late Cenomanian to the early Maastrichtian have yielded various widespread taxa such as Ptychodus, Scapanorhynchus, Squalicorax, Vidalamiinae indet., cf. Protosphyraena, and Eodiaphyodus. The seaway that occupied the Benue Trough during transgressive episodes (late Cenomanian-early Turonian and Maastrichtian) created opportunities for the dispersal of many marine fish taxa into new areas, such as the proto-South Atlantic.

  12. Morphology and ventilatory function of gills in the carpet shark family Parascylliidae (Elasmobranchii, Orectolobiformes).

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomoaki; Shiba, Yojiro; Shibagaki, Kazuhiro; Nakaya, Kazuhiro

    2013-06-01

    We examined gill morphology and ventilatory function in the carpet shark family Parascylliidae using 14 preserved specimens of Parascyllium ferrugineum, P. variolatum, P. collare and Cirrhoscyllium japonicum, and two live specimens of P. ferrugineum and P. variolatum. Morphological examinations revealed eight morphological characteristics related to the fifth gill, based on comparisons with other elasmobranchs, viz. large fifth gill slit without gill filaments, anatomical modifications in the fourth ceratobranchial cartilage and coraco-branchialis muscle, and the hypaxialis muscle associated with the fifth gill arch. Ventilation examinations using dyed seawater and prey items showed different water flows through the gill slits for respiration and prey-capture actions. For respiration, water sucked into the mouth was expelled equally through the first to fourth gill slits via a "double-pump" action, there being no involvement of the fifth gill slit. In prey-capture, however, water sucked into the mouth was discharged only via the widely opened fifth gill slit. This form of water flow is similar to that in other benthic suction-feeding sharks (e.g., Chiloscyllium plagiosum), except for the active water discharge by wide expansion and contraction of the fifth parabranchial cavity. The latter is dependent upon the morphological modifications of the fourth and fifth gill arches, derived phylogenetically as a mechanistic suction specialization in Parascylliidae. PMID:23721470

  13. Oviducal gland microstructure of Raja miraletus and Dipturus oxyrinchus (Elasmobranchii, Rajidae).

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Martina F; Porcu, Cristina; Bellodi, Andrea; Cuccu, Danila; Mulas, Antonello; Follesa, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    We studied the morphology and histology of the oviducal gland (OG) in the brown ray (Raja miraletus) and the long-nosed skate (Dipturus oxyrinchus) to understand its functional role in the reproductive strategy of these species. The external morphology of the gland was similar in both species, with lateral extensions like those found in other members of the Rajidae. Microscopic analysis showed a similar internal organization in both species. Immature and developing glands did not react to histochemical techniques. On reaching maturity, the OG had the largest width due to an increase in the production of secretory materials. In both species, the club zone of the gland showed a strong reaction to Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and alcian blue (AB) stains, indicating production of neutral and sulfated acid mucins. The secretory material produced by the papillary zone varied greatly between the two species. Both displayed tubular glands similar to those observed in the club zone, but in D. oxyrinchus the region near the lumen was intensely PAS+, whereas the last row of tubules of the brown ray stained intensely for a mixture of neutral and sulfated mucins. The baffle zone was the most conspicuous and extensive segment of all OGs, and it did not react to PAS/AB. The terminal zone, which is responsible for production of hair filaments, differed between the two species in terms of composition and organization of serous and mucous glands. This difference probably is related to the different substrates in which they release the egg capsules. Individual sperm detected in the brown ray baffle lamellae could be the result of a recent mating, whereas their presence in the deep recesses of the baffle and in the terminal zone of the long-nosed skate might indicate sperm storage. PMID:26474106

  14. Eggs ultrastructure and early development of Franciscodoras marmoratus (Pisces: Doradidae).

    PubMed

    Alberto Weber, A; Sato, Y; Enemir Santos, J; Rizzo, E; Bazzoli, N

    2012-06-01

    This study presents, for the first time, information on the eggs and early development of Franciscodoras marmoratus, fish of São Francisco river, Brazil. To analyse the egg ultrastructure and morphological events of embryogenesis, a total of 36 F. marmoratus specimens (18 males and 18 females) were captured and subjected to spawning induction. Gametes were collected by manual extrusion, and fertilization was conducted using the dry method. After fertilization, eggs were kept in incubators with water temperature of 24°C. The embryonic development was monitored using a stereomicroscope until hatching. There was a 67% positive response to hypophysation by the females and the fertilization rate was 73.8 ± 6.2%. The oocytes are discoid, yellow, adhesive and covered by a thick jelly coat. Under the electron scanning microscope, the oocytes presented a surface with pore canals and funnel-shaped micropyle with a smooth vestibule. Recently extruded oocytes had a mean diameter of 1.27 ± 0.4 mm and after hydration was 1.91 ± 0.05 mm. The jelly coat was 0.34 ± 0.03 mm thickness, and the perivitelline space was 0.19 ± 0.04 mm. Eight phases of the embryonic development were identified, and embryogenesis was completed at 47 h after fertilization, at 24°C water temperature. The recently hatched larvae had 2.76 ± 0.57 mm of total length. These results provide useful information for the successful breeding and reproductive strategies of fishes. PMID:22150468

  15. Snakeheads (Pisces, Channidae): A biological synopsis and risk assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Courtenay, Walter R., Jr.; Williams, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Snakeheads (family Channidae) are airbreathing freshwater fishes containing two genera, Channa with 26 species native to Asia, Malaysia, and Indonesia; and Parachanna with 3 species native to tropical Africa. Some snakeheads are small, reaching about 17 centimeters, but most are much larger, the largest reported to be 1.8 meters in length. All are considered thrust predators with most being piscivorous as adults. A few of the smaller snakeheads and colorful juveniles of some larger ones have been available to hobbyists through the aquarium fish trade. Several species are highly valued as food fishes within parts of their native ranges, especially in Asia where they are an important part of capture fisheries and aquaculture. Because of these uses by humans, introductions far beyond native ranges have occurred. One Asian snakehead has been established in Oahu, Hawaii, since before 1900. Another species was discovered established in southeastern Florida in 2000, and a third in a pond in Maryland in 2002. Others have been captured from natural waters of the United States without evidence of reproduction and likely represent released aquarium fishes. That snakeheads at or near sexual maturity were being sold alive in ethnic food markets raised fears that they could be introduced into novel waters. These concerns led to this study on the biology of snakeheads. A risk assessment is included that examines environmental and related aspects of snakehead introductions.

  16. Relative gut lengths of coral reef butterflyfishes (Pisces: Chaetodontidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berumen, M. L.; Pratchett, M. S.; Goodman, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Variation in gut length of closely related animals is known to generally be a good predictor of dietary habits. We examined gut length in 28 species of butterflyfishes (Chaetodontidae), which encompass a wide range of dietary types (planktivores, omnivores, and corallivores). We found general dietary patterns to be a good predictor of relative gut length, although we found high variation among groups and covariance with body size. The longest gut lengths are found in species that exclusively feed on the living tissue of corals, while the shortest gut length is found in a planktivorous species. Although we tried to control for phylogeny, corallivory has arisen multiple times in this family, confounding our analyses. The butterflyfishes, a speciose family with a wide range of dietary habits, may nonetheless provide an ideal system for future work studying gut physiology associated with specialization and foraging behaviors.

  17. MICROSATELLITE CHARACTERIZATION IN CENTRAL STONEROLLER CAMPOSTOMA ANOMALUM (PISCES: CYPRINIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The central stoneroller (Campostoma anomalum) is a small cyprinid fish that is native to streams and rivers of central and eastern North America. It can be found in a range of anthropo- genically modified habitats, ranging from nearly pristine to highly polluted waters (Zimmerma...

  18. Okamejei ornata n. sp., a new deep-water skate (Elasmobranchii, Rajidae) from the northwestern Indian Ocean off Socotra Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Simon; Stehmann, Matthias F. W.; Thiel, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    A new species of the Indo-Pacific skate genus Okamejei is described based on 10 specimens caught around the Socotra Islands (northwestern Indian Ocean). The type series of Okamejei ornata n. sp. was sampled during cruise 17 of RV 'Vityaz' along the deep western Indian Ocean in 1988/89. The new species represents the fifth species of Okamejei in the western Indian Ocean and differs from its congeners in having a unique dorsal pattern of variable dark brown spots encircled with beige pigment and arranged into rosettes. The dorsal ground color is ocher, but the anterior snout is dusky. Compared to congeners in the western Indian Ocean, the new species has a shorter preorbital snout length, a greater orbit diameter, fewer pectoral radials, an intermediate distance between first gill slits, and an intermediate number of upper jaw tooth rows.

  19. Aspects of the reproductive biology of the shortfin Mako, Isurus oxyrinchus (Elasmobranchii Lamnidae), in the southeastern region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, F E S; Braga, F M S; Arfelli, C A; Amorim, A F

    2002-05-01

    Uteri from four pregnant females and two newborn of shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, were collected in the southeastern region of Brazil, during September, October, and November of 1993 and 1994. All embryos were near-term with developing dentition and inner organs. Total length ranged from 64.5 to 72.0 cm, and the maximum number of embryos observed in a litter was 20. These observations further confirmed oophagy as a form of nutrition in this species, and its periodicity. The presence of teeth in the embryos' stomachs suggest that tooth replacement begins in the uterine phase. PMID:12489396

  20. Stoibocephalum n. gen. (Cestoda: Lecanicephalidea) from the sharkray, Rhina ancylostoma Bloch & Schneider (Elasmobranchii: Rhinopristiformes), from northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Cielocha, Joanna J; Jensen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A new genus and species of lecanicephalidean cestode, Stoibocephalum arafurense n. gen., n. sp., is described from the sharkray, Rhina ancylostoma Bloch & Schneider, off northern Australia. Stoibocephalum arafurense n. gen., n. sp. is apolytic, and possesses a large, muscular, retractable apical organ, 3 pairs of excretory vessels, and testes in several columns and layers. The presence of 3 pairs of excretory vessels distinguishes this new genus from all other valid lecanicephalidean genera, except Hexacanalis Perrenoud, 1931, from which it can be distinguished based on ovary shape and egg morphology. Stoibocephalum n. gen. most closely resembles Tylocephalum Linton, 1890 but differs from that genus in its ability to completely retract its apical organ into the scolex proper. Scolex microthrix pattern and histological sections of scoleces attached in situ suggest S. arafurense n. gen., n. sp. to attach to the host's intestinal mucosa with apical organ and scolex proper surfaces, rather than just the apical organ surface. This is the third lecanicephalidean species described from the sharkray. PMID:26176156

  1. Long-PCR based next generation sequencing of the whole mitochondrial genome of the peacock skate Pavoraja nitida (Elasmobranchii: Arhynchobatidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome sequence (16,760 bp) of the peacock skate Pavoraja nitida using a long-PCR based next generation sequencing method. It has 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 control region in the typical vertebrate arrangement. Primers, protocols, and procedures used to obtain this mitogenome are provided. We anticipate that this approach will facilitate rapid collection of mitogenome sequences for studies on phylogenetic relationships, population genetics, and conservation of cartilaginous fishes. PMID:24938110

  2. Determination of complete mitochondrial genome sequence from the holotype of the southern Mandarin dogfish Cirrhigaleus australis (Elasmobranchii: Squalidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Matthes-Rosana, Kerri A; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome sequence from the holotype of the southern Mandarin dogfish Cirrhigaleus australis. It has a length of 16,543 bp and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 control region. The gene composition and genome organization is similar to most other vertebrates. Data obtained in this study will be important for resolving possible taxonomic issues related to C. australis and will contribute to the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships among chondrichthyan species. PMID:24725011

  3. Morphology of the reproductive tract and acquisition of sexual maturity in males of Potamotrygon magdalenae (Elasmobranchii: Potamotrygonidae).

    PubMed

    Pedreros-Sierra, Tania Del Mar; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the structure of the reproductive tract of males of Potamotrygon magdalenae before, during, and after they acquire sexual maturity, and to establish the first maturity scale for males within the family Potamotrygonidae. The male reproductive tract of P. magdalenae is composed of testes, efferent ducts, epididymides, deferent ducts, seminal vesicles, Leydig, alkaline, and clasper glands, and claspers, all of which are paired and functional. Four sexual maturity stages were established: immature, maturing, reproductively active, and resting. The degree of claspers calcification is also a good indicator of sexual maturity in this species. The testes are lobulated, each lobe contains numerous spermatocysts which are organized in zones and are displaced radially from germinal papillae to the spermatozoa zone where individual spermatozoa are conveyed to the efferent ducts. The epididymis can be regionalized in head, body, and tail; these regions are distinguished by external pigmentation and by the epithelium lining configuration. The tail of the epididymis is connected with the deferent duct and this, in turn, with the seminal vesicle. The spermatozoa are organized in spermatozeugmata which begin to form in the deferent duct; this latter organ is attached laterally at the Leydig gland that is composed by simple glandular units. Irregular and vesicular secretions can be found in the genital ducts. These secretions might be associated with the maturation of the spermatozoa and formation of spermatozeugmata. The male reproductive tract of P. magdalenae is similar to other elasmobranchs; however, two types of primary spermatogonia, an epididymis internally regionalized, and the presence and structure of spermatozeugmata are specific features not yet described in freshwater stingrays. Most of the year, the males were reproductively active, however, few resting adult males occurred during one of the months of the lowest waters. PMID:25408127

  4. Zanobatus maculatus, a new species of panray from the Gulf of Guinea, eastern central Atlantic (Elasmobranchii: Batoidea: Zanobatidae).

    PubMed

    Séret, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    A new species of panray, Zanabatus maculatus sp. nov., is described from 12 type specimens collected in the Gulf of Guinea (Eastern Central Atlantic). The new species is distinguished from its sympatric congener, the striped panray Zanobatus schoenleinii, by its smaller size, heavier thorn pattern, spearhead-shaped dermal denticles and maculate colour pattern. PMID:27615946

  5. Contributions to the tooth morphology in early embryos of three species of hammerhead sharks (Elasmobranchii: Sphyrnidae) and their evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Mello, Waldiney; Brito, Paulo Marques Machado

    2013-09-01

    The tooth types in the embryos of the hammerhead sharks Sphyrna tiburo, Sphyrna tudes and Eusphyra blochii are here described in labial and lingual views, and, in some cases, in additional views. The presence of cusplets was observed in the anterior teeth of S. tiburo and S. tudes, which is secondarily lost after early embryonic stages. Many aligned root foramina were detected in the sphyrnids, which, as the cusplets, are shared by many phylogenetic-related carcharhinids. Other anatomic features, related to the root and central cusp, are presented for the first time. Such characters represent the first step to compare the teeth of extant and fossil species. PMID:24161244

  6. The complete mitogenome of the bluespotted ribbontail ray Taeniura lymma (Forsskål, 1775) (Elasmobranchii: Myliobatiformes: Dasyatidae).

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Tan, Mun Hua; Croft, Laurence J; Meekan, Mark G; Gan, Huan You; Gan, Han Ming

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitogenome of the ray Taeniura lymma was recovered from genome skimming using the HiSeq sequencing system. The T. lymma mitogenome has 17,652 base pairs (59.13% A + T content) made up of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs and a 1906 bp non-coding AT-rich region. This mitogenome sequence is the second for a ray from Australian waters, the first for the genus Taeniura and the ninth for the family Dasyatidae. PMID:25693694

  7. Eye retraction in the giant guitarfish, Rhynchobatus djiddensis (Elasmobranchii: Batoidea): a novel mechanism for eye protection in batoid fishes.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Taketeru; Murakumo, Kiyomi; Miyamoto, Kei; Sato, Keiichi; Oka, Shin-ichiro; Kamisako, Haruka; Toda, Minoru

    2016-02-01

    Eye retraction behavior has evolved independently in some vertebrate linages such as mudskippers (fish), frogs and salamanders (amphibians), and cetaceans (mammals). In this paper, we report the eye retraction behavior of the giant guitarfish (Rhynchobatus djiddensis) for the first time, and discuss its mechanism and function. The eye retraction distance was nearly the same as the diameter of the eyeball itself, indicating that eye retraction in the giant guitarfish is probably one of the largest among vertebrates. Eye retraction is achieved by unique arrangement of the eye muscle: one of the anterior eye muscles (the obliquus inferior) is directed ventrally from the eyeball and attaches to the ventral surface of the neurocranium. Due to such muscle arrangement, the obliquus inferior can pull the eyeball ventrally. This mechanism was also confirmed by electrical stimulation of the obliquus inferior. The eye retraction ability of the giant guitarfish likely represents a novel eye protection behavior of elasmobranch fishes. PMID:26468088

  8. Rhynchorhina mauritaniensis, a new genus and species of wedgefish from the eastern central Atlantic (Elasmobranchii: Batoidea: Rhinidae).

    PubMed

    Séret, Bernard; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2016-01-01

    A new wedgefish, Rhynchorhina mauritaniensis gen. et sp. nov., is described from three specimens collected in the shallow waters of the shoal "Banc d'Arguin", off Mauritania (Eastern Central Atlantic). The new genus is mainly distinguished from its close relatives, members of the genus Rhynchobatus, by its snout shape, more broadly rounded like that of the shark-ray Rhina ancylostoma, instead of being typically wedge-shaped as in Rhynchobatus species. The new species resembles the common West African wedgefish, Rhynchobatus lubberti, in having a similar colour pattern, but differs in snout shape. The new genus is supported as genetically distinct by comparative analysis of the mitochondrial NADH2 gene. PMID:27470765

  9. Population genetic structure of the round stingray Urobatis halleri (Elasmobranchii: Rajiformes) in southern California and the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Plank, S M; Lowe, C G; Feldheim, K A; Wilson, R R; Brusslan, J A

    2010-08-01

    The round stingray, Urobatis halleri, is a viviparous elasmobranch that inhabits inshore, benthic habitats ranging from the western U.S.A. to Panama. The population genetic structure of this species was inferred with seven polymorphic microsatellite loci in samples collected at three sites in coastal southern California, one near Santa Catalina Island, California and one in the eastern Gulf of California. Urobatis halleri is relatively common, but little is known of its movement patterns or population structure. Small F(ST) values (-0.0017 to 0.0005) suggested little structure among coastal populations of southern and Baja California. The population sampled at Santa Catalina Island, which is separated by a deep-water channel from the coastal sites, however, was significantly divergent (large F(ST), 0.0251) from the other populations, suggesting low connectivity with coastal populations. The Santa Catalina Island population also had the lowest allele richness and lowest average heterozygosity, suggesting recent population bottlenecks in size. PMID:20646159

  10. First report and description of a Cyrilia sp. (Apicomplexa: Haemogregarinidae) from a freshwater Cururu Stingray Potamotrygon cf. histrix (Elasmobranchii: Potamotrygonidae), from the Amazon Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Magro, N M; de Oliveira, A T; O'Dwyer, L H

    2016-08-01

    A haemogregarine is described in 12 cururu stingray (Potamotrygon cf. histrix), from Mariuá Archipelago, Negro River, in the Brazilian Amazon Basin. All animals, both male and female, were parasitized by the haemogregarine and parasitaemia varied between 0.8% and 10% of erythrocytes. The stages observed included trophozoites or merozoites, suspected meronts, and gamonts presumed to be of two types, macrogamonts and microgamonts. Most stages were observed inside mature erythrocytes, while others were extracellular. The stages observed were most similar to those characteristics of the genus Cyrilia, than to any other fish haemogregarine and may represent a new Cyrilia species. PMID:26642832

  11. Insights on the identities of sharks of the Rhizoprionodon acutus (Elasmobranchii: Carcharhiniformes) species complex based on three new species of Phoreiobothrium (Cestoda: Onchoproteocephalidea).

    PubMed

    Caira, J N; Jensen, K

    2015-01-01

    Recent molecular work on milk sharks (Rhizoprionodon acutus [Rüppell]) suggests that, rather than a single widely distributed species, R. acutus represents a complex of four narrowly distributed cryptic species. Examination of the cestodes in three of the four members of that complex globally led to the discovery and description of three new species in the onchoproteocephalidean genus Phoreiobothrium Linton, 1889. The host associations and geographic distributions of the new species are fully congruent with the geographic distributions and species boundaries inferred for the sharks from molecular data: Phoreiobothrium jahki n. sp. parasitizes Rhizoprionodon cf. acutus 3 off Borneo, P. nadiae n. sp. parasitizes R. cf. acutus 1 off Senegal, and P. swaki n. sp. parasitizes R. cf. acutus 2 off northern Australia. The new cestodes differ from one another and from their 11 valid congeners in morphological features such as sublocular configuration and number, hook size, and testis number. Given the notoriously oioxenous nature of elasmobranch-hosted onchoproteocephalidean cestodes, these results provide further support for recognition of the milk shark species complex. This work also raises questions about the Phoreiobothrium species reported in cursory descriptions from India; further examination of these cestodes is key because they are potentially hosted by the fourth member of the R. acutus complex. To encourage future taxonomic work on the morphology of sharks in this complex, comparative photographs of representatives of the four potential host species are provided. PMID:26701566

  12. Sperm of Galeorhinus galeus (Elasmobranchii, Triakidae) Traverse an Excurrent Duct System Characterized by Pronounced Regionalization: A Scanning Electron and Light Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Mcclusky, Leon Mendel

    2015-11-01

    The transport and subsequent maturation of spermatozoa in the vertebrate excurrent duct require the creation of a series of biochemically defined luminal milieus along the length of the duct. Such specialization is accomplished, among others, by changes in the epididymal histoarchitecture. Here we show that the intratesticular and extratesticular genital ducts of mating Galeorhinus galeus exhibit pronounced regionalization both in terms of epithelial histology and lumen diameter size. Findings also reveal distinct differences in the manner in which the spermatozoa were found in each segment of the duct. Novel scanning electron microscopy evidence is presented showing that the wide lumen ductuli epididymides, which ultimately convey the spermatozoa to the proximal epididymis, show functional specialization as well. The wall of the former consisted of cuboidal ciliated and nonciliated cells whose spatial arrangement in the duct wall resulted in a luminal surface showing lengthy rows of cilia-free areas, with each row bordered on both sides by a single row of cilia. The proximal epididymis comprised several subregions whose epithelial histology varied widely. The distal epididymis and ampulla of the epididymis possessed many fingerlike projections and transverse septa, respectively. As the main storage site for spermatozoa, the ampulla completed the bundling of spermatozoa into spermatozeugmata. These were circular sperm masses in which the heads of the spermatozoa were aligned side by side and embedded in a seminal matrix, while their tails extended outward. These findings of pronounced regionalization differ greatly from the rather uniform epididymal histology seen in some rays. PMID:26248611

  13. The electrosensorial pore system of the cephalofoil in the four most common species of hammerhead shark (Elasmobranchii: Sphyrnidae) from the Southwestern Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Mello, Waldiney

    2009-04-01

    The laterally expanded head is the principal character distinguishing hammerhead sharks, and its morphology is important for interpreting their ontogeny and species diversity. Because their head shape changes during its ontogeny, it is vital to evaluate it in order to establish other taxonomical characteristics to correctly identify Sphyrna species. This study examines the distribution of electrosensorial pore regions on the ventral surface of the cephalofoil (VSC) in Sphyrna lewini, S. tiburo, S. tudes and S. zygaena from the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean. The pore distribution patterns in the VSC can distinguish these species. Use of those patterns, with the head shape, confirms the identification of the four most common species of hammerhead sharks in the Southwestern Atlantic. PMID:19304271

  14. First mature male record of Bathyraja schroederi Elasmobranchii, Arhynchobatidae) from the South Atlantic, with descriptions of its clasper and skeletal characters.

    PubMed

    Stehmann, Matthias F W; Pompert, Joost H W

    2014-01-01

    The first mature male of Bathyraja schroederi (Krefft, 1968) is reported based on a single specimen caught by longline in nearly 2000 m depth at 53°S, 57°W in the Western South Atlantic. This is only the third record after the original description of this very rare deepwater skate that is mainly found in the southwestern Atlantic and with records off southern Chile. The hitherto unknown clasper and skeletal characters of this mature male are described here and compared with the original series of seven specimens. The mature male differs in some morphometrics and meristics from the exclusively female type specimens and shows in its clasper the peculiarity of large dorsal and ventral pseudosiphons. PMID:25081786

  15. Molecular Phylogeny and Zoogeography of the Capoeta damascina Species Complex (Pisces: Teleostei: Cyprinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Nisreen; Esmaeili, Hamid-Reza; Krupp, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Capoeta damascina was earlier considered by many authors as one of the most common freshwater fish species found throughout the Levant, Mesopotamia, Turkey, and Iran. However, owing to a high variation in morphological characters among and within its various populations, 17 nominal species were described, several of which were regarded as valid by subsequent revising authors. Capoeta damascina proved to be a complex of closely related species, which had been poorly studied. The current study aims at defining C. damascina and the C. damascina species complex. It investigates phylogenetic relationships among the various members of the C. damascina complex, based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Phylogenetic relationships were projected against paleogeographical events to interpret the geographic distribution of the taxa under consideration in relation to the area’s geological history. Samples were obtained from throughout the geographic range and were subjected to genetic analyses, using two molecular markers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (n = 103) and the two adjacent divergence regions (D1-D2) of the nuclear 28S rRNA genes (n = 65). Six closely related species were recognized within the C. damascina complex, constituting two main lineages: A western lineage represented by C. caelestis, C. damascina, and C. umbla and an eastern lineage represented by C. buhsei, C. coadi, and C. saadii. The results indicate that speciation of these taxa is rather a recent event. Dispersal occurred during the Pleistocene, resulting in present-day distribution patterns. A coherent picture of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of the C. damascina species complex is drawn, explaining the current patterns of distribution as a result of paleogeographic events and ecological adaptations. PMID:27309854

  16. Mitochondrial and Allozyme Genetics of Incipient Speciation in a Landlocked Population of Galaxias Truttaceus (Pisces: Galaxiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ovenden, J. R.; White, RWG.

    1990-01-01

    Galaxias truttaceus is found in coastal rivers and streams in south-eastern Australia. It spawns at the head of estuaries in autumn and the larvae spend 3 months of winter at sea before returning to fresh water. In Tasmania there are landlocked populations of G. truttaceus in a cluster of geologically young lakes on the recently glaciated Central Plateau. These populations have no marine larval stage and spawn in the lakes in spring. Speciation due to land locking is thought to be a frequent occurrence within Galaxias. To investigate the nature of the speciation event which may be occurring within lake populations of G. truttaceus we studied the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and allozyme diversity of both lake and stream populations. Using the presence or absence of restriction sites recognized by 13 six-base restriction endonucleases, we found 58 mtDNA haplotypes among 150 fish collected from 13 Tasmanian and one south-east Australian mainland stream populations. The most parsimonious network relating the haplotypes by site loss or gain was starlike in shape. We argue that this arrangement is best explained by selection upon slightly beneficial mutations within the mitochondrial genome. Gene diversity analysis under Wright's island model showed that the populations in each drainage were not genetically subdivided. Only two of these stream haplotypes were found among the 66 fish analyzed from four lake populations. Despite the extreme lack of mtDNA diversity in lake populations, the observed nuclear DNA heterozygosity of 40 lake fish (0.10355) was only slightly less than that of 82 stream fish (0.11635). In the short time (3000-7000 years) that the lake fish have been landlocked, random genetic drift in a finite, stable-sized population was probably not responsible for the lack of mtDNA diversity in the lake populations. We infer the lake populations have probably experienced at least one, severe, but transitory bottleneck possibly induced by natural selection for life-history characters essential for survival in the lacustrine habitat. If speciation is occurring in the landlocked populations of G. truttaceus, then it may be driven by genetic transilience. PMID:2155855

  17. Biology of eggs, embryos and larvae of Rhinelepis aspera (Spix & Agassiz, 1829) (Pisces: Siluriformes).

    PubMed

    da Rocha Perini, Violeta; Sato, Yoshimi; Rizzo, Elizete; Bazzoli, Nilo

    2010-05-01

    The black armoured catfish Rhinelepis aspera is an important commercial species found in the São Francisco River (Brazil) that has great potential for pisciculture. This paper presents, for the first time, information on the embryogenesis and larval development of this species. The breeder fish were subjected to spawning induction with crude carp pituitary extract. Eggs were kept in incubators at 24 degrees C and embryogenesis was observed with a stereomicroscope until hatching. Ovary fragments, samples of recently extruded oocytes and larvae were fixed in Bouin's solution and subjected to routine histology techniques. Recently extruded oocytes were also analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Females (80%) had a positive response to hypophysation. Oocyte extrusion was performed at 8 h and 30 min after the second hormone injection and the fertilization rate achieved 72.4 +/- 8.8%. Recently extruded oocytes had a mean diameter of 1360.80 +/- 40.87 microm and presented a conspicuous jelly coat covering the zona pellucida. Histochemical reactions indicated the presence of neutral glycoproteins in the yolk globules and in the zona pellucida. These reactions also indicated the presence of neutral glycoproteins and carboxylated acid glycoconjugates in the follicular cells and the jelly coat. These compounds form mucosubstances that can be related to the adhesiveness of the eggs. Under the SEM the oocytes presented a micropyle disc and a thick jelly coat over their surface. The closure of the blastopore occurred 9 h and 40 min after fertilization and embryogenesis was completed at 45 h and 50 min after fertilization, when the embryos were incubated at 24 degrees C. The total absorption of the yolk sac occurred during the fifth day indicating the need for an exogenous food supply. These results provide essential information for the successful breeding and management of the promising R. aspera. PMID:19860989

  18. Oocyte adhesiveness and embryonic development of Astyanax bimaculatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Pisces: Characidae).

    PubMed

    Weber, André Alberto; Arantes, Fábio Pereira; Sato, Yoshimi; Rizzo, Elizete; Bazzoli, Nilo

    2013-05-01

    This study shows for the first time the presence of a jelly coat on oocytes of neotropical Characiformes fish. This structure could be responsible for the adhesiveness of Astyanax bimaculatus oocytes, a species widely distributed in South America including in the São Francisco River basin in Brazil. Adult specimens of A. bimaculatus were submitted to artificial reproduction in order to analyse the egg morphology and embryonic development. The eggs were fertilised and kept in incubators with a water temperature of 24°C so that embryogenesis could be monitored. Ovulated and unfertilised oocytes were also collected and submitted to routine histological techniques. Astyanax bimaculatus oocytes were found to be spherical, yellowish, and covered by a thin jelly coat with a slightly adhesive surface. The mean oocyte diameter was 1.03 ± 0.03 mm, the perivitelline space was 0.21 ± 0.02 mm and the jelly coat's thickness was 0.04 ± 0.01 mm. Positive periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain and Alcian blue stain pH 2.5 indicated the presence of neutral glycoproteins, and carboxylated acid glycoconjugates on the jelly coat that formed mucosubstances that may be associated with egg adhesiveness. At a water temperature of 24°C, blastopore closure and hatching occurred at 5 h and 17 h after fertilisation, respectively. The results of this study provide essential information for phylogenetic studies and for a better understanding of the reproductive strategy of A. bimaculatus, currently included in the incertae sedis group of the Characidae family due to the lack of monophyly among the families of the group. PMID:22717095

  19. Helminth parasites of Chapalichthys encaustus (Pisces: Goodeidae), an endemic freshwater fish from Lake Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aquino, Andrés; Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; Aguilar-Aguilar, Rogelio; Cabañas-Carranza, Guillermina; Ortega-Olivares, Mirza P

    2004-08-01

    A total of 6 helminth species were recorded during helminthological examination of 50 Chapalichthys encaustus from Lake Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico. Helminth species identified included: Salsuginus sp. (an undescribed monogenea); Posthodiplostomum minimum (metacercariae); Cyclustera ralli (metacestode); Polymorphus brevis (cystacanth); Contracaecum sp. (nematode larvae); and Rhabdochona lichtenfelsi (adult nematode). Of these, 2 (Salsuginus sp. and R. lichtenfelsi) are specialist species. The observed species richness, individual parasite abundance, and diversity were low. Data suggest that host specificity is an important factor contributing to observed community composition and richness. Host feeding habits and helminth species availability seem to determine the characteristics of these helminth assemblages. PMID:15357094

  20. Instrument Construction and Initial Validation: Professional Identity Scale in Counseling (PISC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Hong Ryun

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of having a strong professional identity include ethical performances, promoted wellness, and increased awareness of roles and functions among individual counselors (Brott & Myers, 1999; Grimmit & Paisley, 2008; Ponton & Duba, 2009). Scholars in the counseling field have underscored the importance of unified professional…

  1. Chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in Amazon cichlids genome (Pisces, Cichlidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Terencio, Maria Leandra; de Tavares, Édika Sabrina Girão Mitozo; Martins, Cesar; Feldberg, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fish of the family Cichlidae are recognized as an excellent model for evolutionary studies because of their morphological and behavioral adaptations to a wide diversity of explored ecological niches. In addition, the family has a dynamic genome with variable structure, composition and karyotype organization. Microsatellites represent the most dynamic genomic component and a better understanding of their organization may help clarify the role of repetitive DNA elements in the mechanisms of chromosomal evolution. Thus, in this study, microsatellite sequences were mapped in the chromosomes of Cichla monoculus Agassiz, 1831, Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823, and Symphysodon discus Heckel, 1840. Four microsatellites demonstrated positive results in the genome of Cichla monoculus and Symphysodon discus, and five demonstrated positive results in the genome of Pterophyllum scalare. In most cases, the microsatellite was dispersed in the chromosome with conspicuous markings in the centromeric or telomeric regions, which suggests that sequences contribute to chromosome structure and may have played a role in the evolution of this fish family. The comparative genome mapping data presented here provide novel information on the structure and organization of the repetitive DNA region of the cichlid genome and contribute to a better understanding of this fish family’s genome. PMID:26753076

  2. Molecular systematics and biogeography of the circumglobally distributed genus Seriola (Pisces: Carangidae).

    PubMed

    Swart, Belinda L; von der Heyden, Sophie; Bester-van der Merwe, Aletta; Roodt-Wilding, Rouvay

    2015-12-01

    The genus Seriola includes several important commercially exploited species and has a disjunct distribution globally; yet phylogenetic relationships within this genus have not been thoroughly investigated. This study reports the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny for this genus based on mitochondrial (Cytb) and nuclear gene (RAG1 and Rhod) DNA sequence data for all extant Seriola species (nine species, n=27). All species were found to be monophyletic based on Maximum parsimony, Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference. The closure of the Tethys Sea (12-20 MYA) coincides with the divergence of a clade containing ((S. fasciata and S. peruana), S. carpenteri) from the rest of the Seriola species, while the formation of the Isthmus of Panama (±3 MYA) played an important role in the divergence of S. fasciata and S. peruana. Furthermore, factors such as climate and water temperature fluctuations during the Pliocene played important roles during the divergence of the remaining Seriola species. PMID:26279346

  3. Comparative protein profiles: potential molecular markers from spermatozoa of Acipenseriformes (Chondrostei, Pisces).

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Hulak, Martin; Rodina, Marek; Sulc, Miroslav; Li, Zhi-Hua; Linhart, Otomar

    2010-12-01

    Sturgeon and paddlefish (Acipenseriformes), the source of roe consumed as caviar, are a unique and commercially valuable group of ancient fishes. In this study, comparative proteomics was used to analyze protein profiles of spermatozoa from five sturgeon species and one paddlefish: Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii), sterlet (A. ruthenus), Russian sturgeon (A. gueldenstaedtii), starry sturgeon (A. stellatus), beluga (Huso huso), and Mississippi paddlefish (Polyodon spathula). Protein profiles of spermatozoa were determined by isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) high-resolution gels. The peptides, previously selected by 2-DE analysis as potentially species-specific, were obtained by "in-gel" tryptic digestion, followed by matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Among the 23 protein spots selected, 14 were identified as isoforms of enolase B present in all species, but with different isoelectric points or molecular mass. Exceptions were A. ruthenus and H. huso, species with a close phylogenetic relationship. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was detected exclusively in P. spathula. Phosphoglycerate kinase was detected only in A. ruthenus and H. huso, and 3 additional proteins (fructose bisphosphate aldolase A-2, glycogen phosphorylase type IV and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) were found exclusively in A. gueldenstaedtii and H. huso. This study points to the application of proteomics for differential characterization and comparative studies of acipenseriform species at the molecular level. PMID:20869341

  4. Rapid radiation and cryptic speciation in mediterranean triplefin blennies (Pisces: Tripterygiidae) combining multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Carreras-Carbonell, Josep; Macpherson, Enrique; Pascual, Marta

    2005-12-01

    The genus Tripterygion is the unique genus of the family Tripterygiidae in the Mediterranean Sea and in the northeastern Atlantic coast. Three species and four subspecies had been described: Tripterygion tripteronotus and Tripterygion melanurus (T. m. melanurus and T. m. minor) are endemic of the Mediterranean, and T. delaisi (T. d. delaisi and T. d. xanthosoma) is found in both areas. We used five different genes (12S, 16S, tRNA-val, COI, and 18S) to elucidate their taxonomy status and their phylogenetic relationships. We employed different phylogenetic reconstructions that yielded different tree topologies. This discrepancy may be caused by the speciation process making difficult the reconstruction of a highly supported tree. All pair comparisons between these three species showed the same genetic divergence indicating that the speciation process could have been resolved by a rapid radiation event after the Messinian Salinity Crisis (5.2Mya) leading to a trichotomy. Our molecular data revealed two clearly supported clades within T. tripteronotus, whose divergence largely exceeded that found between other fish species, consequently these two groups should be considered two cryptic species diverging 2.75-3.32Mya along the Pliocene glaciations. On the contrary, none of the genes studied supported the existence of two subspecies of T. melanurus. Finally, the two subspecies of T. delaisi were validated and probably originated during the Quaternary climatic fluctuations (1.10-1.23Mya), however their distribution ranges should be redefined. PMID:15964768

  5. Oxidative stress enzyme and histopathological lesions in Colossoma macropomum (pisces, ariidae) for environmental impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Ticianne de Sousa de Oliveira Mota; Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro; Dantas, Janaina Gomes; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    This study used oxidative stress enzyme (Glutathione S-Transferase and Catalase), histopathological lesions (Branchial lesions) and biometric data in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in an Environmental Protection Area at São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations (A1 = contaminated area and A2 = reference site) within the protected area on four occasions. The activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in C. macropomum was compared with biometric data and histopathological lesions. Results have shown that biometric data decreased significantly in fish (p<0.05) at the contaminated site. The activity of CAT was higher in fish specifically caught in A1. A significant difference was observed in the GST activity in the liver of C. macropomum when comparing fish from the contaminated site and those from the reference site (p<0.05).

  6. Chromosomal Variability Between Populations of Electrophorus electricus Gill, 1864 (Pisces: Gymnotiformes: Gymnotidae).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Ready, Jonathan Stuart; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Milhomem, Susana Suely Rodrigues; de Figueiredo-Ready, Wilsea Maria Batista; Silva, Fernando Henrique Ramos; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko

    2015-12-01

    The electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, the only species of its genus, has a wide distribution in the Amazon and Orinoco drainages. There is little previous information regarding the population variation in E. electricus, with only basic karyotype data from two populations (Amazon and Araguaia Rivers). Karyotypic description and analysis of CO1 barcode sequences were performed for E. electricus from three localities (Caripetuba, Irituia, and Maicuru Rivers). All samples share the 2n=52 (42 m-sm [meta-submetacentric] +10 st-a [subtelo-acrocentric]) with previously studied material. However, the Maicuru River samples differ from the other populations, as they have B chromosomes. The distribution of noncentromeric constitutive heterochromatin between samples is relatively divergent. All samples analyzed present the Nucleolar Organizer Region (NOR) located in a single chromosome pair. In the samples from Caripetuba, NORs were colocalized with a heterochromatin block, whereas the NOR was flanked by heterochromatin in Maicuru River samples and pericentromeric heterochromatin adjacent NOR was found in Irituia River samples. Alignment of CO1 barcode sequences indicated no significant differentiation between the samples analyzed. Results suggest that karyotypic differences between samples from the Caripetuba, Irituia, and Amazon Rivers represent chromosome polymorphisms. However, differences between the samples from the Maicuru and Araguaia Rivers and the remaining populations could represent interpopulation differentiation, which has not had time to accrue divergence at the CO1 gene level. PMID:25695141

  7. Phylogenetic relationships among Spanish Barbus species (Pisces, Cyprinidae) shown by RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Callejas, C; Ochando, M D

    2002-07-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to estimate the population structure and phylogenetic relationships among the eight species of the genus Barbus that inhabit the Iberian Peninsula. Ten random oligodecamers were used to amplify DNA from 232 fish sampled from 15 populations. A total of 270 markers were detected that revealed low levels of genetic variability. The conclusions of cluster analysis indicate two main branches and three well-differentiated groups: north-eastern, Mediterranean and Atlantic. This clustering mainly reflects the evolutionary history of the genus, which is closely related to the paleogeography of the Iberian Peninsula. The contribution and application of these results to the conservation of the species, to their taxonomic status and to the process of colonization of the Iberian Peninsula by the genus Barbus are discussed. PMID:12080368

  8. [Micropterus salmoides (Pisces: Centrarchidae) reproduction in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, Sinaloa, México].

    PubMed

    Beltrán Alvarez, Rigoberto; Sánchez Palacios, Jesús; Ramírez Lozano, Juan Pedro; Ortega Salas, Adolfo-Armando

    2013-09-01

    Micropterus salmoides is an important fish species for sport fishing activities, condition that has promoted its introduction to different reservoirs in Mexico and worldwide. With the aim to improve its fisheries management, this research dealt with some reproductive aspects of this species in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, where it was studied from August 2008 through March 2011. To this end, we obtained 938 specimens, with gillnets of different sizes, to determine their total length (Lt, in cm), weight (Pt, in g), sex, gonadosomatic index, condition factor, fecundity and size at first maturity. Lt and Pt ranged from 15.9 to 63 cm (37.4 +/- 78.0) and 57 to 4431 g (731.7 +/- 619.0), respectively. The Pt-Lt relationship showed a positive allometric growth, with no significant difference between males and females (F = 0.9955, p = 0.3187). The male: female ratio obtained was 1:0.83. Mass spawning lasted from December to April. Size at first maturity was 33.7 cm and average fecundity was 32294 +/- 12878.7 oocytes/female. The gonadosomatic index was low from May through November, and increased between January and March. The condition factor was high before the spawning season and decreased after the reproductive period. We recommend a fishing ban from January to March, and to allow the capture size between 33 and 40 cm. PMID:24027925

  9. Homing behaviour and individual identification of the pipefish Nerophis lumbriciformis (Pisces; Syngnathidae): a true intertidal resident?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Nuno Miguel; Vieira, Maria da Natividade; Almada, Vitor

    2005-04-01

    Syngnathids have been the focus of growing interest due to their peculiar reproductive biology and vulnerability to environmental degradation and overcollecting. In this study, near the south limit of the species' geographic distribution, a description of the homing behaviour of the worm pipefish, Nerophis lumbriciformis, based on the unique facial pigmentation patterns, is presented. Even though the amount of facial pigmentation was substantially higher in larger adult females, suggesting that it can be part of the secondary sexual repertoire of this sex role reversed species, this technique allowed for the positive identification of adult individuals (males and females) during at least 19 months. Recaptures showed that this pipefish shows a strong homing behaviour, with individuals being regularly captured within less than 2 m of the original identification event. The absence of horizontal migrations to adjacent areas and the observation of adults in the subtidal, together with the overall low number of recaptures (even though some individuals were cyclically resighted) highlighted the fact that the intertidal is not N. lumbriciformis' permanent residence. This observation also demonstrates that the estimation of the population size, important for conservation purposes, based solely on intertidal data can be misleading because captured individuals are only a fraction of a larger, mainly subtidal, population.

  10. Morphological characteristics and distribution of Pleuronectidae (Pisces) eggs in the western margin of the East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jin-Koo

    2016-03-01

    Seven species of Pleuronectidae ( Platichthys stellatus, Kareius bicoloratus, Pseudopleuronectes herzensteini, Microstomus achne, Glyptocephalus stelleri, Hippoglossoides dubius, and Limanda punctatissima) were identified based on eggs collected from the western margin of the East Sea (east coast of Korea), using DNA barcoding. The eggs of P. herzensteini and G. stelleri were relatively widely distributed along the east coast of Korea, whereas those of P. stellatus and K. bicoloratus were narrowly distributed; in particular, the eggs of P. stellatus were restricted to areas near bays. The eggs, which share common morphological characteristics (such as a homogeneous yolk and smooth membrane) were divided into three groups according to egg size: group A (more than 1.60 mm in egg diameter, including genera Hippoglossoides and Microstomus), group B (1.00-1.60 mm, including genera Kareius, Glyptocephalus, and Platichthys), and group C (less than 1.00 mm, including genera Limanda and Pseudopleuronectes). This paper provides an overview of the morphological characteristics of the eggs of the family Pleuronectidae collected from the east coast of Korea. Our approach to the analysis of eggs, based on DNA barcoding, morphological characteristics, and geographic distributions, provides a rapid and accurate basis for identifying spawning areas and spawning periods, thus facilitating the assessment and management of fisheries stocks and resources.

  11. Bone development in the jaw of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Koji; Okada, Norihiro

    2008-06-01

    East African cichlids have evolved feeding apparatus morphologies adapted to their diverse feeding behaviors. The evolution of the oral jaw morphologies is accomplished by the diversity of bone formation during development. To further understand this evolutionary process, we examined the skeletal elements of the jaw and their temporal and sequential emergence, categorized by developmental stages, using the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus as a model cichlid. We found that chondrogenesis started in Stage 17. The deposition of osteoid for the dermal bones commenced in Stage 18. The uptake of calcium dramatically shifted from the surface of larvae to the gills in Stage 20. The bone mineralization of the skeleton began in Stage 25. These data provide important information regarding the sequential events of craniofacial development in East African cichlids and lay the groundwork for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation of jaw structure to feeding behavior. PMID:18430028

  12. Slingshot feeding of the goblin shark Mitsukurina owstoni (Pisces: Lamniformes: Mitsukurinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Tomita, Taketeru; Suda, Kenta; Sato, Keiichi; Ogimoto, Keisuke; Chappell, Anthony; Sato, Toshihiko; Takano, Katsuhiko; Yuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Five striking and prey capture events of two goblin sharks were videotaped at sea for the first time, showing their extraordinary biting process. The goblin sharks swung their lower jaw downward and backward to attain a huge gape and then rapidly protruded the jaws forward a considerable distance. The jaws were projected at a maximum velocity of 3.1 m/s to 8.6–9.4% of the total length of the shark, which is by far the fastest and greatest jaw protrusion among sharks. While the jaws were being retracted, the mouth opened and closed again, which was considered a novel feeding event for sharks. Phylogenetic evidence suggested that their feeding behavior has evolved as an adaptation to food-poor deep-sea environments, possibly as a trade-off for the loss of strong swimming ability. PMID:27282933

  13. Deep-water chaunacid and lophiid anglerfishes (Pisces: Lophiiformes) off the south-eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caruso, John H.; Ross, S.W.; Sulak, K.J.; Sedberry, G.R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research cruises to deep (80-910 m) reef habitats off the south-eastern U.S. and in the northern Gulf of Mexico have provided new information on the diagnostic characteristics, behaviours, colour patterns in life, bottom associations, distributions and maximum sizes of species of the anglerfish genera Chaunax, Lophiodes and Sladenia. Chaunax stigmaeus occurred much further south than previously known (Blake Plateau off South Carolina), and all C. stigmaeus observed were found associated with dense beds of dead coral (Lophelia pertusa) rubble or on broken hard bottom. In contrast, Chaunax suttkusi was found on soft bottoms. Chaunax stigmaeus and C. suttkusi appear to be sympatric over a major portion of their ranges. Because knowledge of pigmentation in live or freshly caught Chaunax is critical to distinguish some members of the genus, changes in the colouration of C. suttkusi were noted and documented photographically immediately after death and after fixation. The yellow spots found on some, but not all specimens, temporarily disappeared completely after death, but they reappeared after fixation, slowly disappearing thereafter along with other carotenoid pigments. Lophiodes beroe and Lophiodes monodi were collected for the first time off the Atlantic coast of the U.S., being previously known only from the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and the northern coast of South America. For both species (L. beroe and L. monodi), the collections included the two largest known representatives of the species (400 and 325 mm standard length, respectively). Lophiodes beroe commonly occurred on L. pertusa rubble, and seemed to prefer this habitat. Occupying such a habitat that is deep and difficult to sample probably explains how this common species escaped detection. Only a single L. monodi was collected or observed, so this species appears to be uncommon in this geographic area or at least so on coral rubble habitat. Detailed aspects of the colour patterns of both species were noted. In particular, L. beroe displayed a characteristic pattern of white patches in life that were not apparent after death. The first photographic documentation of the colour pattern in life and of the pharyngeal pigmentation of Lophiodes reticulatus is provided. The third known specimen of Sladenia shaefersi, and the first to be taken in U.S. waters was collected from coral rubble near the base of a steep 200 m scarp on the Blake Plateau. ?? 2007 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  14. Deep-water chaunacid and lophiid anglerfishes (Pisces: Lophiiformes) off the Southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caruso, John H.; Ross, S.W.; Sulak, Kenneth J.; Sedberry, George R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research cruises to deep (80–910 m) reef habitats off the south-eastern U.S. and in the northern Gulf of Mexico have provided new information on the diagnostic characteristics, behaviours, colour patterns in life, bottom associations, distributions and maximum sizes of species of the anglerfish genera Chaunax, Lophiodes and Sladenia. Chaunax stigmaeus occurred much further south than previously known (Blake Plateau off South Carolina), and all C. stigmaeusobserved were found associated with dense beds of dead coral (Lophelia pertusa) rubble or on broken hard bottom. In contrast, Chaunax suttkusi was found on soft bottoms. Chaunax stigmaeusand C. suttkusi appear to be sympatric over a major portion of their ranges. Because knowledge of pigmentation in live or freshly caught Chaunax is critical to distinguish some members of the genus, changes in the colouration of C. suttkusi were noted and documented photographically immediately after death and after fixation. The yellow spots found on some, but not all specimens, temporarily disappeared completely after death, but they reappeared after fixation, slowly disappearing thereafter along with other carotenoid pigments. Lophiodes beroe andLophiodes monodi were collected for the first time off the Atlantic coast of the U.S., being previously known only from the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and the northern coast of South America. For both species (L. beroe and L. monodi), the collections included the two largest known representatives of the species (400 and 325 mm standard length, respectively). Lophiodes beroecommonly occurred on L. pertusa rubble, and seemed to prefer this habitat. Occupying such a habitat that is deep and difficult to sample probably explains how this common species escaped detection. Only a single L. monodi was collected or observed, so this species appears to be uncommon in this geographic area or at least so on coral rubble habitat. Detailed aspects of the colour patterns of both species were noted. In particular, L. beroe displayed a characteristic pattern of white patches in life that were not apparent after death. The first photographic documentation of the colour pattern in life and of the pharyngeal pigmentation of Lophiodes reticulatus is provided. The third known specimen of Sladenia shaefersi, and the first to be taken in U.S. waters was collected from coral rubble near the base of a steep 200 m scarp on the Blake Plateau.

  15. REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY AND SPAWNING PERIODICITY OF THE ATLANTIC SILVERSIDE, 'MENIDIA MENIDIA' (PISCES: ATHERINIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reproduction ecology and spawning periodicity of the Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia, living in the North Edisto River estuary, South Carolina, was studied at two sites, Bears Bluff and the Point of Pines, during the spring and summer of 1976, 1977, and 1978. A specific ...

  16. Feeding of the megamouth shark (Pisces: Lamniformes: Megachasmidae) predicted by its hyoid arch: a biomechanical approach.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Taketeru; Sato, Keiichi; Suda, Kenta; Kawauchi, Junro; Nakaya, Kazuhiro

    2011-05-01

    Studies of the megamouth shark, one of three planktivorous sharks, can provide information about their evolutionary history. Megamouth shark feeding has never been observed in life animals, but two alternative hypotheses on biomechanics suggest either feeding, i.e., ram feeding or suction feeding. In this study, the second moment of area of the ceratohyal cartilages, which is an indicator of the flexural stiffness of the cartilages, is calculated for 21 species of ram- and suction-feeding sharks using computed tomography. The results indicate that suction-feeding sharks have ceratohyal cartilages with a larger second moment of area than ram-feeding sharks. The result also indicates that the ram-suction index, which is an indicator of relative contribution of ram and suction behavior, is also correlated with the second moment of area of the ceratohyal. Considering that large bending stresses are expected to be applied to the ceratohyal cartilage during suction, the larger second moment of area of the ceratohyal of suction-feeding sharks can be interpreted as an adaptation for suction feeding. Based on the small second moment of area of the ceratohyal cartilage of the megamouth shark, the feeding mode of the megamouth shark is considered to be ram feeding, similar to the planktivorous basking shark. From these results, an evolutionary scenario of feeding mechanics of three species of planktivorous sharks can be suggested. In this scenario, the planktivorous whale shark evolved ram feeding from a benthic suction-feeding ancestor. Ram feeding in the planktivorous megamouth shark and the basking shark evolved from ram feeding swimming-type ancestors and that both developed their unique filtering system to capture small-sized prey. PMID:21381075

  17. Social Inhibition of Maturation in Natural Populations of Xiphophorus variatus (Pisces: Poeciliidae).

    PubMed

    Borowsky, R

    1978-09-01

    According to analyses of field samples, social inhibition of maturation is at work in natural populations of the variable platyfish, Xiphophorus variatus. In the laboratory, adult males inhibit the maturation of juveniles; the inhibition is overcome as the juveniles increase in size. The proportion of maturing males in any field collection is related to the number of adult males present and the size of the juveniles. The more adults, the fewer maturing males are present; the larger the average juvenile, the greater the number of males maturing. The evolution of this system is best understood in terms of individual selection, but consequences of the system buffer the population against the effects of predation. PMID:17729573

  18. Main features of the oxidative metabolism in gills and liver of Odontesthes nigricans Richardson (Pisces, Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Lattuca, M E; Malanga, G; Aguilar Hurtado, C; Pérez, A F; Calvo, J; Puntarulo, S

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study comparatively the oxidative metabolism in gills and liver of a silverside, Odontesthes nigricans, in their natural environment, the Beagle Channel. Oxidative damage to lipids was evaluated by assessing TBARS and lipid radical content, in gills and liver. Gills showed a significantly higher degree of damage than liver. The content of alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and catalase activity showed significantly higher values in the liver than in the gills. The ascorbyl radical (A(*)) content showed no significant differences between gills and liver. The ascorbate (AH(-)) content was 12+/-2 and 159+/-28 nmol/mg FW in gills and liver, respectively. Oxidative metabolism at the hydrophilic level was assessed as the ratio A(*)/AH(-). The ratio A(*)/AH(-) was significantly different between organs, (6+/-2)10(-5) and (5+/-2)10(-6), for the gills and the liver, respectively. Both, lipid radical content/alpha-tocopherol content and lipid radical content/beta-carotene content ratios were significantly higher in gills as compared to the values recorded for the liver, suggesting an increased situation of oxidative stress condition in the lipid phase of the gills. Taken as a whole, the O. nigricans liver exhibited a better control of oxidative damage than the gills, allowing minimization of intracellular damage when exposed to environmental stressing conditions. PMID:19706336

  19. Communities of parasite metazoans in Piaractus brachypomus (Pisces, Serrasalmidae) in the lower Amazon River (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-06-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the component community of parasite metazoans of Piaractus brachypomus in the lower Amazon River, northern Brazil. From 34 necropsied fish, 27,384 metazoan parasites were collected, such as Anacanthorus spathulatus, Mymarothecium viatorum and Notozothecium janauachensis (Monogenoidea); Spectatus spectatus and Contracaecum sp (Nematoda); Clinostomum marginatum and Dadaytrema oxycephala (Digenea); and Argulus carteri and Ergasilus sp. (Crustacea). The dominant species was S. spectatus followed by monogenoidean species, and there was aggregated dispersion of parasites, except for D. oxycephala and Contracaecum sp., which presented random dispersion. Positive correlation among the abundance of the three monogenoideans species were found, thus indicating that there was no competition between the species of these parasites on the gills of hosts. The abundances of some parasite species showed positive correlations with the size of the hosts, but the condition factor of the fish was not affected by the parasitism levels. It showed that this host had a metazoan community characterized by high species richness of metazoans, low evenness and high diversity of parasites, with prevalence of endoparasites, including larval stages. This was the first record of C. marginatum, A. carteri, Ergasilus sp. and Contracaecum sp. for P. brachypomus. PMID:27304520

  20. Communities of parasite metazoans in Piaractus brachypomus (Pisces, Serrasalmidae) in the lower Amazon River (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-06-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the component community of parasite metazoans of Piaractus brachypomus in the lower Amazon River, northern Brazil. From 34 necropsied fish, 27,384 metazoan parasites were collected, such as Anacanthorus spathulatus, Mymarothecium viatorum and Notozothecium janauachensis (Monogenoidea); Spectatus spectatus and Contracaecum sp (Nematoda); Clinostomum marginatum and Dadaytrema oxycephala (Digenea); and Argulus carteri and Ergasilus sp. (Crustacea). The dominant species was S. spectatus followed by monogenoidean species, and there was aggregated dispersion of parasites, except for D. oxycephala and Contracaecum sp., which presented random dispersion. Positive correlation among the abundance of the three monogenoideans species were found, thus indicating that there was no competition between the species of these parasites on the gills of hosts. The abundances of some parasite species showed positive correlations with the size of the hosts, but the condition factor of the fish was not affected by the parasitism levels. It showed that this host had a metazoan community characterized by high species richness of metazoans, low evenness and high diversity of parasites, with prevalence of endoparasites, including larval stages. This was the first record of C. marginatum, A. carteri, Ergasilus sp. and Contracaecum sp. for P. brachypomus. PMID:27334815

  1. Initial development of Prochilodus hartii (Pisces: Prochilodontidae) submitted to induced reproduction.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Tiago Figueiredo; Perrotti, Paulo Brant; Meireles, Wesley Antunes; Bazzoli, Nilo

    2016-06-01

    The Prochilodontidae prepare for reproduction in captivity, but neither ovulation nor spawning occurs, thus requiring induced reproduction for breeding and restocking. This study analyzed for the first time the embryogenesis and larval ontogeny of P. hartii submitted to induced reproduction by hypophysation with crude common carp pituitary extract. The extrusion of oocytes and sperm was performed manually and fertilization was done using the dry method. After fertilization, the eggs were kept in incubators at 23°C. A stereomicroscope was used to measure egg diameter and to monitor embryo development. Samples of larvae were collected daily for 7 days for histological and biometric analyses. The recently extruded oocytes, non-hydrated, are spherical, grey, and non-adhesive with a diameter of 1480 ± 39 μm and after hydration, have a diameter of 2860 ± 120 μm. The positive response to hypophysation was 100% for females and 80% for males. Spawning occurred 7 h after the third hormonal dosage. The fertilization rate was 77% at 23°C. Blastopore closure occurred at 6 h 45 min and embryonic development was completed 36 h 10 min after fertilization. After 204 h post fertilization (hpf) the larvae reached a standard length of 6.56 ± 0.14 mm with the yolk sac completely resorbed. In P. hartii, the oral cavity opening occurred 132 hpf. The results of this study provide knowledge to better understand induced reproduction, breeding, and management of P. hartii, a species with a high potential for pisciculture, and which is commercially important in the Jequitinhonha River basin. PMID:26199056

  2. [Comparative cytotaxonomy of 3 species of Cichlasoma (Pisces: Cichlidae) native of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Salas, E; Boza, J

    1991-11-01

    The karyotype of three species of Cichlasoma: C. dovii, C. managuense and C. friedrichstali were studied. The number of diploid chromosomes is 2n = 48 in the first two species. Their karyotypes are composed of four pairs of meta-submetacentric chromosomes. The arms fundamental number (NF) is 56. C. friedrichstali has three pairs of meta-submetacentric chromosomes and 21 pairs of subtelocentric-telocentric chromosomes. This species presents two different diploid numbers, 2n = 48 and 2n = 47. PMID:1844157

  3. Molecular Phylogeny and Zoogeography of the Capoeta damascina Species Complex (Pisces: Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Alwan, Nisreen; Esmaeili, Hamid-Reza; Krupp, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Capoeta damascina was earlier considered by many authors as one of the most common freshwater fish species found throughout the Levant, Mesopotamia, Turkey, and Iran. However, owing to a high variation in morphological characters among and within its various populations, 17 nominal species were described, several of which were regarded as valid by subsequent revising authors. Capoeta damascina proved to be a complex of closely related species, which had been poorly studied. The current study aims at defining C. damascina and the C. damascina species complex. It investigates phylogenetic relationships among the various members of the C. damascina complex, based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. Phylogenetic relationships were projected against paleogeographical events to interpret the geographic distribution of the taxa under consideration in relation to the area's geological history. Samples were obtained from throughout the geographic range and were subjected to genetic analyses, using two molecular markers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (n = 103) and the two adjacent divergence regions (D1-D2) of the nuclear 28S rRNA genes (n = 65). Six closely related species were recognized within the C. damascina complex, constituting two main lineages: A western lineage represented by C. caelestis, C. damascina, and C. umbla and an eastern lineage represented by C. buhsei, C. coadi, and C. saadii. The results indicate that speciation of these taxa is rather a recent event. Dispersal occurred during the Pleistocene, resulting in present-day distribution patterns. A coherent picture of the phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of the C. damascina species complex is drawn, explaining the current patterns of distribution as a result of paleogeographic events and ecological adaptations. PMID:27309854

  4. Dentex carpenteri, a new species of deepwater seabream from Western Australia (Pisces: Sparidae).

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Yukio; Newman, Stephen J; Russell, Barry C

    2015-01-01

    A new species of sparid fish, Dentex carpenteri, is described from nine type specimens collected off Ningaloo Reef near Exmouth, Western Australia. Four valid species of Dentex are currently known in the western Pacific, Dentex abei and D. hypselosomus in the Northern Hemisphere, and D. fourmanoiri and D. spariformis in the Southern Hemisphere. These four species comprise the "Dentex hypselosomus complex". Dentex carpenteri n. sp. is most similar to D. spariformis in overall body form, but differs from D. spariformis in having the posterior margin of the upper jaw not reaching or reaching slightly beyond a vertical at the anterior margin of eye; often with the greater part from the snout to the second infraorbital yellowish; deeper suborbital (9.7-10.9% SL); and a considerably deeper body (vs. posterior margin of upper jaw reaching clearly beyond anterior margin of eye; slight yellow region on snout; suborbital depth shallow (7.6-9.6% SL); and a less deep body in D. spariformis). The mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rRNA, 545 bp) of the above five species were analyzed using the Atlantic congener, Dentex macrophthalmus as an out-group, the results clearly indicating that D. carpenteri n. sp. is a valid and distinct species. A key to the "Dentex hypselosomus complex" is provided. The distributional information available for the five species from the western Pacific, including western Australia and the nearby eastern Indian Ocean, are discussed, with the species considered to be allopatric. PMID:26249058

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HI datacubes if Pisces A and B (Carignan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Libert, Y.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; Jarrett, T. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tollerud, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    The observations were obtained with the seven-dish KAT-7 array, located close to the South African SKA core site in the Northern Cape's Karoo desert region. The data were collected between 2014 November 27 and 2014 December 16. (2 data files).

  6. Description of larvae of the Feather Blenny, Hypsoblennius hentz (Pisces: Blenniidae), from New York Waters.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Moccio, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Hypsoblennius hentz (Lesueur) larvae are described from specimens recently collected in the vicinity of New York Harbor and Raritan Bay. Previous descriptions (Hildebrand and Cable 1938) were erroneous and additionally we provide the first yolk-sac larval descriptions for Western Atlantic Hypsoblennius. H. hentz larvae are distinguished from the other Atlantic species by the size and distribution of preopercular spines. PMID:26213782

  7. Ultrastructural changes in female hepatocytes during ovarian maturation of Steindachnerina insculpta (Pisces: Curimatidae).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, V M A; Bazzoli, N; Maria, T A; Santos, G B

    2006-11-01

    During gonadal maturation the females of Steindachnerina insculpta, a teleost of the Furnas reservoir, Minas Gerais, Brazil, show low hepatosomatic and high gonadossomatic indexes, suggesting possible transference of hepatic substances to the ovaries. In comparison to the resting phase, in the maturation/ mature one the hepatocytes show greater development of both smooth and rough endoplasmic reticula, increased electron density in the mitochondria, and glycogen scattered throughout the cytoplasm. In both resting and maturation/mature phases, the hepatic parenchyma contains melanomacrophagic centers that consist of degenerating cellular debris and are surrounded by capsules formed by cells, resembling fibroblasts, joined by desmosomes. No physiological relation of these centers with ovarian maturation was found. PMID:17299931

  8. Cytogenetic analyses of two Curimatidae species (Pisces; Characiformes) from the Paranapanema and Tietê Rivers.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, L V S; Foresti, F; Martins, C; Oliveira, C; Sobrinho, P E; Wasko, A P

    2007-05-01

    Cytogenetic analyses were performed in two Curimatidae species (Steindachnerina insculpta and Cyphocharax modesta) from the Paranapanema and Tietê Rivers (São Paulo State, Brazil), showing a karyotype composed of 54 meta-submetacentric chromosomes in both species. Silver- and chromomycyn-staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a 18S rDNA probe indicated that the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) of both species are localized in the terminal region of the long arm of two metacentric chromosomes. Although a single NOR system was evidenced in both analyzed species, S. insculpta and C. modesta presented the nucleolar organizer regions in distinct chromosome pairs, indicating that these cistrons can be considered cytogenetic markers. Variation on the amount and distribution of the constitutive heterochromatin (C-bands) could also be detected between the two species - while S. insculpta presented few heterochromatic blocks, intensely stained C-bands were evidenced in C. modesta specially in the terminal region of the long arm of the NOR-bearing chromosomes. Although most Curimatidae species have been characterized by homogeneous karyotypes, isolated populations could be established under different environmental conditions leading to karyotype micro-structure variations specially related to the NORs localization and C-banding distribution. The obtained data were useful for the cytogenetic characterization and differentiation of S. insculpta and C. modesta and could be used in evolutionary inferences in the Curimatidae group. PMID:17876445

  9. Alkaline comet assay for genotoxic effect detection in neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus (Pisces, Curimatidae).

    PubMed

    Simoniello, M F; Gigena, F; Poletta, G; Loteste, A; Kleinsorge, E; Campana, M; Scagnetti, J; Parma, M J

    2009-08-01

    Toxicants on fish may induce genetic alterations that can be used as genotoxic markers. We evaluated DNA damage using alkaline comet assay applied on erythrocytes after in vivo exposure of Prochilodus lineatus to different concentrations of Cypermethrin (0.300, 0.150, 0.075 and 0.000 microg/L) as a probable chemical mutagen. The results revealed a significantly higher level of DNA damage at all concentrations of Cypermethrin tested compared to control and background level (p < 0.05). We have standardized the technique for one of the most common native fish species that will be useful for biomonitoring genotoxicity in polluted waters of the region. PMID:19466374

  10. Comparative cytogenetic studies of Curimatidae (Pisces, Characiformes) from the middle Paraná River (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Brassesco, M S; Pastori, M C; Roncati, H A; Fenocchio, A S

    2004-01-01

    Almost all species of the Curimatidae family have a stable karyotype, with a diploid number of 54 metacentric (M) and submetacentric (SM) chromosomes, and one sole nucleolus organizer pair. This family has considerable specific diversity in Argentinean fluvial basins; however, no cytogenetic data are available. Eight species from the Paraná River (Argentina): Cyphocharax voga, C. spilotus, C. platanus, Steindachnerina brevipinna, S. conspersa, Curimatella dorsalis, Psectrogaster curviventris, and Potamorhina squamoralevis were analyzed cytogenetically. Chromosome preparations were obtained from direct samples and through cell culture, and they were processed for conventional, C- and nucleolar organizer region-banding. Six of the species exhibited the standard family karyotype, with 2n = 54 M-SM and fundamental number of chromosomes (FN) = 108, as well as variations in the chromosome formula, and in heterochromatic and nucleolar organizer regions. Though nucleolar organizer regions were located on only one chromosome pair, they varied in both carrier chromosomes and pairs involved. On the other hand, C. platanus showed a complement of 2n = 58 M-SM and subtelocentric with FN = 116, and P. squamoralevis presented 2n = 102, with some M-SM and a large number of acrocentric chromosomes. Even though the karyotype macrostructure appears to be conserved, the speciation process within the family has been accompanied by micro-structural rearrangements, as evidenced by pattern diversity in the heterochromatin and nucleolar organizer regions. Some changes in chromosome macrostructure have also occurred in this group, primarily in C. platanus and P. squamoralevis, in which there have been centric dissociations and inversions. PMID:15266401

  11. Application of the comet assay in erythrocytes of Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces): A methodological comparison

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The present study applied the comet assay to erythrocytes of Oreochromis niloticus with the aim of improving protocols to detect DNA damage in these cells, by using two distinct pHs (pH = 12.1 and pH > 13) and evaluating whether there is a correspondence between silver and ethidium bromide staining. Comets were visually examined and, the frequency of cells with and without damage was obtained, as well as the distribution of classes and scores. By using the Kruskal-Wallis test, our results revealed that pH 12.1 is more effective, although both pHs can be used. Our findings also suggest that silver staining can substitute ethidium bromide, an expensive and highly toxic stain that requires specific equipment for examination. PMID:21637662

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of the sixblotch hind Cephalopholis sexmaculata (Pisces: Perciformes).

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sheng-Tai; Chen, Kao-Sung; Tseng, Chen-Te; Wu, Chi-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitogenome of the sixblotch hind, Cephalopholis sexmaculata was presented in this study. This mitochondrial genome consists of 16,589 bp, with 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a noncoding control region (CR), and its gene arrangement is identical to most vertebrates. The overall base composition of the heavy strand is A, 29.35%; G, 16.08%; C, 28.56%; and T, 26.01%. The COI gene started with GTG codon and the ATP6 gene started with CTG codon. The complete mitogenomic data may provide informative for further phylogenetic approach of species of Cephalopholis and related genera belong to the Epinephelidae groupers. PMID:24938086

  13. [Citogenetic characterization of the tropical freshwater fish Parachromis managuensis (Pisces: Cichlidae)].

    PubMed

    Arias-Rodríguez, Lenin; Páramo-Delgadillo, Salomón; Durán-González, Alicia de la Luz

    2006-03-01

    To describe the cytogenetics of the jaguar cichlid fish Parachromis managuensis, we collected eight males and 13 females in Villahermosa, Tabasco, México. The specimens were processed with standard cytogenetic techniques (slightly modified), and high quality fields of chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis were obtained; 14 of these fields were analyzed by meristics and statistics methods. The specimens presented a diploid modal number of 2n = 48 chromosomes, which is similar to the number reported for others Central American cichlids; five pairs were submetacentric-metacentrics (biarmed) and 19 were subtelocentric-telocentric (uni-armed), giving a fundamental number (NF) of 58. The haploid number was confirmed by counting meiotic fields in metaphase I. There was not evidence of heteromorphism: sexual chromosomes were not identifiable. PMID:18457172

  14. Wallaceochromis gen. nov, a new chromidotilapiine cichlid genus (Pisces: Perciformes) from West Africa.

    PubMed

    Lamboj, Anton; Trummer, Franziska; Metscher, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    A new genus, Wallaceochromis, is described for the chromidotilapiine cichlids of the Pelvicachromis humilis group. It differs from Pelvicachromis sensu stricto in the number and arrangement of tubular infraorbitals, a straighter and sloping dorsal head profile with a low supraoccipital crest, higher abdominal vertebral counts (14-15 vs. 13-14), and in displaying a pattern of vertical bars on the body in several behavioral situations. PMID:27470842

  15. Spawning Behavior, Egg Development, Larvae and Juvenile Morphology of Hyphessobrycon eques (Pisces: Characidae) Characidae Fishes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Kim, Na-Ri; Han, Kyeong-Ho; Han, Ji-Hyeong; Son, Maeng-Hyun; Cho, Jae-Kwon

    2014-12-01

    Hyphessobrycon eques is a famous fish for ornamental fish market and aquarium. They are inhabit in regions of Amazon and Paraguay River basin. Serpae fishs were investigated 2-3 males are chased to female, and then males attempted to simulate the females abdomen. After fertilization, eggs were kept in incubators at 28°C. The fertilized eggs had adhesive and demesal characteristics and had a mean diameter of 0.92 ± 0.01 mm. Larvae hatched at 16 hrs post fertilization. The hatched larvae averaged 2.90 ± 0.16 mm in total length (LT ). Complete yolk sac resorption and mouth opening occurred on the third day post hatching. At 45 days post hatching, the larvae were 12.5 ± 1.60 mm LT and had reached the juvenile stage. PMID:25949194

  16. A trophic ecology of two grenadier species (Macrouridae, Pisces) in deep waters of the Southwest Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptikhovsky, V. V.

    2005-08-01

    The feeding habits of slope-dwelling macrourid fishes from the southern Southwest Atlantic is unknown. In this study the feeding ecology of the two most abundant species, Macrourus carinatus and M. holotrachys, was investigated. Both these grenadiers fed on a variety of prey, including gelatinous plankton, crustaceans, mesopelagic and benthic fish and cephalopods, echinoderms, as well as fishery discards. M. carinatus forage mostly in depths shallower than 900 m and its feeding spectrum and hunting strategy display important seasonal variability. It consumes more pelagic fish, squid and crustaceans than M. holotrachys, which probably indicates occasional feeding in the water column and higher availability of pelagic prey. M. holotrachys forages mostly in depths deeper than 1100 m and is a specialised bottom feeder. Macrourids are able to switch their feeding strategy from browsing on abundant food sources in summer and autumn (a narrow niche breadth and high number of prey per stomach) to hunting occasional prey in winter and spring (a wide niche breadth, low number of prey per stomach). Both species are of similar size and hard to distinguish morphologically, but in deep water M. holotrachys males are smaller than, and females larger than, those of M. carinatus. A probable reason for such energy re-distribution within a population in M. holotrachys is to achieve a higher reproductive output in a food-poor and harsh deep-sea environment.

  17. Slingshot feeding of the goblin shark Mitsukurina owstoni (Pisces: Lamniformes: Mitsukurinidae).

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Tomita, Taketeru; Suda, Kenta; Sato, Keiichi; Ogimoto, Keisuke; Chappell, Anthony; Sato, Toshihiko; Takano, Katsuhiko; Yuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Five striking and prey capture events of two goblin sharks were videotaped at sea for the first time, showing their extraordinary biting process. The goblin sharks swung their lower jaw downward and backward to attain a huge gape and then rapidly protruded the jaws forward a considerable distance. The jaws were projected at a maximum velocity of 3.1 m/s to 8.6-9.4% of the total length of the shark, which is by far the fastest and greatest jaw protrusion among sharks. While the jaws were being retracted, the mouth opened and closed again, which was considered a novel feeding event for sharks. Phylogenetic evidence suggested that their feeding behavior has evolved as an adaptation to food-poor deep-sea environments, possibly as a trade-off for the loss of strong swimming ability. PMID:27282933

  18. Nematode larvae infecting Priacanthus arenatus Cuvier, 1829 (Pisces: Teleostei) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kuraiem, Bianca P; Knoff, Marcelo; Felizardo, Nilza N; Gomes, Delir C; Clemente, Sérgio C São

    2016-05-31

    From July to December, 2013, thirty Priacanthus arenatus specimens commercialized in the cities of Niterói and Rio de Janeiro, State of Rio de Janeiro, were acquired. The fish were necropsied and filleted to investigate the presence of nematode larvae. Twenty fish (66.7%) out of the total were parasitized by nematode larvae. A total of 2024 larvae were collected; among them, 30 third-instar larvae of Anisakis sp. showed prevalence (P) = 20%, mean abundance (MA) = 1, and the mean intensity (MI) = 5, and infection sites (IS) = caecum, stomach, liver, and mesentery; and 1,994 third-instar larvae (1,757 encysted and 237 free) of Hysterothylacium deardorffoverstreetorum with P = 66.7%, MA = 66.5, and MI = 99.7, and IS = spleen, caecum, stomach, liver, mesentery, and abdominal muscle. This is the first study to report H. deardorffoverstreetorum and Anisakis sp. larvae parasitizing P. arenatus. PMID:27254444

  19. Biochemistry, physiology, and ecology of bioluminescence in Porichthys notatus (Pisces: batrachoididae)

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    The minute quantities of Vargula luciferin required to establish long-lasting bioluminescence capability in Puget Sound Porichthys has raised questions concerning the mechanism of luminescence induction. To address these question, a small, known quantity of Vargula luciferin was fed to nonluminescent Puget Sound Porichthys and after monitoring the subsequent light output over a two-year period, it was determined that more light was emitted than could be accounted for by the ingested luciferin. Thus, Porichthys is able to turn over luciferin either by recycling or de novo synthesis. To distinguish between these possibilities, /sup 14/C-labeled luciferin was synthesized and fed to nonluminescent Porichthys. Luciferin recovered from the photophores showed no change in specific activity, demonstrating that incorporation of undiluted Vargula luciferin is sufficient to establish bioluminescence capability in the fish, which is then sustained by recycling of luciferin. Porichthys possesses a specialized mechanism for taking up luciferin from the gut-but shows no apparent specific adaptation for transport of luciferin in the blood. Binding of luciferin to erythrocytes and plasma components greatly retarded the rate of luciferin autoxidation, but appeared to be a nonspecific property of fish blood.

  20. Spawning seasons of Rasbora tawarensis (Pisces: Cyprinidae) in Lake Laut Tawar, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rasbora tawarensis is an endemic freshwater fish in Lake Laut Tawar, Aceh Province, Indonesia. Unfortunately, its status is regarded as critical endangered with populations decreasing in recent years. To date no information on the spawning activities of the fish are available. Therefore, this study provides a contribution to the knowledge on reproductive biology of R. tawarensis especially on spawning seasons as well as basic information for conservation of the species. Methods Monthly sampling was conducted from April 2008 to March 2009 by using selective gillnets. The gonadosomatic index, size composition and sex ratio were assessed. The gonadal development was evaluated based on macroscopic and microscopic examinations of the gonads. Results The gonadosomatic index (GSI) varied between 6.65 to 18.16 in female and 4.94 to 8.56 for male. GSI of the female R. tawarensis was higher in March, September and December indicating the onset of reproductive seasons, the GSI and oocyte size being directly correlated with gonadal development stages. Although, a greater proportion of mature male than female was detected during the study, the sex ratio showed that the overall number of female was higher than male. The ovaries had multiple oocyte size classes at every stage of gonadal development, thus R. tawarensis can be classified as a group synchronous spawner or a fractional multiple spawner. Conclusion The spawning seasons of R. tawarensis were three times a year and September being the peak of the reproductive season and the female was the predominant sex. This species is classified as a group synchronous spawner. PMID:20482777

  1. Blood cell lineage in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus (Pisces: Petromyzontidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piavis, George W.; Hiatt, James L.

    1971-01-01

    Blood cell types of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, are described and identified and the lineage of mature circulating cells in peripheral blood is traced to blast cells in the hematopoietic fat body. The fat body appears to be the phylogenetic precursor of bone marrow in higher forms, since blood cells originate and begin maturation in this tissue. Experimental animals were injected first with a hematopoietic stimulant and then (at an experimentally determined time) with pertussis vaccine to release proliferated blood cells into peripheral blood. Peripheral blood for smears was collected by cardiac exsanguination; hematopoietic tissue was extirpated for imprints; and leucocyte preparations were made by a special technique. Blood cells of the sea lamprey are apparently products of at least four distinct blast cells, each of which has a 'one end' maturation process. Results of this investigation support the polyphyletic theory of blood cell formation.

  2. Identification of Bacterial Specialists in Hosts belonging to Aves, Mammalia, and Pisces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Only a portion of bacteria found in animal guts are able to establish specific associations within animal hosts. Taxa that have formed these specialized relationships may have played a prominent role in host evolution and may also contribute significantly to current host physiolo...

  3. INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURE ON SEX-RATIOS IN THE TIDEWATER SILVERSIDE, 'MENIDIA PENINSULAE' (PISCES: ATHERINIDAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sex-ratios of Menidia peninsulae from Santa Rosa Island, Florida were studied during a 13 month survey. Weekly samples revealed significant deviations from the expected sex-ratio of 1:1. During May-October, young-of-the-year (YOY) females comprised 70 to 94% of the individual...

  4. REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY OF THE TIDEWATER SILVERSIDE, 'MENIDIA PENINSULAE' (PISCES: ATHERINIDAE) FROM SANTA ROSA ISLAND, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reproductive ecology of the tidewater silverside, Menidia peninsulae, was studied during February 1982 through February 1983 along the shoreline of Santa Rosa Island, Florida. Adult Menidia were observed at low tide spawning on a red alga, Ceramium byssoideum, which was growi...

  5. Methods for design and evaluation of integrated hardware-software systems for concurrent computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Research activities and publications are briefly summarized. The major tasks reviewed are: (1) VAX implementation of the PISCES parallel programming environment; (2) Apollo workstation network implementation of the PISCES environment; (3) FLEX implementation of the PISCES environment; (4) sparse matrix iterative solver in PSICES Fortran; (5) image processing application of PISCES; and (6) a formal model of concurrent computation being developed.

  6. [Trophic and reproductive ecology of Trichomycterus calietes and Astrtoblepus cyclopus (pisces: Siluriformes) in Quindio River, Upper Cauca, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Román-Valencia, C

    2001-06-01

    The trophic and reproductive ecology of catfish (Trichomycterus caliense and Astroblepus cyclopus) was studied in the Quindio River upper Basin, Alto Cauca, Colombia. The pH was neutral, water oxygen content high (8.4 ppm) and temperature in the habitats was 18.63 degrees C; both species are nonmigratory and sympatric with four other fish species. The ovaries mature primarily between May and September in T. caliense; between December and May in A. cyclopus. The mean size at maturity is 8.3 cm (standard length) in T. caliense and 6.0 cm (standard length) in A. cyclopus; the sex ratio is 1:1 in T. caliense (X2 = 3.4, P > or = 0.05) and in A. cyclopus (X2 = 1.44, P > or = 0.1); the fecundity is low (191 and 113 oocytes respectively) and the eggs are small (1.5 and 2.39 mm respectively). The fishes are insectivorous and specialize in Coleoptera, Diptera and Trichoptera; Spearman Rank Correlation Coefficients (rs = 0.464) indicated that there are differences (T = 2.5148, P < 0.01) between their diets; both taxa did not agree with the expected trophic habits for sympatric species that are morphologically similar and related in the same trophic level. PMID:11935917

  7. Egg Development and Early Life History of Korean Endemic Species Korean Spotted Sleeper, Odontobutis interrupta (Pisces: Odontobutidae).

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Han, Kyeong-Ho; Kim, Na-Ri; Yoo, Dong-Jae; Yun, Seong-Min; Han, Ji-Hyeong

    2014-12-01

    The egg development and early life history of Korean spotted sleeper, Odontobutis interrupta which is Korean endemic species from Sora-choen was investigated. The Korean spotted sleeper were caught at Sora-myeon, Yeosu-si, Jeollanamdo, from Korea at May in 2014. The fertilized eggs were 4.23 ± 0.05 mm in long diameter and had oil globules. Hatching time of the embryo began about 442 hr 14 min after fertilization under water temperature of 19.5°C. The newly hatched larvae were 4.27 ± 0.35 mm in total length and their anus were not yet opened. 3 days after hatching postlarvae was measured 6.20 ± 0.11 mm in total length. 10 days after hatching postlarvae was measured 6.69 ± 0.14 mm in total length. PMID:25949196

  8. Morphological characteristics of otoliths for Dussumieria acuta and Dussumieria elopsoides (Pisces: Clupeidae) from the Northern Oman Sea.

    PubMed

    Homayuni, Hanie; Marjani, Mohsen; Mousavi-Sabet, Hamed

    2013-06-01

    Otolith shape were investigated to identify two species of genus Dussumieria inhabiting the northern Oman Sea, south of Iran. The main aim of the investigation was to analyze otolith shape differences between these species. The sagittal otoliths of the rainbow sardine Dussumieria acuta Valenciennes, 1847, and the slender rainbow sardine Dussumieria elopsoides Bleeker, 1849, belonging to different length groups were described. The results showed two groups of special characteristics of the sagittal otoliths in D. acuta, and D. elopsoides. The first group is the characteristics that are useful to separate these species from other clupeid species, however these characteristics are closely related to one another in these species of Dussumieria genus. The second group comprises characteristics that vary due to genetically guided mechanisms and biological factors, but that may be useful to define species and are species-specific. PMID:23721471

  9. Galaxitaenia toloi n. gen., n. sp. (Eucestoda: Pseudophyllidea) from Galaxias platei (Pisces: Osmeriformes, Galaxiidae), in the Patagonian region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gil de Pertierra, Alicia A; Semenas, Liliana G

    2005-08-01

    Galaxitaenia n. gen. (Eucestoda: Pseudophyllidea) is proposed to accommodate Galaxitaenia toloi n. gen., n. sp. from Galaxias platei, a freshwater fish inhabiting Andean lakes in Argentine Patagonia. Galaxitaenia belongs to the Triaenophoridae because it possesses a marginal genital pore, a ventral uterine pore, and a follicular vitelline gland. The new genus can be distinguished from other triaenophorids by the following combination of characters: a scolex with a prominent rectangular apical disc without hooks, grooves, or indentations; neck present; segments wider than long to quadrangular; testes in 2 lateral fields, often connected anteriorly; cirrus unarmed; an ovary situated posteriorly; a vagina posterior to the cirrus sac; vitelline follicles medullary, in 2 ventral fields forming 2 wings interrupted medially; a uterus saccate to branched; and eggs without operculum. The types, distribution, and density of microtriches were analyzed on the surface of the tegument of scolex, neck, and immature segments. The presence of tumuli were observed on the apical disc of the scolex. Galaxitaenia toloi n. sp. is the first triaenophorid species recorded in a South American freshwater fish and the fourth helminth parasitizing the intestine of G. platei. PMID:17089762

  10. Parasitic community of Fransciscodoras marmoratus (Reinhardt, 1874) (Pisces: Siluriformes, Doradidae) from the upper São Francisco River, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, M D; Brasil-Sato, M C

    2006-08-01

    One hundred and thirteen specimens of Franciscodoras marmoratus (Reinhardt, 1874) were collected in the upper São Francisco River (18 degrees 12' 32" S, 45 degrees 15' 41" W, state of Minas Gerais) between September, 1999 and January, 2004 to investigate their parasite fauna. From this total, 45 (39.8%) were afflicted by at least one parasite species. The parasitic richness consisted of six species represented by Hirudinea (n = 20), Monogenoidea (n = 25), Eucestoda (n = 55), Nematoda (n = 1, n = 2) and Acanthocephala (n = 41) found in the dry and wet periods making a total of 144 specimens. Proteocephalus renaudi Chambrier & Vaucher, 1994 was the only species with prevalence higher than 10% and a typical aggregate distribution pattern. The prevalence, intensity and abundance of P. renaudi were not influenced by the total length or sex of the hosts or by the collection periods. The relative condition factor indicated that the health of the P. renaudi hosts was not significantly affected in relation to fish not infected by parasites. The fish stocked in tanks before necropsy were opportunistically infested by Lernaea cyprinacea Yashuv, 1959. The various parasites found indicate that F. marmoratus is omnivorous and a potential definitive host. The parasite species, except for Acanthocephala, have expanded their known geographic distribution to the São Francisco River Basin. The parasite community was considered isolationist because of the low endoparasite diversity, infrapopulations with low intensity, lack of evidence of parasite interactions and sparse signs of parasite aggression against their hosts. PMID:17119841

  11. Egg Development of the Ussurian Bullhead Fish, Leiocassis ussuriensis (Pisces: Bagridae) and Morphological Development of Its Larvae and Juveniles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Min; Yim, Hu-Sun; Lee, Yong-Sik; Kim, Heung-Yun; Han, Kyeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study was examined the ovogenesis of Ussurian bullhead, Leiocassis ussuriensis and the morphological development of its larvae and juveniles and to use the results as basic information for the preservation of species and resource enhancement. For artificial egg collection, human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) was injected at a rate of 10 IU per gram of fish weight. During breeding period, water temperature maintained at 24.5~26.5°C (mean 25.0±0.05°C). The process of ovogenesis reached the two-cell stage in 50 minutes after fertilization. In 73 hours of fertilization the movement of the embryoid body became active state and the larvae began to hatch from the tail through the oolemma. Length of prelarvae were 6.33~6.50 mm long (mean 6.40±0.06 mm) just after hatching having yolk with their mouth not opened. After thirty eight days of hatching, juveniles were 30.6∼32.5 mm long (mean 31.5±0.65 mm). The color was dark yellowish brown throughout the entire body, and the number of caudal fin rays developed to thirty six perfectly. PMID:26973970

  12. Helminth parasites of the oceanic horse mackerel Trachurus picturatus Bowdich 1825 (Pisces: Carangidae) from Madeira Island, Atlantic Ocean, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Costa, G; Melo-Moreira, E; Pinheiro de Carvalho, M A A

    2012-09-01

    The helminth parasite fauna of the oceanic horse mackerel Trachurus picturatus Bowdich 1825, caught off the Madeira Islands was composed of six different taxa. Prevalence and abundance of larval Anisakis sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) and Nybelinia lingualis (Trypanorhyncha: Tentaculariidae), the most common parasite taxa, were 24.3%, 0.9 and 37.9%, 0.7, respectively. Bolbosoma vasculosum (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) and the monogeneans Heteraxinoides atlanticus (Monogenea: Heteraxinidae) and Pseudaxine trachuri (Monogenea: Gastrocotylidae) were comparatively rare. The depauperate helminth fauna of the oceanic horse mackerel at Madeira compared to other geographical regions of the north-eastern Atlantic, namely the Azores banks and the West African coast, may be attributed to the paucity of nutrients off oceanic islands and to a low density of the fish population. PMID:21875447

  13. Growth of the Pacific jack Caranx caninus (Pisces: Carangidae) from the coast of Colima, México.

    PubMed

    Barr, Elaine Espino; Cabello, Manuel Gallardo; Solis, Esther Guadalupe Cabral; Boa, Arturo Garcia; Gómez, Marcos Puente

    2008-03-01

    The Pacific jack Caranx caninus is a common species fished by artisanal fishermen off the coast of Colima, México. During 2002, monthly samples of morphometric data and otoliths were taken to determine age and growth. Seven age groups were identified. The highest growth, 14.4 cm, takes place during the first year of life. During the second year, C caninus grows 11.76 cm; the third year 9.61 cm; the fourth 7.85 cm; the fifth 6.41 cm and sixth year 5.24 cm. The constants of von Bertalanffy's growth equation were: L(infinity) = 83.26 cm, W(infinity) = 18.138 g, K = 0.202, t(0) = -0.283 and A(0.95) = 15 years. Growth curves of other species of the same genus were calculated in order to compare them with the one obtained in the present work. The gonadosomatic index presented higher values during November and May. The periods of more intensive feeding are from August to February. PMID:18624235

  14. Epinephelus geoffroyi (Klunzinger, 1870) (Pisces: Serranidae), a valid species of grouper endemic to the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden.

    PubMed

    Randall, John E; Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Krupp, Friedhelm; Rose, Jean Michel; Fricke, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The grouper Epinephelus geoffioyi (Klunzinger), type locality Red Sea, previously regarded as a synonym of E. chlorostigma (Valenciennes) is recognized as a valid species. It is differentiated from E. chlorostigma by having 25-29 (modally 27) gill rakers vs. 23-26 (modally 24), a more angular anal fin, the dark spots on the abdomen more widely separated, and lacking a clear white margin posteriorly on the caudal fin. The missing holotype of E. geoffroyi was found at the Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart (SMNS 233, 191 mm). Epinephelits chlorostigma is wide-ranging from the Gulf of Aden and east coast of Africa to Samoa; it is reported from the depth range of 32-280 m. Epinephelus geoffroyi is presently known only from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden at depths of 3-32 m. Illustrations are provided for three other species of groupers with numerous small dark spots, E. areolatus (Forsskål), E. gabriellae Randall & Heemstra, and E. polylepis Randall & Heemstra, that are, or might be, sympatric with E. geoffroyi. PMID:26287104

  15. Integrative taxonomy of Anisakidae and Raphidascarididae (Nematoda) in Paralichthys patagonicus and Xystreurys rasile (Pisces: Teleostei) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Michelle Cristie Gonçalves da; Knoff, Marcelo; Felizardo, Nilza Nunes; Di Azevedo, Maria Isabel N; Torres, Eduardo José Lopes; Gomes, Delir Corrêa; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo; São Clemente, Sérgio Carmona de

    2016-10-17

    Thirty-six Paralichthys patagonicus and 30 Xystreurys rasile were collected in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to investigate the presence of anisakid and raphidascaridid nematodes. Anisakis typica, Terranova sp., Contracaecum sp., Hysterothylacium deardorffoverstreetorum, and Raphidascaris sp. were identified using integrative taxonomy of morphological and genetic data. Morphological and morphometric analysis was conducted using bright field microscopy with scanning electron microscopy for topographic characterization of the cuticular surface. Phylogenetic analysis, using ITS and cox2 molecular targets, clearly demonstrated the species identification of A. typica and H. deardorffoverstreetorum and the high diversity of H. deardorffoverstreetorum. This is the first report of A. typica, H. deardorffoverstreetorum, and Raphidascaris sp. parasitizing P. patagonicus and X. rasile. PMID:27491056

  16. Morphological biomarkers in Prochilodus lineatus (pisces, prochilodontidae) for environmental impact assessment in the region of the Baixada Maranhense, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantas, Janaína Gomes; Andrade, Ticianne de Sousa de Oliveira Mota; Sodré, Camilla Fernanda Lima; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Carvalho-Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes; Junior, Audálio Rebelo Torres

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to identify the types of histopathological lesions found in gills of Prochilodus lineatus of the Environmental Protection Area of the Baixada Maranhense region (Brazil). Fish were collected in Mearim river. Sampling took place in October, November and December 2014. We have purchased 30 samples of fish from local fishermen. In the laboratory fish gills were removed, and then fixed in 10% formalin solution and kept into alcohol 70% to the usual histological processing. The tissue was performed by light microscopy and findings were photomicrographed in light microscope - ZEIS. The following lesions were identified: epithelial displacement, the marginal channel shift a start vascular congestion, hyperplasia and merging multiple slides; epithelial disruption, edema, vascular congestion, total fusion of lamellae and disorganization of secondary lamellae. These changes express a response of the body to some xenobiontes. Morphological changes in the gills may represent adaptive strategies for conservation of some biological functions when animals are facing changes in the water quality.

  17. Micronucleus frequency and hematologic index in Colossoma macropomum (Pisces, Ariidae) for environmental impact assessment at a protected area in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2014-10-01

    This study used micronucleus assays and erythrocyte indices in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in the Environmental Protection Area at Maracanã, São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations within the protected area, Serena Lagoon and Ambude River, on four occasions. Biometric data (length and weight) and an aliquot of blood were collected from each fish for analysis. Erythrocyte indices including: mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were calculated, and blood samples were examined for micronuclei and nuclear morphological changes. Micronuclei were found in fish from both locations, although the frequency was higher in fish from Ambude River. Nuclear morphological changes were identified only in fish collected from Ambude River. Several nuclear morphological changes were found in erythrocytes stained with Giemsa, including: micronuclei and binucleate nuclei. On average, erythrocyte indices were lower in fish collected from Ambude River than in those from Serena Lagoon. Our results indicate that micronuclei and erythrocyte indices can be used in C. macropomum as indicators of environmental health.

  18. Redescription and genetic characterization of Cucullanus dodsworthi (Nematoda: Cucullanidae) from the checkered puffer Sphoeroides testudineus (Pisces: Tetraodontiformes).

    PubMed

    Mejía-Madrid, Hugo H; Aguirre-Macedo, María Leopoldina

    2011-08-01

    Cucullanus dodsworthi Barreto, 1922 was originally described from the checkered puffer fish, Sphoeroides testudineus (Linnaeus), from Brazilian waters. New material of this nematode species was recovered from the same type host species from Mexican waters off the Yucatán Peninsula. This material was compared with Brazilian specimens. Although Mexican material closely resembles the original description of C. dodsworthi in general appearance, previously undescribed characters, as observed by light and scanning electron microscopy, are described for the first time in this species from both Brazilian and Mexican specimens. These characters include lateral body alae or conspicuous lateral fields that begin in the cervical region and end anterior to first pair of adcloacal papillae in males and at the anus level in females, cephalic and caudal alae absent; presence of pseudobuccal capsule with simple buccal frame well sclerotized with dorsal arrow structures, lateral structures, and lateral reniform structures; deirids, excretory pore, and postdeirids; slight anal protuberance in both sexes, unpaired precloacal papilla in males, phasmids near pair 10 in males and near tail tip in females; female with protruding vulvar lips and smooth eggs. In the absence of better descriptions of this genus, it can be concluded that C. dodsworthi is the only species of marine Cucullanus from the Americas that possesses lateral body alae. Molecular characterization of C. dodsworthi with SSU (18S) and ITS2 rDNA genes is included. A preliminary genetic comparison between SSU rDNA of C. dodsworthi , Truttaedacnitis truttae (Fabricius, 1794), and Dichelyne mexicanus Caspeta-Mandujano, Moravec and Salgado-Maldonado, 1999 places C. dodsworthi as a putative sister taxon to T. truttae . The finding of C. dodsworthi in Mexican marine waters also represents a new geographical record. PMID:21506838

  19. Molecular phylogeny of the families Pleuronectidae and Poecilopsettidae (PISCES, Pleuronectiformes) from Korea, with a Proposal for a new classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hwan-Sung; Kim, Jin-Koo; Kim, Byung-Jik

    2016-03-01

    A new classification of the Korean pleuronectids was proposed based on a molecular phylogeny using specimens collected from Korea (including some Japanese specimens) between 2008 and 2013. A molecular phylogeny based on partial sequences of the two mitochondrial DNA regions (COI and 16S rRNA) supported the reciprocal monophyly of the three genera, Cleisthenes, Pleuronectes and Pseudopleuronectes. We also found that the genus Poecilopsetta is clearly distinct from Pleuronectidae at the family level. Therefore, the previous classification of the Korean pleuronectids should be changed as follows; two families (Pleuronectidae and Poecilopsettidae), 18 genera, and 26 species. Further research is required to resolve the taxonomic uncertainty of the five species in the genus Limanda, which clustered into two clades in our analysis.

  20. Pressure and pain In Systemic sclerosis/Scleroderma - an evaluation of a simple intervention (PISCES): randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Foot problems associated with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)/Scleroderma have been reported to be both common and disabling. There are only limited data describing specifically, the mechanical changes occurring in the foot in SSc. A pilot project conducted in preparation for this trial confirmed the previous reports of foot related impairment and reduced foot function in people with SSc and demonstrated a link to mechanical etiologies. To-date there have been no formal studies of interventions directed at the foot problems experienced by people with Systemic Sclerosis. The primary aim of this trial is to evaluate whether foot pain and foot-related health status in people with Systemic Sclerosis can be improved through the provision of a simple pressure-relieving insole. Methods The proposed trial is a pragmatic, multicenter, randomised controlled clinical trial following a completed pilot study. In four participating centres, 140 consenting patients with SSc and plantar foot pain will be randomised to receive either a commercially available pressure relieving and thermally insulating insole, or a sham insole with no cushioning or thermal properties. The primary end point is a reduction in pain measured using the Foot Function Index Pain subscale, 12 weeks after the start of intervention. Participants will complete the primary outcome measure (Foot Function Index pain sub-scale) prior to randomisation and at 12 weeks post randomisation. Secondary outcomes include participant reported pain and disability as derived from the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Questionnaire and plantar pressures with and without the insoles in situ. Discussion This trial protocol proposes a rigorous and potentially significant evaluation of a simple and readily provided therapeutic approach which, if effective, could be of a great benefit for this group of patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN02824122 PMID:22309847

  1. Seasonal patterns in metazoan parasite community of the "Fat Sleeper" Dormitator latifrons (Pisces: Eleotridae) from Tres Palos Lagoon, Guerrero, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Violante-González, Juan; Rojas-Herrera, Agustín; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina

    2008-09-01

    Dormitator is among the most important fish genera in the Mexican Pacific coastal lagoon systems. In Tres Palos Lagoon, the Fat Sleeper Dormitator latifrons is one of the most significant species based on catch volume, although it is only consumed locally. Very little information exists on this species' parasitofauna. Composition and temporal variation in the metazoan parasite community structure of Dormitator latifrons from Tres Palos Lagoon (99 degrees 47' W, 16 degrees 48' N), Guerrero, Mexico, were determined using seasonal samples taken between April 2000 and June 2002. Ten parasite species (55 817 individuals) were recovered from 219 examined hosts. These species included eight helminths (Ascocotyle (Phagicola) longa, Echinochasmus leopoldinae, Clinostomum complanatum, Pseudoacanthostomum panamense, Saccocoelioides lamothei, Parvitaenia cochlearii, Contracaecum sp. and Neoechinorhynchus golvani) and two crustaceans (Argulus sp. and Ergasilus sp.). Five of the helminth species exhibited seasonal variation in their infection dynamics associated with environmental changes during the dry and rainy seasons. The variations in the infection dynamics generated changes in the community structure over time. PMID:19419054

  2. Reproduction, growth and vertical distribution of the meso- and bathypelagic fish Cyclothone atraria (Pisces: Gonostomatidae) in Sagami Bay, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miya, Masaki; Nemoto, Takahisa

    1987-09-01

    The life history and vertical distribution of the meso- and bathypelagic fish Cyclothone atraria (family Gonostomatidae) are described on the basis of about 9800 specimens taken during a series of 20 cruises from December 1982 to November 1985 at a station near the center of Sagami Bay, Central Japan. C. atraria does not undertake overall diel vertical migrations, being concentrated in the lower mesopelagic and bathypelagic zones below 400 m, with peak abundance at about 600 m both day and night. Spawning occurs mainly during the summer and early autumn. C. atraria releases about 500-3000 eggs at once and may spawn several times during its life span. Duration of the egg and larval stages is estimated to be about 6-7 months. C. atraria is protandrous, attaining male maturation in 3 years at about 25 mm standard length (SL) and attaining female maturation in 5-6 years at about 40 mm SL. Length-frequency analysis demonstrated that modal progressions could be followed until about 55 mm SL; however, no length mode that increases with time was observed at 30-35 mm SL, which corresponds to the size of sex reversal. Such modal indistinctness results from rapid growth of individual fishes set free from male breeding activity during protracted spawning season.

  3. Development of the islets, exocrine pancreas, and related ducts in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Morrison, Carol M; Pohajdak, Bill; Tam, Janet; Wright, James R

    2004-09-01

    Pancreatic development and the relationship of the islets with the pancreatic, hepatic, and bile ducts were studied in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, from hatching to the onset of maturity at 7 months. The number of islets formed during development was counted, using either serial sections or dithizone staining of isolated islets. There was a general increase in islet number with both age and size. Tilapia housed in individual tanks grew more quickly and had more islets than siblings of the same age left in crowded conditions. The pancreas is a compact organ in early development, and at 1 day posthatch (dph) a single principal islet, positive for all hormones tested (insulin, SST-14, SST-28, glucagon, and PYY), is partially surrounded by exocrine pancreas. However, the exocrine pancreas becomes more disseminated in older fish, following blood vessels along the mesenteries and entering the liver to form a hepatopancreas. The epithelium of the pancreatic duct system from the intercalated ducts to the main duct entering the duodenum was positive for glucagon and SST-14 in 8 and 16 dph tilapia. Individual insulin-immunopositive cells were found in one specimen. At this early stage in development, therefore, the pancreatic duct epithelial cells appear to be pluripotent and may give rise to the small islets found near the pancreatic ducts in 16-37 dph tilapia. Glucagon, SST-14, and some PPY-positive enteroendocrine cells were present in the intestine of the 8 dph larva and in the first part of the intestine of the 16 dph juvenile. Glucagon and SST-14-positive inclusions were found in the apical cytoplasm of the mid-gut epithelium of the 16 dph tilapia. These hormones may have been absorbed from the gut lumen, since they are produced in both the pancreatic ducts and the enteroendocrine cells. At least three hepatic ducts join the cystic duct to form the bile duct, which runs alongside the pancreatic duct to the duodenum. PMID:15281064

  4. Development of the embryo, larva and early juvenile of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae). Developmental staging system.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Koji; Okada, Norihiro

    2007-05-01

    We described the developmental stages for the embryonic, larval and early juvenile periods of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus to elucidate sequential events of craniofacial development. Craniofacial development of cichlids, especially differentiation and morphogenesis of the pharyngeal skeleton, progresses until about 30 days postfertilization (dpf). Because there is no comprehensive report describing the sequential processes of craniofacial development up to 30 dpf, we newly defined 32 stages using a numbered staging system. For embryonic development, we defined 18 stages (stages 1-18), which were grouped into seven periods named the zygote, cleavage, blastula, gastrula, segmentation, pharyngula and hatching periods. For larval development, we defined seven stages (stages 19-25), which were grouped into two periods, early larval and late larval. For juvenile development until 30 dpf, we defined seven stages (stages 26-32) in the early juvenile period. This developmental staging system for Nile tilapia O. niloticus will benefit researchers investigating skeletogenesis throughout tilapia ontogeny and will also facilitate comparative evolutionary developmental biology studies of haplochromine cichlids, which comprise the species flocks of Lakes Malawi and Victoria. PMID:17501907

  5. Gamma ionization of Phagicola longa (Trematoda:Heterophyidae) in Mugilidae (pisces) in São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, S. A.; Wiendl, F. M.; Almeida Dias, E. R.; Arthur, V.; Daniotti, C.

    1993-07-01

    The mullet (Mugilidae) is a fish caught in large quantities in brackish and marine waters of the southern Brazilian coast, which in consequence of its raw consumption as "sashimi", a typical Japanese dish, has led to ten cases of human infection by Phagicola longa in São Paulo, Brazil. The mullet acts as a second intermediate host for the parasite, as in human heterophysiasis in the Near and Far East. In order to control these infections under commercial storage conditions and in raw consumption, the radiolysis of P. longa was studied in three mullet species-the silver mullet ( Mugil curema), the grey mullet ( M. platanus) and the "paratipema" ( Mugil sp.) - subjected to ionization ranging from 1.0 to 10.0 kGy (2.21 kGy/h). It was observed that 1.0 and 2.0 kGy caused a motility decrease in silver mullet parasites from 100% to 15% and 17%, and that doses of 4.0 and 10.0 kGy caused metacercaria inviability. The parasite motility decreased in the grey mullet treated with doses of 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.5 kGy, from 56% to 31%, 9%, 18% and 5%, respectively, 4.0 kGy tending to be the control dose for P. longa. This dose also controls other metacercaria found in the "parati-pema", without changing the odor, color or appearance of the treated mullet.

  6. Brood discrimination, maturation, and population structure of the hairtail, Trichiurus Haumela (Pisces, Trichiuridae) in northern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bingzheng; Lu, Jiwu; Huang, Songfang

    1984-12-01

    Based upon analysis of the seasonal fluctuation of GSI (gonado-somatic index), the spawning period of the hairtail extends from April to October. The maximum time difference between the early and the late brood individuals is about half a year. It is possible to distinguish the early brood and the late brood on the basis of the diameter of the first ring, setting 1.32 mm as a border line. Therefore, the identification of the first ring was solved in dispute. The maturation stages can be identified on the basis of the macroscopical and microscopical characteristics of the ovary; i.e., immature (II-A, B), maturing (III-C, D, E, IV-F), mature (IV-G, V-H, VI-I) and recovering (VII-J). Maturation is completed in the course of one year from different brood seasons. The smallest size at first maturity in female was about 170 180 mm in length and 80 100 grams in weight. There were two discrete groups in autumn which shown the same population unit in which those individuals may separate temporarily into different groups of biological activities in certain period of their life. Fishing of hairtail has been greatly intensified, the population structure has been subject to a series of change. But the hairtail has relatively strong adaptability, so that its population can maintain a reasonable size despite the heavy fishing.

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of bocachico Prochilodus magdalenae (Pisces, Prochilodontidae) in the Magdalena River basin and its tributaries, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, Gilberto Orozco; Narváez Barandica, Juan C

    2014-03-01

    Prochilodus magdalenae is an endemic freshwater fish that occurs in the Magdalena, Sinú and Atrato hydrographic basins. It has an important economic role and is a food resource for the artisanal fishing communities. Its socioeconomic importance contrasts with the current status of its fisheries, where stocks are being depleted. Considering its importance and lack of information on its genetic structure, we used seven microsatellite markers to assess the genetic structure of wild populations of P. magdalenae. The genetic diversity was assessed and the population genetic structure was estimated through Fst, analysis of molecular variance and Bayesian analysis. A total of 290 alleles were found in all loci throughout all population. The high polymorphism contrasts with the levels of observed heterozygosity (Ho = 0.276), which are the lowest values recorded for the family. We found three populations of bocachico coexisting throughout the studied system, contradicting the hypothesis that freshwater migratory fish form panmictic populations. These results on the genetic structure of P. magdalenae constitute tools for a better understanding of the behavior and biology of this species, contributing to fish management and conservation programs. PMID:24688289

  8. Global metabolic response in the bile of pejerrey (Odontesthes bonariensis, Pisces) sublethally exposed to the pyrethroid cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Carriquiriborde, Pedro; Marino, Damián J; Giachero, Gabriela; Castro, Eduardo A; Ronco, Alicia E

    2012-02-01

    The metabolic profile of Odontesthes bonariensis and its global response to the insecticide cypermethrin were studied using HPLC-MS-based metabolomics. Three experiments using either juveniles or adults of O. bonariensis were performed by exposing fish (6, 24, or 96 h) to sublethal concentrations of cypermethrin (5 or 10 μg/L). Metabolic profiling was performed on either whole bile or aqueous and organic extracts. Chromatography was performed using a C18 column and an ACN/H₂O mobile phase. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interfaces were used in positive and negative modes. Full scan MS data were processed using the XCMS software, log-transformed, and analyzed using either regression analysis or principal component analysis (PCA). The highest amount of information (1163 peaks) was yielded by analyzing the whole bile with the ESI⁻ interface. Complementary information, useful for metabolite confirmation, was obtained from the aqueous and organic extracts and using the ESI⁺ and APCI interfaces. The bile metabolic profile of O. bonariensis was characterized by some abundant metabolite ions corresponding with taurine conjugated bile acids, which were useful as reference peaks. A characteristic global metabolic response to cypermethrin was identified in the bile of O. bonariensis. A ten-fold or higher variation in abundance was observed in the whole bile of exposed fish for a small group of peaks (32), and these peaks corresponded to an even smaller number of metabolites (nineteen). Both regression analysis and PCA were useful in identifying those peaks, better explaining differences between exposed and control groups, but slight differences were suggested by each of those methods. Using unsupervised PCA scores, we were able to distinguish organisms from each treatment on the basis of the metabolic changes induced by the cypermethrin, this variability being explained mainly by only one principal component (PC3, 17.7 percent total variance). Two cypermethrin metabolites were identified as major contributors within the augmented peaks: the known glucuronide of 4'-hydroxy-cypermethrin and the sulfate of 4'-hydroxycypermethrin, not previously reported in fish bile. The HPLC-MS-based metabolomic approach demonstrated to be a powerful ecotoxicological tool for identifying biological responses to pollutants, discovering new metabolic pathways and proposing specific biomarkers using non model organisms. PMID:21917314

  9. Egg Development and Early Life History of Korean Endemic Species Korean Spotted Sleeper, Odontobutis interrupta (Pisces: Odontobutidae)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Min; Han, Kyeong-Ho; Kim, Na-ri; Yoo, Dong-Jae; Yun, Seong-Min; Han, Ji-Hyeong

    2014-01-01

    The egg development and early life history of Korean spotted sleeper, Odontobutis interrupta which is Korean endemic species from Sora-choen was investigated. The Korean spotted sleeper were caught at Sora-myeon, Yeosu-si, Jeollanamdo, from Korea at May in 2014. The fertilized eggs were 4.23 ± 0.05 mm in long diameter and had oil globules. Hatching time of the embryo began about 442 hr 14 min after fertilization under water temperature of 19.5°C. The newly hatched larvae were 4.27 ± 0.35 mm in total length and their anus were not yet opened. 3 days after hatching postlarvae was measured 6.20 ± 0.11 mm in total length. 10 days after hatching postlarvae was measured 6.69 ± 0.14 mm in total length. PMID:25949196

  10. Pseudocapillaria yucatanensis sp. n. (Nematoda: Capillariidae) from the bagre Rhamdia guatemalensis (Pisces) from cenotes in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moravec, F; Scholz, T; Vivas Rodríguez, C

    1995-01-01

    A new nematode species, Pseudocapillaria yucatanensis sp. n., is described from the intestine of the freshwater pimelodid catfish Rhamdia guatemalensis (Günther) from cenotes (= sinkholes) in Yucatan, Mexico. It differs from other three related species parasitizing freshwater fishes mainly in possessing the spicule with a simple rim of its proximal end and a non-expanded distal end, in the length of the spicule (0.218-0.295 mm), and the size (0.050-0.060 x 0.025-0.030 mm), shape and structure of eggs, and also in the host types and geographical distribution. Pseudocapillaria yucatanensis is the first known autochtonous species of Pseudocapillaria parasitizing freshwater fishes in Mexico. PMID:9599428

  11. Redescription of Cheilinus quinquecinctus Rüppell, 1835 (Pisces: Perciformes, Labridae), a valid endemic Red Sea wrasse.

    PubMed

    Bogorodsky, Sergey V; Alpermann, Tilman J; Mal, Ahmad O

    2016-01-01

    The labrid fish Cheilinus quinquecinctus Rüppell, originally described from the Red Sea, has long been regarded as a junior synonym of C. fasciatus (Bloch). Herein, both nominal species are redescribed, based on examination of the types and additional material from the Red Sea (for C. quinquecinctus) and the Indo-West Pacific (for C. fasciatus). Rüppell's description of Cheilinus quinquecinctus was originally based on three syntypes, and the most representative adult specimen is designated as the lectotype. We show that Cheilinus quinquecinctus is restricted to the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, and it differs from the similar C. fasciatus in having modally fewer gill rakers on the first gill arch, a total of 13-16 (mean 13.9, usually 13 or 14 ) (vs. 13-16, mean 14.7, usually 14 or 15), in developing a ragged posterior margin of the caudal fin with age (versus only upper and lower caudal-fin lobes developing with age), and in its color pattern. The phylogenetic analysis of the COI barcoding region accords with the species status of C. quinquecinctus with the placement of the two sister species in two divergent and reciprocally monophyletic evolutionary lineages. A full description of C. quinquecinctus and diagnosis of C. fasciatus is provided here for comparison. In addition, the data include a table of the results of the meristic and morphological examination of type and additional specimens of both species from throughout their distribution ranges as well as a table of gill-raker counts of all examined specimens. Underwater color photographs are provided for comparison of juveniles, females and males of both species. PMID:27615897

  12. Embryonic and Morphological Development of Larvae and Juvenile of the Buenos Aires Tetra, Hyphessobrycon anisitsi (Pisces Characidae) Characidae Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Min; Han, Kyeong-Ho; Han, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We have launched an investigation for Embryonic Development, Larvae and Juvenile Morphology, of Buenos aires tetra in order to build basic data of Characidae and fish seeding production. We brought 50 couples of Characidae from Bizidduck aquarium in Yeosu-si, Jeollanamdo, from Korea on March of 2015. We put them in the tetragonal glass aquarium (50×50×30 cm). Breeding water temperature was 27.5~28.5°C (mean 28.0±0.05°C) and being maintained. The shape of fertilized egg was round shape, and it was adhesive demersal egg. The egg size was 0.63~0.91 mm (mean 0.74±0.07 mm, n=20). After getting fertilized egg, the developmental stage was gastrula stage, and embryo covered almost two-thirds of Yolk. Incubation was happened after 16 hours 13 minutes from gastrula stage, and the tail of juvenile came out first with tearing egg capsule. Immediately after the incubation, prelarvae had 3.78~3.88 mm length (mean 3.84±0.04 mm, n=5), and it had no mouth and anus yet. 34 days after hatching from the incubation, juvenile had 8.63~13.1 mm (mean 10.9±1.66 mm), and it had similar silver-colored body shape with its mother. PMID:25949207

  13. [Reproduction of the spiny puffer, Diodon holocanthus (Pisces: Diodontidae) in the continental shelf of Mexican Central Pacific].

    PubMed

    Lucano-Ramírez, Gabriela; Peña-Pérez, Edith; Ruiz-Ramírez, Salvador; Rojo-Vázquez, Jorge; González-Sansón, Gaspar

    2011-03-01

    Diodon holocanthus is an important economic and ecological species of the demersal fish community, caught as bycatch from local shrimp fishery. The reproductive biology of this long-spine porcupinefish has not yet been described, and reproductive season, the sex ratio, length distribution, length at first gonad maturity, and the gonad macro and microscopic features are described. A total of 400 organisms, ranging from 5.0 to 40.3 cm (average 18.4 cm) total length, were caught from the continental shelf of the Central Mexican Pacific, from December 1995 and December 1998. Sex ratio was 1:0.86 females to males (n = 253). The length at which 50% of the individuals showed maturing gonads was 19.7 cm for females and 20.1 cm for males. Length of the smallest organism with ripe gonads was 12.2 cm for females and 13 cm for males. Four gonadal maturation stages were found in both sexes, and five oocyte development phases were identified. The oocyte development pattern is of asynchronous type, which means the species can reproduce several times a year. Testicle development is lobular type, as in most teleost fishes. Monthly mean values of the gonad-somatic index suggest the reproduction activity peaks in June, and September-December. PMID:21516647

  14. A reappraisal of the evolution of Asian snakehead fishes (Pisces, Channidae) using molecular data from multiple genes and fossil calibration.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Eleanor A S; Hurwood, David A; Mather, Peter B

    2010-08-01

    Freshwater snakehead fishes (Channidae) provide an interesting target for phylogenetic analysis for the following reasons, their unusual biology, potential for cryptic diversity and availability of a good fossil record. Here, a multi-locus molecular phylogeny was constructed and calibrated using two fossil dates to estimate divergence times within the family. Sampling aimed to explore interspecific divergence of Channa species across Southeast Asia and intra-specific variation where species possessed natural geographical ranges that were extensive. Results contradict divergence times estimated previously independently from single locus mitochondrial data or the fossil record and suggest that after divergence from African taxa 40-50 Ma, evolution of Asian snakeheads has been heavily influenced by multiple broad scale dispersal events across India and Southeast Asia. A similar pattern of divergence within multiple clades suggests that west-east dispersal was limited for many taxa during the Miocene. Deep intra-specific divergence was inferred for C. striata, indicating that long historical periods of isolation ( approximately 8Ma) have not resulted in the evolution of reproductive isolation within this species. Results support suggestions that C. marulia like fishes in northern Cambodia may constitute an undescribed species, and that Indian C. diplogramma warrants taxonomic recognition as being distinct from Southeast Asian C. micropeltes, with the two taxa last sharing a common ancestor in the mid- to late-Miocene. PMID:20359539

  15. SPAWNING PERIODICITY OF THE INLAND SILVERSIDE MENIDIA BERYLLINA (PISCES: ATHERINIDAE) IN THE LABORATORY: RELATIONSHIP TO LUNAR CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reproductive periodicity of the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, was determined in laboratory experiments with two independent populations of fish. hese populations were maintained in a non-tidal environment for 85 days and the daily number of eggs produced was enumerate...

  16. Feeding ecology of the Stomiiformes (Pisces) of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. 1. The Sternoptychidae and Phosichthyidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmo, Vanda; Sutton, Tracey; Menezes, Gui; Falkenhaug, Tone; Bergstad, Odd Aksel

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive trophic studies in the vast mid-oceanic regions are rare compared to coastal and fisheries-oriented investigations. Field sampling conducted by the multidisciplinary, international Census of Marine Life project MAR-ECO, namely the 2004 G.O. Sars cruise, has generated one of the largest open ocean deep-pelagic sample collections ever obtained. With the overall goal of understanding carbon flow processes within and through the deep-pelagic nekton associated with the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge system (N MAR), quantitative trophic analyses were conducted in order to identify the major intraspecific patterns in diet of characteristic members of the midwater fish community. Diets of five abundant species of zooplanktivorous fishes were examined in detail in terms of prey taxonomy and variability in space, ontogeny and diel cycle. Two major patterns of feeding were identified. Pattern 1 included three species preying primarily on copepods, Argyropelecus hemigymnus, Maurolicus muelleri and Vinciguerria attenuata, the former two of which revealed spatial differences in diet with latitude, mostly likely related to latitudinal prey distributions and densities. Maurolicus demonstrated ecological differences in diet that mirrored phenotypic variation North and South of the Subpolar Front, an 'oceanic species concept' question that warrants further research. Pattern 2 included two species feeding primarily on amphipods, Argyropelecus aculeatus and Sternoptyx diaphana, both of which showed ontogenetic variability in feeding primarily related to specific amphipod taxon sizes, rather than prey switching to other major prey taxa. This is the first study that highlights the importance of amphipods in the diets of these species. All fish species showed selectivity in prey choice, possibly related to competition with the other major nekton components along the N MAR, namely the Myctophidae and other zooplanktivorous Stomiiformes. Daily ration fell within the expected values for midwater fishes (1-4% of body weight) with the exception of S. diaphana, suggesting that this species is unique among the zooplanktivores - either its ration is three times higher than the other species, or it eats one-third as often (i.e., every 3 days). Given the high percent stomach fullness observed throughout the diel cycle, we believe the former to be the case, which is the first estimate of its kind for a midwater fish. In order to facilitate further quantitative research on mesopelagic carbon cycling, detailed prey length/weight regressions are presented here.

  17. Micronucleus frequency and hematologic index in Colossoma macropomum (Pisces, Ariidae) for environmental impact assessment at a protected area in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2014-10-06

    This study used micronucleus assays and erythrocyte indices in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in the Environmental Protection Area at Maracanã, São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations within the protected area, Serena Lagoon and Ambude River, on four occasions. Biometric data (length and weight) and an aliquot of blood were collected from each fish for analysis. Erythrocyte indices including: mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were calculated, and blood samples were examined for micronuclei and nuclear morphological changes. Micronuclei were found in fish from both locations, although the frequency was higher in fish from Ambude River. Nuclear morphological changes were identified only in fish collected from Ambude River. Several nuclear morphological changes were found in erythrocytes stained with Giemsa, including: micronuclei and binucleate nuclei. On average, erythrocyte indices were lower in fish collected from Ambude River than in those from Serena Lagoon. Our results indicate that micronuclei and erythrocyte indices can be used in C. macropomum as indicators of environmental health.

  18. Ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Microcotyle pancerii (Monogenea: Polyopisthocotylea: Microcotylidae), parasite of meagre Argyrosomus regius (Pisces: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Yann; Foata, Joséphine; Marchand, Bernard

    2009-04-01

    The present work deals with the ultrastructure of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Microcotyle pancerii, a gill parasite of meagre Argyrosomus regius collected in Corsican fish farms. Spermiogenesis was rather similar to that observed in other polyopisthocotylean Monogenea. The intercentriolar body was different from that described in digeneans. The nuclear condensation occurred in 2 successive stages. First, during the nuclear migration in the median cytoplasmic process, the nucleus developed a honeycomb-like appearance. Then, after the flagellar fusion, a discontinuous twisting of the chromatin appeared along the nucleus, with this process ending in total nuclear condensation. The structure of the spermatozoon is characterized by 2 axonemes (9 + "1" pattern), a single and continuous field of cortical microtubules, a mitochondrion, and a nucleus. Our findings were compared with various ultrastructural features in order to highlight variability within the group. PMID:18817455

  19. The significance of meristic variation in Benthosema glaciale (Pisces, Myctophoidei) and of the species distribution off northwest Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badcock, Julian

    1981-12-01

    A comparison of meristics (vertebrae, AO photophores, and gill rakers) between populations of the lanternfish Benthosema glaciale from the eastern North Atlantic north of the Gulf of Cadiz, the Canary Current Upwelling Region, and the Mediterranean reaffirms the distinctions made by TåNING (1918, Report on the Danish Oceanographical Expeditions 1908-1910 to the Mediterranean and adjacent seas, 2, 1-154) between Northern Atlantic and Mediterranean forms and furthermore shows that the Upwelling and Mediterranean populations are indistinguishable on the basis of these characters. Although the current systems through the Straits of Gibraltar are such that the potential for contact between the Northern Atlantic and Mediterranean populations exists, no clinal relationship of meristics between them was found in the area of Mediterranean Outflow. This, and observed changes in interspecific relationships held by the Northern population and also the different relationships held by the Northern and Mediterranean populations point strongly to their genetic separation. Consideration of other species showing distribution patterns analagous to those of B. glaciale populations suggests that whilst gene flow between the Mediterranean and Canary Current Upwelling regions must be strongly maintained, that between the Mediterranean and Northern Atlantic is much weaker. Moreover, the evidence suggests that a subpolar-temperate and temperate mesopelagic fish fauna may exist in a pseudoceanic capacity, extending southwards of the Gulf of Cadiz along the northwest African slpe area in the "Mauritanean Upwelling Region". Within the northern sector of this region these species have their centres of abundance over the slope rather than off it, whereas species of other basic distribution patterns (northern and tropical) have their centres further offshore, at least in late winter and early spring. The onslope fauna breeds and thrives around upwelling conditions, whereas the situation regarding northern species of the offslope fauna may be analagous to that on the western seaboard, where tropical species can be maintained in abundance in temperate climes by the Florida Current-Gulf Stream system. It is suggested that the hydrographic and circulatory characters off northwest Africa would maintain the core abundances of these two faunas as separate entities.

  20. Recovery of plasmatic cholinesterase activity in a neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus (Pisces, Curimatidae) exposed to organophosphorous pesticides.

    PubMed

    Loteste, Alicia; Cazenave, Jimena; Parma de Croux, M Julieta

    2002-07-01

    The objective was to determine the plasmatic enzyme cholinesterase recovery, after being inhibited by an organophosphorous in juveniles of Prochilodus lineatus. Fish were exposed 12 h to a sublethal concentration of 1 mg/l of monocrotophos, and immediately placing in clean water during 12, 24, 48 and 96 h to detoxification. After this period, blood was extracted and plasma were used for the quantification of cholinesterase. The results showed a enzymatic inhibition of 91.9%, 55.1%, 50.4% and 33.4% with 12, 24, 48 and 96 h of recovery, respectively. The enzymatic activity spreads to be normalized with the course of hours and the degree of inhibition obtained initially was very high and sustained in the first 48 h. PMID:12597563

  1. Gill parasites of Prochilodus lineatus (Valenciennes, 1836) (Pisces; Curimatidae; Prochilodontinae) in the Middle Paraná System (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Chemes, Silvina Beatriz; Gervasoni, Silvia Hebe

    2013-01-01

    We studied gill parasites of Prochilodus lineatus in the San Javier River, which is connected to the Middle Paraná System (Santa Fe, Argentina). In 25 specimens, the parasite prevalence in branchial organs was 92% and the average intensity was 8.3 parasites/infested fish. The parasite community showed no dominance of any taxon, but the family Dactylogyridae represented 60% of the community. We found a significant association between Tereancistrum curimba and Dactylogyridae specimens. The prevalence of the parasites T. toksonum and T. curimba was higher than what has been recorded in the floodplain of the Upper Paraná River, Brazil, demonstrating that the geographic distribution of parasites belonging to Tereancistrum genus is thus expandeing. PMID:24473894

  2. Feeding ecology of Liza ramada (Risso, 1810) (Pisces, Mugilidae) in a south-western estuary of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, P. R.

    2003-05-01

    The feeding activity of the Liza ramada population inhabiting the Mira estuary (Portugal) is reduced during the winter and summer months. At the beginning of the spawning migration (i.e. November) an increase in the amount of food ingested was noticed. In the upper estuary, the feeding behaviour is independent of the tidal cycle, although there is some evidence of a daily rhythm in the food consumption rate, with a reduction during the night. No significant correlation was found between the quantity of particulate organic matter and the concentration of microalgae present in the stomach contents, and it seems that the bulk of the organic matter ingested by the thin-lipped grey mullets comes from a different origin than planktonic or benthic microalgae. The L. ramada population showed a positive selection for sediment particles between 55 and 250 μm in diameter. In general, the diet composition of this species showed a low diversity of food items. A total of 52 food items were identified in the stomach contents, the Bacillariophyceae being the dominant group. The genera Melosira and Ciclotella were the most common and abundant food items, although the genera Navicula, Nitzschia and Surirella were also classified as preferential food items. It was found that the volume of ploughed sediment that resulted from the feeding activity of the thin-lipped grey mullets, and the correspondent disturbed area increased exponentially with the length of the fish.

  3. Heavy Metals and Histopathological Alterations in Salminus franciscanus (Lima & Britski, 2007) (Pisces: Characiformes) in the Paraopeba River, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Savassi, Lourenço Almeida; Arantes, Fabio Pereira; Gomes, Marcos Vinicius Teles; Bazzoli, Nilo

    2016-04-01

    Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, Cr, Hg, and Fe in the liver, spleen and muscle, of the fish Salminus franciscanus, from two sections of Paraopeba River, highly affected by anthropogenic influences, was detected in levels above those recommended for human consumption. Positive correlations between fish size and levels of metals were detected for Cd, Pb, Hg, and Zn. In the livers, areas with lipid accumulation and pigmented macrophages were also observed, as was fibrosis of the spleen in the parenchymal area through the presence of pigmented macrophages. The diameter of vitellogenic follicles was less and the frequency of atresia was higher in fish from section A. Thus, our study showed that beyond the risk to the population that eats S. franciscanus from the Paraopeba River, we should also consider the risk to the conservation of this species, since histopathological changes were detected in target organs and in some reproductive parameters. PMID:26781631

  4. Food and feeding relationships of three sympatric slickhead species (Pisces: Alepocephalidae) from northeastern Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. R. L.; Breen, B. B.

    2013-09-01

    The food and feeding relationships of mid-slope slickheads in New Zealand waters are little known compared with those from the northern hemisphere. This study examines the feeding relationships of three common slickhead species from approximately 1000 m on Chatham Rise, New Zealand: Alepocephalus antipodianus (Parrot, 1948), A. australis (Barnard, 1923), and Xenodermichthys copei (Gill, 1884). The Alepocephalus species were predominantly benthopelagic feeders with a small benthic component to their diets. Alepocephalus australis fed on pelagic tunicates, notably Pyrosoma atlanticum Péron, 1804. Alepocephalus antipodianus fed on fish and pelagic tunicates, and also crustaceans. Xenodermichthys copei fed primarily on crustaceans. Considerable material was recovered from the intestines of all three species, and much of it was identifiable and only partially digested, including the remains of pelagic tunicates. There was little dietary overlap between the stomach contents of the three slickhead species indicating a degree of niche partitioning. Intestinal contents differed from stomach contents in weight, but not in number of items for all three species. The composition of stomach and intestinal contents differed for A. australis, but not for A. antipodianus or X. copei, which suggests that intestinal contents could be potentially useful in lieu of stomach content. There was a high level of overlap between the intestinal contents of A. antipodianus and A. australis, suggesting a possible closer dietary relationship between these two species than that indicated by stomach contents alone. Despite limitations in sample size and spatial and temporal coverage, the results from this study indicate that the three slickhead species could play an important role in the structuring of the demersal community at mid-slope depths on northeastern Chatham Rise.

  5. Distribution and biology of five grenadier fish (Pisces: Macrouridae) from the upper and middle slope of the northwestern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massutí, Enric; Morales-Nin, Beatriz; Stefanescu, Constantí

    1995-03-01

    Specimens of five Macrouridae species ( Trachyrhynchus trachyrhynchus, Nezumia aequalis, Hymenocephalus italicus, Coelorhynehus coelorhynchus and Coelorhynchus labiatus) were obtained from 76 bottom trawls in the Catalan Sea at depths between 147 and 1290 m. Abundance, biomass and length distribution by depth varied depending on the species. For T. trachyrhynchus, maximum abundance and biomass were found between 900 and 1000 m. In H. italicus, abundance and biomass decreased below 500-600 m, whereas abundance and biomass showed a bimodal trend for N. aequalis. In these species, the mean length of the specimens increased with depth. The sex-ratio was 50% for intermediate sizes while larger fish were predominantly females. Reproduction patterns were different for each species. Ripe females of N. aequalis and H. italicus were found all year round, while C. coelorhynchus and C. labiatus ripe females were found in spring-summer and autumn winter, respectively. No ripe females of T. trachyrhynchus were found. Size at attainment of 50% maturity for N. aequalis and H. italicus was 4.5 and 2.7 cm pre-anal length (PAL), respectively. The PAL-otolith length (OL) and OL- otolith weight (OW) relationships showed a negative allometry, except for C. labiatus whose OL-OW relationship was isometric. Seasonal growth was detected in the otoliths of all five species; fast growth rings were laid down in summer. All the species reach ages of at least 9 years, and growth rates were relatively high and greater for females.

  6. Morphological aspects of Clinostomidae metacercariae (Trematoda: Digenea) in Hoplerytrinus unitaeniatus and Hoplias malabaricus (Pisces: Erythrinidae) of the Neotropical region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Benigno, Raimundo N M; Knoff, Marcelo; Matos, Edilson R; Gomes, Delir C; Pinto, Roberto M; Clemente, Sérgio C São

    2014-05-14

    Species of fish of Marajó Island, State of Pará, Brazil, were examined to identify the trematodes parasitizing 102 Hoplerytrinus unitaeniatus (gold wolf fish) and 104 Hoplias malabaricus (thraira). Metacercariae of two species of trematodes, 170 specimens of Clinostomatopsis sorbens and 10 Ithyoclinostomum dimorphum were found and identified. The parasitary indices of C. sorbens from H. unitaeniatus and H. malabaricus, were 43.14% and 30.77% for prevalence, 2.52 and 1.84 for mean intensity, 1.09 and 0.57 for mean abundance and 1 to 9 and 1 to 7 for range of infection, respectively, on both fish the site of infection was the mesentery. The parasitary indices of I. dimorphum from H. unitaeniatus were 2.94% for prevalence, 2.66 for mean intensity, 0.08 for mean abundance, 1 to 4 for range of infection, and the sites of infection were the mesentery and the muscle. Metacercariae of I. dimorphum were collected in muscles of a specimen of H. malabaricus, with 0.96% of prevalence, intensity of infection of 2 parasites and 0.02 of abundance. New morphological data of external and internal structures are presented. This is the first record of metacercariae of C. sorbens and I. dimorphum in Amazonian fish. PMID:24838543

  7. Species composition and distribution of the Antarctic plunderfishes (Pisces, Artedidraconidae) from the Ross Sea off Victoria Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Mesa, Mario; Cattaneo-Vietti, Riccardo; Vacchi, Marino

    2006-04-01

    Among the notothenioid fish, the Antarctic plunderfishes (family Artedidraconidae) are a poorly known component of the bottom fauna of the continental shelf despite their relative importance. The family is composed of 25 small- to medium-sized endemic species and four genera, Artedidraco, Dolloidraco, Histiodraco and Pogonophryne, which are the most benthic and sedentary of the notothenioid fish. In the framework of "Victoria Land Transect Project", several samples of plunderfishes were collected by means of an Agassiz trawl. Sampling activities were carried out between 100 and 500 m depth in five sites over nearly 4° latitude off Victoria Land. Overall, trawling yielded 80 specimens of plunderfish, including all species of Artedidraco reported from the Ross Sea, i.e. Artedidraco glareobarbatus, A. loennbergi, A. orianae, A. shackletoni and A. skottsbergi, and the monotypic genus Histiodraco. The use of multivariate statistical analyses on catch data indicated sampling site as the main factor affecting species composition. Histiodraco velifer and A. skottsbergi were caught almost exclusively in the southernmost sites, characterizing the artedidraconid fauna of Cape Russell. A. orianae was sampled only in the northernmost sites, such as Cape Adare and Hallett Peninsula. A. loennbergi appeared to be a ubiquitous species, whereas A. glareobarbatus was caught only at the Hallett Peninsula. Plunderfishes showed a particular distribution pattern in relation to depth as well. A. glareobarbatus was the shallowest species, being sampled within 100 m. A. orianae and A. shackletoni showed a similar distribution, being caught mostly at 100-200 m, whereas A. skottsbergi was mainly sampled at 200-300 m. H. velifer was caught in a wide depth range, but mostly in deeper waters (400 m). A. loennbergi was eurybathic, showing a wider depth distribution than other species. Univariate measures of diversity indicated Cape Adare as the poorer site in terms of species richness and diversity. Number of species, diversity and equitability were quite similar off Hallett Peninsula and Cape Russell, indicating the absence of a latitudinal trend. Generally, all univariate indices decreased from shallow (100 m) to deep waters (500 m).

  8. Can the name Mugil cephalus (Pisces: Mugilidae) be used for the species occurring in the north western Atlantic?

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Almanzar, Eloísa; Simons, James; Espinosa-Pérez, Héctor; Chiappa-Carrara, Xavier; Ibáñez, Ana L

    2016-01-01

    Menezes et al. (2010) show that Mugil cephalus Linnaeus, 1758 is different from Mugil liza Valenciennes 1836, the latter being the mullet found along the Atlantic coast of South America. They also suggest that individuals identified as M. cephalus from the northwest Atlantic could represent a population of M. liza in this region, since they doubt the presence of M. cephalus in waters colder than the ones of the West Indies. In order to clarify the presence of M. cephalus in the northwest Atlantic, this study compares meristic and morphometric measurements of M. cephalus and M. liza from the Gulf of Mexico with those obtained by Menezes et al. (2010) for M. liza from South America and for M. cephalus in the Mediterranean Sea. Results show that there are differences in both morphometric and meristic data between the two species. The morphometric measure that differentiates these species is the distance from the snout to the dorsal fin, which is positioned backwards in M. liza compared with M. cephalus. The body width is consistently greater in M. cephalus than M. liza. The meristic character that discriminates between both species is the number of scales in the longitudinal series that, in M. cephalus, ranges from 38 to 43 while in M. liza between 32 to 39. The information presented in this work confirms the presence of M. cephalus in the Gulf of Mexico and the sympatric presence of M. liza is established, even if its abundance is quite low. PMID:27394872

  9. Effect of temperature on microstructures and retention properties in tungsten exposed to D + He + Be mixture plasmas in PISCES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, N.; Miyamoto, M.; Nishijima, D.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Ueda, Y.; Sagara, A.; Höschen, T.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of temperature on microstructures and D retention properties in tungsten exposed to D + He + Be mixture plasmas is investigated. For the low temperature exposure case at 573 K, the Be seeding to D + He mixture plasmas results in the suppression of high density He nano-bubbles, which are distinctive internal defects observed in He irradiated/exposed metals. In contrast, fine and high-density He bubbles appear for W exposed to D + He + Be mixture plasmas at higher temperatures of >773 K. TDS measurements also show that the influence of Be seeding to D + He mixture plasmas, which counteracts the significant reduction in D retention, becomes weak with increasing temperature. From XPS analyses, it is considered that Be2W is formed by interdiffusion and solid-state-reaction at the high temperature exposure case, and the influence of the metallic Be on surface properties gradually disappears with increasing temperature.

  10. Comparative age and growth of common snook Centropomus undecimalis (Pisces: Centropomidae) from coastal and riverine areas in Southern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Perera-Garcia, Martha A; Mendoza-Carranza, Manuel; Contreras-Sánchez, Wilfrido; Ferrara, Allyse; Huerta-Ortiz, Maricela; Hernández-Gómez, Raúl E

    2013-06-01

    Common snook Centropomus unidecimalis is an important commercial and fishery species in Southern Mexico, however the high exploitation rates have resulted in a strong reduction of its abundances. Since, the information about its population structure is scarce, the objective of the present research was to determine and compare the age structure in four important fishery sites. For this, age and growth of common snook were determined from specimens collected monthly, from July 2006 to March 2008, from two coastal (Barra Bosque and Barra San Pedro) and two riverine (San Pedro and Tres Brazos) commercial fishery sites in Tabasco, Mexico. Age was determined using sectioned saggitae otoliths and data analyzed by von Bertalanffy and Levenberg-Marquardt among others. Estimated ages ranged from 2 to 17 years. Monthly patterns of marginal increment formation and the percentage of otoliths with opaque rings on the outer edge demonstrated that a single annulus was formed each year. The von Bertalanffy parameters were calculated for males and females using linear adjustment and the non-linear method of Levenberg-Marquardt. The von Bertalanffy growth equations were FLt = 109.21(1-e-0.2(t+0.57)) for Barra Bosque, FLt = 94.56(1-e-027(t+0.485)) for Barra San Pedro, FLt = 97.15(1-e 0.17(t + 1.32)) for San Pedro and FLt = 83.77(1-e-026(t + 0.49)) for Tres Brazos. According to (Hotelling's T2, p < 0.05) test growth was significantly greater for females than for males. Based on the Chen test, von Bertalanffy growth curves were different among the study sites (RSS, p < 0.05). Based on the observed differences in growth parameters among sampling sites (coastal and riverine environments) future research need to be conducted on migration and population genetics, in order to delineate the stock structure of this population and support management programs. PMID:23885591

  11. Morphological biomarkers in Prochilodus lineatus (pisces, prochilodontidae) for environmental impact assessment in the region of the Baixada Maranhense, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Dantas, Janaína Gomes; Andrade, Ticianne de Sousa de Oliveira Mota; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Sodré, Camilla Fernanda Lima; Carvalho-Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes; Junior, Audálio Rebelo Torres

    2015-12-31

    This study aimed to identify the types of histopathological lesions found in gills of Prochilodus lineatus of the Environmental Protection Area of the Baixada Maranhense region (Brazil). Fish were collected in Mearim river. Sampling took place in October, November and December 2014. We have purchased 30 samples of fish from local fishermen. In the laboratory fish gills were removed, and then fixed in 10% formalin solution and kept into alcohol 70% to the usual histological processing. The tissue was performed by light microscopy and findings were photomicrographed in light microscope - ZEIS. The following lesions were identified: epithelial displacement, the marginal channel shift a start vascular congestion, hyperplasia and merging multiple slides; epithelial disruption, edema, vascular congestion, total fusion of lamellae and disorganization of secondary lamellae. These changes express a response of the body to some xenobiontes. Morphological changes in the gills may represent adaptive strategies for conservation of some biological functions when animals are facing changes in the water quality.

  12. Phylogeny of the eelpout genus Lycodes (Pisces, Zoarcidae) as inferred from mitochondrial cytochrome b and 12S rDNA.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter R; Gravlund, Peter

    2003-03-01

    The bottom-dwelling and species-rich eelpout genus Lycodes Reinhardt has a great potential for the study of Arctic marine speciation. Subdivision of the genus has been based on single or few morphological characters (e.g., lateral line configuration) with contradicting results and phylogenetic approaches have not been attended. Here we present the first phylogenetic analysis of the genus employing DNA sequences of the mitochondrial genes cytochrome b and 12S rDNA (714 bp). The analysis with the two genes combined resulted in two equally parsimonious trees. In both cladograms most of the previously suggested subgroups are para- or polyphyletic, except for the so-called short-tailed Lycodes spp., with a short tail, a single mediolateral lateral line configuration and a shallow or filled otolith sulcus. The group of long-tailed Lycodes spp., with ventral or ventro-medio-lateral types of lateral line configuration and a deep otolith sulcus, appears to be paraphyletic, since Pacific and Atlantic species in this group are not each other's closest relatives. Thus, the short-tailed species are placed in a derived clade, indicating a secondary shortening of the tail, and a "slope to shore" type of evolution. This is not in accordance with earlier assumptions of the more elongate, deeper living species being the more derived. The basal position of long-tailed Pacific species supports earlier theories of Pacific origin of the genus/family. Small genetic differences between Arctic/Atlantic species indicate a rather recent radiation in these areas after the opening of the Bering Strait 3.0-3.5 million years ago. PMID:12644398

  13. A new species of Near-shore Marine Goby (Pisces: Gobiidae: Nesogobius) from Kangaroo Island, Australia.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Michael P; Hoese, Douglass F; Bertozzi, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Nesogobius is one of two goby genera with all species wholly restricted to temperate Australian waters. Described here is a new member of the genus discovered during near-shore marine and estuarine fish sampling along the central southern Australian coastline. The tiger sandgoby Nesogobius tigrinus sp. nov. is distinguished from other congeners by a combination of colouration including four prominent vertical black bars on males; morphological characters involving body scales (large), head scales (naked), body depth (slender) and gill opening (wide); meristic counts including a lack of second dorsal and anal fin spines; and mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence. The species appears to be a narrow range endemic, restricted to specific sub-tidal habitat in the unique sheltered embayments of northeast Kangaroo Island. This study forms part of ongoing investigations to more fully describe the biodiversity and conservation requirements of the regional ichthyofauna. PMID:26701487

  14. Population ecology of the tonguefish Symphurus thermophilus (Pisces; Pleuronectiformes; Cynoglossidae) at sulphur-rich hydrothermal vents on volcanoes of the northern Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnicliffe, Verena; Tyler, Jennifer; Dower, John F.

    2013-08-01

    Flatfish are a major component of the hydrothermal vent community on three seamounts of the northern Mariana Volcanic Arc in the northwest Pacific. Nikko, Kasuga-2 and Daikoku seamounts host vent fields between 375 and 480 m depth where high temperature vents release molten sulphur. The small cynoglossid tonguefish, Symphurus thermophilus Munroe and Hashimoto, is ubiquitous in all vent habitats observed on these seamounts: among extensive fields of tubeworms and mussels and on solid sulphur surfaces on Nikko; on sulphur-rich sediments and barnacle-covered boulders on Kasuga-2; and on recent sulphur flows and on broad areas of loose and semi-consolidated sediments on Daikoku. We recorded repeated forays by individuals onto flows of molten sulphur as these surfaces cooled. Based on observations using ROVs, the mean density is 90 fish/m2 with maximum counts over 200 fish/m2 on Daikoku sediments. Compared to collected tonguefish from Daikoku and Kasuga-2, those from Nikko have significantly greater lengths and, on average, six times the mass. Otolith data indicate upper ages of 13 years with Nikko tonguefish growing significantly faster. Diets of tonguefish on the three seamounts reflect the different habitats and prey availability; in Daikoku specimens, small crustaceans and polychaetes are most common while on Nikko, gut contents are predominantly larger shrimp. We made the unusual observation of stunned midwater fish falling to the seafloor near the vents where S. thermophilus immediately attacked them. This tonguefish has a wide diet range and foraging behaviour that likely influence the differing growth rates and sizes of fish inhabiting the different vent sites. Limited genetic data suggest that larval exchange probably occurs among sites where the common habitat factor is high levels of elemental sulphur forming hard and partly unconsolidated substrata. Here, in the northern range of the Mariana Trench Marine National Monument, S. thermophilus, despite having an unusually broad habitat association, may be restricted in its overall range to this region of isolated volcanoes with active hydrothermalism.

  15. Ultrastructural study of vitellogenesis and oogenesis of Metadena depressa (Stossich, 1883) Linton, 1910 (Digenea, Cryptogonimidae), intestinal parasite of Dentex dentex (Pisces, Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Greani, Samuel; Quilichini, Yann; Foata, Joséphine; Swiderski, Zdzisław; Marchand, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of the female reproductive system of Metadena depressa, digenean intestinal parasite of Sparidae (Dentex dentex), was investigated by electron microscopy. The vitellogenesis is divided into four stages: stage I, vitellocytes have a cytoplasm mainly filled with ribosomes and few mitochondria; stage II, beginning of the synthetic activity; stage III, active shell globule clusters synthesis; stage IV, mature vitellocytes are filled with shell globule clusters and generally contain several large lipid droplets. Glycogen granules are grouped at the periphery of the cell. The three stages of the oogenesis process take place in the ovary: stage I, oogonia are undifferentiated small cells located at the periphery of the organ; stage II, primary oocytes possess a higher nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio and a nucleus with a nucleolus and synaptonemal complexes indicating the zygotene-pachytene stage of the first meiotic division; stage III, mature oocytes are located in the proximal region of the organ and possess a cytoplasmic chromatoid body and cortical granules in a monolayer close to the periphery of the cell. PMID:23199633

  16. Balancing genetic uniqueness and genetic variation in determining conservation and translocation strategies: a comprehensive case study of threatened dwarf galaxias, Galaxiella pusilla (Mack) (Pisces: Galaxiidae).

    PubMed

    Coleman, R A; Weeks, A R; Hoffmann, A A

    2013-04-01

    Genetic markers are widely used to define and manage populations of threatened species based on the notion that populations with unique lineages of mtDNA and well-differentiated nuclear marker frequencies should be treated separately. However, a danger of this approach is that genetic uniqueness might be emphasized at the cost of genetic diversity, which is essential for adaptation and is potentially boosted by mixing geographically separate populations. Here, we re-explore the issue of defining management units, focussing on a detailed study of Galaxiella pusilla, a small freshwater fish of national conservation significance in Australia. Using a combination of microsatellite and mitochondrial markers, 51 populations across the species range were surveyed for genetic structure and diversity. We found an inverse relationship between genetic differentiation and genetic diversity, highlighting a long-term risk of deliberate isolation of G. pusilla populations based on protection of unique lineages. Instead, we adopt a method for identifying genetic management units that takes into consideration both uniqueness and genetic variation. This produced a management framework to guide future translocation and re-introduction efforts for G. pusilla, which contrasted to the framework based on a more traditional approach that may overlook important genetic variation in populations. PMID:23432132

  17. Ailinella mirabilis gen. n., sp. n. (eucestoda: pseudophyllidea) from Galaxias maculatus (Pisces: Galaxiidae) in the Andean-Patagonian region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    de Pertierra, Alicia A Gil; Semenas, Liliana G

    2006-12-01

    Ailinella gen. n. (Pseudophyllidea: Triaenophoridae) is proposed to accommodate Ailinella mirabilis sp. n. from Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1842), a freshwater fish inhabiting the Andean lakes in Argentinean Patagonia. Ailinella belongs to the Triaenophoridae because it has a marginal genital pore, a follicular vitelline gland, and a ventral uterine pore. The new genus can be distinguished from other triaenophorids by the following combination of characters: a small body size, a low number of proglottides, which are longer than wide, a truncated pyramidal to globular scolex, a rectangular apical disc, presence of the neck, lack of internal longitudinal musculature separating the cortex from the medulla, testes distributed in one central field surrounding the ovary laterally and posteriorly, the vagina predominantly anterior to the cirrus sac, vitelline follicles circum-medullary, the genital pores post-equatorial, a saccate uterus, and operculate eggs. Blade-like spiniform microtriches were present on all tegument surfaces, and tumuli on all surfaces of the scolex and the anterior surface of the neck. Microtriches were characterized according to their size and density, and tumuli according to their size, inter-tumulus distance and density. Ailinella mirabilis is the first cestode described from G. maculatus and the second triaenophorid species recorded from a South American freshwater fish. PMID:17256203

  18. Gametogenesis and reproduction of the matrinxã Brycon orthotaenia (Günther, 1864) (Pisces: Characidae) in the São Francisco river, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, T L; Bazzoli, N; Brito, M F G

    2006-05-01

    The gametogenesis and reproduction of the matrinxã, Brycon orthotaenia in the São Francisco river, Pirapora Region, Minas Gerais, were studied from December, 1998 to November, 1999. The matrinxã B. orthotaenia is an endemic species in the São Francisco river basin in Brazil and important for commercial fishing. The size of the 1st gonadal maturation, indicated by the total length of the smallest spent males and spawned female, was 32.0 and 40.5 cm respectively. Reproduction occurred from October to January, when high frequencies of females and males at an advanced ripening/mature stage and spawned females were found. The short spawning period and histological characteristics of spawned ovaries containing only oocytes in stages of initial development, along with post-ovulatory and atresic follicles, indicated that Brycon orthotaenia presents total spawning. PMID:16862307

  19. Induction of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities by cyclophosphamide and colchicine in Xenotoca melanosoma (Pisces, Goodeidae) from Lake La Alberca in Michoacan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Aguirre, Jose Luis; Torres-Bugarin, Olivia; Buelna-Osben, Hector Rene; Flores-Kehn, Lola Paulina; Ramos-Ibarra, Maria Luisa; Zuniga-Gonzalez, Guillermo; Ogura, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    This study is a follow-up of previous research in which we described the frequency of spontaneous micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE) in the Goodeid Xenotocoa melanosoma collected from Lake La Alberca, located in the state of Michoacan, Mexico. In the present work, we measured micronuclei (MN) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in erythrocytes of peripheral blood. Bioassays taken at 24 or 96 hours in either the cyclophosfamide (CP) or colchicine (COL) showed a significant increase in MN and BC (P values ranging from 0.0499 to 0.0036) compared with information from wild organisms collected over 3 years. Concentrationdependent and time-dependent responses support the proposal of using endemic Xenotoca melanosoma as a bioindicator of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity with a high transcendence for the health of the entire ecosystem and evaluation of the Lerma-Chapala watershed. PMID:20390845

  20. Sudden weaning of angel fish pterophyllum scalare (Lichtenstein) (Pisces; Cichlidae) larvae from brine shrimp (Artemia sp) nauplii to formulated larval feed.

    PubMed

    Herath, Sandamali Sakunthala; Atapaththu, Kerthi Sri Senarathna

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of sudden weaning of angel fish larvae (Pteraphylum scalari) from Artemia nauplii to commercial larval feed. Four days post hatch (DPH) larvae were reared in four different weaning protocols (TR1-TR4) with triplicates in a complete randomize design. Larvae in TR1 and TR4 were exclusively fed Artemia nauplii and dry feed respectively. In TR2 and TR3, larvae were initially fed Artemia nauplii and suddenly wean to formulated feed on 14 DPH and 7 DPH respectively. The experiment was lasted for 28 days. At the end of the experiment, final mean weight (FW), total length (FL), height (FH), Daily Weight Gain (DWG), Specific Growth Rate (SGR), survival and stress index were compared. Significantly highest (P < 0.05) FW, DWG and SGR were observed in TR1 and TR2 while former values of TR3 were not significantly different from TR1. Highest FL observed in TR1 and TR2 while FL of TR2 was statistically similar to that of TR3. The poorest growth was observed in larvae solely fed formulated feed. Survival and the stress index were independent from weaning methods. Although sudden weaning is possible on 7 DPH, larvae showed comparatively higher growth when switch off to formulate feed on 14 DPH. PMID:23626927

  1. The description of Gyrodactylus corleonis sp. n. and G. neretum sp. n. (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) with comments on other gyrodactylids parasitising pipefish (Pisces: Syngnathidae).

    PubMed

    Paladini, Giuseppe; Cable, Joanne; Fioravanti, Maria Letizia; Faria, Patricia J; Shinn, Andrew P

    2010-03-01

    The current work describes two new species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 collected from pipefish Syngnathus scovelli (Evermann et Kendall) and Syngnathus typhle L. during two separate gyrodactylosis episodes on fish held in a public aquarium located in northern Italy. The gyrodactylids collected from the skin, fins and gills of pipefish were subjected to a morphological analysis of the attachment hooks and the morphometric data were compared to the four species of Gyrodactylus previously described from syngnathid hosts, namely G. eyipayipi Vaughan, Christison, Hansen et Shinn, 2010, G. pisculentui Williams, Kritsky, Dunnigan, Lash et Klein, 2008, G. shorti Holliman, 1963 and G. syngnathi Appleby, 1996. Principal components analysis (PCA) of the morphological data indicated six clusters; two discrete groups among the specimens taken from the pipefisli held in the Italian aquarium and four further groups representing G. eyipayipi, G. pisculentus, G. shorti and G. syngnathi. Molecular sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S gene for the new species considered here were then compared with those available for other species in GenBank. The comparison did not reveal any identical match, supporting the morphological analysis that Gyrodactylus corleonis sp. n. from S. typhle and Gyrodactylus neretum sp. n. from S. scovelli represent distinct species. Both G. corleonis and G. neretum possess robust hamuli, marginal hook blades that curve smoothly from their sickle base to a point beyond the toe and, ventral bars with a broad median portion and a reduced membrane. Gyrodactylus corleonis, however, can be distinguished on the basis of its heart-shaped ventral bar; G. neretum has a 1:2 hamulus point:shaft ratio and a rectangular-shaped ventral bar. A redescription of the haptoral hard parts of the four species previously recorded on pipefish is also presented. PMID:20449996

  2. THE GRAY NEEDLE: LARGE GRAINS IN THE HD 15115 DEBRIS DISK FROM LBT /PISCES/Ks AND LBTI /LMIRcam/L' ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Skemer, Andrew J.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Bailey, Vanessa; Schneider, Glenn; Close, Laird; Apai, Daniel; Leisenring, Jarron; Skrutskie, Michael; Mannucci, Filippo; Esposito, Simone; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Pinna, Enrico; Argomedo, Javier; Agapito, Guido; Bono, Giuseppe; Briguglio, Runa; Boutsia, Kostantina; and others

    2012-06-10

    We present diffraction-limited Ks band and L' adaptive optics images of the edge-on debris disk around the nearby F2 star HD 15115, obtained with a single 8.4 m primary mirror at the Large Binocular Telescope. At the Ks band, the disk is detected at signal-to-noise per resolution element (SNRE) {approx} 3-8 from {approx}1 to 2.''5 (45-113 AU) on the western side and from {approx}1.''2 to 2.''1 (63-90 AU) on the east. At L' the disk is detected at SNRE {approx} 2.5 from {approx}1 to 1.''45 (45-90 AU) on both sides, implying more symmetric disk structure at 3.8 {mu}m. At both wavelengths the disk has a bow-like shape and is offset from the star to the north by a few AU. A surface brightness asymmetry exists between the two sides of the disk at the Ks band, but not at L'. The surface brightness at the Ks band declines inside 1'' ({approx}45 AU), which may be indicative of a gap in the disk near 1''. The Ks - L' disk color, after removal of the stellar color, is mostly gray for both sides of the disk. This suggests that scattered light is coming from large dust grains, with 3-10 {mu}m sized grains on the east side and 1-10 {mu}m dust grains on the west. This may suggest that the west side is composed of smaller dust grains than the east side, which would support the interpretation that the disk is being dynamically affected by interactions with the local interstellar medium.

  3. Long-term monitoring on the occurrence of a myxosporean parasite Kudoa camarguensis (Myxosporean) on the common goby (Teleostei, pisces) Pomatoschistus microps.

    PubMed

    Pampoulie, C; Marques, A; Rosecchi, E; Bouchereau, J L; Crivelli, A J

    2001-05-01

    The evolution of a host-parasite system composed of Pomatoschistus microps-Kudoa camarguensis was investigated in the Vaccarès lagoon (Rhĵne river Delta, France) from 1993 to 1997. During this long-term monitoring, centennial flooding of the Rhĵne river occurred, leading to an inrush of about 110 million m3 of freshwater in the Vaccarès lagoon. The salinity drastically dropped from 14 to 5 g l(-1) in 1 wk. We observed that the annual prevalence and abundance of the myxosporean parasite decreased from 12.18 in 1993 to 3.7% in 1997 and from 1.10 in 1993 to 0.27 in 1997, respectively. Here, we discuss the possible reasons for the rapid decline of this host-parasite system following the flood. PMID:11411646

  4. Ultrastructure of the spermatozoon of the digenean Tergestia acanthocephala (Stossich, 1887) (Gymnophalloidea: Fellodistomidae): An intestinal parasite of Belone belone gracilis (Pisces: Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Kacem, H; Ndiaye, P I; Neifar, L; Torres, J; Miquel, J

    2015-06-01

    The ultrastructural organization of the spermatozoon of the digenean Tergestia acanthocephala (Gymnophalloidea: Fellodistomidae) is described. Live digeneans were collected from Belone belone gracilis (Teleostei: Belonidae), caught off the Gulf of Gabès in Chebba (Tunisia). The mature spermatozoon of T. acanthocephala exhibits the general pattern described in numerous digeneans, characterized by the presence of two axonemes of the different length of the 9+'1' pattern of the Trepaxonemata, a nucleus, two mitochondria, two bundles of parallel cortical microtubules, external ornamentation, spine-like bodies and granules of glycogen. Moreover, the morphology of the posterior spermatozoon extremity in T. acanthocephala corresponds to the fasciolidean type of Quilichini et al. (2010a). PMID:25796547

  5. Life history, population dynamics and production of eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki (Pisces, Poeciliidae), in rice fields of the lower Mondego River Valley, western Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, João Alexandre; Marques, João Carlos

    1999-11-01

    The introduced population of Gambusia holbrooki from the rice fields of the lower Mondego River Valley, Portugal, was studied for 15 months, relating their life cycle and population dynamics with its production, in order to assess the role of the species in the energy flow and secondary production in this type of agro-ecosystem. Two main annual cohorts (1995 and 1996 cohorts) were identified. The females outnumbered males and the average female/male-ratio was 4. The inspection of ovary developmental stages of this viviparous fish, revealed that the most important reproductive period was between April and August. The first recruits were recorded in June and were present thereafter until October. Males from the parental cohort died before August, whereas parental females could survive until October. Mean adjusted fecundity (number of embryos divided by female standard length) peaked in July 1996 (0.95) and in June 1997 (1.05). Females reached greater sizes, had a higher growth rate and lived longer than males. Annual production was estimated at 3.101 g.m -2.year -1 (ash-free dry weight, AFDW), the average biomass at 2.896 g.m -2 (AFDW), and the P/B ratio was 1.071. A conjugation of life history, population dynamics, production and ecological traits (e.g. fast growth, reduced longevity, viviparity, high productivity, an intermediate position in food chain, and no special habitat requirements for reproduction) clearly show that the populations of G. holbrooki, introduced into rice fields all over the world, may play an important role in the structure and functioning of the biological communities of these important agro-ecosystems.

  6. An invasive lineage of sculpins, Cottus sp. (Pisces, Teleostei) in the Rhine with new habitat adaptations has originated from hybridization between old phylogeographic groups

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Arne W; Freyhof, Jörg; Stemshorn, Kathryn C; Tautz, Diethard

    2005-01-01

    Fish abundance surveys in the Rhine system have shown in the past two decades that there is a rapid upriver invasion of a freshwater sculpin of the genus Cottus. These fish are found in habitats that are atypical for the known species Cottus gobio, which is confined to small cold streams within the Rhine drainage. Phylogeographic analysis based on mitochondrial haplotypes and diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms indicates that the invasive sculpins are hybrids between two old lineages from the River Scheldt drainage and the River Rhine drainage, although it is morphologically more similar to the Scheldt sculpins. Most importantly, however, the invasive population possesses a unique ecological potential that does not occur in either of the source populations from the Rhine or the Scheldt, which allows the colonization of new habitats that have previously been free of sculpins. Microsatellite analysis shows that the new lineage is genetically intermediate between the old lineages and that it forms a distinct genetic group across its whole expansion range. We conclude that hybridization between long separated groups has lead to the fast emergence of a new, adaptationally distinct sculpin lineage. PMID:16243698

  7. The migration patterns of the European flounder Platichthys flesus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Pleuronectidae, Pisces) at the southern limit of its distribution range: Ecological implications and fishery management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Pedro; Dias, Ester; Babaluk, John; Antunes, Carlos

    2011-02-01

    This study aims to determine the diversity of migration patterns of the European flounder ( Platichthys flesus (Linnaeus, 1758)) present in the Minho estuary and in the adjacent coastal area (NW-Iberian Peninsula). Assessing the diversity of flounder migration patterns at the southern limit of its distribution allows the determination of characteristics of the species' ecology and provides useful information for fishery managers, since it is a regionally important estuarine fishery. An unexpected result of our study was that flounder appears to spawn in both estuarine and coastal areas and not just in coastal areas as was previously widely accepted. Our interpretation of otolith strontium distribution patterns from flounder specimens collected in the freshwater tidal area of the Minho estuary and in the lower estuary suggested that the flounders hatched in the estuary, while only 6.7% of those captured in the coastal area hatched in the coastal area. Ultimately, studies aimed at collecting larval stages and adult flounders must be made to confirm that flounders spawn in the estuary and to define new and better scientifically supported fishing policies, or simply to confirm the existing ones regarding temporal and spatial closures for each gear used in the Minho estuary.

  8. Measured Copper Toxicity to Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Pisces: Poeciliidae) and Predicted by Biotic Ligand Model in Pilcomayo River Water: A Step for a Cross-Fish-Species Extrapolation

    PubMed Central

    Casares, María Victoria; de Cabo, Laura I.; Seoane, Rafael S.; Natale, Oscar E.; Castro Ríos, Milagros; Weigandt, Cristian; de Iorio, Alicia F.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine copper toxicity (LC50) to a local species (Cnesterodon decemmaculatus) in the South American Pilcomayo River water and evaluate a cross-fish-species extrapolation of Biotic Ligand Model, a 96 h acute copper toxicity test was performed. The dissolved copper concentrations tested were 0.05, 0.19, 0.39, 0.61, 0.73, 1.01, and 1.42 mg Cu L−1. The 96 h Cu LC50 calculated was 0.655 mg L−1 (0.823 − 0.488). 96-h Cu LC50 predicted by BLM for Pimephales promelas was 0.722 mg L−1. Analysis of the inter-seasonal variation of the main water quality parameters indicates that a higher protective effect of calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulphate, and chloride is expected during the dry season. The very high load of total suspended solids in this river might be a key factor in determining copper distribution between solid and solution phases. A cross-fish-species extrapolation of copper BLM is valid within the water quality parameters and experimental conditions of this toxicity test. PMID:22523491

  9. Ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis and the spermatozoon of Acanthocephaloides incrassatus (Molin, 1858) (Acanthocephala, Paleacanthocephala, Arhythmacanthidae) from Anguilla anguilla (Pisces, Teleostei) in Urbino ponds (Corsica Island).

    PubMed

    Foata, J; Quilichini, Y; Dal Pos, N; Greani, S; Marchand, B

    2012-07-01

    This study deals with first ultrastructure features of Acanthocephaloides incrassatus (Paleacanthocephala, Arhythmacanthidae), a parasite of the fish Anguilla anguilla, reported for the first time in a Mediterranean pond. The spermiogenesis of A. incrassatus shows original specificities which have never been pointed out to this day in ultrastructural studies on spermiogenesis: the centriolar derivative is divided into two parts of different densities: an electron-dense, and the other, electron-lucent; a ring form has been observed on each side of the axoneme; a centriole with one central element. After the elaboration of a flagellum of 9+2 pattern, the centriole migrates in a nuclear groove. Rapidly, the centriole disappears. Then, the flagellum migration occurs by a series of processes and gives rise to a spermatozoon. The spermatozoon of A. incrassatus presents its own specificities: it exhibits an evolution of the centriolar derivative characterized by only nine peripheral elements deprived of a central element in the anterior part, then nine peripheral and one central element, and finally, nine peripheral elements with two central elements. An assumption is emitted on a probable correspondence of the evolution of the derivative centriolar during the spermiogenesis and the evolution that occurs in the spermatozoon. Protein granules also show different sizes and forms, full or emptied of their contents compared with data on other Acanthocephala. PMID:22307764

  10. A genetic map of Cottus gobio (Pisces, Teleostei) based on microsatellites can be linked to the physical map of Tetraodon nigroviridis.

    PubMed

    Stemshorn, K C; Nolte, A W; Tautz, D

    2005-11-01

    To initiate QTL studies in the nonmodel fish Cottus gobio we constructed a genetic map based on 171 microsatellite markers. The mapping panel consisted of F1 intercrosses between two divergent Cottus lineages from the River Rhine System. Basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) searches with the flanking sequences of the microsatellite markers yielded a significant (e < 10(-5)) hit with the Tetraodon nigroviridis genomic sequence for 45% of the Cottus loci. Remarkably, most of these hits were due to short highly conserved noncoding stretches. These have an average length of 40 bp and are on average 92% conserved. Comparison of the map locations between the two genomes revealed extensive conserved synteny, suggesting that the Tetraodon genomic sequence will serve as an excellent genomic reference for at least the Acanthopterygii, which include evolutionarily interesting fish groups such as guppies (Poecilia), cichlids (Tilapia) or Xiphophorus (Platy). The apparent high density of short conserved noncoding stretches in these fish genomes will highly facilitate the identification of genes that have been identified in QTL mapping strategies of evolutionary relevant traits. PMID:16313473

  11. Optimization of a Cytochrome-P450-Monooxygenase-1A-Mediated EROD Assay in the Cape Hake Species Merluccius capensis and Merluccius paradoxus (Pisces)

    PubMed Central

    De Almeida, Louise; Froneman, William; Pletschke, Brett

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase 1A (CYP1A) is induced by several planar toxic compounds, for example, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the induction of this protein is often measured in terms of CYP1A-mediated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. This study was aimed at developing this assay in the Cape hake species Merluccius capensis and Merluccius paradoxus (considered one stock). Microsomal fractions were obtained from frozen fish liver samples by differential centrifugation. Fluorimetric and spectrophotometric analysis of the EROD assay resulted in the spectrophotometric (at 572 nm) detection method being selected, as this method resulted in a lower degree of variability and demonstrated higher reproducibility. The activity in the EROD assay was enhanced in the presence of NADPH, and the addition of dicumarol (phase II enzyme inhibitor) to the reaction mixtures prevented the underestimation of this assay by the inhibition of DT-diaphorase. In summary, an EROD assay was established for use in Cape hake species. PMID:22145075

  12. Distribution, population biology, and trophic ecology of the deepwater demersal fish Halosauropsis macrochir (Pisces: Halosauridae) on the mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Clark, Laura; Hansen, Hege Øverbø; Cousins, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Halosauropsis macrochir ranked amongst the most abundant and widespread demersal fishes on the mid-Atlantic Ridge of the North Atlantic (Iceland-Azores) with greatest abundance at 1700-3500 m. All sizes, ranging from 10-76 cm total length, occurred in the area without any apparent spatial pattern or depth trend. Using otolith sections displaying growth increments assumed to represent annuli, the age range recorded was 2-36 years, but most individuals were <20 years. Length and weight at age data were used to fit growth models. No differences between sexes in length and weight at age were observed. The majority of samples had a surplus of males. Diet analysis showed that H. macrochir feeds on Crustacea, Teleostei, Polychaeta, and Cephalopoda, but few prey could be identified to lower taxonomical levels. The mid-Atlantic Ridge constitutes a major portion of the North Atlantic living space of the abyssal halosaur where it completes its full life cycle, primarily as an actively foraging euryophagous micronekton/epibenthos and infauna feeder, becoming a partial piscivore with increasing size. PMID:22384030

  13. Statistical analysis of anionic detergent-induced changes in the goblet mucous cells of opercular epidermis and gill epithelium of Rita rita (Ham.) (Bagridae: Pisces).

    PubMed

    Roy, D

    1988-06-01

    Rita rita exposed to 96-hr LC50 (6.9 mg/liter) of an anionic detergent, dodecylbenzene sodium sulfonate, show significant changes in the number and size of goblet mucous cells in the opercular epidermis as well as in the lining epithelium of the gill arch and the gill filament at different time intervals of treatment. A shift in the staining nature of these cells from acidic glycoprotein to neutral glycoprotein, acidic glycosaminoglycans in the opercular epidermis and acidic glycoprotein to neutral glycoprotein and then again to acidic glycoprotein + acidic glycosaminoglycans in the gill filament epithelium reflects a change in the physiological status of fish. PMID:3168874

  14. Swimming abilities of wild-caught, late-stage larvae of Diplodus capensis and Sarpa salpa (Pisces: Sparidae) from temperate South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattrick, Paula; Strydom, Nadine A.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the movement of marine fish larvae in coastal habitats requires an assessment of active swimming abilities. The critical speed ( U-crit) and endurance swimming of late-stage larvae of Diplodus capensis and Sarpa salpa (Family Sparidae), common inshore recreational linefish species, were measured in a laboratory swimming chamber. Postflexion and settlement-stage larvae were collected from the wild in a small bay on the warm temperate coast of South Africa. Larvae were allowed to acclimate in captivity and were tested soon after capture. For the endurance tests a speed of 18 cm s -1 was selected, as this approximated the mean current speed observed in the coastal environment of the area. The mean U-crit value (maximum swimming speed) for D. capensis (19 cm s -1) was similar to that of S. salpa (18 cm s -1), and similarly mean endurance (km swum) for S. salpa (8 km) was similar to that of D. capensis (6 km). The increase in critical speed and endurance swimming abilities with standard length was best described by a linear relationship. At lengths between 12 and 15 mm BL, D. capensis was the better swimmer, whereas S. salpa was the better swimmer between 15 and 16 mm BL. Of all the larvae that swam at critical speed, 90% were in an inertial environment. These swimming speeds exceed the modal current velocities observed in the shallow nearshore of the study region where these larvae occur abundantly. These swimming abilities provide larvae with the potential to influence their dispersal trajectories and ultimately influence their distribution in their nearshore nursery areas.

  15. A new perspective on phylogeny and evolution of tetraodontiform fishes (Pisces: Acanthopterygii) based on whole mitochondrial genome sequences: Basal ecological diversification?

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The order Tetraodontiformes consists of approximately 429 species of fishes in nine families. Members of the order exhibit striking morphological diversity and radiated into various habitats such as freshwater, brackish and coastal waters, open seas, and deep waters along continental shelves and slopes. Despite extensive studies based on both morphology and molecules, there has been no clear resolution except for monophyly of each family and sister-group relationships of Diodontidae + Tetraodontidae and Balistidae + Monacanthidae. To address phylogenetic questions of tetraodontiform fishes, we used whole mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences from 27 selected species (data for 11 species were newly determined during this study) that fully represent all families and subfamilies of Tetraodontiformes (except for Hollardinae of the Triacanthodidae). Partitioned maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian analyses were performed on two data sets comprising concatenated nucleotide sequences from 13 protein-coding genes (all positions included; third codon positions converted into purine [R] and pyrimidine [Y]), 22 transfer RNA and two ribosomal RNA genes (total positions = 15,084). Results The resultant tree topologies from the two data sets were congruent, with many internal branches showing high support values. The mitogenomic data strongly supported monophyly of all families and subfamilies (except the Tetraodontinae) and sister-group relationships of Balistidae + Monacanthidae and Tetraodontidae + Diodontidae, confirming the results of previous studies. However, we also found two unexpected basal splits into Tetraodontoidei (Triacanthidae + Balistidae + Monacanthidae + Tetraodontidae + Diodontidae + Molidae) and Triacanthodoidei (Ostraciidae + Triodontidae + Triacanthodidae). Conclusion This basal split into the two clades has never been reported and challenges previously proposed hypotheses based on both morphology and nuclear gene sequences. It is likely that the basal split had involved ecological diversification, because most members of Tetraodontoidei exclusively occur in shallow waters (freshwater, brackish and coastal waters, and open seas), while those of Triacanthodoidei occur mainly in relatively deep waters along continental shelves and slopes except for more derived ostraciids. This suggests that the basal split between the two clades led to subsequent radiation into the two different habitats. PMID:18638411

  16. [Size and age structure of the striped marlin Tetrapturus audax (Pisces: Xiphidae), at Cabo San Lucas, Baja California sur, México].

    PubMed

    Barrera, Felipe Neri Melo; Uraga, Roberto Felix

    2004-12-01

    The striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax) is found in temperate and tropical waters of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. It is particularly abundant in the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula. Specimens brought to Cabo San Lucas port (22 degrees 53' N y 109 degrees 54' W) by the sport fishery fleet that operates withing a radius of 54 km from 1988 to 1993 were sexes, measured and weighed. A total 1030 individuals were sampled. Dorsal fin spines (389) were collected for age estimation. The spines were sectioned and hyaline-opaque bands counted. The relation of length to spine radius was similar for males and females. The fourth dorsal spine reflected the growth of the fish. The rhythm of growth mark formation is yearly and related to the sea surface temperature. Ten age groups were found and the seventh group was the most abundant, followed by groups "6" and "8". The age structure of the striped marlin was stable in the study period. The observed sizes were 160-280 cm jaw length with 90% of the organisms measuring between 190 and 225 cm. The small individuals recruit to the fishery from June to December. PMID:17354410

  17. A Sensitive CO(1-0) Survey in Pegasus-Pisces; Reducing the Dark Gas Inventory the Old-Fashioned Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, Loris A.; Donate, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    The idea that substantial molecular gas is present in the ISM but is not detectable by the CO(1-0) emission line at 115 GHz has become fairly prevalent in the last decade. This component has come to be known as “dark gas” in the sense that it is hard to trace using the standard spectral line tracers. It is usually identified by gamma-ray or infrared emission, or via the C+ spectral line at 158 microns. However, in determining the dark gas component and comparing it to the molecular gas traced by the CO(1-0) line, existing CO surveys of varying sensitivity are employed. Even the most sensitive CO surveys typically employed in this fashion have at best 1-sigma rms values of about 0.1 K in antenna temperature. We surveyed a small region in the vicinity of the high-latitude molecular cloud MBM 55 in the CO(1-0) line using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12-meter telescope. The 1-sigma rms of our survey (0.02 – 0.03 K) was significantly better than that of typical CO surveys. We detected more CO emission than previous work had found and increased the known H2 in the region by nearly 80%, thereby reducing significantly the contribution from dark gas.

  18. Distribution, Population Biology, and Trophic Ecology of the Deepwater Demersal Fish Halosauropsis macrochir (Pisces: Halosauridae) on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Clark, Laura; Hansen, Hege Øverbø; Cousins, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Halosauropsis macrochir ranked amongst the most abundant and widespread demersal fishes on the mid-Atlantic Ridge of the North Atlantic (Iceland-Azores) with greatest abundance at 1700–3500 m. All sizes, ranging from 10–76 cm total length, occurred in the area without any apparent spatial pattern or depth trend. Using otolith sections displaying growth increments assumed to represent annuli, the age range recorded was 2–36 years, but most individuals were <20 years. Length and weight at age data were used to fit growth models. No differences between sexes in length and weight at age were observed. The majority of samples had a surplus of males. Diet analysis showed that H. macrochir feeds on Crustacea, Teleostei, Polychaeta, and Cephalopoda, but few prey could be identified to lower taxonomical levels. The mid-Atlantic Ridge constitutes a major portion of the North Atlantic living space of the abyssal halosaur where it completes its full life cycle, primarily as an actively foraging euryophagous micronekton/epibenthos and infauna feeder, becoming a partial piscivore with increasing size. PMID:22384030

  19. A cytochemical study of the "chloride cells" in the skin of a fresh-water teleost (Channa striata (Bl.) Channidae, Pisces).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, T K; Mittal, A K

    1975-01-01

    The chloride cells in the skin of Channa striata have been described. The cytoplasm of these cells is filled with acidophilic, osmiophilic and sudanophilic granules. The sudanophila is due to phospholipids. These cells give positive reaction for chloride ions and exhibit the presence of neutral mucopolysaccharides. The cytoplasm of these cells is packed with numerous mitochondria and exhibit high succinic dehydrogenase activity which may provide the energy needed for the active transportation of ions. Alkaline phosphatase activity could not be demonstrated in these cells. The presence of chloride cells in comparatively large numbers in the regions where the epidermis is thin is correlated as an adaptation for the increased efficiency of these cells for the transportation of ions so as to maintain the osmotic concentration of its body fluid which is higher than that of the surrounding medium. PMID:127502

  20. Anuretes grandis sp. n., a caligid copepod (Siphonostomatoida) parasitic on Diagramma pictum (Pisces) in Taiwan, with discussion of Anuretes Heller, 1865.

    PubMed

    Ho, J; Lin, C L

    2000-01-01

    A new species of caligid copepod (Siphonostomatoida), Anuretes grandis sp. n., parasitic on the painted sweetlips [Diagramma pictum (Thunberg)] in Taiwan is described. The new species is distinguished from its congeners by having: (1) free margin of cephalothorax not covering fourth pediger, (2) large genital complex longer than 2/3 of the cephalic shield, (3) no maxillary whip, (4) leg 3 with 9 setae on the terminal segment of exopod and 8 plumose setae on the terminal segment of endopod, and (5) armature of I,III on leg 4 exopod. Genus Anuretes Heller, 1865 is reviewed and redefined. Based on the new diagnosis three species (A. chelatus Prabha et Pillai, A. fedderni Price and A. parvulus Wilson) were transferred to Pseudanuretes, and two species (A. furcatus Capart and A. renalis Heegaard) were transferred to Lepeophtheirus. In addition, the following three species of caligids were transferred to Anuretes: Lepeophtheirus fallolunulus Lewis, Heniochophilus indicus Pillai, and Lepeophtheirus rotundigenitalis Prabha et Pillai. The latter is renamed Anuretes occultus nom. n. due to the homonym encountered through this transfer. "Anuretes plectorhynchi Yamaguti" reported by Prabha and Pillai (1986) is renamed Anuretes similis sp. n. and Anuretes yamagutii Prabha et Pillai is relegated to the synonym of Anuretes anomalus Pillai. A key to the 18 species of Anuretes is provided. PMID:11104151

  1. Trophic ecology of the deep-sea fish Malacosteus niger (Pisces: Stomiidae): An enigmatic feeding ecology to facilitate a unique visual system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Tracey T.

    2005-11-01

    The deep-sea fish Malacosteus niger belongs to a family of fishes, the dragonfishes (Order: Stomiiformes, Family: Stomiidae), that are among the top predators of the open ocean mesopelagic zone. Malacosteus typifies the morphological adaptation of this group for the taking of relatively large prey. These adaptations include huge fangs, an enormous gape, and the loss of gill rakers. Despite these adaptations, examination of specimens of this species from different ocean basins shows that zooplanktivory is a common feeding mode of the species, an extreme departure from its trophic lineage. Large calanoid copepods made up 69-83% of prey numbers and 9-47% of prey biomass in specimens from the North Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, and throughout the Pacific. As M. niger feeding observations have never been reported, the rationale for this enigmatic feeding ecology must be inferred from other aspects of its ecology. As presently known, M. niger is unique among all vertebrates in the possession of both a long-wave bioluminescence system and a bacteriochlorophyll-derived retinal photosensitizer that allows long-wave visual sensitivity. A two-part theory is presented to explain why M. niger radically diverges from its clade and preys on food it does not appear morphologically suited to eat: (1) the combination of long-wave bioluminescence and vision systems suggests that M. niger may search small volumes for food, and thus may sustain itself energetically by snacking on small parcels of food (copepods) in between rare encounters with large prey, and (2) M. niger may gain the raw material for its long-wave visual sensitivity, and thus its feeding mode, from the consumption of copepods.

  2. Stratigraphic context and paleoenvironmental significance of minor taxa (Pisces, Reptilia, Aves, Rodentia) from the late Early Pleistocene paleoanthropological site of Buia (Eritrea).

    PubMed

    Rook, L; Ghinassi, M; Carnevale, G; Delfino, M; Pavia, M; Bondioli, L; Candilio, F; Coppa, A; Martínez-Navarro, B; Medin, T; Papini, M; Zanolli, C; Libsekal, Y

    2013-01-01

    The Buia Homo site, also known as Wadi Aalad, is an East African paleoanthropological site near the village of Buia that, due to its very rich yield from the late Early Pleistocene, has been intensively investigated since 1994. In this paper, which reports on the finds of the 2010-2011 excavations, we include new fossil evidence on previously identified taxa (i.e., reptiles), as well as the very first description of the small mammal, fish and bird remains discovered. In particular, this study documents the discovery of the first African fossil of the genus Burhinus (Aves, Charadriiformes) and of the first rodent from the site. This latter is identified as a thryonomyid rodent (cane rat), a relatively common taxon in African paleoanthropological faunal assemblages. On the whole, the new occurrences documented within the Buia vertebrate assemblage confirm the occurrence of taxa characterized by strong water dependence. The paleoenvironmental characteristics of the fauna are confirmed as fully compatible with the evidence obtained through sedimentology and facies analysis, documenting the sedimentary evolution of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine systems. PMID:23159190

  3. Big Fish, Little Fish: Two New Ultra-faint Satellites of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokurov, V.; Walker, M. G.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Irwin, M. J.; Just, D.; Koposov, S.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E.; Watkins, L.; Wyrzykowski, L.

    2010-03-01

    We report the discovery of two new Milky Way satellites in the neighboring constellations of Pisces and Pegasus identified in data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Pisces II, an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy lies at the distance of ~180 kpc, some 15° away from the recently detected Pisces I. Segue 3, an ultra-faint star cluster lies at the distance of 16 kpc. We use deep follow-up imaging obtained with the 4-m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory to derive their structural parameters. Pisces II has a half-light radius of ~60 pc, while Segue 3 is 20 times smaller at only 3 pc.

  4. PHARMACOLOGIC PROBING OF MERCURIC CHLORIDE-INDUCED RENAL DYSFUNCTION IN THE NEONATAL RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetazolamide, furosemide, chlorothiazide and amiloride are pharmacologic agents that act in the proximal tubule, loop of Henle, early distal tubule and late distal tubule, respectively. These diuretic agents were used to evaluate the functional integrity of discrete segments of ...

  5. Origin and dynamic lineage characteristics of the developing Drosophila midgut stem cells.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2016-08-15

    Proliferating intestinal stem cells (ISCs) generate all cell types of the Drosophila midgut, including enterocytes, endocrine cells, and gland cells (e.g., copper cells), throughout the lifetime of the animal. Among the signaling mechanisms controlling the balance between ISC self-renewal and the production of different cell types, Notch (N) plays a pivotal role. In this paper we investigated the emergence of ISCs during metamorphosis and the role of N in this process. Precursors of the Drosophila adult intestinal stem cells (pISCs) can be first detected within the pupal midgut during the first hours after onset of metamorphosis as motile mesenchymal cells. pISCs perform 2-3 rounds of parasynchronous divisions. The first mitosis yields only an increase in pISC number. During the following rounds of mitosis, dividing pISCs give rise to more pISCs, as well as the endocrine cells that populate the midgut of the eclosing fly. Enterocytes do not appear among the pISC progeny until around the time of eclosion. The "proendocrine" gene prospero (pros), expressed from mid-pupal stages onward in pISCs, is responsible to advance the endocrine fate in these cells; following removal of pros, pISCs continue to proliferate, but endocrine cells do not form. Conversely, the onset of N activity that occurs around the stage when pros comes on restricts pros expression among pISCs. Loss of N abrogates proliferation and switches on an endocrine fate among all pISCs. Our results suggest that a switch depending on the activity of N and pros acts at the level of the pISC to decide between continued proliferation and endocrine differentiation. PMID:27321560

  6. Methods for design and evaluation of integrated hardware/software systems for concurrent computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Terrence W.

    1987-01-01

    Two testbed programming environments to support the evaluation of a large range of parallel architectures have been implemented under the program Parallel Implementation of Scientific Computing Environments (PISCES). The PISCES 1 environment was applied to two areas of aerospace interest: a sparse matrix iterative equation solver and a dynamic scene analysis system. Currently, the NICE/SPAR testbed system for structural analysis is being modified for parallel operation under PISCES 2; the PISCES 1 applications are also being adapted for PISCES 2. A new formal model of concurrent computation has been developed, based on the mathematical system known as H graph semantics together with a timed Petri net model of the parallel aspects of a system.

  7. Post-operative intra-spinal subdural collections after pediatric posterior fossa tumor resection: Incidence, imaging and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Harreld, Julie H; Mohammed, Noryati; Goldsberry, Grant; Li, Xingyu; Li, Yimei; Boop, Frederick; Patay, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Post-operative intra-spinal subdural collections (PISC) in children after posterior fossa tumor resection may temporarily hinder metastasis detection by MRI or CSF analysis, potentially impacting therapy. We investigated incidence, imaging and clinical features, predisposing factors and time course of PISC after posterior fossa tumor resection. Materials and Methods Retrospective IRB-approved review of post-operative spine MRIs in 243 children (5.5±4.6 years) from our clinical database post-resection of posterior fossa tumors from October 1994-August 2010 yielded 37 (6.0±4.8 years old) PISC+ subjects. Extent and signal properties of PISC were recorded for post-operative (37/37), pre-operative (15/37) and follow-up spine MRIs (35/37). Risk factors were compared to age-matched internal controls (n=37, 5.9±4.5 years). Associations of histology, hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation and post-operative intracranial subdural collections with PISC were assessed by Fisher’s exact test or Chi-square test. Association between pre-operative tumor volume and PISC was assessed by Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results The overall incidence of PISC was 37/243 (15.2%), greatest ≤7 days post-operatively (36%). 97% of PISC were seen 0–41 days post-operatively (12.9±11.0 days). PISC were T2 hyper-intense, iso-intense to CSF on T1WI, homogeneously enhanced and resolved on follow-up MRI (35/35). None were symptomatic. PISC were associated with intracranial subdural collections (p=0.0011) and pre-operative tonsillar herniation (p=0.0228). Conclusion PISC are infrequent, clinically silent and resolve spontaneously, and have a distinctive appearance. Pre-operative tonsillar herniation appears to be a predisposing factor. In this series, repeat MRI by 4 weeks documented improvement or resolution of PISC in 88%. PMID:25614472

  8. A novel offset cancellation based on parasitic-insensitive switched-capacitor sensing circuit for the out-of-plane single-Gimbaled decoupled CMOS-MEMS gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Hui; Huang, Han-Pang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel parasitic-insensitive switched-capacitor (PISC) sensing circuit design in order to obtain high sensitivity and ultra linearity and reduce the parasitic effect for the out-of-plane single-gimbaled decoupled CMOS-MEMS gyroscope (SGDG). According to the simulation results, the proposed PISC circuit has better sensitivity and high linearity in a wide dynamic range. Experimental results also show a better performance. In addition, the PISC circuit can use signal processing to cancel the offset and noise. Thus, this circuit is very suitable for gyroscope measurement. PMID:23493122

  9. A Novel Offset Cancellation Based on Parasitic-Insensitive Switched-Capacitor Sensing Circuit for the Out-of-Plane Single-Gimbaled Decoupled CMOS-MEMS Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Hui; Huang, Han-Pang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel parasitic-insensitive switched-capacitor (PISC) sensing circuit design in order to obtain high sensitivity and ultra linearity and reduce the parasitic effect for the out-of-plane single-gimbaled decoupled CMOS-MEMS gyroscope (SGDG). According to the simulation results, the proposed PISC circuit has better sensitivity and high linearity in a wide dynamic range. Experimental results also show a better performance. In addition, the PISC circuit can use signal processing to cancel the offset and noise. Thus, this circuit is very suitable for gyroscope measurement. PMID:23493122

  10. Interspecific Utility of Microsatellites in Fish: A Case Study of (CT)(n) and (GT)(n) Markers in the Shanny Lipophrys pholis (Pisces: Blenniidae) and Their Use in Other Blennioidei.

    PubMed

    Guillemaud; Almada; Serrão Santos R; Cancela

    2000-05-01

    We report the development of new microsatellite markers that can be used for population analyses in the shanny Lipophrys pholis. The procedure involved the construction of a microsatellite-enriched genomic bank. Five (GT)(n) and (CT)(n) microsatellites have been characterized, four of which are polymorphic. The analysis of one population allowed us to verify their usefulness as markers in population studies. Moreover, interspecific amplifications have been performed using primers defined in other species to amplify Lipophrys pholis, or using the primers defined in Lipophrys pholis to amplify other species. We use these results to discuss the hypothesis that microsatellites are highly conserved in fish. PMID:10852803

  11. Chromosomal mapping of H3 histone and 5S rRNA genes in eight species of Astyanax (Pisces, Characiformes) with different diploid numbers: syntenic conservation of repetitive genes.

    PubMed

    Piscor, Diovani; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia Pasquali

    2016-03-01

    The genus Astyanax is widely distributed from the southern United States to northern Patagonia, Argentina. While cytogenetic studies have been performed for this genus, little is known about the histone gene families. The aim of this study was to examine the chromosomal relationships among the different species of Astyanax. The chromosomal locations of the 5S rRNA and H3 histone genes were determined in A. abramis, A. asuncionensis, A. altiparanae, A. bockmanni, A. eigenmanniorum, A. mexicanus (all 2n = 50), A. fasciatus (2n = 46), and A. schubarti (2n = 36). All eight species exhibited H3 histone clusters on two chromosome pairs. In six species (A. abramis, A. asuncionensis, A. altiparanae, A. bockmanni, A. eigenmanniorum, and A. fasciatus), syntenic clusters of H3 histone and 5S rDNA were observed on metacentric (m) or submetacentric (sm) chromosomes. In seven species, clusters of 5S rDNA sequences were located on one or two chromosome pairs. In A. mexicanus, 5S rDNA clusters were located on four chromosome pairs. This study demonstrates that H3 histone clusters are conserved on two chromosome pairs in the genus Astyanax, and specific chromosomal features may contribute to the genomic organization of the H3 histone and 5S rRNA genes. PMID:26835745

  12. Validity of a blue stripe snapper, Lutjanus octolineatus (Cuvier 1828) and a related species, L. bengalensis (Bloch 1790) with a new species (Pisces; Lutjanidae) from the Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Yukio; Al-Mamry, Juma M; Heemstra, Phillip C

    2016-01-01

    Lutjanus octolineatus (Cuvier 1828), previously considered a junior synonym of Lutjanus bengalensis (Bloch 1790), is shown to be a valid species and lectotypes are designated. Both species are redescribed. The two species have overlapping distributions in the Indian Ocean, but are clearly separable by different dorsal-fin spine counts, blue-striped pattern on the body and the presence or absence of a subocular extension of cheek scales. Lutjanus octovittata (Valenciennes 1830), formerly assigned to synonymy of L. bengalensis, is considered a junior synonym of L. octolineatus based on examination of the holotype. Lutjanus sapphirolineatus n. sp., a species formerly misidentified as L. bengalensis, is described based on 10 specimens from Oman and Somalia. The new species differs from the three species above by a combination of different characters. Analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1, 603 bp) genetic marker, also strongly supports the validity of each species of the blue-striped snapper complex as distinct. PMID:27394598

  13. Lamellodiscus aff. euzeti Diamanka, Boudaya, Toguebaye & Pariselle, 2011 (Monogenea: Diplectanidae) from the gills of Cheimerius nufar (Valenciennes) (Pisces: Sparidae) collected in the Arabian Sea, with comments on the distribution, specificity and historical biogeography of Lamellodiscus spp.

    PubMed

    Machkewskyi, Volodymyr K; Dmitrieva, Evgenija V; Gibson, David I; Al-Jufaili, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Specimens of Lamellodiscus Johnston & Tiegs, 1922 (Monogenea: Diplectanidae) were collected from the gills of Cheimerius nufar (Valenciennes) (Sparidae) in the Arabian Sea. All of these parasites belonged to one and the same species, which is morphologically very close to L. euzeti Diamanka, Boudaya, Toguebaye & Pariselle, 2011. A different host, distant locality and small morphological differences compared with the original description of L. euzeti acted as a stimulus for a detailed redescription. The specimens from the Arabian Sea differ slightly in the details of the male copulatory organ (MCO) from the type-specimens of L. euzeti, which were re-examined, and from the respective drawings in its original description. Such differences include a longer inner process of the large element of the accessory piece associated with the proximal part of the copulatory tube, a longer point on the small element of the accessory piece associated with the distal part of the copulatory tube, and the presence of a smooth or slightly folded inner margin of this element rather than structures resembling spines which occur in the type-specimens of L. euzeti. Therefore, the present specimens infecting C. nufar in the Indo-Pacific may represent a different, but morphologically very similar species to the Atlantic form L. euzeti; consequently, they are recognised here as Lamellodiscus aff. euzeti. This form belongs to the 'ignoratus s. str.' subgroup of the genus. The composition of this subgroup is redefined to comprise 17 species, including L. corallinus Paperna, 1965 but excluding L. acanthopagri Roubal, 1981, and the morphology of the MCO of representatives of this group is clarified. A link between the diversity of Lamellodiscus species and the ancestral origin of present-day sparid species in the Tethys Sea is suggested. It is shown that Lamellodiscus spp. exhibit rather high levels of specificity to their hosts, since half of them parasitise only a single host species and c.90% infect closely related host species. Comparison of the levels of host-specificity of the species of this genus with other narrowly specific genera of the Dactylogyridea revealed that their estimations are comparable. The possibility of intra-host speciation within Lamellodiscus is discussed. It is shown that a co-evolutionary model is more discernible if it includes data on the occurrence of morphologically similar species from different regions and host taxa. PMID:25301511

  14. BIG FISH, LITTLE FISH: TWO NEW ULTRA-FAINT SATELLITES OF THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Belokurov, V.; Walker, M. G.; Evans, N. W.; Gilmore, G.; Irwin, M. J.; Koposov, S.; Watkins, L.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Just, D.; Olszewski, E.; Mateo, M. E-mail: walker@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2010-03-20

    We report the discovery of two new Milky Way satellites in the neighboring constellations of Pisces and Pegasus identified in data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Pisces II, an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy lies at the distance of {approx}180 kpc, some 15 deg. away from the recently detected Pisces I. Segue 3, an ultra-faint star cluster lies at the distance of 16 kpc. We use deep follow-up imaging obtained with the 4-m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory to derive their structural parameters. Pisces II has a half-light radius of {approx}60 pc, while Segue 3 is 20 times smaller at only 3 pc.

  15. MoonRIDERS: NASA and Hawaii's Lunar Surface Flight Experiment for Late 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    This briefing will update the MoonRIDERS lunar surface flight experiment project between NASA-KSC, PISCES, and two Hawaii high schools investigating critical lunar dust-removal technologies. Launch planned in early 2017 on GLXP mission.

  16. First Point of Aries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    An alternative term for vernal equinox. At one time (some 2000 years ago) the vernal equinox lay in the constellation of Aries but, due to precession, this is no longer the case and the vernal equinox has moved into Pisces....

  17. Potential virulence of viable but nonculturable Shigella dysenteriae type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, I; Shahamat, M; Chowdhury, M A; Colwell, R R

    1996-01-01

    We examined a virulent strain of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 after induction into the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state for its ability to (i) maintain the Shiga toxin (stx) gene; (ii) maintain biologically active Shiga toxin (ShT); and (iii) adhere to intestinal epithelial cells (Henle 407 cell line). PCR was used to amplify the stx gene from VBNC cells of S. dysenteriae type 1, thereby establishing its presence even when cells are in the VBNC state. VBNC S. dysenteriae type 1 ShT was monitored by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with mouse monoclonal antibodies against the B subunit of ShT and affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibodies against ShT. We used the Henle 407 cell line to study the adhesive property of VBNC S. dysenteriae type 1 cells in a series of tissue culture experiments. Results showed that VBNC S. dysenteriae type 1 not only maintained the stx gene and biologically active ShT but also remained capable of adhering to Henle 407 cells. However, S. dysenteriae type 1 cells lost the ability to invade Henle 407 cells after entering the VBNC state. From results of the study, we conclude that VBNC cells of S. dysenteriae type 1 retain several virulence factors and remain potentially virulent, posing a public health problem. PMID:8572688

  18. PHARMACOLOGIC PROBING OF RENAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEONATAL RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was designed to examine the ontogeny of renal functions in the neonatal rat using various pharmacologic agents as probes. The renal responses of 2, 6, and 10 day old rats to diuretic agents known to act on proximal tubules, loops of Henle and distal tubules were assesse...

  19. 38 CFR 4.115b - Ratings of the genitourinary system-diagnoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... attacks of colic with infection (pyonephrosis), kidney function impaired 30 Frequent attacks of colic..., with symptoms interfering with function: Rate as voiding dysfunction 7516Bladder, fistula of: Rate as... of Henle's loop and proximal or distal nephron function, etc.): Minimum rating for...

  20. A qualitative analysis of the kidney structure of Meliphagid honeyeaters from wet and arid environments.

    PubMed

    Casotti, G; Richardson, K C

    1993-04-01

    The qualitative ultrastructural renal anatomy was examined in 4 species of honeyeater (parvorder Corvi) inhabiting 2 distinctly different environments. The kidneys of the wet zone New Holland honeyeater Phylidonyris novaehollandiae and little wattlebird Anthochaera lunulata were compared with those of the arid zone white-fronted honeyeater Phylidonyris albifrons and spiny-cheeked honeyeater Acanthogenys rufogularis. The size and structure of glomeruli were similar between species. In all species, except in P. novaehollandiae, the proximal tubule cells contained wide intercellular spaces filled with basolateral cell membrane interdigitations. Medullary nephron tubules were arranged in a sequential manner in all species. Thick and thin limbs of Henle were separated by the collecting ducts and extended the entire length of the medulla, a situation not found in muscicapid passerines. This tubular arrangement is not entirely consistent with the proposed single-effect countercurrent multiplier theory. The thin limb of Henle consisted of only one epithelium type, which had wide intercellular spaces. The thick limb of Henle consisted of 2 types of epithelial cells, each having narrow intercellular spaces, but with varying degrees of cell membrane infoldings. The ultrastructural morphology of the limbs of Henle in honeyeaters differed from those of muscicapid passerines. The ultrastructure of the distal nephron was similar in each species studied. All of the above nephron characteristics are considered to enable honeyeaters to absorb a large proportion of solutes and water from the glomerular filtrate. PMID:8376198

  1. Workplace Incivility: Worker and Organizational Antecedents and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, James E., II; Bartlett, Michelle E.; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Unresolved workplace conflicts represent the largest reducible costs to an organization (Keenan & Newton, 1985). As incivility increases (Buhler, 2003; Pearson, Andersson, & Wegner, 2001; Pearson & Porath, 2005) more research is being conducted (Tepper, Duffy, Henle, & Lambert, 2006; Vickers, 2006). This review examined antecedents (variables that…

  2. Automated mapping of persistent ice and snow cover across the western U.S. with Landsat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkowitz, David J.; Forster, Richard R.

    2016-07-01

    We implemented an automated approach for mapping persistent ice and snow cover (PISC) across the conterminous western U.S. using all available Landsat TM and ETM+ scenes acquired during the late summer/early fall period between 2010 and 2014. Two separate validation approaches indicate this dataset provides a more accurate representation of glacial ice and perennial snow cover for the region than either the U.S. glacier database derived from US Geological Survey (USGS) Digital Raster Graphics (DRG) maps (based on aerial photography primarily from the 1960s-1980s) or the National Land Cover Database 2011 perennial ice and snow cover class. Our 2010-2014 Landsat-derived dataset indicates 28% less glacier and perennial snow cover than the USGS DRG dataset. There are larger differences between the datasets in some regions, such as the Rocky Mountains of Northwest Wyoming and Southwest Montana, where the Landsat dataset indicates 54% less PISC area. Analysis of Landsat scenes from 1987-1988 and 2008-2010 for three regions using a more conventional, semi-automated approach indicates substantial decreases in glaciers and perennial snow cover that correlate with differences between PISC mapped by the USGS DRG dataset and the automated Landsat-derived dataset. This suggests that most of the differences in PISC between the USGS DRG and the Landsat-derived dataset can be attributed to decreases in PISC, as opposed to differences between mapping techniques. While the dataset produced by the automated Landsat mapping approach is not designed to serve as a conventional glacier inventory that provides glacier outlines and attribute information, it allows for an updated estimate of PISC for the conterminous U.S. as well as for smaller regions. Additionally, the new dataset highlights areas where decreases in PISC have been most significant over the past 25-50 years.

  3. Semiconductor device modeling on a workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.

    1985-09-01

    We choose to move from large mainframe computers to workstations to gain the interactive graphics we need to prepare and to analyze semiconductor device modeling problems. Given this much on a workstation, it is convenient to attempt to solve the entire problem there. We find that a top-of-the-line Apollo 660 workstation, with bit-slice processor, pipelined arithmetic processor, and 4 megabytes of real memory, is surprisingly effective in finding solutions when running the Pisces II device modeling code. In our experiment we find where the workstation bogs down when running these problems. We both analyze the Pisces CPU time log and we sample the executing program to accumulate a histogram of execution time as distributed over the source code. Results suggest how Pisces could be adapted to solve somewhat larger problems entirely on the workstation. Evolution of a trusted derivative of Pisces, to be used on supercomputers without interactivity, is suggested to complement our success with Pisces on workstations. 4 refs.

  4. A Prototype Integral Field Spectrograph for High Contrast Visible-Light Imaging Spectroscopy of Jovian and Terrestrial Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, M.

    2014-04-01

    We present the design and status of PISCES, a visible light (0.4-1 micron) integral field spectrograph (IFS) being developed for NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. PISCES, the Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies, is a lenslet-based IFS with diffraction limited spatial sampling and a spectral resolution of ~70. It will be a laboratory prototype for future space instruments intended for exoplanet characterization via high contrast imaging, for instance imaging of Jovian and Neptunian class planets with the AFTA Coronagraph and eventually terrestrial planets with a future TPF/ATLAST/NWO type mission. PISCES will demonstrate visible light imaging spectroscopy at the challenging contrast levels required for direct detection and characterization of habitable exoplanets, and is compatible with both coronagraph and starshade mission concepts.

  5. Expanding the Planetary Analog Test Sites in Hawaii - Planetary Basalt Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) is one of the very few planetary surface research test sites in the country that is totally funded by the state legislature. In recent expansions, PISCES is broadening its work in planetary test sites to include much more R&D work in the planetary surface systems, and the manipulation of basalt materials. This is to include laser 3D printing of basalt, 'lunar-concrete' construction in state projects for Hawaii, renewable energy, and adding lava tubes/skylights to their mix of high-quality planetary analog test sites. PISCES Executive Director, Rob Kelso, will be providing program updates on the interest of the Hawaii State Legislature in planetary surface systems, new applied research initiatives in planetary basalts and interests in planetary construction.

  6. A campaign to end animal testing: introducing the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Gilly; Brown, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    The successful development and validation of non-animal techniques, or the analysis of existing data to satisfy regulatory requirements, provide no guarantee that this information will be used in place of animal experiments. In order to advocate for the replacement of animal-based testing requirements, the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd (PISC) liaises with industry, regulatory and research agencies to establish and promote clear paths to validation and regulatory use of non-animal techniques. PISC and its members use an approach that identifies, promotes and verifies the implementation of good scientific practices in place of testing on animals. Examples of how PISC and its members have applied this approach to minimise the use of animals for the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals regulation in the EU and testing of cosmetics on animals in India, are described. PMID:25635647

  7. Adult and offspring size in the ocean over 17 orders of magnitude follows two life history strategies.

    PubMed

    Neuheimer, A B; Hartvig, M; Heuschele, J; Hylander, S; Kiørboe, T; Olsson, K H; Sainmont, J; Andersen, K H

    2015-12-01

    Explaining variability in offspring vs. adult size among groups is a necessary step to determine the evolutionary and environmental constraints shaping variability in life history strategies. This is of particular interest for life in the ocean where a diversity of offspring development strategies is observed along with variability in physical and biological forcing factors in space and time. We compiled adult and offspring size for 407 pelagic marine species covering more than 17 orders of magnitude in body mass including Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Crustaceans, Ctenophora, Elasmobranchii, Mammalia, Sagittoidea, and Teleost. We find marine life following one of two distinct strategies, with offspring size being either proportional to adult size (e.g., Crustaceans, Elasmobranchii, and Mammalia) or invariant with adult size (e.g., Cephalopoda, Cnidaria, Sagittoidea, Teleosts, and possibly Ctenophora). We discuss where these two strategies occur and how these patterns (along with the relative size of the offspring) may be shaped by physical and biological constraints in the organism's environment. This adaptive environment along with the evolutionary history of the different groups shape observed life history strategies and possible group-specific responses to changing environmental conditions (e.g., production and distribution). PMID:26909435

  8. Cloning and functional characterization of Chondrichthyes, cloudy catshark, Scyliorhinus torazame and whale shark, Rhincodon typus estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Kohno, Satomi; Narita, Haruka; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Yamane, Koudai; Hara, Akihiko; Clauss, Tonya M; Walsh, Michael T; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2010-09-15

    Sex-steroid hormones are essential for normal reproductive activity in both sexes in all vertebrates. Estrogens are required for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage and promote the growth and differentiation of the female reproductive system following puberty. Recent studies have shown that environmental estrogens influence the developing reproductive system as well as gametogenesis, especially in males. To understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen actions and to evaluate estrogen receptor-ligand interactions in Elasmobranchii, we cloned a single estrogen receptor (ESR) from two shark species, the cloudy catshark (Scyliorhinus torazame) and whale shark (Rhincodon typus) and used an ERE-luciferase reporter assay system to characterize the interaction of these receptors with steroidal and other environmental estrogens. In the transient transfection ERE-luciferase reporter assay system, both shark ESR proteins displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription, and shark ESRs were more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol compared with other natural and synthetic estrogens. Further, the environmental chemicals, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, octylphenol and DDT could activate both shark ESRs. The assay system provides a tool for future studies examining the receptor-ligand interactions and estrogen disrupting mechanisms in Elasmobranchii. PMID:20600039

  9. A language comparison for scientific computing on MIMD architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mark T.; Patrick, Merrell L.; Voigt, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Choleski's method for solving banded symmetric, positive definite systems is implemented on a multiprocessor computer using three FORTRAN based parallel programming languages, the Force, PISCES and Concurrent FORTRAN. The capabilities of the language for expressing parallelism and their user friendliness are discussed, including readability of the code, debugging assistance offered, and expressiveness of the languages. The performance of the different implementations is compared. It is argued that PISCES, using the Force for medium-grained parallelism, is the appropriate choice for programming Choleski's method on the multiprocessor computer, Flex/32.

  10. Measuring helium bubble diameter distributions in tungsten with grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Kluth, P.; Doerner, R. P.; Kirby, N.; Riley, D.; Corr, C. S.

    2016-02-01

    Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering was performed on tungsten samples exposed to helium plasma in the MAGPIE and Pisces-A linear plasma devices to measure the size distributions of resulting helium nano-bubbles. Nano-bubbles were fitted assuming spheroidal particles and an exponential diameter distribution. These particles had mean diameters between 0.36 and 0.62 nm. Pisces-A exposed samples showed more complex patterns, which may suggest the formation of faceted nano-bubbles or nano-scale surface structures.

  11. Crystals, Randall's plaques and renal stones: do bone and atherosclerosis teach us something?

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Angela; Fabris, Antionia; Tosetto, Enrica; Anglani, Franca; Lupo, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of calcium-oxalate (CaOx) renal stones is still debated and a number of issues needs to be clarified. In particular, it is difficult to combine the intraluminal physical-chemical imbalance and fixed particle theory with the evidence that CaOx stones actually form and grow on Randall's plaque in the renal pelvis. On the basis of recent findings in renal stone research, and data from the biology of ectopic calcification, the hypothesis is advanced that abnormal pre-urine CaOx supersaturation triggers inflammation in the long Henle's loop cells at tip forceps level. This in turn induces differentiation of these cells toward the osteogenic lineage, determining the synthesis of typical bone osteoid proteins (osteopontin, osteocalcin, BMP-2, etc) and hydroxyapatite mineralization of the Henle's basement membrane (beneath the differentiating cells) which precedes Randal's plaque formation. This may constitute a further, still unexplored example of epithelial-mesenchymal-differentiation in the kidney. PMID:15593050

  12. Mechanisms and regulation of renal magnesium transport.

    PubMed

    Houillier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium's most important role is in the release of chemical energy. Although most magnesium is stored outside of the extracellular fluid compartment, the regulated value is blood magnesium concentration. Cellular magnesium and bone magnesium do not play a major role in the defense of blood magnesium concentration; the major role is played by the kidney, where the renal tubule matches the urinary magnesium excretion and the net entry of magnesium into the extracellular fluid. In the kidney, magnesium is reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, and the distal convoluted tubule. Magnesium absorption is mainly paracellular in the proximal tubule and in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, whereas it is transcellular in the distal convoluted tubule. Several hormones and extracellular magnesium itself alter the distal tubular handling of magnesium, but the hormone(s) regulating extracellular magnesium concentration remains unknown. PMID:24512082

  13. Identification of Chromosomal Shigella flexneri Genes Induced by the Eukaryotic Intracellular Environment

    PubMed Central

    Runyen-Janecky, L. J.; Payne, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    Upon entry into the eukaryotic cytosol, the facultative intracellular bacterium Shigella flexneri is exposed to an environment that may necessitate the expression of particular genes for it to survive and grow intracellularly. To identify genes that are induced in response to the intracellular environment, we screened a library containing fragments of the S. flexneri chromosome fused to a promoterless green fluorescent protein gene (gfp). Bacteria containing promoter fusions that had a higher level of gfp expression when S. flexneri was intracellular (in Henle cells) than when S. flexneri was extracellular (in Luria-Bertani broth) were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Nine different genes with increased expression in Henle cells were identified. Several genes (uhpT, bioA, and lysA) were involved in metabolic processes. The uhpT gene, which encoded a sugar phosphate transporter, was the most frequently isolated gene and was induced by glucose-6-phosphate in vitro. Two of the intracellularly induced genes (pstS and phoA) encode proteins involved in phosphate acquisition and were induced by phosphate limitation in vitro. Additionally, three iron-regulated genes (sufA, sitA, and fhuA) were identified. The sufA promoter was derepressed in iron-limiting media and was also induced by oxidative stress. To determine whether intracellularly induced genes are required for survival or growth in the intracellular environment, we constructed mutations in the S. flexneri uhpT and pstS genes by allelic exchange. The uhpT mutant could not use glucose-6-phosphate as a sole carbon source in vitro but exhibited normal plaque formation on Henle cell monolayers. The pstS mutant had no apparent growth defect in low-phosphate media in vitro but formed smaller plaques on Henle cell monolayers than the parent strain. Both mutants were as effective as the parent strain in inducing apoptosis in a macrophage cell line. PMID:12117948

  14. Bartter Syndrome with Normal Aldosterone Level: An Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Huque, S S; Rahman, M H; Khatun, S

    2016-04-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) is a hereditary disease, with an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of transmission. It is characterized by salt wasting hypochloraemic, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis and hyperreninaemia with normal blood pressure. The primary defect is in the thick ascending limb of loop of Henle (TAL). Herein, we report a case that had typical features of BS like severe dehydration, severe hypokalaemia, metabolic alkalosis and failure to thrive but had normal aldosterone level which is very uncommon. PMID:27277374

  15. Specialized expression of simple O-glycans along the rat kidney nephron.

    PubMed

    Toma, V; Zuber, C; Sata, T; Roth, J

    1999-11-01

    Glycosyltransferases can exhibit tissue-specific expression. By histochemistry glycosyltransferases and their products can be localized to specific cell types in organs of complex cellular composition. We have applied the lectin Amaranthin, having a nominal specificity for Galbeta1,3GalNAcR and Neu5Ac2,3Galbeta1, 3GalNAcalpha-R, and a monoclonal antibody raised against Galbeta1, 3GalNAcalphaR to examine the distribution of these simple O-glycans in adult rat kidney. The monoclonal antibody stained ascending thin limbs of Henle, distal convoluted tubules, and collecting ducts of cortex and outer medulla. Remarkably, the ascending thick limb of Henle, located between ascending thin limb and distal convoluted tubules, was unreactive. However, Amaranthin staining was detectable in ascending thick limbs of Henle, in addition to the structures positive with the monoclonal antibody. In kidney extracts, two bands of approximately 160 kDa and >210 kDa were reactive with both Amaranthin and the monoclonal antibody. One band at approximately 200 kDa, and a smear at approximately 100 kDa, were reactive only with Amaranthin. Our data show that in rat kidney simple O-linked glycans are expressed in a highly specialized manner along the renal tubule and can be detected only on a few glycoproteins. This may reflect a cell-type-specific expression of the corresponding glycosyltransferases. PMID:10536035

  16. Learning Directory 1970-71. A Comprehensive Guide to Instructional Materials in All Media. Volume I, Users Guide, Source Index, Instructional Materials Index A-Boun; Volume II, Bourq-Dros; Volume III, Drou-Gree; Volume IV, Greg-Mari; Volume V, Mark-Pisc; Volume VI, Pise-Smel; Volume VII, Smer-Z, 0-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., New York, NY.

    Over 200,000 distinct items of instructional material are indexed in this seven volume annual directory. They are presented in 600,000 entries under more than 225,000 different topics. Information in the directory is divided into two sections: the instructional materials index and the source index. The instructional materials index is organized…

  17. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of all species of swordtails and platies (Pisces: Genus Xiphophorus) uncovers a hybrid origin of a swordtail fish, Xiphophorus monticolus, and demonstrates that the sexually selected sword originated in the ancestral lineage of the genus, but was lost again secondarily

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Males in some species of the genus Xiphophorus, small freshwater fishes from Meso-America, have an extended caudal fin, or sword – hence their common name “swordtails”. Longer swords are preferred by females from both sworded and – surprisingly also, non-sworded (platyfish) species that belong to the same genus. Swordtails have been studied widely as models in research on sexual selection. Specifically, the pre-existing bias hypothesis was interpreted to best explain the observed bias of females in presumed ancestral lineages of swordless species that show a preference for assumed derived males with swords over their conspecific swordless males. However, many of the phylogenetic relationships within this genus still remained unresolved. Here we construct a comprehensive molecular phylogeny of all 26 known Xiphophorus species, including the four recently described species (X. kallmani, X. mayae, X. mixei and X. monticolus). We use two mitochondrial and six new nuclear markers in an effort to increase the understanding of the evolutionary relationships among the species in this genus. Based on the phylogeny, the evolutionary history and character state evolution of the sword was reconstructed and found to have originated in the common ancestral lineage of the genus Xiphophorus and that it was lost again secondarily. Results We estimated the evolutionary relationships among all known species of the genus Xiphophorus based on the largest set of DNA markers so far. The phylogeny indicates that one of the newly described swordtail species, Xiphophorus monticolus, is likely to have arisen through hybridization since it is placed with the southern platyfish in the mitochondrial phylogeny, but with the southern swordtails in the nuclear phylogeny. Such discordance between these two types of markers is a strong indication for a hybrid origin. Additionally, by using a maximum likelihood approach the possession of the sexually selected sword trait is shown to be the most likely ancestral state for the genus Xiphophorus. Further, we provide a well supported estimation of the phylogenetic relationships between the previously unresolved northern swordtail groups. Conclusions This comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the entire genus Xiphophorus provides evidence that a second swordtail species, X. monticolus, arose through hybridization. Previously, we demonstrated that X. clemenciae, another southern swordtail species, arose via hybridization. These findings highlight the potential key role of hybridization in the evolution of this genus and suggest the need for further investigations into how hybridization contributes to speciation more generally. PMID:23360326

  18. The era of Aries and Kriophoros statues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, E.; Mantarakis, P.; Dimitrijević, M. S.

    We discuss the possibility that the great number of ancient Greek statues of Kriophoros (= `ram-bearer') before 1 BC may have been the result of religious influence stemming from the knowledge that the constellation of Aries marked the point of vernal equinox rather than Pisces.

  19. Multiplex matrix network analysis of protein complexes in the human TCR signalosome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen E P; Neier, Steven C; Reed, Brendan K; Davis, Tessa R; Sinnwell, Jason P; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Sciallis, Gabriel F; Wieland, Carilyn N; Torgerson, Rochelle R; Gil, Diana; Neuhauser, Claudia; Schrum, Adam G

    2016-01-01

    Multiprotein complexes transduce cellular signals through extensive interaction networks, but the ability to analyze these networks in cells from small clinical biopsies is limited. To address this, we applied an adaptable multiplex matrix system to physiologically relevant signaling protein complexes isolated from a cell line or from human patient samples. Focusing on the proximal T cell receptor (TCR) signalosome, we assessed 210 pairs of PiSCES (proteins in shared complexes detected by exposed surface epitopes). Upon stimulation of Jurkat cells with superantigen-loaded antigen-presenting cells, this system produced high-dimensional data that enabled visualization of network activity. A comprehensive analysis platform generated PiSCES biosignatures by applying unsupervised hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis, an adaptive nonparametric with empirical cutoff analysis, and weighted correlation network analysis. We generated PiSCES biosignatures from 4-mm skin punch biopsies from control patients or patients with the autoimmune skin disease alopecia areata. This analysis distinguished disease patients from the controls, detected enhanced basal TCR signaling in the autoimmune patients, and identified a potential signaling network signature that may be indicative of disease. Thus, generation of PiSCES biosignatures represents an approach that can provide information about the activity of protein signaling networks in samples including low-abundance primary cells from clinical biopsies. PMID:27485017

  20. [Zooplankton of the Costa Rica Dome: taxonomy and biogeography].

    PubMed

    Vicencio Aguilar, M E; Fernández Alamo, M A

    1996-08-01

    A list of the species and taxa of some pelagic animals from a tropical upwelling region, based on collections made off the coast of Costa Rica is presented. The list includes a total of 224 species, 53 genera and 11 subspecific forms in Cnidaria, Annelida, Mollusca, Artropoda (Crustacea), Chaetognatha and Pisces. PMID:9246370

  1. Development of the Drosophila entero-endocrine lineage and its specification by the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Adams, Katrina L; Ortiz, Paola A; Ying, Chong T; Moridzadeh, Rameen; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-05-15

    In this paper we have investigated the developmental-genetic steps that shape the entero-endocrine system of Drosophila melanogaster from the embryo to the adult. The process starts in the endoderm of the early embryo where precursors of endocrine cells and enterocytes of the larval midgut, as well as progenitors of the adult midgut, are specified by a Notch signaling-dependent mechanism. In a second step that occurs during the late larval period, enterocytes and endocrine cells of a transient pupal midgut are selected from within the clusters of adult midgut progenitors. As in the embryo, activation of the Notch pathway triggers enterocyte differentiation and inhibits cells from further proliferation or choosing the endocrine fate. The third step of entero-endocrine cell development takes place at a mid-pupal stage. Before this time point, the epithelial layer destined to become the adult midgut is devoid of endocrine cells. However, precursors of the intestinal midgut stem cells (pISCs) are already present. After an initial phase of symmetric divisions which causes an increase in their own population size, pISCs start to spin off cells that become postmitotic and express the endocrine fate marker, Prospero. Activation of Notch in pISCs forces these cells into an enterocyte fate. Loss of Notch function causes an increase in the proliferatory activity of pISCs, as well as a higher ratio of Prospero-positive cells. PMID:21382366

  2. Development of the Drosophila entero-endocrine lineage and its specification by the Notch signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Adams, Katrina L.; Ortiz, Paola A.; Ying, Chong T.; Moridzadeh, Rameen; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the developmental-genetic steps that shape the entero-endocrine system of Drosophila melanogaster from the embryo to the adult. The process starts in the endoderm of the early embryo where precursors of endocrine cells and enterocytes of the larval midgut, as well as progenitors of the adult midgut, are specified by a Notch signaling-dependent mechanism. In a second step that occurs during the late larval period, enterocytes and endocrine cells of a transient pupal midgut are selected from within the clusters of adult midgut progenitors. As in the embryo, activation of the Notch pathway triggers enterocyte differentiation, and inhibits cells from further proliferation or choosing the endocrine fate. The third step of entero-endocrine cell development takes place at a mid-pupal stage. Before this time point, the epithelial layer destined to become the adult midgut is devoid of endocrine cells. However, precursors of the intestinal midgut stem cells (pISCs) are already present. After an initial phase of symmetric divisions which causes an increase in their own population size, pISCs start to spin off cells that become postmitotic and express the endocrine fate marker, Prospero. Activation of Notch in pISCs forces these cells into an enterocyte fate. Loss of Notch function causes an increase in the proliferatory activity of pISCs, as well as a higher ratio of Prospero-positive cells. PMID:21382366

  3. Investigation of single-event upset (SEU) in an advanced bipolar process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Secrest, Elaine C.; Berndt, Dale F.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive analytical and experimental study SEU in an advanced silicon bipolar process was made. The modeling used process and device parameters to model the SEU charge, collection, and circuit response derived from a special version of PISCES in cylindrical coordinates and SPICE, respectively. Data are reported for test cells of various sizes.

  4. Protein and cholesterol electrophoresis of plasma samples from captive cownose ray (Rhinoptera bonasus).

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Field, Cara; McDermott, Alexa; Leppert, Lynda; Clauss, Tonya; Bossart, Gregory D

    2015-11-01

    Our study was undertaken to assess the application of semiautomated methods available at the reference laboratory level for the evaluation of plasma protein and cholesterol via electrophoresis in samples from cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus). Three groups of animals were assessed: clinically normal, clinically abnormal, and parasitized with leeches. As reported previously, the albumin band was negligible; the protein electrophoretograms were dominated by a large beta-globulin fraction. While the group of samples from the leech-parasitized rays did not show any large differences, the abnormal group exhibited significantly elevated total solids and cholesterol levels. The latter was related to a significant increase in very low density lipoprotein levels. The results demonstrate the potential application of these laboratory methods in quantitation of plasma proteins and cholesterol fractions in subclass Elasmobranchii. PMID:26450839

  5. Euryphorus suarezi n. sp. (Copepoda: Caligidae) parasitic on an elasmobranch from the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Morales-Serna, Francisco Neptalí; Rodríguez-Santiago, María Amparo; Gómez, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the caligid genus Euryphorus Milne Edwards, 1840 contains two valid species. A new species, Euryphorus suarezi, is described based on adult females and males collected from the spotted eagle ray Aetobatus narinari (Euphrasen) (Elasmobranchii: Myliobatidae), captured off Campeche and Tabasco, Mexico (southern coast of the Gulf of Mexico). The new species is mainly distinguished from its congeners by the absence of dorsal plates, the presence of postantennal process, bifurcated maxillule, maxilliped with slender corpus, and leg 4 with 3-segmented endopod. Leg 6 is conspicuous in the male. Additional differences are described. This is the first record of a species of Euryphorus from an elasmobranch host, which may provide insight into the evolutionary relationships within the Caligidae. PMID:26739291

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome of the pelagic stingray Pteroplatytrygon violacea (Myliobatiformes: Dasyatidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Pin; Zhi, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Shuai; Yan, Shuai; Yang, Tingbao

    2016-01-01

    The pelagic stingray Pteroplatytrygon violacea is the only pelagic species of the Dasyatidae (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii), which is widely distributed in all tropical, subtropical and temperate oceans. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Pteroplatytrygon violacea was determined. It is 17,665 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 control region, with the typical gene order and direction of transcription of vertebrates. The overall nucleotide compositions of the whole mitogenome are 30.8% A, 26.9% C, 28.6% T and 13.7% G. The ND2 and CO1 sequences are highly similar to the corresponding sequences of this species available in NCBI collected from the Atlantic sea. PMID:24938117

  7. New data on Upper Devonian stratigraphy of the northwestern Kuznetsk basin: Evidence from foraminifera and chondrichthyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timokhina, I. G.; Rodina, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    The thorough investigation of four Frasnian-Famennian (Upper Devonian) boundary sections along the right side of the Tom River northwest of Kemerovo yielded new data on the composition of their foraminiferal and ichthyofaunal assemblages. These data were used for development of the zonal foraminiferal scale for Upper Devonian deposits of the northwestern Kuznetsk coal basin and the first zonal scale for their subdivision on the basis of Elasmobranchii remains and for correlation of the examined sections between each other and with Upper Devonian sequences in other regions. The analysis of foraminiferal and ichthyofaunal assemblages, which are the most widespread in upper Frasnian sections of the northwestern Kuznetsk coal basin, made it possible to specify the regional stratigraphic model.

  8. Localization by immunofluorescence and by light- and electron-microscopic immunoperoxidase techniques of Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein in adult hamster kidney

    PubMed Central

    Sikri, Krishan L.; Foster, Charles L.; Bloomfield, Frederick J.; Marshall, R. Derek

    1979-01-01

    1. Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein was isolated from hamster urine and antiserum against it was produced in rabbits. Immunoglobulin G was isolated from the antiserum. 2. Indirect methods of immunofluorescence staining were applied to kidney sections previously fixed by both perfusion and immersion methods. Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein was identified associated with only the cells of the ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule. Maculae densae were free of the glycoprotein. 3. Indirect immunoperoxidase procedures with light microscopy were applied to kidney sections. The results extended those found by immunofluorescence by showing that the glycoprotein is largely associated with the plasma membrane of the cells. Macula densa cells were shown to be free of the glycoprotein, although the luminal surface of the remaining cells in the transverse section of the nephron at that region was shown to contain it. 4. A variety of immuno-electron-microscopic techniques were applied to sections previously fixed in a number of ways. Providing periodate/lysine/paraformaldehyde was used as the fixative, the glycoprotein was often seen to be present not only on the luminal surface of the cells of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and of the distal convoluted tubule, but also on the basal plasma membrane, including the infoldings. 5. It is generally accepted that the hyperosmolarity in the medulla of the kidney results from passage of Cl− ions with their accompanying Na+ ions across the single cell layer of the lumen of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, a region of the nephron with relatively high impermeability to water. We suggest that Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein operates as a barrier to decrease the passage of water molecules by trapping the latter at the membrane of the cells. Our hypothesis requires the glycoprotein on the basal plasma membrane also. ImagesFig. 1.PLATE 4PLATE 1PLATE 3PLATE 2PLATE 6PLATE 5 PMID:391220

  9. Effect of ELMs on deuterium-loaded-tungsten plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, K. R.; Rudakov, D. L.; Wampler, W.; Watkins, J. G.; Wong, C. P. C.

    2011-08-01

    Prior heat pulse testing of plasma facing components (PFCs) has been completed in vacuum environments without the presence of background plasma. Edge localized modes (ELMs) will not be this kind of isolated event and one should know the effect of a plasma background during these transients. Heat-pulse experiments have been conducted in the PISCES-A device utilizing laser heating in a divertor-like plasma background. Initial results indicate that the erosion of PFCs is enhanced as compared to heat pulse or plasma only tests. To determine if the enhanced erosion effect is a phenomena only witnessed in the laboratory PISCES device, tungsten and graphite samples were exposed to plasmas in the lower divertor of the DIII-D tokamak using the Divertor Material Evaluation System (DiMES). Mass loss analysis indicates that materials that contain significant deuterium prior to experiencing a transient heating event will erode faster than those that have no or little retained deuterium.

  10. Creatinine, urea, uric acid, water and electrolytes renal handling in the healthy oldest old

    PubMed Central

    Musso, Carlos Guido; Álvarez Gregori, Joaquín; Jauregui, José Ricardo; Macías Núñez, Juan Florencio

    2012-01-01

    Renal physiology in the healthy oldest old has the following characteristics, in comparison with the renal physiology in the young: a reduced creatinine clearance, tubular pattern of creatinine back-filtration, preserved proximal tubule sodium reabsorption and uric acid secretion, reduced sodium reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle, reduced free water clearance, increased urea excretion, presence of medulla hypotonicity, reduced urinary dilution and concentration capabilities, and finally a reduced collecting tubules response to furosemide which expresses a reduced potassium excretion in this segment due to a sort of aldosterone resistance. All physiological changes of the aged kidney are the same in both genders. PMID:24175249

  11. Star of Bethlehem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D.; Murdin, P.

    2001-07-01

    The biblical Star of Bethlehem, which heralded the birth of Jesus Christ, is only mentioned in the Gospel of St Matthew 2. The astrologically significant 7 bc triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation of Pisces is the most likely candidate, although a comet/nova in 5 bc and a comet in 4 bc cannot be ruled out. There is also the possibility that the star was simply fictitious....

  12. Aries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Ram; abbrev. Ari, gen. Arietis; area 441 sq. deg.) A northern zodiacal constellation that lies between Taurus and Pisces, and culminates at midnight in late October. It represents the ram in Greek mythology whose golden fleece was the quest of Jason and the Argonauts. Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest. In Ptolemy's day the Sun was in Aries at the v...

  13. Impurity Transport in a Simulated Gas Target Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blush, L. M.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Whyte, D.; Conn, R. W.; Schmitz, L.

    1997-11-01

    Previous simulated gas target divertor experiments in the PISCES-A linear plasma device (n <= 3 × 10^19 m-3, kTe <= 20 eV) indicated enhanced impurity retention near the target in comparison to a high recycling divertor regime. A 1 1\\over2-D fluid modeling code suggested that impurities are impeded from transporting away from the target by friction with the neutral and ionized hydrogen. In recent experiments with a PISCES-A ``slot-type'' divertor configuration, we have implemented a spectroscopic detection system to measure the axial density profiles of several impurity charge states. Moreover, we envision adding two extended cylindrical baffles spanning a pumped vacuum section to achieve strong differential pumping. This arrangement will isolate the plasma source from the gas target region and allow us to seed the background hydrogen plasma with higher impurities concentrations and investigate a regime dominated by impurity radiation. In preliminary design experiments, PISCES-A was successfully operated with an electrically isolated, copper baffle (d=5 cm, l=33.5 cm) mounted to reduce the vacuum conductance between the source and target regions. This work supported by US-DoE contract DE-FG03-95ER-54301.

  14. Improving the parameters of a global ocean biogeochemical model via variational assimilation of in situ data at five time series stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, A.; Moulin, C.; Thiria, S.; Bopp, L.; Berrada, M.; Tagliabue, A.; CréPon, M.; Aumont, O.; Badran, F.

    2011-06-01

    The global ocean biogeochemical models that are used in order to assess the ocean role in the global carbon cycle and estimate the impact of the climate change on marine ecosystems are getting more and more sophisticated. They now often account for several phytoplankton functional types that play particular roles in marine food webs and the ocean carbon cycle. These phytoplankton functional types have specific physiological characteristics, which are usually poorly known and therefore add uncertainties to model results. Indeed, this evolution in model complexity is not accompanied by a similar increase in the number and diversity of in situ data sets necessary for model calibration and evaluation. Thus, it is of primary importance to develop new methods to improve model performance using existing biogeochemical data sets, despite their current limitations. In this paper, we have optimized 45 physiological parameters of the PISCES global model, using a variational optimal control method. In order to bypass a global 3-D ocean variational assimilation, which would require enormous computation and memory storage, we have simplified the estimation procedure by assimilating monthly climatological in situ observations at five contrasted oceanographic stations of the JGOFS program in a 1-D version of the PISCES model. We began by estimating the weight matrix in the cost function by using heuristic considerations. Then we used this matrix to estimate the 45 parameters of the 1-D version of the PISCES model by assimilating the different monthly profiles (observed profiles at the five stations) in the same variational procedure on a time window of 1 year. This set of optimized parameters was then used in the standard 3-D global PISCES version to perform a 500 year global simulation. The results of both the standard and the optimized versions of the model were compared to satellite-derived chlorophyll-a images, which are an independent and global data set, showing that our

  15. Identification and evaluation of shark bycatch in Georgia's commercial shrimp trawl fishery with implications for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Many US states have recreational and commercial fisheries that occur in nursery areas occupied by subadult sharks and can potentially affect their survival. Georgia is one of few US states without a directed commercial shark fishery, but the state has a large, nearshore penaeid shrimp trawl fishery in which small sharks occur as bycatch. During our 1995–1998 investigation of bycatch in fishery-dependent sampling events, 34% of 127 trawls contained sharks. This bycatch totalled 217 individuals from six species, with Atlantic sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson), the most common and finetooth shark, Carcharhinus isodon (Müller & Henle) and spinner shark, Carcharhinus brevipinna (Müller & Henle), the least common. The highest catch rates for sharks occurred during June and July and coincided with the peak months of the pupping season for many species. Trawl tow speed and tow time did not significantly influence catch rates for shark species. Gear configurations [net type, turtle excluder device (TED), bycatch reduction device] affected catch rates for shark species. Results of this study indicate gear restrictions, a delayed season opening, or reduced bar spacing on TEDs may reduce shark bycatch in this fishery.

  16. Identification and evaluation of shark bycatch in Georgia’s commercial shrimp trawl fishery with implications for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2011-01-01

    Many US states have recreational and commercial fisheries that occur in nursery areas occupied by subadult sharks and can potentially affect their survival. Georgia is one of few US states without a directed commercial shark fishery, but the state has a large, nearshore penaeid shrimp trawl fishery in which small sharks occur as bycatch. During our 1995-1998 investigation of bycatch in fishery-dependent sampling events, 34% of 127 trawls contained sharks. This bycatch totalled 217 individuals from six species, with Atlantic sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae (Richardson), the most common and finetooth shark, Carcharhinus isodon (Müller & Henle) and spinner shark, Carcharhinus brevipinna (Müller & Henle), the least common. The highest catch rates for sharks occurred during June and July and coincided with the peak months of the pupping season for many species. Trawl tow speed and tow time did not significantly influence catch rates for shark species. Gear configurations [net type, turtle excluder device (TED), bycatch reduction device] affected catch rates for shark species. Results of this study indicate gear restrictions, a delayed season opening, or reduced bar spacing on TEDs may reduce shark bycatch in this fishery.

  17. Progesterone--specific binding sites in the kidney of the female baboon

    SciTech Connect

    Weaker, F.J.; Herbert, D.C.; Sheridan, P.J.

    1984-10-01

    The uptake and retention of a radiolabeled synthetic progestin, ORG 2058, was studied in the urinary tract of the female baboon. Four estrogen-primed baboons were injected intravenously with 2.5 micrograms./kg. body weight of 3H-ORG 2058. One animal, which served as a control, received an additional injection of 2.5 mg./kg. body weight of unlabeled progesterone. One hour after the injections, the animals were killed and the kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder were removed and processed for autoradiography. Localization of progestin was observed in the nuclei of the convoluted and straight segments of the distal tubule, the ascending thick limb of the loop of Henle and both cortical and medullary collecting tubules. Connective tissue cells were also labeled in the medulla and cortex of the kidney. An absence of silver grains was noted in the renal corpuscle, all segments of the proximal tubule and the thin loop of Henle. Concentration of the tritiated steroid was not observed in either the ureter or bladder or in any portions of the urinary tract of the control animal. This study suggests that progesterone has a direct effect via a progesterone specific receptor on the various target cells that sequestered the 3H-ORG 2058.

  18. Concentrating Engines and the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John L.

    1973-01-01

    Mass balance relations, valid for any counterflow system, are derived and applied to a central core model of the renal medulla, in which descending Henle's limbs (DHL), ascending Henle's limbs (AHL), and collecting ducts (CD) exchange with a central vascular core (VC) formed by vasa recta loops, assumed so highly permeable that the core functions as a single tube open at the cortical end, closed at the papillary. Solute supplied to the VC primarily by the water impermeable AHL may either enter the DHL to be recycled or remain in the core to extract water by osmosis from DHL and CD. If concentrations in core and descending flows are nearly equal, then for all degrees of recycling the ratio of entering DHL concentration to loop concentration is given by r = 1/[1 - fT(1 - fU)], where fT is the fractional net solute transport out of AHL and fU is the ratio of CD flow to the sum of CD and AHL flows. Differential equations for a single solute are derived for core and AHL concentrations. Explicit analytic solutions are given for solute transport out of the AHL governed by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Finally the energy requirements for concentration are analyzed. PMID:4714446

  19. Music, musicians, medicine, and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Rajeev; Eknoyan, Garabed

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between music, medicine and nephrology is ancient; ranging from musicians afflicted with kidney disease, contributors to nephrology who were musicians, and the use of music to treat renal maladies. Musicians have long been afflicted by diseases of the kidney, particularly nephrolithiasis, for which Marin Marais in 1725 composed a unique piece for the viol detailing the harrowing experience of 'cutting for stone.' Beethoven and Mozart were afflicted by kidney disease, as are several current musicians. Where past musicians succumbed to their failing kidneys, the advent of renal replacement therapy has given today's musicians, such as James DePreist and Natalie Cole, the opportunity to continue performing and composing. Several notable physicians of old have excelled as musicians; one example is Jacob Henle (1809-1885), for whom the loop of Henle is named, another is Robert Christison, a contemporary of Richard Bright, who is considered a 'founder of nephrology'. Importantly, music therapy, as used in the times of Hippocrates and King David, has evolved from an empiric to a well-established scientific discipline. Given the recent enlarging body of scholarly studies of music therapy, its rudimentary role in nephrology deserves further exploration. PMID:24033748

  20. Renal Effects of Prostaglandins and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) with best-defined renal functions are PGE2 and prostacyclin (PGI2). These vasodilatory PGs increase renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate under conditions associated with decreased actual or effective circulating volume, resulting in greater tubular flow and secretion of potassium. Under conditions of decreased renal perfusion, the production of renal PGs serves as an important compensatory mechanism. PGI2 (and possibly PGE2) increases potassium secretion mainly by stimulating secretion of renin and activating the renin-angiotensin system, which leads to increased secretion of aldosterone. In addition, PGE2 is involved in the regulation of sodium and water reabsorption and acts as a counterregulatory factor under conditions of increased sodium reabsorption. PGE2 decreases sodium reabsorption at the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle probably via inhibition of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter type 2 (NKCC2). Cyclooxygenase inhibitors may enhance urinary concentrating ability in part through effects to upregulate NKCC2 in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and aquaporin-2 in the collecting duct. Thus, they may be useful to treat Bartter's syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. PMID:24459520

  1. The renal concentrating mechanism: fundamental theoretical concepts.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, J L

    1983-05-15

    Five theoretical principles that follow from qualitative consideration of renal architecture and tubular permeabilities are proposed to explain the concentration of urine in the mammalian kidney. These are: 1) The medullary loop of the doubly folded S-shaped configuration of the nephron permits solute supplied by ascending Henle's limb (AHL) to extract water from descending Henle's limb (DHL) and collecting duct (CD). 2) The cortical loop allows the diluted AHL fluid to return to isotonicity with cortical plasma before returning to the medulla. 3) The folded vasa recta and surrounding interstitium (the central core) provide an expansion chamber for the performance of osmotic work and a mixing chamber for salt and urea. This mixing induces passive salt transport out of AHL. 4) Overall, the system acts as a solute cycling multiplier from the AHL to vascular core and the osmotically equilibrated DHL and CD. 5) The short-looped nephrons provide urea to drive salt transport out of AHL of long nephrons in the inner medulla. PMID:6840288

  2. Reactive oxygen species as important determinants of medullary flow, sodium excretion, and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Michiaki; Mori, Takefumi; O'Connor, Paul M.; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Zheleznova, Nadezhda N.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological evidence linking the production of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide in the renal medullary thick ascending limb of Henle (mTAL) to regulation of medullary blood flow, sodium homeostasis, and long-term control of blood pressure is summarized in this review. Data obtained largely from rats indicate that experimentally induced elevations of either superoxide or hydrogen peroxide in the renal medulla result in reduction of medullary blood flow, enhanced Na+ reabsorption, and hypertension. A shift in the redox balance between nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) is found to occur naturally in the Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat model, where selective reduction of ROS production in the renal medulla reduces salt-induced hypertension. Excess medullary production of ROS in SS rats emanates from the medullary thick ascending limbs of Henle [from both the mitochondria and membrane NAD(P)H oxidases] in response to increased delivery and reabsorption of excess sodium and water. There is evidence that ROS and perhaps other mediators such as ATP diffuse from the mTAL to surrounding vasa recta capillaries, resulting in medullary ischemia, which thereby contributes to hypertension. PMID:25354941

  3. Mission Accomplished: Deep Submergence Science Routinely Supported Using Multiple Vehicles Throughout the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory's 2005 South Pacific Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, T.; Smith, J. R.; Shackelford, R.; Wiltshire, J. C.; Malahoff, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) recently completed an internationally partnered 5-month, 14,500 nautical mile multiple leg expedition to the South Pacific that included 21 study sites in the waters of American Samoa, New Zealand, Tonga, and the U.S. Line Islands to commemorate its 25th anniversary of supporting deep submergence science in the Pacific Ocean. During this voyage, HURL successfully operated its two human occupied vehicles ( Pisces IV and Pisces V) each capable of diving to 2000 m from their support ship, the R/V Ka'imikai-o-Kanaloa ( KoK). In addition, a remotely operated vehicle ( RCV-150) with a nearly 1000-m depth limit was utilized alternately with the Pisces HOV's. The size and organized placement of these vehicles on the compact but efficiently run KoK (70-m length, 2000-tons displacement, 14 crew) allowed for deployment of a CTD rosette system and recovery of instrument package moorings during the same cruise leg. The Pisces submersibles are 20-ft long, 13-ton, 3-person vehicles with 7-10 hours duration, up to 350-lb payload capacities, and three forward looking viewports. The small size of the Pisces' relative to much larger deeper diving HOV's increases their agility, thus allowing maneuvering into more difficult sampling site terrain. The smaller package also facilitates rapid launch (8 min avg, stdev=1) and recovery (12 min avg, stdev=2) in heavier seas (up to sea state 5), as routinely experienced in the South Pacific during the austral winter. In addition to the enhanced safety aspect of having two compatible submersibles aboard, scientific efficiency has benefited by allowing the rotation of vehicles on extended deployments prior to battery servicing, thus maintaining an overall dive time average of 7.1 hr (stdev=1.52) for an average dive depth of 891 m (stdev=431) in 2005. Having the two fully operational submersibles also provides a contingency for equipment malfunction while on site that saved 7 dive days in 2005 alone

  4. The Clinical Physiology of Water Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Richard E.; Kleeman, Charles R.

    1979-01-01

    The renal reabsorption of water independent of solute is the result of the coordinated function of the collecting duct and the ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The unique juxtaposition of the ascending and descending portions of the loop of Henle and of the vasa recta permits the function of a counter-current multiplier system in which water is removed from the tubular lumen and reabsorbed into the circulation. The driving force for reabsorption is the osmotic gradient in the renal medulla which is dependent, in part, on chloride (followed by sodium) pumping from the thick ascending loop of Henle. Urea trapping is also thought to play an important role in the generation of a hypertonic medullary interstitium. Arginine vasopressin (AVP) acts by binding to receptors on the cell membrane and activating adenylate cyclase. This, inturn, results in the intracellular accumulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) which in some fashion abruptly increases the water permeability of the luminal membrane of cells in the collecting duct. As a consequence, water flows along an osmotic gradient out of the tubular lumen into the medullary interstitium. Diabetes insipidus is the clinical condition associated with either a deficiency of or a resistance to AVP. Central diabetes insipidus is due to diminished release of AVP following damage to either the neurosecretory nuclei or the pituitary stalk. Possible causes include idiopathic, familial, trauma, tumor, infection or vascular lesions. Patients present with polyuria, usually beginning over a period of a few days. The diagnosis is made by showing that urinary concentration is impaired after water restriction but that there is a good response to exogenous vasopressin therapy. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus can be identified by a patient's lack of response to AVP. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by a familial defect, although milder forms can be acquired as a result of various forms of renal disease. Central

  5. A new model for the global biogeochemical cycle of carbonyl sulfide - Part 1: Assessment of direct marine emissions with an oceanic general circulation and biogeochemistry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launois, T.; Belviso, S.; Bopp, L.; Fichot, C. G.; Peylin, P.

    2015-03-01

    The global budget of tropospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is believed to be at equilibrium because background air concentrations have remained roughly stable over at least the last decade. Since the uptake of OCS by leaves (associated with photosynthesis) and soils have been revised significantly upwards recently, an equilibrated budget can only be obtained with a compensatory source of OCS. It has been assumed that the missing source of OCS comes from the low-latitude ocean, following the incident solar flux. The present work uses parameterizations of major production and removal processes of organic compounds in the NEMO-PISCES (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean, Pelagic Interaction Scheme for Carbon and Ecosystem Studies) ocean general circulation and biogeochemistry model to assess the marine source of OCS. In addition, the OCS photo-production rates computed with the NEMO-PISCES model~were evaluated independently using the UV absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (derived from satellite ocean color data) and apparent quantum yields available in the literature. Our simulations show global direct marine emissions of OCS in the range of 573-3997 GgS yr-1, depending mostly on the quantification of the absorption rate of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The high estimates of that range are unlikely, as they correspond to a formulation that most likely overestimate photo-production process. Low and medium (813 GgS yr-1) estimates derived from the NEMO-PISCES model are however consistent spatially and temporally~with the suggested missing source of Berry et al. (2013), allowing us thus to close the global budget of OCS given the recent estimates of leaf and soil OCS uptake.

  6. A new model for the global biogeochemical cycle of carbonyl sulfide - Part 1: Assessment of direct marine emissions with an oceanic general circulation and biogeochemistry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launois, T.; Belviso, S.; Bopp, L.; Fichot, C. G.; Peylin, P.

    2014-08-01

    The global budget of tropospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is believed to be at equilibrium because background air concentrations have remained roughly stable over at least the last decade. Since the uptakes of OCS by leaves (associated to photosynthesis) and soils have been revised significantly upwards recently, an equilibrated budget can only be obtained with a compensatory source of OCS. It has been assumed that the missing source of OCS comes from the low latitude ocean, following the incident solar flux. The present work uses parameterizations of major production and removal processes of organic compounds in the NEMO-PISCES Ocean General Circulation and Biogeochemistry Model to assess the marine source of OCS. In addition, the OCS photo-production rates computed with the NEMO-PISCES model were evaluated independently using UV absorption coefficient of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (derived from satellite ocean color) and apparent quantum yields available in the literature. Our simulations show global direct marine emissions of COS in the range of 573-3997 Gg S yr-1, depending mostly on the quantification of the absorption rate of chromophoric dissolved organic matter. The high estimates on that range are unlikely, as they correspond to a formulation that most likely overestimate photo-production process. Low and medium (813 Gg S yr-1) estimates derived from the NEMO-PISCES model are however consistent spatially and temporally with the suggested missing source of Berry et al. (2013), allowing thus to close the global budget of OCS given the recent estimates of leaf and soil OCS uptakes.

  7. Sediment quality and polychlorinated biphenyls in the Lower Neponset River, Massachusetts, and implications for urban river restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Cooke, Matthew G.; Merrill, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to restore fish passage, habitat, and recreational use of the Neponset River, a tributary to Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, have raised concerns about the sediment, water, and biota quality of the river. Consequently, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs Department of Fish and Game Riverways Program and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, studied sediment and water quality, with a specific focus on polychlorinated biphenyls, in the Neponset River. Sediment samples were collected throughout the Neponset River and tested for elements and organic compounds including polyaromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Although enriched compared to background concentrations, sediment quality in the Neponset River was generally better than that of other urban rivers in the United States, except with respect to one constituent, polychlorinated biphenyls. Concentrations of lead, some polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls in the sediment may be toxic to aquatic organisms and may pose a risk to human health. The sediment quality also fails to meet the minimum requirements set by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for lined landfill disposal. The locations of the source(s) of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Neponset River were determined by means of congener analysis from PISCES passive water-column samplers. The PISCES data indicate a sharp increase in polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and a substantial shift in congener pattern downstream of one PISCES sampling location near Fairmont Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts. This result indicates that the area upstream of this sampling location may be the location of a historical source of polychlorinated biphenyls to the Neponset River. The present (2003) source to the water column may likely be PCB contaminated sediment.

  8. Technical performance of percutaneous leads for spinal cord stimulation: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Manola, Ljubomir; Holsheimer, Jan; Veltink, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Objective  To compare the technical performance of different percutaneous lead types for spinal cord stimulation. Methods  Using the ut-scs software (University of Twente's spinal cord stimulation), lead models having similar characteristics such as the 3487A PISCES-Quad (PQ), 3887 PISCES-Quad Compact (PC), 3888 PISCES-Quad Plus (PP) (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN), and the AB SC2108 (AB) (Advanced Bionics Corp., Valencia, CA) were simulated in monopolar and tripolar (guarded cathode) combinations on a single lead, placed just outside the dorsal dura mater and both centered on the spinal cord midline, and at 1 mm lateral. The influence of displacing a lead dorsally in the epidural fat was examined as well. Finally, dual leads both aligned and offset were modeled. Several parameters were calculated to allow a quantitative comparison of the performances. Results  When programmed as a guarded cathode, the AB lead recruits nerve fibers in an ~25% larger dorsal column area than the PQ. However, the AB has an ~160% higher energy consumption. The performance of the PC is between the AB and PQ, whereas the PP is suitable only for dorsal root stimulation. Displacing a single lead off midline or dorsally decreases its ability to recruit fibers in the dorsal columns. Similarly, dual lead combinations are less capable when compared to single lead centered on the spinal cord midline just outside the dura mater. Conclusions  Complex pain syndromes are treated best with lead having a small contact spacing, being programmed as a tripole (guarded cathode) and centered on the spinal cord midline just outside the dura mater. This is because dorsal column fiber recruitment is more extensive than with any other combinations, including dual leads. Improved recruitment of dorsal column fibers is accompanied by increased energy consumption. PMID:22151437

  9. Proteome scale characterization of human S-acylated proteins in lipid raft-enriched and non-raft membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores; Kirchner, Marc; Steen, Hanno; Freeman, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    Protein S-acylation (palmitoylation), a reversible post-translational modification, is critically involved in regulating protein subcellular localization, activity, stability, and multimeric complex assembly. However, proteome scale characterization of S-acylation has lagged far behind that of phosphorylation, and global analysis of the localization of S-acylated proteins within different membrane domains has not been reported. Here we describe a novel proteomics approach, designated palmitoyl protein identification and site characterization (PalmPISC), for proteome scale enrichment and characterization of S-acylated proteins extracted from lipid raft-enriched and non-raft membranes. In combination with label-free spectral counting quantitation, PalmPISC led to the identification of 67 known and 331 novel candidate S-acylated proteins as well as the localization of 25 known and 143 novel candidate S-acylation sites. Palmitoyl acyltransferases DHHC5, DHHC6, and DHHC8 appear to be S-acylated on three cysteine residues within a novel CCX(7-13)C(S/T) motif downstream of a conserved Asp-His-His-Cys cysteine-rich domain, which may be a potential mechanism for regulating acyltransferase specificity and/or activity. S-Acylation may tether cytoplasmic acyl-protein thioesterase-1 to membranes, thus facilitating its interaction with and deacylation of membrane-associated S-acylated proteins. Our findings also suggest that certain ribosomal proteins may be targeted to lipid rafts via S-acylation, possibly to facilitate regulation of ribosomal protein activity and/or dynamic synthesis of lipid raft proteins in situ. In addition, bioinformatics analysis suggested that S-acylated proteins are highly enriched within core complexes of caveolae and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, both cholesterol-rich membrane structures. The PalmPISC approach and the large scale human S-acylated protein data set are expected to provide powerful tools to facilitate our understanding of the

  10. The Independent Technical Analysis Process Final Report 2006-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Duberstein, Corey; Ham, Kenneth; Dauble, Dennis; Johnson, Gary

    2007-03-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical analytical support for system-wide fish passage information (BPA Project No. 2006-010-00). The goal of this project was to produce rigorous technical analysis products using independent analysts and anonymous peer reviewers. This project provided an independent technical source for non-routine fish passage analyses while allowing routine support functions to be performed by other well-qualified entities. The Independent Technical Analysis Process (ITAP) was created to provide non-routine analysis for fish and wildlife agencies and tribes in particular and the public in general on matters related to juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage through the mainstem hydrosystem. The process was designed to maintain the independence of analysts and reviewers from parties requesting analyses, to avoid potential bias in technical products. The objectives identified for this project were to administer a rigorous, transparent process to deliver unbiased technical assistance necessary to coordinate recommendations for storage reservoir and river operations that avoid potential conflicts between anadromous and resident fish. Seven work elements, designated by numbered categories in the Pisces project tracking system, were created to define and accomplish project goals as follows: (1) 118 Coordination - Coordinate technical analysis and review process: (a) Retain expertise for analyst/reviewer roles. (b) Draft research directives. (c) Send directive to the analyst. (d) Coordinate two independent reviews of the draft report. (e) Ensure reviewer comments are addressed within the final report. (2) 162 Analyze/Interpret Data - Implement the independent aspects of the project. (3) 122 Provide Technical Review - Implement the review process for the analysts. (4) 132 Produce Annual Report - FY06 annual progress report with Pisces Disseminate (5) 161

  11. Simulating Fertilization of the Ocean as a Carbon Sequestration Strategy: Effectiveness and Unintended Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K

    2002-03-20

    The primary objectives of this project are to assess, and improve our understanding of: (1) The effectiveness of various strategies to intentionally store carbon in the ocean through fertilization of the surface ocean with iron and/or macronutrients; and (2) Unanticipated environmental consequences of these ocean fertilization strategies. We propose to use what may be the best global ocean biogeochemical model in the world (PISCES) and apply it to perform the most realistic global-scale simulations of various iron fertilization scenarios. Versions of PISCES are currently used by MPI in Germany and IPSL in France. The model represents diatoms, coccolithophorids, and two classes of zooplankton. This model considers Fey N, P, O{sub 2}, Si, alkalinity, and carbon; for some of these it considers dissolved inorganic and organic, as well as particulate, forms. We would install the PISCES model with a minimum of modification into the LLNL ocean model, and perform an initial suite of simulations of both iron fertilization experiments (e.g., SOFeX) and proposed iron fertilization strategies. Based on the simulated experiments, we will analyze model deficiencies with respect to the observations and use this analysis to improve future versions of the model. The source code for and results from this set of models will be freely distributed, and thus should help groups performing related work elsewhere. This project the most-realistic ocean fertilization simulations yet performed in a global model, with an assessment of and improvement in the reliability of those predictions using results from iron fertilization experiments such as SOFeX. These results will help provide context and guidance for biological observations within the ocean carbon sequestration research program.

  12. Basal Gnathostomes Provide Unique Insights into the Evolution of Vitamin B12 Binders

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Ruivo, Raquel; Delgado, Inês; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Castro, L. Filipe C.

    2015-01-01

    The uptake and transport of vitamin B12 (cobalamin; Cbl) in mammals involves a refined system with three evolutionarily related transporters: transcobalamin 1 (Tcn1), transcobalamin 2 (Tcn2), and the gastric intrinsic factor (Gif). Teleosts have a single documented binder with intermediate features to the human counterparts. Consequently, it has been proposed that the expansion of Cbl binders occurred after the separation of Actinopterygians. Here, we demonstrate that the diversification of this gene family took place earlier in gnathostome ancestry. Our data indicates the presence of single copy orthologs of the Sarcopterygii/Tetrapoda duplicates Tcn1 and Gif, and Tcn2, in Chondrichthyes. In addition, a highly divergent Cbl binder was found in the Elasmobranchii. We unveil a complex scenario forged by genome, tandem duplications and lineage-specific gene loss. Our findings suggest that from an ancestral transporter, exhibiting large spectrum and high affinity binding, highly specific Cbl transporters emerged through gene duplication and mutations at the binding pocket. PMID:25552533

  13. Evolution of melanocortin receptors in cartilaginous fish: melanocortin receptors and the stress axis in elasmobranches.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Reinick, Christina; Angleson, Joseph K; Dores, Robert M

    2013-01-15

    There is general agreement that the presence of five melanocortin receptor genes in tetrapods is the result of two genome duplications that occurred prior to the emergence of the gnathostomes, and at least one local gene duplication that occurred early in the radiation of the ancestral gnathostomes. Hence, it is assumed that representatives from the extant classes of gnathostomes (i.e., Chondrichthyes, Actinopterygii, Sarcopterygii) should also have five paralogous melanocortin genes. Current studies on cartilaginous fishes indicate that while there is evidence for five paralogous melanocortin receptor genes in this class, to date all five paralogs have not been detected in the genome of a single species. This mini-review will discuss the ligand selectivity properties of the melanocortin-3 receptor of the elephant shark (subclass Holocephali) and the ligand selectivity properties of the melanocortin-3 receptor, melanocortin-4 receptor, and the melanocortin-5 receptor of the dogfish (subclass Elasmobranchii). The potential relationship of these melanocortin receptors to the hypothalamus/pituitary/interrenal axis will be discussed. PMID:22964529

  14. The early origin of melanocortin receptors, agouti-related peptide, agouti signalling peptide, and melanocortin receptor-accessory proteins, with emphasis on pufferfishes, elephant shark, lampreys, and amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Västermark, Ake; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2011-06-11

    There are conflicting theories about the evolution of melanocortin MC receptors while only few studies have addressed the evolution of agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and agouti signalling peptide (ASIP), which are antagonists at the melanocortin receptors (MCRs), or the melanocortin MC(2) receptor accessory proteins (MRAP1 and MRAP2). Previously we have cloned melanocortin MC receptors (MC(a) and MC(b)) genes in river lamprey and here we identify orthologues to these melanocortin MC receptor sequences in the sea lamprey. We investigate the putative presence of the melanocortin MC receptor genes in lancelet (amphioxus; Branchiostoma floridae) but we find it unlikely that such gene exists, due to a sharp drop in sequence similarity beyond sequence clusters of known receptors. We show the presence of AgRP and ASIP in elephant shark, a cartilaginous fish belonging to the subclass of Elasmobranchii. However, we do not find any of these genes in lamprey or lancelet after detailed analysis of both targeted and whole proteome regular expression scans. We found MRAP2, but not MRAP1, to be present in elephant shark and sea lamprey while Fugu (T. rubripes) has both genes. This study shows that the most ancient presence of these melanocortin-related sequences is found in elephant shark and lampreys considering the current available sequence data. PMID:21208605

  15. A Scientific Basis for Regulating Deep-Sea Fishing by Depth.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jo; Milligan, Rosanna J; Bailey, David M; Neat, Francis C

    2015-09-21

    The deep sea is the world's largest ecosystem, with high levels of biodiversity and many species that exhibit life-history characteristics that make them vulnerable to high levels of exploitation. Many fisheries in the deep sea have a track record of being unsustainable. In the northeast Atlantic, there has been a decline in the abundance of commercial fish species since deep-sea fishing commenced in the 1970s. Current management is by effort restrictions and total allowable catch (TAC), but there remain problems with compliance and high levels of bycatch of vulnerable species such as sharks. The European Union is currently considering new legislation to manage deep-sea fisheries, including the introduction of a depth limit to bottom trawling. However, there is little evidence to suggest an appropriate depth limit. Here we use survey data to show that biodiversity of the demersal fish community, the ratio of discarded to commercial biomass, and the ratio of Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays) to commercial biomass significantly increases between 600 and 800 m depth while commercial value decreases. These results suggest that limiting bottom trawling to a maximum depth of 600 m could be an effective management strategy that would fit the needs of European legislations such as the Common Fisheries Policy (EC no. 1380/2013) and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (2008/56/EC). PMID:26320948

  16. Rock wall fauna in a deep Newfoundland fiord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haedrich, Richard L.; Gagnon, Jean-Marc

    1991-08-01

    Research dives with PISCES IV in the Bay D'Espoir fiord system of southern Newfoundland revealed a rich and abundant fauna inhabiting the rock walls in the warm deep (790 m) central basin. The giant file clam Acesta excavata, otherwise unknown in the western North Atlantic, was in many places a dominant species. Species otherwise known from continental slope depths quite removed from the fiord included the anemone Actinauge sp., sponges, alcyonarians, the fish Phycis chesteri and Nezumia bairdii and the gooseneck barnacle Arcoscalpellum mitchellotianum. The food source for this abundant fauna is unknown. Nearby cold water basins are impoverished with respect to the fauna.

  17. Research in computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Several short summaries of the work performed during this reporting period are presented. Topics discussed in this document include: (1) resilient seeded errors via simple techniques; (2) knowledge representation for engineering design; (3) analysis of faults in a multiversion software experiment; (4) implementation of parallel programming environment; (5) symbolic execution of concurrent programs; (6) two computer graphics systems for visualization of pressure distribution and convective density particles; (7) design of a source code management system; (8) vectorizing incomplete conjugate gradient on the Cyber 203/205; (9) extensions of domain testing theory and; (10) performance analyzer for the pisces system.

  18. The Church of San Miniato al Monte, Florence: Astronomical and Astrological Connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrimplin, V.

    2011-06-01

    The church of San Miniato al Monte is examined in the context of interest in astrology and astronomy in early Renaissance Florence. Vitruvius emphasised the need for architects to "be acquainted with astronomy and the theory of the heavens" in his famous Ten Books of Architecture and, at San Miniato, astronomical and astrological features are combined in order to link humanity with the celestial or spiritual realm. The particular significance of Pisces and Taurus is explored in relation to Christian symbolism, raising questions about the role of astronomy and astrology in art and architecture.

  19. Sea floor gouges and pits in deep fjords, Baffin Island: Possible mammalian feeding traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, F. J.; Syvitski, J. P. M.

    1989-06-01

    Pisces submersible dives within Baffin Island fjords have revealed the common occurrence of pits on the sea floor, at water depths between 40 and 326 m. The size of these pits are in the decimeter to meter range. Through indirect evidence (by comparison of morphologic features to pits or gouges of known origin) they are believed to be feeding traces of narwhal, beluga, or bowhead whales. If so, they are the deepest mammalian feeding traces yet reported. Bioerosion by large foraging mammals may be a more common sea floor process than previously thought.

  20. Calculation of rf fields in axisymmetric cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Iwashita, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A new code, PISCES, has been developed for calculating a complete set of rf electromagnetic modes in an axisymmetric cavity. The finite-element method is used with up to third-order shape functions. Although two components are enough to express these modes, three components are used as unknown variables to take advantage of the symmetry of the element matrix. The unknowns are taken to be either the electric field components or the magnetic field components. The zero-divergence condition will be satisfied by the shape function within each element.

  1. Study of childhood renal tumours using a monoclonal antibody to Tamm-Horsfall protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Marsden, H B; Jasani, B; Kumar, P

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein was used for the immuno-localization of Tamm-Horsfall protein in formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue sections of childhood renal tumours, normal children's kidneys, and human fetal kidneys. The procedure was a dinitrophenyl hapten sandwich staining method. The antibody, diluted 1/100,000, gave a very strong and specific staining of the loop of Henle and distal tubules of normal and fetal kidneys. No staining was seen in Wilms' tumour, mesoblastic nephroma, and bone metastasizing renal tumour of childhood. In contrast, two of seven renal carcinomas and three of four rhabdoid renal tumours were positive for Tamm-Horsfall protein. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 PMID:3429675

  2. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria R; Rocca, Bruno J; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T; Tripodi, Sergio A; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  3. Morphological and molecular study of the poorly known species Pseudanisakis rajae (Yamaguti, 1941) (Nematoda: Acanthocheilidae) from elasmobranchs in the Yellow Sea and Taiwan Strait off the coast of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Gibson, David I; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Lu-Ping

    2012-02-01

    Ascaridoid nematodes identified as Pseudanisakis rajae (Yamaguti, 1941) were collected from the skates Bathyraja smirnovi (Soldatov & Pavlenko), Okamejei kenojei (Müller & Henle) and Raja pulchra Liu (Rajiformes: Rajidae) in the Yellow Sea and Taiwan Strait off the coast of China. Their examination using light microscopy and, for the first time, scanning electron microscopy revealed erroneous and previously unreported morphological features, necessitating the redescription of this little known species. In addition, specimens of P. rajae collected from the three different hosts were characterised using molecular methods by sequencing and analysing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA. These new morphological and molecular data enabled an updated diagnosis of this nematode and the presentation of an identification key to the species of Pseudanisakis Layman & Borovkova, 1926. PMID:22183921

  4. Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) and dopamine DA1 agonist-sensitive Na+,K+-ATPase in renal tubule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Meister, B; Fryckstedt, J; Schalling, M; Cortés, R; Hökfelt, T; Aperia, A; Hemmings, H C; Nairn, A C; Ehrlich, M; Greengard, P

    1989-01-01

    The cellular localization of DARPP-32, a dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32,000 that appears to mediate certain actions of dopamine in the mammalian brain by acting as an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1, was studied in the kidney of several species. DARPP-32 mRNA and DARPP-32-like immunoreactivity were found in the cytoplasm of cells in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The specific dopamine DA1 agonist SKF 82526 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of Na+,K+-ATPase activity, which could be blocked by SCH 23390, a specific DA1 antagonist, and by PKI-(5-24) amide, a specific inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The results indicate that DA1 dopamine receptors and DARPP-32, an intracellular third messenger for dopamine, are part of the signal-transduction process for dopamine acting on renal tubule cells. Images PMID:2573060

  5. An Adult Case of Bartter Syndrome Type III Presenting with Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Jung; Hwang, Won Min; Yun, Sung-Ro; Park, Moon Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) I–IV is a rare autosomal recessive disorder affecting salt reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. This report highlights clinicopathological findings and genetic studies of classic BS in a 22-year-old female patient who presented with persistent mild proteinuria for 2 years. A renal biopsy demonstrated a mild to moderate increase in the mesangial cells and matrix of most glomeruli, along with marked juxtaglomerular cell hyperplasia. These findings suggested BS associated with mild IgA nephropathy. Focal tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and lymphocytic infiltration were also observed. A genetic study of the patient and her parents revealed a mutation of the CLCNKB genes. The patient was diagnosed with BS, type III. This case represents an atypical presentation of classic BS in an adult patient. Pathologic findings of renal biopsy combined with genetic analysis and clinicolaboratory findings are important in making an accurate diagnosis. PMID:26755355

  6. Adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type IV with erythrocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Tótoli, Cláudia; Calado, Joaquim Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bartter syndrome comprises a group of rare autosomal-recessive salt-losing disorders with distinct phenotypes, but one unifying pathophysiology consisting of severe reductions of sodium reabsorption caused by mutations in five genes expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle, coupled with increased urinary excretion of potassium and hydrogen, which leads to hypokalemic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome type IV, caused by loss-of-function mutations in barttin, a subunit of chloride channel CLC-Kb expressed in the kidney and inner ear, usually occurs in the antenatal-neonatal period. We report an unusual case of late onset presentation of Bartter syndrome IV and mild phenotype in a 20 years-old man who had hypokalemia, deafness, secondary hyperparathyroidism and erythrocytosis. PMID:26537508

  7. KLOSSIELLA DULCIS N. SP. (APICOMPLEXA: KLOSSIELLIDAE) IN THE KIDNEYS OF PETAURUS BREVICEPS (MARSUPIALIA: PETAURIDAE).

    PubMed

    Ardiaca, Maria; Bennett, Mark D; Montesinos, Andres; Juan-Sallés, Carles; Soriano-Navarro, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Two cases of renal klossiellosis were diagnosed by histopathology in pet sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps). In both cases, parasites were associated with tubular dilation and mild interstitial nephritis. Rare schizonts were seen in the proximal convoluted renal tubular epithelium, whereas all other life cycle stages were found within distal convoluted tubule cells or the urinary space of the structures distal to the loop of Henle. Conventional optical and transmission electron microscopies were used to assess the life stages of the parasite. The morphologic characteristics and measurements observed differ from those of previously described species of Klossiella infecting marsupial hosts, and the name Klossiella dulcis n. sp. is hereby proposed. This is the first report of a Klossiella sp. infection in Petaurus breviceps . PMID:27468038

  8. Claudins and the Kidney Volume 75: Annual Review of Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianghui; Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Yu, Alan S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Claudins are tight junction membrane proteins that regulate paracellular permeability of renal epithelia to small ions, solutes and water. Claudins interact within the cell membrane and between neighboring cells to form tight junction strands and constitute both the paracellular barrier and pore. The first extracellular domain of claudins is thought to be the pore-lining domain and contains the determinants of charge selectivity. Multiple claudins are expressed in different nephron segments and this likely determines the permeability properties of each segment. Recent evidence has identified claudin-2 as constituting the cation-reabsorptive pathway in the proximal tubule, claudin-14, -16 and -19 as forming a complex that regulates calcium transport in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, and claudin-4, -7 and -8 as determinants of collecting duct choride permeability. Mutations in claudin-16 and -19 cause familial hypercalciuric hypomagnesemia. The roles of other claudins in kidney diseases remain to be fully elucidated. PMID:23140368

  9. The distribution of sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase in medulla and cortex of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Hendler, Ernesto D.; Torretti, Jorge; Epstein, Franklin H.

    1971-01-01

    The activity of sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase (Na-K-ATPase) is considerably higher in homogenates of outer medulla than in the cortex or papilla of the kidney. The enzyme has similar kinetic characteristics in both cortex and medulla, and binds ouabain in the same proportion. The discrepancy in enzymatic activity is not paralleled by similar change in the activity of adenyl cyclase, 5′nucleotidase, glucose-6-phosphatase, or succinic dehydrogenase. Na-K-ATPase is also higher in distal convoluted tubules (ventral slices) than in the proximal tubules (dorsal slices) of the kidney of Amphiuma. The high concentration of Na-K-ATPase in the red medulla of the kidney is probably related to the presence here of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, and this has important implications with regard to the mechanism of sodium reabsorption by different portions of the nephron. PMID:4325313

  10. Development of the kidney medulla

    PubMed Central

    Song, Renfang; Yosypiv, Ihor V.

    2012-01-01

    The mature renal medulla, the inner part of the kidney, consists of the medullary collecting ducts, loops of Henle, vasa recta and the interstitium. The unique spatial arrangement of these components is essential for the regulation of urine concentration and other specialized kidney functions. Thus, the proper and timely assembly of medulla constituents is a crucial morphogenetic event leading to the formation of a functioning metanephric kidney. Mechanisms that direct renal medulla formation are poorly understood. This review describes the current understanding of the key molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying morphological aspects of medulla formation. Given that hypoplasia of the renal medulla is a common manifestation of congenital obstructive nephropathy and other types of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), better understanding of how disruptions in medulla formation are linked to CAKUT will enable improved diagnosis, treatment and prevention of CAKUT and their associated morbidity. PMID:22343825

  11. The macula densa tubular basement membrane: a unique plaque of basement membrane specialization.

    PubMed

    Bonsib, S M

    1986-01-01

    The inner (luminal) surface of the macula densa (MD) basement membrane (BM) was exposed by solubilization of the overlying epithelium permitting examination of its structural features by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nineteen macula densa BM were identified in five autopsy kidneys and seven renal biopsies by this SEM technique. The MD BM consists of an oval plaque of specialized BM, restricted to the glomerular hilum and arteriolar aspect of the thick ascending limb of Henle. It contains haphazardly oriented shallow tunnels, slender pleats, and bridges of BM which do not resemble any other nephron BM examined by this technique. The MD BM, critically located between MD and lacis cells appears to firmly anchor the MD to the juxtaglomerular apparatus and may amplify the extent of interaction between lacis cell processes or lacis cell interstitial space and MD cell processes. PMID:3453363

  12. Nephron organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells model kidney development and injury.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Ryuji; Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Kishi, Seiji; Valerius, M Todd; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-11-01

    Kidney cells and tissues derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may enable organ regeneration, disease modeling and drug screening. We report an efficient, chemically defined protocol for differentiating hPSCs into multipotent nephron progenitor cells (NPCs) that can form nephron-like structures. By recapitulating metanephric kidney development in vitro, we generate SIX2+ SALL1+ WT1+ PAX2+ NPCs with 90% efficiency within 9 days of differentiation. The NPCs possess the developmental potential of their in vivo counterparts and form PAX8+ LHX1+ renal vesicles that self-organize into nephron structures. In both two- and three-dimensional culture, NPCs form kidney organoids containing epithelial nephron-like structures expressing markers of podocytes, proximal tubules, loops of Henle and distal tubules in an organized, continuous arrangement that resembles the nephron in vivo. We also show that this organoid culture system can be used to study mechanisms of human kidney development and toxicity. PMID:26458176

  13. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Maria R.; Rocca, Bruno J.; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T.; Tripodi, Sergio A.; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  14. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  15. [Molecular structure of luminal diuretic receptors].

    PubMed

    Gamba, G

    1995-01-01

    Since day to day sodium and water intake is more or less constant, the output by urinary sodium excretion is the key to maintain extracellular fluid volume within physiologic ranges. To achieve this goal, the kidneys ensure that most of the large quantities of filtered sodium are reabsorbed, a function that takes place in the proximal tubule, the loop of Henle and the distal tubule, and then the kidneys adjust the small amount of sodium that is excreted in urine in such a way that sodium balance is maintained. This adjustment occurs in the collecting duct. Three groups of diuretic-sensitive sodium transport mechanisms have been identified in the apical membranes of the distal nephron based on their different sensitivities to diuretics and requirements for chloride and potassium: 1) the sulfamoylbenzoic (or bumetanide)-sensitive Na+:K+:2CI- and Na+:CI- symporters in the thick ascending loop of Henle; 2) the benzothiadiazine (or thiazide)-sensitive Na+:CI- cotransporter in the distal tubule; and 3) the amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel in the collecting tubule. The inhibition of any one of these proteins by diuretics results in increased sodium urinary excretion. Recently, the use of molecular biology techniques, specially the functional expression cloning in Xenopus laevis oocytes, has led to the identification of cDNA's encoding members of the three groups of diuretic-sensitive transport proteins. The present paper reviews the primary structure and some aspects of the relationship between structure and function of these transporters as well as the new protein families emerging from these sequences. It also discusses the future implications of these discoveries on the physiology and pathophysiology of kidney disease and sodium retaining states. PMID:7569367

  16. Identification of a bacterial pathogen associated with Porites white patch syndrome in the Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Séré, Mathieu G; Tortosa, Pablo; Chabanet, Pascale; Quod, Jean-Pascal; Sweet, Michael J; Schleyer, Michael H

    2015-09-01

    Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS) is a coral disease recently described in the Western Indian Ocean. This study aimed to isolate and identify potential pathogens associated with PWPS utilizing both culture and nonculture screening techniques and inoculation trials. A total of 14 bacterial strains (those dominant in disease lesions, absent or rare in healthy tissues and considered potential pathogens in a previous study) were cultured and used to experimentally inoculate otherwise healthy individuals in an attempt to fulfil Henle-Koch's postulates. However, only one (P180R), identified as closely related (99-100% sequence identity based on 1.4 kb 16S RNA sequence) to Vibrio tubiashii, elicited signs of disease in tank experiments. Following experimental infection (which resulted in a 90% infection rate), the pathogen was also successfully re-isolated from the diseased tissues and re-inoculated in healthy corals colonies, therefore fulfilling the final stages of Henle-Koch's postulates. Finally, we report that PWPS appears to be a temperature-dependent disease, with significantly higher tissue loss (anova: d.f. = 2, F = 39.77, P < 0.01) occurring at 30 °C [1.45 ± 0.85 cm(2) per day (mean ± SE)] compared to ambient temperatures of 28 and 26 °C (0.73 ± 0.80 cm(2) per day (mean ± SE) and 0.51 ± 0.50 cm(2) per day (mean ± SE), respectively). PMID:26193772

  17. Isoforms of Spectrin and Ankyrin Reflect the Functional Topography of the Mouse Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Stankewich, Michael C.; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Ji, Lan; Ardito, Thomas; Morrow, Jon S.

    2016-01-01

    The kidney displays specialized regions devoted to filtration, selective reabsorption, and electrolyte and metabolite trafficking. The polarized membrane pumps, channels, and transporters responsible for these functions have been exhaustively studied. Less examined are the contributions of spectrin and its adapter ankyrin to this exquisite functional topography, despite their established contributions in other tissues to cellular organization. We have examined in the rodent kidney the expression and distribution of all spectrins and ankyrins by qPCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescent and immuno electron microscopy. Four of the seven spectrins (αΙΙ, βΙ, βΙΙ, and βΙΙΙ) are expressed in the kidney, as are two of the three ankyrins (G and B). The levels and distribution of these proteins vary widely over the nephron. αΙΙ/βΙΙ is the most abundant spectrin, found in glomerular endothelial cells; on the basolateral membrane and cytoplasmic vesicles in proximal tubule cells and in the thick ascending loop of Henle; and less so in the distal nephron. βΙΙΙ spectrin largely replaces βΙΙ spectrin in podocytes, Bowman’s capsule, and throughout the distal tubule and collecting ducts. βΙ spectrin is only marginally expressed; its low abundance hinders a reliable determination of its distribution. Ankyrin G is the most abundant ankyrin, found in capillary endothelial cells and all tubular segments. Ankyrin B populates Bowman’s capsule, podocytes, the ascending thick loop of Henle, and the distal convoluted tubule. Comparison to the distribution of renal protein 4.1 isoforms and various membrane proteins indicates a complex relationship between the spectrin scaffold, its adapters, and various membrane proteins. While some proteins (e.g. ankyrin B, βΙΙΙ spectrin, and aquaporin 2) tend to share a similar distribution, there is no simple mapping of different spectrins or ankyrins to most membrane proteins. The implications of this data are

  18. Distinct distribution of specific members of protein 4.1 genefamily in the mouse nephron

    SciTech Connect

    Ramez, Mohamed; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel; Cluzeaud, Francoise; Chanan, Sumita; Patterson, Michael; Walensky, Loren D.; Marfatia, Shirin; Baines, Anthony J.; Chasis, Joel A.; Conboy, John G.; Mohandas, Narla; Gascard, Philippe

    2002-12-11

    Background: Protein 4.1 is an adapter protein which linksthe actin cytoskeleton to various transmembrane proteins. 4.1 proteinsare encoded by four homologous genes, 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1N, and 4.1B, whichundergo complex alternative splicing. Here we performed a detailedcharacterization of the expression of specific 4.1 proteins in the mousenephron. Methods: Distribution of renal 4.1 proteins was investigated bystaining of paraformaldehyde fixed mouse kidney sections with antibodieshighly specific for each 4.1 protein. Major 4.1 splice forms, amplifiedfrom mouse kidney marathon cDNA, were expressed in transfected COS-7cells in order to assign species of known exon composition to proteinsdetected in kidney. Results: A 105kDa4.1R splice form, initiating atATG-2 translation initiation site and lacking exon 16, but including exon17B, was restricted to thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. A 95kDa 4.1Nspliceform,lacking exons 15 and 17D, was expressed in either descendingor ascending thin limb of Henle'sloop, distal convoluted tubule and allregions of the collecting duct system. A major 108kDa 4.1B spliceform,initiating at a newly characterized ATG translation initiation site, andlacking exons 15, 17B, and 21, was present only in Bowman's capsule andproximal convoluted tubule (PCT). There was no expression of 4.1G inkidney. Conclusion: Distinct distribution of 4.1 proteins along thenephron suggests their involvement in targeting of selected transmembraneproteins in kidney epithelium andtherefore in regulation of specifickidney functions.

  19. Primary gene structure and expression studies of rodent paracellin-1.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Schlingmann, K P; Peters, M; Nejsum, L N; Nielsen, S; Engel, H; Grzeschik, K H; Seyberth, H W; Gröne, H J; Nüsing, R; Konrad, M

    2001-12-01

    The novel member of the claudin multigene family, paracellin-1/claudin-16, encoded by the gene PCLN1, is a renal tight junction protein that is involved in the paracellular transport of magnesium and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. Mutations in human PCLN1 are associated with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, an autosomal recessive disease that is characterized by severe renal magnesium and calcium loss. The complete coding sequences of mouse and rat Pcln1 and the murine genomic structure are here presented. Full-length cDNAs are 939 and 1514 bp in length in mouse and rat, respectively, encoding a putative open-reading frame of 235 amino acids in both species with 99% identity. Exon-intron analysis of the human and mouse genes revealed a 100% homology of coding exon lengths and splice-site loci. By radiation hybrid mapping, the murine Pcln1 gene was assigned directly to marker D16Mit133 on mouse chromosome 16 (syntenic to a locus on human chromosome 3q27, which harbors the human PCLN1 gene). Mouse multiple-tissue Northern blot showed Pcln1 expression exclusively in the kidney. The expression profile along the nephron was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-PCR on microdissected nephron segments and immunohistochemistry of rat kidney. Paracellin-1 expression was restricted to distal tubular segments including the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, the distal tubule, and the collecting duct. The identification and characterization of the rodent Pcln1 genes provide the basis for further studies of paracellin-1 function in suitable animal models. PMID:11729235

  20. The control of glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow in chronically volume-expanded rats.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J M; Häberle, D A; Kawata, T

    1988-01-01

    1. Chronic volume expansion by dietary salt loading practically abolishes tubuloglomerular feed-back (TGF) by means of a humoral inhibitor in tubular fluid. Elimination of the vasoconstrictor influence of feed-back does not, however, increase glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal blood flow (RBF), implying that chronic salt loading induces additional preglomerular vasoconstriction. This being so, the feed-back response which, although absent in free-flowing nephrons, can still be elicited by loop of Henle perfusion with Ringer solution, should be essentially normal, except that nephron GFR at any loop perfusion rate should be lower than in controls. Persistence of RBF, GFR and nephron GFR autoregulation would imply that autoregulation is achieved by a preglomerular resistance control system independent of feed-back. 2. These hypotheses were tested by clearance and micropuncture experiments in rats chronically fed a diet containing 40 g NaCl (kg food)-1. 3. RBF and GFR autoregulation indeed persisted, the former down to 90 mmHg compared with 105 mmHg in controls. In controls, nephron GFR measured distally was autoregulated down to 90 mmHg whereas that measured proximally was autoregulated only above 105 mmHg. In high-salt rats nephron GFR from both sites was autoregulated to 90 mmHg. 4. Loop of Henle perfusion with homologous tubular fluid in high-salt rats confirmed attenuation of feed-back. Loop perfusion with Ringer solution yielded a response comparable to that in controls (maximal reduction of nephron GFR to 57%, compared with 56% in controls). Absolute nephron GFR at any loop perfusion rate was lower in high-salt rats than in controls. 5. These observations confirm the initial hypotheses. Considering feed-back and autoregulation as independent, preglomerular resistance control mechanisms, together with elementary haemodynamic considerations, allows formulation of a renal haemodynamics model whose quantitative predictions regarding characteristics of RBF

  1. Localization of Tubular Adaptation to Renal Sodium Loss in Gitelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Valérie; Kolb, Isabelle; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Hannedouche, Thierry; Moulin, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Gitelman syndrome (GS) is a salt-wasting tubulopathy that results from the inactivation of the human thiazide–sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter located in the distal convoluted tubule. Tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss has been described and localized in the distal tubule in experimental models of GS but not in humans with GS. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss is described. Osmole-free water clearance and endogenous lithium clearance with furosemide infusion are used to compare 7 patients with genetically confirmed GS and 13 control participants. Results Neither endogenous lithium clearance nor osmole-free water clearance disclosed enhanced proximal fluid reabsorption in patients with GS. These patients displayed significantly lower osmole-free water clearance factored by inulin clearance (7.1±1.9 versus 10.1±2.2; P<0.01) and significantly lower fractional sodium reabsorption in the diluting nephron (73.2%±7.1% versus 86.1%±4.7%; P<0.005), consistent with the inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter. The furosemide-induced reduction rate of fractional sodium reabsorption in the diluting segment was higher in patients with GS (75.6%±6.1% versus 69.9%±3.2%; P<0.039), suggesting that sodium reabsorption would be enhanced in the cortical part of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle in patients with GS. Conclusions These findings suggest that tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss in GS would be devoted to the cortical part of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle in humans. PMID:22241817

  2. Molecular evidence for a role for K+-Cl− cotransporters in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Zesergio; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; Bautista, Rocio; Vázquez, Norma; Castañeda-Bueno, María; Mount, David B.; Pasantes-Morales, Herminia; Mercado, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC) isoforms 3 (KCC3) and 4 (KCC4) are expressed at the basolateral membrane of proximal convoluted tubule cells, and KCC4 is present in the basolateral membrane of the thick ascending loop of Henle's limb and α-intercalated cells of the collecting duct. Little is known, however, about the physiological roles of these transporters in the kidney. We evaluated KCC3 and KCC4 mRNA and protein expression levels and intrarenal distribution in male Wistar rats or C57 mice under five experimental conditions: hyperglycemia after a single dose of streptozotocin, a low-salt diet, metabolic acidosis induced by ammonium chloride in drinking water, and low- or high-K+ diets. Both KCC3 mRNA and protein expression were increased during hyperglycemia in the renal cortex and at the basolateral membrane of proximal tubule cells but not with a low-salt diet or acidosis. In contrast, KCC4 protein expression was increased by a low-sodium diet in the whole kidney and by metabolic acidosis in the renal outer medulla, specifically at the basolateral membrane of α-intercalated cells. The increased protein expression of KCC4 by a low-salt diet was also observed in WNK4 knockout mice, suggesting that upregulation of KCC4 in these circumstances is not WNK4 dependent. No change in KCC3 or KCC4 protein expression was observed under low- or high-K+ diets. Our data are consistent with a role for KCC3 in the proximal tubule glucose reabsorption mechanism and for KCC4 in salt reabsorption of the thick ascending loop of Henle's loop and acid secretion of the collecting duct. PMID:24089410

  3. Response of the GPHS/RTG system to potential launch accident environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunda, Meera

    1998-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft is designed to carry out an orbital tour of the Saturnian system and an investigation of the planet, its satellites, atmosphere, and its ring system. The space vehicle is powered by three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) which are mounted normal to the thrust axis of the vehicle. The nuclear heat source for each RTG consists of a stacked column of eighteen General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module primarily consists of an aeroshell, two Graphite Impact Shells (GIS), and four Fueled Clads (FC). Each FC consists of a fuel pellet of plutonium-238 in the form of the oxide PuO2 encased in an iridium shell which serves to contain the fuel. An extensive program of experimental tests and analyses was conducted in support of previous missions (Galileo and Ulysses) which served to calibrate and validate the PISCES 2D-ELK continuum mechanics code. This paper describes the response of the GPHS-RTG system to a large number of potential launch accident environments employing the MSC/PISCES Euler Lagrange shell coupled hydrocode as an analytical tool. The results of these calculations quantified the integrity of the iridium clad fuel containment system and provided a data base for a determination of the overall risk for the Cassini mission by others.

  4. Codon usage trend in mitochondrial CYB gene.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2016-07-15

    Here we reported the pattern of codon usage and the factors which influenced the codon usage pattern in mitochondrial cytochrome B (MT-CYB) gene among pisces, aves and mammals. The F1 axis of correspondence analysis showed highly significant positive correlation with nucleobases A3, C and C3 and significant negative correlation with T and T3 while F2 of correspondence analysis showed significant positive correlation with C and C3 and significant negative correlation with A and A3. From the neutrality plot, it was evident that the GC12 was influenced by mutation pressure and natural selection with a ratio of 0.10/0.90=0.11 in pisces, 0.024/0.976=0.0245 in aves and in mammals 0.215/0.785=0.273, which indicated that the role of natural selection was more than mutation pressure on structuring the bases at the first and second codon positions. Natural selection played the major role; but compositional constraint and mutation pressure also played a significant role in codon usage pattern. Analysis of codon usage pattern has contributed to the better understanding of the mechanism of distribution of codons and the evolution of MT-CYB gene. PMID:27063508

  5. Simulating the growth and distribution of planktic foraminifer using an ecophysiological multi-species model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, F.; Labeyrie, L.; Michel, E.; Bopp, L.; Cortijo, E.; Retailleau, S.; Howa, H.; Jorissen, F.

    2011-01-01

    We present an eco-physiological model reproducing the growth of eight foraminifer species (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinella siphonifera and Orbulina universa). By using the main physiological rates of foraminifers (nutrition, respiration, symbiotic photosynthesis), this model estimates their growth as a function of temperature, light availability, and food concentration. Model parameters are directly derived or calibrated from experimental observations and only the influence of food concentration (estimated via chl-a concentration) was calibrated against field observations. Growth rates estimated from the model show positive correlation with observed abundance from plankton net data suggesting close coupling between individual and assemblage growth rates. This observation was used to directly estimate potential abundance from the model-derived growth. Using satellite data, the model simulate the dominant foraminifer with a 70.5% efficiency when compared to a data set of 576 field observations worldwide. Using outputs of a biogeochemical model of the global ocean (PISCES) instead of satellite images as forcing variables gives also good results, but with lower efficiency (58.9%). The model also correctly reproduces the relative worldwide abundance and the diversity of the eight species when compared to core tops observations both using satellite and PISCES data. This model allows prediction of the season and water depth at which each species has its highest growth potential. This offers promising perspectives for both an improved quantification of paleoceanographic reconstructions and for a better understanding of the foraminiferal role in the marine carbon cycle.

  6. Modelling planktic foraminifer growth and distribution using an ecophysiological multi-species approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, F.; Labeyrie, L.; Michel, E.; Bopp, L.; Cortijo, E.; Retailleau, S.; Howa, H.; Jorissen, F.

    2011-04-01

    We present an eco-physiological model reproducing the growth of eight foraminifer species (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globigerinella siphonifera and Orbulina universa). By using the main physiological rates of foraminifers (nutrition, respiration, symbiotic photosynthesis), this model estimates their growth as a function of temperature, light availability, and food concentration. Model parameters are directly derived or calibrated from experimental observations and only the influence of food concentration (estimated via Chlorophyll-a concentration) was calibrated against field observations. Growth rates estimated from the model show positive correlation with observed abundance from plankton net data suggesting close coupling between individual growth and population abundance. This observation was used to directly estimate potential abundance from the model-derived growth. Using satellite data, the model simulate the dominant foraminifer species with a 70.5% efficiency when compared to a data set of 576 field observations worldwide. Using outputs of a biogeochemical model of the global ocean (PISCES) instead of satellite images as forcing variables gives also good results, but with lower efficiency (58.9%). Compared to core tops observations, the model also correctly reproduces the relative worldwide abundance and the diversity of the eight species when using either satellite data either PISCES results. This model allows prediction of the season and water depth at which each species has its maximum abundance potential. This offers promising perspectives for both an improved quantification of paleoceanographic reconstructions and for a better understanding of the foraminiferal role in the marine carbon cycle.

  7. Investigation of He–W interactions using DiMES on DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doerner, R. P.; Rudakov, D. L.; Chrobak, C. P.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Corr, C.; De Temmerman, G.; Kluth, P.; Lasnier, C. J.; McLean, A. G.; Pace, D. C.; et al

    2016-01-22

    Here, tungsten button samples were exposed to He ELMing H-mode plasma in DIII-D using 2.3 MW of electron cyclotron heating power. Prior to the exposures, the W buttons were exposed to either He, or D, plasma in PISCES-A for 2000 s at surface temperatures of 225–850 °C to create a variety of surfaces (surface blisters, subsurface nano-bubbles, fuzz). Erosion was spectroscopically measured from each DiMES sample, with the exception of the fuzzy W samples which showed almost undetectable WI emission. Post-exposure grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering surface analysis showed the formation of 1.5 nm diameter He bubbles in themore » surface of W buttons after only a single DIII-D (3 s, ~150 ELMs) discharge, similar to the bubble layer resulting from the 2000 s. exposure in PISCES-A. No surface roughening, or damage, was detected on the samples after approximately 600 ELMs with energy density between 0.04–0.1 MJ m–2.« less

  8. Closing the carbon cycle in the EC EARTH earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, Matthias; Döscher, Ralf; Meier, Markus; Svensson, Gunilla

    2015-04-01

    A closed carbon cycle, i.e. the exchange of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs (living biomass, soil carbon, sediments etc) via the atmosphere is essential for state of the art earth system models and it will become more and more important in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). It is also a prerequisite for simulating the atmospheric pCO2 in a fully prognostic mode and thus, for the realistic simulation of the important feedback of the carbon cycle to the predicted future climate change. The main challenges of this work are two fold: It requires close cooperation between physical oceanographers, meteorologists and biogeochemists. Moreover, especially the marine carbon cycle has very long internal time scales which demand for long spinup phases. The work presented here is the result of the joined efforts of the Meteorological Institute University of Stockholm, the Rossby Center for Climatic Research and the oceanographic department of the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), and the University of Lund. We here introduce our basic strategy for the implementation of the marine biogeochemistry model PISCES into EC Earth and first results for the marine carbon cycle model PISCES are presented.

  9. Beryllium deposition on International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor first mirrors: Layer morphology and influence on mirror reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Temmerman, G.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Seraydarian, R.; Schmid, K.; Kost, F.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Marot, L.

    2007-10-01

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of the optical diagnostic systems in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Reliability of these systems may be affected by mirror reflectivity changes induced by erosion and/or deposition of impurities (carbon, beryllium). The present study aims to assess the effect of beryllium (Be) deposition on the reflectivity of metallic mirrors and to collect data on the optical quality of these layers in terms of morphology, roughness, etc. Mirrors from molybdenum and copper were exposed in the PISCES-B linear plasma device to collect eroded material from graphite and beryllium targets exposed to beryllium-seeded deuterium plasma. After exposure, relative reflectivity of the mirrors was measured and different surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the properties of the deposited layers. Be layers formed in PISCES-B exhibit high levels of porosity which makes the reflectivity of the Be layers much lower than the reflectivity of pure Be. It is found that if Be deposition occurs on ITER first mirrors, the reflectivity of the coated mirrors will strongly depend on the layer morphology, which in turn depends on the deposition conditions.

  10. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Brian

    2004-10-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 05 contract period October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was completion of the water system that will provide water to wetland basins within the Vancouver Lake Unit and three independent basins on adjoining Clark County owned lands. The water system paid for by Clark Public Utilities was designed and built under the direction of Ducks Unlimited. Having a reliable water supply for these areas has allowed us for the first time to begin making significant progress toward our wetland vegetation management goals on this unit. A reduction in the density of reed canary grass has already been noted and increased levels of native plant occurrence have been observed. Our most notable setback was an increase in the infestation of purple loosestrife within a portion of the Shillapoo Lakebed including parts of the North and South Units. A great deal of effort and time was spent on addressing the problem including hand cutting and spraying individual plants.

  11. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation : 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A.; Firehammer, Jon A.

    2008-12-12

    This annual report summarizes previously unreported data collected to fulfill the contractual obligations for BPA project No.1990-044-00, 'Coeur d'Alene Subbasin Fisheries Habitat Enhancement', during the 2006 calendar year. Even though the contract performance period for this project crosses fiscal and calendar years, the timing of data collection and analysis, as well as implementation of restoration projects, lends itself to this reporting schedule. The 2006 performance period marked the first year that BPA implemented its Process Improvement Initiative with the Pisces system serving as the vehicle for developing statements of work and tracking project performance. This document attempts to provide some consistency between the project objectives, around which past reports have been structured, and the new work element format adopted for use in Pisces. The report is formatted into three primary sections that respectively provide results and discussion of: (1) monitoring and evaluation of biological and physical habitat indicators; (2) implementation of restoration and enhancement projects; and (3) education and outreach work performed during 2006. The relevant work elements and/or milestones found in the statement of work are listed under these section headings and described in the body of the report.

  12. Investigation of He-W interactions using DiMES on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerner, R. P.; Rudakov, D. L.; Chrobak, C. P.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Corr, C.; De Temmerman, G.; Kluth, P.; Lasnier, C. J.; McLean, A. G.; Pace, D. C.; Pitts, R. A.; Schmitz, O.; Thompson, M.; Winters, V.

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten button samples were exposed to He ELMing H-mode plasma in DIII-D using 2.3 MW of electron cyclotron heating power. Prior to the exposures, the W buttons were exposed to either He, or D, plasma in PISCES-A for 2000 s at surface temperatures of 225-850 °C to create a variety of surfaces (surface blisters, subsurface nano-bubbles, fuzz). Erosion was spectroscopically measured from each DiMES sample, with the exception of the fuzzy W samples which showed almost undetectable WI emission. Post-exposure grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering surface analysis showed the formation of 1.5 nm diameter He bubbles in the surface of W buttons after only a single DIII-D (3 s, ˜150 ELMs) discharge, similar to the bubble layer resulting from the 2000 s. exposure in PISCES-A. No surface roughening, or damage, was detected on the samples after approximately 600 ELMs with energy density between 0.04-0.1 MJ m-2.

  13. The Arrowhead Mini-supercluster of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarède, Daniel; Tully, R. Brent; Hoffman, Yehuda; Courtois, Hélène M.

    2015-10-01

    Superclusters of galaxies can be defined kinematically from local evaluations of the velocity shear tensor. The location where the smallest eigenvalue of the shear is positive and maximal defines the center of a basin of attraction. Velocity and density fields are reconstructed with Wiener Filter techniques. Local velocities due to the density field in a restricted region can be separated from external tidal flows, permitting the identification of boundaries separating inward flows toward a basin of attraction and outward flows. This methodology was used to define the Laniakea Supercluster that includes the Milky Way. Large adjacent structures include Perseus-Pisces, Coma, Hercules, and Shapley but current kinematic data are insufficient to capture their full domains. However, there is a small region trapped between Laniakea, Perseus-Pisces, and Coma that is close enough to be reliably characterized and that satisfies the kinematic definition of a supercluster. Because of its shape, it is given the name the Arrowhead Supercluster. This entity does not contain any major clusters. A characteristic dimension is ˜25 Mpc and the contained mass is only ˜ {10}15 {M}⊙ .

  14. Hepatic and extrahepatic distribution of ornithine urea cycle enzymes in holocephalan elephant fish (Callorhinchus milii).

    PubMed

    Takagi, Wataru; Kajimura, Makiko; Bell, Justin D; Toop, Tes; Donald, John A; Hyodo, Susumu

    2012-04-01

    Cartilaginous fish comprise two subclasses, the Holocephali (chimaeras) and Elasmobranchii (sharks, skates and rays). Little is known about osmoregulatory mechanisms in holocephalan fishes except that they conduct urea-based osmoregulation, as in elasmobranchs. In the present study, we examined the ornithine urea cycle (OUC) enzymes that play a role in urea biosynthesis in the holocephalan elephant fish, Callorhinchus milii (cm). We obtained a single mRNA encoding carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (cmCPSIII) and ornithine transcarbamylase (cmOTC), and two mRNAs encoding glutamine synthetases (cmGSs) and two arginases (cmARGs), respectively. The two cmGSs were structurally and functionally separated into two types: brain/liver/kidney-type cmGS1 and muscle-type cmGS2. Furthermore, two alternatively spliced transcripts with different sizes were found for cmgs1 gene. The longer transcript has a putative mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) and was predominantly expressed in the liver and kidney. MTS was not found in the short form of cmGS1 and cmGS2. A high mRNA expression and enzyme activities were found in the liver and muscle. Furthermore, in various tissues examined, mRNA levels of all the enzymes except cmCPSIII were significantly increased after hatching. The data show that the liver is the important organ for urea biosynthesis in elephant fish, but, extrahepatic tissues such as the kidney and muscle may also contribute to the urea production. In addition to the role of the extrahepatic tissues and nitrogen metabolism, the molecular and functional characteristics of multiple isoforms of GSs and ARGs are discussed. PMID:22227372

  15. Cestodes from deep-water squaliform sharks in the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caira, Janine N.; Pickering, Maria

    2013-12-01

    The majority of our knowledge on marine tapeworms (cestodes) is limited to taxa that are relatively easy to obtain (i.e., those that parasitize shallower-water species). The invitation to participate in a deep-water research survey off the Condor seamount in the Azores offered the opportunity to gain information regarding parasites of the less often studied sharks of the mesopelagic and bathypelagic zone. All tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda) found parasitizing the spiral intestine of squaliform shark species (Elasmobranchii: Squaliformes) encountered as part of this survey, as well as some additional Azorean sampling from previous years obtained from local fishermen are reported. In total, 112 shark specimens of 12 species of squaliform sharks representing 4 different families from depths ranging between 400 and 1290 m were examined. Cestodes were found in the spiral intestines from 11 of the 12 squaliform species examined: Deania calcea, D. cf. profundorum, D. profundorum, Etmopterus princeps, E. pusillus, E. spinax, Centroscyllium fabricii, Centroscymnus coelolepis, C. cryptacanthus, C. crepidater, and Dalatias licha. No cestodes were found in the spiral intestines of Centrophorus squamosus. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed several potentially novel trypanorhynch and biloculated tetraphyllidean species. Aporhynchid and gilquiniid trypanorhynchs dominated the adult cestode fauna of Etmopterus and Deania host species, respectively, while larval phyllobothriids were found across several host genera, including, Deania, Centroscyllium, and Centroscymnus. These results corroborate previous findings that deep-water cestode faunas are relatively depauperate and consist primarily of trypanorhynchs of the families Gilquiniidae and Aporhynchidae and larval tetraphyllideans. A subset of specimens of most cestode species was preserved in ethanol for future molecular analysis to allow more definitive determinations of the identification of the

  16. Fish Rejections in the Marine Aquarium Trade: An Initial Case Study Raises Concern for Village-Based Fisheries.

    PubMed

    Militz, Thane A; Kinch, Jeff; Foale, Simon; Southgate, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    A major difficulty in managing wildlife trade is the reliance on trade data (rather than capture data) to monitor exploitation of wild populations. Collected organisms that die or are rejected before a point of sale often go unreported. For the global marine aquarium trade, identifying the loss of collected fish from rejection, prior to export, is a first step in assessing true collection levels. This study takes a detailed look at fish rejections by buyers before export using the Papua New Guinea marine aquarium fishery as a case study. Utilizing collection invoices detailing the species and quantity of fish (Actinopteri and Elasmobranchii) accepted or rejected by the exporting company it was determined that, over a six month period, 24.2% of the total fish catch reported (n = 13,886) was rejected. Of the ten most collected fish families, rejection frequency was highest for the Apogonidae (54.2%), Chaetodontidae (26.3%), and Acanthuridae (18.2%) and lowest for Labridae (6.6%) and Hemiscylliidae (0.7%). The most frequently cited reasons for rejection were fin damage (45.6% of cases), undersized fish (21.8%), and fish deemed too thin (11.1%). Despite fishers receiving feedback on invoices explaining rejections, there was no improvement in rejection frequencies over time (r = -0.33, P = 0.15) with weekly rejection frequencies being highly inconsistent (range: 2.8% to 79.4%; s = 16.3%). These findings suggest that export/import statistics can greatly underestimate collection for the marine aquarium trade as additional factors such as fisher discards, escapees, post-collection mortalities, and unregulated domestic trade would further contribute to this disparity. PMID:26963259

  17. Bipteria vetusta n. sp. – an old parasite in an old host: tracing the origin of myxosporean parasitism in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kodádková, Alena; Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Holzer, Astrid S; Fiala, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Myxosporea (Myxozoa), a group of parasitic Cnidaria, use mostly bony fishes (Teleostei) as intermediate hosts; however, they can also parasitize other vertebrates such as cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes). Molecular data of myxosporeans from sharks and rays (Elasmobranchii) revealed these parasites to be one of the most basal representatives in the myxosporean phylogenetic tree, suggesting their ancient evolutionary history. A new myxosporean species, Bipteria vetusta n. sp., was found in the gall bladder of rabbit fish, Chimaera monstrosa (Holocephali; Chondrichthyes), and ssrDNA-based phylogeny revealed its basal position within the marine myxosporean lineage. Molecular dating based on ssrDNA analysis suggested the origin of a stem lineage leading to the marine myxosporean lineage at the time of the origin of Chondrichthyes in the Silurian era. The two common lineages of Myxozoa, Myxosporea and Malacosporea, were estimated to have split from their common ancestor in the Cambrian era. Tracing the history of evolution of the "vertebrate host type" character in the context of molecular dating showed that cartilaginous fish represented an ancestral state for all myxosporeans. Teleosts were very likely subsequently parasitized by myxozoans four times, independently. Myxosporean radiation and diversification appear to correlate with intermediate host evolution. The first intermediate hosts of myxosporeans were cartilaginous fish. When bony fish evolved and radiated, myxosporeans switched and adapted to bony fish, and subsequently greatly diversified in this new host niche. We believe that the present study is the first attempt at molecular dating of myxozoan evolution based on an old myxosporean species – a living myxosporean fossil. PMID:25659495

  18. Revealing less derived nature of cartilaginous fish genomes with their evolutionary time scale inferred with nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Renz, Adina J; Meyer, Axel; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2013-01-01

    Cartilaginous fishes, divided into Holocephali (chimaeras) and Elasmoblanchii (sharks, rays and skates), occupy a key phylogenetic position among extant vertebrates in reconstructing their evolutionary processes. Their accurate evolutionary time scale is indispensable for better understanding of the relationship between phenotypic and molecular evolution of cartilaginous fishes. However, our current knowledge on the time scale of cartilaginous fish evolution largely relies on estimates using mitochondrial DNA sequences. In this study, making the best use of the still partial, but large-scale sequencing data of cartilaginous fish species, we estimate the divergence times between the major cartilaginous fish lineages employing nuclear genes. By rigorous orthology assessment based on available genomic and transcriptomic sequence resources for cartilaginous fishes, we selected 20 protein-coding genes in the nuclear genome, spanning 2973 amino acid residues. Our analysis based on the Bayesian inference resulted in the mean divergence time of 421 Ma, the late Silurian, for the Holocephali-Elasmobranchii split, and 306 Ma, the late Carboniferous, for the split between sharks and rays/skates. By applying these results and other documented divergence times, we measured the relative evolutionary rate of the Hox A cluster sequences in the cartilaginous fish lineages, which resulted in a lower substitution rate with a factor of at least 2.4 in comparison to tetrapod lineages. The obtained time scale enables mapping phenotypic and molecular changes in a quantitative framework. It is of great interest to corroborate the less derived nature of cartilaginous fish at the molecular level as a genome-wide phenomenon. PMID:23825540

  19. What is an 'elasmobranch'? The impact of palaeontology in understanding elasmobranch phylogeny and evolution.

    PubMed

    Maisey, J G

    2012-04-01

    The Subclass Elasmobranchii is widely considered nowadays to be the sister group of the Subclass Holocephali, although chimaeroid fishes were originally classified as elasmobranchs along with modern sharks and rays. While this modern systematic treatment provides an accurate reflection of the phylogenetic relationships among extant taxa, the classification of many extinct non-holocephalan shark-like chondrichthyans as elasmobranchs is challenged. A revised, apomorphy-based definition of elasmobranchs is presented in which they are considered the equivalent of neoselachians, i.e. a monophyletic group of modern sharks and rays which not only excludes all stem and crown holocephalans, but also many Palaeozoic shark-like chondrichthyans and even close extinct relatives of neoselachians such as hybodonts. The fossil record of elasmobranchs (i.e. neoselachians) is reviewed, focusing not only on their earliest records but also on their subsequent distribution patterns through time. The value and limitations of the fossil record in answering questions about elasmobranch phylogeny are discussed. Extinction is seen as a major factor in shaping early elasmobranch history, especially during the Triassic. Extinctions may also have helped shape modern lamniform diversity, despite uncertainties surrounding the phylogenetic affinities of supposedly extinct clades such as cretoxyrhinids, anacoracids and odontids. Apart from these examples, and the supposed Cretaceous extinction of 'sclerorhynchids', elasmobranch evolution since the Jurassic has mostly involved increased diversification (especially during the Cretaceous). The biogeographical distribution of early elasmobranchs may be obscured by sampling bias, but the earliest records of numerous groups are located within the Tethyan realm. The break-up of Gondwana, and particularly the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean (together with the development of epicontinental seaways across Brazil and Africa during the Cretaceous

  20. Fish Rejections in the Marine Aquarium Trade: An Initial Case Study Raises Concern for Village-Based Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Militz, Thane A.; Kinch, Jeff; Foale, Simon; Southgate, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    A major difficulty in managing wildlife trade is the reliance on trade data (rather than capture data) to monitor exploitation of wild populations. Collected organisms that die or are rejected before a point of sale often go unreported. For the global marine aquarium trade, identifying the loss of collected fish from rejection, prior to export, is a first step in assessing true collection levels. This study takes a detailed look at fish rejections by buyers before export using the Papua New Guinea marine aquarium fishery as a case study. Utilizing collection invoices detailing the species and quantity of fish (Actinopteri and Elasmobranchii) accepted or rejected by the exporting company it was determined that, over a six month period, 24.2% of the total fish catch reported (n = 13,886) was rejected. Of the ten most collected fish families, rejection frequency was highest for the Apogonidae (54.2%), Chaetodontidae (26.3%), and Acanthuridae (18.2%) and lowest for Labridae (6.6%) and Hemiscylliidae (0.7%). The most frequently cited reasons for rejection were fin damage (45.6% of cases), undersized fish (21.8%), and fish deemed too thin (11.1%). Despite fishers receiving feedback on invoices explaining rejections, there was no improvement in rejection frequencies over time (r = -0.33, P = 0.15) with weekly rejection frequencies being highly inconsistent (range: 2.8% to 79.4%; s = 16.3%). These findings suggest that export/import statistics can greatly underestimate collection for the marine aquarium trade as additional factors such as fisher discards, escapees, post-collection mortalities, and unregulated domestic trade would further contribute to this disparity. PMID:26963259

  1. Surface ultrastructural characteristics of Dictyocotyle coeliaca Nybelin, 1941 (Monopisthocotylea: Monocotylidae), an endoparasitic monogenean of rays.

    PubMed

    Poddubnaya, Larisa G; Hemmingsen, Willy; Gibson, David I

    2016-03-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopical observations were made of the surface topography of Dictyocotyle coeliaca (Nybelin, 1941) (Monopisthocotylea: Monocotylidae), a unique endoparasitic monogenean from the body cavity of the ray Amblyraja radiata (Elasmobranchii: Rajidae). Scanning investigation show the presence on the ventral side of the anterior body of smooth areas with pit-like depressions and shallow ridges, whereas the tegument of the middle and posterior regions of the body is extensively folded, and on the dorsal surface the tegument is smooth but interrupted by deep depressions. Transmission observation revealed the presence of invaginations of varying irregularity and depth, which form the various depressions of the tegumental surface. Non-ciliated, dome-shaped papillae occur singly or in groups and are common around the mouth and both the genital and vaginal pores, but exhibit no particular orientation. The haptor is much reduced, compared with that of ectoparasitic monocotylids, and is covered ventrally with an irregular array of 40-70 shallow loculi. Internal differences occur in the thickness of the syncytial tegumentary layer of the haptoral loculi and septa and also in the number of cytoplasmic inclusions. The locular surface has distinct ultrastructural characteristics, the most obvious of which are a honeycomb arrangement of small pockets measuring 0.6 × 0.75 to 1.0 × 1.7 μm in diameter, a terminal web beneath the surface plasma membrane and large outgrowths on the surface of the loculi filled with lysosome-like bodies. The surface specializations of the body and haptoral tegument of D. coeliaca are discussed in relation to their being adaptations to an endoparasitic environment. PMID:26614359

  2. Locating and Evaluating Sea-Disposed Munitions--Examples from the Hawaii Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M.; Wilkens, R. H.; Kelley, C.; de Carlo, E. H.; MacDonald, K.; Garcia, S.; Vanwoerkom, M.; Payne, Z.; Dupra, V.; Rosete, M.; Cox, M.; Fineran, S.; King, J. C.; Carton, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Army, under its Environmental Quality Technology (EQT) Program funded the HUMMA Project to assess the location of, and potential risk to human health posed by, sea disposed munitions (discarded military munitions (DMM)) at a study site south of Pearl Harbor, Hawai‘i known as HI-05. These conventional and chemical munitions are believed to have been exposed to undersea biochemical and mechanical erosion since the late 1940’s. To locate <2-meter long DMM at depths of 300-600 meters, we used a series of nested surveys beginning with an IMI-120 sidescan sonar survey of HI-05. From backscatter data gridded into 0.5-2m cells, we identified trails of highly reflective targets as candidate study sites. We initially surveyed these sites using a towed video camera. Subsequently, during a 12-day program aboard the R/V Kaimikai-o-Kanaloa, we surveyed selected targets using PISCES submersibles and an RCV-150 remotely operated vehicle operated by the Hawaii Undersea Research Lab. Every trail of reflective targets identified in the IMI-120 data was subsequently shown to contain DMM of various types. In combination with completing optical surveys to augment the IMI-120 acoustic data, the PISCES submersibles collected 96 sediment and 24 water samples within 1 and 2 meters of high-interest DMM as well as comparative background sites. The Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center supported dive operations to ensure crew personnel were not exposed to chemical agents (CA) and processed samples on board to determine if CA was present. The processed samples were then packaged and shipped to various shore-based laboratories to determine the presence of energetics and metals. Upon completion of the diving program, various species of locally consumed snapper and shrimp were collected near several of the sediment and water sample sites for analogous laboratory analyses. Our approach proved to be highly successful, identifying in a 5-day long IMI-120 survey the location of dozens of

  3. The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory's 25th Anniversary Expedition to the South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. R.; Wiltshire, J. C.; Malahoff, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL) was established by NOAA at the University of Hawaii 25 years ago as part of its National Undersea Research Program. HURL's mission is to study deep water marine processes in the Pacific Ocean through a competitive proposal and review process. The dual Pisces IV and Pisces V 2000-meter manned submersibles, an RCV-150 1000-meter ROV, and multibeam equipped support ship R/V Ka'imikai-o-Kanaloa ( KoK) were largely acquired from the petroleum industry then adapted and upgraded to carry out cutting edge scientific expeditions. These studies range from active submarine volcanoes, delicate precious coral gardens, endangered marine mammal and fisheries management, to engineering surveys and deployment of observatory systems. HURL successfully completed a major 5-month expedition to the South Pacific during March-August 2005, working in the waters of New Zealand, Tonga, American Samoa, and the U.S. Line Islands covering a distance of nearly 14,500 nautical miles. This mission was significant in both the scientific merit and scope of operations, consisting of 8 different cruise legs at 21 study sites, with 12 chief and co-chief scientists, 58 total science team participants, and completing 61 out of 56 scheduled Pisces science dives, 17 ROV dives, 5 multibeam survey areas, 6 CTD rosette deployments, and 7 instrument mooring recoveries. The $3.5 million expedition was funded by an international partnership with New Zealand agencies (GNS & NIWA) and the University of Kiel in Germany along with the NOAA Office of Exploration and National Undersea Research Program. While most of the individual cruise legs focused on active submarine volcanoes of the Tonga-Kermadec Islands Arc and the Samoan hot spot chain with their hydrothermal systems and associated biological communities, others concentrated on marine protected areas including those of American Samoa and the remote atolls of the Line Islands of the Central Pacific. These studies

  4. Deep-depletion breakdown of Johnsen-Rahbek type electrostatic chuck operation for semiconductor processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shu; McTeer, Allen

    2008-11-01

    Johnsen-Rahbek type (JR type) electrostatic chuck (ESC) was found to be more sensitive to wafer conditions than classic ESC, including backside dielectric quality and thickness, wafer type, and doping level. Wafer type and doping level may significantly affect the reliability of ESC operations, depending on ESC configurations and operation conditions. Deep-depletion breakdown phenomenon of a JR type ESC operation, which is equivalent to a metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor, was simulated by PISCES-IIB device simulator, and it was found to be a mechanism of the reliability and pop-off issues of JR type ESC operations. In this paper, the potential solutions are proposed to solve these issues.

  5. Charge collected by diffusion from an ion track under mixed boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1991-01-01

    Charge-carrier diffusion from an ion track in a silicon substrate at least a few hundred microns thick is analyzed. The substrate upper surface is treated as reflective except for a small section, intended to represent a reverse-biased junction, which is treated as a sink. Total charge collected by the sink is calculated by assuming transport to be governed by an ambipolar diffusion equation with temporally constant and spatially uniform carrier lifetime and diffusion coefficient. Present results apply to a normally incident track but could easily be generalized to arbitrary track direction. The collected charge is found to depend on track length and on the electrostatic capacitance, rather than the area, of the sink. Theoretical predictions are compared to the results of a numerical simulation called the Poisson and Continuity Equation Solver (PISCES) for three cases and are found to agree within a factor of two in the worst case.

  6. A Fitting Routine to Obtain Temperature and Relative Spectral Emissivity from Mixed Material (C, W, Be) Surfaces in PSI Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraydarian, Ray; Hanna, Jeremy; Doerner, Russ; Baldwin, Matt

    2007-11-01

    A nonlinear least-squares fitting code has been written to fit a black body profile multiplied by a polynomial spectral emissivity to the data from an IR spectroscopy diagnostic on the PISCES-B machine. The result is the absolute surface temperature and the coefficients of the polynomial emissivity. Emissivity measurements are important for thermal balance calculations of first wall materials in ITER, especially under conditions for which mixed materials can be created (e.g., combinations of C, W and Be) for which no other emissivity data are available. A straightforward data-to-theory-function fit is made possible by an intensity calibration using a commercially available illumination source. The raw spectrum has sufficient detail (512 pixels) to see and eliminate atomic line emission and absorption features from the spectrum before fitting. Fitting code details and preliminary experimental data analysis will be presented and discussed.

  7. The structure of the nearby universe traced by theIRAS galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahil, Amos

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) has been the detection of about 20,000 galaxies with 60 microns fluxes above 0.5 Jy. From the observational point of view, the IRAS galaxies are ideal tracers of density, since they are homogeneously detected over most of the sky, and their fluxes are unaffected by galactic extinction. The nearby universe was mapped by the IRAS galaxies to a distance of approximately 200 h(exp -1) Mpc for the absolute value of b less than 5 deg. The ability to map down to such low galactic latitudes has proven to be particularly imporant, since some of the most important nearby large-scale structures, such as the Great Attractor, the Perseus-Pisces region, and the Shapley concentration, all lie there. Two major results of the U.S. IRAS redshift survey are discussed.

  8. Operation of the adaptive optics system at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Guerra, Juan Carlos; Boutsia, Konstantina; Fini, Luca; Argomedo, Javier; Biddick, Chris; Agapito, Guido; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Briguglio, Runa; Brusa, Guido; Busoni, Lorenzo; Esposito, Simone; Hill, John; Kulesa, Craig; McCarthy, Don; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio T.; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The Adaptive Optics System at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory consists of two Adaptive Secondary (ASM) mirrors and two Pyramid Wavefront sensors. The first ASM/Pyramid pair has been commissioned and is being used for science operation using the NIR camera PISCES on the right side of the binocular telescope. The left side ASM/Pyramid system is currently being commissioned, with completion scheduled for the Fall of 2012. We will discuss the operation of the first Adaptive Optics System at the LBT Observatory including interactions of the AO system with the telescope and its TCS, observational modes, user interfaces, observational scripting language, time requirement for closed loop and offsets and observing efficiency.

  9. [Embrionary-larval development of the tropical fish Hemirhamphus brasiliensis (Beloniformes: Hemirhamphidae) from eggs collected in the wild].

    PubMed

    Rosas, Jesús; Mata, Ernesto; Velásquez, Aidé; Cabrera, Tomas

    2008-09-01

    The embryo formation and larval development of Hemirhamphus brasiliensis Linnaeus, 1758 (Pisces: Hemirhamphidae) is described from morula stage eggs collected on Sargassum sp. Thalii in the field (10 degrees 50'55.2" N y 64 degrees 09'467" W). The eggs were spherical, 1 923.54 +/- 72.35 microm diameter with several corionic filaments, and are striated. During the first 48 h the embryo developed cephalic vesicle, miomers, and a heart located on the external body surface, beating strongly and circulating colorless blood which became pigmented red later. Before hatching, the larva developed kidney, gut tract, liver and biliar vesicle, pectoral fins, four pairs of gill arches and the mouth. The larva hatched at 114 h, the body was torpedo-shaped, yellow-green, with several dendriform melanophores; the pelvic fin was observed 72 h post hatching. At 240 hours the metamorphoses was completed. When the larvae hatched they could ingest Artemia metanauplii. PMID:19419056

  10. Redescriptions of Polysteganus coeruleopunctatus (Klunzinger 1870) and P. lineopunctatus (Boulenger 1903), with two new species from Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Yukio; Heemstra, Phillip C

    2015-01-01

    Five valid species in the genus Polysteganus (Pisces; Sparidae) from the Western Indian Ocean are currently known: P. baissaci Smith 1978, P. coeruleopunctatus (Klunzinger 1870), P. mascarenensis Iwatsuki & Heemstra, 2011, P. praeorbitalis (Günther 1859), and P. undulosus (Regan 1908). Although P. lineopunctatus (Boulenger 1903) has long been synonymized under P. coeruleopunctatus, both species are redescribed as valid. Two new species of Polysteganus were discovered in the course of this review. Polysteganus flavodorsalis n. sp. is described on the basis of six type specimens (143-265 mm SL) from Nazareth Bank, Mascarene Plateau, Indian Ocean, and P. cerasinus n. sp. is described based on the holotype (134 mm SL) from Saya de Malha Bank. Provisional distribution patterns of the eight valid species of Polysteganus in the Western Indian Ocean are discussed. A key to the species of Polysteganus is provided. PMID:26701557

  11. Working session 2: Tubing inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, J.; Tapping, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    This session was attended by delegates from 10 countries, and four papers were presented. A wide range of issues was tabled for discussion. Realizing that there was limited time available for more detailed discussion, three topics were chosen for the more detailed discussion: circumferential cracking, performance demonstration (to focus on POD and sizing), and limits of methods. Two other subsessions were organized: one dealt with some challenges related to the robustness of current inspection methods, especially with respect to leaving cracked tubes in service, and the other with developing a chart of current NDE technology with recommendations for future development. These three areas are summarized in turn, along with conclusions and/or recommendations. During the discussions there were four presentations. There were two (Canada, Japan) on eddy current probe developments, both of which addressed multiarray probes that would detect a range of flaws, one (Spain) on circumferential crack detection, and one (JRC, Petten) on the recent PISC III results.

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of the largest living fish: whale shark Rhincodon typus (Orectolobiformes: Rhincodontidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Ai, Weiming; Pan, Lianghao; Shi, Xiaofang

    2016-01-01

    The whale shark Rhincodon typus (Pisces: Chondrichthyes, Orectolobiformes, Rhincodontidae) is the largest living fish on Earth. In this study, we presented its complete mitogenome. It is 16,928 bp in length, contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and one control region with the typical gene order and transcriptional direction in the vertebrates. Overall base composition of the R. typus mitogenome is 33.5% A, 24.3% C, 12.8% G and 29.5% T. Two start codon (GTG and ATG) and two stop codon patterns (TAG and TAA/T) were found in protein-coding genes. The tRNA-Ser2 could not be folded into the typical cloverleaf secondary structure because of the replacement of its dihydrouridine arm by a simple loop. A termination associated sequences (TAS) and three conserved sequence blocks (CSB1-3) were identified in the control region. PMID:24660935

  13. IRAS galaxies versus POTENT mass - Density fields, biasing, and Omega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekel, Avishai; Bertschinger, Edmund; Yahil, Amos; Strauss, Michael A.; Davis, Marc; Huchra, John P.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of the galaxy density field extracted from a complete redshift survey of IRAS galaxies brighter than 1.936 Jy with the mass-density field reconstructed by the POTENT procedure from the observed peculiar velocities of 493 objects is presented. A strong correlation is found between the galaxy and mass-density fields; both feature the Great Attractor, part of the Perseus-Pisces supercluster, and the large void between them. Monte Carlo noise simulations show that the data are consistent with the hypotheses that the smoothed fluctuations of galaxy and mass densities at each point are proportional to each other with the 'biasing' factor of IRAS galaxies, b(I), and that the peculiar velocity field is related to the mass-density field as expected according to the gravitational instability theory. Under these hypotheses, the two density fields can be related by specifying b(I) and the cosmological density parameter, Omega.

  14. Systematic investigation of the formation behavior of helium bubbles in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Mikami, S.; Nagashima, H.; Iijima, N.; Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R. P.; Yoshida, N.; Watanabe, H.; Ueda, Y.; Sagara, A.

    2015-08-01

    The formation of He bubbles in tungsten under exposure to a He plasma was systematically investigated using low energy (∼50 eV) He+ ions with a wide fluence range (∼1023 to 1026 m-2) in the linear divertor plasma simulator PISCES-A at several temperatures (523-973 K). TEM observations after thinning exposed W samples with FIB revealed that the layer thickness (>30 nm) of He bubbles largely exceeds the ion implantation range of a few nm. The size of He bubbles was found to increase with an increase in the sample temperature: it was around 10 nm at 973 K, while only small He bubbles of 1-2 nm were observed at <773 K. In addition, to obtain information on the initial formation behavior, in-situ TEM observations during He ion irradiation were also performed.

  15. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Collaborative Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, John M.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) has allowed faculty and students from a wide range of public and private colleges and especially those with small astronomy programs to learn how science is accomplished in a large collaboration while contributing to the scientific goals of a legacy radio astronomy survey. The UAT has achieved this through close collaboration with ALFALFA PIs to identify research areas accessible to undergraduates. In this talk we will summarize the main research efforts of the UAT, including multiwavelength followup observations of ALFALFA sources, the UAT Collaborative Groups Project, the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD), and the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, and AST-1211005.

  16. Predicting the velocity and azimuth of fragments generated by the range destruction or random failure of rocket casings and tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, Marshall; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-01-01

    A calculational method is described which provides a powerful tool for predicting solid rocket motor (SRM) casing and liquid rocket tankage fragmentation response. The approach properly partitions the available impulse to each major system-mass component. It uses the Pisces code developed by Physics International to couple the forces generated by an Eulerian-modeled gas flow field to a Lagrangian-modeled fuel and casing system. The details of the predictive analytical modeling process and the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-overpressure failures are also discussed. Good agreement between predictions and observations are obtained for five specific events.

  17. A fast spatial scanning combination emissive and mach probe for edge plasma diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmer, R.D.; LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-04-01

    A fast spatially scanning emissive and mach probe has been developed for the measurement of plasma profiles in the PISCES facility at UCLA. A pneumatic cylinder is used to drive a multiple tip probe along a 15cm stroke in less than 400msec, giving single shot profiles while limiting power deposition to the probe. A differentially pumped sliding O-ring seal allows the probe to be moved between shots to infer two and three dimensional profiles. The probe system has been used to investigate the plasma potential, density, and parallel mach number profiles of the presheath induced by a wall surface and scrape-off-layer profile modifications in biased limiter simulation experiments. Details of the hardware, data acquisition electronics, and tests of probe reliability are discussed. 30 refs., 24 figs.

  18. Si mass and the entropy distribution of the AWM7 cluster out to r500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Kyoko

    2013-10-01

    The AWM 7 cluster is a nearby bright cluster (z=0.017; kT=3.7 keV), which forms a part of the Perseus- Pisces filament. We propose to map the AWM 7 cluster to cover 0.3-1 r500 with 8 pointings with a 200 ks total exposure. One objective is to derive Si abundance out to r500. With Suzaku data out to the virial radius, we will be able to constrain the ratio of the Si mass in the ICM and total stellar luminosity of galaxies out to the virial radius. Another objective is to derive two-dimensional maps of temperature and entropy, and with the Suzaku data out to the virial radius, and to study history of accretion along the filament and gas heating.

  19. ROSAT observations of the galaxy group AWM 7.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, D. M.; Boehringer, H.

    1995-09-01

    We present results of ROSAT/PSPC and HRI observations of the AWM 7 group of galaxies, which is a poor galaxy cluster and forms part of the Perseus-Pisces filament. The X-ray emission originates from intracluster gas at temperatures of 1.7 to 4.5keV. The cluster obviously is elliptical with a position angle perpendicular to the position angle of the dominant elliptical galaxy NGC 1129, which is offset from the cluster X-ray centre by 30kpc. The analysis of the PSPC imaging and spectral data yield a gravitational mass of 2-5x10^14^Msun_within a radius of 1.2Mpc and a cooling flow with a mass deposition rate of up to 60-66Msun_/yr.

  20. Spectroscopic characterization and imaging of laser- and unipolar arc-induced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aussems, Damien U. B.; Nishijima, Daisuke; Brandt, Christian; Doerner, Russell P.; Cardozo, Niek J. Lopes

    2014-08-14

    Tungsten plasmas induced by unipolar arcs were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy and imaging, and compared with laser-induced tungsten plasmas. The unipolar arcs were initiated in the linear-plasma simulator PISCES-A at UCSD under fusion relevant conditions. The electron temperature and density of the unipolar arc plasmas were in the range 0.5–0.7 eV and 0.7–2.0 × 10{sup 20 }m{sup −3}, respectively, and increased with increasing negative bias voltage, but did not correlate with the surface temperature. In comparison, the electron temperature and density of the laser-induced plasmas were in the range 0.6–1.4 eV and 7 × 10{sup 19}–1 × 10{sup 22 }m{sup −3}, respectively.

  1. Tetrameric assembly of CHIP28 water channels in liposomes and cell membranes: a freeze-fracture study.

    PubMed

    Verbavatz, J M; Brown, D; Sabolić, I; Valenti, G; Ausiello, D A; Van Hoek, A N; Ma, T; Verkman, A S

    1993-11-01

    Channel forming integral protein of 28 kD (CHIP28) functions as a water channel in erythrocytes, kidney proximal tubule and thin descending limb of Henle. CHIP28 morphology was examined by freeze-fracture EM in proteoliposomes reconstituted with purified CHIP28, CHO cells stably transfected with CHIP28k cDNA, and rat kidney tubules. Liposomes reconstituted with HPLC-purified CHIP28 from human erythrocytes had a high osmotic water permeability (Pf0.04 cm/s) that was inhibited by HgCl2. Freeze-fracture replicas showed a fairly uniform set of intramembrane particles (IMPs); no IMPs were observed in liposomes without incorporated protein. By rotary shadowing, the IMPs had a diameter of 8.5 +/- 1.3 nm (mean +/- SD); many IMPs consisted of a distinct arrangement of four smaller subunits surrounding a central depression. IMPs of similar size and appearance were seen on the P-face of plasma membranes from CHIP28k-transfected (but not mock-transfected) CHO cells, rat thin descending limb (TDL) of Henle, and S3 segment of proximal straight tubules. A distinctive network of complementary IMP imprints was observed on the E-face of CHIP28-containing plasma membranes. The densities of IMPs in the size range of CHIP28 IMPs, determined by non-linear regression, were (in IMPs/microns 2): 2,494 in CHO cells, 5,785 in TDL, and 1,928 in proximal straight tubules; predicted Pf, based on the CHIP28 single channel water permeability of 3.6 x 10(-14) cm3/S (10 degrees C), was in good agreement with measured Pf of 0.027 cm/S, 0.075 cm/S, and 0.031 cm/S, respectively, in these cell types. Assuming that each CHIP28 monomer is a right cylindrical pore of length 5 nm and density 1.3 g/cm3, the monomer diameter would be 3.2 nm; a symmetrical arrangement of four cylinders would have a greatest diameter of 7.2 nm, which after correction for the thickness of platinum deposit, is similar to the measured IMP diameter of approximately 8.5 nm. These results provide a morphological signature for CHIP28

  2. The Extended Halo of Centaurus A: Uncovering Satellites, Streams, and Substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the widest-field resolved stellar map to date of the closest (D˜ 3.8 Mpc) massive elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A; Cen A), extending out to a projected galactocentric radius of ˜150 kpc. The data set is part of our ongoing Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) utilizing the Magellan/Megacam imager. We resolve a population of old red giant branch (RGB) stars down to ˜1.5 mag below the tip of the RGB, reaching surface brightness limits as low as {μ }V,0˜ 32 mag arcsec‑2. The resulting spatial stellar density map highlights a plethora of previously unknown streams, shells, and satellites, including the first tidally disrupting dwarf around Cen A (CenA-MM-Dw3), which underline its active accretion history. We report 13 previously unknown dwarf satellite candidates, of which 9 are confirmed to be at the distance of Cen A (the remaining 4 are not resolved into stars), with magnitudes in the range {M}V=-7.2 to ‑13.0, central surface brightness values of {μ }V,0=25.4{--}26.9 mag arcsec‑2, and half-light radii of {r}h=0.22{--}2.92 {{kpc}}. These values are in line with Local Group dwarfs but also lie at the faint/diffuse end of their distribution; interestingly, CenA-MM-Dw3 has similar properties to the recently discovered ultradiffuse galaxies in Virgo and Coma. Most of the new dwarfs are fainter than the previously known Cen A satellites. The newly discovered dwarfs and halo substructures are discussed in light of their stellar populations, and they are compared to those discovered by the PAndAS survey of M31. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  3. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Brian

    2006-10-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

  4. A Tidally Disrupting Dwarf Galaxy in the Halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson; McLeod, Brian; Seth, Anil C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Scl-MM-Dw2, a new dwarf galaxy at a projected separation of ∼50 kpc from NGC 253, as part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor project (PISCeS). We measure a tip of the red giant branch (RGB) distance of 3.12 ± 0.30 Mpc, suggesting that Scl-MM-Dw2 is likely a satellite of NGC 253. We qualitatively compare the distribution of RGB stars in the color–magnitude diagram with theoretical isochrones and find that it is consistent with an old, ∼12 Gyr, and metal-poor, -2.3 \\lt [Fe/H] \\lt -1.1, stellar population. We also detect a small number of asymptotic giant branch stars consistent with a metal-poor 2–3 Gyr population in the center of the dwarf. Our non-detection of HI in a deep Green Bank Telescope spectrum implies a gas fraction {M}{HI}/{L}V\\lt 0.02 {M}ȯ /{L}ȯ . The stellar and gaseous properties of Scl-MM-Dw2 suggest that it is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Scl-MM-Dw2 has a luminosity of {M}V=-12.1+/- 0.5 mag and a half-light radius of rh =2.94+/- 0.46 {{kpc}}, which makes it moderately larger than dwarf galaxies in the Local Group of the same luminosity. However, Scl-MM-Dw2 is very elongated (ε =0.66+/- 0.06), and it has an extremely low surface brightness ({μ }0,V=27.7+/- 0.6 mag arcsec‑2). Its elongation and diffuseness make it an outlier in the ellipticity–luminosity and surface brightness–luminosity scaling relations. These properties suggest that this dwarf is being tidally disrupted by NGC 253.

  5. Inhibition of erythrocytes δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity in fish from waters affected by lead smelters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Colleen A.; Olsen, Bill; Serdar, Dave; Coffey, Mike

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the effects on fish of lead (Pb) released to streamsby smelters located in Trail, BC (Canada), E. Helena, MT, Herculaneum, MO, and Glover, MO. Fish were collected by electrofishing from sites located downstream of smelters and from reference sites. Blood from each fish was analyzed for δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and hemoglobin (Hb), and samples of blood, liver, or carcass were analyzed for Pb, zinc (Zn), or both. Fish collected downstreamof all four smelters sites had elevated Pb concentrations, decreased ALAD activity, or both relative to their respectivereference sites. At E. Helena, fish from the downstream site also had lower Hb concentrations than fish from upstream. Differences among taxa were also apparent. Consistent with previous studies, ALAD activity in catostomids (Pisces: Catostomidae-northern hog sucker,Hypentelium nigricans;river carpsucker, Carpiodes carpio; largescale sucker, Catostomus macrocheilus; and mountain sucker, C. platyrhynchus) seemed more sensitive to Pb-induced ALADinhibition than the salmonids (Pisces: Salmonidae-rainbow trout,Oncorhynchus mykiss; brook trout,Salvelinus fontinalis) or common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Some of these differences may have resulted from differential accumulation of Zn, which was not measured at all sites. We detected noALAD activity in channel catfish (Ictaluruspunctatus) from either site on the Mississippi River at Herculaneum, MO. Our findings confirmed that Pb is releasedto aquatic ecosystems by smelters and accumulated by fish, andwe documented potentially adverse effects of Pb in fish. We recommend that Zn be measured along with Pb when ALAD activityis used as a biomarker and the collection of at least 10 fish ofa species at each site to facilitate statistical analysis.

  6. Development and Application of a Streamflow Disaggregation Tool in Natural Waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, A.; Ryu, J.

    2013-12-01

    A simple streamflow disaggregation method/tool has been developed to disaggregate streamflow from monthly to daily time steps. This disaggregation method is simple, site specific, data driven, flexible and adaptive at any regions and by any organizations that are looking for less intensive and less time consuming method of streamflow disaggregation from monthly to daily scale. The application of this methodology has been demonstrated through its application at both regulated and unregulated rivers located in Idaho. The flow indexes, which are developed with respect to historical data at the Source Station (SS), are applied to monthly streamflow at target station (TSS) while performing disaggregation. The selection of SS is based on minimum error criteria which is calculated for each 3-month seasonal flow volume for each year. An additional cubic spline interpolation is applied for unregulated cases to smoothen sudden high/low flows during month to month transition. The performance of this method to synthesize daily streamflow while preserving historical daily streamflow at both regulated and unregulated cases is evaluated based on different metrics such as statistical parameters, total runoff volume, peak runoff e.t.c.. The availability of finer scale (daily or shorter) hydrologic data can be utilized by water engineers in water resources management including reservoir operation, water quality and ecological modeling. This tool has been incorporated into the "PISCES" software program developed by the Bureau of Reclamation Pacific NorthWest Region (at http://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/pisces) and this tool can also be directly assessed through http://water.cals.uidaho.edu/products/UIDisagg/ .

  7. DISCOVERY OF A NEW FAINT DWARF GALAXY ASSOCIATED WITH NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, D. J.; Crnojević, D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Caldwell, N.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A. C.

    2014-09-20

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, which we dub Scl-MM-Dw1, at a projected distance of ∼65 kpc from the spiral galaxy NGC 253. The discovery results from the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), a program with the Magellan/Megacam imager to study faint substructure in resolved stellar light around massive galaxies outside of the Local Group. We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to Scl-MM-Dw1 of D = 3.9 ± 0.5 Mpc, consistent with that of NGC 253, making their association likely. The new dwarf's stellar population is complex, with an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳10 Gyr, [Fe/H] ∼ –2), and an asymptotic giant branch with an age of ∼500 Myr. Scl-MM-Dw1 has a half-light radius of r{sub h} = 340 ± 50 pc and an absolute magnitude of M{sub V}  = –10.3 ± 0.6 mag, comparable to the Milky Way's satellites at the same luminosity. Once complete, our imaging survey of NGC 253 and other nearby massive galaxies will provide a census of faint substructure in halos beyond the Local Group, both to put our own environment into context and to confront models of hierarchical structure formation.

  8. The Extended Halo of Centaurus A: Uncovering Satellites, Streams, and Substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the widest-field resolved stellar map to date of the closest (D∼ 3.8 Mpc) massive elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A; Cen A), extending out to a projected galactocentric radius of ∼150 kpc. The data set is part of our ongoing Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) utilizing the Magellan/Megacam imager. We resolve a population of old red giant branch (RGB) stars down to ∼1.5 mag below the tip of the RGB, reaching surface brightness limits as low as {μ }V,0∼ 32 mag arcsec‑2. The resulting spatial stellar density map highlights a plethora of previously unknown streams, shells, and satellites, including the first tidally disrupting dwarf around Cen A (CenA-MM-Dw3), which underline its active accretion history. We report 13 previously unknown dwarf satellite candidates, of which 9 are confirmed to be at the distance of Cen A (the remaining 4 are not resolved into stars), with magnitudes in the range {M}V=-7.2 to ‑13.0, central surface brightness values of {μ }V,0=25.4{--}26.9 mag arcsec‑2, and half-light radii of {r}h=0.22{--}2.92 {{kpc}}. These values are in line with Local Group dwarfs but also lie at the faint/diffuse end of their distribution; interestingly, CenA-MM-Dw3 has similar properties to the recently discovered ultradiffuse galaxies in Virgo and Coma. Most of the new dwarfs are fainter than the previously known Cen A satellites. The newly discovered dwarfs and halo substructures are discussed in light of their stellar populations, and they are compared to those discovered by the PAndAS survey of M31. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  9. Quality assurance and control issues for HF radar wave and current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Lucy

    2015-04-01

    HF radars are now widely used to provide surface current measurements over wide areas of the coastal ocean for scientific and operational applications. In general data quality is acceptable for these applications but there remain issues that impact on the quantity and quality of the data. These include problems with calibration and interference which impact on both phased array (e.g. WERA, Pisces) and direction-finding (e.g. SeaSonde) radars. These same issues and others (e.g. signal-to-noise, in-cell current variability, antenna sidelobes) also impact on the quality and quantity of wave data that can be obtained. These issues will be discussed in this paper, illustrated with examples from deployments of WERA, Pisces and SeaSonde radars in the UK, Europe, USA and Australia. These issues involve both quality assurance (making sure the radars perform to spec and the software is fully operational) and in quality control (identifying problems with the data due to radar hardware or software performance issues and flagging these in the provided data streams). Recommendations for the former, and current practice (of the author and within the Australian Coastal Ocean Radar Network, ACORN*) for the latter, will be discussed. The quality control processes for wave measurement are not yet as well developed as those for currents and data from some deployments can be rather noisy. Some new methods, currently under development by SeaView Sensing Ltd and being tested with ACORN data, will be described and results presented. *ACORN is a facility of the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System, IMOS. IMOS is a national collaborative research infrastructure, supported by Australian Government. It is led by University of Tasmania in partnership with the Australian marine and climate science community.

  10. A Tidally Disrupting Dwarf Galaxy in the Halo of NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David J.; Spekkens, Kristine; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson; McLeod, Brian; Seth, Anil C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Scl-MM-Dw2, a new dwarf galaxy at a projected separation of ˜50 kpc from NGC 253, as part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor project (PISCeS). We measure a tip of the red giant branch (RGB) distance of 3.12 ± 0.30 Mpc, suggesting that Scl-MM-Dw2 is likely a satellite of NGC 253. We qualitatively compare the distribution of RGB stars in the color-magnitude diagram with theoretical isochrones and find that it is consistent with an old, ˜12 Gyr, and metal-poor, -2.3 < [Fe/H] < -1.1, stellar population. We also detect a small number of asymptotic giant branch stars consistent with a metal-poor 2-3 Gyr population in the center of the dwarf. Our non-detection of HI in a deep Green Bank Telescope spectrum implies a gas fraction {M}{HI}/{L}V< 0.02 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ . The stellar and gaseous properties of Scl-MM-Dw2 suggest that it is a dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Scl-MM-Dw2 has a luminosity of {M}V=-12.1+/- 0.5 mag and a half-light radius of rh =2.94+/- 0.46 {{kpc}}, which makes it moderately larger than dwarf galaxies in the Local Group of the same luminosity. However, Scl-MM-Dw2 is very elongated (ɛ =0.66+/- 0.06), and it has an extremely low surface brightness ({μ }0,V=27.7+/- 0.6 mag arcsec-2). Its elongation and diffuseness make it an outlier in the ellipticity-luminosity and surface brightness-luminosity scaling relations. These properties suggest that this dwarf is being tidally disrupted by NGC 253.

  11. Active Osmotic Exchanger for Efficient Nanofiltration Inspired by the Kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying one of the most efficient filtration devices: the kidney. Building on a minimal model of the Henle loop—the central part of the kidney filtration—we investigate theoretically the detailed out-of-equilibrium fluxes in this separation process in order to obtain absolute theoretical bounds for its efficiency in terms of separation ability and energy consumption. We demonstrate that this separation process operates at a remarkably small energy cost as compared to traditional sieving processes while working at much smaller pressures. This unique energetic efficiency originates in the double-loop geometry of the nephron, which operates as an active osmotic exchanger. The principles for an artificial-kidney-inspired filtration device could be readily mimicked based on existing soft technologies to build compact and low-energy artificial dialytic devices. Such a "kidney on a chip" also points to new avenues for advanced water recycling, targeting, in particular, sea-water pretreatment for decontamination and hardness reduction.

  12. Facts and philosophy in neurophysiology. The 200th anniversary of Johannes Müller (1801-1858).

    PubMed

    Lohff, B

    2001-12-01

    Johannes Müller was the founder of the first school of physiology in Germany. His anatomical, morphological and physiological research as well as his epistemological view of scientific medicine opened the way to a deeper understanding of the structure and the function of the organism. With important discoveries like the law of sense energy, the reflex movement and the definition of different organic stimuli, he enriched the knowledge of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and sensory physiology and smoothed the way to an experimental physiology. All his famous students like Hermann von Helmholtz, Emil Du Bois-Reymond, Ernst Brücke, Jakob Henle, Robert Remak, Rudolf Virchow and Ernst Haeckel solved many crucial research problems, which Müller identified and pointed out to them as open questions, due to the insufficient methods of investigation. Müller's research method, epistemological view of biological sciences, and his open-minded personal style encouraged the development of new methods adapted to particular problems. PMID:11770194

  13. Involvement of the V2 Vasopressin Receptor in Adaptation to Limited Water Supply

    PubMed Central

    Böselt, Iris; Römpler, Holger; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Thor, Doreen; Busch, Wibke; Schulz, Angela; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Mammals adapted to a great variety of habitats with different accessibility to water. In addition to changes in kidney morphology, e.g. the length of the loops of Henle, several hormone systems are involved in adaptation to limited water supply, among them the renal-neurohypophysial vasopressin/vasopressin receptor system. Comparison of over 80 mammalian V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) orthologs revealed high structural and functional conservation of this key component involved in renal water reabsorption. Although many mammalian species have unlimited access to water there is no evidence for complete loss of V2R function indicating an essential role of V2R activity for survival even of those species. In contrast, several marsupial V2R orthologs show a significant increase in basal receptor activity. An increased vasopressin-independent V2R activity can be interpreted as a shift in the set point of the renal-neurohypophysial hormone circuit to realize sufficient water reabsorption already at low hormone levels. As found in other desert mammals arid-adapted marsupials show high urine osmolalities. The gain of basal V2R function in several marsupials may contribute to the increased urine concentration abilities and, therefore, provide an advantage to maintain water and electrolyte homeostasis under limited water supply conditions. PMID:19440390

  14. Renal bicarbonate reabsorption in the rat. I. Effects of hypokalemia and carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, G; Kinne, R; Malnic, G; Giebisch, G

    1986-01-01

    Free-flow micropuncture studies were carried out on superficial rat proximal and distal tubules to assess the participation of different nephron segments in bicarbonate transport. Particular emphasis was placed on the role of the distal tubule, and micro-calorimetric methods used to quantitate bicarbonate reabsorption. Experiments were carried out in control conditions, during dietary potassium withdrawal, and after acute intravenous infusions of carbonic anhydrase. We observed highly significant net bicarbonate reabsorption in normal acid-base conditions as evidenced by the maintenance of significant bicarbonate concentration gradients in the presence of vigorous fluid absorption. Distal bicarbonate reabsorption persisted in hypokalemic alkalosis and even steeper transepithelial concentration gradients of bicarbonate were maintained. Enhancement of net bicarbonate reabsorption followed the acute intravenous administration of carbonic anhydrase but was limited to the nephron segments between the late proximal and early distal tubule. The latter observation is consistent with a disequilibrium pH along the proximal straight tubule (S3 segment), the thick ascending limb of Henle, and/or the early distal tubule. PMID:3097074

  15. PTH-independent regulation of blood calcium concentration by the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Ramakrishnan, Suresh Krishna; Wootla, Bharath; Chambrey, Régine; de la Faille, Renaud; Bourgeois, Soline; Bruneval, Patrick; Mandet, Chantal; Christensen, Erik Ilso; Faure, Hélène; Cheval, Lydie; Laghmani, Kamel; Collet, Corinne; Eladari, Dominique; Dodd, Robert H; Ruat, Martial; Houillier, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    Tight regulation of calcium levels is required for many critical biological functions. The Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) expressed by parathyroid cells controls blood calcium concentration by regulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. However, CaSR is also expressed in other organs, such as the kidney, but the importance of extraparathyroid CaSR in calcium metabolism remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of extraparathyroid CaSR using thyroparathyroidectomized, PTH-supplemented rats. Chronic inhibition of CaSR selectively increased renal tubular calcium absorption and blood calcium concentration independent of PTH secretion change and without altering intestinal calcium absorption. CaSR inhibition increased blood calcium concentration in animals pretreated with a bisphosphonate, indicating that the increase did not result from release of bone calcium. Kidney CaSR was expressed primarily in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL). As measured by in vitro microperfusion of cortical TAL, CaSR inhibitors increased calcium reabsorption and paracellular pathway permeability but did not change NaCl reabsorption. We conclude that CaSR is a direct determinant of blood calcium concentration, independent of PTH, and modulates renal tubular calcium transport in the TAL via the permeability of the paracellular pathway. These findings suggest that CaSR inhibitors may provide a new specific treatment for disorders related to impaired PTH secretion, such as primary hypoparathyroidism. PMID:22886306

  16. Expression and localization of BCRP, MRP1 and MRP2 in intestines, liver and kidney in horse.

    PubMed

    Tydén, E; Bjornstrom, H; Tjälve, H; Larsson, P

    2010-08-01

    The gene and protein expression and the cellular localization of the ABC transport proteins breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) have been examined in the intestines, liver and kidney in horse. High gene and protein expression of BCRP and MRP2 were found in the small intestines, with cellular localization in the apical membranes of the enterocytes. In the liver, MRP2 was present in the bile canalicular membranes of the hepatocytes, whereas BCRP was localized in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes in the peripheral parts of the liver lobuli. In the kidney both BCRP and MRP2 were predominantly present in the distal tubuli and in the loops of Henle. In most tissues, the gene and protein expression of MRP1 were much lower than for BCRP and MRP2. Immunostaining of MRP1 was detectable only in the intestines and with localization in the cytoplasm of enterocytes in the caecum and colon and in the cells of serous acini of Brunner's glands in the duodenum and the upper jejunum. The latter cells were also stained for BCRP, but not for MRP2. Many drugs used in horse are substrates for one or more of the ABC transport proteins. These transporters may therefore have important functions for oral bioavailability, distribution and excretion of substrate compounds in horse. PMID:20646193

  17. Aquaporin-1 retards renal cyst development in polycystic kidney disease by inhibition of Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiling; Li, Fei; Sun, Yi; Lei, Lei; Zhou, Hong; Lei, Tianluo; Xia, Yin; Verkman, A S; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-04-01

    Water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed at epithelial cell plasma membranes in renal proximal tubules and thin descending limb of Henle. Recently, AQP1 was reported to interact with β-catenin. Here we investigated the relationship between AQP1 and Wnt signaling in in vitro and in vivo models of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD). AQP1 overexpression decreased β-catenin and cyclinD1 expression, suggesting down-regulation of Wnt signaling, and coimmunoprecipitation showed AQP1 interaction with β-catenin, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, LRP6, and Axin1. AQP1 inhibited cyst development and promoted branching in matrix-grown MDCK cells. In embryonic kidney cultures, AQP1 deletion increased cyst development by up to ∼ 40%. Kidney size and cyst number were significantly greater in AQP1-null PKD mice than in AQP1-expressing PKD mice, with the difference mainly attributed to a greater number of proximal tubule cysts. Biochemical analysis revealed decreased β-catenin phosphorylation and increased β-catenin expression in AQP1-null PKD mice, suggesting enhanced Wnt signaling. These results implicate AQP1 as a novel determinant in renal cyst development that may involve inhibition of Wnt signaling by an AQP1-macromolecular signaling complex. PMID:25573755

  18. Epidemiological causality.

    PubMed

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological methods, which combine population thinking and group comparisons, can primarily identify causes of disease in populations. There is therefore a tension between our intuitive notion of a cause, which we want to be deterministic and invariant at the individual level, and the epidemiological notion of causes, which are invariant only at the population level. Epidemiologists have given heretofore a pragmatic solution to this tension. Causal inference in epidemiology consists in checking the logical coherence of a causality statement and determining whether what has been found grossly contradicts what we think we already know: how strong is the association? Is there a dose-response relationship? Does the cause precede the effect? Is the effect biologically plausible? Etc. This approach to causal inference can be traced back to the English philosophers David Hume and John Stuart Mill. On the other hand, the mode of establishing causality, devised by Jakob Henle and Robert Koch, which has been fruitful in bacteriology, requires that in every instance the effect invariably follows the cause (e.g., inoculation of Koch bacillus and tuberculosis). This is incompatible with epidemiological causality which has to deal with probabilistic effects (e.g., smoking and lung cancer), and is therefore invariant only for the population. PMID:16898206

  19. Detection of Antibodies to a Pathogenic Mycoplasma in American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), Broad-Nosed Caimans (Caiman latirostris), and Siamese Crocodiles (Crocodylus siamensis)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. R.; Schumacher, I. M.; Nogueira, M. F.; Richey, L. J.; Zacher, L. A.; Schoeb, T. R.; Vliet, K. A.; Bennett, R. A.; Jacobson, E. R.; Brown, M. B.

    2001-01-01

    An epidemic of pneumonia with fibrinous polyserositis and multifocal arthritis emerged in captive American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in Florida, United States, in 1995. Mycoplasma alligatoris sp. nov. was cultured from multiple organs, peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid of affected alligators. In a subsequent experimental inoculation study, the Henle-Koch-Evans postulates were fulfilled for M. alligatoris as the etiological agent of fatal mycoplasmosis of alligators. That finding was remarkable because mycoplasmal disease is rarely fatal in animals. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies produced by alligators in response to M. alligatoris exposure was developed by using plasma obtained from naturally infected alligators during the original epidemic. The assay was validated by using plasma obtained during an experimental dose-response study and applied to analyze plasma obtained from captive and wild crocodilian species. The ELISA reliably detected alligator seroconversion (P < 0.05) beginning 6 weeks after inoculation. The ELISA also detected seroconversion (P < 0.05) in the relatively closely related broad-nosed caiman Caiman latirostris and the relatively distantly related Siamese crocodile Crocodylus siamensis following experimental inoculation with M. alligatoris. The ELISA may be used to monitor exposure to the lethal pathogen M. alligatoris among captive, repatriated, and wild crocodilian species. PMID:11136785

  20. A primary culture system of mouse thick ascending limb cells with preserved function and uromodulin processing.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, Bob; Terryn, Sara; Gölz, Nadine; Brunati, Martina; Cattaneo, Angela; Bachi, Angela; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Ziegler, Urs; Staub, Olivier; Rampoldi, Luca; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    The epithelial cells lining the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the loop of Henle perform essential transport processes and secrete uromodulin, the most abundant protein in normal urine. The lack of differentiated cell culture systems has hampered studies of TAL functions. Here, we report a method to generate differentiated primary cultures of TAL cells, developed from microdissected tubules obtained in mouse kidneys. The TAL tubules cultured on permeable filters formed polarized confluent monolayers in ∼12 days. The TAL cells remain differentiated and express functional markers such as uromodulin, NKCC2, and ROMK at the apical membrane. Electrophysiological measurements on primary TAL monolayers showed a lumen-positive transepithelial potential (+9.4 ± 0.8 mV/cm(2)) and transepithelial resistance similar to that recorded in vivo. The transepithelial potential is abolished by apical bumetanide and in primary cultures obtained from ROMK knockout mice. The processing, maturation and apical secretion of uromodulin by primary TAL cells is identical to that observed in vivo. The primary TAL cells respond appropriately to hypoxia, hypertonicity, and stimulation by desmopressin, and they can be transfected. The establishment of this primary culture system will allow the investigation of TAL cells obtained from genetically modified mouse models, providing a critical tool for understanding the role of that segment in health and disease. PMID:23887378

  1. Heterozygous disruption of renal outer medullary potassium channel in rats is associated with reduced blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zuo; Shin, Myung Kyun; Horwitz, Sarah Beth; Levorse, John M; Zhu, Lei; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Streltsov, Denis Y; Dajee, Maya; Hernandez, Melba; Pan, Yi; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Wang, Li; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Zhu, Yonghua; Cui, Yan; Michael, Bindhu; Balogh, Leslie Ann; Welling, Paul A; Wade, James B; Roy, Sophie; Sullivan, Kathleen A

    2013-08-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, KCNJ1) mediates potassium recycling and facilitates sodium reabsorption through the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter in the loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct. Human genetic studies indicate that ROMK homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause type II Bartter syndrome, featuring polyuria, renal salt wasting, and hypotension; humans heterozygous for ROMK mutations identified in the Framingham Heart Study have reduced blood pressure. ROMK null mice recapitulate many of the features of type II Bartter syndrome. We have generated an ROMK knockout rat model in Dahl salt-sensitive background by using zinc finger nuclease technology and investigated the effects of knocking out ROMK on systemic and renal hemodynamics and kidney histology in the Dahl salt-sensitive rats. The ROMK(-/-) pups recapitulated features identified in the ROMK null mice. The ROMK(+/-) rats, when challenged with a 4% salt diet, exhibited a reduced blood pressure compared with their ROMK(+/+) littermates. More importantly, when challenged with an 8% salt diet, the Dahl salt-sensitive rats with 50% less ROMK expression showed increased protection from salt-induced blood pressure elevation and signs of protection from renal injury. Our findings in ROMK knockout Dahl salt-sensitive rats, together with the previous reports in humans and mice, underscore a critical role of ROMK in blood pressure regulation. PMID:23753405

  2. SORLA/SORL1 functionally interacts with SPAK to control renal activation of Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter 2.

    PubMed

    Reiche, Juliane; Theilig, Franziska; Rafiqi, Fatema H; Carlo, Anne-Sophie; Militz, Daniel; Mutig, Kerim; Todiras, Mihail; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Ellison, David H; Bader, Michael; Nykjaer, Anders; Bachmann, Sebastian; Alessi, Dario; Willnow, Thomas E

    2010-06-01

    Proper control of NaCl excretion in the kidney is central to bodily functions, yet many mechanisms that regulate reabsorption of sodium and chloride in the kidney remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify an important role played by the intracellular sorting receptor SORLA (sorting protein-related receptor with A-type repeats) in functional activation of renal ion transporters. We demonstrate that SORLA is expressed in epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb (TAL) of Henle's loop and that lack of receptor expression in this cell type in SORLA-deficient mice results in an inability to properly reabsorb sodium and chloride during osmotic stress. The underlying cellular defect was correlated with an inability of the TAL to phosphorylate Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter 2 (NKCC2), the major sodium transporter in the distal nephron. SORLA functionally interacts with Ste-20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK), an activator of NKCC2, and receptor deficiency is associated with missorting of SPAK. Our data suggest a novel regulatory pathway whereby intracellular trafficking of SPAK by the sorting receptor SORLA is crucial for proper NKCC2 activation and for maintenance of renal ion balance. PMID:20385770

  3. Relationship between the Foveal Avascular Zone and Foveal Pit Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Dubis, Adam M.; Hansen, Benjamin R.; Cooper, Robert F.; Beringer, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the relationship between foveal pit morphology and size of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ). Methods. Forty-two subjects were recruited. Volumetric images of the macula were obtained using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Images of the FAZ were obtained using either a modified fundus camera or an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope. Foveal pit metrics (depth, diameter, slope, volume, and area) were automatically extracted from retinal thickness data, whereas the FAZ was manually segmented by two observers to extract estimates of FAZ diameter and area. Results. Consistent with previous reports, the authors observed significant variation in foveal pit morphology. The average foveal pit volume was 0.081 mm3 (range, 0.022 to 0.190 mm3). The size of the FAZ was also highly variable between persons, with FAZ area ranging from 0.05 to 1.05 mm2 and FAZ diameter ranging from 0.20 to 1.08 mm. FAZ area was significantly correlated with foveal pit area, depth, and volume; deeper and broader foveal pits were associated with larger FAZs. Conclusions. Although these results are consistent with predictions from existing models of foveal development, more work is needed to confirm the developmental link between the size of the FAZ and the degree of foveal pit excavation. In addition, more work is needed to understand the relationship between these and other anatomic features of the human foveal region, including peak cone density, rod-free zone diameter, and Henle fiber layer. PMID:22323466

  4. Impaired Urine Dilution Capability in HIV Stable Patients

    PubMed Central

    Belloso, Waldo H.; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Navarro, Matilde; Sanchez, Marisa L.; Perelsztein, Ariel G.; Musso, Carlos G.

    2014-01-01

    Renal disease is a well-recognized complication among patients with HIV infection. Viral infection itself and the use of some antiretroviral drugs contribute to this condition. The thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TALH) is the tubule segment where free water clearance is generated, determining along with glomerular filtration rate the kidney's ability to dilute urine. Objective. We analyzed the function of the proximal tubule and TALH in patients with HIV infection receiving or not tenofovir-containing antiretroviral treatment in comparison with healthy seronegative controls, by applying a tubular physiological test, hyposaline infusion test (Chaimowitz' test). Material & Methods. Chaimowitz' test was performed on 20 HIV positive volunteers who had normal renal functional parameters. The control group included 10 healthy volunteers. Results. After the test, both HIV groups had a significant reduction of serum sodium and osmolarity compared with the control group. Free water clearance was lower and urine osmolarity was higher in both HIV+ groups. Proximal tubular function was normal in both studied groups. Conclusion. The present study documented that proximal tubule sodium reabsorption was preserved while free water clearance and maximal urine dilution capability were reduced in stable HIV patients treated or not with tenofovir. PMID:24800076

  5. A new genus and two new species of lecanicephalidean tapeworms from the striped panray, Zanobatus schoenleinii (Rhinopristiformes: Zanobatidae), off Senegal.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten; Mojica, Kendra R; Caira, Janine N

    2014-10-01

    Recognised for their diversity in apical structure morphology, members of the cestode order Lecanicephalidea Wardle et McLeod, 1952 known to date exhibit relatively mundane and uniform acetabular morphology. A new lecanicephalidean genus, Zanobatocestus gen. n., is proposed for two new species found parasitising the spiral intestine of the striped panray, Zanobatus schoenleinii (Müller et Henle), off Senegal that are highly unusual in acetabular morphology. Unlike the members of the 21 recognised lecanicephalidean genera, which possess simple, uniloculate suckers or bothridia, Zanobatocestus minor sp. n. and Z. major sp. n. possess biloculate bothridia. The form of their apical structures and cocoons readily distinguish the two new species from one another. Zanobatocestus minor sp. n. exhibits an apical modification of the scolex proper that is narrow and elongated, an apical organ that is small and internal, and eggs in cocoons forming linear strands, whereas Z. major sp. n. exhibits an apical modification of the scolex proper that is wide and short, an apical organ that is extensive and primarily external, and eggs in cocoons primarily as doublets with bipolar filaments. Given the typically high host specificity of lecanicephalidean cestodes, as parasites of the only genus and species currently considered valid in the family Zanobatidae, Zanobatocestus gen. n. is likely to remain one of the less specious lecanicephalidean genera. PMID:25549499

  6. Claudins and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianghui; Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Yu, Alan S L

    2013-01-01

    Claudins are tight junction membrane proteins that regulate paracellular permeability of renal epithelia to small ions, solutes, and water. Claudins interact within the cell membrane and between neighboring cells to form tight junction strands and constitute both the paracellular barrier and the pore. The first extracellular domain of claudins is thought to be the pore-lining domain and contains the determinants of charge selectivity. Multiple claudins are expressed in different nephron segments; such differential expression likely determines the permeability properties of each segment. Recent evidence has identified claudin-2 as constituting the cation-reabsorptive pathway in the proximal tubule; claudin-14, -16, and -19 as forming a complex that regulates calcium transport in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle; and claudin-4, -7, and -8 as determinants of collecting duct chloride permeability. Mutations in claudin-16 and -19 cause familial hypercalciuric hypomagnesemia with nephrocalcinosis. The roles of other claudins in kidney diseases remain to be fully elucidated. PMID:23140368

  7. The Excretion of Renal Cells Following Necrosis of the Distal Segment of the Nephron by Hexadi-Methrine Bromide

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. J.; Kennedy, A.; Roberts, C.

    1969-01-01

    The rate of excretion of renal cells was determined in rats with necrosis of the distal convoluted tubules and broad ascending limbs of the loops of Henle caused by injection of hexadimethrine bromide. The magnitude and the duration of abnormal cell excretion were correlated both with the dose of hexadimethrine and with the degree of damage that was evident on histological examination of the kidney. In general cell excretion studies provided a satisfactory indication of the degree of renal damage but the smallest lesions did not cause a significant increase in cell excretion and occasionally a rat with a very large lesion failed to show an increase in cell excretion rate. The changes in excretion rates observed in the present experiments were less than those found previously in animals with necrosis of proximal convoluted tubules caused by mercuric chloride. This is probably due firstly to the smaller number of cells in the distal nephron and secondly to the toxin causing disintegration of many of the cells. These findings have implications for the investigation of analgesic nephrotoxicity by measurement of urinary cell excretion rates. In order to appreciate the significance of increases in renal cell excretion following administration of various substances their site of action and the type of cell damage that they cause must first be established. ImagesFigs. 1-4 PMID:5792904

  8. Hypertonic NaCl enhances adenosine release and hormonal cAMP production in mouse thick ascending limb.

    PubMed

    Baudouin-Legros, M; Badou, A; Paulais, M; Hammet, M; Teulon, J

    1995-07-01

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), accumulated in the presence of adenosine, was measured in medullary portions of mouse thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop, suspended either in classic extracellular buffer or in the presence of added NaCl. Under control conditions (140 mmol/l NaCl), adenosine (< 10(-5) mol/l) and N6-cyclohexyladenosine, an A1 adenosine receptor agonist, inhibit the cAMP accumulation induced by arginine vasopressin (AVP). On the other hand, high concentrations of adenosine and CGS-21680, an A2 adenosine receptor agonist, stimulate cAMP formation. Addition of NaCl (+300 mmol/l) to extracellular buffer stimulates the release of endogenous adenosine. It also enhances A2 receptor-induced cAMP accumulation but suppresses A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. This hypertonic NaCl medium also potentiates the stimulatory action of AVP on adenylyl cyclase. The modifications of tubular responses to both AVP and A1 and A2 agonists, brought about by hypertonic NaCl, were all inhibited by adenosine deaminase, thereby demonstrating the involvement of endogenous adenosine. Adenosine, the release and the effects of which are modulated by hypertonic NaCl, thus appears to act as an endogenous physiological modulator of kidney medulla function. PMID:7631823

  9. Active osmotic exchanger for advanced filtration at the nano scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-11-01

    One of the main functions of the kidney is to remove the waste products of an organism, mostly by excreting concentrated urea while reabsorbing water and other molecules. The human kidney is capable of recycling about 200 liters of water per day, at the relatively low cost of 0.5 kJ/L (standard dialysis requiring at least 150 kJ/L). Kidneys are constituted of millions of parallel filtration networks called nephrons. The nephrons of all mammalian kidneys present a specific loop geometry, the Loop of Henle, that is believed to play a key role in the urinary concentrating mechanism. One limb of the loop is permeable to water and the other contains sodium pumps that exchange with a common interstitium. In this work, we take inspiration from this osmotic exchanger design to propose new nanofiltration principles. We first establish simple analytical results to derive general operating principles, based on coupled water permeable pores and osmotic pumps. The best filtration geometry, in terms of power required for a given water recycling ratio, is comparable in many ways to the mammalian nephron. It is not only more efficient than traditional reverse osmosis systems, but can also work at much smaller pressures (of the order of the blood pressure, 0.13 bar, as compared to more than 30 bars for pressure-retarded osmosis systems). We anticipate that our proof of principle will be a starting point for the development of new filtration systems relying on the active osmotic exchanger principle.

  10. New pediatric vision screener employing polarization-modulated, retinal-birefringence-scanning-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system: opto-mechanical design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L.

    2014-06-01

    Amblyopia ("lazy eye") is a major public health problem, caused by misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or defocus. If detected early in childhood, there is an excellent response to therapy, yet most children are detected too late to be treated effectively. Commercially available vision screening devices that test for amblyopia's primary causes can detect strabismus only indirectly and inaccurately via assessment of the positions of external light reflections from the cornea, but they cannot detect the anatomical feature of the eyes where fixation actually occurs (the fovea). Our laboratory has been developing technology to detect true foveal fixation, by exploiting the birefringence of the uniquely arranged Henle fibers delineating the fovea using retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), and we recently described a polarization-modulated approach to RBS that enables entirely direct and reliable detection of true foveal fixation, with greatly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and essentially independent of corneal birefringence (a confounding variable with all polarization-sensitive ophthalmic technology). Here, we describe the design and operation of a new pediatric vision screener that employs polarization-modulated, RBS-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system, and demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach.

  11. Thomsen-Friedenreich glycotope is expressed in developing and normal kidney but not in renal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Toma, V; Zuber, C; Sata, T; Komminoth, P; Hailemariam, S; Eble, J N; Heitz, P U; Roth, J

    2000-06-01

    The Thomsen-Friedenreich glycotope (TF) is considered a general carcinoma autoantigen and is therefore of importance in cancer diagnosis and immunotherapy. We report the distribution of the TF glycotope in developing and adult human kidney and renal neoplasms. A monoclonal antibody and the lectin amaranthin were used to study the TF and its sialylated, masked form by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. In developing kidney, the TF was restricted to the loop of Henle, distal tubules, and peripheral collecting ducts, whereas its sialylated form was detectable in all epithelial differentiations derived from the 2 embryonic anlagen, the metanephrogenic blastema being unreactive. This pattern was essentially preserved in adult kidney, with TF labeling beginning in the thick ascending limb and extending into the collecting ducts of outer medulla. The sialylated TF glycotope was additionally observed in ascending thin limbs. The TF was exclusively expressed in the luminal cell surface and hence was inaccessible to immune reactions. Analysis of a spectrum of renal neoplasms failed to detect the TF, with the exception of occasional staining of tubules in nephroblastoma. Moreover, the sialylated TF was only detectable in oncocytoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, cystic nephroma, nephroblastoma, and nephroblastomatosis complex and occasionally in type 1 papillary renal cell carcinoma. Thus, the TF and its sialylated form are expressed in normal developing and adult kidney. However, the TF does not seem to represent a tumor-associated glycotope in human kidney, nor does it appear to be of value in diagnosis and immunotherapy of renal neoplasms. PMID:10872656

  12. The human erythrocyte Cl-dependent Na-K cotransport system as a possible model for studying the action of loop diuretics.

    PubMed Central

    Ellory, J. C.; Stewart, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 The recent demonstration of the chloride-dependence of the red cell Na-K cotransport system suggests an analogy between this process and the active Cl- absorption in the ascending loop of Henle, which is the target transport system for loop diuretics. 2 Using red cell K influx, four known loop diuretics, six experimental frusemide analogues, two thiazides, two K-retaining diuretics and one organomercurial were compared for inhibitory potency on the red cell Na-K cotransport system. 3 Except for mersalyl, whose exact mode of action in the kidney is still in doubt, the inhibition of the red cell system by various loop diuretics was consistent with both published whole body diuretic data and isolated perfused tubule studies, while the system did not respond to the thiazides or the K-retaining diuretics. 4 It is concluded that the human red cell Na-K cotransport system is a possible valid model process on which to study the activity of loop diuretics. PMID:7074281

  13. Salt handling in the distal nephron: lessons learned from inherited human disorders.

    PubMed

    Jeck, Nikola; Schlingmann, Karl P; Reinalter, Stephan C; Kömhoff, Martin; Peters, Melanie; Waldegger, Siegfried; Seyberth, Hannsjörg W

    2005-04-01

    The molecular basis of inherited salt-losing tubular disorders with secondary hypokalemia has become much clearer in the past two decades. Two distinct segments along the nephron turned out to be affected, the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and the distal convoluted tubule, accounting for two major clinical phenotypes, hyperprostaglandin E syndrome and Bartter-Gitelman syndrome. To date, inactivating mutations have been detected in six different genes encoding for proteins involved in renal transepithelial salt transport. Careful examination of genetically defined patients ("human knockouts") allowed us to determine the individual role of a specific protein and its contribution to the overall process of renal salt reabsorption. The recent generation of several genetically engineered mouse models that are deficient in orthologous genes further enabled us to compare the human phenotype with the animal models, revealing some unexpected interspecies differences. As the first line treatment in hyperprostaglandin E syndrome includes cyclooxygenase inhibitors, we propose some hypotheses about the mysterious role of PGE(2) in the etiology of renal salt-losing disorders. PMID:15793031

  14. Discovery of MK-7145, an Oral Small Molecule ROMK Inhibitor for the Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haifeng; Zhu, Yuping; Teumelsan, Nardos; Walsh, Shawn P; Shahripour, Aurash; Priest, Birgit T; Swensen, Andrew M; Felix, John P; Brochu, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande; Pai, Lee-Yuh; Hampton, Caryn; Corona, Aaron; Hernandez, Melba; Metzger, Joseph; Forrest, Michael; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Owens, Karen; Tong, Vincent; Parmee, Emma; Roy, Sophie; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Yang, Lihu; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Garcia, Maria L; Pasternak, Alexander

    2016-07-14

    ROMK, the renal outer medullary potassium channel, is involved in potassium recycling at the thick ascending loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct in the kidney nephron. Because of this dual site of action, selective inhibitors of ROMK are expected to represent a new class of diuretics/natriuretics with superior efficacy and reduced urinary loss of potassium compared to standard-of-care loop and thiazide diuretics. Following our earlier work, this communication will detail subsequent medicinal chemistry endeavors to further improve lead selectivity against the hERG channel and preclinical pharmacokinetic properties. Pharmacological assessment of highlighted inhibitors will be described, including pharmacodynamic studies in both an acute rat diuresis/natriuresis model and a subchronic blood pressure model in spontaneous hypertensive rats. These proof-of-biology studies established for the first time that the human and rodent genetics accurately predict the in vivo pharmacology of ROMK inhibitors and supported identification of the first small molecule ROMK inhibitor clinical candidate, MK-7145. PMID:27437080

  15. Iodinated contrast media cause direct tubular cell damage, leading to oxidative stress, low nitric oxide, and impairment of tubuloglomerular feedback

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi Zhao; Schmerbach, Kristin; Lu, Yuan; Perlewitz, Andrea; Nikitina, Tatiana; Cantow, Kathleen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Persson, Pontus B.; Liu, Ruisheng; Sendeski, Mauricio M.

    2014-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) have adverse effects that may result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Oxidative stress is believed to play a role in CM-induced kidney injury. We test the hypothesis that oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide in tubules are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage and that increased local oxidative stress may increase tubuloglomerular feedback. Rat thick ascending limbs (TAL) were isolated and perfused. Superoxide and nitric oxide were quantified using fluorescence techniques. Cell death rate was estimated using propidium iodide and trypan blue. The function of macula densa and tubuloglomerular feedback responsiveness were measured in isolated, perfused juxtaglomerular apparatuses (JGA) of rabbits. The expression of genes related to oxidative stress and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were investigated in the renal medulla of rats that received CM. CM increased superoxide concentration and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability in TAL. Propidium iodide fluorescence and trypan blue uptake increased more in CM-perfused TAL than in controls, indicating increased rate of cell death. There were no marked acute changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative stress in medullary segments of Henle's loop. SOD activity did not differ between CM and control groups. The tubuloglomerular feedback in isolated JGA was increased by CM. Tubular cell damage and accompanying oxidative stress in our model are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage, which also modifies the tubulovascular interaction at the macula densa, and may therefore contribute to disturbances of renal perfusion and filtration. PMID:24431205

  16. dksA Is Required for Intercellular Spread of Shigella flexneri via an RpoS-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mogull, Scott A.; Runyen-Janecky, Laura J.; Hong, Mei; Payne, Shelley M.

    2001-01-01

    Pathogenesis of Shigella flexneri is dependent on the ability of the bacterium to invade and spread within epithelial cells. In this study, we identified dksA as a gene necessary for intercellular spread in, but not invasion of, cultured cells. The S. flexneri dksA mutant exhibited sensitivity to acid and oxidative stress, in part due to an effect of DksA on production of RpoS. However, an S. flexneri rpoS mutant formed plaques on tissue culture monolayers, thus excluding DksA regulation of RpoS as the mechanism responsible for the inability of the dksA mutant to spread intercellularly. Intracellular analysis of the dksA mutant indicates that it survived and divided within the Henle cell cytoplasm, but the dksA mutant cells were elongated, and some exhibited filamentation in the intracellular environment. Some of the S. flexneri dksA mutant cells showed aberrant localization of virulence protein IcsA, which may inhibit spread between epithelial cells. PMID:11500451

  17. Pathology of renal dysplasia and bladder aplasia-hypoplasia in a flock of sheep.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, D; Jeffrey, M; Jones, T; Morgan, G; Green, R

    1993-10-01

    Congenital renal disease was detected in a flock of sheep in the English Midlands over 2 successive years (1982 and 1983). A Suffolk ram was removed from the flock and test mated to unrelated Suffolk ewes in another flock; 14 of the resulting 43 lambs born in 1984 had an identical congenital renal disease. Kidneys were examined microscopically from 60 clinically affected neonatal lambs. Kidneys from 7 of the 60 clinically affected neonatal lambs (1, 1983; 6, 1984) were examined ultrastructurally and compared with kidneys from 3 healthy unrelated neonatal lambs. Most affected lambs examined (52/60) had bilaterally small kidneys (< or = 2 g) with fine intracortical cysts and distinct cortical and medullary zones. Kidneys were either grossly normal (3/60 lambs) or multicystic and of normal size to markedly enlarged (5/60 lambs). The bladder was absent or vestigial in most lambs. Microscopically, poorly differentiated ("primitive") tubules were present in renal cortex and medulla. Proximal convoluted tubules, where present, were formed by epithelial cells with distinctive round weakly autofluorescent intracytoplasmic inclusions with the ultrastructural appearance of atypical lysosomes. Loops of Henle, distal convoluted tubules, and juxtaglomerular-peripolar cell complexes were largely absent. Glomerular changes were minimal. Cystic dilatation of nephrons was restricted to proximal convoluted tubules lined by vacuolated epithelium. This distinctive congenital renal dysplasia of sheep was most likely inherited as a dominant trait with complete penetrance. PMID:8286460

  18. A Morphologic and Biochemical Study of Nutritional Nephrocalcinosis in Female Rats Fed Semipurified Diets

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, James C.

    1971-01-01

    Nephrocalcinosis occurred in weanling female rats fed a semipurified diet for 8 weeks. Mineralization of the inner cortex began after 3 weeks on the semipurified diet, and was most severe after 8 weeks. Intraluminal calcification was observed first in the pars recta of the proximal convoluted tubule; calcification of cytoplasmic organelles or basement membranes of the tubular epithelium was not observed. At the end of 8 weeks, some mineral deposits were seen within Henle's loops of the outer medulla. Histochemical studies demonstrated that the deposits contained calcium and phosphorus and had a glycoprotein matrix; electron diffraction studies indicated that the main mineral phase was hydroxyapatite. No differences in serum calcium or phosphorus or in the ultrastructural characteristics of the thyroid parafollicular cells and the parathyroid parenchymal cells were observed between animals fed the semipurified diet and those fed a commercial chow. The urinary excretion of calcium and magnesium was less and urinary citrate excretion was greater in animals fed the semipurified diet. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 8Fig 9Fig 6Fig 7 PMID:5096368

  19. Structural-functional correlations in the kidneys and observations of colon and cloacal morphology in certain Australian birds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, O W; Skadhauge, E

    1975-12-01

    1. Variations in renal microstructure between the zebra finch and Senegal dove were consistent with their relative renal concentrating abilities (urine/plasma ratios of 2-8 and 1-7, respectively). Compared with dove kidneys, those of the finch contained a higher fraction of mammalian-type nephrons (with Henle's loops), and a lower fraction of reptilian-type nephrons (without loops). 2. Singing honeyeaters concentrated their urine almost as well as zebra finches, although honeyeater kidneys were less specialized (fewer mammalian-type nephrons). Such findings emphasize the need to clarify other osmoregulatory parameters. 3. No significant microstructural differences were found in the kidneys of domesticated as compared with those of wild zebra finches. Hence, osmoregulatory differences between tame and wild birds must be related to physiological factors rather than morphological. 4. Thickness of the renal medulla seemed to be directly correlated with urine concentrating ability. However, certain inconsistencies obscure this relationship such that its resolution will require further research. 5. Histological features of the mucosae of the colon and cloaca are described. The galah and kookaburra displayed a mammalian (non-villous) pattern of mucosal organization. Zebra finches, singing honeyeaters, and particularly emus, possessed colonic and cloacal villi and hence an increased surface area per volume in this region of the gut. This raises the possibility that the colon and cloaca are involved in uring concentration and osmoregulatory activities in these species. PMID:1213951

  20. Detection and characterization of mineralo-organic nanoparticles in human kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tsui-Yin; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Martel, Jan; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Hsu, Fu-Yung; Ojcius, David M.; Lin, Paul Y.; Young, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is associated with various human diseases, including atherosclerosis, cancer, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus. Although mineral nanoparticles have been detected in calcified blood vessels, the nature and role of these particles in the human body remain unclear. Here we show for the first time that human kidney tissues obtained from end-stage chronic kidney disease or renal cancer patients contain round, multilamellar mineral particles of 50 to 1,500 nm, whereas no particles are observed in healthy controls. The mineral particles are found mainly in the extracellular matrix surrounding the convoluted tubules, collecting ducts and loops of Henle as well as within the cytoplasm of tubule-delineating cells, and consist of polycrystalline calcium phosphate similar to the mineral found in bones and ectopic calcifications. The kidney mineral nanoparticles contain several serum proteins that inhibit ectopic calcification in body fluids, including albumin, fetuin-A, and apolipoprotein A1. Since the mineralo-organic nanoparticles are found not only within calcified deposits but also in areas devoid of microscopic calcifications, our observations indicate that the nanoparticles may represent precursors of calcification and renal stones in humans. PMID:26497088

  1. Human CLC-K Channels Require Palmitoylation of Their Accessory Subunit Barttin to Be Functional*

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, Kim Vanessa; Gorinski, Nataliya; Wojciechowski, Daniel; Todorov, Vladimir; Guseva, Daria; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Fahlke, Christoph; Fischer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    CLC-K/barttin chloride channels are essential for NaCl re-absorption in Henle's loop and for potassium secretion by the stria vascularis in the inner ear. Here, we studied the posttranslational modification of such channels by palmitoylation of their accessory subunit barttin. We found that barttin is palmitoylated in vivo and in vitro and identified two conserved cysteine residues at positions 54 and 56 as palmitoylation sites. Point mutations at these two residues reduce the macroscopic current amplitudes in cells expressing CLC-K/barttin channels proportionally to the relative reduction in palmitoylated barttin. CLC-K/barttin expression, plasma membrane insertion, and single channel properties remain unaffected, indicating that these mutations decrease the number of active channels. R8W and G47R, two naturally occurring barttin mutations identified in patients with Bartter syndrome type IV, reduce barttin palmitoylation and CLC-K/barttin channel activity. Palmitoylation of the accessory subunit barttin might thus play a role in chloride channel dysfunction in certain variants of Bartter syndrome. We did not observe pronounced alteration of barttin palmitoylation upon increased salt and water intake or water deprivation, indicating that this posttranslational modification does not contribute to long term adaptation to variable water intake. Our results identify barttin palmitoylation as a novel posttranslational modification of CLC-K/barttin chloride channels. PMID:26013830

  2. A novel sponge disease caused by a consortium of micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Michael; Bulling, Mark; Cerrano, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    In healthy sponges, microbes have been shown to account for up to 40 % of tissues. The majority of these are thought to originate from survivors evading digestion and immune responses of the sponge and growing and residing in the microenvironments of the mesophyll. Although a large percentage of these microbes are likely commensals, they may also include potentially pathogenic agents, which under specific conditions, such as temperature stress, may cause disease. Here we report a novel disease (sponge necrosis syndrome) that is severely affecting populations of the sponge Callyspongia ( Euplacella) aff biru. Both ITS fungal and 16S rDNA bacterial diversities were assessed in healthy and diseased individuals, highlighting six potential primary causal agents for this new disease: two bacteria, a Rhodobacteraceae sp. and a cyanobacterium, Hormoscilla spongeliae (formally identified as Oscillatoria spongeliae), and four fungi, a Ascomycota sp., a Pleosporales sp., a Rhabdocline sp., and a Clasosporium sp. Furthermore, histological analysis showed the dominance of fungal hyphae rather than bacteria throughout the disease lesion, which was absent or rare in healthy tissues. Inoculation trails showed that only a combination of one bacterium and one fungus could replicate the disease, fulfilling Henle-Koch's postulates and showing that this sponge disease is caused by a poly-microbial consortium.

  3. First record of the Indo-Pacific areolate grouper Epinephelus areolatus (Forsskål, 1775) (Perciformes: Epinephelidae) in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Shevy B S; Stern, Nir; Goren, Menachem

    2016-01-01

    The number of alien species in the Mediterranean Sea is steadily increasing and it seems that the pace has been accelerating since the turn of the century (Galil et al. 2014). In 2015 alone five additional fish species have been reported, Epinephelus geoffroyi (Klunzinger, 1870) (Golani et al. 2015); Stolephorus indicus (van Hasselt, 1823) (Fricke et al. 2015); Sardinella gibbosa (Bleeker, 1849) (Stern et al. 2015); Mobula japanica (Müller & Henle, 1841) (Capapé et al. 2015); and Cryptocentrus caeruleopunctatus (Rüppell, 1830) (Rothman & Goren 2015). Among the ca. 100 alien fish species reported from the Mediterranean to date (Galil & Goren 2014), five Indo-Pacific species belong to the genus Epinephelus Bloch, 1793: Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822), Epinephelus fasciatus (Forsskål, 1775), Epinephelus malabaricus (Bloch and Schneider, 1804) Epinephelus merra Bloch, 1793 (Golani et al. 2013a) and Epinephelus geoffroyi (Klunzinger, 1870) (Golani et al. 2015). Additional alien Epinephelus species reported from the Mediterranean are excluded for various reasons (Golani et al. 2013b). Here we report the finding of a sixth Indo-Pacific species of this genus along the Mediterranean coast of Israel. PMID:27395890

  4. [Milestones of cardiovascular therapy. V. Diuretics].

    PubMed

    Jerie, P

    2007-01-01

    After their introduction in 1959, thiazide diuretics have become the cornerstone in the managment of heart failure and hypertension. They prevent sodium reabsorption in the upper segment of the distal tubule, increase the diuresis and, by diminishing the intravascular volume, they reduce the preload. With vigorous diuresis, cardiac output may drop under the critical level, and hypovolaemia, hypotension, syncopes and dehydratation with severe water-mineral disturbance may occur. A similar disorder takes place after aggressive administration of loop diuretics which act by the same mechanism at the ascending limb of the loop of Henle. Moreover, any chronic treatment with saluretics triggers the contraregulatory activation of RAAS. Thus, the dosing should be cautiously titrated, and with diminishing efficacy the diuretic is to be replaced by another one, or a second drug is to be added. With any potent diuretic agent, electrolyte depletion may occur; therefore, minimal active doses should be applied, potassium-sparing diuretics added or a pause should be inserted after/before furosemide with spirolactone. Hyponatraemia and hypokalaemia are common, and in combined treatment with ACE-inhibitors and spirolactone, hyperkalaemia is frequent. With long-term treatment, a rebound period of sodium reabsorption follows, and the diuretic effect is reduced or lost. To overcome this ",diuretic resistance", the dietary sodium is to be restricted, physical effort avoided and salt retaining drugs (NSAIDs and similar) eliminated. In the article, a short review of basic physiology concerning the water-electrolyte balance and the distribution of body-water is summarized. PMID:18069212

  5. Dicer1 activity in the stromal compartment regulates nephron differentiation and vascular patterning during mammalian kidney organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Naoki; Xin, Cuiyan; Roach, Allie M; Naiman, Natalie; Shankland, Stuart J; Ligresti, Giovanni; Ren, Shuyu; Szak, Suzanne; Gomez, Ivan G; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs, activated by the enzyme Dicer1, control post-transcriptional gene expression. Dicer1 has important roles in the epithelium during nephrogenesis, but its function in stromal cells during kidney development is unknown. To study this, we inactivated Dicer1 in renal stromal cells. This resulted in hypoplastic kidneys, abnormal differentiation of the nephron tubule and vasculature, and perinatal mortality. In mutant kidneys, genes involved in stromal cell migration and activation were suppressed as were those involved in epithelial and endothelial differentiation and maturation. Consistently, polarity of the proximal tubule was incorrect, distal tubule differentiation was diminished, and elongation of Henle's loop attenuated resulting in lack of inner medulla and papilla in stroma-specific Dicer1 mutants. Glomerular maturation and capillary loop formation were abnormal, whereas peritubular capillaries, with enhanced branching and increased diameter, formed later. In Dicer1-null renal stromal cells, expression of factors associated with migration, proliferation, and morphogenic functions including α-smooth muscle actin, integrin-α8, -β1, and the WNT pathway transcriptional regulator LEF1 were reduced. Dicer1 mutation in stroma led to loss of expression of distinct microRNAs. Of these, miR-214, -199a-5p, and -199a-3p regulate stromal cell functions ex vivo, including WNT pathway activation, migration, and proliferation. Thus, Dicer1 activity in the renal stromal compartment regulates critical stromal cell functions that, in turn, regulate differentiation of the nephron and vasculature during nephrogenesis. PMID:25651362

  6. Nephron organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells model kidney development and injury

    PubMed Central

    Morizane, Ryuji; Lam, Albert Q.; Freedman, Benjamin S.; Kishi, Seiji; Valerius, M. Todd; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Kidney cells and tissues derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) would enable organ regeneration, disease modeling, and drug screening in vitro. We established an efficient, chemically defined protocol for differentiating hPSCs into multipotent nephron progenitor cells (NPCs) that can form nephron-like structures. By recapitulating metanephric kidney development in vitro, we generate SIX2+SALL1+WT1+PAX2+ NPCs with 90% efficiency within 9 days of differentiation. The NPCs possess the developmental potential of their in vivo counterparts and form PAX8+LHX1+ renal vesicles that self-pattern into nephron structures. In both 2D and 3D culture, NPCs form kidney organoids containing epithelial nephron-like structures expressing markers of podocytes, proximal tubules, loops of Henle, and distal tubules in an organized, continuous arrangement that resembles the nephron in vivo. We also show that this organoid culture system can be used to study mechanisms of human kidney development and toxicity. PMID:26458176

  7. Flcn-deficient renal cells are tumorigenic and sensitive to mTOR suppression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Schoen, Susan; Xiao, Guang-Qian; Li, Xueying; Teh, Bin Tean; Wu, Guan; Chen, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of tumor suppressor FLCN leads to the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in human BHD-associated renal cell carcinomas (RCC). We have previously developed a renal distal tubule-collecting duct-Henle's loop-specific Flcn knockout (KO) mouse model (Flcnflox/flox/Ksp-Cre). This mouse model can only survive for three weeks after birth due to the development of polycystic kidney and uremia. Whether these cystic solid hyperplasia changes seen in those KO mice are tumorigenic or malignant is unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that genetic disruption of Flcn in mouse kidney distal tubule cells could lead to tumorigenic transformation of these cells to develop allograft tumors with an aggressive histologic phenotype. Consistent with previous reports, we showed that the mTOR pathway plays an important role in the growth of these Flcn-deficient allograft and human UOK 257-1 xenograft tumors. We further demonstrated that the mTOR inhibitor, sirolimus, suppresses the tumor's growth, suggesting that mTOR inhibitors might be effective in control of FLCN-deficient RCC, especially in BHD renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26418749

  8. Mathematical Model of Ammonia Handling in the Rat Renal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Noiret, Lorette; Baigent, Stephen; Jalan, Rajiv; Thomas, S. Randall

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is one of the main organs that produces ammonia and release it into the circulation. Under normal conditions, between 30 and 50% of the ammonia produced in the kidney is excreted in the urine, the rest being absorbed into the systemic circulation via the renal vein. In acidosis and in some pathological conditions, the proportion of urinary excretion can increase to 70% of the ammonia produced in the kidney. Mechanisms regulating the balance between urinary excretion and renal vein release are not fully understood. We developed a mathematical model that reflects current thinking about renal ammonia handling in order to investigate the role of each tubular segment and identify some of the components which might control this balance. The model treats the movements of water, sodium chloride, urea, NH3 and NH4+, and non-reabsorbable solute in an idealized renal medulla of the rat at steady state. A parameter study was performed to identify the transport parameters and microenvironmental conditions that most affect the rate of urinary ammonia excretion. Our results suggest that urinary ammonia excretion is mainly determined by those parameters that affect ammonia recycling in the loops of Henle. In particular, our results suggest a critical role for interstitial pH in the outer medulla and for luminal pH along the inner medullary collecting ducts. PMID:26280830

  9. Structural-functional correlations in the kidneys and observations of colon and cloacal morphology in certain Australian birds.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, O W; Skadhauge, E

    1975-01-01

    1. Variations in renal microstructure between the zebra finch and Senegal dove were consistent with their relative renal concentrating abilities (urine/plasma ratios of 2-8 and 1-7, respectively). Compared with dove kidneys, those of the finch contained a higher fraction of mammalian-type nephrons (with Henle's loops), and a lower fraction of reptilian-type nephrons (without loops). 2. Singing honeyeaters concentrated their urine almost as well as zebra finches, although honeyeater kidneys were less specialized (fewer mammalian-type nephrons). Such findings emphasize the need to clarify other osmoregulatory parameters. 3. No significant microstructural differences were found in the kidneys of domesticated as compared with those of wild zebra finches. Hence, osmoregulatory differences between tame and wild birds must be related to physiological factors rather than morphological. 4. Thickness of the renal medulla seemed to be directly correlated with urine concentrating ability. However, certain inconsistencies obscure this relationship such that its resolution will require further research. 5. Histological features of the mucosae of the colon and cloaca are described. The galah and kookaburra displayed a mammalian (non-villous) pattern of mucosal organization. Zebra finches, singing honeyeaters, and particularly emus, possessed colonic and cloacal villi and hence an increased surface area per volume in this region of the gut. This raises the possibility that the colon and cloaca are involved in uring concentration and osmoregulatory activities in these species. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1213951

  10. Integrated Control of Na Transport along the Nephron

    PubMed Central

    Schnermann, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The kidney filters vast quantities of Na at the glomerulus but excretes a very small fraction of this Na in the final urine. Although almost every nephron segment participates in the reabsorption of Na in the normal kidney, the proximal segments (from the glomerulus to the macula densa) and the distal segments (past the macula densa) play different roles. The proximal tubule and the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle interact with the filtration apparatus to deliver Na to the distal nephron at a rather constant rate. This involves regulation of both filtration and reabsorption through the processes of glomerulotubular balance and tubuloglomerular feedback. The more distal segments, including the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), connecting tubule, and collecting duct, regulate Na reabsorption to match the excretion with dietary intake. The relative amounts of Na reabsorbed in the DCT, which mainly reabsorbs NaCl, and by more downstream segments that exchange Na for K are variable, allowing the simultaneous regulation of both Na and K excretion. PMID:25098598

  11. Element composition of tubule cells in the inner stripe of the renal outer medulla.

    PubMed

    Beck, F X; Dörge, A; Ring, T; Sauer, M

    1989-01-01

    To obtain further insight into renal medullary function, element concentrations were determined in individual tubule cells of the outer medulla in the rat kidney using electron microprobe analysis on freeze-dried cryosections. In the cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop the Na, P, Cl, and K concentrations (means +/- SEM) were: 9.5 +/- 0.6, 158.4 +/- 6.2, 25.6 +/- 1.2, and 135.3 +/- 4.8 mmol/kg wet weight, respectively. While similar Na, P, and K concentrations were observed in light and dark cells of the medullary collecting duct, Cl was markedly higher--55.0 +/- 2.8 mmol/kg wet weight--in the dark cells. The electrolyte concentrations of the thick ascending limb cells seen in the present study are in good agreement with ion activities reported for the isolated perfused thick ascending limb. The low cell Na and Cl concentrations provide a favorable driving force for passive cell entry of Na, Cl, and K across the apical membrane via the Na-2Cl-K cotransporter even at low tubule fluid NaCl concentrations. Although in hydropenic rats interstitial tonicity of the inner stripe is above isotonicity, electrolyte concentrations of inner stripe cells did not differ from those obtained in cortical tubule cells. This finding suggests that, similar to papillary cells, osmoadaptation of outer medullary cells is, at least partially, accomplished by organic osmolytes. PMID:2725433

  12. The importance of aerobic metabolism in the renal concentrating process

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Edward; Manitius, Andrzej; Epstein, Franklin H.

    1969-01-01

    The extent to which the concentrating function of the kidney depends on oxidative processes was investigated by infusing cyanide into one renal artery of dogs undergoing mild mannitol diuresis while receiving an infusion of vasopressin. This produced an abrupt fall in concentrating capacity (TcH2O) that was reversed when the cyanide infusion was stopped. The change could not be accounted for by the accompanying solute diuresis, since it was not reproduced by increasing the rate of mannitol infusion. The reduction in TcH2O induced by cyanide did not result from increased delivery of dilute urine to the collecting ducts, since free water clearance (CH2O), studied in other dogs during water diuresis, was unchanged or decreased by cyanide. Cyanide produced renal vasodilatation, as did intraarterial acetylcholine, but in contrast to the striking reduction in concentrating capacity evoked by cyanide, TcH2O was not significantly changed by acetylcholine. The data indicate that concentrating ability is closely tied to oxidative metabolism in the kidney, and it is suggested that the region where this is critically important is the red medulla and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. PMID:5822590

  13. Are Demodex mites principal, conspirator, accomplice, witness or bystander in the cause of rosacea?

    PubMed

    Chen, WenChieh; Plewig, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    As the only permanent human ectoparasite, the role of human Demodex mites in health and diseases remains largely unclarified. In view of the ecological interaction between organisms of two different species, a type of commensalism between Demodex mites and humans (the former benefit, the latter unaffected) is most likely, while parasitism occurs temporarily and spatially in the diseased state (the former benefit, the latter harmed). As part of normal skin microbiota, the causal role of Demodex mites in the initiation of rosacea can neither fulfill the classical Henle-Koch's principal nor the advanced criteria proposed by Fredericks and Relman for molecular detection of non-cultivatable microorganisms. Epidemiological analysis using Hill's criteria fails to support the causative role of Demodex mites in rosacea regarding the strength of association, specificity and temporality of association, biological gradient and plausibility as well as clinical coherence, therapeutic experimentation and medical analogy. In application of Rothman's sufficient cause model to evaluate the contribution of Demodex mites to rosacea on a population basis, Demodex mites can be regarded as a non-necessary, non-sufficient causal factor for certain forms of rosacea. Further strategies to dissect the association between Demodex mites and rosacea may include studying the possible existence of more virulent forms of mites with a higher pathogenicity, the endosymbiotic bacteria in certain life periods of mites, the interactions between mites and human hosts or between mites and environment, and to set up ex vivo culture models for Demodex mites. PMID:25666117

  14. Development of polycystic kidney disease in juvenile cystic kidney mice: insights into pathogenesis, ciliary abnormalities, and common features with human disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laurie A; Bukanov, Nikolay O; Husson, Hervé; Russo, Ryan J; Barry, Tiffany C; Taylor, Ava L; Beier, David R; Ibraghimov-Beskrovnaya, Oxana

    2006-10-01

    Significant progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) has been made in recent years. Translating this understanding into effective therapeutics will require testing in animal models that closely resemble human PKD by multiple parameters. Similar to autosomal dominant PKD, juvenile cystic kidney (jck) mice develop cysts in multiple nephron segments, including cortical collecting ducts, distal tubules, and loop of Henle. The jck mice display gender dimorphism in kidney disease progression with more aggressive disease in male mice. Gonadectomy experiments show that testosterone aggravates the severity of the disease in jck male mice, while female gonadal hormones have protective effects. EGF receptor is overexpressed and mislocalized in jck cystic epithelia, a hallmark of human disease. Increased cAMP levels in jck kidneys and activation of the B-Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway are demonstrated. The effect of jck mutation on the expression of Nek8, a NIMA-related (never in mitosis A) kinase, and polycystins in jck cilia is shown for the first time. Nek8 overexpression and loss of ciliary localization in jck epithelia are accompanied by enhanced expression of polycystins along the cilia. The primary cilia in jck kidneys are significantly more lengthened than the cilia in wild-type mice, suggesting a role for Nek8 in controlling ciliary length. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the jck mice should be useful for testing potential therapies and for studying the molecular mechanisms that link ciliary structure/function and cystogenesis. PMID:16928806

  15. Thiazolidinediones and Edema: Recent Advances in the Pathogenesis of Thiazolidinediones-Induced Renal Sodium Retention.

    PubMed

    Horita, Shoko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Seki, George

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are one of the major classes of antidiabetic drugs that are used widely. TZDs improve insulin resistance by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and ameliorate diabetic and other nephropathies, at least, in experimental animals. However, TZDs have side effects, such as edema, congestive heart failure, and bone fracture, and may increase bladder cancer risk. Edema and heart failure, which both probably originate from renal sodium retention, are of great importance because these side effects make it difficult to continue the use of TZDs. However, the pathogenesis of edema remains a matter of controversy. Initially, upregulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the collecting ducts by TZDs was thought to be the primary cause of edema. However, the results of other studies do not support this view. Recent data suggest the involvement of transporters in the proximal tubule, such as sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter and sodium-proton exchanger. Other studies have suggested that sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 in the thick ascending limb of Henle and aquaporins are also possible targets for TZDs. This paper will discuss the recent advances in the pathogenesis of TZD-induced sodium reabsorption in the renal tubules and edema. PMID:26074951

  16. Taxonomic status of maskrays of the Neotrygon kuhlii species complex (Myliobatoidei: Dasyatidae) with the description of three new species from the Indo-West Pacific.

    PubMed

    Last, Peter R; White, William T; Séret, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The bluespotted maskray, Neotrygon kuhlii (Müller & Henle, 1841), once thought to be widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific, consists of a complex of several species and the type series consists of multiple species; its nomenclature is discussed. A lectotype and paralectotype are designated and the species rediagnosed based on the types and a fresh specimen from Honiara (Solomon Islands), near to the collection locality of the lectotype (Vanikoro, Solomon Islands). Molecular and morphological data provide confirmatory evidence that this maskray is distinct from some other regional forms. Three members of the complex from the Western Pacific identified in earlier studies are confirmed to be new species; Neotrygon australiae sp. nov. (Australia, New Guinea and eastern Indonesia), N. caeruleopunctata sp. nov. (Indian Ocean), and N. orientale sp. nov. (North-West Pacific). These species differ from each other and N. kuhlii in their adult size, anterior angle of the disc, number and distribution of blue spots on the dorsal disc, and other more subtle morphometric and meristic characters. Another largely plain-coloured Neotrygon, also currently misidentified as N. kuhlii, is sympatric with N. orientale sp. nov. in the South China Sea and off Taiwan. Neotrygon varidens (Garman) is resurrected as the valid name for this ray. A key is provided to species of the genus. PMID:27394245

  17. Micropuncture study of hypertonic mannitol diuresis in the proximal and distal tubule of the dog kidney

    PubMed Central

    Seely, John F.; Dirks, John H.

    1969-01-01

    Fractional reabsorption of water, sodium, and potassium at proximal and distal tubular sites within the nephron was studied by recollection-micropuncture experiments on dogs undergoing hypertonic mannitol diuresis. After an initial control hydropenic phase, 16% mannitol in modified Ringer's solution was administered intravenously, resulting in marked increases in fractional excretion of water (28.7%), sodium (12.6%), and potassium (63.9%). Inulin clearance decreased significantly from 35.1 to 25.2 ml/min. Analysis of paired micropuncture data revealed a significant decrease in tubule fluid to plasma (TF:P) inulin ratios in both the proximal tubule (1.63-1.45) and distal tubule (5.38-1.94). There was also a significant decrease in proximal TF:P sodium ratios (0.99-0.93) and potassium ratios (1.05-0.98). Distal TF:P sodium ratios, in contrast, rose significantly (0.38-0.59), while TF:P potassium ratios tended towards unity whether initially greater or less than one. Fractional reabsorption of sodium and water decreased by 5% and 10% respectively in the proximal tubule, but to a lesser extent than the resulting increases in fractional urinary excretion. The nonreabsorbed fraction, however, had increased sharply at the point of distal puncture for water (32%), sodium (26%), and potassium (26%), indicating a large inhibitory effect within the loop of Henle in addition to the smaller proximal effects. PMID:5355344

  18. Size limitations in semicircular duct systems

    PubMed

    Muller

    1999-06-01

    The present article discusses mechanical requirements and limitations which are applicable to the construction of the system of semicircular ducts, especially to its size. The simplified case of a single, uniform duct system has been considered which can be described by a second order equation of motion. The principal functional quantities for this rotation-sensor are: (1) response speed; (2) sensitivity; and (3) regular flow. The response speed of a single, uniform semicircular duct is characterized by the short time constant (T2) which is dependent on the duct radius (r). Its estimated range is from 0.04 ms in the smallest to 140 ms in the largest known labyrinth. The sensitivity is characterized by the maximal endolymph displacement after a step stimulus (xmax). Its estimated range is from 0.0016 &mgr;m to 5.97 mm (6.56 decades!), assuming an input angular velocity of omega=1 rad s-1. The Reynolds number is a measure for an undisturbed laminar flow. Its estimated range varies from 7.38.10(-4)to 45.1 for omega=1 rad s-1. The above data follow from graphs in which, for a single uniform duct, circuit radius (R) is plotted against duct radius (r) for labyrinths of 233 species belonging to different vertebrate-groups. A relation R =38.9. r1.60was determined. The smallest labyrinth was found in a carp larva (Cyprinus), the largest in a whale shark (Rhincodon). Large whales possess labyrinths of average mammalian size. It is revealed that semicircular duct size is bound by requirements concerning regular flow and by a too low response speed for large labyrinths, and by a too low sensitivity for small labyrinths. Other important quantities are mechanical amplification factors which are a consequence of more complex vestibular constructions than a single uniform duct circuit. Allometric relationships are interpreted as compromises between the quantities mentioned. A hypothesis for the relatively large semicircular duct sizes of fishes, especially Elasmobranchii, compared

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities (Willick+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willick, J. A.; Courteau, S.; Faber, S. M.; Burstein, D.; Dekel, A.; Kolatt, T.

    1996-08-01

    The Mark III Catalog of Galaxy Peculiar Velocities comprises five different types of data files. 1. Basic Observational and Catalog Data 2. Individual Galaxy TF and Dn-sigma Distances 3. Grouped Spiral Galaxy TF Distances 4. Elliptical Galaxy Distances as in the Mark II 5. Comparison of Spiral Galaxy Distances 1. The Basic Data files are: a. Aaronson et al. Field, (359 galaxies; a82): a82file1.dat, a82file2.dat, a82file3.dat b. Mathewson et al. 1992 (1355 galaxies; mat): matfile1.dat, matfile2.dat, matfile3.dat c. Willick 1991, Perseus-Pisces sample (383 galaxies; w91pp): d. Willick 1991, Cluster galaxy sample (156 galaxies; w91cl): The basic data for all 539 objects in the w91 sample are given in the following files: w91file1.dat, w91file2.dat, w91file3.dat Some galaxies are duplicates; see below for details. e. Courteau-Faber 1993 (326 galaxies; cf): cffile1.dat, cffile2.dat, cffile3.dat f. Han-Mould et al. 1992+, Cluster galaxy sample (433 galaxies; hmcl): The basic data for all 433 galaxies the the hm sample are given in the following files: hmfile1.dat, hmfile3.dat, hmfile2.dat Some galaxies are duplicates; see below for details. 2. The Individual Spiral Galaxy Distances Files are: (See notes for detailed descriptions of how the w91pp, w91cl, hmcl and cf distance files correspond to the galaxies in the w91file*, hmfile*, and cffile* Basic Data files.) a. Aaronson et al. Field, (359 galaxies; a82): a82_s b. Mathewson et al. 1992 (1355 galaxies; mat): mat_s c. Willick 1991, Perseus-Pisces sample (326 galaxies; w91pp): w91pp_s.dat d. Willick 1991, Cluster galaxy sample (156 galaxies; w91cl): w91cl_s.dat e. Courteau-Faber 1993 (321 galaxies; cf): cf_s.dat f. Han-Mould et al. 1992+, all cluster galaxies (427 galaxies; hmcl): hmcl_s.dat 3. The Grouped Spiral Galaxy Distance Files are: (Note: Group numbers in the wcf group (merged w91pp and cf) data file correspond to those in the w91pp and cf individual galaxy files. The hmw group file (merged w91cl and hmcl, 10

  20. SiC devices: Physics and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Martin; Mitlehner, Heinz; Helbig, Reinhard

    1994-06-01

    The important material parameters for 6H silicon carbide (6H-SiC) are extracted from the literature and implemented into the 2-D device simulation programs PISCES and BREAKDOWN and into the 1-D program OSSI Simulations of 6H-SiC p-n junctions show the possibility to operate corresponding devices at temperatures up to 1000 K thanks to their low reverse current densities. Comparison of a 6H-SiC 1200 V p-n(-)-n(+) diode with a corresponding silicon (Si) diode shows the higher switching performance of the 6H-SiC diode, while the forward power loss is somewhat higher than in Si due to the higher built-in voltage of the 6H-SiC p-n junction. This disadvantage can be avoided by a 6H-SiC Schottky diode. The on-resistances of Si, 3C-SiC, and 6H-SiC vertical power MOSFET's are compared by analytical calculations. At room temperature, such SiC MOSFET's can operate up to blocking capabilities of 5000 V with an on-resistance below 0.1 (Omega) sq cm, while Si MOSFET's are limited to below 500 V. This is checked by calculating the characteristics of a 6H-SiC 1200 V MOSFET with PISCES. In the voltage region below 200 V, Si is superior due to its higher mobility and lower threshold voltage. Electric fields in the order of 4 x 10(exp 6) V/cm occur in the gate oxide of the mentioned 6H-SiC MOSFET as well as in a field plate oxide used to passivate its planar junction. To investigate the high frequency performance of SiC devices, a heterobipolartransistor with a 6H-SiC emitter is considered. Base and collector are assumed to be out of 3C-SiC. Frequencies up to 10 GHz with a very high output power are obtained on the basis of analytical considerations.

  1. The influence of the merger history of dwarf galaxies in a reionized universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, Robbert; Vandenbroucke, Bert; De Rijcke, Sven; Koleva, Mina

    2015-08-01

    In the ΛCDM model, cosmic structure forms in a hierarchical fashion. According to this paradigm, even low-mass dwarf galaxies grow via smooth accretion and mergers. Given the low masses of dwarf galaxies and their even smaller progenitors, the UV background is expected to have a significant influence on their gas content and, consequently, their star formation histories. Generally, cosmological simulations predict that most dwarf systems with circular velocities below ~30 km/s should not be able to form significant amounts of stars or contain gas and be, in effect, "dark" galaxies (Sawala et al. 2013, 2014; Hopkins et al. 2014; Shen et al. 2014). This is in contradiction with the recent discovery of low-mass yet gas-rich dwarf galaxies, such as Leo P (Skillman et al. 2013), Pisces A (Tollerud et al. 2014), and SECCO 1 (Bellazzini et al. 2015). Moreover, Tollerud et al. (2014) point out that most isolated dark-matter halos down to circular velocities of ~15 km/s contain neutral gas, in contradiction with the predictions of current simulations.Based on a suite of simulations of the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies we show that, by reducing the first peak of star formation by including Pop-III stars in the simulations, the resulting dwarf galaxies have severely suppressed SFRs and can hold on to their gas reservoirs. Moreover, we show that the majority of the zero-metallicity stars are ejected during mergers, resulting in an extended, low-metallicity stellar halo. This results in a marked difference between a galaxy's "total" star-formation history and the one read from the stars in the center of the galaxy at z=0. This mechanism leads to the formation of realistic low-mass, gas-rich dwarfs with a broad range of SFHs and which adhere to the observed scaling relations, such as the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation.In short, the simulations presented here are for the first time able to reproduce the observed properties of low-mass, gas-rich dwarfs such as DDO 210

  2. DISCOVERY OF A CLOSE PAIR OF FAINT DWARF GALAXIES IN THE HALO OF CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Caldwell, N.; McLeod, B.; Guhathakurta, P.; Toloba, E.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.

    2014-11-10

    As part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), we report the discovery of a pair of faint dwarf galaxies (CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2) at a projected distance of ∼90 kpc from the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (CenA). We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to each dwarf, finding D = 3.63 ± 0.41 Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and D = 3.60 ± 0.41 Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw2, both of which are consistent with the distance to NGC 5128. A qualitative analysis of the color-magnitude diagrams indicates stellar populations consisting of an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳12 Gyr, [Fe/H] ∼ –1.7 to –1.9). In addition, CenA-MM-Dw1 seems to host an intermediate-age population as indicated by its candidate asymptotic giant branch stars. The derived luminosities (M{sub V} = –10.9 ± 0.3 for CenA-MM-Dw1 and –8.4 ± 0.6 for CenA-MM-Dw2) and half-light radii (r{sub h} = 1.4 ± 0.04 kpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and 0.36 ± 0.08 kpc for CenA-MM-Dw2) are consistent with those of Local Group dwarfs. CenA-MM-Dw1's low central surface brightness (μ {sub V,} {sub 0} = 27.3 ± 0.1 mag arcsec{sup –2}) places it among the faintest and most extended M31 satellites. Most intriguingly, CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2 have a projected separation of only 3 arcmin (∼3 kpc): we are possibly observing the first, faint satellite of a satellite in an external group of galaxies.

  3. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Brian

    2007-10-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have modified our budget plan for next year to include a

  4. Large-Scale Structures in the Zone of Avoidance: The Galactic Anticenter Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Nanyao Y.; Freudling, Wolfram

    1995-01-01

    We have selected a sample of 876 galaxy candidates from the IRAS Point Source Catalog in the region of 2(exp h) < alpha < 10(exp h) and 0 deg < delta < 36 deg, which crosses the Galactic anticenter part of the Zone of Avoidance (ZOA) and includes most of the highly obscured Orion-Taurus complex region. We have identified galaxies among the candidate sources by attempting to detect the 21 cm H I line of those sources which were not known to be galaxies at the beginning of the survey. In this manner, we constructed a galaxy sample which is largely free from Galactic reddening. Of the 272 observed candidates, 89 were detected in the H I line up to a heliocentric velocity of v(sub h) approximately 16,000 km/s. The resulting galaxy sample of 717 galaxies is fairly complete (within about 10%) and uniform (within about 4%) in the part of the survey area 10 deg away from the Galactic plane and for velocities up to at least 9000 km/s. This provides, for the first time, a largely unbiased view on the large-scale structures in much of the survey area. Our main results are the following: (1) Several large voids are identified. In particular, a void between alpha approximately equals 3(sup h) and 4(sup h), up to v(sub h) approximately 6000 km/s, separates the Pisces-Perseus supercluster at alpha < 3(sup h) from structures at alpha > 4(sup h); and a "nearby void" occupies most of our survey area and reaches out to a redshift of nearly 3000 km/s. (2) We found no nearby galaxy concentration that could significantly contribute to the "Local Velocity Anomoly" (LVA), but a general excess of galaxies around v(sub h) approximately 5000 km/s in the survey area. (3) The contrast between the "Great Wall" at v(sub h) approximately 8500 km/s and the void in front of it appears to gradually diffuse out after it enters the Zone of Avoidance from the northern Galactic hemisphere. (4) Our data combined with other galaxy surveys in or near the Galactic anticenter part of the ZOA suggest that the

  5. Renal regulation of acid-base equilibrium during chronic administration of mineral acid.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, R C; Harrington, J T; Ricanati, E S; Shelkrot, J W; Schwartz, W B

    1974-02-01

    Previous studies in metabolic alkalosis have demonstrated that two factors are the prime determinants of acid excretion and bicarbonate reabsorption; first, the diversion to distal exchange sites of sodium previously reabsorbed in the proximal tubule and loop of Henle; and, second, a stimulus to sodium-cation exchange greater than that produced by a low-salt diet alone. In the present study we have examined the hypothesis that these two factors are also the prime determinants of acid excretion during the administration of mineral acid loads. To test this hypothesis, we have administered to dogs ingesting a low NaCl diet a daily dose of 7 meq/kg of H+ with anions (chloride, sulfate, or nitrate) whose differing degrees of reabsorbability influence the speed and completeness with which each is delivered to the distal nephron with its accompanying Na+. After 2-3 wk of acid administration, and after an initial urinary loss of Na+ and K+, the steady-state value for plasma [HCO3-] was 8.6 meq/liter below control in the HCl group, 3.7 meq/liter below control in the H2SO4 group, and unchanged from control in the HNO3 group; all of these values were significantly different from each other. We would propose the following explanation for our findings: when HCl is administered chronically, marked acidosis occurs because distal delivery of Cl- is restricted by the ease with which the Cl- can be reabsorbed in the proximal portions of the nephron. Only when Cl- retention produces sufficient hyperchloremia to insure delivery of Na+ (previously reabsorbed in proximal tubule and loop of Henle) to the distal nephron in quantities equal to ingested Cl is this primary constraint removed. In the case of sulfuric and nitric acids, there is no constraint on distal delivery, the nonreabsorbability of the administered anion causing prompt, total delivery of Na+ to exchange sites in quantities equal to administered hydrogen. Thus, with H2SO4 and HNO3 the sole constraint on removal of the acid

  6. Role for intrarenal mechanisms in the impaired salt excretion of experimental nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, I; Rennke, H G; Hoyer, J R; Badr, K F; Schor, N; Troy, J L; Lechene, C P; Brenner, B M

    1983-01-01

    A unilateral model of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced albuminuria was produced in Munich-Wistar rats to examine the mechanisms responsible for renal salt retention. 2 wk after selective perfusion of left kidneys with PAN (n = 8 rats) or isotonic saline (control, n = 7 rats), increases in albumin excretion and decreases in sodium excretion were demonstrated in PAN-perfused but not in nonperfused kidneys of PAN-treated rats although systemic plasma protein concentration remained at control level. Total kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and superficial single nephron (SN) GFR were also reduced selectively in PAN-perfused kidneys, on average by approximately 30%, due primarily to a marked decline in the glomerular capillary ultrafiltration coefficient (Kf), which was also confined to PAN-perfused kidneys. Values for absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) were also selectively depressed in PAN-perfused kidneys, in keeping with a similarly selective decline in peritubular capillary oncotic pressure measured in these kidneys, the latter also a consequence of the fall in Kf. In a separate group of seven PAN-treated rats, however, no differences were detected between PAN-perfused and nonperfused kidneys in the absolute amount of sodium reaching the early (0.77 +/- 0.09 neq/min vs. 0.74 +/- 0.08, P greater than 0.40) and late portions of superficial distal tubules (0.31 +/- 0.02) neq/min vs. 0.32 +/- 0.05, P greater than 0.50), despite the lesser filtered load of sodium in PAN-perfused kidneys. Suppressed sodium reabsorption in both proximal convoluted tubules and short loops of Henle of PAN-perfused kidneys contributed to this equalization of sodium delivery rates to the late distal tubule, as did comparable reabsorption along distal convolutions. In two additional groups of PAN-treated rats, infusion of saralasin (0.3 mg/kg per h, i.v.) led to substantial increases in total kidney GFR and SNGFR in PAN-perfused but not in nonperfused kidneys. Despite these

  7. The betaine-GABA transporter (BGT1, slc6a12) is predominantly expressed in the liver and at lower levels in the kidneys and at the brain surface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Holmseth, S; Hua, R; Lehre, A C; Olofsson, A M; Poblete-Naredo, I; Kempson, S A; Danbolt, N C

    2012-02-01

    The Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent GABA-betaine transporter (BGT1) has received attention mostly as a protector against osmolarity changes in the kidney and as a potential controller of the neurotransmitter GABA in the brain. Nevertheless, the cellular distribution of BGT1, and its physiological importance, is not fully understood. Here we have quantified mRNA levels using TaqMan real-time PCR, produced a number of BGT1 antibodies, and used these to study BGT1 distribution in mice. BGT1 (protein and mRNA) is predominantly expressed in the liver (sinusoidal hepatocyte plasma membranes) and not in the endothelium. BGT1 is also present in the renal medulla, where it localizes to the basolateral membranes of collecting ducts (particularly at the papilla tip) and the thick ascending limbs of Henle. There is some BGT1 in the leptomeninges, but brain parenchyma, brain blood vessels, ependymal cells, the renal cortex, and the intestine are virtually BGT1 deficient in 1- to 3-mo-old mice. Labeling specificity was assured by processing tissue from BGT1-deficient littermates in parallel as negative controls. Addition of 2.5% sodium chloride to the drinking water for 48 h induced a two- to threefold upregulation of BGT1, tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein, and sodium-myo-inositol cotransporter 1 (slc5a3) in the renal medulla, but not in the brain and barely in the liver. BGT1-deficient and wild-type mice appeared to tolerate the salt treatment equally well, possibly because betaine is one of several osmolytes. In conclusion, this study suggests that BGT1 plays its main role in the liver, thereby complementing other betaine-transporting carrier proteins (e.g., slc6a20) that are predominantly expressed in the small intestine or kidney rather than the liver. PMID:22071246

  8. How to overcome osmotic stress? Marine crabs conquer freshwater. New insights from modern electrophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, H.; Graszynski, K.; Johannsen, A.; Putzenlechner, M.; Riestenpatt, S.; Schirmer, C.; Siebers, D.; Zeiske, W.

    1995-03-01

    In the present article we review our findings on split lamella preparations of crab gills mounted in modified Ussing-chambers with respect to mechanistic and ecophysiological aspects. The leaky gill epithelium of shore crabs adapted to brackish water absorbs Na+ and Cl- in a coupled mode, and shows similarities to other salt-absorbing epithelia exposed to moderately diluted media. The results so far obtained for NaCl uptake across the gills of the shore crab are compatible with a transport model where two cell types operate in parallel, one displaying cotransport-like NaCl absorption, similar to that in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop of the mammalian mephron, and the other one with characteristics of amiloride-sensitive, channel-mediated Na+ uptake by frog skin. Although there is no clear evidence for the apical mechanisms in this model, it may serve as a good basis for more detailed studies in the future. The moderately tight gill epithelium of freshwater adapted Chinese crabs absorbs Na+ and Cl- independently from each other, and shows similarities to other salt-absorbing epithelia exposed to freshwater. The characteristics of a positive, Na+-dependent short-circuit current with externally Cl--free saline indicate that active Na+ uptake proceeds in a frog-skin-like mode via apical Na+-channels and the basolateral Na+/K+-pump. The nature of a negative short-circuit current with external Cl--saline indicates that active and Na+-independent Cl- uptake is driven by an apical V-type H+-pump and proceeds via apical Cl-/ HCO3 --exchange and basolateral Cl--channels.

  9. KCNJ10 gene mutations causing EAST syndrome (epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and tubulopathy) disrupt channel function

    PubMed Central

    Reichold, Markus; Zdebik, Anselm A.; Lieberer, Evelyn; Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Katharina; Bandulik, Sascha; Sterner, Christina; Tegtmeier, Ines; Penton, David; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Witzgall, Ralph; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Howie, Alexander J.; Kleta, Robert; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Warth, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the KCNJ10 (Kir4.1) K+ channel underlie autosomal recessive epilepsy, ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and (a salt-wasting) renal tubulopathy (EAST) syndrome. We investigated the localization of KCNJ10 and the homologous KCNJ16 in kidney and the functional consequences of KCNJ10 mutations found in our patients with EAST syndrome. Kcnj10 and Kcnj16 were found in the basolateral membrane of mouse distal convoluted tubules, connecting tubules, and cortical collecting ducts. In the human kidney, KCNJ10 staining was additionally observed in the basolateral membrane of the cortical thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. EM of distal tubular cells of a patient with EAST syndrome showed reduced basal infoldings in this nephron segment, which likely reflects the morphological consequences of the impaired salt reabsorption capacity. When expressed in CHO and HEK293 cells, the KCNJ10 mutations R65P, G77R, and R175Q caused a marked impairment of channel function. R199X showed complete loss of function. Single-channel analysis revealed a strongly reduced mean open time. Qualitatively similar results were obtained with coexpression of KCNJ10/KCNJ16, suggesting a dominance of KCNJ10 function in native renal KCNJ10/KCNJ16 heteromers. The decrease in the current of R65P and R175Q was mainly caused by a remarkable shift of pH sensitivity to the alkaline range. In summary, EAST mutations of KCNJ10 lead to impaired channel function and structural changes in distal convoluted tubules. Intriguingly, the metabolic alkalosis present in patients carrying the R65P mutation possibly improves residual function of KCNJ10, which shows higher activity at alkaline pH. PMID:20651251

  10. Specific renal parenchymal-derived urinary extracellular vesicles identify age-associated structural changes in living donor kidneys.

    PubMed

    Turco, Anne E; Lam, Wing; Rule, Andrew D; Denic, Aleksandar; Lieske, John C; Miller, Virginia M; Larson, Joseph J; Kremers, Walter K; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive tests to identify age and early disease-associated pathology within the kidney are needed. Specific populations of urinary extracellular vesicles (EVs) could potentially be used for such a diagnostic test. Random urine samples were obtained from age- and sex-stratified living kidney donors before kidney donation. A biopsy of the donor kidney was obtained at the time of transplantation to identify nephron hypertrophy (larger glomerular volume, cortex per glomerulus and mean profile tubular area) and nephrosclerosis (% fibrosis, % glomerulosclerosis and arteriosclerosis). Renal parenchymal-derived EVs in cell-free urine were quantified by digital flow cytometry. The relationship between these EV populations and structural pathology on the kidney biopsy was assessed. Clinical characteristics of the kidney donors (n=138, age range: 20-70 years, 50% women) were within the normative range. Overall, urine from women contained more EVs than that from men. The number of exosomes, juxtaglomerular cells and podocyte marker-positive EVs decreased (p<0.05) with increasing age. There were fewer total EVs as well as EVs positive for mesangial cell, parietal cell, descending limb of Henle's loop (simple squamous epithelium), collecting tubule-intercalated cell and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 markers (p<0.05) in persons with nephron hypertrophy. The number of EVs positive for intercellular adhesion molecule-1, juxtaglomerular cell, podocyte, parietal cell, proximal tubular epithelial cell, distal tubular epithelial cell and collecting duct cells were fewer (p<0.05) in persons with nephrosclerosis. EVs carrying markers of cells from the renal pelvis epithelium did not associate with any indices of nephron hypertrophy or nephrosclerosis. Therefore, specific populations of EVs derived from cells of the glomerulus and nephron associate with underlying kidney structural changes. Further validation of these findings in other cohorts is needed to determine their

  11. Histochemical demonstration of a Na(+)-coupled transporter for short-chain fatty acids (slc5a8) in the intestine and kidney of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Kumiko; Nio, Junko; Morimatsu, Masami; Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwahara, Atsukazu; Kato, Ikuo; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2005-10-01

    Short-chain fatty acids in the intestinal lumen affect colonic cell proliferation as well as function as an energy source for intestinal epithelial cells. A novel transporter of monocarboxylates, Slc5a8, is expressed abundantly in the colon, where it may participate in the Na(+)-coupled absorption of short-chain fatty acids produced by bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber. The present study examined the cellular localization of Slc5a8 in the murine gastrointestinal tract and kidney by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The hybridization signals were recognized in the terminal ileum and whole length of the large intestine, and were especially intense in the distal colon and rectum. The immunoreactivity of Slc5a8 was restricted to the striated border (the brush border) of enterocytes, and was not present in goblet cells, Paneth cells, or lamina propria cells. In the kidney, proximal tubules of both the cortex and the outer stripe of the outer medulla intensely expressed Slc5a8 mRNA, while the distal portions, including the loop of Henle, lacked the signals. The renal Slc5a8 immunoreactivity was localized only in the brush border of proximal tubules, not along the basolateral membrane. Thyroid follicular cells were immunoreactive for Slc5a8, with predominant labeling on the apical membrane. No other organs, including the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and salivary glands contained any notable signals of Slc5a8. These findings on the cellular and subcellular localization of Slc5a8 under normal conditions are helpful for understanding the physiological and pathological roles of Slc5a8. PMID:16295698

  12. The Role of the Renal Ammonia Transporter Rhcg in Metabolic Responses to Dietary Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bounoure, Lisa; Ruffoni, Davide; Müller, Ralph; Kuhn, Gisela Anna; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    High dietary protein imposes a metabolic acid load requiring excretion and buffering by the kidney. Impaired acid excretion in CKD, with potential metabolic acidosis, may contribute to the progression of CKD. Here, we investigated the renal adaptive response of acid excretory pathways in mice to high-protein diets containing normal or low amounts of acid-producing sulfur amino acids (SAA) and examined how this adaption requires the RhCG ammonia transporter. Diets rich in SAA stimulated expression of enzymes and transporters involved in mediating NH4+ reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. The SAA-rich diet increased diuresis paralleled by downregulation of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channels. The absence of Rhcg transiently reduced NH4+ excretion, stimulated the ammoniagenic pathway more strongly, and further enhanced diuresis by exacerbating the downregulation of the Na+/K+/2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC2) and AQP2, with less phosphorylation of AQP2 at serine 256. The high protein acid load affected bone turnover, as indicated by higher Ca2+ and deoxypyridinoline excretion, phenomena exaggerated in the absence of Rhcg. In animals receiving a high-protein diet with low SAA content, the kidney excreted alkaline urine, with low levels of NH4+ and no change in bone metabolism. Thus, the acid load associated with high-protein diets causes a concerted response of various nephron segments to excrete acid, mostly in the form of NH4+, that requires Rhcg. Furthermore, bone metabolism is altered by a high-protein acidogenic diet, presumably to buffer the acid load. PMID:24652796

  13. Short-term nonpressor angiotensin II infusion stimulates sodium transporters in proximal tubule and distal nephron

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mien T X; Han, Jiyang; Ralph, Donna L; Veiras, Luciana C; McDonough, Alicia A

    2015-01-01

    In Sprague Dawley rats, 2-week angiotensin II (AngII) infusion increases Na+ transporter abundance and activation from cortical thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) to medullary collecting duct (CD) and raises blood pressure associated with a pressure natriuresis, accompanied by depressed Na+ transporter abundance and activation from proximal tubule (PT) through medullary TALH. This study tests the hypothesis that early during AngII infusion, before blood pressure raises, Na+ transporters’ abundance and activation increase all along the nephron. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused via osmotic minipumps with a subpressor dose of AngII (200 ng/kg/min) or vehicle for 3 days. Overnight urine was collected in metabolic cages and sodium transporters’ abundance and phosphorylation were determined by immunoblotting homogenates of renal cortex and medulla. There were no significant differences in body weight gain, overnight urine volume, urinary Na+ and K+ excretion, or rate of excretion of a saline challenge between AngII and vehicle infused rats. The 3-day nonpressor AngII infusion significantly increased the abundance of PT Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3), cortical TALH Na-K-2Cl cotransporter 2 (NKCC2), distal convoluted tubule (DCT) Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC), and cortical CD ENaC subunits. Additionally, phosphorylation of cortical NKCC2, NCC, and STE20/SPS1-related proline–alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) were increased; medullary NKCC2 and SPAK were not altered. In conclusion, 3-day AngII infusion provokes PT NHE3 accumulation as well as NKCC2, NCC, and SPAK accumulation and activation in a prehypertensive phase before evidence for intrarenal angiotensinogen accumulation. PMID:26347505

  14. Familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis: clinical and molecular characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Claverie-Martin, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) is an autosomal-recessive renal tubular disorder characterized by excessive urinary losses of magnesium and calcium, bilateral nephrocalcinosis and progressive chronic renal failure. Presentation with FHHNC symptoms generally occurs early in childhood or before adolescence. At present, the only therapeutic option is supportive and consists of oral magnesium supplementation and thiazide diuretics. However, neither treatment seems to have a significant effect on the levels of serum magnesium or urine calcium or on the decline of renal function. In end-stage renal disease patients, renal transplantation is the only effective approach. This rare disease is caused by mutations in the CLDN16 or CLDN19 genes. Patients with mutations in CLDN19 also present severe ocular abnormalities such as myopia, nystagmus and macular colobamata. CLDN16 and CLDN19 encode the tight-junction proteins claudin-16 and claudin-19, respectively, which are expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and form an essential complex for the paracellular reabsorption of magnesium and calcium. Claudin-19 is also expressed in retinal epithelium and peripheral neurons. Research studies using mouse and cell models have generated significant advances on the understanding of the pathophysiology of FHHNC. A recent finding has established that another member of the claudin family, claudin-14, plays a key regulatory role in paracellular cation reabsorption by inhibiting the claudin-16–claudin-19 complex. Furthermore, several studies on the molecular and cellular consequences of disease-causing CLDN16 and CLDN19 mutations have provided critical information for the development of potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26613020

  15. Nitric oxide synthase in macula densa regulates glomerular capillary pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C S; Welch, W J; Murad, F; Gross, S S; Taylor, G; Levi, R; Schmidt, H H

    1992-01-01

    Tubular-fluid reabsorption by specialized cells of the nephron at the junction of the ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule, termed the macula densa, releases compounds causing vasoconstriction of the adjacent afferent arteriole. Activation of this tubuloglomerular feedback response reduces glomerular capillary pressure of the nephron and, hence, the glomerular filtration rate. The tubuloglomerular feedback response functions in a negative-feedback mode to relate glomerular capillary pressure to tubular-fluid delivery and reabsorption. This system has been implicated in renal autoregulation, renin release, and longterm body fluid and blood-pressure homeostasis. Here we report that arginine-derived nitric oxide, generated in the macula densa, is an additional intercellular signaling molecule that is released during tubular-fluid reabsorption and counters the vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole. Antibody to rat cerebellar constitutive nitric oxide synthase stained rat macula densa cells specifically. Microperfusion of the macula densa segment of single nephrons with N omega-methyl-L-arginine (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) or with pyocyanin (a lipid-soluble inhibitor of endothelium-derived relaxation factor) showed that generation of nitric oxide can vasodilate the afferent arteriole and increase glomerular capillary pressure; this effect was blocked by drugs that prevent tubular-fluid reabsorption. We conclude that nitric oxide synthase in macula densa cells is activated by tubular-fluid reabsorption and mediates a vasodilating component to the tubuloglomerular feedback response. These findings imply a role for arginine-derived nitric oxide in body fluid-volume and blood-pressure homeostasis, in addition to its established roles in modulation of vascular tone by the endothelium and in neurotransmission. Images PMID:1281548

  16. Pharmacologic inhibition of the renal outer medullary potassium channel causes diuresis and natriuresis in the absence of kaliuresis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Maria L; Priest, Birgit T; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Felix, John P; Brochu, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande; Liu, Jessica; Swensen, Andrew; Pai, Lee-Yuh; Xiao, Jianying; Hernandez, Melba; Hoagland, Kimberly; Owens, Karen; Tang, Haifeng; de Jesus, Reynalda K; Roy, Sophie; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Pasternak, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel, which is located at the apical membrane of epithelial cells lining the thick ascending loop of Henle and cortical collecting duct, plays an important role in kidney physiology by regulating salt reabsorption. Loss-of-function mutations in the human ROMK channel are associated with antenatal type II Bartter's syndrome, an autosomal recessive life-threatening salt-wasting disorder with mild hypokalemia. Similar observations have been reported from studies with ROMK knockout mice and rats. It is noteworthy that heterozygous carriers of Kir1.1 mutations associated with antenatal Bartter's syndrome have reduced blood pressure and a decreased risk of developing hypertension by age 60. Although selective ROMK inhibitors would be expected to represent a new class of diuretics, this hypothesis has not been pharmacologically tested. Compound A [5-(2-(4-(2-(4-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)phenyl)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one)], a potent ROMK inhibitor with appropriate selectivity and characteristics for in vivo testing, has been identified. Compound A accesses the channel through the cytoplasmic side and binds to residues lining the pore within the transmembrane region below the selectivity filter. In normotensive rats and dogs, short-term oral administration of compound A caused concentration-dependent diuresis and natriuresis that were comparable to hydrochlorothiazide. Unlike hydrochlorothiazide, however, compound A did not cause any significant urinary potassium losses or changes in plasma electrolyte levels. These data indicate that pharmacologic inhibition of ROMK has the potential for affording diuretic/natriuretic efficacy similar to that of clinically used diuretics but without the dose-limiting hypokalemia associated with the use of loop and thiazide-like diuretics. PMID:24142912

  17. Determination of Phosphate-activated Glutaminase Activity and Its Kinetics in Mouse Tissues using Metabolic Mapping (Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry)

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) converts glutamine to glutamate as part of the glutaminolysis pathway in mitochondria. Two genes, GLS1 and GLS2, which encode for kidney-type PAG and liver-type PAG, respectively, differ in their tissue-specific activities and kinetics. Tissue-specific PAG activity and its kinetics were determined by metabolic mapping using a tetrazolium salt and glutamate dehydrogenase as an auxiliary enzyme in the presence of various glutamine concentrations. In kidney and brain, PAG showed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Km of 0.6 mM glutamine and a Vmax of 1.1 µmol/mL/min when using 5 mM glutamine. PAG activity was high in the kidney cortex and inner medulla but low in the outer medulla, papillary tip, glomeruli and the lis of Henle. In brain tissue sections, PAG was active in the grey matter and inactive in myelin-rich regions. Liver PAG showed allosteric regulation with a Km of 11.6 mM glutamine and a Vmax of 0.5 µmol/mL/min when using 20 mM glutamine. The specificity of the method was shown after incubation of brain tissue sections with the PAG inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. PAG activity was decreased to 22% in the presence of 2 mM 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. At low glutamine concentrations, PAG activity was higher in periportal regions, indicating a lower Km for periportal PAG. When compared with liver, kidney and brain, other tissues showed 3-fold to 6-fold less PAG activity. In conclusion, PAG is mainly active in mouse kidney, brain and liver, and shows different kinetics depending on which type of PAG is expressed. PMID:25163927

  18. The C-Terminal Fragment of Agrin (CAF), a Novel Marker of Renal Function, Is Filtered by the Kidney and Reabsorbed by the Proximal Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Daryadel, Arezoo; Haubitz, Monika; Figueiredo, Marta; Steubl, Dominik; Roos, Marcel; Mäder, Armin; Hettwer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Agrin, a multidomain proteoglycan and neurotrypsin, a neuronal serine protease, are important for forming (neuromuscular) synapses. Proteolytical activity of neurotrypsin produces a C-terminal fragment of agrin, termed CAF, of approximately 22 kDA molecular size which also circulates in blood. The presence of CAF in urine suggests either glomerular filtration or secretion into urine. Blood levels of CAF have been identified as a potential novel marker of kidney function. Here we describe that several nephron segments in the mouse kidney express agrin and neutrotrypsin in addition to the localization of both protein in the glomerulum. Agrin mRNA and protein was detected in almost all nephron segments and mRNA abundance was highest in the inner medullary collecting duct. Neurotrypsin mRNA was mostly detected in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, the distal convoluted tubule, and the inner medullary collecting duct. Moreover, we show that the proximal tubule absorbs injected recombinant CAF by a process shared with receptor-mediated and fluid phase endocytosis. Co-injection of CAF with recombinant human transferrin, a substrate of the receptor-mediated endocytic pathway as well as with FITC-labelled dextran (10 kDa), a marker of fluid phase endocytosis, showed partial colocalization of CAF with both markers. Further colocalization of CAF with the lysosomal marker cathepsin B suggested degradation of CAF by the lysosome in the proximal tubule. Thus, the murine kidney expresses agrin and neurotrypsin in nephron segments beyond the glomerulum. CAF is filtered by the glomerulum and is reabsorbed by endocytosis by the proximal tubule. Thus, impaired kidney function could impair glomerular clearance of CAF and thereby increase circulating CAF levels. PMID:27380275

  19. [Kidney damage in multiple myeloma and other monoclonal gammopathies].

    PubMed

    Adam, Z; Pour, L; Krejcí, M; Stĕpánková, S; Svobodová, I; Veselý, K; Hájek, R

    2008-09-01

    Multiple myeloma typically damages the skeleton in the form of osteolytic lesions or diffuse osteoporosis and causes a decrease in blood production. Renal insufficiency is diagnosed immediately at the onset of illness when establishing diagnosis in up to 20% of patients. Where patients suffer from an advanced form of the illness, it occurs in up to 40%. The predominant cause of damage to the kidneys is the monoclonal light chains. Most frequently, nephropathy is caused by the precipitation of light chains with the Tamm-Horsfall protein in the distal part of the loop of Henle and subsequent tubular ruptures and the creation of fibrous changes in the interstitium. Less frequently, there is clinically serious damage to tubular functions without indication of renal insufficiency. In some patients monoclonal immunoglobulin induces changes in the glomeruli. A rare type of damage is deposits of light chains in the form of AL-amyloid and subsequent nephritic syndrome. A very rare form is the deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin in the form of amorphous matter (light-chain deposition disease) or in the form of crystals within tissue histiocytes (crystal storing histiocytosis). Both of these disorders cause renal insufficiency and less frequently nephritic syndrome such as AL amyloidosis. With timely and intensive treatment of multiple myeloma, which quickly suppresses the creation of light chains, a significant proportion of patients experience reparative changes and improved kidney function. The benefit of plasmapheresis for patients with severe kidney damage has not been confirmed by randomised studies. At the present time the first positive results are becoming available from tests of the use of pre-emptive haemodialysis with special columns that are permeable for light chains. The aim of the text is to provide information on the various forms of nephropathy whose closer analysis can reveal multiple myeloma and contribute to the timely diagnosis of the cause of the

  20. Pathophysiology of radiocontrast nephropathy: a role for medullary hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Heyman, S N; Reichman, J; Brezis, M

    1999-11-01

    Recent experimental data underlies the role of hypoxic tubular injury in the pathophysiology of radiocontrast nephropathy. Although systemic transient hypoxemia, increased blood viscosity, and a leftward shift of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve may all contribute to intrarenal hypoxia, imbalance between oxygen demand and supply plays a major role in radiocontrast-induced outer medullary hypoxic damage. Low oxygen tension normally exists in this renal region, reflecting the precarious regional oxygen supply and a high local metabolic rate and oxygen requirement, resulting from active salt reabsorption by medullary thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop. Radiologic contrast agents markedly aggravate outer medullary physiologic hypoxia. This results from enhanced metabolic activity and oxygen consumption (as a result of osmotic diuresis and increased salt delivery to the distal nephron) because the regional blood flow and the oxygen supply actually increase. The latter effect may result in part from the activation of various regulatory mediators of outer medullary blood flow to ensure maximal regional oxygen supply. Low-osmolar radiocontrast agents may be less nephrotoxic because of the smaller osmotic load and vasomotor alterations. Experimental radiocontrast-induced renal failure requires preconditioning of animals with various insults (for example, congestive heart failure, reduced renal mass, salt depletion, or inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis). In all these perturbations, which resemble clinical conditions that predispose to contrast nephropathy, outer medullary hypoxic injury results from insufficiency or inactivation of mechanisms designed to preserve regional oxygen balance. This underlines the importance of identifying and ameliorating predisposing factors in the prevention of this iatrogenic disease. PMID:10548380

  1. β-Adrenergic receptor stimulation increases surface NKCC2 expression in rat thick ascending limbs in a process inhibited by phosphodiesterase 4.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mohammed Z; Caceres, Paulo S; Ortiz, Pablo A

    2012-11-01

    The thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (THAL) reabsorbs ∼30% of the filtered NaCl in a process mediated by the apical Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2. Stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors in the THAL enhances NaCl reabsorption and increases intracellular cAMP. We found that intracellular cAMP stimulates NKCC2 trafficking to the apical membrane via protein kinase A (PKA). Several cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE) have been identified in rat THALs, and PDE4 decreases cAMP generated by β-adrenergic stimulation in other cells. However, it is not known whether β-adrenergic receptors activation stimulates NKCC2 trafficking. Thus we hypothesized that β-adrenergic receptor stimulation enhances THAL apical membrane NKCC2 expression via the PKA pathway and PDE4 blunts this effect. THAL suspensions were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats, and surface NKCC2 expression was measured by surface biotinylation and Western blot. Incubation of THALs with the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol at 0.5 and 1.0 μM increased surface NKCC2 by 17 ± 1 and 29 ± 5% respectively (P < 0.05). Preventing cAMP degradation with 3-isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX; a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor) enhanced isoproterenol-stimulated surface NKCC2 expression to 51 ± 7% (P < 0.05 vs. isoproterenol). The β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol or the PKA inhibitor H-89 completely blocked isoproterenol + IBMX-induced increase on surface NKCC2, while propranolol or H-89 alone had no effect. Selective inhibition of PDE4 with rolipram (20 μM) potentiated the effect of isoproterenol on surface NKCC2 and increased cAMP levels. We concluded that β-adrenergic receptor stimulation enhances surface NKCC2 expression in the THALs via PKA and PDE4 blunts this effect. PMID:22933300

  2. cAMP stimulates apical exocytosis of the renal Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC2 in the thick ascending limb: role of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Paulo S; Ares, Gustavo R; Ortiz, Pablo A

    2009-09-11

    The apical renal Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC2 mediates NaCl absorption by the thick ascending limb (TAL) of Henle's loop. cAMP stimulates NKCC2 by enhancing steady-state apical membrane levels of this protein; however, the trafficking and signaling mechanisms by which this occurs have not been studied. Here, we report that stimulation of endogenous cAMP levels with either forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) or the V2 receptor agonist [deamino-Cys(1),d-Arg(8)]vasopressin increases steady-state surface NKCC2 and that the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 blocks this effect. Confocal imaging of apical surface NKCC2 in isolated perfused TALs confirmed a stimulatory effect of cAMP on apical trafficking that was blocked by PKA inhibition. Selective stimulation of PKA with the agonist N(6)-benzoyl-cAMP (500 microm) stimulated steady-state surface NKCC2, whereas the Epac-selective agonist 8-p-chlorophenylthio-2'-O-methyl-cAMP (100 and 250 microm) had no effect. To explore the trafficking mechanism by which cAMP increases apical NKCC2, we measured cumulative apical membrane exocytosis and NKCC2 exocytic insertion in TALs. By monitoring apical FM1-43 fluorescence, we observed rapid stimulation of apical exocytosis (2 min) by forskolin/IBMX. We also found constitutive exocytic insertion of NKCC2 in TALs over time, which was increased by 3-fold in the presence of forskolin/IBMX. PKA inhibition blunted cAMP-stimulated exocytic insertion but did not affect the rate of constitutive exocytosis. We conclude that cAMP stimulates steady-state apical surface NKCC2 by stimulating exocytic insertion and that this process is highly dependent on PKA but not Epac. PMID:19592485

  3. Outer Retinal Structure in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, David B.; Land, Megan E.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Godara, Pooja; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Stepien, Kimberly E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize outer retinal structure in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy (BVMD), using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Methods Four symptomatic members of a family with BVMD with known BEST1 gene mutation were recruited. Thickness of two outer retinal layers corresponding to photoreceptor inner and outer segments were measured using SD-OCT. Photoreceptor mosaic AOSLO images within and around visible lesions were obtained, and cone density was assessed in two subjects. Results Each subject was at a different stage of BVMD, with photoreceptor disruption evident by AOSLO at all stages. When comparing SD-OCT and AOSLO images from the same location, AOSLO images allowed for direct assessment of photoreceptor structure. A variable degree of retained photoreceptors was seen within all lesions. The photoreceptor mosaic immediately adjacent to visible lesions appeared contiguous and was of normal density. Fine hyperreflective structures were visualized by AOSLO, and their anatomical orientation and size are consistent with Henle fibers. Conclusions AOSLO findings indicate substantial photoreceptor structure persists within active lesions, accounting for good visual acuity in these patients. Despite previous reports of diffuse photoreceptor outer segment abnormalities in BVMD, our data reveal normal photoreceptor structure in areas adjacent to clinical lesions. Clinical Relevance This study demonstrates the utility of AOSLO for understanding the spectrum of cellular changes that occur in inherited degenerations such as BVMD. Photoreceptors are often significantly affected at various stages of inherited degenerations, and these changes may not be readily apparent with current clinical imaging instrumentation. PMID:23765342

  4. Mechanical challenges to freshwater residency in sharks and rays.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Adrian C; Potvin, Jean; Keleher, James J; Whitty, Jeff M; Morgan, David L; Goldbogen, Jeremy A

    2015-04-01

    Major transitions between marine and freshwater habitats are relatively infrequent, primarily as a result of major physiological and ecological challenges. Few species of cartilaginous fish have evolved to occupy freshwater habitats. Current thought suggests that the metabolic physiology of sharks has remained a barrier to the diversification of this taxon in freshwater ecosystems. Here, we demonstrate that the physical properties of water provide an additional constraint for this species-rich group to occupy freshwater systems. Using hydromechanical modeling, we show that occurrence in fresh water results in a two- to three-fold increase in negative buoyancy for sharks and rays. This carries the energetic cost of lift production and results in increased buoyancy-dependent mechanical power requirements for swimming and increased optimal swim speeds. The primary source of buoyancy, the lipid-rich liver, offers only limited compensation for increased negative buoyancy as a result of decreasing water density; maintaining the same submerged weight would involve increasing the liver volume by very large amounts: 3- to 4-fold in scenarios where liver density is also reduced to currently observed minimal levels and 8-fold without any changes in liver density. The first data on body density from two species of elasmobranch occurring in freshwater (the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas, Müller and Henle 1839, and the largetooth sawfish Pristis pristis, Linnaeus 1758) support this hypothesis, showing similar liver sizes as marine forms but lower liver densities, but the greatest negative buoyancies of any elasmobranch studied to date. Our data suggest that the mechanical challenges associated with buoyancy control may have hampered the invasion of freshwater habitats in elasmobranchs, highlighting an additional key factor that may govern the predisposition of marine organisms to successfully establish in freshwater habitats. PMID:25573824

  5. A history of urine microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since. PMID:26079823

  6. Lipid and stress dependence of amphotericin B ion selective channels in sterol-free membranes.

    PubMed

    Ruckwardt, T; Scott, A; Scott, J; Mikulecky, P; Hartsel, S C

    1998-07-17

    The idea that amphotericin B (AmB) may not require sterols to form ion selective channels has recently been criticized on the grounds that egg phospholipids commonly used in experiments may contain small amounts of sterol which associate with AmB to form AmB/sterol pore channel structures. It was recently shown in this laboratory that modest osmotic stress can enhance the formation of AmB channels in sterol-free egg phosphatidylcholine (eggPC) membranes. We have tested AmB's ability to form ion channels/defects in synthetic palmitoyl oleoyl (POPC), dieicosenyl (DEPC) and natural eggPC osmotically stressed large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) using pyranine fluorescence detected ion/H+ exchange. These sterol-free POPC LUV exhibit greatly increased sensitivity to cation selective AmB channel formation when osmotically stressed; even more than eggPC. Under these stressed conditions, AmB activity was observed at [AmB]/POPC ratios as low as 3.5x10(-4), corresponding to about 34 AmB molecules/vesicle. DEPC vesicles were almost completely unresponsive, demonstrating a strong bilayer thickness dependence. These results prove conclusively that AmB can form sterol-free channels and do so within therapeutic concentration ranges (>0.5-10x10(-6) M) in a stress-dependent manner. This phenomenon may allow us to use osmotic stress changes in simple model systems to spectroscopically isolate and characterize the thus-far elusive AmB channel forming aggregate. In addition, this stress dependence may be responsible for the potentiation of renal toxicity of AmB in the ascending branch of the loop of Henle which is under greatest osmotic stress. PMID:9675313

  7. Parallel scanning light ophthalmoscope for retinal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vienola, Kari V.; Damodaran, Mathivanan; Braaf, Boy; Vermeer, Koenraad A.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy is a confocal imaging technique that allows high-contrast imaging of retinal structures. Rapid, involuntary eye movements during image acquisition are known to cause artefacts and high-speed imaging of the retina is crucial to avoid them. To reach higher imaging speeds we propose to illuminate the retina with multiple parallel lines simultaneously within the whole field of view (FOV) instead of a single focused line that is raster-scanned. These multiple line patterns were generated with a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and by shifting the line pattern, the whole FOV is scanned. The back-scattered light from the retinal layers is collected via a beam-splitter and imaged onto an area camera. After every pattern from the sequence is projected, the final image is generated by combining these back-reflected illumination patterns. Image processing is used to remove the background and out-of-focus light. Acquired pattern images are stacked, pixels sorted according to intensity and finally bottom layer of the stack is subtracted from the top layer to produce confocal image. The obtained confocal images are rich in structure, showing the small blood vessels around the macular avascular zone and the bow tie of Henle's fiber layer in the fovea. In the optic nerve head images the large arteries/veins, optic cup rim and cup itself are visualized. Images have good contrast and lateral resolution with a 10°×10° FOV. The initial results are promising for the development of high-speed retinal imaging using spatial light modulators such as the DMD.

  8. Sympathetic nerve-derived ATP regulates renal medullary vasa recta diameter via pericyte cells: a role for regulating medullary blood flow?

    PubMed

    Crawford, C; Wildman, S S P; Kelly, M C; Kennedy-Lydon, T M; Peppiatt-Wildman, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pericyte cells are now known to be a novel locus of blood flow control, being able to regulate capillary diameter via their unique morphology and expression of contractile proteins. We have previously shown that exogenous ATP causes constriction of vasa recta via renal pericytes, acting at a variety of membrane bound P2 receptors on descending vasa recta (DVR), and therefore may be able to regulate medullary blood flow (MBF). Regulation of MBF is essential for appropriate urine concentration and providing essential oxygen and nutrients to this region of high, and variable, metabolic demand. Various sources of endogenous ATP have been proposed, including from epithelial, endothelial, and red blood cells in response to stimuli such as mechanical stimulation, local acidosis, hypoxia, and exposure to various hormones. Extensive sympathetic innervation of the nephron has previously been shown, however the innervation reported has focused around the proximal and distal tubules, and ascending loop of Henle. We hypothesize that sympathetic nerves are an additional source of ATP acting at renal pericytes and therefore regulate MBF. Using a rat live kidney slice model in combination with video imaging and confocal microscopy techniques we firstly show sympathetic nerves in close proximity to vasa recta pericytes in both the outer and inner medulla. Secondly, we demonstrate pharmacological stimulation of sympathetic nerves in situ (by tyramine) evokes pericyte-mediated vasoconstriction of vasa recta capillaries; inhibited by the application of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin. Lastly, tyramine-evoked vasoconstriction of vasa recta by pericytes is significantly less than ATP-evoked vasoconstriction. Sympathetic innervation may provide an additional level of functional regulation in the renal medulla that is highly localized. It now needs to be determined under which physiological/pathophysiological circumstances that sympathetic innervation of renal pericytes is important

  9. Parallel down-regulation of chloride channel CLC-K1 and barttin mRNA in the thin ascending limb of the rat nephron by furosemide.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Konrad; Meier-Meitinger, Martina; Bergler, Tobias; Castrop, Hayo; Vitzthum, Helga; Riegger, Günter A J; Kurtz, Armin; Krämer, Bernhard K

    2003-09-01

    In the past few years the pivotal role of kidney Cl(-)channels (ClC-K) channels in maintaining salt and water homeostasis in the kidney has been established. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the loop diuretic furosemide on the gene expression of the kidney chloride channel ClC-K1 and its recently described functional subunit barttin. Male Sprague Dawley rats received the loop diuretic furosemide (12 mg/kg/day) for 6 days. Rats had free access to 0.9% NaCl, 0.1%KCl solution to prevent volume depletion. Localisation and regulation of ClC-K1 and barttin mRNA was analysed by RNase protection and in situ hybridisation. Nephron-specific regulation was investigated by microdissection and real-time PCR quantification. In furosemide-treated rats ClC-K1 mRNA decreased to half in the inner medulla. In the renal cortex and outer medulla ClC-K1 mRNA levels were weak and did not change. Under furosemide treatment barttin mRNA was regulated in parallel with ClC-K1 mRNA. A significant mRNA decrease occurred after furosemide treatment in inner medulla (0.50 fold), whereas cortical and outer medulla levels remained unaffected. (35)S in situ hybridisation confirmed the regulation and distribution seen in the RNase protection assay experiments. Microdissection of the inner medullary collecting duct and thin limb of Henle's loop followed by real-time PCR revealed that CLC-K1 and barttin mRNA regulation in inner medulla was limited to the thin limb; mRNA levels in collecting ducts were not affected by furosemide treatment. Our findings imply that during furosemide treatment selective down-regulation of ClC-K1 and barttin mRNAs in thin limb plays a role in maintaining salt and water homeostasis. PMID:12759757

  10. Expression of human beta-defensins 1 and 2 in kidneys with chronic bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Jan; Retz, Margitta; Harder, Jürgen; Krams, Matthias; Kellner, Udo; Hartmann, Julia; Hohgräwe, Kerstin; Raffenberg, Uta; Gerber, Martin; Loch, Tillmann; Weichert-Jacobsen, Klaus; Stöckle, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Background Constitutive expression and localization of antimicrobial human β-defensin-1 (HBD-1) in human kidneys as a potential mechanism of antimicrobial defense has been previously reported. Inducible expression of human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) has been described in various epithelial organs but not for the urogenital tract. Methods We investigated the gene- and protein expression of HBD-1 and HBD-2 by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry in 15 normal human kidney samples and 15 renal tissues with chronic bacterial infection. Additionally, cell culture experiments were performed to study HBD gene expression by real-time RT-PCR in response to inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β as well as lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria. Results Constitutive HBD-1 gene- and protein expression was detected in normal renal tissue and kidneys with chronic infection. As a novel finding, inducible HBD-2 gene- and protein expression was demonstrated in tubulus epithelia with chronic infection but not in normal renal tissue. In pyelonephritic kidneys HBD-1 and HBD-2 expression showed a similar pattern of localizaton in distal tubules, loops of Henle and in collecting ducts of the kidney. Furthermore, real-time RT-PCR of kidney derived cell lines stimulated with inflammatory agents TNF-α, IL-1β and LPS revealed a strong increase in relative HBD-2 transcription level and also a slight increase in relative HBD-1 transcription level. Conclusions Upregulated HBD-2 expression in renal tubulus epithelium indicates a role of a wider range of human defensins for antimicrobial host defense in the urogenital tract than previously recognized. PMID:12238953

  11. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for a domain antibody in mice using the two-pore theory.

    PubMed

    Sepp, Armin; Berges, Alienor; Sanderson, Andrew; Meno-Tetang, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Domain antibodies (dAbs) are the smallest antigen-binding fragments of immunoglobulins. To date, there is limited insight into the pharmacokinetics of dAbs, especially their distribution into tissues and elimination. The objective of this work was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to investigate the biodisposition of a non-specific dAb construct in mice. Following a single IV administration of 10 mg/kg dummy dAb protein to twenty four female mice, frequent blood samples were collected and whole body lateral sections were analyzed by quantitative whole-body autoradiography. The model is based on the two-pore hypothesis of extravasation where organ-specific isogravimetric flow rates (Jorg,ISO) and permeability-surface area products (PSorg) are expressed as linear functions of the lymph flow rate (Jorg) and the kidney compartment is modified to account for glomerular filtration of dAb. As a result, only Jorg, glomerular filtration coefficient and the combined volume of Bowman's capsule, proximal and distal renal tubules and loop of Henle were optimized by fitting simultaneously all blood and organ data to the model. Our model captures the pharmacokinetic profiles of dAb in blood and all organs and shows that extravasation into interstitial space is a predominantly diffusion-driven process. The parameter values were estimated with good precision (%RMSE ≈ 30) and low cross-correlation (R(2) < 0.2). We developed a flexible model with a limited parameter number that may be applied to other biotherapeutics after adapting for size-related effects on extravasation and renal elimination processes. PMID:25577033

  12. New insights into diuretic use in patients with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Christopher S

    2002-03-01

    Patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) or the nephrotic syndrome frequently manifest diuretic resistance. Factors limiting diuretic responsiveness in patients with CRI may include a reduced basal level of fractional Na(+) reabsorption that places an upper limit on diuretic response, and enhanced NaCl reabsorption in downstream segments, combined with a reduced delivery of diuretic to the kidney. Diuretics are secreted by the recently characterized organic anion transporters (OATs), which are expressed in proximal tubule cells. Secretion may be inhibited by retained organic anions, urate, or acidosis. These limitations necessitate an increased diuretic dosage, up to a defined ceiling level, and consideration of the use of a nonrenally metabolized loop diuretic rather than furosemide. Diuretic responsiveness in patients with the nephrotic syndrome is limited by avid Na(+) reabsorption by the terminal nephron. Experimental studies have shown that a reduced serum albumin concentration can increase the volume of distribution of loop diuretics, reduce their tubular secretion, and enhance the inactivation of furosemide within the kidney by glucuronidization. Binding of loop diuretics can curtail their action in the loop of Henle. Recent clinical investigations have challenged the importance of some of these mechanisms that were identified in animal models. Strategies to improve loop diuretic responsiveness include increasing diuretic dosage, concurrent use of a thiazide diuretic to inhibit downstream NaCl reabsorption and attempts to maximally reduce albumin excretion. Strategies to limit albumin excretion include the use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker and appropriate limitation of protein intake. These measures are more logical, effective, and less expensive than infusion of albumin solutions. PMID:11856788

  13. The Effects of Angiotensin II on Renal Water and Electrolyte Excretion in Normal and Caval Dogs*

    PubMed Central

    Porush, Jerome G.; Kaloyanides, George J.; Cacciaguida, Roy J.; Rosen, Stanley M.

    1967-01-01

    to the ascending limb of Henle's loop and the proximal tubule. PMID:16695930

  14. The Effect of Cone Opsin Mutations on Retinal Structure and the Integrity of the Photoreceptor Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Gardner, Jessica C.; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Nordgren, Rick; Genead, Mohamed; Connor, Thomas B.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Sharon, Dror; Hunt, David M.; Banin, Eyal; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Moore, Anthony T.; Williams, David R.; Fishman, Gerald; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen; Michaelides, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate retinal structure and photoreceptor mosaic integrity in subjects with OPN1LW and OPN1MW mutations. Methods. Eleven subjects were recruited, eight of whom have been previously described. Cone and rod density was measured using images of the photoreceptor mosaic obtained from an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). Total retinal thickness, inner retinal thickness, and outer nuclear layer plus Henle fiber layer (ONL+HFL) thickness were measured using cross-sectional spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images. Molecular genetic analyses were performed to characterize the OPN1LW/OPN1MW gene array. Results. While disruptions in retinal lamination and cone mosaic structure were observed in all subjects, genotype-specific differences were also observed. For example, subjects with “L/M interchange” mutations resulting from intermixing of ancestral OPN1LW and OPN1MW genes had significant residual cone structure in the parafovea (∼25% of normal), despite widespread retinal disruption that included a large foveal lesion and thinning of the parafoveal inner retina. These subjects also reported a later-onset, progressive loss of visual function. In contrast, subjects with the C203R missense mutation presented with congenital blue cone monochromacy, with retinal lamination defects being restricted to the ONL+HFL and the degree of residual cone structure (8% of normal) being consistent with that expected for the S-cone submosaic. Conclusions. The photoreceptor phenotype associated with OPN1LW and OPN1MW mutations is highly variable. These findings have implications for the potential restoration of visual function in subjects with opsin mutations. Our study highlights the importance of high-resolution phenotyping to characterize cellular structure in inherited retinal disease; such information will be critical for selecting patients most likely to respond to therapeutic intervention and for establishing a baseline for

  15. Constitutive expression of the Vi polysaccharide capsular antigen in attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar typhi oral vaccine strain CVD 909.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y; Noriega, F R; Galen, J E; Barry, E; Levine, M M

    2000-08-01

    Live oral Ty21a and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccines provide significant protection against typhoid fever, albeit by distinct immune mechanisms. Vi stimulates serum immunoglobulin G Vi antibodies, whereas Ty21a, which does not express Vi, elicits humoral and cell-mediated immune responses other than Vi antibodies. Protection may be enhanced if serum Vi antibody as well as cell-mediated and humoral responses can be stimulated. Disappointingly, several new attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi oral vaccines (e.g., CVD 908-htrA and Ty800) that elicit serum O and H antibody and cell-mediated responses following a single dose do not stimulate serum Vi antibody. Vi expression is regulated in response to environmental signals such as osmolarity by controlling the transcription of tviA in the viaB locus. To investigate if Vi antibodies can be stimulated if Vi expression is rendered constitutive, we replaced P(tviA) in serovar Typhi vaccine CVD 908-htrA with the constitutive promoter P(tac), resulting in CVD 909. CVD 909 expresses Vi even under high-osmolarity conditions and is less invasive for Henle 407 cells. In mice immunized with a single intranasal dose, CVD 909 was more immunogenic than CVD 908-htrA in eliciting serum Vi antibodies (geometric mean titer of 160 versus 49, P = 0.0007), whereas O antibody responses were virtually identical (geometric mean titer of 87 versus 80). In mice challenged intraperitoneally with wild-type serovar Typhi 4 weeks after a single intranasal immunization, the mortality of those immunized with CVD 909 (3 of 8) was significantly lower than that of control mice (10 of 10, P = 0.043) or mice given CVD 908-htrA (9 of 10, P = 0.0065). PMID:10899868

  16. Correlating Photoreceptor Mosaic Structure to Clinical Findings in Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razeen, Moataz M.; Cooper, Robert F.; Langlo, Christopher S.; Goldberg, Mara R.; Wilk, Melissa A.; Han, Dennis P.; Connor, Thomas B.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Collison, Frederick T.; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Stepien, Kimberly E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate a method for correlating photoreceptor mosaic structure with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and microperimetry findings in patients with Stargardt disease. Methods A total of 14 patients with clinically diagnosed Stargardt disease were imaged using confocal and split-detection adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy. Cone photoreceptors were identified manually in a band along the temporal meridian. Resulting values were compared to a normative database (n = 9) to generate cone density deviation (CDD) maps. Manual measurement of outer nuclear layer plus Henle fiber layer (ONL+HFL) thickness was performed, in addition to determination of the presence of ellipsoid zone (EZ) and interdigitation zone (IZ) bands on OCT. These results, along with microperimetry data, were overlaid with the CDD maps. Results Wide variation in foveal structure and CDD maps was seen within this small group. Disruption of ONL+HFL and/or IZ band was seen in all patients, with EZ band preservation in regions with low cone density in 38% of locations analyzed. Normality of retinal lamellar structure on OCT corresponded with cone density and visual function at 50/78 locations analyzed. Outer retinal tubulations containing photoreceptor-like structures were observed in 3 patients. Conclusions The use of CDD color-coded maps enables direct comparison of cone mosaic local density with other measures of retinal structure and function. Larger normative datasets and improved tools for automation of image alignment are needed. Translational Relevance The approach described facilitates comparison of complex multimodal data sets from patients with inherited retinal degeneration, and can be expanded to incorporate other structural imaging or functional testing. PMID:26981328

  17. Fabry nephropathy: a review - how can we optimize the management of Fabry nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Waldek, Stephen; Feriozzi, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare, X-linked, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Complete or partial deficiency in this enzyme leads to intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and related glycosphingolipids in many cell types throughout the body, including the kidney. Progressive accumulation of Gb3 in podocytes, epithelial cells and the tubular cells of the distal tubule and loop of Henle contribute to the renal symptoms of Fabry disease, which manifest as proteinuria and reduced glomerular filtration rate leading to chronic kidney disease and progression to end-stage renal disease. Early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment of Fabry renal disease is an important facet of disease management. Initiating treatment with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT; agalsidase alfa, Replagal®, Shire; agalsidase beta, Fabrazyme®, Genzyme) as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent complications of the disease, may be beneficial in stabilizing renal function or slowing its decline. Early initiation of ERT may also be more effective than initiating therapy in patients with more advanced disease. Several strategies are required to complement the use of ERT and treat the myriad of associated symptoms and organ involvements. In particular, patients with renal Fabry disease are at risk of cardiovascular events, such as high blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmias and stroke. This review discusses the management of renal involvement in Fabry disease, including diagnosis, treatments, and follow-up, and explores recent advances in the use of biomarkers to assist with diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. PMID:24886109

  18. Furosemide and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity, in man.

    PubMed

    Palermo, M; Armanini, D; Shackleton, C H L; Sorba, G; Cossu, M; Roitman, E; Scaroni, C; Delitala, G

    2002-09-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors possess the same affinity for aldosterone and for cortisol and preferential binding of aldosterone is modulated by the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) enzyme, which converts cortisol to its inactive metabolite cortisone. Several endogenous or exogenous compounds able to inhibit the enzyme have been described and, as a consequence, produce the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) characterized by hypertension, hypokalemia, volume repletion and suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. High doses of furosemide, a diuretic that works in the luminal surface of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, have been reported to inhibit 11 beta-OHSD activity to the same extent as licorice in vivo and in vitro, in rat. The aim of our study was to verify the effect of the drug on 11 beta-OHSD activity in man at the doses currently used in clinical practice. We tested the activity of 11 beta-OHSD following both acute and protracted administration of furosemide. In the acute study, the drug was administered at low (40 mg i.v. in bolo) and high doses (infusion of 10 mg/kg bw i.v for six hours); the protracted furosemide administration consisted in 50 mg/day for 20 days, by mouth. The ratios between the cortisol metabolites tetrahydrocortisol plus allo-tetrahydrocortisol to tetra-hydrocortisone and urinary free cortisol to urinary free cortisone were used to measure the activity of 11 beta-OHSD. Urinary cortisol, cortisone and their metabolites were tested by a gas-chromatographic/mass spectrometric method. Neither acute nor prolonged administration of furosemide did affect the activity of 11 beta-OHSD although the drug was able to modify plasma aldosterone and PRA secretion and to determine hypokalemia. Our results suggest that furosemide does not play a significant role in 11 beta-OHSD modulation in humans, at least at the dosage used in clinical practice. PMID:12373630

  19. Specific renal parenchymal-derived urinary extracellular vesicles identify age-associated structural changes in living donor kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Anne E.; Lam, Wing; Rule, Andrew D.; Denic, Aleksandar; Lieske, John C.; Miller, Virginia M.; Larson, Joseph J.; Kremers, Walter K.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive tests to identify age and early disease-associated pathology within the kidney are needed. Specific populations of urinary extracellular vesicles (EVs) could potentially be used for such a diagnostic test. Random urine samples were obtained from age- and sex-stratified living kidney donors before kidney donation. A biopsy of the donor kidney was obtained at the time of transplantation to identify nephron hypertrophy (larger glomerular volume, cortex per glomerulus and mean profile tubular area) and nephrosclerosis (% fibrosis, % glomerulosclerosis and arteriosclerosis). Renal parenchymal-derived EVs in cell-free urine were quantified by digital flow cytometry. The relationship between these EV populations and structural pathology on the kidney biopsy was assessed. Clinical characteristics of the kidney donors (n=138, age range: 20–70 years, 50% women) were within the normative range. Overall, urine from women contained more EVs than that from men. The number of exosomes, juxtaglomerular cells and podocyte marker–positive EVs decreased (p<0.05) with increasing age. There were fewer total EVs as well as EVs positive for mesangial cell, parietal cell, descending limb of Henle's loop (simple squamous epithelium), collecting tubule-intercalated cell and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 markers (p<0.05) in persons with nephron hypertrophy. The number of EVs positive for intercellular adhesion molecule-1, juxtaglomerular cell, podocyte, parietal cell, proximal tubular epithelial cell, distal tubular epithelial cell and collecting duct cells were fewer (p<0.05) in persons with nephrosclerosis. EVs carrying markers of cells from the renal pelvis epithelium did not associate with any indices of nephron hypertrophy or nephrosclerosis. Therefore, specific populations of EVs derived from cells of the glomerulus and nephron associate with underlying kidney structural changes. Further validation of these findings in other cohorts is needed to determine their

  20. Claudin-16 affects transcellular Cl− secretion in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    Günzel, Dorothee; Amasheh, Salah; Pfaffenbach, Sandra; Richter, Jan F; Kausalya, P Jaya; Hunziker, Walter; Fromm, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Claudin-16 (paracellin-1) is a tight junction protein localized mainly in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and also in the distal nephron. Its defect causes familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. This had been taken as an indication that claudin-16 conveys paracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ transport; however, evidence is still conflicting. We studied paracellular ion permeabilties as well as effects of claudin-16 on the driving forces for passive ion movement. MDCK-C7 cells were stably transfected with wild-type (wt) and mutant (R146T, T233R) claudin-16. Results indicated that paracellular permeability to Mg2+ but not to Ca2+ is increased in cells transfected with wt compared to mutant claudin-16 and control cells. Increased basolateral Mg2+ concentration activated a transcellular Cl− current which was greatly enhanced in cells transfected with wt and T233R claudin-16, as compared to R146T claudin-16-transfected or control cells. This current was triggered by the basolateral calcium-sensing receptor causing Ca2+ release from internal stores, thus activating apical Ca2+-sensitive Cl− channels and basolateral Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels. Immunohistochemical data suggest that the Cl− channel involved is bestrophin. We conclude that claudin-16 itself possesses only moderate paracellular Mg2+ permeability but governs transcellular Cl− currents by interaction with apical Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, presumably bestrophin. As the transepithelial voltage generated by such a current alters the driving force for all ions, this may be the major mechanism to regulate Mg2+ and Ca2+ absorption in the kidney. PMID:19528248

  1. Identification of Anchor Genes during Kidney Development Defines Ontological Relationships, Molecular Subcompartments and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Chiu, Han Sheng; Taylor, Darrin; Tang, Dave T. P.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Little, Melissa H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of the mammalian kidney is well conserved from mouse to man. Despite considerable temporal and spatial data on gene expression in mammalian kidney development, primarily in rodent species, there is a paucity of genes whose expression is absolutely specific to a given anatomical compartment and/or developmental stage, defined here as ‘anchor’ genes. We previously generated an atlas of gene expression in the developing mouse kidney using microarray analysis of anatomical compartments collected via laser capture microdissection. Here, this data is further analysed to identify anchor genes via stringent bioinformatic filtering followed by high resolution section in situ hybridisation performed on 200 transcripts selected as specific to one of 11 anatomical compartments within the midgestation mouse kidney. A total of 37 anchor genes were identified across 6 compartments with the early proximal tubule being the compartment richest in anchor genes. Analysis of minimal and evolutionarily conserved promoter regions of this set of 25 anchor genes identified enrichment of transcription factor binding sites for Hnf4a and Hnf1b, RbpJ (Notch signalling), PPARγ:RxRA and COUP-TF family transcription factors. This was reinforced by GO analyses which also identified these anchor genes as targets in processes including epithelial proliferation and proximal tubular function. As well as defining anchor genes, this large scale validation of gene expression identified a further 92 compartment-enriched genes able to subcompartmentalise key processes during murine renal organogenesis spatially or ontologically. This included a cohort of 13 ureteric epithelial genes revealing previously unappreciated compartmentalisation of the collecting duct system and a series of early tubule genes suggesting that segmentation into proximal tubule, loop of Henle and distal tubule does not occur until the onset of glomerular vascularisation. Overall, this study serves to illuminate

  2. cAMP-binding proteins in medullary tubules from rat kidney: effect of ADH

    SciTech Connect

    Gapstur, S.M.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Little is known of the regulatory steps in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) on the renal epithelium, subsequent to the cAMP generation. We studied cAMP-binding proteins in the medullary collecting tubule (MCT) and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (MTAL) microdissected from the rat kidney by use of photoaffinity labeling. Microdissected tubules were homogenized and photoaffinity labeled by incubation with 1 microM 32P-labeled 8-azido-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (N3-8-(32P)-cAMP); the incorporated 32P was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Both in MCT and MTAL preparations, the analyses showed incorporation of N3-8-(32P)cAMP into two bands (Mr = 49,000 and Mr = 55,000) that comigrated with standards of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits RI and RII. In MCT, most of the 32P (80%) was incorporated into RI, whereas in MTAL the 32P incorporated into RI and RII was equivalent. When freshly dissected MCT segments were incubated with 10(-12)-10(-6) M AVP, the subsequent photoaffinity labeling of RI with N3-8-(32P)cAMP was markedly diminished in a dose-dependent manner compared with controls. Our results suggest that cAMP binds in MCT and MTAL to regulatory subunits RI and RII of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, in MCT the dominant type of cAMP-dependent protein kinase appears to be type I. The outlined procedure is suitable to indirectly measure the occupancy of RI by endogenous cAMP generated in MCT cells in response to physiological levels (10(-12) M) of AVP.

  3. Alternative channels for urea in the inner medulla of the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Nawata, C Michele; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-12-01

    The ascending thin limbs (ATLs) and lower descending thin limbs (DTLs) of Henle's loop in the inner medulla of the rat are highly permeable to urea, and yet no urea transporters have been identified in these sections. We hypothesized that novel, yet-unidentified transporters in these tubule segments could explain the high urea permeability. cDNAs encoding for Na(+)-glucose transporter 1a (SGLT1a), Na(+)-glucose transporter 1 (NaGLT1), urea transporter (UT)-A2c, and UT-A2d were isolated and cloned from the Munich-Wistar rat inner medulla. SGLT1a is a novel NH2-terminal truncated variant of SGLT1. NaGLT1 is a Na(+)-dependent glucose transporter primarily located in the proximal tubules and not previously described in the thin limbs. UT-A2c and UT-A2d are novel variants of UT-A2. UT-A2c is truncated at the COOH terminus, and UT-A2d has one exon skipped. When rats underwent water restriction for 72 h, mRNA levels of SGLT1a increased in ATLs, NaGLT1 levels increased in both ATLs and DTLs, and UT-A2c increased in ATLs. [(14)C]urea uptake assays performed on Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing these proteins revealed that despite having structural differences from their full-length versions, SGLT1a, UT-A2c, and UT-A2d enhanced urea uptake. NaGLT1 also facilitated urea uptake. Uptakes were Na(+) independent and inhibitable by phloretin and/or phloridzin. Our data indicate that there are several alternative channels for urea in the rat inner medulla that could potentially contribute to the high urea permeabilities in thin limb segments. PMID:26423860

  4. Everything we always wanted to know about furosemide but were afraid to ask.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohua; Dorhout Mees, Evert; Vos, Pieter; Hamza, Shereen; Braam, Branko

    2016-05-01

    Furosemide is a widely used, potent natriuretic drug, which inhibits the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC)-2 in the ascending limb of the loop of Henle applied to reduce extracellular fluid volume expansion in heart and kidney disease. Undesirable consequences of furosemide, such as worsening of kidney function and unpredictable effects on sodium balance, led to this critical evaluation of how inhibition of NKCC affects renal and cardiovascular physiology. This evaluation reveals important knowledge gaps, involving furosemide as a drug, the function of NKCC2 (and NKCC1), and renal and systemic indirect effects of NKCC inhibition. Regarding renal effects, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate could become compromised by activation of tubuloglomerular feedback or by renin release, particularly if renal function is already compromised. Modulation of the intrarenal renin angiotensin system, however, is ill-defined. Regarding systemic effects, vasodilation followed by nonspecific NKCC inhibition and changes in venous compliance are not well understood. Repetitive administration of furosemide induces short-term (braking phenomenon, acute diuretic resistance) and long-term (chronic diuretic resistance) adaptations, of which the mechanisms are not well known. Modulation of NKCC2 expression and activity in kidney and heart failure is ill-defined. Lastly, furosemide's effects on cutaneous sodium stores and on uric acid levels could be beneficial or detrimental. Concluding, a considerable knowledge gap is identified regarding a potent drug with a relatively specific renal target, NKCC2, and renal and systemic actions. Resolving these questions would increase the understanding of NKCCs and their actions and improve rational use of furosemide in pathophysiology of fluid volume expansion. PMID:26911852

  5. ER stress and basement membrane defects combine to cause glomerular and tubular renal disease resulting from Col4a1 mutations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Frances E.; Bailey, Matthew A.; Murray, Lydia S.; Lu, Yinhui; McNeilly, Sarah; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Lennon, Rachel; Sado, Yoshikazu; Brownstein, David G.; Mullins, John J.; Kadler, Karl E.; Van Agtmael, Tom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Collagen IV is a major component of basement membranes, and mutations in COL4A1, which encodes collagen IV alpha chain 1, cause a multisystemic disease encompassing cerebrovascular, eye and kidney defects. However, COL4A1 renal disease remains poorly characterized and its pathomolecular mechanisms are unknown. We show that Col4a1 mutations in mice cause hypotension and renal disease, including proteinuria and defects in Bowman's capsule and the glomerular basement membrane, indicating a role for Col4a1 in glomerular filtration. Impaired sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle and distal nephron despite elevated aldosterone levels indicates that tubular defects contribute to the hypotension, highlighting a novel role for the basement membrane in vascular homeostasis by modulation of the tubular response to aldosterone. Col4a1 mutations also cause diabetes insipidus, whereby the tubular defects lead to polyuria associated with medullary atrophy and a subsequent reduction in the ability to upregulate aquaporin 2 and concentrate urine. Moreover, haematuria, haemorrhage and vascular basement membrane defects confirm an important vascular component. Interestingly, although structural and compositional basement membrane defects occurred in the glomerulus and Bowman's capsule, no tubular basement membrane defects were detected. By contrast, medullary atrophy was associated with chronic ER stress, providing evidence for cell-type-dependent molecular mechanisms of Col4a1 mutations. These data show that both basement membrane defects and ER stress contribute to Col4a1 renal disease, which has important implications for the development of treatment strategies for collagenopathies. PMID:26839400

  6. Eutetrarhynchid trypanorhynchs (Cestoda) from elasmobranchs off Argentina, including the description of Dollfusiella taminii sp. n. and Parachristianella damiani sp. n., and amended description of Dollfusiella vooremi (São Clemente et Gomes, 1989).

    PubMed

    Menoret, Adriana; Ivanov, Verónica A

    2014-10-01

    During a parasitological survey of teleosts and elasmobranchs in the Argentine Sea, 3 species of eutetrarhynchids were collected from the batoids Myliobatis goodei Garman and Psammobatis bergi Marini, and the shark Mustelus schmitti Springer. The specimens collected from Mu. schmitti were identified as Dollfusiela vooremi (Sπo Clemente et Gomes, 1989), whereas the specimens from My. goodei and Ps. bergi resulted in new species of Dollfusiella Campbell et Beveridge, 1994 and Parachristianella Dollfus, 1946, respectively. Dollfusiella taminii sp. n. from Ps. bergi is characterised by a distinct basal armature with basal swelling and a heteroacanthous homeomorphous metabasal armature with 7-9 falcate hooks per principal row. Parachristianella damiani sp. n. from My. goodei lacks a distinct basal armature, having 2-3 initial rows of uncinate hooks, a heteroacanthous heteromorphous metabasal armature with the first principal row of small hooks, followed by rows with 10-14 large hooks. This is the first record of Parachristianella in the southwestern Atlantic. The amended description of D. vooremi includes the detailed description of the tentacular armature, including SEM micrographs of all tentacular surfaces. This species is characterised by a basal armature consisting of rows of uncinate and falcate hooks, a basal swelling and a metabasal armature with billhooks on the antibothrial surface and uncinate hooks on the bothrial surface. The scolex peduncle of D. vooremi is covered with enlarged spinitriches. This species is restricted to carcharhiniform sharks, since the report of D. vooremi in Sympterygia bonapartii Müller et Henle off Bahia Blanca (Argentina) is dubious. PMID:25549498

  7. Correlation of Outer Nuclear Layer Thickness With Cone Density Values in Patients With Retinitis Pigmentosa and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Menghini, Moreno; Lujan, Brandon J.; Zayit-Soudry, Shiri; Syed, Reema; Porco, Travis C.; Bayabo, Kristine; Carroll, Joseph; Roorda, Austin; Duncan, Jacque L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We studied the correlation between outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness and cone density in normal eyes and eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans were acquired using a displaced pupil entry position of the scanning beam to distinguish Henle's fiber layer from the ONL in 20 normal eyes (10 subjects) and 12 eyes with RP (7 patients). Cone photoreceptors were imaged using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. The ONL thickness and cone density were measured at 0.5° intervals along the horizontal meridian through the fovea nasally and temporally. The ONL thickness and cone density were correlated using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient r. Results. Cone densities averaged over the central 6° were lower in eyes with RP than normal, but showed high variability in both groups. The ONL thickness and cone density were significantly correlated when all retinal eccentricities were combined (r = 0.74); the correlation for regions within 0.5° to 1.5° eccentricity was stronger (r = 0.67) than between 1.5° and 3.0° eccentricity (r = 0.23). Although cone densities were lower between 0.5° and 1.5° in eyes with RP, ONL thickness measures at identical retinal locations were similar in the two groups (P = 0.31), and interindividual variation was high for ONL and cone density measures. Although ONL thickness and retinal eccentricity were important predictors of cone density, eccentricity was over 3 times more important. Conclusions. The ONL thickness and cone density were correlated in normal eyes and eyes with RP, but both were strongly correlated with retinal eccentricity, precluding estimation of cone density from ONL thickness. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00254605.) PMID:25515570

  8. Higher Activity of the Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Contributes to Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Sandeep S; Mastropaolo, Lucas A; Murchie, Ryan; Griffiths, Christopher; Thöni, Cornelia; Elkadri, Abdul; Xu, Wei; Mack, Amanda; Walters, Thomas; Guo, Conghui; Mack, David; Huynh, Hien; Baksh, Shairaz; Silverberg, Mark S; Brumell, John H; Snapper, Scott B; Muise, Aleixo M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The NOS2 gene encodes for the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), responsible for nitric oxide (NO) production, which contributes to antimicrobial and antipathogenic activities. Higher levels of both iNOS and NO-induced damage have been observed in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. NOS2 may have a role in a specific subset of IBD patients with severe and/or extensive colitis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the role of NOS2 in such a subset, very early onset IBD (VEO-IBD). METHODS: Seventeen tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NOS2 gene were successfully genotyped in VEO-IBD patients. Genetic associations were replicated in an independent VEO-IBD cohort. Functional analysis for iNOS activity was performed on the most significantly associated functional variant. RESULTS: The NOS2 rs2297518 SNP was found to be associated in VEO-IBD in two independent cohorts. Upon combined analysis, a coding variant (S608L) showed the strongest association with VEO-IBD (Pcombined=1.13 × 10−6, OR (odds ratio)=3.398 (95% CI (confidence interval) 2.02–5.717)) as well as associations with VEO-Crohn's disease and VEO-ulcerative colitis (UC). This variant also showed an association with UC diagnosed between 11 and 17 years of age but not with adult-onset IBD (>17 years). B-cell lymphoblastoid cell lines genotyped for the risk variant as well as Henle-407 cells transfected with a plasmid construct with the risk variant showed higher NO production. Colonic biopsies of VEO-IBD patients showed higher immunohistochemical staining of nitrotyrosine, indicating more nitrosative stress and tissue damage. CONCLUSIONS: These studies suggest the importance of iNOS in genetic susceptibility to younger IBD presentation due to higher NO production. PMID:24430113

  9. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-B and its receptor (VEGFR1) in murine heart, lung and kidney.

    PubMed

    Muhl, Lars; Moessinger, Christine; Adzemovic, Milena Z; Dijkstra, Marike H; Nilsson, Ingrid; Zeitelhofer, Manuel; Hagberg, Carolina E; Huusko, Jenni; Falkevall, Annelie; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Eriksson, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, are a serious burden for the health system. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-B has been shown to regulate tissue uptake and accumulation of fatty acids and is thus involved in these metabolic diseases. However, the cell-type-specific expression pattern of Vegfb and its receptor (VEGFR1, gene Flt1) remains unclear. We explore the expression of Vegfb and Flt1 in the murine heart, lung and kidney by utilizing β-galactosidase knock-in mouse models and combining the analysis of reporter gene expression and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, Flt1 heterozygous mice were analyzed with regard to muscular fatty acid accumulation and peripheral insulin sensitivity. Throughout the heart, Vegfb expression was found in cardiomyocytes with a postnatal ventricular shift corresponding to known changes in energy requirements. Vegfb expression was also found in the pulmonary myocardium of the lung and in renal epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, the connecting tubule and the collecting duct. In all analyzed organs, VEGFR1 expression was restricted to endothelial cells. We also show that reduced expression of VEGFR1 resulted in decreased cardiac fatty acid accumulation and increased peripheral insulin sensitivity, possibly as a result of attenuated VEGF-B/VEGFR1 signaling. Our data therefore support a tightly controlled, paracrine signaling mechanism of VEGF-B to VEGFR1. The identified cell-specific expression pattern of Vegfb and Flt1 might form the basis for the development of cell-type-targeted research models and contributes to the understanding of the physiological and pathological role of VEGF-B/VEGFR1 signaling. PMID:26928042

  10. Follistatin-like 1 regulates renal IL-1β expression in cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Adams, Derek C; Karolak, Michele J; Larman, Barry W; Liaw, Lucy; Nolin, James D; Oxburgh, Leif

    2010-12-01

    Follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) is a secreted protein with homology to both Follistatin and the SPARC/BM40 family of matricellular proteins. In this study, we sought to determine the expression patterns of Fstl1 and its cognate receptor Dip2a in the adult, and to assess the consequences of Fstl1 inactivation on development and homeostasis of the kidney. We find that FSTL1 circulates at high levels in both the human and the mouse and that it is also locally expressed in the loop of Henle in the kidney. To begin to understand the in vivo functions of Fstl1, we generated a mouse mutant using a genetrap approach. The hypomorphic Fstl1 genetrap strain displays a strong reduction in FSTL1 expression at the protein level, but it does not show overt developmental defects. FSTL1 has previously been implicated in diverse disease processes as a regulator of inflammatory cytokine expression, and we therefore evaluated the response of the genetrap strain to cisplatin-mediated acute kidney injury, a disease model with highly cytokine-dependent pathology. We find that although TNF-α and Il6 levels are unchanged relative to wild-type, renal Il-1β expression is increased in genetrap mice following cisplatin treatment. Furthermore, histopatological analysis, expression of the tissue injury marker Havcr1, and measurement of serum creatinine demonstrate that reduction of Fstl1 expression sensitizes the kidney to acute cisplatin nephrotoxicity, suggesting a role for FSTL1-mediated Il-1β suppression in protection of the kidney from acute nephrotoxic injury. PMID:20861081

  11. Follistatin-like 1 regulates renal IL-1β expression in cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Derek C.; Karolak, Michele J.; Larman, Barry W.; Liaw, Lucy; Nolin, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) is a secreted protein with homology to both Follistatin and the SPARC/BM40 family of matricellular proteins. In this study, we sought to determine the expression patterns of Fstl1 and its cognate receptor Dip2a in the adult, and to assess the consequences of Fstl1 inactivation on development and homeostasis of the kidney. We find that FSTL1 circulates at high levels in both the human and the mouse and that it is also locally expressed in the loop of Henle in the kidney. To begin to understand the in vivo functions of Fstl1, we generated a mouse mutant using a genetrap approach. The hypomorphic Fstl1 genetrap strain displays a strong reduction in FSTL1 expression at the protein level, but it does not show overt developmental defects. FSTL1 has previously been implicated in diverse disease processes as a regulator of inflammatory cytokine expression, and we therefore evaluated the response of the genetrap strain to cisplatin-mediated acute kidney injury, a disease model with highly cytokine-dependent pathology. We find that although TNF-α and Il6 levels are unchanged relative to wild-type, renal Il-1β expression is increased in genetrap mice following cisplatin treatment. Furthermore, histopatological analysis, expression of the tissue injury marker Havcr1, and measurement of serum creatinine demonstrate that reduction of Fstl1 expression sensitizes the kidney to acute cisplatin nephrotoxicity, suggesting a role for FSTL1-mediated Il-1β suppression in protection of the kidney from acute nephrotoxic injury. PMID:20861081

  12. Levels of synthesis of primate-specific nuclear proteins differ between growth-arrested and proliferating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Celis, J.E.; Madsen, P.; Nielsen, S.; Ratz, G.P.; Lauridsen, J.B.; Celis, A.

    1987-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody that reacts specifically with the proliferation-sensitive nuclear proteins, isoelectric focusing (IEF) 8Z31 (molecular weight (MW), 76,000 charge variants, HeLa protein catalogue number) has been characterized. As determined by indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody stains the nucleolus and nucleoplasm of interphase-cultured cells of primate origin, but does not react with cells of other species. Proteins having similar MWs and isoelectric points as the human or monkey (primates) proteins were not observed in cultured cells of the following species: aves, bat, dog, dolphin, goat, hamster, mink, mouse, pisces, potoroo, rabbit and rat. Quantitative two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoretic analysis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labelled proteins synthesized by normal (quiescent, proliferating) and SV40-transformed human MRC-5 fibroblasts revealed significant differences in the levels of synthesis of both IEF 8Z30 and 8Z31. In quiescent cells the main labelled product corresponded to IEF 8Z31 (ratio IEF 8Z31/8Z30, 2.3), while in the transformed cells the major product was IEF 8Z30 (ratio, 0.62). Normal proliferating fibroblasts exhibited similar levels of both proteins (ratio, 1.21). Combined levels of synthesis of both proteins were 1.50 and 1.20 times as high in the transformed cells as in the quiescent and proliferating cells, respectively. Modulation of the levels of synthesis of these proteins may play a role in cell proliferation.

  13. Copper, zinc and cadmium in benthic organisms from the Java Sea and estuarine and coastal areas around East Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everaarts, J. M.; Boon, J. P.; Kastoro, W.; Fischer, C. V.; Razak, H.; Sumanta, I.

    A study was made of the concentrations of copper, zinc and cadmium in benthic organisms, representing the phyla Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata and Pisces, from the riverine and estuarine areas of the rivers Brantas and Solo (East Java) and the adjacent coastal area. Moreover, an assessment was made of the contamination of the benthic biota with these elements in the Java Sea and Bali Sea. Benthic organisms show a species-specific uptake pattern for each element. Compared to the same type of animals from estuaries and coastal areas in temperate regions of western Europe, the concentrations of cadmium are considerably higher, while copper and zinc concentrations are somewhat lower. There is no general trend in concentration levels of the metals in specimens from rivers, estuaries, coastal zone and open sea. In some groups of organisms ( e.g. shrimp, starfish) the concentrations of copper and zinc are highest in specimens from rivers and estuaries. In contrast, cadmium concentration levels in e.g. crab, shrimp and squid are lowest in riverine and estuarine areas. Significant differences in metal concentrations in these organisms were found between the dry monsoon period (July, August) and the beginning of the wet monsoon (November, December). No relationship existed between the metal concentration of the organisms and the silt fraction of the sediment (grain size < 63 μm) or the bulk sediment.

  14. The Sponge Zygomycale parishii(Bowerbank) and its Endobiotic Fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Luiz; Nalesso, Rosebel

    1996-02-01

    The endobiotic fauna of the sponge Zygomycale parishii(Bowerbank) was studied for 2·5 years at two sites, Ubatuba and São Sebastião, on the northern coast of the State of São Paulo, Brazil. Ninety-two macrofaunal species (over 1 mm long) were identified among which Cnidaria, Turbellaria, Nemertinea, Sipuncula, Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea, Pycnogonida, Echinodermata, Ascidiacea and Pisces were represented. The results obtained on the number of species (species richness), the abundances of different species and faunal composition were related to the physico-biotic characteristics of the study sites. The influence of sample volume and other methodological artifacts on sample characteristics were also examined. The ophiuroid Ophiactis savignyi(Müller & Troschell) was the dominant endobiotic species, comprising 64% of all individuals collected. The São Sebastião endobiotic fauna was more diversified than the Ubatuba endobiotic fauna, possibly due to higher larval recruitment, and to the closeness of Z. parishiito the sea-floor providing a greater possibility for inhabitants of this microhabitat to find and to live inside the sponge.

  15. Across the southern Andes on fin: glacial refugia, drainage reversals and a secondary contact zone revealed by the phylogeographical signal of Galaxias platei in Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Zemlak, Tyler S; Habit, Evelyn M; Walde, Sandra J; Battini, Miguel A; Adams, Emily D M; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2008-12-01

    We employed DNA sequence variation at two mitochondrial (control region, COI) regions from 212 individuals of Galaxias platei (Pisces, Galaxiidae) collected throughout Patagonia (25 lakes/rivers) to examine how Andean orogeny and the climatic cycles throughout the Quaternary affected the genetic diversity and phylogeography of this species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed four deep genealogical lineages which likely represent the initial division of G. platei into eastern and western lineages by Andean uplift, followed by further subdivision of each lineage into separate glacial refugia by repeated Pleistocene glacial cycles. West of the Andes, refugia were likely restricted to the northern region of Patagonia with small relicts in the south, whereas eastern refugia appear to have been much larger and widespread, consisting of separate northern and southern regions that collectively spanned most of Argentinean Patagonia. The retreat of glacial ice following the last glacial maximum allowed re-colonization of central Chile from nonlocal refugia from the north and east, representing a region of secondary contact between all four glacial lineages. Northwestern glacial relicts likely followed pro-glacial lakes into central Chilean Patagonia, whereas catastrophic changes in drainage direction (Atlantic --> Pacific) for several eastern palaeolakes were the likely avenues for invasions from the east. These mechanisms, combined with evidence for recent, rapid and widespread population growth could explain the extensive contemporary distribution of G. platei throughout Patagonia. PMID:19017262

  16. Phylogeography in Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1848) along Two Biogeographical Provinces in the Chilean Coast.

    PubMed

    González-Wevar, Claudio A; Salinas, Pilar; Hüne, Mathias; Segovia, Nicolás I; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Astorga, Marcela; Cañete, Juan I; Poulin, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Major geologic and climatic changes during the Quaternary exerted a major role in shaping past and contemporary distribution of genetic diversity and structure of aquatic organisms in southern South America. In fact, the northern glacial limit along the Pacific coast, an area of major environmental changes in terms of topography, currents, and water salinity, represents a major biogeographic transition for marine and freshwater species. We used mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop) to investigate the consequences of Quaternary glacial cycles over the pattern of genetic diversity and structure of G. maculatus (Pisces: Galaxiidae) along two biogeographical provinces in the Chilean coast. Extreme levels of genetic diversity and strong phylogeographic structure characterize the species suggesting a low amount of influence of the last glacial cycle over its demography. However, we recognized contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and structure between main biogeographical areas here analyzed. Along the Intermediate Area (38°-41° S) each estuarine population constitutes a different unit. In contrast, Magellanic populations (43°-53° S) exhibited low levels of genetic differentiation. Contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and structure recorded in the species between the analyzed biogeographic areas are consistent with the marked differences in abiotic factors (i.e., different coastal configurations, Quaternary glacial histories, and oceanographic regimes) and to inherent characteristics of the species (i.e., salt-tolerance, physiology, and reproductive behavior). PMID:26161896

  17. Star-Hopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, Robert A.

    1997-07-01

    Introduction; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. How to use this book and what you are going to see; 2. How the sky works, determining your field of view, observing tips and how to navigate in the night sky; 3. January - Taurus and Orion: the bull and hunter; 4. February - Canis Minor, Canis Major, and Puppis: dog days in February and Jason's Argo; 5. March - Cancer, Leo, and Corvus: a crab, the king of the beasts, and a crow; 6. April - Ursa Major: a dipper round tripper; 7. May - Coma Berenices and Virgo: the sparkling hair of Berenice and the wheat maiden and her bushel of galaxies; 8. June - Libra and Lupus: the balance scales and the wolf; 9. July - Scorpius, Sagittarius, and Scutum: the scorpion, archer, and shield of John Sobieski; 10. August - Draco: following the trail of the dragon; 11. September - Cygnus, Lyra, Vulpecula, and Sagitta: the swan, lyre, fox, and arrow; 12. October - Andromeda and Perseus: the chained lady and her rescuer; 13. November - Cepheus and Cassiopeia: the king and queen of Joppa; 14. December - Pisces, Triangulum, and Aries: of fishes, a triangle, and a ram; 15. Messier Marathon, a sundown to sunup hop across the skies; Appendix A: Classification tables; Appendix B: The constellations; Appendix C: The Greek alphabet; Appendix D: Decimalization of the day; Glossary; Bibliography; Index.

  18. Laniakea, our Home Supercluster of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarede, Daniel; Courtois, Helene M.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Tully, R. Brent

    2015-08-01

    We report the recent discovery of Laniakea, the supercluster of galaxies that contains the Milky Way. The three-dimensional extent of the supercluster is reconstructed and visualized using the concept of gravitational basin of attraction within which flows of matter are found to converge onto a unique attractor. This has been achieved by exploiting the Cosmicflows-2 Catalog of line-of-sight peculiar velocities of galaxies, that provides data on a scale large enough to circumscribe our supercluster and separate it from the partially reconstructed neighbor superclusters. The intergalactic three-dimensional velocity field, where the Hubble expansion and the long range flows are removed, is reconstructed by the Wiener Filter technique, in the framework of the standard cosmological model, using a Bayesian approach. We characterize the structure and present maps of its cosmography, including 3D visualizations of the frontier surface, configurations of cosmic flows both inside and outside the frontier, contents in known clusters of galaxies, filaments and voids, connections with the local cosmic web, interfaces with the neighboring superclusters Perseus-Pisces, Shapley, Coma, and the newly discovered Arrowhead mini-supercluster of galaxies.

  19. Interaction of high flux deuterium/nitrogen plasmas with beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, T.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Oberkofler, M.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Tabarés, F.

    2011-12-01

    Before nitrogen can be used as a radiator for edge plasma temperature control in experiments with beryllium as the wall material, the compatibility of nitrogen-containing plasma with beryllium has to be tested. Therefore beryllium samples were exposed to a variety of mixed N2/D2 plasmas in PISCES-B and codeposits from the sputtered material were collected. It was found that introducing N2 to a D2 plasma reduces Be erosion significantly but recovery to the pre-N2 levels is possible in pure D2 plasma. Berylliated vessel walls can be a reservoir for N2 and chemical processes probably play a significant role during nitriding and N2 removal. Nitrided target samples remain conductive and do not lead to additional arcing, but codeposits are insulating. Thermal desorption measurements of nitrided and un-nitrided target samples are comparable, while codeposits show a slightly reduced D retention. However, D release for both target and codeposits is shifted ≈100 K to higher temperatures, above 510 K.

  20. How the First Stars Shaped the Faintest Gas-dominated Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, R.; Vandenbroucke, B.; De Rijcke, S.

    2015-12-01

    Low-mass dwarf galaxies are very sensitive test-beds for theories of cosmic structure formation since their weak gravitational fields allow the effects of the relevant physical processes to clearly stand out. Up to now, no unified account has existed of the sometimes seemingly conflicting properties of the faintest isolated dwarfs in and around the Local Group, such as Leo T and the recently discovered Leo P and Pisces A systems. Using new numerical simulations, we show that this serious challenge to our understanding of galaxy formation can be effectively resolved by taking into account the regulating influence of the ultraviolet radiation of the first population of stars on a dwarf's star formation rate while otherwise staying within the standard cosmological paradigm for structure formation. These simulations produce faint, gas-dominated, star-forming dwarf galaxies that lie on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation and that successfully reproduce a broad range of chemical, kinematical, and structural observables of real late-type dwarf galaxies. Furthermore, we stress the importance of obtaining properties of simulated galaxies in a manner as close as possible to the typically employed observational techniques.