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Sample records for hepa wash treatment

  1. Evaluation of the Hepa Wash® treatment in pigs with acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mortality of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is still unacceptably high. Available liver support systems are still of limited success at improving survival. A new type of albumin dialysis, the Hepa Wash® system, was newly introduced. We evaluated the new liver support system as well as the Molecular Adsorbent Recycling System (MARS) in an ischemic porcine model of ALF. Methods In the first study animals were randomly allocated to control (n=5) and Hepa Wash (n=6) groups. In a further pilot study, two animals were treated with the MARS-system. All animals received the same medical and surgical procedures. An intraparenchymal intracranial pressure was inserted. Hemodynamic monitoring and goal-directed fluid therapy using the PiCCO system was done. Animals underwent functional end-to-side portacaval shunt and ligation of hepatic arteries. Treatment with albumin dialysis was started after fall of cerebral perfusion pressure to 45 mmHg and continued for 8 h. Results All animals in the Hepa Wash group survived the 13-hour observation period, except for one that died after stopping treatment. Four of the control animals died within this period (p=0.03). Hepa Wash significantly reduced impairment of cerebral perfusion pressure (23±2 vs. 10±3 mmHg, p=0.006) and mean arterial pressure (37±1 vs. 24±2 mmHg, p=0.006) but had no effect on intracranial pressure (14±1 vs. 15±1 mmHg, p=0.72). Hepa Wash also enhanced cardiac index (4.94±0.32 vs. 3.36±0.25 l/min/m2, p=0.006) and renal function (urine production, 1850 ± 570 vs. 420 ± 180 ml, p=0.045) and eliminated water soluble (creatinine, 1.3±0.2 vs. 3.2±0.3 mg/dl, p=0.01; ammonia 562±124 vs. 1382±92 μg/dl, p=0.006) and protein-bound toxins (nitrate/nitrite 5.54±1.57 vs. 49.82±13.27 μmol/l, p=0.01). No adverse events that could be attributed to the Hepa Wash treatment were observed. Conclusions Hepa Wash was a safe procedure and improved multiorgan system failure in pigs with ALF. The survival

  2. Nasal Wash Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Make the nasal wash solution. Do not use tap water for the nasal wash (unless boiled or filtered ... water. You may use: Distilled water Sterilized water Tap water that has been boiled for 1 minute (at ...

  3. SOIL WASHING TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a water-based process for mechanically scrubbing soils ex-situ to remove undesirable contaminants. he process removes contaminants from soils in one of two ways: by dissolving or suspending them in the wash solution (which is later treated by conventional wastewat...

  4. Treatment of tunnel wash water and implications for its disposal.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, M; Renman, G; Byman, L; Svenstam, G; Norling, M

    2014-01-01

    The use of road tunnels in urban areas creates water pollution problems, since the tunnels must be frequently cleaned for traffic safety reasons. The washing generates extensive volumes of highly polluted water, for example, more than fivefold higher concentrations of suspended solids compared to highway runoff. The pollutants in the wash water have an affinity for particulate material, so sedimentation should be a viable treatment option. In this study, 12 in situ sedimentation trials were carried out on tunnel wash water, with and without addition of chemical flocculent. Initial suspended solids concentration ranged from 804 to 9,690 mg/L. With sedimentation times of less than 24 hours and use of a chemical flocculent, it was possible to reach low concentrations of suspended solids (<15 mg/L), PAH (<0.1 μg/L), As (<1.0 μg/L), Cd (<0.05 μg/L), Hg (<0.02 μg/L), Fe (<200 μg/L), Ni (<8 μg/L), Pb (<0.5 μg/L), Zn (<60 μg/L) and Cr (<8 μg/L). Acute Microtox(®) toxicity, mainly attributed to detergents used for the tunnel wash, decreased significantly at low suspended solids concentrations after sedimentation using a flocculent. The tunnel wash water did not inhibit nitrification. The treated water should be suitable for discharge into recipient waters or a wastewater treatment plant. PMID:24845317

  5. Altered Hepa1-6 cells by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-treatment induce anti-tumor immunity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhengyu; Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Ye; Yu, Bin; Wang, Chen; Liu, Changcheng; Lu, Juan; Chen, Fei; Wang, Minjun; Yu, Xinlu; Lin, Jiahao; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Pin; Zhu, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is the use of the immune system to treat cancer. Our current research proposed an optional strategy of activating immune system involving in cancer immunotherapy. When being treated with 2% DMSO in culture medium, Hepa1-6 cells showed depressed proliferation with no significant apoptosis or decreased viability. D-hep cells, Hepa1-6 cells treated with DMSO for 7 days, could restore to the higher proliferation rate in DMSO-free medium, but alteration of gene expression profile was irreversible. Interestingly, tumors from D-hep cells, not Hepa1-6 cells, regressed in wild-type C57BL/6 mice whereas D-hep cells exhibited similar tumorigenesis as Hep1–6 cells in immunodeficient mice. As expected, additional Hepa1-6 cells failed to form tumors in the D-hep-C57 mice in which D-hep cells were eliminated. Further research confirmed that D-hep-C57 mice established anti-tumor immunity against Hepa1-6 cells. Our research proposed viable tumor cells with altered biological features by DMSO-treatment could induce anti-tumor immunity in vivo. PMID:26824185

  6. SOLVENT WASHING OF PCP CONTAMINATED SOILS WITH ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF WASH FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A solvent washing procedure for the removal of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated soils is presented. his procedure can be used in both in-situ and above ground soil washing applications. he in-situ solvent washing (flushing) of soil was simulated by continuously flushing ...

  7. Waste washing pre-treatment of municipal and special waste.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana; Pivnenko, Kostyantyn

    2012-03-15

    Long-term pollution potential in landfills is mainly related to the quality of leachate. Waste can be conveniently treated prior to landfilling with an aim to minimizing future emissions. Washing of waste represents a feasible pre-treatment method focused on controlling the leachable fraction of residues and relevant impact. In this study, non-recyclable plastics originating from source segregation, mechanical-biological treated municipal solid waste (MSW), bottom ash from MSW incineration and automotive shredder residues (ASR) were treated and the removal efficiency of washing pre-treatment prior to landfilling was evaluated. Column tests were performed to simulate the behaviour of waste in landfill under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The findings obtained revealed how waste washing treatment (WWT) allowed the leachability of contaminants from waste to be reduced. Removal rates exceeding 65% were obtained for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN). A percentage decrease of approximately 60% was reached for the leachable fraction of chlorides, sulphates, fluoride and metals, as proved by a reduction in electric conductivity values (70%). PMID:21968117

  8. Aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system HEPA filters and adsorbers. Volume 1, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1993-08-01

    A Phase I aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units (adsorbers) was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Information concerning design features; failure experience; aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors; and surveillance and monitoring methods for these key air-treatment system components was compiled. Over 1100 failures, or 12 percent of the filter installations, were reported as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) survey. Investigators from other national laboratories have suggested that aging effects could have contributed to over 80 percent of these failures. Tensile strength tests on aged filter media specimens indicated a decrease in strength. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter properties of sealants and gaskets. Low radioiodine decontamination factors associated with the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident were attributed to the premature aging of the carbon in the adsorbers. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include oxidation as well as the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants.

  9. HEPA Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2006-01-01

    Poor indoor air quality in school facilities can detract from the health and productivity of students, teachers and other employees. Asthma--often triggered or aggravated by dust--is the No. 1 cause of chronic absenteeism in schools. Using vacuum cleaners equipped with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to clean education institutions…

  10. Treatment of car wash wastewater by UF membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istirokhatun, Titik; Destianti, Puti; Hargianintya, Adenira; Oktiawan, Wiharyanto; Susanto, Heru

    2015-12-01

    The existence of car wash service facilitates car owners to remove dirt and grime from their vehicles. However, the dirt washed off vehicles as well as the cleaning materials themselves may be harmful to the environment if they are not properly managed and discharged. Many technologies have been proposed to treat car wash wastewater such as coagulation flocculation, tricking filter and flocculation-flotation. Nevertheless, these technologies have low efficiency to eliminate oil and small organic compounds. Ultrafiltration (UF) membranes were used in this study to treat car wash wastewater. This study investigated the performance of UF membranes under various pressures to remove COD, oil and grease, and also turbidity from car wash waste water. The membrane performance was examined by investigation of permeate flux and membrane rejection. The results meet the standard of environmental regulation and it is possible to be reused. The highest rejection was shown by PES10 (polyethersulfone 10 kDa) in 1 bar operation with complete rejection for both turbidity and oil and grace and 95% rejection for COD.

  11. ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF SOIL WASH FLUIDS FROM A WOOD PRESERVING SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated system has been developed to remediate sols contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This system involves the coupling of two treatment technologies, soil solvent washing and anaerobic biotreatment of the extract. Specif...

  12. Performance of a Small-scale Treatment Wetland for Treatment of Landscaping Wash Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. J.; Fayed, E.; Fish, W.

    2011-12-01

    A large number of lawn mowers and related equipment must be cleaned each day by commercial landscaping operations and state and local highway maintenance crews. Washing these devices produces wastewater that contains high amounts of organic matter and potentially problematic nutrients, as well as oil and grease and other chemicals and metals that come from the machinery itself. Dirty water washes off the mowers, flows off the pavement and into nearby storm drains without any kind of treatment. A better idea would be to collect such wastewater, retain it in an appropriate catchment such as an engineered wetland where natural processes could break down any pollutants in the wash water, and allow the water to naturally evaporate or percolate into the soil where it could recharge ground water resources safely. This research examines the performance of a small-scale treatment wetland tailored to remove nitrogen from landscaping wash water by incorporating both aerobic and anaerobic phases. Contaminants are analyzed through physical and chemical methods. Both methods involve collection of samples, followed by standardized, validated analytical laboratory tests for measuring total solids, total kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrates, total and dissolved phosphorus, COD, BOD, oil and grease, and metals (Zn and Cu). High levels of total solids, total kjeldahl nitrogen, nitrates, total and dissolved phosphorus, COD, BOD, oil and grease are found. Zinc and copper levels are low. Wetland treatment removes 99% total solids, 77% total kjeldahl nitrogen, 100% nitrates, 94% total phosphorus, 86% dissolved phosphorus, 94% COD, 97% BOD, and 76% oil and grease. The results will be a critical step towards developing a sustainable low-energy system for treating such wastewater that could be used by private landscaping companies and government agencies.

  13. Efficient remediation of pentachlorophenol contaminated soil with tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Wang, Li; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-07-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that pentachlorophenol contaminated soil can be efficiently remediated with tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent zerovalent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment. 2 mmol L(-1) of tetrapolyphosphate could wash away 52.8% of pentachlorophenol (PCP) at pH 7.0 and 84.2% of pentachlorophenol at pH 11.0 from contaminated soil owing to the promotion effect of tetrapolyphosphate on the soil matrix dispersion and the subsequent solubilization of pentachlorophenol. More importantly, tetrapolyphosphate ions remained in the washing effluent could greatly enhance the molecular oxygen activation by ZVI to oxidize the desorbed PCP without any pH adjustment, and also avoid the competitive consumption of reactive oxygen species, as caused by the common organic surfactants in the washing effluent. Therefore, 85.1% of pentachlorophenol could be aerobically removed from the washing effluent by merely using 5 g L(-1) of ZVI. We also interestingly found that the dissolved iron ions released from the soil could enhance the oxidation of pentachlorophenol in the washing effluent, but the dissolved organic matter had the opposite effect. This study suggests the coupling tetrapolyphosphate washing and subsequent ZVI/Air treatment is an optional approach to remediate pentachlorophenol contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:25781373

  14. Treatment techniques for the recycling of bottle washing water in the soft drinks industry.

    PubMed

    Ramirez Camperos, E; Mijaylova Nacheva, P; Diaz Tapia, E

    2004-01-01

    The soft drink production is an important sector in the manufacturing industry of Mexico. Water is the main source in the production of soft drinks. Wastewater from bottle washing is almost 50% of the total wastewater generated by this industry. In order to reduce the consumption of water, the water of the last bottle rinse can be reused in to the bottle pre-rinse and pre-washing cycles. This work presents the characterization of the final bottle washing rinse discharge and the treatability study for the most appropriate treatment system for recycling. Average characteristics of the final bottle wash rinse were as follows: Turbidity 40.46 NTU, COD 47.7 mg/L, TSS 56 mg/L, TS 693.6 mg/L, electrical conductivity 1,194 microS/cm. The results of the treatability tests showed that the final rinse water can be used in the pre-rinse and pre-washing after removing the totality of the suspended solids, 80% of the COD and 75% of the dissolved solids. This can be done using the following treatment systems: filtration-adsorption-reverse osmosis, or filtration-adsorption-ion exchange. The installation of these treatment techniques in the soft drink industry would decrease bottle washing water consumption by 50%. PMID:15344780

  15. Development of a Pulp Process Treating Contaminated HEPA Filters (III)

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. S.; Ramer, J.; Argyle, M. D.; Demmer, R. L.

    2002-02-28

    The Pulp Process (PP) Treatment option was conceived as a replacement for the current Filter Leaching System (FLS). The FLS has operated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1995 to treat radioactive, mixed waste HEPA filters. In recent years, the FLS has exhibited difficulty in removing mercury from the HEPA filters as the concentration of mercury in the spent HEPA filters has increased. The FLS leaches and washes the whole filter without any preparation or modification. The filter media and the trapped calcine particles are confined in a heavy filter housing that contributes to poor mixing zones around the edges of the filter, low media permeability, channeling of the liquid through cracks and tears in the filter media, and liquid retention between leach and rinse cycles. In the PP, the filter media and the trapped calcine particles are separated from the filter housing and treated as a pulp, taking advantage of improved contact with the leach solution that cannot be achieved when the media is still in the HEPA filter housing. In addition to removing the mercury more effectively, the PP generates less volume of liquid waste, requires a shorter leach cycle time, and possesses the versatility for treating filters of different sizes. A series of tests have been performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the advantages of the PP concept. These tests compare the PP with the FLS under controlled conditions that simulate the current operating parameters. A prior study using blended feed, a mixture of shredded clean HEPA filter media and non-radioactive calcine particles, indicated that the PP would significantly increases the calcine dissolution percentages. In this study, hazardous-metal contaminated HEPA filter media was studied. The results of side-by-side tests indicated that the PP increased the mercury removal percentage by 80% and might be a solution to the mercury removal

  16. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents and evaluates the extensive database from the SITE Program demonstration at the MacGillis and Gibbs wood treatment facility in New Brighton, MN. oil washing and segregation, biotreatment of contaminated process water, and biodegradation of a slurry of the con...

  17. BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report analyzes the results of the SITE Program demonstration of BioTrol's Soil Washing System at the MacGillis & Gibbs wood treatment facility in New Brighton, MN. The contaminants of primary interest are pentachlorophenol (penta) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)...

  18. BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report analyzes the results of the SITE Program demonstration of BioTrol's Soil Washing System at the MacGillis & Gibbs wood treatment facility in New Brighton, MN. he contaminants of primary interest are pentachlorophenol (penta) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)...

  19. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents and evaluates the extensive database from the SITE Program demonstration at the MacGillis and Gibbs wood treatment facility in New Brighton, MN. Soil washing and segregation, biotreatment of contaminated process water, and biodegradation of a slurry of the con...

  20. Assessment of seasonal variation for air pollutant accumulation by Zizyphus tree under washing treatment.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Mohamed Abdulraheem; El-Nakhlawy, Fathy Saad; Almehmadi, Fahd Mosallam; Ihsan, Muhammad Zahid; Al-Shareef, Abdulmohsin Rajeh

    2016-06-01

    A field study was carried out near Jeddah Industrial Zone to estimate the leaf impairment, physiological disorders, and air pollutant accumulation potential of Ziziphus tree. The experiment was triplicated in RCBD design with factorial arrangement having seasonality as the main plot and washing as subplot treatments along with the control. Accumulation of heavy metals and micronutrients in plant foliage varied significantly under the influence of seasons and washing treatments. The maximum accumulation of cadmium, chromium, nickel, and lead were perceived in summer season while the minimum was observed in winter. Contrarily, a greater acquisition of iron, copper, zinc, and manganese was observed in autumn. Washing significantly reduced the accumulation of Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb by 58, 90, 80, and 96 %, while Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn by 89, 37, 60, and 93 %, respectively. Leaf protein and nitrogen content illustrated a greater adjustment for pollutants by presenting a minimum variation (14-18 % and 2-3 %) to seasonality. In contrast, leaf area and stomatal aperture were significantly disturbed and resulted in minimum recovery under washing. Correlation analysis revealed a stronger negative interaction of heavy metal accumulation to leaf features while non-significant interaction was perceived for microelements. In conclusion, planting of Ziziphus trees along industrial areas may impede potential threats of toxic pollutants to human and ecosystem. PMID:27170355

  1. INEEL HEPA Filter Leach System: A Mixed Waste Solution

    SciTech Connect

    K. Archibald; K. Brewer; K. Kline; K. Pierson; K. Shackelford; M. Argyle; R. Demmer

    1999-02-01

    Calciner operations and the fuel dissolution process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have generated many mixed waste high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)filters. The HEPA Filter Leach System located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center lowers radiation contamination levels and reduces cadmium, chromium, and mercury concentrations on spent HEPA filter media to below disposal limits set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The treated HEPA filters are disposed as low-level radioactive waste. The technical basis for the existing system was established and optimized in initial studies using simulants in 1992. The treatment concept was validated for EPA approval in 1994 by leaching six New Waste Calcining Facility spent HEPA filters. Post-leach filter media sampling results for all six filters showed that both hazardous and radiological constituent levels were reduced so the filters could be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Since the validation tests the HEPA Filter Leach System has processed 78 filters in 1997 and 1998. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory HEPA Filter Leach System is the only mixed waste HEPA treatment system in the DOE complex. This process is of interest to many of the other DOE facilities and commercial companies that have generated mixed waste HEPA filters but currently do not have a treatment option available.

  2. INEEL HEPA Filter Leach System: A Mixed Waste Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Argyle, Mark Don; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Archibald, Kip Ernest; Brewer, Ken Neal; Pierson, Kenneth Alan; Shackelford, Kimberlee Rene; Kline, Kelli Suzanne

    1999-03-01

    Calciner operations and the fuel dissolution process at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have generated many mixed waste high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The HEPA Filter Leach System located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center lowers radiation contamination levels and reduces cadmium, chromium, and mercury concentrations on spent HEPA filter media to below disposal limits set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The treated HEPA filters are disposed as low-level radioactive waste. The technical basis for the existing system was established and optimized in initial studies using simulants in 1992. The treatment concept was validated for EPA approval in 1994 by leaching six New Waste Calcining Facility spent HEPA filters. Post-leach filter media sampling results for all six filters showed that both hazardous and radiological constituent levels were reduced so the filters could be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. Since the validation tests the HEPA Filter Leach System has processed 78 filters in 1997 and 1998. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory HEPA Filter Leach System is the only mixed waste HEPA treatment system in the DOE complex. This process is of interest to many of the other DOE facilities and commercial companies that have generated mixed waste HEPA filters but currently do not have a treatment option available.

  3. Efficacy of household washing treatments for the control of Listeria monocytogenes on salad vegetables.

    PubMed

    Nastou, Aikaterini; Rhoades, Jonathan; Smirniotis, Petros; Makri, Ioanna; Kontominas, Michael; Likotrafiti, Eleni

    2012-10-15

    The efficacy of household decontamination methods at reducing Listeria monocytogenes on fresh lettuce (Lactuca sativa), cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and parsley (Petroselinum sativum) was studied. Inoculated vegetable pieces were immersed in washing solutions and surviving L. monocytogenes enumerated. Parameters investigated were storage temperature prior to washing, dipping water temperature, agitation, acetic acid concentration and immersion time. The results indicated that the storage temperature significantly affects the efficacy of dipping vegetables in water for the control of L. monocytogenes, as the reduction in count was greatest when products had been stored at cooler temperatures. Decontamination with acetic acid (up to 2.0% v/v) was shown to have some effect in most cases, but the highest observed decrease in count was 2.6 log cfu/g. Experiments investigating the effect of exposure time to acetic acid (0.5% and 1.0% v/v, up to 30 min immersion) indicated that immersing the vegetables for more than 10 min is of minimal benefit. The most significant factor affecting washing and decontamination efficacy was the vegetable itself: L. monocytogenes colonizing cucumber epidermis was far more resistant to removal by washing and to acid treatment than that on the leafy vegetables, and L. monocytogenes on parsley was the most susceptible. This shows that published decontamination experiments (often performed with lettuce) cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other vegetables. PMID:23107504

  4. HEPA filter dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  5. Hepa filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, Ken N.; Murphy, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal.

  6. HEPA filter dissolution process

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, K.N.; Murphy, J.A.

    1994-02-22

    A process is described for dissolution of spent high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and then combining the complexed filter solution with other radioactive wastes prior to calcining the mixed and blended waste feed. The process is an alternate to a prior method of acid leaching the spent filters which is an inefficient method of treating spent HEPA filters for disposal. 4 figures.

  7. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:26476769

  8. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-04-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween(®) 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween(®) 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R(2) > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween(®) 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween(®) 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  9. Electrochemical treatment of spent solution after EDTA-based soil washing.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2012-04-15

    The use of EDTA in soil washing technologies to remediate soils contaminated with toxic metals is prohibitive because of the large volumes of waste washing solution generated, which must be treated before disposal. Degradation of EDTA in the waste solution and the removal of Pb, Zn and Cd were investigated using electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOP) with a boron-doped diamond anode (BDDA), graphite and iron anodes and a stainless-steel cathode. In addition to EAOP, the efficiency of electro-Fenton reactions, induced by the addition of H(2)O(2) and the regulation of electrochemical systems to pH 3, was also investigated. Soil extraction with 15 mmol kg(-1) of soil EDTA yielded waste washing solution with 566 ± 1, 152 ± 1 and 5.5 ± 0.1 mg L(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively. Treatments of the waste solution in pH unregulated electrochemical systems with a BDDA and graphite anode (current density 67 mA cm(-2)) were the most efficient and removed up to 98 ± 1, 96 ± 1, 99 ± 1% of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively, by electrodeposition on the cathode and oxidatively degraded up to 99 ± 1% of chelant. In the electrochemical system with an Fe anode operated at pH 3, the chelant remained preserved in the treated solution, while metals were removed by electrodeposition. This separation opens up the possibility of a new EDTA recycling method from waste soil washing solution. PMID:22305659

  10. HEPA air filter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pet dander and other irritating allergens from the air. Along with other methods to reduce allergens, such ... controlling the amount of allergens circulating in the air. HEPA filters can be found in most air ...

  11. Contextualizing Hepatocyte Functionality of Cryopreserved HepaRG Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan P; Li, Linhou; Chamberlain, Erica D; Wang, Hongbing; Ferguson, Stephen S

    2016-09-01

    Over the last decade HepaRG cells have emerged as a promising alternative to primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and have been featured in over 300 research publications. Most of these reports employed freshly differentiated HepaRG cells that require time-consuming culture (∼28 days) for full differentiation. Recently, a cryopreserved, predifferentiated format of HepaRG cells (termed here "cryo-HepaRG") has emerged as a new model that improves global availability and experimental flexibility; however, it is largely unknown whether HepaRG cells in this format fully retain their hepatic characteristics. Therefore, we systematically investigated the hepatocyte functionality of cryo-HepaRG cultures in context with the range of interindividual variation observed with PHH in both sandwich-culture and suspension formats. These evaluations uncovered a novel adaptation period for the cryo-HepaRG format and demonstrated the impact of extracellular matrix on cryo-HepaRG functionality. Pharmacologically important drug-metabolizing alleles were genotyped in HepaRG cells and poor metabolizer alleles for CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP3A5 were identified and consistent with higher frequency alleles found in individuals of Caucasian decent. We observed liver enzyme inducibility with aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and pregnane X receptor activators comparable to that of sandwich-cultured PHH. Finally, we show for the first time that cryo-HepaRG supports proper CAR cytosolic sequestration and translocation to hepatocyte nuclei in response to phenobarbital treatment. Taken together, these data reveal important considerations for the use of this cell model and demonstrate that cryo-HepaRG are suitable for metabolism and toxicology screening. PMID:27338863

  12. Combination of surfactant enhanced soil washing and electro-Fenton process for the treatment of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Huguenot, David; Mousset, Emmanuel; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2015-04-15

    In order to improve the efficiency of soil washing treatment of hydrocarbon contaminated soils, an innovative combination of this soil treatment technique with an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (i.e. electro-Fenton (EF)) has been proposed. An ex situ soil column washing experiment was performed on a genuinely diesel-contaminated soil. The washing solution was enriched with surfactant Tween 80 at different concentrations, higher than the critical micellar concentration (CMC). The impact of soil washing was evaluated on the hydrocarbons concentration in the leachates collected at the bottom of the soil columns. These eluates were then studied for their degradation potential by EF treatment. Results showed that a concentration of 5% of Tween 80 was required to enhance hydrocarbons extraction from the soil. Even with this Tween 80 concentration, the efficiency of the treatment remained very low (only 1% after 24 h of washing). Electrochemical treatments performed thereafter with EF on the collected eluates revealed that the quasi-complete mineralization (>99.5%) of the hydrocarbons was achieved within 32 h according to a linear kinetic trend. Toxicity was higher than in the initial solution and reached 95% of inhibition of Vibrio fischeri bacteria measured by Microtox method, demonstrating the presence of remaining toxic compounds even after the complete degradation. Finally, the biodegradability (BOD₅/COD ratio) reached a maximum of 20% after 20 h of EF treatment, which is not enough to implement a combined treatment with a biological treatment process. PMID:25646675

  13. DOE HEPA filter test program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This standard establishes essential elements of a Department of Energy (DOE) program for testing HEPA filters to be installed in DOE nuclear facilities or used in DOE-contracted activities. A key element is the testing of HEPA filters for performance at a DOE Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. Other key elements are (1) providing for a DOE HEPA filter procurement program, and (2) verifying that HEPA filters to be installed in nuclear facilities appear on a Qualified Products List (QPL).

  14. SEPARATION OF HAZARDOUS ORGANICS BY LOW PRESSURE MEMBRANES: TREATMENT OF SOIL-WASH RINSE WATER LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a promising technology for treating contaminated soils. n the present work, low-pressure, thin-film composite membranes were evaluated to treat he soil-wash leachates so that the treated water could be recycled back to the soil washing step. Experiments were done ...

  15. HEPA filter encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    Gates-Anderson, Dianne D.; Kidd, Scott D.; Bowers, John S.; Attebery, Ronald W.

    2003-01-01

    A low viscosity resin is delivered into a spent HEPA filter or other waste. The resin is introduced into the filter or other waste using a vacuum to assist in the mass transfer of the resin through the filter media or other waste.

  16. HEPA and PARSE

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qing-Wen; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2013-01-01

    The effective discovery of tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) holds the key for the development of new diagnostic assays and immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer. Here, we discuss our recently developed technologies, HEPA and PARSE, which allow for the systematic identification of TSAs, generating a reservoir of immunologically and clinically relevant targets. PMID:23802073

  17. Treatment of Wastewater From Car Washes Using Natural Coagulation and Filtration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Rahman, M. A. A.; Johari, M. R.; Kassim, A. H. M.

    2016-07-01

    Wastewater generated from carwash is one of the main wastewater resources, which contribute effectively in the increasing of environmental contamination due to the chemical characteristics of the car wastes. The present work aimed to develop an integrated treatment system for carwash wastewater based on coagulation and flocculation using Moringa oleifera and Ferrous Sulphate (FeSO4.7H2O) as well as natural filtration system. The carwash wastewater samples were collected from carwash station located at Parit Raja, Johor, Malaysia. The treatment system of car wash wastewater was designed in the lab scale in four stages included, aeration, coagulation and flocculation, sedimentation and filtration. The coagulation and flocculation unit was carried out using different dosage (35, 70, 105 and 140 mg L-1) of M. oleifera and FeSO4.7H2O, respectively. The efficiency of the integrated treatment system to treat carwash wastewater and to meet Environmental Quality Act (EQA 1974) was evaluated based on the analysis of pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and turbidity (NTU). The integrated treatment system was efficient for treatment of raw carwash wastewater. The treated carwash wastewaters meet EQA 1974 regulation 2009 (Standards A) in the term of pH and DO while, turbidity and COD reduced in the wastewater to meet Standards B. The integrated treatment system designed here with natural coagulant (M. oleifera) and filtration unit were effective for primary treatment of carwash wastewater before the final disposal or to be reused again for carwash process.

  18. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - VOLUME II, PART A

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents and evaluates the extensive database from the SITE Program demonstration at the MacGillis and Gibbs wood treatment facility in New Brighton, MN. oil washing and segregation, biotreatment of contaminated process water, and biodegradation of a slurry of the con...

  19. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - VOLUME III, PART B

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents and evaluates the extensive database from the SITE Program demonstration at the MacGillis and Gibbs wood treatment facility in New Brighton, MN. oil washing and segregation, biotreatment of contaminated process water, and biodegradation of a slurry of the con...

  20. EDTA leaching of Cu contaminated soil using electrochemical treatment of the washing solution.

    PubMed

    Pociecha, Maja; Lestan, Domen

    2009-06-15

    The feasibility of a two-phase method for remediation of Cu (364+/-2 mg kg(-1)) contaminated vineyard soil was evaluated. In the first phase we used ethylenediamine tetraacetae (EDTA) for Cu leaching, while in the second phase we used an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) for the treatment and reuse of the washing solution for soil rinsing (removal of soil-retained, chelant-mobilized Cu complexes) in a closed loop. In the EAOP, a boron-doped diamond anode was used for the generation of hydroxyl radicals and oxidative decomposition of EDTA-metal complexes at a constant current density (40 mA cm(-2)). The released Cu was removed from the solution mostly as an electro-deposit on the cathode. Two consecutive additions of 10 mmol kg(-1) EDTA removed 26% of Cu from the soil, mostly from carbonate and oxide soil fractions (58% and 40% Cu reduction). The soil Cu oral availability (in vitro Physiologically Based Extraction Test) was reduced after remediation by 42% and 51% in the simulated stomach and intestinal phases. The discharge solution was clear, almost colorless, with pH 8.4 and 0.5 mg L(-1) Cu and 0.07 mM EDTA. The novel method enables soil Cu availability stripping using small volumes of process waters, and no wastewater generation or other emissions into the environment. PMID:19022571

  1. The application of the ozonation/electrocoagulation treatment process of the boat pressure washing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Visnja; Kollar, Robert; Nad, Karlo

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the information on the optimum conditions of the treatment process of the boat pressure washing wastewater (BPWW) by the combination of the ozonation and electrochemical (EC) methods developed on the laboratory and pilot plant scale. The initial effluent was highly enriched in heavy metals and elevated levels of organic contaminants. The concentrations of V, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, TOC, and COD exceeded the upper permissible limits of 22, 20, 6, 112, 17, 4, and 2 times, respectively. The main mechanisms of the organic matter destruction were the ozone oxidation and the indirect oxidation with chlorine/hypochlorite formed by the anodic oxidation of chloride already present in the wastewater. The heavy metal removal was forced by the coagulation/flocculation using Fe(2+), Fe(3+), and Al(3+) ions released into the treated solution by electrochemical corrosion of the sacrificial stainless steel and aluminum electrodes. At the optimum conditions obtained with the pilot plant, the removal efficiencies of the parameters V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, TOC, and COD were 100.00 %, 99.35 %, 99.51 %, 87.31 %, 99.83 %, 99.65 %, 100.00 %, 88.46 %, and 76.28 %, respectively. All the parameters in the final effluent were in agreement with regulated values. The advantages of this system compared to its physico-chemical counterparts are as follows: (1) no need for the external addition of flocculating agents since they are electrochemically generated inside the treatment tank; (2) minimal pH changes during the treatment process not requiring pH adjustment by acids/basis; (3) a significantly lower amount of sludge since only Fe and Al ions were released in the solution; (4) flocs formed by the electrocoagulation can be easily separated by the filtration due to their higher stability, lower content of the bound water and larger surface compared to chemical flocs; (5) the final EC effluent is clear, colourless and odourless, containing the less total dissolved solids and

  2. SOLVENT EXTRACTION AND SOIL WASHING TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SOILS FROM WOOD PRESERVING SITES: BENCH SCALE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction and soil washing studies were performed on soil samples obtained from three abandoned wood preserving sites that included in the NPL. The soil samples from these sites were contaminated with high levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pentachlo...

  3. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BIOTROL SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF A WOOD PRESERVING SITE - VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program demonstration of one configuration of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS) was conducted to obtain reliable performance and cost data that can be used to evaluate the potential applicability of the technology as a remediation alternative for sites contaminated ...

  4. BESCORP SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR LEAD BATTERY SITE TREATMENT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report evaluates the Brice Environmental Services Corporation (BESCORP) Soil Washing System (BSWS) and Its applicability in remediating lead-contaminated soil at lead battery sites. It presents performance and economic data, developed from the U.S. Environmental Protection A...

  5. BESCORP SOIL WASHING SYSTEM FOR LEAD BATTERY SITE TREATMENT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Brice Environmental Services Corporation (BESCORP Soil Washing System (BSWS) and its applicability in remediating lead-contaminated soil at lead battery sites was evaluated. he report presents performance and economic data, developed from the U.S. Environmental Protection Age...

  6. Influence of bentonite in polymer membranes for effective treatment of car wash effluent to protect the ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kiran, S Aditya; Arthanareeswaran, G; Thuyavan, Y Lukka; Ismail, A F

    2015-11-01

    In this study, modified polyethersulfone (PES) and cellulose acetate (CA) membranes were used in the treatment of car wash effluent using ultrafiltration. Hydrophilic sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) and bentonite as nanoclay were used as additives for the PES and CA membrane modification. Performances of modified membranes were compared with commercial PES membrane with 10kDa molecular weight cut off (MWCO). The influencing parameters like stirrer speed (250-750rpm) and transmembrane pressure (100-600kPa) (TMP) were varied and their effects were studied as a function of flux. In the treatment of car wash effluent, a higher permeate flux of 52.3L/m(2)h was obtained for modified CA membrane at TMP of 400kPa and stirrer speed of 750rpm. In comparison with modified PES membrane and commercial PES membrane, modified CA membranes showed better performance in terms of flux and flux recovery ratio. The highest COD removal (60%) was obtained for modified CA membrane and a lowest COD removal (47%) was observed for commercial PES membrane. The modified membranes were better at removing COD, turbidity and maintained more stable flux than commercial PES membrane, suggesting they will provide better economic performance in car wash effluent reclamation. PMID:25869419

  7. Conformational changes in proteins recovered from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle through pH shift washing treatments.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Ramírez-Suárez, Juan C; Lugo-Sánchez, Maria E; García-Orozco, Karina D; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Peña-Ramos, Aida

    2016-04-01

    Conformational and thermal-rheological properties of acidic (APC) and neutral (NPC) protein concentrates were evaluated and compared to those of squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle proteins (SM). Surface hydrophobicity, sulfhydryl status, secondary structure profile, differential scanning calorimetry and oscillatory dynamic rheology were used to evaluate the effect of treatments on protein properties. Acidic condition during the washing process (APC) promoted structural and conformational changes in the protein present in the concentrate produced. These changes were enhanced during the heat setting of the corresponding sol. Results demonstrate that washing squid muscle under the proposed acidic conditions is a feasible technological alternative for squid-based surimi production improving its yield and gel-forming ability. PMID:26593553

  8. Hand Washing

    MedlinePlus

    ... dirty little secrets: Students don't wash their hands often or well. In one study, only 58% of female and 48% of male middle- and high-school students washed their hands after using the bathroom. Yuck! previous continue How ...

  9. Bio-desulfurization and denitrification by anaerobic-anoxic process for the treatment of wastewater from flue gas washing.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyu; Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang; Yang, Maohua; Xing, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    For amine-based carbon dioxide capture, nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides were the main pollutants that had a negative effect on the regeneration of solvent. Before carbon dioxide capture, the sulfur oxides in flue gas should be removed by the method of calcium salt, and then washed by alkaline solution to eliminate the residual nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. The washing wastewater containing sulfate and nitrate needs to be treated. In this study, a novel anaerobic-anoxic process was built up for the treatment of this washing wastewater. Nitrate was reduced to nitrogen by denitrifying bacteria. Sulfate was firstly reduced to sulfide by sulfate reducing bacteria, and then selectively oxidized to element sulfur by sulfide oxidizing bacteria. The treated liquid could be reused as absorption after the adjustment of pH value. The performances of this bioprocess were investigated under various pH values and S/N ratios. It was found that the optimal pH value of influent was 6.0, the percentages of denitrification and sulfate reducing could reach 90 and 89%, respectively. Seventy-six percent of sulfate was transformed into element sulfur. Nitrate significantly had a negative effect on sulfate reduction above 10 mM. As 20 mM nitrate, the sulfate reducing percentage would drop to 67%. These results showed that the anaerobic-anoxic process was feasible for the treatment of flue gas washing wastewater. It would be prospectively applied to other wastewater with the higher ratio of SO4(2-)/NO3(-). PMID:23656948

  10. HEPA filter monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, K. N.; Johnson, C. M.; Aiken, W. F.; Lucerna, J. J.; Barnett, R. L.; Jensen, R. T.

    1986-07-01

    The testing and replacement of HEPA filters, widely used in the nuclear industry to purify process air, are costly and labor-intensive. Current methods of testing filter performance, such as differential pressure measurement and scanning air monitoring, allow determination of overall filter performance but preclude detection of incipient filter failure such as small holes in the filters. Using current technology, a continual in-situ monitoring system was designed which provides three major improvements over current methods of filter testing and replacement. The improvements include: cost savings by reducing the number of intact filters which are currently being replaced unnecessarily; more accurate and quantitative measurement of filter performance; and reduced personnel exposure to a radioactive environment by automatically performing most testing operations.

  11. Treatment of real wastewater produced from Mobil car wash station using electrocoagulation technique.

    PubMed

    El-Ashtoukhy, E-S Z; Amin, N K; Fouad, Y O

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the electrocoagulation of real wastewater produced from a car wash station using a new cell design featuring a horizontal spiral anode placed above a horizontal disc cathode. The study dealt with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and turbidity removal using electrodes in a batch mode. Various operating parameters such as current density, initial pH, NaCl concentration, temperature, and electrode material were examined to optimize the performance of the process. Also, characterization of sludge formed during electrocoagulation was carried out. The results indicated that the COD reduction and turbidity removal increase with increasing the current density and NaCl concentration; pH from 7 to 8 was found to be optimum for treating the wastewater. Temperature was found to have an insignificant effect on the process. Aluminum was superior to iron as a sacrificial electrode material in treating car wash wastewater. Energy consumption based on COD reduction ranged from 2.32 to 15.1 kWh/kg COD removed depending on the operating conditions. Finally, the sludge produced during electrocoagulation using aluminum electrodes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis. PMID:26373303

  12. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  13. SEPARATION OF HAZARDOUS ORGANICS BY LOW PRESSURE MEMBRANES: TREATMENT OF SOIL-WASH RINSE-WATER LEACHATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing is a promising technology for treating contaminated soils. In the present work, low-pressure, thin-film composite membranes were evaluated to treat the soil-wash leachates so that the treated water could be recycled back to the soil washing step. Experiments were don...

  14. Evaluation of performance and community dynamics of microorganisms during treatment of distillery spent wash in a three stage bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Garima; Gopal, Madhuban; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    The ability of Emericella nidulans var. lata, Neurospora intermedia and Bacillus sp. to treat distillery spent wash in a three stage bioreactor was investigated. Process parameters were optimized in shake flask cultures with the individual strains before treatment of the effluent in a 15-l bioreactor. Treatment was first carried out by the fungi followed by bacteria. The treated effluent showed significant reduction in color (82%) and COD (93%) after 30 h. Metabolites formed after degradation of complex polymers in distillery effluent were assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and included furan, simple acid types and organic compounds. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA sequences amplified from DNA isolated from the reactor communities indicated the presence of other organisms besides those introduced initially. The microbial communities were able to carry out bioremediation of distillery effluent and produce discharge that conforms to safety standards. PMID:20156685

  15. Hand washing.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    A surgery matron has writt en a hand hygiene promotional video rap to encourage staff, patients and visitors to wash their hands. Vicky Cartwright from University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust rewrote the lyrics to 1990s hit rap, Ice Ice Baby. PMID:27380706

  16. Successful treatment of severe oligozoospermia with sperm washing and intrauterine insemination.

    PubMed

    Centola, G M

    1997-01-01

    During the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1995, 258 patients, in whom motile sperm counts for insemination (postwash, processed) were 10.0 million motile sperm or less were seen in the andrology unit for sperm washing and intrauterine insemination (IUI). No significant female factors were noted on history; all female partners had patent Fallopian tubes and were ovulatory spontaneously or were treated by the referring gynecologist with clomiphene citrate, human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), or follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ovulation induction in both anovulatory or ovulatory women. Of the total of 258 patients, 15 achieved a pregnancy in 284 cycles of IUI in which the inseminating motile-count was < 1.0 million motile sperm, resulting in a monthly fecundity (f) of 5.3%. The mean (+/-SD) motile count for IUI in this group was 0.61 (+/-0.29) million sperm, with a range of 0.19-0.95 million motile sperm. The initial motile count was 2.97 (3.2) million sperm, with a range of 0.2-12.81 million sperm. With inseminating motile counts of 1.0-10.0 million motile sperm, there were 83 pregnancies after 467 cycles of IUI, resulting in a monthly f of 17.8%. The mean (+/-SD) motile count for IUI in this group was 4.9 (+/-2.7) million motile sperm with a range of 1.0-9.9 million motile sperm. The initial sperm count in this group was 10.9 million (+/-7.1), with a range of 1.1-23.7 million motile sperm. These data suggest that acceptable pregnancy rates can be achieved with IUI, even in severely oligozoospermic specimens. Intrauterine insemination is less invasive and less costly than other assisted reproductive techniques. These data are supportive of IUI prior to attempting other more invasive and potentially costly reproductive technologies. PMID:9283959

  17. The role of decongestants, cromolyn, guafenesin, saline washes, capsaicin, leukotriene antagonists, and other treatments on rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Nataliya M

    2011-08-01

    Clinical symptoms of allergic and nonallergic rhinitis are similar despite the significant difference in underlying mechanisms. Over-the-counter (OTC) treatments can be used as effective and affordable therapeutic modalities when recommended by a physician. Adjunct treatments, such as herbal medicine, acupuncture and homeopathy, have become increasingly popular. Most of the treatments reviewed in this article are available OTC and are a likely choice for patients suffering from acute or chronic rhinitis. This article provides an overview of treatment suggestions, benefits, and side effects for available OTC, prescription drug, and alternative choices in addition to the therapies described in other articles. PMID:21737044

  18. Comparison of Hot Water Surface Pasteurization and Chlorine Wash Treatments for Reducing Populations of Salmonella Poona on Inoculated Whole Cantaloupe Melons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous outbreaks of salmonellosis have been associated with the consumption of cantaloupes. Commercial chlorine wash treatments for cantaloupes are limited in their ability to inactivate and/or remove the human pathogen, Salmonella Poona. Our objective was to compare efficacy of hot water surface ...

  19. HEPA Filter Use at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J. R.

    2002-02-28

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are relied upon at the Hanford site to support several different activities. Each facility relies upon the filters to provide the same function; remove radioactive particulate from various air streams. However, HEPA filters are operated in differing environmental conditions from one facility to another and the constituents in the air streams also differ. In addition, some HEPA filters at the Hanford site have been in service for several years. As a result, an assessment was performed which evaluated the service life and conditions of the HEPA filters at the Hanford site.

  20. Water washable stainless steel HEPA filter

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Terrance D.

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a high efficiency particulate (HEPA) filter apparatus and system, and method for assaying particulates. The HEPA filter provides for capture of 99.99% or greater of particulates from a gas stream, with collection of particulates on the surface of the filter media. The invention provides a filter system that can be cleaned and regenerated in situ.

  1. Soil washing treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstich, M.

    1995-12-01

    Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

  2. Comparison of water wash, trimming, and combined hot water and lactic acid treatments for reducing bacteria of fecal origin on beef carcasses.

    PubMed

    Castillo, A; Lucia, L M; Goodson, K J; Savell, J W; Acuff, G R

    1998-07-01

    Cleaning treatments, such as high-pressure water wash at 35 degrees C or trim, alone and combined with sanitizing treatments, such as hot water (95 degrees C at the source), warm (55 degrees C) 2% lactic acid spray, and combinations of these two sanitizing methods, were compared for their effectiveness in reducing inoculated numbers (5.0 to 6.0 log CFU/cm2) of Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, aerobic plate counts, Enterobacteriaceae, total coliforms, thermotolerant coliforms, and generic E. coli on hot beef carcass surface areas in a model carcass spray cabinet. Log reductions in numbers of all tested organisms by water wash or trim alone were significantly smaller than the log reductions obtained by the different combined treatments. Regardless of the cleaning treatment (water wash or trim) or surface area, the range for mean log reductions by hot water was from 4.0 to > 4.8 log CFU/cm2, by lactic acid spray was from 4.6 to > 4.9 log CFU/cm2, by hot water followed by lactic acid spray was from 4.5 to > 4.9 log CFU/cm2, and by lactic acid spray followed by hot water was from 4.4 to > 4.6 log CFU/cm2, for S. typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7. Identical reductions were obtained for thermotolerant coliforms and generic E. coli. No differences in bacterial reductions were observed for different carcass surface regions. Water wash and trim treatments caused spreading of the contamination to other areas of the carcass surface while providing an overall reduction in fecal or pathogenic contamination on carcass surface areas. This relocated contamination after either water wash or trim was most effectively reduced by following with hot water and then lactic acid spray. This combined treatment yielded 0% positive samples for S. typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7, thermotolerant coliforms, and generic E. coli on areas outside the inoculated areas, whereas percent positive samples after applying other combined treatments ranged from 22 to 44% for S. typhimurium, 0 to

  3. Two-stage electrochemical treatment of bio-digested distillery spent wash using stainless steel and aluminum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pinki; Joshi, Himanshu; Srivastava, Vimal C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of two-stage electro-coagulation (EC) process using multi-parameter optimization for treating bio-digested distillery spent wash by stainless steel (SS) and aluminum (Al) electrodes. Operating parameters have been optimized and treatment efficiency of SS and Al electrodes have been compared by central composite design of response surface analysis in terms of COD, color and total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Individual and interactive effects of four independent parameters namely initial pH (pHo: 2-10 and 4-10 for SS and Al electrodes, respectively), current density (j: 30.86-154.32 A m(-2)), inter-electrode distance (g: 0.5-2.5 cm) and electrolysis time (t: 30-150 min) on the COD, color and TOC removal efficiency were evaluated for both the electrodes. SS electrode was found to be more effective for the removal of COD, color and TOC with removal efficiencies of 70%, 93% and 72%, respectively, as compared to Al electrode, which showed respective removal efficiencies of 59%, 80% and 55%. A two-stage EC process was also conducted to study the predominance of different types of electrodes, and to increase the efficiency of EC process. Results shows that SS followed by Al electrode (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 81%, 94% and 78%, respectively) was found to be more effective than Al followed by SS electrode combination (with total COD, color and TOC removal efficiency of 78%, 89% and 76%, respectively). Present study shows that EC process can be used as an additional step to bio-methanation process so as to meet effluent discharge standards in distilleries. PMID:25837564

  4. Ultrasonic washing of textiles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junhee; Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of experimental investigation of ultrasonic washing of textiles. The results demonstrate that cavitation bubbles oscillating in acoustic fields are capable of removing soils from textiles. Since the washing performance is mitigated in a large washing bath when using an ultrasonic transducer, we propose a novel washing scheme by combining the ultrasonic vibration with a conventional washing method utilizing kinetic energy of textiles. It is shown that the hybrid washing scheme achieves a markedly enhanced performance up to 15% in comparison with the conventional washing machine. This work can contribute to developing a novel laundry machine with reduced washing time and waste water. PMID:26215790

  5. Effects of integrated treatment of nonthermal UV-C light and different antimicrobial wash on Salmonella enterica on plum tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Produce contamination by foodborne pathogens remains a serious threat. This study investigated synergistic effects of ultraviolet-C and various active sanitizers’ washes against Salmonella enterica on plum tomatoes. A bacterial cocktail containing three serotypes of Salmonella enterica (S. Newport H...

  6. Utility of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and bronchial washings in the diagnosis and treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, C.U.; Delaney, M.D.; Simon, G.L.; Witorsch, P.; Varma, V.M.

    1985-11-01

    Twenty patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and suspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were evaluated by /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy for initial diagnosis and response to therapy. Lung uptake of /sup 67/Ga was demonstrated in 100% of AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, including those with subclinical infection. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy identified P. carinii in the bronchial washings of 100% of cases (19 patients), whereas only 13 of 16 (81%) patients had P. carinii in lung tissue obtained by transbronchial biopsy. Repeat fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 16 of 20 patients. After 2 to 4 wk of therapy, P. carinii was identified in bronchial washings in 8 of 16 (50%) patients and in transbronchial biopsy in 1 of 10 (10%) patients examined. Bronchial washing has a higher yield than transbronchial biopsy in demonstrating P. carinii in patients with AIDS and may evolve as the procedure of choice in such patients. Based on the clinical course and results of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, optimal therapy may require at least 3 wk of treatment.

  7. Volatility and leachability of heavy metals and radionuclides in thermally treated HEPA filter media generated from nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Lee, Suk-Chol; Min, Byung-Youn; Yang, Hee-Chul; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of the present study was to apply thermal treatments to reduce the volume of HEPA filter media and to investigate the volatility and leachability of heavy metals and radionuclides during thermal treatment. HEPA filter media were transformed to glassy bulk material by thermal treatment at 900°C for 2h. The most abundant heavy metal in the HEPA filter media was Zn, followed by Sr, Pb and Cr, and the main radionuclide was Cs-137. The volatility tests showed that the heavy metals and radionuclides in radioactive HEPA filter media were not volatilized during the thermal treatment. PCT tests indicated that the leachability of heavy metals and radionuclides was relatively low compared to those of other glasses. XRD results showed that Zn and Cs reacted with HEPA filter media and were transformed into crystalline willemite (ZnO·SiO(2)) and pollucite (Cs(2)OAl(2)O(3)4SiO(2)), which are not volatile or leachable. The proposed technique for the volume reduction and transformation of radioactive HEPA filter media into glassy bulk material is a simple and energy efficient procedure without additives that can be performed at relatively low temperature compared with conventional vitrification process. PMID:22525481

  8. Hydrology of Cornfield Wash area and effects of land treatment practices, Sandoval County, New Mexico, 1951-60

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkham, D.E.

    1967-01-01

    The collection of runoff and sediment data was the primary objective of the 10-year (1951-60) study in the Cornfield Wash basin, which has an area of 21.3 square miles. However, reconnaissance investigations also were made of (1) precipitation; (2) the effects of reservoirs on runoff, erosion, and sediment yield; (3) the effects of range pitting on runoff, sediment, and vegetation yields; and (4) the effects of wire sediment barriers on sediment accumulations. Precipitation averaged 6.07 inches for the warm season (May 1 through October 31). From 1951 to 1955 much of the precipitation came in short torrential downpours. Since 1955, precipitation usually has been of lower intensity, resulting in a low runoff-precipitation ratio. The total composite inflow to the 19 reservoirs in the Cornfield Wash basin--12 constructed in 1950 and 7 constructed from 1953 to 1956--was 5,720 acre-feet. The reservoirs permanently retained 1,370 acre-feet of water, 43 percent of which was apparently lost by evaporation. The average seasonal runoff (1951-59) from the ephemeral streams of the Cornfield Wash basin and nearby watersheds can be expressed, with a high coefficient of correlation, by the equation: runoff = 29.4 (area) 0.82 acre-feet. This relation suggests that there is a good correlation between the size of the drainage basin and the basin characteristics that most influence travel time of runoff. Comparisons of readily measurable basin characteristics that influence travel time indicate: 1. Land slope is proportional to (area) .0.035; 2. Length of longest watercourse is proportional to (area) 0.52; 3. Distance along the longest watercourse from gaging station to a point opposite the center of drainage basin is proportional to (area)0.52; and 4. Equivalent channel slope is proportional to (area)- 0.027. Except for land slope, the coefficients of correlation for each of the basin characteristics-area relations were relatively high. The correlation between seasonal runoff (1951

  9. Bacterial Selection during the Formation of Early-Stage Aerobic Granules in Wastewater Treatment Systems Operated Under Wash-Out Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Weissbrodt, David G.; Lochmatter, Samuel; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Rossi, Pierre; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge is attractive for high-rate biological wastewater treatment. Biomass wash-out conditions stimulate the formation of aerobic granules. Deteriorated performances in biomass settling and nutrient removal during start-up have however often been reported. The effect of wash-out dynamics was investigated on bacterial selection, biomass settling behavior, and metabolic activities during the formation of early-stage granules from activated sludge of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) over start-up periods of maximum 60 days. Five bubble-column sequencing batch reactors were operated with feast-famine regimes consisting of rapid pulse or slow anaerobic feeding followed by aerobic starvation. Slow-settling fluffy granules were formed when an insufficient superficial air velocity (SAV; 1.8 cm s−1) was applied, when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing organic matter only, or when reactors were operated at 30°C. Fast-settling dense granules were obtained with 4.0 cm s−1 SAV, or when the inoculation sludge was taken from a WWTP removing all nutrients biologically. However, only carbon was aerobically removed during start-up. Fluffy granules and dense granules were displaying distinct predominant phylotypes, namely filamentous Burkholderiales affiliates and Zoogloea relatives, respectively. The latter were predominant in dense granules independently from the feeding regime. A combination of insufficient solid retention time and of leakage of acetate into the aeration phase during intensive biomass wash-out was the cause for the proliferation of Zoogloea spp. in dense granules, and for the deterioration of BNR performances. It is however not certain that Zoogloea-like organisms are essential in granule formation. Optimal operation conditions should be elucidated for maintaining a balance between organisms with granulation propensity and nutrient removing organisms in order to form granules with BNR activities in short

  10. Saline nasal washes

    MedlinePlus

    Salt water washes; Nasal irrigation; Nasal lavage; Sinusitis - nasal wash ... by mixing: 3 teaspoons (tsp) canning or pickling salt (no iodine) 1 tsp baking soda 1 cup warm distilled, filtered, or boiled water To use the wash: Fill the device with ...

  11. Combined mild soil washing and compost-assisted phytoremediation in treatment of silt loams contaminated with copper, nickel, and chromium.

    PubMed

    Sung, Menghau; Lee, Chi-Yi; Lee, Suen-Zone

    2011-06-15

    A new soil remediation option, combining the soil washing process using pure water followed by the compost-assisted phytoextraction, is evaluated using silt loams contaminated with plating wastewater containing Cu, Ni, and Cr. Plants utilized in this study are the rapeseeds, sunflowers, tomatoes, and soapworts. Phytoextraction operation was carried out in pot experiments over a period of 4 months. Metal concentrations in roots and shoots of plants were analyzed upon completion of each pot experiment. Hypothesis testing was employed in assessing the significance of difference in the experimental data. Results indicated that the rapeseed, a hyperaccumulator, is most effective in extracting metals from the compost-amended silt loams. The fast-growing sunflowers and tomatoes are comparable to rapeseeds in accumulating metals despite their relatively low metal concentrations in tissues. Bioaccumulation coefficients obtained for all plants are less than one, indicating that phytostabilization rather than phytoextraction is the dominant mechanism at this simulated final-phase condition. PMID:21531509

  12. Late Washing efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.

    1992-08-31

    Interim Waste Technology has demonstrated the Late Washing concept on the Experimental Laboratory Filter (ELF) at TNX. In two tests, washing reduced the [NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}] from 0.08 M to approximately 0.01 M on slurries with 2 year equivalent radiation exposures and 9.5 wt. % solids. For both washes, the [NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}] decreased at rates near theoretical for a constant volume stirred vessel, indicating approximately l00% washing efficiency. Permeate flux was greater than 0.05 gpm/ft{sup 2} for both washes at a transmembrane pressure of 50 psi and flow velocity of 9 ft/sec.

  13. Evaluation of HEPA filter service life

    SciTech Connect

    Fretthold, J.K.; Stithem, A.R.

    1997-07-14

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), has approximately 10,000 High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters installed in a variety of filter plenums. These ventilation/filtration plenum systems are used to control the release of airborne particulate contaminates to the environment during normal operations and potential accidents. This report summarizes the results of destructive and non-destructive tests on HEPA filters obtained from a wide variety of ages and service conditions. These tests were performed to determine an acceptable service life criteria for HEPA filters used at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). A total of 140 filters of various ages (1972 to 1996) and service history (new, aged unused, used) were tested. For the purpose of this report, filter age from manufacture date/initial test date to the current sample date was used, as opposed to the actual time a filter was installed in an operating system.

  14. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  15. Enhanced sludge washing evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium/cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Waste Pretreatment Program is to treat tank waste and separate that waste into HLW and LLW fractions and provide additional treatment as required to feed LLW and HLW immobilization facilities. Enhanced sludge washing was chosen as the baseline process for separating Hanford tank waste sludge. Section 1.0 briefly discusses the purpose of the evaluation plan and provides the background that led to the choice of enhanced sludge washing as the baseline process. Section 2.0 provides a brief summary of the evaluation plan details. Section 3.0 discusses, in some detail, the technical work planned to support the evaluation of enhanced sludge washing. Section 4.0 briefly discusses the potential important of policy issues to the evaluation. Section 5.0 discusses the methodology to be used in the evaluation process. Section 6.0 summarizes the milestones that have been defined to complete the enhanced sludge washing evaluation and provides a summary schedule to evaluate the performance of enhanced sludge washing. References are identified in Section 7.0, and additional schedule and milestone information is provided in the appendices.

  16. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  17. Synergistic anticancer effects of curcumin and resveratrol in Hepa1-6 hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Qin; Hu, Bing; An, Hong-Mei; Shen, Ke-Ping; Xu, Ling; Deng, Shan; Wei, Meng-Meng

    2013-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma remains one of the most prevalent malignancies worldwide. Curcuma aromatica and Polygonum cuspidatum are one of the commonly used paired-herbs for liver cancer treatment. Curcumin and resveratrol are the major anticancer constituents of Curcuma aromatica and Polygonum cuspidatum, respectively. Curcumin and resveratrol have been found to exhibit a synergistic anticancer effect in colon cancer. However, the combined effect of curcumin and resveratrol against hepatocellular carcinoma remains unknown. In the present study, we evaluated the combined effects of curcumin and resveratrol in hepatocellular carcinoma Hepa1-6 cells. The results showed that curcumin and resveratrol significantly inhibited the proliferation of Hepa1-6 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The combination treatment of curcumin and resveratrol elicited a synergistic antiproliferative effect in Hepa1-6 cells. The apoptosis of Hepa1-6 cells induced by the combination treatment with curcumin and resveratrol was accompanied by caspase-3, -8 and -9 activation, which was completely abrogated by a pan caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Combination of curcumin and resveratrol upregulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in Hepa1-6 cells. The ROS scavenger, NAC, partially attenuated the apoptosis and caspase activation induced by the combination treatment of curcumin and resveratrol. In addition, the combination of curcumin and resveratrol downregulated XIAP and survivin expression. These data suggest that the combination treatment of curcumin and resveratrol is a promising novel anticancer strategy for liver cancer. The present study also provides new insights into the effective mechanism of paired-herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:23446753

  18. Identification of proteins containing redox-sensitive thiols after PRDX1, PRDX3 and GCLC silencing and/or glucose oxidase treatment in Hepa 1-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Almagro, Carlos A; Prieto-Álamo, María-José; Pueyo, Carmen; Jurado, Juan

    2012-12-21

    The oxidation and reduction of cysteine thiols are thought to be a major mechanism for redox regulation. The aim of this study was to identify proteins with reactive thiols and determine their oxidation profiles under oxidative stress induced by simultaneous silencing of antioxidant defences (peroxiredoxin-1, peroxiredoxin-3, and the catalytic subunit of the glutamate-cysteine ligase), and/or treatment with glucose oxidase (GO). Using an approach that combined the labelling of reversibly oxidised cysteines, 2-DE protein separation and MS analysis, we identified 26 proteins with cysteines prone to reversible oxidation belonging to different functional classes. Among these proteins are those that have not been previously recognised as reversible oxidation targets, including cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase, proteasome subunit alpha type-6, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins isoA2/B1 and A/B, and histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1. We provide the first evidence of reversible oxidation for specific cysteines, including Cys112 and Cys146 in glutamate dehydrogenase 1, Cys17 in actins, Cys5 in protein disulfide-isomerase A3, and Cys267 in the heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein. Silencing induced lower oxidative stress than GO treatment. Nevertheless, we detected some proteins particularly sensitive to oxidation by silencing. We hypothesised that these proteins may play a role in regulatory mechanisms by redox stress. PMID:22975676

  19. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Elliott, J.

    1997-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in-place penetration test is practical. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. HEPA filter fire (and subsequent unfiltered release)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: HEPA Filter Failure - Exposure to High Temperature or Pressure. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  1. HEPA filter fire (and subsequent unfiltered release)

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.B.

    1996-09-27

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: HEPA Filter Failure - Exposure to High Temperature or Pressure. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  2. Wash water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckman, G.; Rousseau, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The Wash Water Recovery System (WWRS) is intended for use in processing shower bath water onboard a spacecraft. The WWRS utilizes flash evaporation, vapor compression, and pyrolytic reaction to process the wash water to allow recovery of potable water. Wash water flashing and foaming characteristics, are evaluated physical properties, of concentrated wash water are determined, and a long term feasibility study on the system is performed. In addition, a computer analysis of the system and a detail design of a 10 lb/hr vortex-type water vapor compressor were completed. The computer analysis also sized remaining system components on the basis of the new vortex compressor design.

  3. A Survey of Mixed-Waste HEPA Filters in the DOE Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.; Barber, D. B.; Carney, K. P.

    2002-02-28

    A brief investigation was made to determine the quantities of spent, mixed-waste HEPA filters within the DOE Complex. The quantities of both the mixed-waste filters that are currently being generated, as well as the legacy mixed-waste filters being stored and awaiting disposition were evaluated. Seven DOE sites representing over 89% of the recent HEPA filter usage were identified. These sites were then contacted to determine the number of these filters that were likely destined to become mixed waste and to survey the legacy-filter quantities. Inquiries into the disposition plans for the filters were also made. It was determined that the seven sites surveyed possess approximately 500 m3 of legacy mixed-waste HEPA filters that will require processing, with an annual generation rate of approximately 25 m3. No attempt was made to extrapolate the results of this survey to the entire DOE Complex. These results were simply considered to be the lower bound of the totality of mixed-waste HEPA filters throughout the Complex. The quantities determined encourage the development of new treatment technologies for these filters, and provide initial data on which an appropriate capacity for a treatment process may be based.

  4. Validation of the integrity of a HEPA filter system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Hsung

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a delayed air sampling method to verify the integrity of an existing HEPA filter system in a ventilated fume hood. (238U,232Th)O2 microspheres were generated to fabricate cement nuclear fuel pellets in a HEPA-filtered hood. To comply with the air effluent concentration limits by NRC, the capture efficiency of the HEPA filter was examined. An in-line isokinetic air sampling system was installed downstream of the HEPA filter. Utilizing a gas flow proportional counter, 212Pb was used as a surrogate to indicate any possible penetration of the (238U,232Th)O2 particles through the HEPA filter. Based on the experimental results, this delayed sampling method proved to be an easy and effective way to validate the integrity of the HEPA filter. PMID:14570263

  5. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT CHINA WASH FLUME SHOWING WASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT CHINA WASH FLUME SHOWING WASH - San Carlos Irrigation Project, China Wash Flume, Main (Florence-Case Grande) Canal at Station 137+00, T4S, R10E, S14, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  6. Evaluation of the impact of a simple hand-washing and water-treatment intervention in rural health facilities on hygiene knowledge and reported behaviours of health workers and their clients, Nyanza Province, Kenya, 2008.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, N; Gotestrand, S A; Ombeki, S; Oluoch, G; Fischer, T K; Quick, R

    2015-03-01

    Many clinics in rural western Kenya lack access to safe water and hand-washing facilities. To address this problem, in 2005 a programme was initiated to install water stations for hand washing and drinking water in 109 health facilities, train health workers on water treatment and hygiene, and motivate clients to adopt these practices. In 2008, we evaluated this intervention's impact by conducting observations at facilities, and interviewing staff and clients about water treatment and hygiene. Of 30 randomly selected facilities, 97% had water stations in use. Chlorine residuals were detectable in at least one container at 59% of facilities. Of 164 interviewed staff, 79% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Of 298 clients, 45% had received training on water treatment at a facility; of these, 68% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Use of water stations, water treatment, and client training were sustained in some facilities for up to 3 years. PMID:24865584

  7. DOE standard: Quality assurance inspection and testing of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This standard establishes essential elements for the quality assurance inspection and testing of HEPA filters by US Department of Energy (DOE)-accepted Filter Test Facilities (FTF). The standard specifies HEPA filter quality assurance inspection and testing practices established in DOE-STD-3022-98, DOE HEPA Filter Test Program, and provides a basis for the preparation of written operating procedures for primary FTF functions.

  8. Alternative Antimicrobial Commercial Egg Washing Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Lauren K; Harrison, Mark A; Berrang, Mark E; Jones, Deana R

    2016-07-01

    Commercial table eggs are washed prior to packaging. Standard wash procedures use an alkaline pH and warm water. If a cool water method could be developed that would still provide a microbiologically safe egg, the industry may save energy costs associated with water heating. Four wash procedures were evaluated for Salmonella reduction: pH 11 at 48.9°C (industry standard), pH 11 at ambient temperature (∼20°C), pH 6 at 48.9°C, and pH 6 at ambient temperature. Alkaline washes contained potassium hydroxide-based detergent, while pH 6 washes contained approximately 200 ppm of chlorine and a proprietary chlorine stabilizer (T-128). When eggs were inoculated by immersion in a cell suspension of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium, all treatments resulted in a slight and similar reduction of Salmonella numbers (approximately 0.77 log CFU/ml of shell emulsion reduction). When eggs were inoculated by droplet on the shell surface, Salmonella counts were reduced by approximately 5 log CFU when washed with chlorine plus the chlorine stabilizer at both temperatures and with the alkaline wash at the high temperature. The reductions in Salmonella by these treatments were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from each other but were significantly (P < 0.05) more than the reduction observed for the 20°C alkaline treatment and 20°C control water treatments. Ambient temperature acidic washes reduced Salmonella contamination to the same degree as the standard pH 11 warm water wash and may be a viable option to reduce cost, increase shelf life, and slow pathogen growth in and on shell eggs. PMID:27357042

  9. Separation of hazardous organics by low-pressure membranes: treatment of soil-wash rinse-water leachates. Rept. for Jan 90-Jan 92

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Kothari, A.

    1992-03-01

    Soil washing is a promising technology for treating contaminated soils. In the present work, low-pressure, thin-film composite membranes were evaluated to treat the soil-wash leachates so that the treated water could be recycled back to the soil washing step. Experiments were done with SARM (Synthetic Analytical Reference Matrix) soils. Membrane performance was evaluated with leachates obtained from different wash solutions. The effect of fine suspensions in the leachates was also studied. A solution-diffusion model was modified to include an adsorption resistance term in water flux, and this term was correlated with bulk concentration using the Freundlich isotherm. The correlation was then used to predict water flux drop at different bulk concentrations or to predict water flux at different recoveries. Thin-film composite membranes were found to effectively treat the leachate from rinse water used to wash contaminated soil. In addition, feed preozonation significantly improved water flux.

  10. Granular activated carbon adsorption and microwave regeneration for the treatment of 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl in simulated soil-washing solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitao; Yu, Gang; Han, Wenya

    2007-08-25

    The treatment of 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB29) in simulated soil-washing solution by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and microwave (MW) regeneration was investigated in this study. The PCB29 adsorption process was carried out in a continuous flow adsorption column. After adsorption, the PCB29-loaded GAC was dried at 103 degrees C, and regenerated in a quartz reactor by 2450MHz MW irradiation at 700W for 5min. The efficacy of this procedure was analyzed by determining the rates and amounts of PCB29 adsorbed in successive adsorption/MW regeneration cycles. Effects of the regeneration on the textural properties and the PCB29 adsorption capacity of GAC were examined. It was found that after several adsorption/MW regeneration cycles, the adsorption rate of GAC increased, whereas, the adsorption capacity decreased, which could be explained according to the change of textural properties. Most of the PCB29 adsorbed on GAC was degraded within 3min under MW irradiation, and the analysis of degradation products by GC-MS demonstrated that PCB29 experienced dechlorination during this treatment. PMID:17368933

  11. Degradation of HEPA filters exposed to DMSO

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; LeMay, J.

    1994-07-11

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sprays are being used to remove the high explosive (HE) from nuclear weapons in the process of their dismantlement. A boxed 50 cfm HEPA filter with an integral prefilter was exposed to DMSO vapor and aerosols that were generated by a spray nozzle to simulate conditions expected in the HE dissolution operation. After 198 hours of operation, the pressure drop of the filter had increased from 1.15 inches to 2.85 inches, and the efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl sebacate (DOS) aerosols decreased from 99.992% to 98.6%. Most of the DMSO aerosols had collected as a liquid pool inside the boxed HEPA. The liquid was blown out of the filter exit with 100 cfm air flow at the end of the test. Since the filter still met the minimum allowed efficiency of 99.97% after 166 hours of exposure, we recommend replacing the filter every 160 hours of operation or sooner if the pressure drop increases by 50%. Examination of the filter showed that visible cracks appeared at the joints of the wooden frame and a portion of the sealant had pulled away from the frame. Since all of the DMSO will be trapped in the first HEPA filter, the second HEPA filter should not suffer from DMSO degradation. Thus the combined efficiency for the first filter (98.6%) and the second filter (99.97%) is 99.99996% for 0.3{mu}m particles. If the first filter is replaced prior to its degradation, each of the filters will have 99.97% efficiency, and the combined efficiency will be 99.999991%. The collection efficiency for DMSO/HE aerosols will be much higher because the particle size is much greater.

  12. Degradation of HEPA filters exposed to DMSO

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Larsen, G.

    1995-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sprays are being used to remove the high explosive (HE) from nuclear weapons in the process of their dismantlement. A boxed 50 cmf HEPA filter with an integral prefilter was exposed to DMSO vapor and aerosols that were generated by a spray nozzle to simulate conditions expected in the HE dissolution operation. After 198 hours of operation, the pressure drop of the filter had increased form 1.15 inches to 2,85 inches, and the efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl sebacate (DOS) aerosols decreased form 99.992% to 98.6%. Most of the DMSO aerosols had collected as a liquid pool inside the boxed HEPA. The liquid was blown out of the filter exit with 100 cmf air flow at the end of the test. Since the filter still met the minimum allowed efficiency of 99.97% after 166 hours of exposure, we recommend replacing the filter every 160 hours of operation or sooner if the pressure drop increases by 50%. Examination of the filter showed that visible cracks appeared at the joints of the wooden frame and a portion of the sealant had pulled away from the frame. Since all of the DMSO will be trapped in the first HEPA filter, the second HEPA filter should not suffer from DMSO degradation. Thus the combined efficiency for the first filter (98.6%) and the second filter (99.97%) is 99.99996% for 0.3 {mu}m particles. If the first filter is replaced prior to its degradation, each of the filters will have 99.97% efficiency, and the combined efficiency will be 99.999991%. The collection efficiency for DMSO/HE aerosols will be much higher because the particle size is much greater.

  13. High-pressure washing treatments to remove obscure mealybug (Homoptera: Pseudococcidae) and lightbrown apple moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) from harvested apples.

    PubMed

    Whiting, D C; Hoy, L E; Maindonald, J H; Connolly, P G; McDonald, R M

    1998-12-01

    Mixed life stages of obscure mealybug, Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret), and late 1st-instar or early 2nd-instar lightbrown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker), on 'Royal Gala' apples (Malus domestica Borkhausen) were exposed to standard packhouse processing with and without addition of high-pressure apple washer treatments. Insect removal and mortality were assessed. After standard packhouse processing approximately 60% of P. viburni remained on their host apples. The 2 high-pressure apple washer treatments (500 and 800 psi at 2.0 rods/s) were equally effective and significantly reduced the number of P. viburni on apples compared with the packhouse control. High-pressure apple washer removal by location decreased in the following order: calyx cavity outside the sepals > cheek approximately stem cavity > or = calyx beneath sepals. About half of the E. postvittana larvae infesting apples was removed by standard packhouse processing. Removal rates were similar for all locations on open-calyxed apples. However, no removal occurred from the calyx beneath the sepals if the apple calyx was closed. All 4 high-pressure apple washer treatments tested (500 and 800 psi at 1.0 and 2.0 rods/s) halved the number of larvae on the apple exterior relative to the packhouse control. The pattern of removal for larvae on open-calyxed apples was calyx outside sepals approximately stem cavity > calyx beneath the sepals approximately cheek. A similar pattern was evident for larvae on closed-calyxed apples, except insects beneath the sepals evaded removal. The persistence of insects on the apple cheek reflects the high proportion of larvae inside tunnels in this location compared with other apple locations. Removal of internally positioned insects was much lower than that of externally positioned insects. PMID:9887685

  14. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2009-08-14

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. Two operating scenarios were evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-VSL-T01A/B ultrafiltration feed vessels, identified as Integrated Test A. The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-VSL-T02A ultrafiltration feed preparation vessel, identified as Integrated Test B. Washing operations in PEP Integrated Tests A and B were conducted successfully as per the approved run sheets. However, various minor instrumental problems occurred, and some of the process conditions specified in the run sheet were not met during the wash operations, such as filter-loop flow-rate targets not being met. Five analytes were selected based on full solubility and monitored in the post-caustic-leach wash as successful indicators of washing efficiency. These were aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, and free hydroxide. Other analytes, including sodium, oxalate, phosphate, and total dissolved solids, showed indications of changing solubility; therefore, they were unsuitable for monitoring washing efficiency. In the post-oxidative-leach wash, two analytes with full solubility were selected as suitable indicators of washing

  15. Wash water solids removal system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    During wash water purification, surfactants tend to precipitate and foul the RO membranes, causing water flux decline and loss of salt rejection. The use of 165 to 190 ppm ferric chloride and optionally 0.25 to 1.0 ppm polymeric flocculate precipitates 92 to 96 percent of the surfactant from an Olive Leaf Soap based wash water. Crossflow filtration and pressure filtration yield good soap rejection at high water flux rates. Post-treatment of the chemically pretreated and filtered wash water with activated charcoal removes the residual soap down to an undetectable level.

  16. Single-stage fermentation process for high-value biohythane production with the treatment of distillery spent-wash.

    PubMed

    Pasupuleti, Suresh Babu; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-01-01

    The current communication reports the development of a single-stage biosystem for biohythane production from wastewater treatment. A semi-pilot scale bioreactor with 34 L capacity was used for this study. Maximum biohythane production of 147.5 ± 2.4 L was observed after five cycles of operation with production rate of 4.7 ± 0.1L/h. The biohythane composition (H2/(H2+CH4)) varied from 0.60 to 0.23 during stabilized fifth cycle of operation. During each cycle of operation, higher H2 fraction was noticed within 12h of cycle period followed by CH4 production for rest of operation (36 h). During biohythane production, COD removal efficiency of 60 ± 5% (SDR, 29.0 ± 1.9 kg CODr/m(3)-day) was also achieved. The synergistic function of volatile fatty acids (VFA) production and consumption during process in hybrid biosystem played vital role on the composition of biohythane. The single-stage biosystem facilitates production of high valued and cost efficient biofuel (biohythane) with fewer controls than individual acidogenic and methanogenic processes. PMID:25889805

  17. Qualification of box HEPA filters for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Wilson, K.; Rainer, F.

    1995-03-01

    We have successfully completed qualification tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters that are encapsulated within a box and manufactured by American Air Filters. The qualification tests are required by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Standard ASME N509 and the U.S. Military Standard MIL-F-51068 for HEPA filters to be used in nuclear applications. The qualification tests specify minimum filter efficiencies following exposure to heated air, overpressure, and rough handling. Prior to this study, no box HEPA filters from any manufacturer had been qualified despite their wide-spread use in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Box HEPA filters are not addressed in any of the existing HEPA standards and only briefly discussed in the Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook.

  18. Reduction of Salmonella enterica contamination on grape tomatoes by washing with thyme oil, thymol, and carvacrol as compared with chlorine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingjian; Wu, Changqing

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, multistate outbreaks of Salmonella enterica serovars were traced to tomatoes and resulted in serious economic loss for the tomato industry and decreased consumer confidence in the safety of tomato produce. Purified compounds derived from essential oils such as thymol and carvacrol had wide inhibitory effects against foodborne pathogens including Salmonella. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activities of thymol, carvacrol, and thyme oil against Salmonella on grape tomatoes. Surface-inoculated grape tomatoes were washed with 4% ethanol, 200 ppm of chlorine, or one of six washing solutions (thymol [0.2 and 0.4 mg/ml], thyme oil [1 and 2 mg/ml], and carvacrol [0.2 and 0.4 mg/ml]) for 5 or 10 min. There was no significant difference in the reduction of S. enterica serovars when different washing times were used (P > 0.05). Thymol (especially at the concentration of 0.4 mg/ml) was the most effective (P < 0.05) among the three natural antimicrobial agents, which achieved >4.1-log reductions of S. enterica serovars Typhimurium, Kentucky, Senftenberg, and Enteritidis on grape tomatoes after a 5-min washing and >4.3-log reductions after a 10-min washing. A >4.6-log reduction in the S. enterica populations in comparison to control was observed with the use of thymol solutions. The uses of these antimicrobial agents achieved significant log reductions of Salmonella on inoculated grape tomatoes and decreased dramatically the risk of potential transmission of pathogens from tomatoes to washing solutions. None of these antimicrobial agents decreased the total phenolic and ascorbic acid content, nor did any of them change the color and pH values or affect the taste, aroma, or visual quality of grape tomatoes. Therefore, 0.4 mg/ml thymol has great potential to be an alternative to chlorine-based washing solution for fresh produce. PMID:21219747

  19. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  20. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  1. 5-azacytidine inhibits the proliferation of bladder cancer cells via reversal of the aberrant hypermethylation of the hepaCAM gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaorong; Chen, E; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yin; Quan, Zhen; Wu, Xiaohou; Luo, Chunli

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocyte cell adhesion molecule (hepaCAM), a tumor-suppressor gene, is rarely expressed in bladder carcinoma. However, little is known concerning the mechanisms of low hepaCAM expression in bladder cancer. Abnormal hypermethylation in the promoter plays a crucial role in cancer by silencing tumor-suppressor genes, which is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). In the present study, a total of 31 bladder cancer and 22 adjacent tissues were assessed by immunohistochemistry to detect DNMT3A/3B and hepaCAM expression. Methylation of hepaCAM was determined by methylation‑specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The mRNA and protein levels of DNMT3A/3B and hepaCAM were determined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis after treatment with 5-azacytidine (AZAC). Following AZAC treatment, the proliferation of bladder cancer cells was detected by CCK-8 and colony formation assays. Cell cycle distribution was examined by flow cytometry. To further evaluate the tumor‑suppressive roles of AZAC and the involved mechanisms, the anti-tumorigenicity of AZAC was tested in vivo. The expression of DNMT3A/3B protein was markedly increased in the bladder carcinoma tissues (P<0.05), and had a negative linear correlation with hepaCAM expression in the same patients according to Pearson's analysis (r=-0.7176/-0.7127, P<0.05). The MSP results indicated that the hepaCAM gene was hypermethylated in three bladder cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we found that downregulation of DNMT3A/3B expression, after treatment with AZAC, reversed the hypermethylation and expression of hepaCAM in bladder cancer cells. In addition, AZAC inhibited the proliferation of bladder cancer cells and arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase. The in vivo results showed that expression of DNMT3A/3B and hepaCAM as well as tumor growth of nude mice were markedly altered which corresponded with the in vitro results. Due to the ability to reactivate expression of hepaCAM and inhibit growth of bladder cancer cells

  2. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  3. The two-phase leaching of Pb, Zn and Cd contaminated soil using EDTA and electrochemical treatment of the washing solution.

    PubMed

    Finzgar, Neza; Lestan, Domen

    2008-11-01

    The feasibility of a novel two-phase method for remediation of Pb (1374 mg kg(-1)), Zn (1007 mg kg(-1)), and Cd (9.1 mg kg(-1)) contaminated soil was evaluated. In the first phase we used EDTA for leaching heavy metals from the soil. In the second phase we used an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) for the treatment and reuse of washing solution for soil rinsing (removal of the soil-retained, chelant-mobilized metallic species). In EAOP, a boron-doped diamond anode was used for the generation of hydroxyl radicals and oxidative decomposition of EDTA-metal complexes at a constant current density (15 mA cm(-2)). The released metals were removed from the solution by filtration as insoluble participate and by electro-deposition on the cathode. Four consecutive additions of 5.0 mm ol kg(-1) EDTA (total 20 mmol kg(-1)) removed 44% Pb, 14% Zn and 35% Cd from the soil. The mobility of the Pb, Zn and Cd (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) left in the soil after remediation was reduced by 1.6, 3.4 and 1.5 times, respectively. The Pb oral availability (Physiologically Based Extraction Test) in the simulated stomach phase was reduced by 2.4 and in the intestinal phase by 1.7 times. The discharge solution was clear, almost colorless, with pH 7.73 and 0.47 mg L(-1) Pb, 1.03 mg L(-1) Zn, bellow the limits of quantification of Cd and 0.023 mM EDTA. The novel method enables soil leaching with small water requirements and no wastewater generation or other emissions into the environment. PMID:18762318

  4. Domestic wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    System consists of filtration unit, reverse-osmosis module, tanks, pumps, plumbing, and various gauges, meters, and valves. After water is used in washing machine or shower, it is collected in holding tank. Water is pumped through series of five particulate filters. Pressure tank supplies processed water to commode water closet.

  5. Wash Your Hands

    MedlinePlus

    ... do if you don't have soap and clean, running water? Washing hands with soap and water is the ... specific questions. More Information CDC's Handwashing Work Handwashing: Clean Hands Save Lives Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings Water-related Hygiene Hand Hygiene to Help Prevent Flu ...

  6. Technology development: HEPA filter service life test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, K.N.; Cummings, K.G.; Leck, W.C.; Fretthold, J.K.

    1995-05-31

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site) has approximately 10,000 High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters installed in a variety of filter plenums. These ventilation/filtration plenum systems are used to control the release of airborne particulate contaminates to the environment during normal operations and also during potential design-based accidents. The operational integrity of the HEPA filter plenums is essential to maintaining the margins of safety as required by building specific Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARS) for protection of the public and environment. An Unreviewed Safety Question Determination (USQD), USDQ-RFP94.0615-ARS, was conducted in 1994 addressing the potential inadequacy of the safety envelope for Protected Area building HEPA plenums. While conducting this USQD, questions were raised concerning the maximum service life criteria for HEPA filters. Accident scenarios in existing FSARs identify conditions that could potentially cause plugging or damage of down stream HEPA filters as a result of impaction from failed filters. Additionally, available data indicates that HEPA filters experience structural degradation due to the effects of age. The Unresolved Safety Question (USQ) compensatory measures thus require testing and analysis of used HEPA filters in order to determine and implement service life criteria.

  7. Washing of waste prior to landfilling.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana

    2012-05-01

    The main impact produced by landfills is represented by the release of leachate emissions. Waste washing treatment has been investigated to evaluate its efficiency in reducing the waste leaching fraction prior to landfilling. The results of laboratory-scale washing tests applied to several significant residues from integrated management of solid waste are presented in this study, specifically: non-recyclable plastics from source separation, mechanical-biological treated municipal solid waste and a special waste, automotive shredded residues. Results obtained demonstrate that washing treatment contributes towards combating the environmental impacts of raw wastes. Accordingly, a leachate production model was applied, leading to the consideration that the concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), parameters of fundamental importance in the characterization of landfill leachate, from a landfill containing washed wastes, are comparable to those that would only be reached between 90 and 220years later in the presence of raw wastes. The findings obtained demonstrated that washing of waste may represent an effective means of reducing the leachable fraction resulting in a consequent decrease in landfill emissions. Further studies on pilot scale are needed to assess the potential for full-scale application of this treatment. PMID:22245736

  8. Efficacy of Hot Water Surface Pasteurization vs. Chlorine and Experimental Sanitizing Wash Treatments for Reducing Populations of Salmonella Poona on Inoculated Whole Cantaloupe Melons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous outbreaks of salmonellosis by Salmonella Poona have been associated with the consumption of cantaloupes. Commercial washing processes for cantaloupes are limited in their ability to inactivate and/or remove this human pathogen. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of ho...

  9. Single treatment with ethanol hand rub is ineffective against human rhinovirus--hand washing with soap and water removes the virus efficiently.

    PubMed

    Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Korpela, Terttu; Simonen-Tikka, Marja-Leena; Amiryousefi, Ali; Ziegler, Thedi; Roivainen, Merja; Hovi, Tapani

    2012-03-01

    Ethanol-containing hand rubs are used frequently as a substitute for hand washing with water and soap. However, not all viruses are inactivated by a short term rubbing with alcohol. The capacity of a single round of instructed and controlled hand cleaning with water and soap or ethanol-containing hand rub, respectively, was tested for removal of human rhinovirus administered onto the skin of healthy volunteers on the back of the hands. Hand washing with soap and water appeared to be much more efficient for removing rhinoviruses from skin than rubbing hands with an ethanol-containing disinfectant. After washing with soap and water the virus was detected in 3/9 (33.3%) test persons from the left hand and 1/9 (11.1%) cases from the right hand, whereas the virus was detected invariably by real-time RT-PCR from both hands after cleaning with alcohol hand rub (P-value <0.01). Both substances evaluated clinically were also tested in vitro for virucidal efficacy against Human rhinovirus2 (HRV2) using a standardized assay. Both tested substances were poor within the contact time used in the hand-cleaning test. In conclusion, thorough and conventional hand washing with water and soap can clean efficiently hands contaminated with the virus responsible for an extensive share of common cold episodes. PMID:22246844

  10. An alternative paper based tissue washing method for mass spectrometry imaging: localized washing and fragile tissue analysis.

    PubMed

    van Hove, Erika R Amstalden; Smith, Donald F; Fornai, Lara; Glunde, Kristine; Heeren, Ron M A

    2011-10-01

    Surface treatment of biological tissue sections improves detection of peptides and proteins for mass spectrometry imaging. However, liquid surface treatments can result in diffusion of surface analytes and fragile tissue sections can be easily damaged by typical washing solvents. Here, we present a new surface washing procedure for mass spectrometry imaging. This procedure uses solvent wetted fiber-free paper to enable local washing of tissue sections for mass spectrometry imaging and tissue profiling experiments. In addition, the method allows fragile tissues that cannot be treated by conventional washing techniques to be analyzed by mass spectrometry imaging. PMID:21952901

  11. The effect of media area on the dust holding capacity of deep pleat HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Dyment, J.; Loughborough, D.

    1997-08-01

    The high potential cost of storage, treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes places a premium on the longevity of installed HEPA filters in situations in radioactive processing facilities where dust capacity is a life determining factor. Previous work investigated the dust holding capacity v pressure drop characteristics of different designs of HEPA filter and also the effect of using graded density papers. This paper records an investigation of the effect of media area variation on the dust holding capacity of the {open_quotes}deep-pleat{close_quotes} design of HEPA filter. As in the previously reported work two test dusts (carbon black and sub micron sodium chloride) in the range (0.15 - 0.4{mu}m) were used. Media area adjustment was effected by varying the number of separators within the range 60 - 90. Results with the coarser dust allowed an optimum media area to be identified. Media areas greater or smaller than this optimum retained less dust than the optimum for the same terminal pressure drop. Conversely with the finer sodium chloride aerosol the dust holding capacity continued to increase up to the maximum area investigated. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Washing Out the Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    AJT Associates, Inc. (AJT) worked with NASA to develop a revolutionary ozone-based laundry system. AJT's TecH2Ozone(R) wash system presents its customers with an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe way to perform commercial laundering. TecH2Ozone significantly reduces the amount of water and chemical used as compared to traditional commercial laundry systems. This reduction has resulted in lower cost and shorter wash cycles. And due to the reduced use of chemicals, a significant portion of the rinse water is recycled back into the system for reuse. TecH2Ozone customers, such as hotels and other large commercial laundry facilities, have felt the benefits of this equipment. Because of the reduced cycle times, fewer washers are needed and there is a notable increase in the cleanliness of the laundry. The reduction in chemical residues is a boon to customers with allergies and those prone to skin irritation from chemicals retained in regular laundry. AJT Associates, Inc. (AJT) worked with NASA to develop a revolutionary ozone-based laundry system. AJT's TecH2Ozone(R) wash system presents its customers with an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe way to perform commercial laundering.

  13. Experience in the quality-assurance testing of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Burchsted, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The DOE HEPA filter quality-assurance test program was initiated in 1960 to ensure the supply of adequate filters for environmental control applications in DOE operations. The program has played a significant role in the development and improvement of HEPA filters, and has more than paid for itself. However, the receipt of large numbers of filters which require repair or waiver of specification requirements, even as recent as 1980 and 1981, indicates that there are problems in the HEPA filter manufacturing industry. It is clear that DOE users are receiving the cream of the crop of HEPA filters, but that other users who do not avail themselves of the DOE testing service are receiving filters of lesser quality.

  14. Specification for HEPA filters used by DOE contractors

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This standard establishes specification and testing requirements for High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters procured to provide personnel and environmental protection when installed in DOE nuclear facilities. The standard specifies minimum requirements to be included in contractor specifications.

  15. Acetaminophen inhibits NF-kappaB activation by interfering with the oxidant signal in murine Hepa 1-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Boulares, A H; Giardina, C; Inan, M S; Khairallah, E A; Cohen, S D

    2000-06-01

    A toxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) reduces the activity of NF-kappaB in mouse liver. NF-kappaB inactivation may be important for APAP toxicity, as this transcription factor can play a central role in maintaining hepatic viability. We recently reported that APAP likewise inhibits serum growth factor activation of NF-kappaB in a mouse hepatoma cell line (Hepa 1-6 cells). Here we present evidence that APAP's antioxidant activity may be involved in this NF-kappaB inhibition in Hepa 1-6 cells. Like the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC), APAP was found to suppress the H(2)O(2)-induced oxidation of an intracellular reactive oxygen species probe (dihydrodichlorofluorescein) in Hepa 1-6 cells. Treatment of Hepa 1-6 cells with H(2)O(2) was sufficient for NF-kappaB activation and IkappaBalpha degradation, and APAP was able to block both of these events. The APAP inhibition of NF-kappaB activation by serum growth factors may also be due to APAP's antioxidant activity, as the antioxidants NAC and PDTC likewise inhibit this activation. The potential role of NF-kappaB and oxidant-based growth factor signal transduction in APAP toxicity is discussed. PMID:10828269

  16. Differential sensitivity of metabolically competent and non-competent HepaRG cells to apoptosis induced by diclofenac combined or not with TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Al-Attrache, Houssein; Sharanek, Ahmad; Burban, Audrey; Burbank, Matthew; Gicquel, Thomas; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Morel, Isabelle; Guillouzo, André

    2016-09-01

    The role of reactive metabolites and inflammatory stress has been largely evoked in idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of diclofenac (DCF); however mechanisms remain poorly understood. We aimed to evaluate the influence of liver cell phenotype on the hepatotoxicity of DCF combined or not with TNF-α using differentiated and undifferentiated HepaRG cells, and for comparison, HepG2 cells. Our results demonstrate that after a 24h-treatment metabolizing HepaRG cells were less sensitive to DCF than their undifferentiated non-metabolizing counterparts as shown by lower oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses and lower activation of caspase 9. Differentiated HepaRG cells were also less sensitive than HepG2 cells. Their lower sensitivity to DCF was related to their high content in glutathione transferases. DCF-induced apoptotic effects were potentiated by TNF-α only in death receptor-expressing differentiated HepaRG and HepG2 cells and were associated with marked activation of caspase 8. TNF-α co-treatment did not aggravate DCF-induced cholestatic features. Altogether, our results demonstrate that (i) lower sensitivity to DCF of differentiated HepaRG cells compared to their non-metabolically active counterparts was related to their high detoxifying capacity, giving support to the higher sensitivity of nonhepatic tissues than liver to this drug; (ii) TNF-α-potentiation of DCF cytotoxicity occurred only in death receptor-expressing cells. PMID:27313093

  17. Scaling-up parameters for site restoration process using surfactant-enhanced soil washing coupled with wastewater treatment by Fenton and Fenton-like processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Cossio, Horacio; Sánchez-Lopez, Adriana D; Córdova, Felipe; Peralta-Herández, Juan M; Torres, Luis G

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of scaling-up parameters for a site restoration process using a surfactant-enhanced soil washing (SESW) process followed by the application of advanced oxidation processes (Fenton and photo-Fenton) was performed. For the SESW, different parameters were varied and the soil washing efficiency for pesticide (2,4-D) removal assessed. The resulting wastewater was treated using the Fenton reaction in the absence and presence of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for pesticide removal. Results showed that agitation speed of 1550 rpm was preferable for the best pesticide removal from contaminated soil. It was possible to wash contaminated soils with different soil concentrations; however the power drawn was higher as the soil concentration increased. Complete removal of the pesticide and the remaining surfactant was achieved using different reaction conditions. The best degradation conditions were for the photo-Fenton process using [Fe(II)] = 0.3 mM; [H2O2] = 4.0 mM where complete 2,4-D and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) removal was observed after 8 and 10 minutes of reaction, respectively. Further increase in the hydrogen peroxide or iron salt concentration did not show any improvement in the reaction rate. Kinetic parameters, i.e. reaction rate constant and scaling-up parameters, were determined. It was shown that, by coupling both processes (SESW and AOPs), it is possible the restoration of contaminated sites. PMID:23530350

  18. EPA site demonstration of the Biotrol Soil Washing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, M.K.; Skovronek, H.S.; Ellis, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    A pilot-scale soil washing process, patented by BioTrol, was demonstrated on soil that was contaminated by wood treating waste. The BioTrol Soil Washing was demonstrated in a treatment train sequence with two other pilot-scale units of BioTrol technologies for treatment of waste streams from the soil washer. The three technologies of the treatment train were: The BioTrol Soil Washer (BSW), the BioTrol Aqueous Treatment System (BATS), and the Slurry Bioreactor (SBR). The BioTrol processes were evaluated on pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which were the primary soil contaminants at the site. The sandy site soil, consisting of less than 10% of fines, was well suited for treatment by soil washing. The BSW successfully separated the feed soil (100% by weight) into 83% of washed soil, 10% of woody residues, and 7% of fines. The soil washer achieved up to 89% removal of PCP and PAHs, based on the difference between their levels in the feed soil and in the washed soil. The BATS degraded up to 94% of PCP in the process water from soil washing. The SBR achieved over 90% removals of PCP and 70-90% removals of PAHs, respectively from the soil washing. Cost of a commercial-scale soil washing, assuming use of all three technologies, was estimated to be $168 per ton of treated soil.

  19. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOIL WASHING SYSTEM - BIOTROL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three component technologies of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS). Tested in the SITE demonstration were a Soil Washer (SW), and Aqueous Treatment System (ATS), and a Slurry Bio-Reactor (SBR). The Soil Washer operates on the principle that a significant fraction of the...

  20. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING WEST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING WEST. THE NONHISTORIC CHEMICAL BUILDING IS SEEN IN THE BACKGROUND. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  1. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST. PIPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST. PIPING IN FOREGROUND IS NOT RELATED TO THE MACHINE. THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 3 IS SEEN AT THE LOWER LEFT. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  2. Soil washing of fluorine contaminated soil using various washing solutions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Jo, Raehyun; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-03-01

    Bench-scale soil washing experiments were conducted to remove fluoride from contaminated soils. Five washing solutions including hydrochloric acid (HCl), nitric acid (HNO3), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and tartaric acid (C4H6O6) were tested. The concentration of the washing solutions used ranged from 0.1 to 3 M with a liquid to solid ratio of 10. The soil washing results showed that the most effective washing solution for the removal of fluoride from contaminated soils was HCl. The highest fluoride removal results of approximately 97 % from the contaminated soil were obtained using 3 M HCl. The fluoride removal efficiency of the washing solution increases in the following order: C4H6O6 < NaOH < H2SO4 < HNO3 < HCl. PMID:25552323

  3. HEPA Filter Performance under Adverse Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    This study involved challenging nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under a variety of conditions that can arise in Department of Energy (DOE) applications such as: low or high RH, controlled and uncontrolled challenge, and filters with physically damaged media or seals (i.e., leaks). Reported findings correlate filter function as measured by traditional differential pressure techniques in comparison with simultaneous instrumental determination of up and down stream PM concentrations. Additionally, emission rates and failure signatures will be discussed for filters that have either failed or exceeded their usable lifetime. Significant findings from this effort include the use of thermocouples up and down stream of the filter housing to detect the presence of moisture. Also demonstrated in the moisture challenge series of tests is the effect of repeated wetting of the filter. This produces a phenomenon referred to as transient failure before the tensile strength of the media weakens to the point of physical failure. An evaluation of the effect of particle size distribution of the challenge aerosol on loading capacity of filters is also included. Results for soot and two size distributions of KCl are reported. Loading capacities for filters ranged from approximately 70 g of soot to nearly 900 g for the larger particle size distribution of KCl. (authors)

  4. HEPA filter leaching concept validation trials at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravartty, A.C.

    1995-04-01

    The enclosed report documents six New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) HEPA filter leaching trials conducted at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant using a filter leaching system to validate the filter leaching treatment concept. The test results show that a modified filter leaching system will be able to successfully remove both hazardous and radiological constituents to RCRA disposal levels. Based on the success of the filter leach trials, the existing leaching system will be modified to provide a safe, simple, effective, and operationally flexible filter leaching system.

  5. Effects of Shampoo and Water Washing on Hair Cortisol Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Amanda F.; Meyer, Jerrold S.; Henchey, Elizabeth; Dettmer, Amanda M.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Measurement of cortisol in hair is an emerging biomarker for chronic stress in human and nonhuman primates. Currently unknown, however, is the extent of potential cortisol loss from hair that has been repeatedly exposed to shampoo and/or water. Methods Pooled hair samples from 20 rhesus monkeys were subjected to five treatment conditions: 10, 20, or 30 shampoo washes, 20 water-only washes, or a no-wash control. For each wash, hair was exposed to a dilute shampoo solution or tap water for 45 s, rinsed 4 times with tap water, and rapidly dried. Samples were then processed for cortisol extraction and analysis using previously published methods. Results Hair cortisol levels were significantly reduced by washing, with an inverse relationship between number of shampoo washes and the cortisol concentration. This effect was mainly due to water exposure, as cortisol levels following 20 water-only washes were similar to those following 20 shampoo treatments. Conclusions Repeated exposure to water with or without shampoo appears to leach cortisol from hair, yielding values that underestimate the amount of chronic hormone deposition within the shaft. Collecting samples proximal to the scalp and obtaining hair washing frequency data may be valuable when conducting human hair cortisol studies. PMID:21034727

  6. Effect of DOP heterodispersion on HEPA-filter-penetration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.

    1984-08-09

    The accuracy of the standard US test method for certifying High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters has been in question since the finding by Hinds, et al. that the dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol used in the test is not monodisperse as had been assumed and that particle-size analyzers, or owls, could not distinguish between different particle-size distributions with the same owl reading. We have studied theoretically and experimentally the filter efficiency for different DOP size distributions with the same owl reading. Our studies show that the effect of varying DOP size distributions on the measured HEPA-filter penetration depends on the light-scattering-photometer response and on the HEPA-filter penetration curve, both measured as a function of particle size. HEPA-filter penetration for a heterodisperse DOP aerosol may be increased, decreased, or remain the same when compared to the filter penetration for monodisperse aerosols. Using experimental HEPA-filter penetration and photometer response curves, we show that heterodisperse DOP aerosols (D/sub cmd/ 0.19 and sigma g = 1.4) yield 24% lower penetrations than that for monodisperse DOP aerosols (D/sub cmd/ = 0.3 and sigma g = 1.0). This surprisingly small effect of the DOP heterodispersion on HEPA-filter penetration is due to the response function of the owl that is similar to the response of the photometer. Changes in the particle-size distribution are therefore seen in a similar fashion by both the photometer and the owl. We also show that replacing the owl with modern particle-size spectrometers may lead to large errors in filter penetration because the particle-size spectrometers do not provide measurements that correspond to the photometer measurements. 15 references, 16 figures.

  7. Washing of the AW-101 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta

    2000-03-31

    BNFL Inc. (BNFL) is under contract with the US Department of Energy, River Protection Project (DOE-RPP) to design, construct, and operate facilities for treating wastes stored in the single-shell and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The DOE-BNFL RPP contract identifies two feeds to the waste treatment plant: (1) primarily liquid low-activity waste (LAW) consisting of less than 2 wt% entrained solids and (2) high-level waste (HLW) consisting of 10 to 200 g/L solids slurry. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AW-101 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-9, Rev. 0, LAW Entrained Solids Water Wash and Caustic Leach Testing. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan. Based on the results of the 0.01 M NaOH washing, a decision was made by BNFL to not proceed with the caustic leaching test. The composition of the washed solids was such that caustic leaching would not result in significant reduction in the immobilized HLW volume.

  8. Sludge pretreatment chemistry evaluation: Enhanced sludge washing separation factors

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, N.G.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the work conducted in Fiscal Year 1994 by the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Treatment Science Task. The main purpose of this task, is to provide the technical basis and scientific understanding to support TWRS baseline decisions and actions, such as the development of an enhanced sludge washing process to reduce the volume of waste that will require high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. One objective within the Sludge Pretreatment Chemistry Evaluation Subtask was to establish wash factors for various SST (single-shell tank) sludges. First, analytical data were compiled from existing tank waste characterization reports. These data were summarized on tank-specific worksheets that provided a uniform format for reviewing and comparing data, as well as the means to verify whether the data set for each tank was complete. Worksheets were completed for 27 SST wastes. The analytical water wash data provided tank-specific information about the fraction of each component that dissolves with water, i.e., an estimate of tank-specific wash factors for evaluating tank-by-tank processing. These wash data were then used collectively to evaluate some of the wash factors that are assumed for the overall SST waste inventory; specifically, wash factors for elements that would be found primarily in sludges. The final step in this study was to incorporate the characterization and wash factor data into a spreadsheet that provides insight into the effect of enhanced sludge washing on individual tank sludges as well as for groups of sludges that may be representative of different waste types. Spreadsheet results include the estimated mass and percentage of each element that would be removed with washing and leaching. Furthermore, estimated compositions are given of the final wash and leach streams and residual solids, in terms of both concentration and dry weight percent.

  9. Teens and Acne Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of treatments Benzoyl peroxide Benzoyl peroxide wash, lotion, or gel—the most effective acne treatment you ... and make it redder than the wash or lotion, so try the wash or lotion first. How ...

  10. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  11. HEPA/vaccine plan for indoor anthrax remediation.

    PubMed

    Wein, Lawrence M; Liu, Yifan; Leighton, Terrance J

    2005-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to compare 2 indoor remediation strategies in the aftermath of an outdoor release of 1.5 kg of anthrax spores in lower Manhattan. The 2 strategies are the fumigation approach used after the 2001 postal anthrax attack and a HEPA/vaccine plan, which relies on HEPA vacuuming, HEPA air cleaners, and vaccination of reoccupants. The HEPA/vaccine approach leads to few anthrax cases among reoccupants if applied to all but the most heavily contaminated buildings, and recovery is much faster than under the decades-long fumigation plan. Only modest environmental sampling is needed. A surge capacity of 10,000 to 20,000 Hazmat workers is required to perform remediation within 6 to 12 months and to avoid permanent mass relocation. Because of the possibility of a campaign of terrorist attacks, serious consideration should be given to allowing or encouraging voluntary self-service cleaning of lightly contaminated rooms by age-appropriate, vaccinated, partially protected (through masks or hoods) reoccupants or owners. PMID:15705325

  12. ALTERNATE HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTRATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bishop; Robert Goldsmith; Karsten Nielsen; Phillip Paquette

    2002-08-16

    In Phase IIA of this project, CeraMem has further developed and scaled up ceramic HEPA filters that are appropriate for use on filtration of vent gas from HLW tanks at DOE sites around the country. This work included procuring recrystallized SiC monoliths, developing membrane and cement materials, and defining a manufacturing process for the production of prototype full sizes HEPA filters. CeraMem has demonstrated that prototype full size filters can be manufactured by producing 9 full size filters that passed DOP aerosol testing at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. One of these filters was supplied to the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) for process tests using simulated HLW tank waste. SRTC has reported that the filter was regenerable (with some increase in pressure drop) and that the filter retained its HEPA retention capability. CeraMem has also developed a Regenerable HEPA Filter System (RHFS) design and acceptance test plan that was reviewed by DOE personnel. The design and acceptance test plan form the basis of the system proposal for follow-on work in Phase IIB of this project.

  13. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF HEPA FILTRATION UNITS AT ASBESTOS ABATEMENT SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine-the filtering efficiencies of 31 high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units in use at asbestos-abatement projects. article-removal efficiencies for these units ranged from 90.53 to > 99.99 percent. ineteen (61%) of the units tested ...

  14. HEPA/Vaccine Plan for Indoor Anthrax Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yifan; Leighton, Terrance J.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to compare 2 indoor remediation strategies in the aftermath of an outdoor release of 1.5 kg of anthrax spores in lower Manhattan. The 2 strategies are the fumigation approach used after the 2001 postal anthrax attack and a HEPA/vaccine plan, which relies on HEPA vacuuming, HEPA air cleaners, and vaccination of reoccupants. The HEPA/vaccine approach leads to few anthrax cases among reoccupants if applied to all but the most heavily contaminated buildings, and recovery is much faster than under the decades-long fumigation plan. Only modest environmental sampling is needed. A surge capacity of 10,000 to 20,000 Hazmat workers is required to perform remediation within 6 to 12 months and to avoid permanent mass relocation. Because of the possibility of a campaign of terrorist attacks, serious consideration should be given to allowing or encouraging voluntary self-service cleaning of lightly contaminated rooms by age-appropriate, vaccinated, partially protected (through masks or hoods) reoccupants or owners. PMID:15705325

  15. Histamine H2 receptor antagonism by T-593: studies on cAMP generation in Hepa cells expressing histamine H2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, T; Ono, K; Watanabe, T; Inoie, M; Arai, H; Kimura, S; Kurokawa, K

    1999-07-01

    Histamine H2 receptor antagonism by T-593 was investigated in Hepa cells expressing canine histamine H2 receptors. T-593 inhibited generation of cAMP in Hepa cells stimulated by 10(-5) mol/l histamine with an IC50 value of 2.3 x 10(-6) mol/l, (S)-(-)-T-593, one of the enantiomers comprising racemic T-593, inhibited cAMP generation with an IC50 value of 6.1 x 10(-7) mol/l. On the other hand, the other enantiomer (R)-(+)-T-593 exhibited only a negligible effect. Incubation of the cell with (S)-(-)-T-593 for 60 min depressed the maximal response of the concentration-response curve of histamine with a nonparallel rightward shift. The slope of a Schild plot was 1.27. In contrast, (S)-(-)-T-593 caused a parallel rightward shift of the curve, with a Schild plot slope that did not significantly differ from unity, by treating the cells for 15 min. The H2 receptor-blocking action of (S)-(-)-T-593 remained almost unaffected after washing out the drug, whereas the effect of ranitidine was reversible after washing. These results suggest that T-593 possesses a time-dependent insurmountable antagonistic action against histamine H2 receptor. T-593 may interact with the histamine H2 receptor molecule in a slowly associable and dissociable manner. PMID:10352421

  16. Fostering hand washing before lunch by students attending a special needs young adult program.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which allowed the quality of hand washing to be assessed by comparing the amount visible before and after hand washing using a 3-point scale. Following a baseline period in which hand washing was assessed, participants were exposed to a hand washing training procedure, which improved one participant's hand washing. Next, a lottery system was imposed in which the number of lottery tickets earned each day depended on the quality of hand washing, specifically, on the rating assigned (0, 1, or 2). This condition was associated with improved hand washing by the other four participants. Finally, a condition adding feedback to the lottery system resulted in further improvements in the quality of hand washing for all participants. Follow up data indicated modest maintenance of hand washing after lunch. These results suggest that treatment packages similar to that used in the present study merit further investigation and that Glo Germ is of value in ascertaining the quality of hand washing. PMID:22940163

  17. Modulation of CYP3A4 activity alters the cytotoxicity of lipophilic phycotoxins in human hepatic HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Ferron, P J; Hogeveen, K; De Sousa, G; Rahmani, R; Dubreil, E; Fessard, V; Le Hegarat, L

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate (i) the cytotoxic effects of lipophilic phycotoxins, including okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxin-1 and -2 (DTX-1 and DTX-2), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2), yessotoxin (YTX), spirolide (SPX), and azaspiracids-1, -2 and -3 (AZA-1, AZA-2 and AZA-3), in human HepaRG cells using a multiparametric high content analysis approach, (ii) the ability of nine lipophilic phycotoxins to act as PXR agonists in a HepG2-PXR cell line, (iii) their potential to induce CYP450 activity, and (iv) the role of CYP3A4 in cytotoxicity induced by lipophilic phycotoxins. Our results indicate that while OA, DTX-1 and DTX-2 activated PXR-dependent transcriptional activity in HepG2 cells, no increase of CYP450 (1A2, 3A4, 2C9, 2C19) activities were observed in HepaRG cell following a 72h treatment with these toxins. Multiparametric analysis showed that OA, DTX-1, DTX-2, and PTX-2 were highly cytotoxic in HepaRG cells; inducing cell loss, activation of caspase-3 and γ-H2AX formation. However, no toxicity was observed for YTX, SPX, and AZAs. Moreover, we found that inhibition of CYP3A4 activity by ketoconazole enhances the toxic effects of OA, DTX-1, DTX-2, and PTX-2 in HepaRG cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of some lipophilic phycotoxins decreases their in vitro toxicity. PMID:26956883

  18. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE OUTSIDE FACE OF THE NORTH WALL OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 3 IS SEEN AT THE RIGHT. THE SETTLING RESERVOIR IS ELEVATED ABOVE THE FILTERING RESERVOIR TO ACHIEVE GRAVITY WATER FLOW FROM THE SETTLING RESERVOIR INTO THE FILTERING RESERVOIR. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  19. Performance Evaluation of Axial Flow AG-1 FC and Prototype FM (High Strength) HEPA Filters - 13123

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Wilson, John A.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2013-07-01

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are routinely used in DOE nuclear containment activities. The Nuclear Air Cleaning Handbook (NACH) stipulates that air cleaning devices and equipment used in DOE nuclear applications must meet the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) standard. This testing activity evaluates two different axial flow HEPA filters, those from AG-1 Sections FC and FM. Section FM is under development and has not yet been added to AG-1 due to a lack of qualification data available for these filters. Section FC filters are axial flow units that utilize a fibrous glass filtering medium. The section FM filters utilize a similar fibrous glass medium, but also have scrim backing. The scrim-backed filters have demonstrated the ability to endure pressure impulses capable of completely destroying FC filters. The testing activities presented herein will examine the total lifetime loading for both FC and FM filters under ambient conditions and at elevated conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Results will include loading curves, penetration curves, and testing condition parameters. These testing activities have been developed through collaborations with representatives from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), New Mexico State University, and Mississippi State University. (authors)

  20. Metabolomic signatures in lipid-loaded HepaRGs reveal pathways involved in steatotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Brown, MV; Compton, SA; Milburn, MV; Lawton, KA; Cheatham, B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) describes a spectrum of disorders including simple steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. With the increased prevalence of obesity, and consequently NAFLD, there is a need for novel therapeutics in this area. To facilitate this effort, we developed a cellular model of hepatic steatosis using HepaRG cells and determined the resulting biochemical alterations. Design and methods Using global metabolomic profiling, by means of a novel metabolite extraction procedure, we examined the metabolic profiles in response to the saturated fatty acid palmitate, and a mixture of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, palmitate and oleate (1:2). Results We observed elevated levels of the branched chain amino acids, TCA cycle intermediates, sphingosine and acylcarnitines, and reduced levels of carnitine in the steatotic HepaRG model with both palmitate and palmitate:oleate treatments. In addition, palmitate-induced steatotic cells selectively displayed elevated levels of diacylglycerols and monoacylglycerols, as well as altered bile acid metabolism. Conclusion This global metabolomics approach reveals biochemical changes in pathways important in the transition to hepatic steatosis including insulin resistance, altered mitochondrial metabolism, and oxidative stress. Moreover, our data demonstrate the utility of this in vitro model for investigating mechanisms of steatotic progression, insulin resistance and lipotoxicity in NAFLD. PMID:23512965

  1. Washing of soils spiked with various pollutants by surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.C.C.; Chang, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, the batch-type of washing with surfactant solutions was employed for the treatment of soils artificially contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals. 15 industrial grade surfactants were tested. Washing was conducing by adding surfactant solution to the soils and mixing for one hour, then centrifuging it and analyzing the supernatant. Deionized water was used for soil washing for comparison. Results indicated that deionized water performed as well as Surfactant No. 1 in washing VOC-contaminated soils. Therefore, it is concluded that the VOCs tested can be easily washed from soils by rain water. In washing PAH-contaminated soils, nonionic surfactants performed better than anionic surfactants in terms of removal efficiency. The amphoteric surfactant performed worst in washing PAH-contaminated soils. Generally, surfactants are useful in removing cadmium from soils, but are not useful for the removal of lead and copper. Amphoteric, anionic, and low pH cationic surfactants were the most effective of those tested. For PAH/heavy metals-contaminated soils, removal efficiencies were lower than that of soils containing a single contaminant.

  2. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  3. 27 CFR 19.328 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 19.328 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.328 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits therefrom may be run into a wash tank or a...

  4. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  5. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  6. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  7. A review of DOE HEPA filter component test activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slawski, J.W.; Bresson, J.F.; Scripsick, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    All HEPA filters purchased for installation in DOE nuclear facilities are required to be tested at a Filter Test Facility (FTF) prior to installation. The number of HEPA filters purchased by DOE has been reduced so much that the Hanford FTF was closed. From Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to 1994, funding was not provided to the FTF Technical Support Group (TSG) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. As a consequence, Round Robin Tests (RRTs), performed twice each year by the FTFs to assess constituency of test results among the FTFs, were not performed in FY 1992 and FY 1993. The Annual Reports of FTF test activities were not prepared for FY 1992 - 1995. Technical support provided to the FTFs was minimal. There is talk of closing a second FTF, and ongoing discussions as to whether DOE will continue to fund operation of the FTFs. In FY 1994, DOE Defense Programs commenced funding the TSG. RRT data for FY 1994 and 1995 have been entered into the database; the FY 1994 RRT report has been issued; and the FY 1995 RRT report is in progress. Data from semiannual reports have been retrieved and entered into the database. Standards related to HEPA filter test and procurement activities are now scheduled for issuance by FY 1996. Continuation of these activities depends on whether DOE will continue to support the HEPA filter test program. The history and activities of the FTFs and the TSG at Los Alamos have been reported at previous Air Cleaning Conferences. Data from the FY 1991 Annual Report of FTF activities was presented at the 1992 Air Cleaning Conference. Preparation of the Annual Reports was temporarily suspended in 1992. However, all of the FTF Semiannual report data have been retrieved and entered into the data base. This paper focuses primarily on the results of HEPA filter tests conducted by FTFs during FY 1992 - FY 1995, and the possible effects of the DOE program uncertainties on the quality of HEPA filters for installation at the DOE sites. 15 refs., 13 tabs.

  8. PPAR agonists reduce steatosis in oleic acid-overloaded HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Anthérieu, Sébastien; Vluggens, Aurore; Umbdenstock, Thierry; Claude, Nancy; Moureyre-Spire, Catherine de la; Weaver, Richard J.; Guillouzo, André

    2014-04-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common form of chronic liver disease there is no pharmacological agent approved for its treatment. Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are closely associated with hepatic lipid metabolism, they seem to play important roles in NAFLD. However, the effects of PPAR agonists on steatosis that is a common pathology associated with NAFLD, remain largely controversial. In this study, the effects of various PPAR agonists, i.e. fenofibrate, bezafibrate, troglitazone, rosiglitazone, muraglitazar and tesaglitazar on oleic acid-induced steatotic HepaRG cells were investigated after a single 24-hour or 2-week repeat treatment. Lipid vesicles stained by Oil-Red O and triglycerides accumulation caused by oleic acid overload, were decreased, by up to 50%, while fatty acid oxidation was induced after 2-week co-treatment with PPAR agonists. The greatest effects on reduction of steatosis were obtained with the dual PPARα/γ agonist muraglitazar. Such improvement of steatosis was associated with up-regulation of genes related to fatty acid oxidation activity and down-regulation of many genes involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, modulation of expression of some nuclear receptor genes, such as FXR, LXRα and CAR, which are potent actors in the control of lipogenesis, was observed and might explain repression of de novo lipogenesis. Conclusion: Altogether, our in vitro data on steatotic HepaRG cells treated with PPAR agonists correlated well with clinical investigations, bringing a proof of concept that drug-induced reversal of steatosis in human can be evaluated in in vitro before conducting long-term and costly in vivo studies in animals and patients. - Highlights: • There is no pharmacological agent approved for the treatment of NAFLD. • This study demonstrates that PPAR agonists can reduce fatty acid-induced steatosis. • Some nuclear receptors appear to be potent actors in the control

  9. Study of Soil Washing for Remediation of Pb and Zn Contaminated Coastal Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, S.; Lee, M.

    2013-12-01

    As a result of analyzing the pre-treatment process of Pb, Zn in contaminated coastal landfill soil presented by Korean Soil Analysis Method, the each concentration was presented 577.00mg/kg, 3894.34mg/kg. This soil was critically contaminated with Pb and Zn because it was exceeded the Standard of soil contamination(2area: Pb-400mg/kg, Zn-600mg/kg). Soil remediation efficiency of the soil washing process for the removal of Pb and Zn was determined to be consistent with the results. The batch experiment on the several washing solutions(HCl, HNO3), washing solutions concentrations(0.1-0.8M) and the ratio of soil vs. solution for soil washing(1:3, 1:5 and 1:10) was performed. The results of experiments, washing time was appropriate in 30 minutes. The removal efficiency of soil washing increased as the ratio of soil vs. washing solution increased. But, in the case of heavy metals, the soil vs. solution for soil washing was determined as the optimal ratio of 1 : 5. Five consecutive soil washing with 0.5M of HCl and HNO3 solutions were performed. Results of experiments, in case of Pb was removed by target removal efficiency from soil on the twice washing. With in case of Zn was over on the first washing by target removal efficiency, but suggesting that twice consecutive soil washing is desirable as stability at field. Results of consecutive soil washing experiments, the removal efficiency maintained lower than 10 % after the 4th washing. From the results, demanding consecutive washing is not recommended. Results about the heavy metal contaminated soil washing experiments of the coastal landfill, in the case of HCl with more than 0.5 M of solution was performed at 1:5 of soil ratio vs. solution, 30 minutes of washing time and 2-3 consecutive soil washing. And in the case of HNO3 with 0.8 M of solution was performed various ratios of soil vs. washing solution, suggesting that 2-3 consecutive soil washing was reached to Pb and Zn target removal efficiency. Key words

  10. Overhead robot system for remote HEPA filter replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesener, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    A high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system for facility exhaust air filtraction of radioactive particles has been designed that utilizes a modified industrial gantry robot to remotely replace filter elements. The system filtration design capacity can be readily changed by increasing or decreasing the number of plenums, which only affects the cell length and robot bridge travel. The parallel flow plenum design incorporates remote HEPA filter housings, which are commercially available. Filter removal and replacement is accomplished with the robot under sequenced program control. A custom-designed robot control console, which interfaces with the standard gantry robot power center controller, minimizes operator training. Critical sequence steps are operator verified, using closed-circuit television (CCTV), before proceeding to the next programmed stop point. The robot can be operated in a teleoperator mode to perform unstructured maintenance tasks, such as replacing filter housing components and cell lights.

  11. Response of HEPA filters to simulated-accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.; Smith, P.R.; Fenton, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters have been subjected to simulated accident conditions to determine their response to abnormal operating events. Both domestic and European standard and high-capacity filters have been evaluated to determine their response to simulated fire, explosion, and tornado conditions. The HEPA filter structural limitations for tornado and explosive loadings are discussed. In addition, filtration efficiencies during these accident conditions are reported for the first time. Our data indicate efficiencies between 80% and 90% for shock loadings below the structural limit level. We describe two types of testing for ineffective filtration - clean filters exposed to pulse-entrained aerosol and dirty filters exposed to tornado and shock pulses. Efficiency and material loss data are described. Also, the resonse of standard HEPA filters to simulated fire conditions is presented. We describe a unique method of measuring accumulated combustion products on the filter. Additionally, data relating to pressure drop vs accumulated mass during plugging are reported for simulated combustion aerosols. The effects of concentration and moisture levels on filter plugging were evaluated. We are obtaining all of the above data so that mathematical models can be developed for fire, explosion, and tornado accident analysis computer codes. These computer codes can be used to assess the response of nuclear air cleaning systems to accident conditions.

  12. Performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankum, D.P.; Costigan, G.

    1995-02-01

    Accidents in nuclear facilities involving fires may have implications upon the ventilation systems where high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are used to minimise the airborne release of radioactive or toxic particles. The Filter Development Section at Harwell Laboratory has been investigating the effect of temperature on the performance of HEPA filters under hot dynamic conditions[{sub 1}] for a number of years. The test rig is capable of delivering air flows of 10001/s (at ambient conditions) at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C, where measurements of the penetration and pressure drop across the filter are obtained. This paper reports the experiments on different constructions of HEPA filters; rectangular and circular. The filters were tested at an air temperature of 200{degrees}C for up to 48 hours at the rated airflow to assess their performance. The penetration measurements for rectangular filters were observed to be below 0.021% after prolonged operation. In a number of cases, holes appeared along the pleat creases of circular filters although the penetration remained below 1%. The sealing gasket for these filters was noted to deform with temperature, permitting a leakage path. A prototype high strength circular filter was evaluated at temperatures of up to 400{degrees}C with a penetration less than 0.65%.

  13. Drug-metabolising enzymes are down-regulated by hypoxia in differentiated human hepatoma HepaRG cells: HIF-1alpha involvement in CYP3A4 repression.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Claire; Hori, Tamaki; Loyer, Pascal; Aninat, Caroline; Ishida, Seiichi; Glaise, Denise; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Boudjema, Karim; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Corlu, Anne; Morel, Fabrice

    2009-11-01

    Weak blood irrigation within solid tumours including hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) plays an important role in resistance to anticancer drugs by decreasing accessibility of cytotoxic agents to tumour cells. Reduced oxygen levels, or hypoxia, also contribute to drug resistance because many anticancer drugs require molecular oxygen to be cytotoxic. Our aim was to develop a new in vitro model mimicking hypoxic cells within HCCs in order to further explore the molecular responses to hypoxia, including regulation of drug-metabolising enzymes (DMEs) expression. For this purpose, we used the highly differentiated human hepatoma HepaRG cells cultured under either normoxic or hypoxic (24h at 1% O(2)) conditions. Gene and protein expressions were investigated by quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. We showed that HepaRG cells adapt to prolonged moderate hypoxia by a switch from aerobic to anaerobic glycolysis and a repression of critical genes involved in amino acid, lipid and ethanol metabolisms. Importantly, expression of several DMEs (particularly cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and phase II enzymes) and xenosensors (CAR, PXR and AhR) was down-regulated and CYPs activities (using testosterone and paclitaxel as substrates) were decreased during hypoxia. In addition, a new role for HIF-1alpha in the repression of CYP3A4 is demonstrated in cells treated with chemical inducers of HIF-1alpha, cobalt chloride or desferrioxamine, and by transfecting untreated HepaRG cells with HIF-1alpha expression vector. In conclusion, HepaRG cells cultured under hypoxia might mimic metabolic changes occurring within poorly irrigated differentiated HCCs. Furthermore, hypoxia down-regulates hepatic DMEs, a phenomenon that might compromise chemotherapy effectiveness in HCC treatment. Thus, HepaRG cells might represent a new in vitro model to test anticancer agents in hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. PMID:19695866

  14. A Window-Washing Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Skyscrapers sure do have a lot of windows, and these windows are cleaned and checked regularly. All this takes time, money, and puts workers at potential risk. Might there be a better way to do it? In this article, the author discusses a window-washing challenge and describes how students can tackle this task, pick up the challenge, and creatively…

  15. Effects of Benzyl Isothiocyanate and Its N-Acetylcysteine Conjugate on Induction of Detoxification Enzymes in Hepa1c1c7 Mouse Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2014-01-01

    The induction of detoxification enzymes by benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) and its synthetic N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) conjugate (NAC-BITC) was examined in Hepa1c1c7 murine hepatoma cells. BITC and NAC-BITC inhibited Hepa1c1c7 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. Cell growth was 4.5~57.2% lower in Hepa1c1c7 cells treated with 0.1~10 μM BITC than in control-treated Hepa1c1c7 cells. The NAC-BITC treatment had a similar inhibitory pattern on Hepa1c1c7 cell growth; 0.5 μM and 10 μM NAC-BITC decreased cell growth by 13.6% and 47.4%, respectively. Treatment of Hepa1c1c7 cells with 0.1~2.0 μM BITC also elicited a dose-response effect on the induction of quinone reductase quinone reductase (QR) activity and QR mRNA expression. Treatment with 1 μM and 2 μM BITC caused 1.8- and 2.8-fold inductions of QR mRNA, respectively. By comparison, treatment with 1 μM and 2 μM NAC-BITC caused 1.6- and 1.9-fold inductions of QR mRNA, respectively. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP2E1 induction were lower in 0.1~2 μM BITC-treated cells than in control-treated cells. CYP2E1 activity was 1.2-fold greater in 0.1 μM NAC-BITC-treated cells than in control-treated cells. However, the CYP2E1 activity of cells treated with higher concentrations (i.e., 1~2 μM) of NAC-BITC was similar to the activity of control-treated cells. Considering the potential of isothiocyanatesto prevent cancer, these results provide support for the use of BITC and NAC-BITC conjugates as chemopreventive agents. PMID:25580390

  16. Effects of benzyl isothiocyanate and its N-acetylcysteine conjugate on induction of detoxification enzymes in hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2014-12-01

    The induction of detoxification enzymes by benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) and its synthetic N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) conjugate (NAC-BITC) was examined in Hepa1c1c7 murine hepatoma cells. BITC and NAC-BITC inhibited Hepa1c1c7 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. Cell growth was 4.5~57.2% lower in Hepa1c1c7 cells treated with 0.1~10 μM BITC than in control-treated Hepa1c1c7 cells. The NAC-BITC treatment had a similar inhibitory pattern on Hepa1c1c7 cell growth; 0.5 μM and 10 μM NAC-BITC decreased cell growth by 13.6% and 47.4%, respectively. Treatment of Hepa1c1c7 cells with 0.1~2.0 μM BITC also elicited a dose-response effect on the induction of quinone reductase quinone reductase (QR) activity and QR mRNA expression. Treatment with 1 μM and 2 μM BITC caused 1.8- and 2.8-fold inductions of QR mRNA, respectively. By comparison, treatment with 1 μM and 2 μM NAC-BITC caused 1.6- and 1.9-fold inductions of QR mRNA, respectively. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP2E1 induction were lower in 0.1~2 μM BITC-treated cells than in control-treated cells. CYP2E1 activity was 1.2-fold greater in 0.1 μM NAC-BITC-treated cells than in control-treated cells. However, the CYP2E1 activity of cells treated with higher concentrations (i.e., 1~2 μM) of NAC-BITC was similar to the activity of control-treated cells. Considering the potential of isothiocyanatesto prevent cancer, these results provide support for the use of BITC and NAC-BITC conjugates as chemopreventive agents. PMID:25580390

  17. A basket for washing benthological samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selgeby, James H.

    1971-01-01

    Since benthological samples collected with dredges are usually too large to be preserved in toto, a washing method must be employed to reduce the sample volume without losing or damaging the organisms. Traditionally, the sample is washed in a sieve until the volume is small enough for convenient handling or preservation. Most washing procedures are time-consuming and laborious. To save time in washing samples, a washing 'basket' was designed which accomadates a Ponar dredge. The only additional equipment needed to employ the washing basket effectively is a pump that delivers about 8 gallons of water per minute.

  18. Effect of different soil washing solutions on bioavailability of residual arsenic in soils and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-11-01

    The effect of soil washing used for arsenic (As)-contaminated soil remediation on soil properties and bioavailability of residual As in soil is receiving increasing attention due to increasing interest in conserving soil qualities after remediation. This study investigates the effect of different washing solutions on bioavailability of residual As in soils and soil properties after soil washing. Regardless of washing solutions, the sequential extraction revealed that the residual As concentrations and the amount of readily labile As in soils were reduced after soil washing. However, the bioassay tests showed that the washed soils exhibited ecotoxicological effects - lower seed germination, shoot growth, and enzyme activities - and this could largely be attributed to the acidic pH and/or excessive nutrient contents of the washed soils depending on washing solutions. Overall, this study showed that treated soils having lower levels of contaminants could still exhibit toxic effects due to changes in soil properties, which highly depended on washing solutions. This study also emphasizes that data on the As concentrations, the soil properties, and the ecotoxicological effects are necessary to properly manage the washed soils for reuses. The results of this study can, thus, be utilized to select proper post-treatment techniques for the washed soils. PMID:26086811

  19. Requirements for a cleanable steel HEPA filter derived from a systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.

    1996-06-01

    A systems analysis was conducted to determine customer requirements for a cleanable high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter in DOE Environmental Management (EM) facilities. The three principal drivers for cleanable steel HEPA are large cost savings, improved filter reliability, and new regulations; they produce a strong incentive to DOE customers to use cleanable steel HEPA filters. Input for customer requirements were obtained from field trips to EM sites and from discussions. Most existing applications require that cleanable steel HEPA filters meet size/performance requirements of standard glass HEPA filters; applications in new facilities can relax size/weight/pressure drop requirements on a case-by-case basis. We then obtained input from commercial firms on availability of cleanable steel HEPA filters. Systems analysis then showed that currently available technology was only able to meet customer needs in a limited number of cases. Further development is needed to meet requirements of EM customers. For cleanable steel HEPA to be retrofitted into existing systems, pressure drop and weight must be reduced. Pressure drop can be reduced by developing steel fiber media from 0.5 {mu}m dia steel fibers. Weight can be reduced by packaging the steel fiber media in one of the standard HEPA configurations. Although most applications will be able to use standard 304 or 316L alloys, an acid resistant alloy such as Hastelloy or Inconel will be needed for incinerator and other thermal processes.

  20. Face washing promotion for preventing active trachoma

    PubMed Central

    Ejere, Henry OD; Alhassan, Mahmoud B; Rabiu, Mansur

    2015-01-01

    Background Trachoma remains a major cause of avoidable blindness among underprivileged populations in many developing countries. It is estimated that about 146 million people have active trachoma and nearly six million people are blind due to complications associated with repeat infections. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of face washing promotion for the prevention of active trachoma in endemic communities. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to January 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2015), PubMed (January 1948 to January 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2015), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) (accessed 10 January 2014), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 26 January 2015. To identify further relevant trials we checked the reference lists of the included trials. Also, we used the Science Citation Index to search for references to publications that cited the trials included in the review. We contacted investigators and experts in the field to identify additional trials. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs that compared face washing with no treatment or face washing combined with antibiotics against antibiotics alone. Trial participants were residents of endemic trachoma communities. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. We contacted trial

  1. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  2. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  3. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  4. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  5. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  6. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BloGenesis™ soil washing technology uses a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soil to wastewater. The surfactant used in the soil washing process wa...

  7. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  8. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  9. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  10. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  11. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  12. Alternative Antimicrobial Commercial Egg Washing Procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial table eggs are washed prior to packaging. Standard wash procedures use an alkaline pH and warm water. If a cool water method could be developed that would still provide a microbiologically safe egg, the industry may save energy costs associated with water heating. Four wash procedures ...

  13. Comparative alkali washing of simulated radioactive sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, G.A.; Ensor, D.D.; Egan, B.Z.

    1996-10-01

    The treatment of large volumes of radioactive sludge generated from uranium and plutonium recovery processes is a pressing problem in the environmental restoration currently planned at various U.S. Department of Energy sites. This sludge, commonly stored in underground tanks, is mainly in the form of metal oxides or precipitated metal hydroxides and the bulk of this material is nonradioactive. One method being developed to pretreat this waste takes advantage of the amphoteric character of aluminum and other nonradioactive elements. Previous studies have reported on the dissolution of eleven elements from simulated sludge using NaOH solutions up to 6M. This work provides a comparative study using KOH. The effectiveness of the alkali washing as a treatment method to reduce the bulk of radioactive sludge requiring long term isolation will be discussed.

  14. Chemical characterization of challenge aerosols for HEPA filter penetration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, S.W.

    1985-04-01

    Quality assurance penetration testing of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters use oil mists as challenge aerosols. Concern over the carcinogenic risk associated with the use of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) has led to the investigation of alternative materials and generation methods for these aerosols. Since several commonly used generation methods for quality assurance testing of HEPA filters utilize heating of the starting material, it was determined essential to evaluate the starting material and the resultant aerosol which might contain thermal degradation by-products. A penetrometer utilizing flash vaporization has been developed by A.D. Little, Inc., for the US Government as a possible alternative generation method to the Q-127 thermally generated DEHP penetrometer. Tetraethylene glycol, oleic acid, and DEHP aerosols were generated in this unit, and particulate and vapor samples were collected and identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. Thermally generated DEHP by-products were also sampled and identified using a Q-107 penetrometer used in the testing of large HEPA filters. Determination of the toxicological hazards of starting materials and all of the identified compounds was made by reviewing available literature obtained on the Toxline system of the National Library of Medicine. No major degradation products were found in the flash vaporization penetrometer although a number of thermally generated by-products were found in the Q-107 penetrometer. Toxicologically, no hazards were found to preclude the use of either tetraethylene glycol or oleic acid as tested in the A.D. Little penetrometer. 133 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Method of treating contaminated HEPA filter media in pulp process

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian S.; Argyle, Mark D.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Mondok, Emilio P.

    2003-07-29

    A method for reducing contamination of HEPA filters with radioactive and/or hazardous materials is described. The method includes pre-processing of the filter for removing loose particles. Next, the filter medium is removed from the housing, and the housing is decontaminated. Finally, the filter medium is processed as pulp for removing contaminated particles by physical and/or chemical methods, including gravity, flotation, and dissolution of the particles. The decontaminated filter medium is then disposed of as non-RCRA waste; the particles are collected, stabilized, and disposed of according to well known methods of handling such materials; and the liquid medium in which the pulp was processed is recycled.

  16. The synthetic retinoid AGN 193109 but not retinoic acid elevates CYP1A1 levels in mouse embryos and Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Soprano, D R; Gambone, C J; Sheikh, S N; Gabriel, J L; Chandraratna, R A; Soprano, K J; Kochhar, D M

    2001-07-15

    The synthetic retinoid AGN 193109 is a potent pan retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonist. Treatment of pregnant mice with a single oral 1 mg/kg dose of this antagonist on day 8 postcoitum results in severe craniofacial (median cleft face or frontonasal deficiency) and eye malformations in virtually all exposed fetuses. Using differential display analysis, we have determined that CYP1A1 mRNA levels are elevated in mouse embryos 6 h following treatment with AGN 193109. Similarly, an elevation in CYP1A1 mRNA levels, protein levels, and aryl hydrocarbon hydoxylase activity occurs in Hepa-1c1c7 cells, with the maximal elevation observed when the cells were treated with 10(-5) M AGN 193109 for 4 to 8 h. Elevation in CYP1A1 mRNA levels in mouse embryos and Hepa-1c1c7 cells does not occur upon treatment with the natural retinoid, all-trans-retinoic acid. Finally, elevation in CYP1A1 mRNA levels was not observed when mutant Hepa-1c1c7 cells, which are defective in either the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), were treated with AGN 193109. This suggests that the AhR/ARNT pathway and not the RAR/RXR pathway is mediating the elevation of CYP1A1 mRNA levels by AGN 193109, at least in the Hepa-1c1c7 cells. This is the first example of a retinoid that displays the abililty to regulate both the RAR/RXR and AhR/ARNT transcriptional regulatory pathways. PMID:11446831

  17. Suppression of CYP1A1 expression by 4-nonylphenol in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H G; Kim, J Y; Choi, C Y; You, H J; Hahm, K

    2001-04-10

    This study investigated the effects that 4-nonylphenol (NP) has on CYP1A1 expression in Hepa-1c1c7 cell cultures. NP alone did not affect CYP1A1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. In contrast, the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible EROD activities were markedly reduced upon concomitant treatment with TCDD and NP in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen that acts through the estrogen receptor, did not affect the suppressive effects that NP has on TCDD-inducible EROD activity. The TCDD-inducible CYP1A1 mRNA levels were markedly suppressed upon concomitant treatment with TCDD and NP that is consistent with their effects on EROD activity. A transient transfection assay using dioxin-response element (DRE)-linked luciferase and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that NP reduced the transformation of the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor to a form capable of binding specifically to the DRE sequence of the CYP1A1 gene promoter. These results suggest that the down-regulation of CYP1A1 gene expression by NP in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be an antagonism of the DRE-binding potential of the nuclear Ah receptor, but is not mediated through the estradiol receptor. PMID:11248424

  18. Results from Evaluation of Representative ASME AG-1 Section FK Radial Flow Dimple Pleated HEPA Filters Under Elevated Conditions - 12002

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rickert, Jaime G.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-07-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has recently added Section FK establishing requirements for radial flow HEPA filters to the Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1). Section FK filters are expected to be a major element in the HEPA filtration systems across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Radial flow filters have been used in Europe for some time, however a limited amount of performance evaluation data exists with respect to these new AG-1 Section FK units. In consultation with a technical working group, the Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University (MSU)has evaluated a series of representative AG-1 Section FK dimple pleated radial flow HEPA filters. The effects of elevated relative humidity and temperature conditions on these filters are particularly concerning. Results from the evaluation of Section FK filters under ambient conditions have been presented at the 2011 waste management conference. Additions to the previous test stand to enable high temperature and high humidity testing, a review of the equipment used, the steps taken to characterize the new additions, and the filter test results are presented in this study. Test filters were evaluated at a volumetric flow rate of 56.6 m{sup 3}/min (2000 cfm) and were challenged under ambient conditions with Alumina, Al(OH){sub 3}, until reaching a differential pressure of 1 kPa (4 in. w.c.), at which time the filters were tested, unchallenged with aerosol, at 54 deg. C (130 deg. F) for approximately 1 hour. At the end of that hour water was sprayed near the heat source to maximize vaporization exposing the filter to an elevated relative humidity up to 95%. Collected data include differential pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and volumetric flow rate versus time. (authors)

  19. Protective effect of Porphyra yezoensis glycoprotein on D-galactosamine‑induced cytotoxicity in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wook; Kim, Young-Min; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to examine the signaling pathways and enzyme activity associated with the protective effect of Porphyra yezoensis glycoprotein (PYGP) on D‑galactosamine (D‑GaIN)‑induced cytotoxicity in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. D‑GaIN is commonly used to induce hepatic injury models in vivo as well as in vitro. PYGP was extracted from Porphyra yezoensis, a red algae distributed along the coasts of Republic of Korea, China and Japan. In the present study, Hepa 1c1c7 cells were pre‑treated with PYGP (20 and 40 µg/ml) for 24 h and then the media was replaced with D‑GaIN (20 mM) and PYGP (20 and 40 µg/ml). The results demonstrated that D‑GaIN induced Hepa 1c1c7 cell death and pretreatment with PYGP was found to attenuate D‑GaIN toxicity. In addition, D‑GaIN decreased the antioxidant activity and increased lipid peroxidation processes; however, pre‑treatment with PYGP reduced the generation of lipid peroxidation products, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, as well as increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione‑s‑transferase (GST). PYGP was shown to suppress the overexpression of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase, c‑jun N‑terminal kinase and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation induced by D‑GaIN. Furthermore, PYGP increased the protein expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 (Nrf2), quinine oxidoreductase 1, GST and heme oxygenase 1 protein expression. These results suggested that PYGP had cytoprotective effects against D‑GaIN‑induced cell damage, which may be associated with MAPKs and the Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:25626067

  20. Dose- and time-dependent effects of phenobarbital on gene expression profiling in human hepatoma HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Carine B.; Spire, Catherine Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, Andre

    2009-02-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) induces or represses a wide spectrum of genes in rodent liver. Much less is known about its effects in human liver. We used pangenomic cDNA microarrays to analyze concentration- and time-dependent gene expression profile changes induced by PB in the well-differentiated human HepaRG cell line. Changes in gene expression profiles clustered at specific concentration ranges and treatment times. The number of correctly annotated genes significantly modulated by at least three different PB concentration ranges (spanning 0.5 to 3.2 mM) at 20 h exposure amounted to 77 and 128 genes (p {<=} 0.01) at 2- and 1.8-fold filter changes, respectively. At low concentrations (0.5 and 1 mM), PB-responsive genes included the well-recognized CAR- and PXR-dependent responsive cytochromes P450 (CYP2B6, CYP3A4), sulfotransferase 2A1 and plasma transporters (ABCB1, ABCC2), as well as a number of genes critically involved in various metabolic pathways, including lipid (CYP4A11, CYP4F3), vitamin D (CYP24A1) and bile (CYP7A1 and CYP8B1) metabolism. At concentrations of 3.2 mM or higher after 20 h, and especially 48 h, increased cytotoxic effects were associated with disregulation of numerous genes related to oxidative stress, DNA repair and apoptosis. Primary human hepatocyte cultures were also exposed to 1 and 3.2 mM PB for 20 h and the changes were comparable to those found in HepaRG cells treated under the same conditions. Taken altogether, our data provide further evidence that HepaRG cells closely resemble primary human hepatocytes and provide new information on the effects of PB in human liver. These data also emphasize the importance of investigating dose- and time-dependent effects of chemicals when using toxicogenomic approaches.

  1. WASHING STUDIES FOR PCP AND CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and lo...

  2. Accidental entrapment of cats in front-loading washing machines

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Sarah A.; Gaunt, Matthew C.; Taylor, Susan M.; Snead, Elizabeth C.R.

    2010-01-01

    Two clinical cases of accidental entrapment of cats in front-loading washing machines are described. One cat died the day after presentation as a result of aspiration pneumonia and head trauma, despite supportive care. The second cat survived with supportive treatment, but developed dermatologic complications 10 d later. PMID:21119868

  3. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE SUCTION (INTAKE) HOSE IS SEEN AT THE LEFT RESTING ON THE FILTER BED SURFACE; THE DISCHARGE HOSE IS AT THE RIGHT, RUNNING FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE CENTRAL VERTICAL AXLE TO THE CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. FROM THE PUMP WATER IS DISCHARGED THROUGH THE HORIZONTAL PIPE LOCATED UNDER THE EDGE OF PLATFORM DECK INTO THE WASTE-WATER TROUGH (NOT SEEN IN THIS VIEW). - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  4. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THE ELECTRIC TROLLEY IS SEEN AT THE LEFT. THE BULKHEAD SEEN AT THE LOWER RIGHT IS NOT PART OF THE MACHINE; IT WAS INSTALLED TO RETAIN THE FILTER SAND AFTER THE MACHINE WAS NO LONGER USED. THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SETTLING RESERVOIR NO. 4 IS SEEN IN THE DISTANCE BELOW THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE TROLLEY. - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  5. Potential for Hepa filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.; Slawsld, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for HEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. Afire in a four-stage, HEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of HEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenum , additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk.

  6. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions. PMID:26066704

  7. Preliminary studies to determine the shelf life of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.; Fretthold, J.K.; Rainer, F.; Bergman, W.; Beason, D.

    1994-07-18

    We have completed a preliminary study using filter media tests and filter qualification tests to investigate the effect of shelf-life on HEPA filter performance. Our media studies showed that the tensile strength decreased with age, but the data were not sufficient to establish a shelf-life. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that one manufacturer had media with low tensile strength due to insufficient binder. The filter qualification tests (heated air and overpressure) conducted on different aged filters showed that filter age is not the primary factor affecting filter performance; materials and the construction design have a greater effect. An unexpected finding of our study was that sub-standard HEPA filters have been installed in DOE facilities despite existing regulations and filter qualification tests. We found that the filter with low tensile strength failed the overpressure test. The same filter had passed the heated air test, but left the filter so structurally weak, it was prone to blowout. We recommend that DOE initiate a filter qualification program to prevent this occurrence.

  8. Preliminary studies to determine the shelf life of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.; Fretthold, J.K.; Rainer, F.

    1995-02-01

    We have completed a preliminary study using filter media tests and filter qualification tests to investigate the effect of shelf-life on HEPA filter performance. Our media studies showed that the tensile strength decreased with age, but the data were not sufficient to establish a shelf-life. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that one manufacturer had media with low tensile strength due to insufficient binder. The filter qualification tests (heated air and overpressure) conducted on different aged filters showed that filter age is not the primary factor affecting filter performance; materials and the construction design have a greater effect. An unexpected finding of our study was that sub-standard HEPA filters have been installed in DOE facilities despite existing regulations and filter qualification tests. We found that the filter with low tensile strength failed the overpressure test. The same filter had passed the heated air test, but left the filter so structurally weak, it was prone to blow-out. We recommend that DOE initiate a filter qualification program to prevent this occurrence.

  9. Improved HEPA Filter Technology for Flexible and Rigid Containment Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Pinson, Paul Arthur

    1998-07-01

    Safety and reliability in glovebox operations can be significantly improved and waste packaging efficiencies can be increased by inserting flexible, lightweight, high capacity HEPA filters into the walls of plastic sheet barriers. This HEPA filter/barrier technology can be adapted to a wide variety of applications: disposable waste bags, protective environmental barriers for electronic equipment, single or multiple use glovebag assemblies, flexible glovebox wall elements, and room partitions. These reliable and inexpensive filtered barriers have many uses in fields such as radioactive waste processing, HVAC filter changeout, vapor or grit blasting, asbestos cleanup, pharmaceutical, medical, biological, and electronic equipment containment. The applications can result in significant cost savings, improved operational reliability and safety, and total waste volume reduction. This technology was developed at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in 1993 and has been used at ANL-W since then at the TRU Waste Characterization Chamber Gloveboxes. Another 1998 AGS Conference paper titled "TRU Waste Characterization Gloveboxes", presented by Mr. David Duncan of ANL-W, describes these boxes.

  10. Fostering Hand Washing before Lunch by Students Attending a Special Needs Young Adult Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which…

  11. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  12. 49 CFR 230.60 - Time of washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time of washing. 230.60 Section 230.60... Washing Boilers § 230.60 Time of washing. (a) Frequency of washing. All boilers shall thoroughly be washed... inspection. The date of the boiler wash shall be noted on the FRA Form No. 1 or FRA Form No. 3. (See...

  13. Cytokine-mediated suppression of cytochrome P450 1A1 in Hepa-1c1c7 cells by pokeweed mitogen.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H G

    2001-02-28

    This study investigated the effects of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) on the regulation of cytochrome P450 (P450) 1A1 expression in an in vitro model, using murine hepatoma cell line Hepa-1c1c7 and murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cell cultures. PWM added directly to Hepa-1c1c7 cells had no effect on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced P450 1A1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity. However, TCDD-induced EROD activity and P450 1A1 mRNA levels were markedly suppressed when Hepa-1c1c7 cells were cultured with PWM-treated conditioned media from RAW 264.7 in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitant treatment with PWM and pentoxifylline, a TNFalpha synthesis inhibitor, to RAW 264.7 cells decreased the suppressive effects of PWM on TCDD-induced EROD activity. In PWM-exposed RAW 264.7 cell cultures, TNFalpha and IL-6 levels increased in a dose-dependent fashion. When antibodies to TNFalpha or/and IL-6 were added to PWM-treated conditioned media from RAW 264.7, the suppression of EROD activity was inhibited. These results suggested the suppression of P450 1A1 by PWM was mediated exclusively by TNFalpha and IL-6, released from macrophages. PMID:11311574

  14. Mold colonization during use of preservative-treated and untreated air filters, including HEPA filters from hospitals and commercial locations over an 8-year period (1996-2003).

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel L; Simmons, Robert B; Crow, Sidney A; Ahearn, Donald G

    2005-07-01

    High efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA; 99.97% efficient at 0.3 microm) filters, filters with ASHRAE particulate arrestance rating of 90-95% at 1 mum (90-95% filters), and lower efficiency cellulosic-polyester filters from air conditioning systems in hospitals and commercial buildings were removed from the systems and examined microscopically for mold colonization. Cellulosic-type filters from systems with water entrainment problems typically were colonized, or became colonized upon incubation in moisture chambers. Species of Acremonium, Aspergillus, and Cladosporium were most common. With air filters of all types, treatment of filter media with an antimicrobial preservative tended to reduce or delay colonization. Mold colonization of HEPA and 90-95% filters was observed most often on the load surfaces, but two untreated HEPA filters were permeated with fungi, one with Aspergillus flavus, the other with Cladosporium sp. Air filters in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, particularly those with chronic or periodic exposure to moisture, may serve as point sources for indoor molds. PMID:15856351

  15. Bathing or washing babies after birth?

    PubMed

    Henningsson, A; Nyström, B; Tunnell, R

    One group of healthy full-term newborn babies was washed after birth and another was bathed to remove vernix caseosa and clean the skin. Few infections, none of them serious, occurred in either group. Bacterial colonisation of the umbilical cord on the third day of life was similar in both groups. The rectal temperature fell further and more infants cried during washing than during bathing. Thus bathing the baby after birth makes it calmer, quieter, and more comfortable than washing and causes less heat-loss. Clinical signs of infection and bacterial colonisation rates are no higher after bathing than after washing. PMID:6118769

  16. Wash water waste pretreatment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were completed on wash waters based on each candidate personal cleansing agent. Evaluations of coagulants, antifoam agents, and the effect of promising antifoams on the chemical precipitation were included. Based on these evaluations two candidate soaps as well as their companion antifoam agents were selected for further work. Operating parameters included the effect of soap concentration, ferric chloride concentration, duration of mixing, and pore size of depth filters on the degree of soap removal. The effect of pressure on water flow through filter cartridges and on the rate of decline of water flow was also investigated. The culmination of the program was the recommendation of a pretreatment concept based on chemical precipitation followed by pressure filtration.

  17. Suppression of CYP1A1 expression by naringenin in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Han, Eun Hee; Shin, Dong Weon; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2004-08-01

    Naringenin, dietary flavonoid, is antioxidant constituents of many citrus fruits. In the present study, we investigated the effect of naringenin on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible CYP1A1 gene expression in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Naringenin alone did not affect CYP1A1-specific 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity. In contrast, the TCDD-inducible EROD activities were markedly reduced upon concomitant treatment with TCDD and naringenin in a dose dependent manner. TCDD-induced CYP1A1 mRNA level was also markedly suppressed by naringenin. A transient transfection assay using dioxin-response element (DRE)-linked luciferase and electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that naringenin reduced transformation of the aryl hydrocarbons receptor(AhR) to a form capable of specifically binding to the DRE sequence in the promoter of the CYP1A1 gene. These results suggest the down regulation of the CYP1A1 gene expression by either naringenin in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be antagonism of the DRE binding potential of nuclear AhR. PMID:15460448

  18. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.; Gilbert, H.; Jacox, J.W.

    1994-12-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

  19. [Synergistic inhibitory effect of static magnetic field and antitumor drugs on Hepa1-6 cells].

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingling; Guo, Wei; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xueqing; Yu, Juntao; Wu, Wencai; Zhao, Tiejun

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy as a routine method for clinical treatment of cancer has disadvantages such as significant toxicity and strong resistance. In order to improve the efficacy of the drugs and reduce the by-effects, we tried to combine static magnetic field (SMF) with cisplatin or adriamycin. The growth of Hepa1-6 cells treated with the static magnetic field (SMF) combined with cisplatin or adriamycin was significantly inhibited, as detected with MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) test. Combined treatment group cells underwent significant morphological changes as observed by HE (Hematoxylin and eosin) staining under optical microscope. Cell cycle analysis indicated that SMF increased the ratio of cells arrested in G2/M phase caused by cisplatin, and when treated with SMF combined with adriamycin, cells were almost arrested in G1 and G2/M phase. SCGE test showed that SMF can enhance the ability of cisplatin or adriamycin to promote cell DNA damage. Atomic force microscope observation found that the combination of antitumor drugs and magnetic field treatment induced larger and deeper holes on the cell membrane, and surface structure damage is serious. The combination of antitumor drugs and magnetic field technology effectively inhibits the growth of tumor cells, and reduces drug doses. The results implicate this method as potential cancer therapy. PMID:26955714

  20. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory HEPA filter box

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.

    1998-07-15

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the safe onsite transport of eight high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory HEPA Filter Box from the 300 Area of the Hanford Site to the Central Waste Complex and on to burial in the 200 West Area. Use of this SEP is authorized for 1 year from the date of release.

  1. Method for HEPA filter leak scanning with differentiating aerosol detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, B.J.; Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.

    1997-08-01

    While scanning HEPA filters for leaks with {open_quotes}Off the Shelf{close_quote} aerosol detection equipment, the operator`s scanning speed is limited by the time constant and threshold sensitivity of the detector. This is based on detection of the aerosol density, where the maximum signal is achieved when the scanning probe resides over the pinhole longer than several detector time-constants. Since the differential value of the changing signal can be determined by observing only the first small fraction of the rising signal, using a differentiating amplifier will speed up the locating process. The other advantage of differentiation is that slow signal drift or zero offset will not interfere with the process of locating the leak, since they are not detected. A scanning hand-probe attachable to any NUCON{reg_sign} Aerosol Detector displaying the combination of both aerosol density and differentiated signal was designed. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Application and evaluation of the washing effect in the collector well using pilot plant with washing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, B. H.

    2012-04-01

    Riverbed/bank filtration (RBF) is a natural process used as a first step in drinking water treatment. RBF systems consist of well fields that draw water from an aquifer that is hydraulically connected to surface waters. The benefits of RBF are multiple and include a reduction of turbidity, total coliform, microbial contaminants natural organic matter, and organic contaminants. Some of the disadvantages of RBF include the difficulty of preventing river water from infiltrating the aquifer in in-stances of severe river contamination, the geochemical reaction of the infiltrate with aquifer materials that may raise the aqueous concentrations of Fe2+, Mn2+, As, NH4+, CH4, Ca2+ and HCO3- , and clogging of the riverbed. For example, has demonstrated that riverbed clogging may decrease the specific capacity of RBF wells (flow reduction in the collector well etc.). The objective of this study is to optimization and evaluation the washing effect on various nozzle type and intervals, soil retention rate in the collector well using pilot plant with washing device for prevention flow reduction in the collector well. The Pilot plant experiments were conducted under various conditions; two kinds nozzle type (spray nozzle of circle type (single - Full Cone, multi - Hollow Cone) and spray nozzle of fan shape type (Veejet)), two different nozzle intervals (200 mm, 400mm) and a various soil retention rate in the collector well (10 ~ 40%). The results of experiment showed that in the nozzle type case, the washing effect of the veeject nozzle was more effective than other (Full Cone, Hollow Cone) nozzle through spray results (range, strength and height). In the nozzle interval conditions, washing effect is 200 mm better than 400 mm through spray distance and soil height. The washing efficiency in the collector well increased on soil retention rate decreased and the nozzle injection pressure increased using washing device

  3. Induction of cytochrome P-450 1A2 by oxidized tryptophan in Hepa lclc7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, R K; Mitsuhashi, M; Kikkawa, Y

    2000-03-01

    Recent studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that L-tryptophan, after oxidation either by UV-irradiation or ozone, induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation and binding of the liganded AhR complex to its specific DNA recognition site, thereby initiating transcription of the cytochrome P-450 1a1 (Cyp1a1) gene with concomitant increase of CYP1A1 protein and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in wild-type mouse hepatoma cells, Hepa lclc7 (Hepa-1), in culture. Temporary inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide resulted in superinduction of oxidized tryptophan-inducible CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in Hepa-1 cells. In the present communication, the results obtained by immunoblot analyses with monoclonal CYP1A1/1A2 antibody (NIH 1-7-1) demonstrate that both UV- or ozone-oxidized tryptophan also induce CYP1A2 protein in Hepa-1 cells. CYP1A2 mRNA, detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, was markedly induced in the UV- or ozone-oxidized tryptophan-treated cells. Temporary inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide further induced oxidized tryptophan-inducible CYP1A2 mRNA as well as the protein in Hepa-1 cells. This is the first report demonstrating the induction of CYP1A2 mRNA and protein in Hepa-1 cells. PMID:10688617

  4. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  5. WASH SOLVENT REUSE IN PAINT PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluated solvent used to clean paint manufacture equipment for its utility in production of subsequent batches of solvent-borne paint. eusing wash solvent would reduce the amount of solvent disposed of as waste. he evaluation of this wash-solvent recovery technology...

  6. Development of the sampling and nuclide analysis methods for spent HEPA filter wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Yong Ji; Dae Seok Hong; Il-Sik Kang; Bum-Kyoung Seo; Jong-Sik Shon

    2007-07-01

    Spent filter wastes of about 2,160 units have been stored in the waste storage facility of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute since its operation. These spent filters have generally consisted of a HEPA filter after its filtering of all the contaminants in the gas stream generated during the operation of the HANARO research reactor and the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. At the moment, to secure enough storage space, it is necessary to make a volume reduction of the stored radioactive wastes through a compression treatment or a regulatory clearance. There have been many studies on a treatment and a clearance of the low level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear facilities. These methods are used in view of a reduction of a management cost and disposal cost and the security of free space for a waste storage facility approaching saturation. In order to dispose of the spent filters, it is first necessary to conduct a radionuclide assessment of them. To do that, a sampling procedure should be prepared to obtain a representative sample from a spent filter. As for conducting a nuclide analysis for this representative sample, a corresponding spent filter can be determined as either a regulatory clearance waste or a radioactive waste. (authors)

  7. Development and evaluation of a HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.; Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    We have completed a preliminary study of an improved HEPA filter for increased strength and resistance to elevated temperature to improve the reliability of the standard deep pleated HEPA filter under accident conditions. The improvements to the HEPA filter consist of a silicone rubber sealant and a new HEPA medium reinforced with a glass cloth. Three prototype filters were built and evaluated for temperature and pressure resistance and resistance to rough handling. The temperature resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to 1,000 scan (1,700 m{sup 3}/hr) at 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) for five minutes.The pressure resistance test consisted of exposing the HEPA filter to a differential pressure of 10 in. w.g. (2.5 kPa) using a water saturated air flow at 95{degrees}F (35{degrees}C). For the rough handling test, we used a vibrating machine designated the Q110. DOP filter efficiency tests were performed before and after each of the environmental tests. In addition to following the standard practice of using a separate new filter for each environmental test, we also subjected the same filter to the elevated temperature test followed by the pressure resistance test. The efficiency test results show that the improved HEPA filter is significantly better than the standard HEPA filter. Further studies are recommended to evaluate the improved HEPA filter and to assess its performance under more severe accident conditions.

  8. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets.

    PubMed

    Pineda, A A; Zylstra, V W; Clare, D E; Dewanjee, M K; Forstrom, L A

    1989-01-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous 111In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% [p less than 0.001] vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% [p greater than 0.1], respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake. PMID:2749876

  9. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  10. Contaminant resorption during soil washing

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the applicability of soil washing to a specific site requires some basic research in how contaminants are bound. Much can be learned from sequential extraction methodology based on micronutrient bioavailability studies wherein the soil matrix is chemically dissected to selectively remove particular fixation mechanisms independently. This procedure uses a series of progressively more aggressive solvents to dissolve the principle phases that make up a soil, however, the published studies do not appear to consider the potential for a contaminant released from one type of site to resorb on another site during an extraction. This physical model assumes no ion exchange or adsorption at sites either previously occupied by other ions, or exposed by the dissolution. Therefore, to make engineering use of the sequential extraction data, the release of contamination must be evaluated relative to the effects of resorption. Time release studies were conducted to determine the optimum duration for extraction to maximize complete destruction of the target matrix fraction while minimizing contaminant resorption. Tests with and without a potassium brine present to inhibit cesium resorption indicated extraction efficiency could be enhanced by as much as a factor of ten using the brine.

  11. Particle size separation via soil washing to obtain volume reduction.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Rasor, E; Van Ryn, F

    1999-04-23

    A pilot-plant study was performed using a soil washing pilot plant originally designed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to demonstrate scale-up and potential full-scale remediation. This pilot plant named VORCE (Volume Reduction/Chemical Extraction) was modified to meet the specific requirements for treatment of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and a Department of Energy site soils. After a series of tests on clean soils to develop operating parameters and system performance, the machine was used to treat soils, one contaminated with Thorium-232 and the other with Cesium-137. All indicate that soil washing is very promising for volume reduction treatment. In addition, cost data was generated and is given herein. PMID:10379032

  12. Comparisons of differential gene expression elicited by TCDD, PCB126, βNF, or ICZ in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Nault, Rance; Forgacs, Agnes L; Dere, Edward; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2013-10-23

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a promiscuous receptor activated by structurally diverse synthetic and natural compounds. AhR activation may lead to ligand-specific changes in gene expression despite similarities in mode of action. Therefore, differential gene expression elicited by four structurally diverse, high affinity AhR ligands (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 10nM, 30 μg/kg), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126; 100nM, 300μg/kg), β-naphthoflavone (βNF; 10 μM, 90 mg/kg), and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ; 1μM)) in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver samples were compared. A total of 288, 183, 119, and 131 Hepa1c1c7 genes were differentially expressed (|fold-change|≥ 1.5, P1(t)≥ 0.9999) by TCDD, βNF, PCB126, and ICZ, respectively. Only ∼35% were differentially expressed by all 4 ligands in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In vivo, 661, 479, and 265 hepatic genes were differentially expressed following treatment with TCDD, βNF, and PCB126, respectively. Similar to Hepa1c1c7 cells, ≤ 34% of gene expression changes were common across all ligands. Principal components analysis identified time-dependent gene expression divergence. Comparisons of ligand-elicited expression between Hepa1c1c7 cells and mouse liver identified only 11 common gene expression changes across all ligands. Although metabolism may explain some ligand-specific gene expression changes, PCB126, βNF, and ICZ also elicited divergent expression compared to TCDD, suggestive of selective AhR modulation. PMID:23994337

  13. Comparisons of differential gene expression elicited by TCDD, PCB126, βNF, or ICZ in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Nault, Rance; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Dere, Edward; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a promiscuous receptor activated by structurally diverse synthetic and natural compounds. AhR activation may lead to ligand-specific changes in gene expression despite similarities in mode of action. Therefore, differential gene expression elicited by four structurally diverse, high affinity AhR ligands (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 10 nM, 30 µg/kg), 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126; 100 nM, 300 µg/kg), β-naphthoflavone (βNF; 10 µM, 90 mg/kg), and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ; 1 µM)) in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver samples were compared. A total of 288, 183, 119, and 131 Hepa1c1c7 genes were differentially expressed (|fold-change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) ≥ 0.9999) by TCDD, βNF, PCB126, and ICZ, respectively. Only ~35% were differentially expressed by all 4 ligands in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In vivo, 661, 479, and 265 hepatic genes were differentially expressed following treatment with TCDD, βNF, and PCB126, respectively. Similar to Hepa1c1c7 cells, ≤34% of gene expression changes were common across all ligands. Principal components analysis identified time-dependent gene expression divergence. Comparisons of ligand-elicited expression between Hepa1c1c7 cells and mouse liver identified only 11 common gene expression changes across all ligands. Although metabolism may explain some ligand-specific gene expression changes, PCB126, βNF, and ICZ also elicited divergent expression compared to TCDD, suggestive of selective AhR modulation. PMID:23994337

  14. Down-regulation of murine Cyp1a-1 in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells by bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H G; Kimand, J Y; Choi, C Y

    2000-11-01

    Cultured mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells were treated with either bisphenol A or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or in combination to assess the role of bisphenol A in the process of Cyp1a-1 induction. Treatment of Hepa-1c1c7 cultures with 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced Cyp1a-1, as determined by analysis of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activities. Bisphenol A alone did not affect the activity of Cyp1a-1-specific EROD; in contrast, TCDD-induced EROD activities were markedly reduced in the concomitant treatment of TCDD and bisphenol A in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with tamoxifen, an antiestrogen that acts through the estrogen receptor, did not affect the suppressive effects of bisphenol A on TCDD-induced EROD activity. TCDD-induced Cyp1a-1 mRNA levels were markedly suppressed in the concomitant treatment of TCDD and bisphenol A consistent with their effects on EROD activity. Transient transfection assay using dioxin-response element (DRE)-linked luciferase revealed that bisphenol A reduced transformation of the aryl hydrocarbons (Ah) receptor to a form capable of specifically binding to the DRE sequence in the promoter of the Cyp1a-1 gene. These results suggest the down-regulation of the Cyp1a-1 gene expression by bisphenol A in Hepa-1c1c7 cells might be antagonism of the DRE binding potential of nuclear Ah receptor but not mediated through estradiol receptor. PMID:11061999

  15. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  16. Development assessment of wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical study assessment of state-of-the-art wash water reclamation technology is presented. It covers all non-phase-change unit operations, unit processes and subsystems currently under development by NASA. Each approach to wash water reclamation is described in detail. Performance data are given together with the projected weights and sizes of key components and subsystems. It is concluded that a simple multifiltration subsystem composed of surface-type cartridge filters, carbon adsorption and ion exchange resins is the most attractive approach for spacecraft wash water reclamation in earth orbital missions of up to 10 years in duration.

  17. TANK 7 CHARACTERIZATION AND WASHING STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

    2010-02-04

    A 3-L PUREX sludge sample from Tank 7 was characterized and then processed through a series of inhibited water washes to remove oxalate, sodium, and other soluble ions. Current plans use Tank 7 as one of the feed sources for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7). Tank 7 is high in oxalate due to the oxalic acid cleaning of the sludge heels from Tanks 5 and 6 and subsequent transfer to Tank 7. Ten decant and nine wash cycles were performed over a 47 day period at ambient temperature. Initially, seven decants and seven washes were completed based on preliminary estimates of the number of wash cycles required to remove the oxalate in the sludge. After reviewing the composition data, SRNL recommended the completion of 2 or 3 more decant/wash cycles to ensure all of the sodium oxalate had redissolved. In the first 7 washes, the slurry oxalate concentration was 12,300 mg/kg (69.6% oxalate removal compared to 96.1% removal of the other soluble ions). After all ten decants were complete, the slurry oxalate concentration was 3,080 mg/kg (89.2% oxalate removal compared to 99.0% of the other soluble ions). The rate of dissolution of oxalate increased significantly with subsequent washes until all of the sodium oxalate had been redissolved after seven decant/wash cycles. The measured oxalate concentrations agreed very well with LWO predictions for washing of the Tank 7 sample. Highlights of the analysis and washing of the Tank 7 sample include: (1) Sodium oxalate was detected in the as-received filtered solids. 95% of the oxalate was insoluble (undissolved) in the as-received slurry. (2) No sodium oxalate was detected in the post-wash filtered solids. (3) Sodium oxalate is the last soluble species that redissolves during washing with inhibited water. In order to significantly reduce the sodium oxalate concentration, the sludge must be highly washed, leaving the other soluble anions and cations (including sodium) very low in concentration. (4) The post-wash slurry had 1% of the soluble anions

  18. Cost and waste volume reduction in HEPA filter trains by effective pre-filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Chris

    2007-07-01

    Data published elsewhere (Moore, et al., 1992; Bergman et al., 1997) suggests that the then costs of disposable type Glass Fibre HEPA filtration trains to the DOE was $55 million per year (based on an average usage of HEPA panels of 11,748 pieces per year between 1987 and 1990), $50 million of which was attributable to installation, testing, removal and disposal. The same authors suggest that by 1995 the number of HEPA panels being used had dropped to an estimated 4000 pieces per year due to the ending of the Cold War. The yearly cost to the DOE of 4000 units per year was estimated to be $29.5 million using the same parameters that previously suggested the $55 million figure. Within that cost estimate, $300 each was the value given to the filter and $4,450 was given to peripheral activity per filter. Clearly, if the $4,450 component could be reduced, tremendous saving could result, in addition to a significant reduction in the legacy burden of waste volumes. This same cost is applied to both the 11,748 and 4000 usage figures. The work up to now has focussed on the development of a low cost, long life (cleanable), direct replacement of the traditional filter train. This paper will review an alternative strategy, that of preventing the contaminating dust from reaching and blinding the HEPA filters, and thereby removing the need to replace them. What has become clear is that 'low cost' and 'Metallic HEPA' are not compatible terms. The original Bergman et al., 1997 work suggested that 1000 cfm (cubic feet per minute) (1690 m{sup 3}/hr) stainless HEPAs could be commercially available for $5000 each after development (although the $70,000 development unit may be somewhat exaggerated - the authors own company have estimated development units able to be retrofitted into strengthened standard housings would be available for perhaps $30,000). The likely true cost of such an item produced industrially in significant numbers may be closer to $15,000 each. That being the case

  19. Effects of rutaecarpine on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in murine hepa-1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  20. Effects of Rutaecarpine on Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Murine Hepa-1c1c7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Hyunjin; Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Mar, Woongchon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of rutaecarpine on DNA strand breaks and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in murine Hepa-1c1c7 cells. Oxidative DNA damage was estimated by nuclear condensation assessment, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and Comet assay. Rutaecarpine inhibited cell death induced by 500 μM H2O2, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Treatment with rutaecarpine reduced the number of DNA strand breaks induced by H2O2, as assessed by DAPI staining and Comet assay, and increased quinone reductase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and pAkt protein levels, as assessed by western blotting. PMID:24009839

  1. Suppression of cytochrome P450 1A1 expression induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in mouse hepatoma hepa-1c1c7 cells treated with serum of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate- and green tea extract-administered rats.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Itsuko; Tsutsui, Miki; Sakane, Iwao; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2009-05-01

    The suppression of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression was examined in mouse hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 cells treated with serum prepared from (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate- and green tea extract-administered rats. Catechins were found in the rat plasma after the administration. In Hepa-1c1c7 cells, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced CYP1A1 expression was suppressed by treatment with the rat serum. It is concluded that catechins can possibly modulate CYP1A1 expression. PMID:19420696

  2. Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.; Bergman, W.; Gilbert, H.

    1992-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through a combination of personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate, life-cycle cost for a glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA fitter in the complex is $4,753. Although the cost estimate represents an average for all sizes and types of HEPA filters used in DOE facilities, the majority of the fitters are 2 ft {times} 2 ft {times} l ft filters with wooden frames, deep pleated glass-fiber media, and an adhesive sealant.

  3. Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.; Bergman, W.; Gilbert, H.

    1992-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through a combination of personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate, life-cycle cost for a glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA fitter in the complex is $4,753. Although the cost estimate represents an average for all sizes and types of HEPA filters used in DOE facilities, the majority of the fitters are 2 ft [times] 2 ft [times] l ft filters with wooden frames, deep pleated glass-fiber media, and an adhesive sealant.

  4. Filter Paper: Solution to High Self-Attenuation Corrections in HEPA Filter Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R.B.; Harold, N.B.; Gunn, C.A.; Brummett, M.; Chaing, L.G.

    2005-10-01

    An 8 by 8 by 6 inch High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter was measured as part of a uranium holdup survey in June of 2005 as it has been routinely measured every two months since 1998. Although the survey relies on gross gamma count measurements, this was one of a few measurements that had been converted to a quantitative measurement in 1998. The measurement was analyzed using the traditional Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) approach, using HMS3 software, with an area calibration and self-attenuation corrected with an empirical correction factor of 1.06. A result of 172 grams of {sup 235}U was reported. The actual quantity of {sup 235}U in the filter was approximately 1700g. Because of this unusually large discrepancy, the measurement of HEPA filters will be discussed. Various techniques for measuring HEPA filters will be described using the measurement of a 24 by 24 by 12 inch HEPA filter as an example. A new method to correct for self attenuation will be proposed for this measurement Following the discussion of the 24 by 24 by 12 inch HEPA filter, the measurement of the 8 by 8 by 6 inch will be discussed in detail.

  5. Wash water waste pretreatment system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The use of real wash water had no adverse effect on soap removal when an Olive Leaf soap based system was used; 96 percent of the soap was removed using ferric chloride. Numerous chemical agents were evaluated as antifoams for synthetic wash water. Wash water surfactants used included Olive Leaf Soap, Ivory Soap, Neutrogena and Neutrogena Rain Bath Gel, Alipal CO-436, Aerosol 18, Miranol JEM, Palmeto, and Aerosol MA-80. For each type of soapy wash water evaluated, at least one antifoam capable of causing nonpersistent foam was identified. In general, the silicones and the heavy metal ions (i.e., ferric, aluminum, etc.) were the most effective antifoams. Required dosage was in the range of 50 to 200 ppm.

  6. A Wash-Free Homogeneous Colorimetric Immunoassay Method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqiao; Rong, Pengfei; Jia, Hongwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Bo; Dong, Qiong; Yang, Cejun; Hu, Pengzhi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Haitao; Liu, Dingbin

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and convenient biosensing platforms could be beneficial to timely diagnosis and treatment of diseases in virtually any care settings. Sandwich immunoassays, the most commonly used methods for protein detection, often rely on expensive tags such as enzyme and tedious wash and incubation procedures operated by skilled labor. In this report, we revolutionized traditional sandwich immunoassays by providing a wash-free homogeneous colorimetric immunoassay method without requirement of any separation steps. The proposed strategy was realized by controlling the growth of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to mediate the interparticle spacing in the protein-AuNP oligomers. We have demonstrated the successful in vitro detection of cancer biomarker in serum samples from patients with high clinical sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26722373

  7. The effect of SAMe and betaine on Hepa 1-6, C34 and E47 liver cell survival in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Joan; Zhong, Jin; Buslon, Virgil S; French, Samuel W

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, methyl one-carbon metabolism has received a great deal of attention because the disruption of methyl balance in a variety of genetically modified mice is associated with the development of various forms of liver injury, namely fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition, patients with liver disease often have an abnormal expression of key genes involved in methionine metabolism as well as elevated serum levels of methionine and homocysteine (Hcy). S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) has rapidly moved from being a methyl donor to a key metabolite that regulates hepatocyte proliferation, necrosis and differentiation. Biosynthesis of SAMe occurs in all mammalian cells as the first step in methionine catabolism in a reaction catalyzed by methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). Decreased hepatic SAMe biosynthesis is a consequence of numerous forms of chronic liver injury. In an animal model of chronic liver SAMe deficiency, the liver is predisposed to further injury and develops spontaneous steatohepatitis and HCC. SAMe treatment in experimental animal models of liver injury shows hepatoprotective properties. Meta-analyses also showed that it is effective in the treatment of patients with cholestatic liver diseases. We studied the survival of liver cells treated with SAMe and betaine using Hepa 1-6 and E47/C34 cell lines. We showed that exogenous SAMe decreased the number of Hepa 1-6 and E47/C34 cells, and increased the number of dead cells in vitro. Betaine had no significant effect on the number of surviving cells and the number of dead cells. The combination of both methyl donors significantly increased the survival of liver cells and reduced necrosis, compared to SAMe alone. This study showed the inhibition of the proliferation and increased necrosis in response to SAMe on liver cancer cell lines Hepa 1-6 and C34. PMID:22032937

  8. THE EFFECT OF SAMe AND BETAINE ON HEPA 1-6, C34 AND E47 LIVER CELL SURVIVAL IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Joan; Zhong, Jin; Buslon, Virgil S.; French, Samuel W.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, methyl one-carbon metabolism has received a great deal of attention because the disruption of methyl balance in a variety of genetically modified mice is associated with the development of various forms of liver injury, namely fatty liverdisease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition, patients with liver disease often have an abnormal expression of key genes involved in methionine metabolism as well as elevated serum levels of methionine and homocysteine (Hcy). S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) has rapidly moved from being a methyl donor to a key metabolite that regulates hepatocyte proliferation, necrosis and differentiation. Biosynthesis of SAMe occurs in all mammalian cells as the first step in methionine catabolism in a reaction catalyzed by methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). Decreased hepatic SAMe biosynthesis is a consequence of numerous forms of chronic liver injury. In an animal model of chronic liver SAMe deficiency, the liver is predisposed to further injury and develops spontaneous steatohepatitis and HCC. SAMe treatment in experimental animal models of liver injury shows that its hepatoprotective properties. Meta-analyses also showed that it is effective in the treatment of patients with cholestatic liver diseases. We studied the survival of liver cells treated with SAMe and betaine using Hepa 1–6 and E47/C34 cell lines. We showed that exogenous SAMe decreased the number of Hepa 1–6 and E47/C34 cells, and increased the number of dead cells in vitro. Betaine had no significant effect on the number of surviving cells and the number of dead cells. The combination of both methyl donors significantly increased the survival of liver cells and reduced necrosis, compare to SAMe alone. This study showed the inhibition of the proliferatino and increased necrosis in response to SAMe on liver cancer cell lines Hepa 1–6 and C34. PMID:22032937

  9. Apoptosis in murine hepatoma hepa 1c1c7 wild-type, C12, and C4 cells mediated by bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Seubert, John M; Darmon, Alison J; El-Kadi, Ayman O S; D'Souza, Sudhir J A; Bend, John R

    2002-08-01

    Elevated serum and tissue bilirubin concentrations that occur in pathological conditions such as cholestasis, jaundice, and other liver diseases are known to stimulate cytotoxic responses. In preliminary studies, we noted that bilirubin seemed to cause apoptosis in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 wild-type (WT) cells. Consequently, we investigated apoptosis caused by bilirubin in WT, mutant C12 [aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-deficient], and C4 (AHR nuclear translocator-deficient) Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Three independent measures of apoptosis were used to quantify the effects of exogenous bilirubin (0, 1, 10, 25, 50, or 100 microM). Caspase-3 activity and cytochrome c release from mitochondria increased at 3 h post-treatment, before increased caspase-8 activity at 6 h, and nuclear condensation by 24 h after treatment with bilirubin. No differences in whole-cell lipid peroxidation were observed between the cell types; however, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was greater in WT cells than C12 or C4 cells 3 h after bilirubin exposure. Pretreatment of cells for 1 h with 1 or 10 microM alpha-naphthoflavone, an AHR antagonist, before bilirubin exposure resulted in decreased caspase-3 activity at 6 h and nuclear condensation at 24 h in WT cells. These results indicate that bilirubin, a potential AHR ligand, causes apoptosis in murine Hepa 1c1c7 WT cells by a mechanism(s) partially involving the AHR, disruption of membrane integrity, and increased intracellular ROS production. PMID:12130676

  10. Testing cleanable/reuseable HEPA prefilters for mixed waste incinerator air pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, B.W.; Paul, J.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the US DOE Savannah River Site is undergoing preoperational testing. The CIF is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes from site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing incinerators, air pollution control experience, and recommendations from consultants. This approach resulted in a facility design using experience from other operating hazardous/radioactive incinerators. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Operation of the pilot facility has provided long-term performance data of integrated systems and critical facility components. This has reduced facility startup problems and helped ensure compliance with facility performance requirements. Technical support programs assist in assuring all stakeholders the CIF can properly treat combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas strewn before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The Potential of Wash-and-Dry Toilets to Improve the Toileting Experience for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Biddison, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the feasibility of using a "wash-and-dry" toilet in the nursing home. Design and Methods: We used a controlled comparison baseline-versus-treatment design with 22 female nursing home residents aged 75 and older living in a 562-bed, not-for-profit nursing home facility in Maryland. The Luscence Luxury Lavage wash-and-dry…

  12. Summary of meeting on disposal of LET&D HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-21

    This report is a compilation of correspondence between Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company and the US EPA over a period of time from 1988 to 1992 (most from 1991-92) regarding waste management compliance with EPA regulations. Typical subjects include: compliance with satellite accumulation requirements; usage of ``Sure Shot`` containers in place of aerosol cans; notice of upcoming recyclable battery shipments; disposition of batteries; HEPA filter leach sampling and permit impacts; functional and operation requirements for the spent filter handling system; summary of meeting on disposal of LET and D HEPA filters; solvent substitution database report; and mercury vapor light analytical testing.

  13. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in neutropenic patients during hospital construction: before and after chemoprophylaxis and institution of HEPA filters.

    PubMed

    Oren, I; Haddad, N; Finkelstein, R; Rowe, J M

    2001-04-01

    Between September 1993 and December 1993, during extensive hospital construction and indoor renovation, a nosocomial outbreak of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis occurred in acute leukemia patients treated in a regular ward that has only natural ventilation. The observed infection rate was 50%. Chemoprophylaxis with intravenous continuous low-dose amphotericin B was then instituted as a preventive measure. During the next 18 months invasive pulmonary aspergillosis developed in 43% of acute leukemia patients. After that period a new hematology ward was opened with an air filtration system through high-efficiency particulate air filtration (HEPA) filters, and a bone marrow transplantation program was started on the hematology service. During the following three years, none of the acute leukemia or bone marrow transplantation patients who were hospitalized exclusively in the hematology ward developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, although 29% of acute leukemia patients who were housed in a regular ward, because of shortage of space in the new facility, still contracted invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Overall, 31 patients were diagnosed with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis during almost five years: 74% of patients recovered from invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, and 42% are long-term survivors; 26% of patients died of resistant leukemia with aspergillosis, but no one died of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis alone. In conclusion, during an on-going construction period, an extremely high incidence rate of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in acute leukemia patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy was observed. Institution of low-dose intravenous amphotericin B prophylaxis marginally reduced the incidence rate of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Keeping patients in a special ward with air filtration through a HEPA system eliminated invasive pulmonary aspergillosis completely. Among patients who developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, early diagnosis and

  14. Hand washing promotion for preventing diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ejemot-Nwadiaro, Regina I; Ehiri, John E; Arikpo, Dachi; Meremikwu, Martin M; Critchley, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea accounts for 1.8 million deaths in children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). One of the identified strategies to prevent diarrhoea is hand washing. Objectives To assess the effects of hand washing promotion interventions on diarrhoeal episodes in children and adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (27 May 2015); CENTRAL (published in the Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5); MEDLINE (1966 to 27 May 2015); EMBASE (1974 to 27 May 2015); LILACS (1982 to 27 May 2015); PsycINFO (1967 to 27 May 2015); Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index (1981 to 27 May 2015); ERIC (1966 to 27 May 2015); SPECTR (2000 to 27 May 2015); Bibliomap (1990 to 27 May 2015); RoRe, The Grey Literature (2002 to 27 May 2015); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), and reference lists of articles up to 27 May 2015. We also contacted researchers and organizations in the field. Selection criteria Individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs that compared the effects of hand washing interventions on diarrhoea episodes in children and adults with no intervention. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We stratified the analyses for child day-care centres or schools, community, and hospital-based settings. Where appropriate, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were pooled using the generic inverse variance method and random-effects model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. Main results We included 22 RCTs: 12 trials from child day-care centres or schools in mainly high-income countries (54,006 participants), nine community-based trials in LMICs (15,303 participants), and one hospital-based trial among people with acquired immune deficiency

  15. 30 CFR 206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.459 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the...

  16. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  17. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it...

  18. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it...

  19. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  20. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  1. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  2. 30 CFR 206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.260 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the...

  3. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  4. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  5. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  6. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  7. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  8. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  9. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  10. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a Late Wash' facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.