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Sample records for hepatic cytokine tnf-alpha

  1. Implications of oxidative stress and hepatic cytokine (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) response in the pathogenesis of hepatic collagenesis in chronic arsenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Subhankar; Santra, Amal; Lahiri, Sarbari; Guha Mazumder, D.N. . E-mail: dngm@apexmail.com

    2005-04-01

    Introduction: Noncirrhotic portal fibrosis has been reported to occur in humans due to prolonged intake of arsenic contaminated water. Further, oxystress and hepatic fibrosis have been demonstrated by us in chronic arsenic induced hepatic damage in murine model. Cytokines like tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) are suspected to play a role in hepatic collagenesis. The present study has been carried out to find out whether increased oxystress and cytokine response are associated with increased accumulation of collagen in the liver due to prolonged arsenic exposure and these follow a dose-response relationship. Methods: Male BALB/c mice were given orally 200 {mu}l of water containing arsenic in a dose of 50, 100, and 150 {mu}g/mouse/day for 6 days a week (experimental group) or arsenic-free water (<0.01 {mu}g/l, control group) for 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Hepatic glutathione (GSH), protein sulfhydryl (PSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Catalase, lipid peroxidation (LPx), protein carbonyl (PC), interleukin (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-{alpha}), arsenic and collagen content in the liver were estimated from sacrificed animals. Results: Significant increase of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in the liver associated with depletion of hepatic thiols (GSH, PSH), and antioxidant enzymes (GPx, Catalase) occurred in mice due to prolonged arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. Significant elevation of hepatic collagen occurred at 9 and 12 months in all the groups associated with significant elevation of TNF-{alpha} and IL-6. However, arsenic level in the liver increased progressively from 3 months onwards. There was a positive correlation between the hepatic arsenic level and collagen content (r = 0.8007), LPx (r = 0.779) and IL-6 (r = 0.7801). Further, there was a significant negative correlation between GSH and TNF-{alpha} (r = -0.5336)) and LPx (r = -0.644). Conclusion: Increasing dose and duration of arsenic exposure in

  2. Isolated hepatic perfusion in the pig with TNF-alpha with and without melphalan.

    PubMed Central

    Borel Rinkes, I. H.; de Vries, M. R.; Jonker, A. M.; Swaak, T. J.; Hack, C. E.; Nooyen, P. T.; Wiggers, T.; Eggermont, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Isolated limb perfusion with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and melphalan is well tolerated and highly effective in irresectable sarcoma and melanoma. No data are available on isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP) with these drugs for irresectable hepatic malignancies. This study was undertaken to assess the feasibility of such an approach by analysing hepatic and systemic toxicity of IHP with TNF-alpha with and without melphalan in pigs. Ten healthy pigs underwent IHP. After vascular isolation of the liver, inflow catheters were placed in the hepatic artery and portal vein, and an outflow catheter was placed in the inferior vena cava (IVC). An extracorporeal veno-venous bypass was used to shunt blood from the lower body and intestines to the heart. The liver was perfused for 60 min with (1) 50 microg kg(-1) TNF-alpha (n = 5), (2) 50 microg kg(-1) TNF-alpha plus 1 mg kg(-1) melphalan (n = 3) or (3) no drugs (n = 2). The liver was washed with macrodex before restoring vascular continuity. All but one pigs tolerated the procedure well. Stable perfusion was achieved in all animals with median perfusate TNF-alpha levels of 5.1 +/- 0.78 x 10(6) pg ml(-1) (+/- s.e.m). Systemic leakage of TNF-alpha from the perfusate was consistently < 0.02%. Following IHP, a transient elevation of systemic TNF-alpha levels was observed in groups 1 and 2 with a median peak level of 23 +/- 3 x 10(3) pg ml(-1) at 10 min after washout, which normalized within 6 h. No significant systemic toxicity was observed. Mild transient hepatotoxicity was seen to a similar extent in all animals, including controls. IHP with TNF-alpha with(out) melphalan in pigs is technically feasible, results in minimal systemic drug exposure and causes minor transient disturbances of liver biochemistry and histology. PMID:9166936

  3. Leucine metabolism in TNF-alpha- and endotoxin-treated rats: contribution of hepatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Holecek, M; Sprongl, L; Skopec, F; Andrýs, C; Pecka, M

    1997-12-01

    The effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; cachectin) and lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella enteritidis (LPS; endotoxin) on leucine metabolism in rats were evaluated in the whole body using intravenous infusion of L-[1-14C]leucine and in isolated perfused liver (IPL) using the single-pass perfusion technique with alpha-keto[1-14C]isocaproate as a tracer for measurement of ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) oxidation, and the recirculation technique for measurement of hepatic amino acid exchanges. The data obtained in TNF-alpha and LPS groups were compared with those obtained in controls. Both TNF-alpha and LPS treatment induced an increase of whole body leucine turnover, oxidation, and clearance. As the result of a higher increase of leucine oxidation than of incorporation into the pool of body proteins, the fractional oxidation of leucine was increased. The fractional rate of protein synthesis increased significantly in the spleen (both in TNF-alpha and LPS rats), in blood plasma, liver, colon, kidneys, gastrocnemius muscle (in LPS rats), and in lungs (TNF-alpha-treated rats), whereas it decreased in the jejunum (LPS rats). In IPL of TNF-alpha- and LPS-treated rats a decrease of KIC oxidation and higher uptake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) were observed when compared with control animals. We hypothesize that the negative consequences of increased whole body proteolysis and of increased oxidation of BCAA induced by TNF-alpha and/or LPS are reduced by decreased activity of hepatic branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase that can help resupply BCAA to the body. PMID:9435518

  4. Ibuprofen administration attenuates serum TNF-{alpha} levels, hepatic glutathione depletion, hepatic apoptosis and mouse mortality after Fas stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cazanave, Sophie; Vadrot, Nathalie; Tinel, Marina; Berson, Alain; Letteron, Philippe; Larosche, Isabelle; Descatoire, Veronique; Feldmann, Gerard; Robin, Marie-Anne |; Pessayre, Dominique |

    2008-09-15

    Fas stimulation recruits neutrophils and activates macrophages that secrete tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), which aggravates Fas-mediated liver injury. To determine whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs modify these processes, we challenged 24-hour-fasted mice with the agonistic Jo2 anti-Fas antibody (4 {mu}g/mouse), and treated the animals 1 h later with saline or ibuprofen (250 mg/kg), a dual cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibitor. Ibuprofen attenuated the Jo2-mediated recruitment/activation of myeloperoxidase-secreting neutrophils/macrophages in the liver, and attenuated the surge in serum TNF-{alpha}. Ibuprofen also minimized hepatic glutathione depletion, Bid truncation, caspase activation, outer mitochondrial membrane rupture, hepatocyte apoptosis and the increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity 5 h after Jo2 administration, to finally decrease mouse mortality at later times. The concomitant administration of pentoxifylline (decreasing TNF-{alpha} secretion) and infliximab (trapping TNF-{alpha}) likewise attenuated the Jo2-mediated increase in TNF-{alpha}, the decrease in hepatic glutathione, and the increase in serum ALT activity 5 h after Jo2 administration. The concomitant administration of the COX-1 inhibitor, SC-560 (10 mg/kg) and the COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib (40 mg/kg) 1 h after Jo2 administration, also decreased liver injury 5 h after Jo2 administration. In contrast, SC-560 (10 mg/kg) or celecoxib (40 or 160 mg/kg) given alone had no significant protective effects. In conclusion, secondary TNF-{alpha} secretion plays an important role in Jo2-mediated glutathione depletion and liver injury. The combined inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 by ibuprofen attenuates TNF-{alpha} secretion, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial alterations, hepatic apoptosis and mortality in Jo2-treated fasted mice.

  5. TNF-alpha-independent IL-8 expression: alterations in bacterial challenge dose cause differential human monocytic cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Patrone, Julia B; Bish, Samuel E; Stein, Daniel C

    2006-07-15

    We examined the effects of different bacterial doses of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on the cytokine response of primary human monocytes. The data indicate that a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) challenge (MOI = 0.1) results in substantial production of IL-8 and other chemokines/cytokines, in the absence of significant TNF-alpha production. Positive control challenges (MOI = 10) induced levels of IL-8 that were comparable to the low MOI challenges, but now induced significant levels of TNF-alpha. Induction of IL-8 expression in low MOI challenges was not mediated by an autocrine response as pretreatment of monocytes with neutralizing Abs against TNF-alpha or IL-1beta had no effect on IL-8 expression. IL-8 induction resulting from gonococcal challenge was shown to require NF-kappaB activation, though this activation was limited by the inoculating dose. These data indicate that IL-8 induction results from direct contact between bacteria and monocytes. Analysis of the overall cytokine profile revealed patterns of expression for growth-regulated oncogene, MCP-1, and IL-6 that were similar to IL-8. Analysis of various MAPKs indicated that low MOI challenges were able to efficiently activate both the ERK and p38 pathways, but in contrast to positive control samples, failed to activate the JNK pathway. A lack of phosphorylated JNK leads to decreased production of AP-1 dimers, transcription factors that are critical for efficient transcription of TNF-alpha. Therefore, we propose a mechanism where a low MOI gonococcal challenge results in diminished AP-1 activity and TNF-alpha production while IL-8 levels remain constant. PMID:16818792

  6. Blueberries inhibit proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and IL-6 production in macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) have been reported to attenuate atherosclerosis in apoE deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, the effect of BB on proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages was investigated. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G diet (...

  7. Human resistin stimulates the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha} and IL-12 in macrophages by NF-{kappa}B-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Silswal, Nirupama; Singh, Anil K.; Aruna, Battu; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita; Ghosh, Sudip; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z. . E-mail: nas_ehtesham@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    Resistin, a recently discovered 92 amino acid protein involved in the development of insulin resistance, has been associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. The elevated serum resistin in human diabetes is often associated with a pro-inflammatory milieu. However, the role of resistin in the development of inflammation is not well understood. Addition of recombinant human resistin protein (hResistin) to macrophages (both murine and human) resulted in enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-{alpha} and IL-12, similar to that obtained using 5 {mu}g/ml lipopolysaccharide. Both oligomeric and dimeric forms of hResistin were able to activate these cytokines suggesting that the inflammatory action of resistin is independent of its conformation. Heat denatured hResistin abrogated cytokine induction while treatment of recombinant resistin with polymyxin B agarose beads had no effect thereby ruling out the role of endotoxin in the recombinant hResistin mediated cytokine induction. The pro-inflammatory nature of hResistin was further evident from the ability of this protein to induce the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B transcription factor as seen from electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Induction of TNF-{alpha} in U937 cells by hResistin was markedly reduced in the presence of either dominant negative I{kappa}B{alpha} plasmid or PDTC, a pharmacological inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B. A protein involved in conferring insulin resistance is also a pro-inflammatory molecule that has important implications.

  8. Cytokine influence on simian immunodeficiency virus replication within primary macrophages. TNF-alpha, but not GMCSF, enhances viral replication on a per-cell basis.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, D. G.; Horvath, C. J.; Hansen-Moosa, A.; MacKey, J. J.; Sehgal, P. K.; Daniel, M. D.; Desrosiers, R. C.; Ringler, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The control of HIV-1 or SIV replication within macrophages is probably influenced by a variety of viral and cellular factors. Of the cellular factors, the authors have studied cytokine influence on SIV replication in vitro utilizing simian alveolar macrophages and uncloned SIVmacMTV, a macrophage-tropic variant. The approach allowed quantification of viral replication on a per-cell basis. As reported for HIV-1 replication in macrophages, TNF-alpha significantly increased SIV production in these macrophage cultures. GMCSF also resulted in marked increases in SIV gag protein in culture supernatants. However, after correcting for differences in total cell numbers and numbers of gag-containing cells in the treated and untreated cultures, GMCSF did not upregulate SIV production on a per-cell basis. IL-6 increased SIV replication little if at all but induced significantly greater cytopathic changes in the treated cultures compared with infected, untreated cultures. In contrast, IFN-gamma greatly decreased replication. Our results for GMCSF, IFN-gamma, and IL-6 are in contrast to previously published reports of cytokine control of HIV-1 growth in target cells, and they stress the importance of cell number analyses and the use of primary cultures in the study of lentiviral replication kinetics in macrophages. Images Figure 5 PMID:1928304

  9. Increase in cytokine production (IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha but not IFN-gamma, GM-CSF or LIF) by stimulated whole blood cells in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S X; Vrindts, Y; Lopez, M; De Groote, D; Zangerle, P F; Collette, J; Franchimont, N; Geenen, V; Albert, A; Reginster, J Y

    1997-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a progressive disorder characterized by a decreased bone mass and increased susceptibility to fractures. Several investigations have suggested that one of the mechanisms through which estrogen prevents bone loss was a modulation on secretion or release of various cytokines that are known to influence bone remodeling, even if some recent data have challenged this hypothesis. However, in established osteoporosis, the possibility that enhanced cytokines activity may account for the progression of this disease remains unclear and controversial. We sought here to determine whether production of IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, GM-CSF and LIF, after direct stimulation in whole blood, was different in healthy (n = 30) or osteoporotic postmenopausal women (n = 24) and whether lumbar bone density (1-BMD) correlated with the values of cytokine production observed in these conditions. A significant difference was observed between the osteoporotic and control subjects for IL-1 beta (p < 0.0001), IL-6 (p < 0.001) and TNF-alpha (p = 0.027) productions, the values being higher in the osteoporotic women. No significant differences between the groups were observed for IFN-gamma (p = 0.51), GM-CSF (p = 0.70) or LIF (p = 0.97). In the whole population, statistically significant negative correlations were observed between lumbar BMD and IL-1 beta (r = -0.46) (p < 0.0005), IL-6 (r = -0.50) (p < 0.0001) and TNF-alpha (r = -0.39) (p < 0.005) production while no such correlations were observed for IFN-gamma, GM-CSF or LIF. In conclusion, the study of cytokine production by immune cells cultured in autologous whole blood suggests that in women more than 10 years past the menopause and presenting a decrease in lumbar bone density corresponding to the new WHO definition of "osteoporosis', production of IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha is still increased compared to controls matched for age and ovarian function, while no differences are reported for IFN

  10. Targeting TNF-Alpha in HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has dramatically extended the lifespan and quality of life of individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). HAART comprises of a cocktail of various pharmacological inhibitors which interfere with almost every stages of HIV-1 life cycle. However, constant application of drugs often results in the evolution of hostpathogen relationship resulting in the emergence of drug resistant viral strains. Drug resistant HIV-1 is a potent threat for the humankind. Therefore, there is a constant need to search for novel therapeutic molecules. HIV-1 infection results in the depletion of CD4+/CD8+T cells and alters the cytokine network in the infected individuals. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a critical role in HIV-1 pathogenesis. HIV-1 utilizes the TNF-alpha signaling pathway for expanding its reservoir. Several HIV-1 proteins mimic and regulate the TNF-alpha signaling pathway. TNF-alpha inhibitors have been used in several inflammatory pathologies with success to some extent. In the present mini review we will discuss the role of TNF-alpha in HIV-1 pathogenesis. Furthermore we will evaluate the TNF-alpha inhibitors as an additional therapeutic option for HIV-1 infection. PMID:26073859

  11. High tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected pregnant mice and increased TNF-alpha gene transcription in their offspring.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, M T; Marques de Araujo, S; Lucas, R; Deman, J; Truyens, C; Defresne, M P; de Baetselier, P; Carlier, Y

    1995-01-01

    Since tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is known to be involved in the feto-maternal relationship, this cytokine was studied in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected pregnant BALB/c mice and their fetuses and offspring. Pregnant chronically infected mice displayed significantly higher levels of circulating TNF-alpha than animals either only infected or only pregnant. TNF-alpha was undetectable in sera of uninfected and nonpregnant mice as well as in breast milk obtained from infected and uninfected animals. Fetuses from infected mice exhibited significantly more cells containing TNF-alpha mRNA in their thymus than fetuses from uninfected mothers. When infected 2 months after birth, offspring born to infected and uninfected mothers displayed similar amounts of circulating TNF-alpha during chronic infection, whereas this cytokine was only weakly detectable during the acute phase of the disease. An intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide during acute infection strongly increased the production of TNF-alpha in offspring born to infected mothers to levels higher than those in progeny from uninfected mice. These results suggest that TNF-alpha is an important cytokine in the feto-maternal relationship during T. cruzi infection and that fetuses and offspring of infected mothers are primed to produce elevated levels of TNF-alpha. PMID:7822027

  12. Blueberries reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and IL-6 production in mouse macrophages by inhibiting NF Kappa B activation and the MAPK pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) have been reported to attenuate atherosclerosis in apoE deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of BB in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production in mouse macrophages. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G diet (CD) or CD formulated to contain 1% fre...

  13. TNF{alpha} release from peripheral blood leukocytes depends on a CRM1-mediated nuclear export

    SciTech Connect

    Miskolci, Veronika; Ghosh, Chandra C.; Rollins, Janet; Romero, Carlos; Vu, Hai-Yen; Robinson, Staci; Davidson, Dennis; Vancurova, Ivana . E-mail: vancuroi@stjohns.edu

    2006-12-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays a major role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders such as septic shock and arthritis, respectively. Leukocytes stimulated with inflammatory signals such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are the predominant producers of TNF{alpha}, and thus control of TNF{alpha} release from stimulated leukocytes represents a potential therapeutic target. Here, we report that leptomycin B (LMB), a specific inhibitor of CRM1-dependent nuclear protein export, inhibits TNF{alpha} release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood neutrophils and mononuclear cells. In addition, immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and immunoblotting analysis indicate that TNF{alpha} is localized in the nucleus of human neutrophils and mononuclear cells. This study demonstrates that the cellular release of TNF{alpha} from stimulated leukocytes is mediated by the CRM1-dependent nuclear export mechanism. Inhibition of CRM1-dependent cellular release of TNF{alpha} could thus provide a novel therapeutic approach for disorders involving excessive TNF{alpha} release.

  14. Discovering a new analogue of thalidomide which may be used as a potent modulator of TNF-alpha production.

    PubMed

    Fernández Braña, Miguel; Acero, Nuria; Añorbe, Loreto; Muñoz Mingarro, Dolores; Llinares, Francisco; Domínguez, Gema

    2009-09-01

    A new series of imide derivatives related to thalidomide were synthesized and evaluated as modulators of TNF-alpha production. These derivatives enhance TNF-alpha production using human leukemia HL-60 cells induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), while inhibiting TNF-alpha production induced with okadaic acid (OA) in the same cell line. The diphenylmaleimide derivative 2f, was found to be the most active product, producing a strong modulation of the cytokine level. PMID:19394719

  15. Immunoreactivity for IL-1 beta and TNF alpha in human lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Ruco, L. P.; Stoppacciaro, A.; Pomponi, D.; Boraschi, D.; Santoni, A.; Tagliabue, A.; Uccini, S.; Baroni, C. D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against two non-cross-reacting antigens of human IL-1 beta (Vhp20 and BRhC3) and human TNF alpha (B154.2 and B154.7) were applied to identify cytokine-containing cells in tissue sections and in cell suspensions. IL-1 beta- or TNF alpha-positive cells were not present in immunostained cytocentrifuge smears prepared from freshly isolated peripheral blood leukocytes, spleen, and lymph node cells. After 18 hours of culture with bacterial endotoxin (LPS), 80% to 90% of blood monocytes, 30% of spleen macrophages, and 2% to 28% of lymph node macrophages were strongly positive for IL-1 beta with either of the MAbs. Furthermore, 25% to 35% of blood monocytes and 6% to 60% of lymph node macrophages were stained for TNF alpha. Cells positive for IL-1 beta or TNF alpha were extremely rare in sections of normal thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes. Immunoreactivity for IL-1 beta or TNF alpha was frequently observed in sections of granulomatous lymphadenitis (N = 11). IL-1 beta or TNF alpha staining was confined to the epithelioid macrophages forming the granuloma, and the intensity of TNF alpha reactivity was generally stronger. The high frequency of cytokine-containing cells in this pathologic condition was confirmed in a cell suspension study showing that 20% of epithelioid macrophages were weakly positive for IL-1 beta and 80% were strongly positive for TNF alpha. The presence of cytokine-containing cells was investigated in cryostat sections of several nonlymphoid organs with normal histologic appearance. IL-1 beta reactivity was not observed in any of the tissues. TNF alpha reactivity was frequently demonstrated in isolated macrophages embedded in the interstitial connective tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2683798

  16. HPV-18 confers resistance to TNF-{alpha} in organotypic cultures of human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Boccardo, Enrique . E-mail: eboccardo@ludwig.org.br; Noya, Francisco; Broker, Thomas R.; Chow, Louise T.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2004-10-25

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) inhibits normal keratinocytes proliferation. However, many human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized or transformed cell lines are resistant to TNF-{alpha} antiproliferative effect. The present study analyzes the effects of TNF-{alpha} on organotypic cultures of primary human keratinocytes (PHKs) that express HPV-18 oncogenes. Raft cultures prepared with PHKs acutely transfected with HPV-18 whole genome or infected with recombinant retroviruses containing only E6/E7 or E7 were treated with 2 nM TNF-{alpha}. While BrdU incorporation into basal/parabasal cells of normal PHKs cultures was markedly inhibited by TNF-{alpha} cultures transfected with HPV-18 whole genome showed proliferation in all cell strata. Furthermore, BrdU incorporation into cultures expressing E6/E7 or E7 was not significantly reduced, indicating that E7 alone confers partial resistance to TNF-{alpha}. Besides, TNF-{alpha} treatment did not alter p16{sup ink4a}, p21{sup cip1}, p27{sup kip1}, or cyclin E levels, but did reduce cyclin A and PCNA levels in sensitive cells.

  17. Downregulation effects of beta-elemene on the levels of plasma endotoxin, serum TNF-alpha, and hepatic CD14 expression in rats with liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Zhe; Gao, Jiechang; Xie, Jiwen; Yang, Lin; Hu, Shenjun

    2011-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that β-elemene could protect against carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced liver fibrosis in our laboratory work, and the aim of this paper is to reveal the protective mechanisms of β-elemene. The hepatic fibrosis experimental model was induced by the hypodermical injection of CCl(4) in Wistar male rats. β-elemene was intraperitoneally administered into rats for 8 weeks (0.1 mL/100 g bodyweight per day), and plasma endotoxin content was assayed by biochemistry. The serum TNF-α level was detected using radioactive immunity. CD14 expression in rat livers was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The results showed that β-elemene can downregulate the levels of plasma endotoxins, serum TNF-α, and hepatic CD14 expression in rats with liver fibrosis. β-elemene plays an important role in downregulating the lipopolysaccharide signal transduction pathway, a significant pathway in hepatic fibrosis development. PMID:21681682

  18. IGFBP-3, hypoxia and TNF-{alpha} inhibit adiponectin transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Zappala, Giovanna; Rechler, Matthew M.

    2009-05-15

    The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone, an agonist ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-{gamma}, improves insulin sensitivity in part by stimulating transcription of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin. It activates PPAR-{gamma}-RXR-{alpha} heterodimers bound to PPAR-{gamma} response elements in the adiponectin promoter. Rosiglitazone-stimulated adiponectin protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes has been shown to be inhibited by IGFBP-3, which can be induced by hypoxia and the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-{alpha}, two inhibitors of adiponectin transcription. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3, the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride, and TNF-{alpha} inhibit rosiglitazone-induced adiponectin transcription in mouse embryo fibroblasts that stably express PPAR-{gamma}2. Native IGFBP-3 can bind RXR-{alpha} and inhibited rosiglitazone stimulated promoter activity, whereas an IGFBP-3 mutant that does not bind RXR-{alpha} did not. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 may mediate the inhibition of adiponectin transcription by hypoxia and TNF-{alpha}, and that IGFBP-3 binding to RXR-{alpha} may be required for the observed inhibition.

  19. Hypoxia enhances lysosomal TNF-alpha degradation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lahat, Nitza; Rahat, Michal A; Kinarty, Amalia; Weiss-Cerem, Lea; Pinchevski, Sigalit; Bitterman, Haim

    2008-07-01

    Infection, simulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is a potent stimulator of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production, and hypoxia often synergizes with LPS to induce higher levels of the secreted cytokine. However, we show that in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages and in three mouse peritoneal macrophage cell lines (RAW 264.7, J774A.1, and PMJ-2R), hypoxia (O(2) < 0.3%) reduces the secretion of LPS-induced TNF-alpha (P < 0.01). In RAW 264.7 cells this reduction was not regulated transcriptionally as TNF-alpha mRNA levels remained unchanged. Rather, hypoxia and LPS reduced the intracellular levels of TNF-alpha by twofold (P < 0.01) by enhancing its degradation in the lysosomes and inhibiting its secretion via secretory lysosomes, as shown by confocal microscopy and verified by the use of the lysosome inhibitor Bafilomycin A1. In addition, although hypoxia did not change the accumulation of the soluble receptor TNF-RII, it increased its binding to the secreted TNF-alpha by twofold (P < 0.05). We suggest that these two posttranslational regulatory checkpoints coexist in hypoxia and may partially explain the reduced secretion and diminished biological activity of TNF-alpha in hypoxic peritoneal macrophages. PMID:18434619

  20. Activation of caspase 3 (CPP32)-like proteases is essential for TNF-alpha-induced hepatic parenchymal cell apoptosis and neutrophil-mediated necrosis in a murine endotoxin shock model.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, H; Fisher, M A; Lawson, J A; Simmons, C A; Farhood, A; Jones, D A

    1998-04-01

    Endotoxin (ET)-induced liver failure is characterized by parenchymal cell apoptosis and inflammation leading to liver cell necrosis. Members of the caspase family have been implicated in the signal transduction pathway of apoptosis. The aim of this study was to characterize ET-induced hepatic caspase activation and apoptosis and to investigate their effect on neutrophil-mediated liver injury. Treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 700 mg/kg galactosamine (Gal) and 100 microg/kg Salmonella abortus equi ET increased caspase 3-like protease activity (Asp-Val-Glu-Asp-substrate) by 1730 +/- 140% at 6 h. There was a parallel enhancement of apoptosis (assessed by DNA fragmentation ELISA and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay). In contrast, activity of caspase 1 (IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-like proteases (Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-substrate) did not change throughout the experiment. Caspase 3-like protease activity and apoptosis was not induced by Gal/ET in ET-resistant mice (C3H/HeJ). Furthermore, only murine TNF-alpha but not IL-1alphabeta increased caspase activity and apoptosis. Gal/ET caused neutrophil-dependent hepatocellular necrosis at 7 h (area of necrosis, 45 +/- 3%). Delayed treatment with the caspase 3-like protease inhibitor Z-Val-Ala-Asp-CH2F (Z-VAD) (10 mg/kg at 3 h) attenuated apoptosis by 81 to 88% and prevented liver cell necrosis (< or = 5%). Z-VAD had no effect on the initial inflammatory response, including the sequestration of neutrophils in sinusoids. However, Z-VAD prevented neutrophil transmigration and necrosis. Our data indicate that activation of the caspase 3 subfamily of cysteine proteases is critical for the development of parenchymal cell apoptosis. In addition, excessive hepatocellular apoptosis can be an important signal for transmigration of primed neutrophils sequestered in sinusoids. PMID:9531309

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol on TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 expression in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jian; Yong Wei; Wu Xiaohong; Yu Ying; Lv Jinghuan; Liu Cuiping; Mao Xiaodong; Zhu Yunxia; Xu Kuanfeng; Han Xiao Liu Chao

    2008-05-02

    Chronic low-grade inflammation characterized by adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and abnormal cytokine production is a key feature of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Adipose-tissue-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, induced by cytokines, has been shown to play an essential role in the early events during macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue. In this study we investigated the effects of resveratrol upon both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 gene expression and its underlying signaling pathways in 3T3-L1 adipoctyes. Resveratrol was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 secretion and gene transcription, as well as promoter activity, which based on down-regulation of TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 transcription. Nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B was determined to play a major role in the TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 expression. Further analysis showed that resveratrol inhibited DNA binding activity of the NF-{kappa}B complex and subsequently suppressed NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cells. Finally, the inhibition of MCP-1 may represent a novel mechanism of resveratrol in preventing obesity-related pathologies.

  2. Inhibition of cytokine-induced microvascular arrest of tumor cells by recombinant endostatin prevents experimental hepatic melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Lorea; Valcárcel, María; Carrascal, Teresa; Egilegor, Eider; Salado, Clarisa; Sim, B Kim Lee; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    We investigated effects of endostatin (ES) in the prometastatic microenvironment of inflammation occurring during the microvascular phase of cancer cell infiltration in the liver. We used a model of intrasplenic injection of B16 melanoma (B16M) cells leading to hepatic metastasis through vascular cell adhesion molecule-(VCAM-1)-mediated capillary arrest of cancer cells via interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent mechanism. We show that administration of 50 mg/kg recombinant human (rh) ES 30 min before B16M, plus repetition of same dose for 3 additional days decreased metastasis number by 60%. A single dose of rhES before B16M injection reduced hepatic microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M by 40% and inhibited hepatic production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-18 and VCAM-1 expression by hepatic sinusoidal endothelia (HSE). Consistent with these data, rhES inhibited VCAM-1-dependent B16M cell adhesion to primary cultured HSE receiving B16M conditioned medium, and it abolished the HSE cell production of TNF-alpha and IL-18 induced by tumor-derived vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). rhES abrogated recombinant murine VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR/flk-1 receptor in HSE cells, preventing the proinflammatory action of tumor-derived VEGF on HSE. rhES also abolished hepatic production of TNF-alpha, microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M, and adhesion of B16M cells to isolated HSE cells, all of them induced in mice given 5 micro g/kg recombinant murine VEGF for 18 h. This capillary inflammation-deactivating capability constitutes a nonantiangiogenic antitumoral action of endostatin that decreases cancer cell arrest within liver microvasculature and prevents metastases promoted by proinflammatory cytokines induced by VEGF. PMID:14729638

  3. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Chicken Lipopolysaccharide-Induced TNF-alpha Factor (LITAF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inflammatory response to parasites, bacteria, and viruses is mediated by multiple host factors. TNF-alpha is one of the most pleiotropic cytokines in mammals, but has yet to be identified in avian species. In the current study, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding the chicken homologue of ...

  4. The state of macrophage differentiation determines the TNF alpha response to nitrated lipoprotein uptake.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Cheryl D W; Skinner, Vernon O; Bruckdorfer, K Richard; Haskard, Dorian O; Landis, R Clive

    2003-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokine synthesis by monocyte-macrophages in the developing plaque represents an important amplification point in atherosclerotic disease progression. Here we have investigated whether the state of monocyte-macrophage differentiation can influence TNF alpha synthesis in response to scavenged modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL). We show that LDL modified by nitration induces TNF alpha synthesis when added to undifferentiated human monocytes or a mouse cell line (RAW264.7) bearing an incompletely differentiated phenotype. However, significantly reduced levels of TNF alpha were released from in vitro differentiated human macrophages (P=0.006) or a mouse cell line (IC-21) bearing a well-differentiated macrophage phenotype (P<0.001). A possible scavenging insufficiency in macrophagic cell types was ruled out by lipoprotein-uptake studies and competency to synthesise TNF alpha was confirmed using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a stimulus. However, LPS-induced TNF alpha secretion in IC-21 cells was partially suppressed by pre-treatment with nitrated LDL (46%, P=0.0076), with no equivalent effect seen in RAW264.7 cells. Based on these data, we hypothesise that the state of differentiation of intimal monocyte-macrophages may play an important role in their inflammatory response to scavenged modified lipoproteins and that the fully differentiated macrophage end-point may be associated with a non-inflammatory and therefore, atheroprotective, phenotype. PMID:14612200

  5. TNF-alpha levels in cancer patients relate to social variables.

    PubMed

    Marucha, Phillip T; Crespin, Timothy R; Shelby, Rebecca A; Andersen, Barbara L

    2005-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an important cytokine associated with tumor regression and increased survival time for cancer patients. Research evidence relates immune factors (e.g., natural killer (NK) cell counts, NK cell lysis, lymphocyte profile, and lymphocyte proliferation) to the frequency and quality of social relations among cancer patients. We hypothesized that disruptions in social relations would be associated with lower TNF-alpha responses, and conversely, that reports of positive changes in social relations correlate with stronger responses. A prospective design measured changes in social activity and relationship satisfaction with a partner in 44 breast cancer patients at the time of cancer diagnosis, and initial surgery and 12 months later. Results indicated that patients reporting increased social activities or satisfaction exhibited stronger stimulated TNF-alpha responses. This is the first study to link changes in patient social relations with a cancer-relevant immune variable. PMID:15890493

  6. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 on the production of immunoreactive IL-1 and TNF-alpha by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Danis, V A; Franic, G M; Rathjen, D A; Brooks, P M

    1991-01-01

    The effects of GM-CSF, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-6 on the production of IL-1 (both secreted and cell associated) and TNF-alpha by peripheral blood monocytes were studied. Monocytes were cultured for 20 h in suspension and in serum-free conditions which minimized background stimulation of monokine production. GM-CSF, IL-2 and TNF-alpha directly induced the production of cell-associated IL-1 but little or no IL-1 or TNF-alpha secretion. Combination of GM-CSF with IFN-gamma, IL-2 or TNF-alpha synergistically enhanced IL-1 secretion and had an additive effect on cell-associated IL-1 production. Combination of IL-2 with IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha also synergistically enhanced IL-1 secretion but the effect on cell-associated IL-1 production was less than additive. GM-CSF synergistically enhanced TNF-alpha secretion induced by IFN-gamma but not by lipopolysaccharide. GM-CSF did not enhance TNF-alpha secretion induced by IL-2 or TNF-alpha. In contrast, IL-2 synergistically enhanced TNF-alpha secretion induced by IFN-gamma. These results are discussed in relation to cytokine involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:1906383

  7. Role of transient receptor potential C3 in TNF-alpha-enhanced calcium influx in human airway myocytes.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas A; Xue, Ailing; Chini, Eduardo N; Thompson, Michael; Sieck, Gary C; Wylam, Mark E

    2006-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha, contributes to airway hyperresponsivness by altering airway smooth muscle (ASM) Ca(2+) responses to agonist stimulation. The present study examined the effects of TNF-alpha on Ca(2+) influx pathways in cultured human ASM cells (HASMCs). Proteins encoded by the transient receptor potential (TRP) gene family function as channels through which receptor-operated and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) occur. In the present study, the presence of TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPC6 mRNA and protein expression was confirmed in cultured HASMCs using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. TNF-alpha treatment significantly increased TRPC3 mRNA and protein levels in HASMCs as well as SOCE. TNF-alpha treatment also increased both the peak and plateau intracellular Ca(2+) concentration responses in HASMCs elicited by acetylcholine and bradykinin. The effects of TNF-alpha treatment on SOCE and agonist-induced intracellular Ca(2+) concentration responses were attenuated using small interfering RNA transfection, which knocked down TRPC3 expression. Thus, in inflammatory airway diseases, TNF-alpha treatment may result in increased myocyte activation due to altered Ca(2+) influx pathways. These results suggest that TRPC3 may be an important therapeutic target in inflammatory airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:16574942

  8. Role of PGL-I of M. leprae in TNF-alpha production by in vitro whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, S; Ranjit, C; Sapkota, B R; Macdonald, M

    2008-03-01

    Phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) is known to be a major antigen of Mycobacterium leprae. We have studied the influence of PGL-I on the production of Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-alpha) using the in vitro whole blood assay. Armadillo-derived M. leprae (ADML) are thought to be depleted of PGL-I during the purification process. M. leprae obtained from mouse foot pad material (MFPML) has been subjected to a less rigorous purification process; their PGL-I coating is therefore believed to be more intact than that of ADML. PGL-I or ADML alone induced the secretion of minimal levels of TNF-alpha in whole blood assay; when added in combination, higher levels of this cytokine were observed. The highest TNF-alpha response was seen following stimulation with MFPML. MFP material not infected with ML did not elicit any response. The difference in TNF-alpha response shown by ADML and MFPML was postulated to be largely due to the presence of higher levels of PGL-I in MFPML. This increase in TNF-alpha production suggests that PGL-I may play a significant role in the induction of TNF-alpha during natural infection. PMID:18700620

  9. Effect of TNF{alpha} on activities of different promoters of human apolipoprotein A-I gene

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Sergey V.; Mogilenko, Denis A.; Shavva, Vladimir S.; Dizhe, Ella B.; Ignatovich, Irina A.; Perevozchikov, Andrej P.

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF{alpha} stimulates the distal alternative promoter of human apoA-I gene. {yields} TNF{alpha} acts by weakening of promoter competition within apoA-I gene (promoter switching). {yields} MEK1/2 and nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha} and LXRs take part in apoA-I promoter switching. -- Abstract: Human apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) is a major structural and functional protein component of high-density lipoproteins. The expression of the apolipoprotein A-I gene (apoA-I) in hepatocytes is repressed by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1{beta} and TNF{alpha}. Recently, two novel additional (alternative) promoters for human apoA-I gene have been identified. Nothing is known about the role of alternative promoters in TNF{alpha}-mediated downregulation of apoA-I gene. In this article we report for the first time about the different effects of TNF{alpha} on two alternative promoters of human apoA-I gene. Stimulation of HepG2 cells by TNF{alpha} leads to activation of the distal alternative apoA-I promoter and downregulation of the proximal alternative and the canonical apoA-I promoters. This effect is mediated by weakening of the promoter competition within human apoA-I 5'-regulatory region (apoA-I promoter switching) in the cells treated by TNF{alpha}. The MEK1/2-ERK1/2 cascade and nuclear receptors PPAR{alpha} and LXRs are important for TNF{alpha}-mediated apoA-I promoter switching.

  10. Intratumoral delivery of encapsulated IL-12, IL-18 and TNF-alpha in a model of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Michael S; Su, Gang; Griffith, Kent A; Chang, Alfred E

    2010-07-01

    Intratumoral (i.t.) cytokine release through the use of poly-lactic acid microspheres (PLAM) holds tremendous potential for the immunotherapy of breast cancer as it harnesses the immunologic potential of autologous tumor in a clinically feasible and minimally toxic manner. We examined the potential of combinations of i.t. IL-12, IL-18 and TNF-alpha PLAM to generate a tumor-specific immune response and improve outcome in a model of metastatic breast cancer. Balb/c mice with established 4T1 mammary carcinomas were treated with a single injection of BSA, IL-12, IL-18 or TNF-alpha-loaded PLAM alone or in combination after spontaneous metastases occurred. Combined treatment with IL-12 and TNF-alpha PLAM was superior to all other treatments, including the triple combination of IL-12, IL-18 and TNF-alpha in ablation of the primary tumor, eradicating distant disease and enhancing survival. Simultaneous delivery of IL-12 and TNF-alpha was superior to sequential delivery of IL-12 followed by TNF-alpha, but not TNF-alpha followed by IL-12. In vivo lymphocyte depletion studies established that the effects of IL-12 alone are mediated primarily by NK cells, while the combination of IL-12 and TNF-alpha is dependent upon CD8+ T-cells. Only the combination of IL-12 and TNF-alpha results in an increase in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and a reduction in CD4+CD25+ cells. While there was no change in the dendritic cell population, IL-12 and TNF-alpha resulted in a dramatic increase in DC maturation and antigen presentation. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy with simultaneous intratumoral delivery of IL-12 and TNF-alpha PLAM augments DC antigen presentation and increases cytotoxic T-cells without increasing regulatory T-cells, resulting in a T-cell based anti-tumor immune response capable of eradicating disseminated disease. The addition of IL-18 did not improve the efficacy. PMID:19802695

  11. Dissociation of TNF-alpha cytotoxic and proinflammatory activities by p55 receptor- and p75 receptor-selective TNF-alpha mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, J A; Smith, W B; Gamble, J R; Van Ostade, X; Vandenabeele, P; Tavernier, J; Fiers, W; Vadas, M A; Lopez, A F

    1994-01-01

    Human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a pleiotropic cytokine capable of killing mammalian tumour cells in vitro and in vivo, and of enhancing the proinflammatory activity of leucocytes and endothelium, the latter effects limiting its usage as an antitumour agent in humans. Using TNF-alpha mutants with a selective capacity to bind to the TNF p55 receptor (TNFR55) or to the p75 receptor (TNFR75) we show here that these two major activities of TNF-alpha can be dissociated. The TNFR55-selective mutants (R32W, E146K and R32W-S86T) which bind poorly to TNFR75 displayed similar potency to wild-type TNF in causing cytotoxicity of a human laryngeal carcinoma-derived cell line (HEp-2) and cytostasis in a human leukaemic cell line (U937). However, these TNFR55-selective mutants exhibited lower proinflammatory activity than wild-type TNF. Specifically, TNF-alpha's priming of human neutrophils for superoxide production and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, platelet-activating factor synthesis and adhesion to endothelium were reduced by up to 170-fold. Activation of human endothelial cell functions represented by human umbilical venular endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesiveness for neutrophils, E-selectin expression, neutrophil transmigration and IL-8 secretion were also reduced by up to 280-fold. On the other hand, D143F, a TNFR75-selective mutant tested either alone or in combination with TNFR55-selective mutants, did not stimulate these activities despite being able to cause cytokine production in TNFR75-transfected PC60 cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7509279

  12. Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) regulates CD40 expression through SMAR1 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kamini; Sinha, Surajit; Malonia, Sunil Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-01-08

    CD40 plays an important role in mediating inflammatory response and is mainly induced by JAK/STAT phosphorylation cascade. TNF{alpha} is the key cytokine that activates CD40 during inflammation and tumorigenesis. We have earlier shown that SMAR1 can repress the transcription of Cyclin D1 promoter by forming a HDAC1 dependent repressor complex. In this study, we show that SMAR1 regulates the transcription of NF-{kappa}B target gene CD40. SMAR1 recruits HDAC1 and forms a repressor complex on CD40 promoter and keeps its basal transcription in check. Further, we show that TNF{alpha} stimulation induces SMAR1 phosphorylation at Ser-347 and promotes its cytoplasmic translocation, thus releasing its negative effect. Concomitantly, TNF{alpha} induced phosphorylation of STAT1 at Tyr-701 by JAK1 facilitates its nuclear translocation and activation of CD40 through p300 recruitment and core Histone-3 acetylation. Thus, TNF{alpha} mediated regulation of CD40 expression occurs by dual phosphorylation of SMAR1 and STAT1.

  13. Sphingolipid signalling: molecular basis and role in TNF-alpha-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Gouazé, Valérie; Tardy, Claudine; Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry

    2002-12-01

    Various lipidic molecules serve as second messengers for transducing signals from the cell surface to the cell interior and trigger specific cellular responses. Sphingolipids represent a complex group of lipids that have recently emerged as new transducers in eukaryotic cells. Several sphingolipid molecules are able to modulate cell growth, differentiation and death. This review summarises current knowledge of the signalling functions of sphingolipids, especially in the regulation of tumour necrosis factor [alpha] (TNF-[alpha])-mediated cytotoxic effects. TNF-[alpha] is a multifaceted cytokine that controls a wide range of immune responses in mammals, including induction of programmed cell death (also called apoptosis). On the basis of recent observations, a working model is proposed for the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of sphingolipid generation following TNF-[alpha] receptor 1 activation. The implications of these findings for the development of future pharmacological strategies to prevent the cytotoxic TNF-[alpha] response and subsequent cellular dysfunctions (as seen in various human diseases) are discussed. PMID:14987386

  14. DNA polymorphisms and mutations of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) promoter in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH).

    PubMed

    Wu, W S; McClain, K L

    1997-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of dendritic histiocytes expressing elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). The cause of the increased cytokine levels is unknown, but DNA sequence changes in promoters could alter expression. The TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma promoter DNA sequences of 12 LCH patients were studied and compared with normal individuals by dideoxy fingerprinting and DNA sequencing. Functional consequences of polymorphic or mutated sequences were assessed by cloning altered and control promoter sequences into a luciferase reporter gene vector. Electrophoretic mobility shifts (EMSA) after binding of nuclear extracts from a macrophage cell line (U-937) by mutated promoters were compared with controls. Five of 12 LCH patients had alterations in the TNF-alpha promoter DNA sequence. None were found in the IFN-gamma gene promoter. Of the 5 with TNF-alpha DNA alterations, 2 were at position -308, which has been described as a G-A polymorphism associated with upregulation of TNF-alpha in some patients with infections or immune-mediated diseases. The polymorphism at -308 but not the other TNF-alpha promoter mutations caused a 3-fold to 7-fold increased production of the luciferase reporter gene. EMSA showed that the -308 mutant promoters bound fewer nuclear proteins than normals. Polymorphisms of the TNF-alpha promoter in LCH patients could increase the production of that cytokine. PMID:9355965

  15. TNF-{alpha} mediates the stimulation of sclerostin expression in an estrogen-deficient condition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Beom-Jun; Bae, Sung Jin; Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Young-Sun; Baek, Ji-Eun; Park, Sook-Young; Lee, Seung Hun; Koh, Jung-Min; Kim, Ghi Su

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estrogen deprivation stimulates the bony sclerostin levels with reversal by estrogen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} increases the activity and expression of MEF2 in UMR-106 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} blocker prevents the stimulation of bony sclerostin expression by ovariectomy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No difference in bony sclerostin expression between sham-operated and ovariectomized nude mice. -- Abstract: Although recent clinical studies have suggested a possible role for sclerostin, a secreted Wnt antagonist, in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis, the detailed mechanisms how estrogen deficiency regulates sclerostin expression have not been well-elucidated. Bilateral ovariectomy or a sham operation in female C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c nude mice was performed when they were seven weeks of age. The C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with phosphate-buffered serum (PBS), 5 {mu}g/kg {beta}-estradiol five times per week for three weeks, or 10 mg/kg TNF-{alpha} blocker three times per week for three weeks. Bony sclerostin expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry staining in their femurs. The activity and expression of myocyte enhancer factors 2 (MEF2), which is essential for the transcriptional activation of sclerostin, in rat UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells were determined by luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Bony sclerostin expression was stimulated by estrogen deficiency and it was reversed by estradiol supplementation. When the UMR-106 cells were treated with well-known, estrogen-regulated cytokines, only TNF-{alpha}, but not IL-1 and IL-6, increased the MEF2 activity. Consistently, TNF-{alpha} also increased the nuclear MEF2 expression. Furthermore, the TNF-{alpha} blocker prevented the stimulation of bony sclerostin expression by ovariectomy. We also found that there was no difference in sclerostin expression between ovariectomized

  16. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 and IL-6 plasma levels in humans subjected to the sleep deprivation model of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, W. T.; Reuben, J. M.; Mullington, J. M.; Price, N. J.; Lee, B. N.; Smith, E. O.; Szuba, M. P.; Van Dongen, H. P.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which sleep loss may predispose astronauts to a state of altered immunity during extended space travel prompts evaluation with ground-based models. OBJECTIVE: We sought to measure plasma levels of selected cytokines and their receptors, including the putative sleep-regulation proteins soluble TNF-alpha receptor (sTNF-alpha R) I and IL-6, in human subjects undergoing 2 types of sleep deprivation during environmental confinement with performance demands. METHODS: Healthy adult men (n = 42) were randomized to schedules that varied in severity of sleep loss: 4 days (88 hours) of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) involving two 2-hour naps per day or 4 days of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Plasma samples were obtained every 6 hours across 5 days and analyzed by using enzyme-linked immunoassays for sTNF-alpha RI, sTNF-alpha RII, IL-6, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: Interactions between the effects of time and sleep deprivation level were detected for sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6 but not for sTNF-alpha RII, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. Relative to the PSD condition, subjects in the TSD condition had elevated plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI on day 2 (P =.04), day 3 (P =.01), and across days 2 to 4 of sleep loss (P =.01) and elevated levels of IL-6 on day 4 (P =.04). CONCLUSIONS: Total sleep loss produced significant increases in plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6, messengers that connect the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. These changes appeared to reflect elevations of the homeostatic drive for sleep because they occurred in TSD but not PSD, suggesting that naps may serve as the basis for a countermeasures approach to prolonged spaceflight.

  17. Endogenous glucocorticoids protect against TNF-alpha-induced increases in anxiety-like behavior in virally infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, MN; Macdougall, MG; Hu, F; Pace, TWW; Raison, CL; Miller, AH

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids restrain proinflammatory cytokine responses to immune challenges such as viral infection. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines induce behavioral alterations including changes in locomotor/exploratory activity. Accordingly, we examined proinflammatory cytokines and open-field behavior in virally infected mice rendered glucocorticoid deficient by adrenalectomy (ADX). Mice were infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), and open-field behavior (36 h post-infection) and plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 (42 h post-infection) were assessed. Compared to sham-ADX-MCMV-infected animals, ADX-MCMV-infected mice exhibited significant reductions in total distance moved, number of center entries, and time spent in center. These behavioral alterations were accompanied by significantly higher plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-6, both of which were correlated with degree of behavioral change. To examine the role of TNF-alpha in these behavioral alterations, open-field behavior was compared in wild-type (WT) and TNF-R1-knockout (KO), ADX-MCMV-infected mice. TNF-R1-KO mice exhibited significantly attenuated decreases in number of rearings, number of center entries and time spent in center, but not distance moved, which correlated with plasma IL-6. Given the potential role of brain cytokines in these findings, mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6 was assessed in various brain regions. Although MCMV induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine mRNA throughout the brain (especially in ADX animals), no remarkable differences were found between WT and TNF-R1-KO mice. These results demonstrate that endogenous glucocorticoids restrain proinflammatory cytokine responses to viral infection and their impact on locomotor/exploratory activity. Moreover, TNF-alpha appears to mediate cytokine-induced changes in open-field behaviors, especially those believed to reflect anxiety. PMID:17389906

  18. TNF-alpha mediated modulation of T cell development and exacerbation of in vitro T1DM in fetal thymus organ culture.

    PubMed

    Middlebrook, Aaron J; Lebsack, Ty; DeLuca, Dominick

    2007-01-01

    TNF-alpha is a pleiotropic cytokine that is constitutively expressed in the thymus. This cytokine has opposing effects on type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) as non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice administered TNF-alpha early in life experience an acceleration in disease onset while TNF-alpha administered to adult NOD mice are rescued from disease entirely. Using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC) as a model of T cell development and an associated in vitro T1DM model, we set out to reconcile the role of TNF-alpha in thymic development with its role in the pathogenesis of T1DM. Our data indicate that NOD derived FTOC produce a smaller percentage of double negative (CD4(-)/CD8(-)) thymocytes expressing TNF receptors compared to non-diabetic C57BL/6 (B6) derived FTOC. NOD FTOC produce more TNF-alpha than B6 FTOC during days 6-9 of culture, a time when negative selection of T cells is known to occur. Neutralization of this endogenous TNF-alpha production in NOD derived FTOC with soluble TNF receptor (sTNF R1) rescued insulin production in our in vitro T1DM model. Flow cytometric analysis of NOD FTOC treated with recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) or sTNF R1 demonstrated that the relative levels of TNF-alpha in the culture during the selection window (days 6-9) influence the ratio of immature vs. mature T cells that emerge from FTOC. PMID:17716860

  19. Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin (TNF alpha) in sera from patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Malavé, I; Perdomo, Y; Escalona, E; Rodriguez, E; Anchustegui, M; Malavé, H; Arends, T

    1993-01-01

    Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin (TNF alpha) were studied in a group of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), which include 31 patients with homozygous SS hemoglobinopathy and 10 patients bearing double heterozygous SC hemoglobinopathy and in their matched normal controls. All patients tested did not show any form of crisis for at least 4 weeks prior to the extraction of the sample. The amount of TNF alpha in serum was quantitated by means of an immunoenzymatic assay with a lower limit of detection of 25 pg/ml. The percentage of sera with detectable levels of TNF alpha was significantly increased in SCD patients as compared with the normal controls. Mean TNF alpha values in individuals with detectable levels of the cytokine were also significantly higher in the whole group of SCD patients and in patients bearing either SS or SC hemoglobinopathies than in the control group. An inverse correlation was observed between the percentages of Hb F and the levels of TNF alpha found in the sera from the patients. PMID:8140855

  20. Divergent effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol on human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell function diminishes TNF-{alpha}-induced neointima formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nintasen, Rungrat; Riches, Kirsten; Mughal, Romana S.; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Chaisri, Urai; Maneerat, Yaowapa; Turner, Neil A.; Porter, Karen E.

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} augments neointimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces detrimental effects on endothelial and smooth muscle cell function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol exerts modulatory effects on TNF-induced vascular cell functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modulatory effects of estradiol are discriminatory and cell-type specific. -- Abstract: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a condition characterized by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). TNF-{alpha} can induce vascular endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) dysfunction, central events in development of neointimal lesions. The reduced incidence of CHD in young women is believed to be due to the protective effects of estradiol (E2). We therefore investigated the effects of TNF-{alpha} on human neointima formation and SMC/EC functions and any modulatory effects of E2. Saphenous vein (SV) segments were cultured in the presence of TNF-{alpha} (10 ng/ml), E2 (2.5 nM) or both in combination. Neointimal thickening was augmented by incubation with TNF-{alpha}, an effect that was abolished by co-culture with E2. TNF-{alpha} increased SV-SMC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner that was optimal at 10 ng/ml (1.5-fold increase), and abolished by E2 at all concentrations studied (1-50 nM). Surprisingly, E2 itself at low concentrations (1 and 5 nM) stimulated SV-SMC proliferation to a level comparable to that of TNF-{alpha} alone. SV-EC migration was significantly impaired by TNF-{alpha} (42% of control), and co-culture with E2 partially restored the ability of SV-EC to migrate and repair the wound. In contrast, TNF-{alpha} increased SV-SMC migration by 1.7-fold, an effect that was completely reversed by co-incubation with E2. Finally, TNF-{alpha} potently induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in both SV-EC and SV-SMC. However there

  1. TNF-alpha and ghrelin: opposite effects on immune system, metabolism and mental health.

    PubMed

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Sheldrick, Abigail J

    2010-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a glycoprotein hormone with important functions in inflammation and apoptosis. It plays a significant role as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in the defense against viral, bacterial and parasitic infections and autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, it influences energy homeostasis and has an anorexigenic effect on the hypothalamus. TNF-alpha has also been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders such as depression or narcolepsy. Ghrelin is a peptide hormone which primarily regulates eating behavior through modulation of expression of orexigenic peptides in the hypothalamus. Ghrelin administration increases food intake and body weight, while weight loss in turn increases ghrelin levels. Secondly, it posesses anti-inflammatory properties. It also seems to have an impact on mental health as it is has been suggested to have antidepressant and anxiolytic properties. Therefore, TNF-alpha and ghrelin seem to have opposite effects regarding the hypothalamic regulation of eating behavior, modulation of the immune response and the state of mental health. PMID:20214644

  2. Cellular signaling roles of TGF beta, TNF alpha and beta APP in brain injury responses and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattson, M P; Barger, S W; Furukawa, K; Bruce, A J; Wyss-Coray, T; Mark, R J; Mucke, L

    1997-02-01

    beta-Amyloid precursor protein (beta APP), transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) are remarkably pleiotropic neural cytokines/neurotrophic factors that orchestrate intricate injury-related cellular and molecular interactions. The links between these three factors include: their responses to injury; their interactive effects on astrocytes, microglia and neurons; their ability to induce cytoprotective responses in neurons; and their association with cytopathological alterations in Alzheimer's disease. Astrocytes and microglia each produce and respond to TGF beta and TNF alpha in characteristic ways when the brain is injured. TGF beta, TNF alpha and secreted forms of beta APP (sAPP) can protect neurons against excitotoxic, metabolic and oxidative insults and may thereby serve neuroprotective roles. On the other hand, under certain conditions TNF alpha and the fibrillogenic amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) derivative of beta APP can promote damage of neuronal and glial cells, and may play roles in neurodegenerative disorders. Studies of genetically manipulated mice in which TGF beta, TNF alpha or beta APP ligand or receptor levels are altered suggest important roles for each factor in cellular responses to brain injury and indicate that mediators of neural injury responses also have the potential to enhance amyloidogenesis and/or to interfere with neuroregeneration if expressed at abnormal levels or modified by strategic point mutations. Recent studies have elucidated signal transduction pathways of TGF beta (serine/threonine kinase cascades), TNF alpha (p55 receptor linked to a sphingomyelin-ceramide-NF kappa B pathway), and secreted forms of beta APP (sAPP; receptor guanylate cyclase-cGMP-cGMP-dependent kinase-K+ channel activation). Knowledge of these signaling pathways is revealing novel molecular targets on which to focus neuroprotective therapeutic strategies in disorders ranging from stroke to Alzheimer's disease

  3. Role of interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha in intestinal maturation induced by dietary spermine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaouass, M; Deloyer, P; Gouders, I; Peulen, O; Dandrifosse, G

    1997-04-01

    In the present investigation, the authors aimed to evaluate the role of cytokines in intestinal postnatal maturation induced by dietary polyamines. Neonatal rats were administered either saline (8 mumol) orally. Spermine increased interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-6, and TNF-alpha plasma concentration. The maximum concentrations of IL-1 beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha were, respectively, observed at 4, 4, and 8 h posttreatment. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of IL-1 beta increased the specific activity of sucrase in whole small intestine, whereas the specific activities of maltase and lactase were significantly enhanced only in the jejunum. IL-6 elicited sucrase and increased maltase specific activity in the whole small intestine, but lactase specific activity was not affected. TNF-alpha had no effect on sucrase and maltase specific activity, but a slight augmentation of lactase specific activity was detected in the jejunum. Spermine and spermidine content in the intestine was increased by i.p. injection of IL-1 beta and IL-6. Corticosterone secretion was elevated by single i.p. injection of IL-1 beta, IL-6, or TNF-alpha. These findings suggest that spermine could induce postnatal intestinal development and corticosterone secretion through a cytokine-dependent mechanism. PMID:9225134

  4. TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis is prevented by erythropoietin treatment on SH-SY5Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pregi, Nicolas Wenker, Shirley; Vittori, Daniela; Leiros, Claudia Perez; Nesse, Alcira

    2009-02-01

    The growth factor erythropoietin (Epo) has shown neuronal protective action in addition to its well known proerythroid activity. Furthermore, Epo has dealt with cellular inflammation by inhibiting the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1 and TNF-{alpha}. The action of TNF can have both apoptotic and antiapoptotic consequences due to altered balance between different cell signalling pathways. This work has focused on the apoptotic effects of this cytokine and the potential protective action of Epo. The model we used was neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells cultured in the presence of 25 ng/ml TNF-{alpha} or pretreated with 25 U/ml Epo for 12 h before the addition of TNF-{alpha}. Apoptosis was evaluated by differential cell count after Hoechst staining, analysis of DNA ladder pattern, and measurement of caspase activity. Despite its ability to induce NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation, TNF-{alpha} induced cell death, which was found to be associated to upregulation of TNF Receptor 1 expression. On the other hand, cells activated by Epo became resistant to cell death. Prevention of death receptor upregulation and caspase activation may explain this antiapoptotic effect of Epo, which may be also favoured by the induction of a higher expression of protective factors, such as Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, through mechanisms involving Jak/STAT and PI3K signalling pathways.

  5. Regulation of PPAR{gamma} function by TNF-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Jianping

    2008-09-26

    The nuclear receptor PPAR{gamma} is a lipid sensor that regulates lipid metabolism through gene transcription. Inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activity by TNF-{alpha} is involved in pathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and cancer cachexia. PPAR{gamma} activity is regulated by TNF-{alpha} at pre-translational and post-translational levels. Activation of serine kinases including IKK, ERK, JNK, and p38 may be involved in the TNF-regulation of PPAR{gamma}. Of the four kinases, IKK is a dominant signaling molecule in the TNF-regulation of PPAR{gamma}. IKK acts through at least two mechanisms: inhibition of PPAR{gamma} expression and activation of PPAR{gamma} corepressor. In this review article, literature is reviewed with a focus on the mechanisms of PPAR{gamma} inhibition by TNF-{alpha}.

  6. Effects of pentoxifylline on TNF-alpha production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Duman, Deniz G; Ozdemir, Filiz; Birben, Esra; Keskin, Ozlem; Ekşioğlu-Demiralp, Emel; Celikel, Cigdem; Kalayci, Omer; Kalayci, Cem

    2007-10-01

    Pentoxifylline (POF) is a new candidate for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Its effects on the cytokine production in patients with NASH are not completely understood. This study was designed to investigate the effect of POF on TNF-alpha production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with NASH. After preliminary experiments in healthy control subjects to determine the range of POF concentration to be used in NASH patients, PBMCs from patients with NASH (n = 13) were cultured in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml) and various concentrations of POF for 24 hr. Concentrations of TNF-alpha in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA and the transcriptional activity was determined by RT-PCR. As dictated by the results of our preliminary study in PBMC from healthy control subjects, we treated LPS stimulated PBMCs from NASH patients with 10, 100, and 500 microg/ml of POF. Stimulation of PBMCs from NASH patients with LPS resulted in a strong up-regulation of TNF-alpha production from median 355.9 (interquartile range, 206.7-463.5) pg/ml to 1,670 pg/ml (interquartile range, 1,121-2,414) pg/ml. In this LPS-stimulated culture system, POF caused a dose-dependent suppression of TNF-alpha levels (P < 0.001, ANOVA on ranks for repeated measures). TNF-alpha levels in culture supernatants decreased to 870.3 (range, 598.3-2,077) pg/ml with 10 microg/ml of POF treatment, and to levels similar to those obtained in baseline unstimulated cultures (133.4 (range, 95.8-1518.5) pg/ml) at 100 microg/ml. At 500 microg/ml, POF suppressed TNF-alpha production to levels significantly lower than that obtained in unstimulated (baseline) culture supernatants (76.3 (range, 33-94.5) pg/ml; P = 0.001). The mRNA expression was consistent with the effects on protein concentration. Demographic characteristics of the patients, laboratory results, such as AST, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, GGT, and triglyceride levels, and the liver histology did

  7. TNF-alpha increases ubiquitin-conjugating activity in skeletal muscle by up-regulating UbcH2/E220k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Lecker, Stewart H.; Chen, Yuling; Waddell, Ian D.; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Reid, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    In some inflammatory diseases, TNF-alpha is thought to stimulate muscle catabolism via an NF-kappaB-dependent process that increases ubiquitin conjugation to muscle proteins. The transcriptional mechanism of this response has not been determined. Here we studied the potential role of UbcH2, a ubiquitin carrier protein and homologue of murine E220k. We find that UbcH2 is constitutively expressed by human skeletal and cardiac muscles, murine limb muscle, and cultured myotubes. TNF-alpha stimulates UbcH2 expression in mouse limb muscles in vivo and in cultured myotubes. The UbcH2 promoter region contains a functional NF-kappaB binding site; NF-kappaB binding to this sequence is increased by TNF-alpha stimulation. A dominant negative inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation blocks both UbcH2 up-regulation and the increase in ubiquitin-conjugating activity stimulated by TNF-alpha. In extracts from TNF-alpha-treated myotubes, ubiquitin-conjugating activity is limited by UbcH2 availability; activity is inhibited by an antiserum to UbcH2 or a dominant negative mutant of UbcH2 and is enhanced by wild-type UbcH2. Thus, UbcH2 up-regulation is a novel response to TNF-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle that appears to be essential for the increased ubiquitin conjugation induced by this cytokine.

  8. Implication of TNF-alpha convertase (TACE/ADAM17) in inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and inflammation in an experimental model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Colón, A L; Menchén, L A; Hurtado, O; De Cristóbal, J; Lizasoain, I; Leza, J C; Lorenzo, P; Moro, M A

    2001-12-21

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which is shed in its soluble form by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) called TNF-alpha convertase (TACE; ADAM17). TNF-alpha plays a role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is involved in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) which has also been implicated in IBD. The study was designed to investigate whether colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in rats produces an increase in TACE activity and/or expression and whether its pharmacological inhibition reduces TNF-alpha levels, iNOS expression and colonic damage in this model. TNBS (30 mg in 0.4 ml of 50% ethanol) was instilled into the colon of female Wistar rats. Saline or TACE inhibitor BB1101 (10 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally 5 days after TNBS instillation. On day 10, colons were removed and assessed for pathological score, myeloperoxidase (MPO), NO synthase (NOS), TACE enzymatic activity and protein levels, colonic TNF-alpha and NOx- levels. Instillation of TNBS caused an increase in TACE activity and expression and the release of TNF-alpha. TNBS also resulted in iNOS expression and colonic damage. BB1101 blocked TNBS-induced increase in TACE activity, TNF-alpha release and iNOS expression. Concomitantly, BB1101 ameliorated TNBS-induced colonic damage and inflammation. TNBS causes TNF-alpha release by an increase in TACE activity and expression and this results in the expression of iNOS and subsequent inflammation, suggesting that TACE inhibition may prove useful as a therapeutic means in IBD. PMID:11884025

  9. [Autoimmune aspects of treatment with TNF-alpha inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kolarz, Bogdan; Targońska-Stepniak, Bozena; Darmochwał-Kolarz, Dorota; Majdan, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of such diseases as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and juvenile chronic arthritis. Recent years have brought improvement in the understanding of the pathogeneses of these diseases, resulting in the production of new groups of biological drugs, including, among others, anti-TNF-alpha antibodies. The use of TNF inhibitors has been a great advance in the treatment of patients with these inflammatory diseases. Infliximab and adalimumab are monoclonal antibodies that bind to and neutralize the activity of TNF-alpha. Infliximab is a mouse/human chimera that joins the variable regions of a mouse antibody to the constant region of human IgG1. Adalimumab is a fully human IgG1 antibody. Etanercept is a dimeric fusion protein that joins the human p75 TNF receptor to the Fc domain of human IgG1. The beneficial effects of the anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies infliximab and adalimumab and the soluble receptor fusion protein etanercept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, especially in patients resistant to other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), are discussed. We observe stoppage of articular destruction during treatment with TNF-alpha inhibitors. Soon after the introduction of this therapy it was found that these agents have a propensity for stimulating the production of autoantibodies and antibodies against themselves. In this review, recent studies analyzing the effect of TNF-alpha blockade (infliximab, etanercept, and adalimumab) on the ANA, anti-dsDNA, and anticardiolipin antibody profiles in autoimmune diseases are discussed. PMID:17786135

  10. TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, regulates CCN2 (CTGF), collagen type I, and proliferation in mesangial cells: possible roles in the progression of renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cooker, Laurinda A; Peterson, Darryl; Rambow, Joann; Riser, Melisa L; Riser, Rebecca E; Najmabadi, Feridoon; Brigstock, David; Riser, Bruce L

    2007-07-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) is a profibrotic factor acting downstream and independently of TGF-beta to mediate renal fibrosis. Although inflammation is often involved in the initiation and/or progression of fibrosis, the role of inflammatory cytokines in regulation of glomerular CCN2 expression, cellular proliferation, and extracellular matrix accumulation is unknown. We studied two such cytokines, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, for their effects on cultured mesangial cells in the presence or absence of TGF-beta, as a model for progressive renal fibrosis. Short-term treatment with TNF-alpha, like TGF-beta, significantly increased secreted CCN2 per cell, but unlike TGF-beta inhibited cellular replication. TNF-alpha combined with TGF-beta further increased CCN2 secretion and mRNA levels and reduced proliferation. Surprisingly, however, TNF-alpha treatment decreased baseline collagen type I protein and mRNA levels and largely blocked their stimulation by TGF-beta. Long-term treatment with TGF-beta or TNF-alpha alone no longer increased CCN2 protein levels. However, the combination synergistically increased CCN2. IFN-gamma had no effect on either CCN2 or collagen activity and produced a mild inhibition of TGF-beta-induced collagen only at a high concentration (500 U/ml). In summary, we report a strong positive regulatory role for TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, in CCN2 production and secretion, including that driven by TGF-beta. The stimulation of CCN2 release by TNF-alpha, unlike TGF-beta, is independent of cellular proliferation and not linked to increased collagen type I accumulation. This suggests that the paradigm of TGF-beta-driven CCN2 with subsequent collagen production may be overridden by an as yet undefined inhibitory mechanism acting either directly or indirectly on matrix metabolism. PMID:17376761

  11. Impaired tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and abnormal B cell response to TNF-alpha in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed Central

    Mitamura, K; Kang, H; Tomita, Y; Hashimoto, H; Sawada, S; Horie, T

    1991-01-01

    We examined the TNF-alpha activity in culture supernatants of monocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of patients with SLE and of normal individuals. The monocytes from patients with SLE stimulated with silica particles, lipopolysaccharide or Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 secreted significantly lower amounts of TNF-alpha than did normal monocytes. A decreased TNF mRNA expression was observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated by mitogens from patients with SLE. Furthermore, we examined the effect of recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) on the B cell function in SLE patients. rTNF-alpha inhibited the spontaneous B cell proliferation of SLE, but tended to enhance the normal B cell proliferation. Spontaneous IgM production from SLE B cells was inhibited by rTNF-alpha, but that from normal B cells was not. Spontaneous IgG production was unaffected by rTNF-alpha. Also, rTNF-alpha did not affect the viability of B cells. These findings suggest that an impaired TNF-alpha production and an abnormal B cell response to TNF-alpha play a role in the immunological dysfunction in patients with SLE. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1893618

  12. Radioimmunotherapy Using Vascular Targeted 213Bi: The Role of TNF-Alpha in the Development of Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, I.A.; Kennel, S.J.

    1998-10-14

    A monoclonal antibody (201B) specific to murine thrombomodulin, covalently linked to CHX-b-DTPA, successfully delivers chelated 213Bi, an {alpha}-particle emitter, (213Bi-201B) rapidly to lungvascular endothelium. When injected at doses of l MBq/mouse, 213Bi-201B destroyed most of the 100 colonies of EMT-6 mammary carcinomas growing as lung tumors of up to 2000 cells/colony. Some mice were cured of lung tumors and others had extended life-spans compared to untreated control animals but eventually succumbed to tumor recurrence. At injected doses of 4-6 MBq/mouse, 100% of lung tumor colonies were eliminated; however, 3-4 months later these mice developed pulmonary fibrosis and died. The mechanisms leading to the fibrotic response in other pulmonary irradiation models strongly implicate tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}), released from damaged tissues, as the pivotal inflammatory cytokine in a cascade of events which culminate in fibrosis. Attempts to prevent the development of pulmonary fibrosis, by using antibodies or soluble receptor (Enbrel{trademark}) as inhibitors of TNF-{alpha}, were unsuccessful. Additionally, mice genetically deficient for TNF-{alpha} production developed pulmonary fibrosis following 213Bi-201B treatment. Interestingly, non-tumor bearing BALB/c mice receiving Enbrel{trademark} or mice genetically deficient in TNF-{alpha} production and treated with 213Bi-201B, had significantly reduced life spans compared to mice receiving no treatment or 213Bi-201B alone. We speculate that, in normal mice, while TNF-{alpha} may induce an inflammatory response following {alpha}-particle radiation mediated tumor clearance and pulmonary damage, its effects in the post-tumor clearance time period may actually retard the development of fibrosis.

  13. A selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibits TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis by activating ERK1/2 signaling pathway in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Eto, Masato; Akishita, Masahiro; Okabe, Tetsuro; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi

    2009-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) is a pleiotropic cytokine exerting both inflammatory and cell death activity and is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The present study was designed to examine whether the raloxifene analogue, LY117018 could inhibit TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells and to clarify the involved mechanisms. Apoptosis of endothelial cells was determined by DNA fragmentation assay and the activation of caspase-3. LY117018 significantly inhibited TNF-alpha-induced caspase-3 activation and cell DNA fragmentation levels in bovine carotid artery endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of LY117018 was abolished by an estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. p38 MAPK, JNK, ERK1/2 and Akt have been shown to act as apoptotic or anti-apoptotic signals. TNF-alpha stimulated the phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK, JNK, ERK1/2 and Akt in vascular endothelial cells. TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis was significantly decreased by SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor or SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, but was enhanced by an ERK1/2 pathway inhibitor, PD98059 or a PI3-kinase/Akt pathway inhibitor, wortmannin. The anti-apoptotic effect of LY117018 was abrogated only by PD98059 but was not affected by the inhibitors for p38 MAPK, JNK, or Akt. LY117018 stimulated the further increase in phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in TNF-alpha treated endothelial cells but it did not affect phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK, JNK or Akt. These results suggest that LY 110718 prevents caspase-3 dependent apoptosis induced by TNF-alpha in vascular endothelial cells through activation of the estrogen receptors and the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. PMID:19275968

  14. TNF-alpha and IL-8 are upregulated in the epidermis of normal human skin after UVB exposure: correlation with neutrophil accumulation and E-selectin expression.

    PubMed

    Strickland, I; Rhodes, L E; Flanagan, B F; Friedmann, P S

    1997-05-01

    The in vivo response to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation in skin is characterized by the accumulation of both mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells within the dermis and an induction of vascular endothelial adhesion molecules. Epidermal production of cytokines (IL-8 and TNF-alpha) has been strongly implicated in the development of UVB-induced inflammation. In the current study, we examined the time course of IL-8 and TNF-alpha mRNA and protein expression in the epidermis over a 24-h period after in vivo UVB irradiation. Also, the induction of adhesion molecule expression and the accumulation of neutrophils within the dermis were followed. We found constitutive expression of both cytokines (mRNA and protein) in the epidermis of unirradiated skin. IL-8 was rapidly upregulated after irradiation and mRNA and protein increased at 4 h, reaching a maximum between 8 and 24 h. TNF-alpha mRNA and protein was minimally increased by 8 h after UVB irradiation and reached a maximum by 24 h. No significant alteration in ICAM-1 or VCAM-1 expression was observed. E-selectin expression, which was absent from control samples, was increased from 4 h onward and also reached a maximum at 24 h, coinciding with peak neutrophil accumulation. A strong correlation (r = 0.96) was found between number of E-selectin-positive vessels and numbers of infiltrating neutrophils at this time. Moreover, because E-selectin expression was increased before any apparent increase in TNF-alpha protein (4 h), TNF-alpha does not appear to be involved in the early induction of the adhesion molecule, but cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-8 may act subsequently to augment the inflammatory response. PMID:9129230

  15. Proinflammatory response of alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced by alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha during pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish K; Fernandez, Lucas G; Awad, Alaa S; Kron, Irving L; Laubach, Victor E

    2007-07-01

    Pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury entails acute activation of alveolar macrophages followed by neutrophil sequestration. Although proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from macrophages are known to modulate acute IR injury, the contribution of alveolar epithelial cells to IR injury and their intercellular interactions with other cell types such as alveolar macrophages and neutrophils remain unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that following IR, alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha further induces alveolar epithelial cells to produce key chemokines that could then contribute to subsequent lung injury through the recruitment of neutrophils. Cultured RAW264.7 macrophages and MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells were subjected to acute hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) as an in vitro model of pulmonary IR. H/R (3 h/1 h) significantly induced KC, MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), RANTES, and IL-6 (but not TNF-alpha) by MLE-12 cells, whereas H/R induced TNF-alpha, MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-2 (but not KC) by RAW264.7 cells. These results were confirmed using primary murine alveolar macrophages and primary alveolar type II cells. Importantly, using macrophage and epithelial coculture methods, the specific production of TNF-alpha by H/R-exposed RAW264.7 cells significantly induced proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression (KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, RANTES, and IL-6) by MLE-12 cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alveolar type II cells, in conjunction with alveolar macrophage-produced TNF-alpha, contribute to the initiation of acute pulmonary IR injury via a proinflammatory cascade. The release of key chemokines, such as KC and MIP-2, by activated type II cells may thus significantly contribute to neutrophil sequestration during IR injury. PMID:17416740

  16. Association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha)gene promoter polymorphisms with TNF-alpha response to endotoxin (LPS)in calves.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attenuation of TNF-alpha gene expression is a NF-'B-mediated regulatory process essential to avoid deleterious effects of excessive or prolonged synthesis of TNF-alpha, especially in response to gram-negative bacterial infection or LPS. An uncommon G to A transition polymorphism in the promoter regi...

  17. TNF-{alpha} upregulates the A{sub 2B} adenosine receptor gene: The role of NAD(P)H oxidase 4

    SciTech Connect

    St Hilaire, Cynthia; Koupenova, Milka; Carroll, Shannon H.; Smith, Barbara D.; Ravid, Katya

    2008-10-24

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), oxidative stress, and elevated inflammatory cytokines are some of the components that contribute to plaque formation in the vasculature. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) is released during vascular injury, and contributes to lesion formation also by affecting VSMC proliferation. Recently, an A{sub 2B} adenosine receptor (A{sub 2B}AR) knockout mouse illustrated that this receptor is a tissue protector, in that it inhibits VSMC proliferation and attenuates the inflammatory response following injury, including the release of TNF-{alpha}. Here, we show a regulatory loop by which TNF-{alpha} upregulates the A{sub 2B}AR in VSMC in vitro and in vivo. The effect of this cytokine is mimicked by its known downstream target, NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (Nox4). Nox4 upregulates the A{sub 2B}AR, and Nox inhibitors dampen the effect of TNF-{alpha}. Hence, our study is the first to show that signaling associated with Nox4 is also able to upregulate the tissue protecting A{sub 2B}AR.

  18. Effects of mitoxantrone on multiple sclerosis patients' lymphocyte subpopulations and production of immunoglobulin, TNF-alpha and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Gbadamosi, Joystone; Buhmann, Carsten; Tessmer, Wiebke; Moench, Andrea; Haag, Friedrich; Heesen, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    We designed this longitudinal study to clarify the short- and long-term effects of mitoxantrone on the immune system in a subgroup of multiple sclerosis patients treated at our centre. After 14 days we found a highly significant sustained reduction of leucocytes, primarily affecting neutrophils and most lymphocyte subsets except for naive and activated T lymphocytes. The CD4/CD8 ratio and serum immmunoglobulin levels were not affected. Furthermore, whole blood-stimulated mononuclear cell IL-10 production showed a significant lower level 2 weeks treatment, whereas basal IL-10 as well as stimulated and basal TNF-alpha secretion showed no significant changes. Longitudinal data disclosed a persistent decrease of B lymphocytes, while secretion of immunoglobulins, IL-10, and TNF-alpha was not altered in the follow-up. In conclusion, we confirmed a selective short-term effect of mitoxantrone therapy on most lymphocyte subpopulations, but not on immunoglobulines or the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-10, which do not serve as possible response markers. PMID:12646755

  19. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) mediates repression of TNF-{alpha} by decreasing levels of acetylated histone H3 and H4 at its promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Engdahl, Ryan . E-mail: rengdahl@temple.edu; Monroy, M. Alexandra; Daly, John M.

    2007-07-20

    Prostaglandin metabolite 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is known to inhibit a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as being a ligand for nuclear receptor PPAR{gamma}. We investigated the ability of 15d-PGJ2 to inhibit TNF-{alpha} gene expression through mechanisms that involve histone modification. Pretreatment with 15d-PGJ2 (10 {mu}M) inhibited LPS-stimulated TNF-{alpha} mRNA in THP-1 monocytes or PMA-differentiated cells to nearly basal levels. A specific PPAR{gamma} ligand, GW1929, failed to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} mRNA expression nor did a PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662, alter the repression of TNF-{alpha} mRNA in LPS-stimulated cells pretreated with 15d-PGJ2 suggesting a PPAR{gamma}-independent inhibition of TNF-{alpha} mRNA in THP-1 cells. Transfection studies with a reporter construct and subsequent treatment with 15d-PGJ2 demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of the TNF-{alpha} promoter. Additional studies demonstrated that inhibition of histone deacetylases with trichostatin A (TSA) or overexpression of histone acetyltransferase CBP could overcome 15d-PGJ2-mediated repression of the TNF-{alpha} promoter, suggesting that an important mechanism whereby 15d-PGJ2 suppresses a cytokine is through factors that regulate histone modifications. To examine the endogenous TNF-{alpha} promoter, chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP) were performed. ChIP assays demonstrated that LPS stimulation induced an increase in histone H3 and H4 acetylation at the TNF-{alpha} promoter, which was reduced in cells pretreated with 15d-PGJ2. These results highlight the ability of acetylation and deacetylation factors to affect the TNF-{alpha} promoter and demonstrate that an additional important mechanism whereby 15d-PGJ2 mediates TNF-{alpha} transcriptional repression by altering levels of acetylated histone H3 and H4 at its promoter.

  20. TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta} are mediated by both TLR4 and Nod1 pathways in the cultured HAPI cells stimulated by LPS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenwen; Zheng, Xuexing; Liu, Shue; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Levitt, Roy C.; Candiotti, Keith A.; Hao, Shuanglin

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS induces proinflammatory cytokine release in HAPI cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK pathway is dependent on TLR4 signaling to release cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B pathway is dependent on Nod1 signaling to release cytokines. -- Abstract: A growing body of evidence recently suggests that glial cell activation plays an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases and neuropathic pain. Microglia in the central nervous system express toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) that is traditionally accepted as the primary receptor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS activates TLR4 signaling pathways to induce the production of proinflammatory molecules. In the present studies, we verified the LPS signaling pathways using cultured highly aggressively proliferating immortalized (HAPI) microglial cells. We found that HAPI cells treated with LPS upregulated the expression of TLR4, phospho-JNK (pJNK) and phospho-NF-{kappa}B (pNF-{kappa}B), TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}. Silencing TLR4 with siRNA reduced the expression of pJNK, TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}, but not pNF-{kappa}B in the cells. Inhibition of JNK with SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) decreased the expression of TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}. Unexpectedly, we found that inhibition of Nod1 with ML130 significantly reduced the expression of pNF-{kappa}B. Inhibition of NF-{kappa}B also reduced the expression of TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}. Nod1 ligand, DAP induced the upregulation of pNF-{kappa}B which was blocked by Nod1 inhibitor. These data indicate that LPS-induced pJNK is TLR4-dependent, and that pNF-{kappa}B is Nod1-dependent in HAPI cells treated with LPS. Either TLR4-JNK or Nod1-NF-{kappa}B pathways is involved in the expression of TNF{alpha} and IL-1{beta}.

  1. Expression of POEM, a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation, is suppressed by TNF-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukasaki, Masayuki; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Aizawa, Ryo; Miyazono, Agasa; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Morimura, Naoko; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM gene expression. {yields} Inhibition of POEM gene expression is caused by NF-{kappa}B activation by TNF-{alpha}. {yields} Over-expression of POEM recovers inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: POEM, also known as nephronectin, is an extracellular matrix protein considered to be a positive regulator of osteoblast differentiation. In the present study, we found that tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a key regulator of bone matrix properties and composition that also inhibits terminal osteoblast differentiation, strongly inhibited POEM expression in the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. TNF-{alpha}-induced down-regulation of POEM gene expression occurred in both time- and dose-dependent manners through the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. In addition, expressions of marker genes in differentiated osteoblasts were down-regulated by TNF-{alpha} in a manner consistent with our findings for POEM, while over-expression of POEM recovered TNF-{alpha}-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggest that TNF-{alpha} inhibits POEM expression through the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway and down-regulation of POEM influences the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation by TNF-{alpha}.

  2. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  3. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  4. Therapeutic effect of anti-feline TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody for feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Kawagoe, Kohei; Kito, Akihiko; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2016-02-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) replication in macrophages/monocytes induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production, and that the TNF-alpha produced was involved in aggravating the pathology of FIP. We previously reported the preparation of a feline TNF-alpha (fTNF-alpha)-neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody (anti-fTNF-alpha mAb). This anti-fTNF-alpha mAb 2-4 was confirmed to inhibit the following fTNF-alpha-induced conditions in vitro. In the present study, we investigated whether mAb 2-4 improved the FIP symptoms and survival rate of experimentally FIPV-inoculated SPF cats. Progression to FIP was prevented in 2 out of 3 cats treated with mAb 2-4, whereas all 3 cats developed FIP in the placebo control group. Plasma alpha1-glycoprotein and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were improved by the administration of mAb 2-4, and the peripheral lymphocyte count also recovered. These results strongly suggested that the anti-fTNF-alpha antibody is effective for the treatment of FIP. PMID:26850532

  5. Evaluation of pGL1-TNF-alpha therapy in combination with radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, J.; Andres, M. L.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-term control of high-grade brain tumors is rarely achieved with current therapeutic regimens. In this study a new plasmid-based human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression vector was synthesized (pGL1-TNF-alpha) and evaluated together with radiation in the aggressive, rapidly growing C6 rat glioma model. pGL1-TNF-alpha was successfully transfected into C6 cells in vitro using a cationic polyamine method. Expression was detected up to 7 days and averaged 0.4 ng of TNF-alpha in the culture medium from 1x10(5) cells. The expressed protein was biologically functional, as evidenced by growth inhibition of L929, a TNF-alpha-susceptible cell line. Using fluorescence-labeled monoclonal antibodies and laser scanning cytometry, we confirmed that both the P55 and P75 receptors for TNF-alpha were present on the C6 cell membrane. However, the receptors were present at low density and P55 was expressed more than the P75 receptor. These findings were in contrast to results obtained with TNF-alpha-susceptible L929 cells. Tests in athymic mice showed that pGL1-TNF-alpha administered intratumorally 16-18 h before radiation (each modality given three times) significantly inhibited C6 tumor progression (P<0.05). This effect was more than additive, because pGL1-TNF-alpha alone did not slow tumor growth and radiation alone had little effect on tumor growth. These results indicate that pGL1-TNF-alpha has potential to augment the antitumor effects of radiation against a tumor type that is virtually incurable.

  6. Cyclosporine A inhibits the mRNA expressions of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma, but not TNF-alpha, in canine mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2007-09-01

    The effects of the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK506 on the mRNA expressions of various cytokines were evaluated in dogs to determine whether the effects of CsA and FK506 in dogs were similar to those in humans. The mRNA expression levels of the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were measured in PHA-stimulated canine PBMC using real-time RT-PCR after incubation with CsA or FK506 for 5 hr. Both reagents inhibited IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma mRNA expressions in a dose-dependent manner. However, CsA hardly inhibited the mRNA expression of TNF-alpha. These findings are important for assessing the indications of CsA treatment in dogs. PMID:17917372

  7. C-peptide signals via Galpha i to protect against TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis of opossum kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Rasheed, Nawal M; Willars, Gary B; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2006-04-01

    Cell loss by apoptosis occurs in renal injury such as diabetic nephropathy. TNF-alpha is a cytokine that induces apoptosis and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. The aim was to investigate whether C-peptide or insulin could modulate TNF-alpha-mediated cell death in opossum kidney proximal tubular cells and to examine the mechanism(s) of any effects observed. C-peptide and insulin protect against TNF-alpha-induced proximal tubular cell toxicity and apoptosis. Cell viability was analyzed by methylthiazoletetrazolium assay; cell viability was reduced to 60.8 +/- 2.7% of control after stimulation with 300 ng/ml TNF-alpha. Compromised cell viability was reversed by pretreatment with 5 nM C-peptide or 100 nM insulin. TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis was detected by DNA nick-end labeling and by measuring histone associated DNA fragments using ELISA. By ELISA assay, 300 ng/ml TNF-alpha increased apoptosis by 145.8 +/- 4.9% compared with controls, whereas 5 nM C-peptide and 100 nM insulin reduced apoptosis to 81.6 +/- 4.8 and 77.4 +/- 3.1% of control, respectively. The protective effects of C-peptide and insulin were associated with activation of NF-kappaB. Activation of NF-kappaB by C-peptide was pertussis toxin sensitive and dependent on activation of Galpha(i). Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase but not extracellular signal regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase mediated C-peptide and insulin activation of NF-kappaB. The cytoprotective effects of both C-peptide and insulin were related to increased expression of TNF receptor-associated factor 2, the product of an NF-kappaB-dependent survival gene. These data suggest that C-peptide and/or insulin activation of NF-kappaB-regulated survival genes protects against TNF-alpha-induced renal tubular injury in diabetes. The data further support the concept of C-peptide as a peptide hormone in its own right and suggest a potential therapeutic role for C-peptide. PMID:16510765

  8. Broad range of adverse cutaneous eruptions in patients on TNF-alpha antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hawryluk, Elena B; Linskey, Katy R; Duncan, Lyn M; Nazarian, Rosalynn M

    2012-05-01

    Biologic therapies targeting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha have become a mainstay in the management of a number of autoimmune diseases. We report a series of adverse skin eruptions in six patients (four females, two males, age: 21-58 years, mean: 39) receiving 4 months to 10 years (mean 3.1 years) of anti-TNF-alpha therapies (infliximab, n = 4; adalimumab, n = 1 or etanercept, n = 1). The following drug-associated diagnoses were made in eight skin biopsies performed at Massachusetts General Hospital between 3/2007 and 10/2010: pustular folliculitis, psoriasis, interface dermatitis, neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis, Sweet's syndrome, lupus, vasculitis and palmoplantar pustulosis. The descriptions of neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis-like and Sweet's-like hypersensitivity eruptions induced by anti-TNF-alpha therapies are the first such cases described in the literature. Each cutaneous eruption improved or resolved with switching to a different TNF-alpha inhibitor, discontinuation of the anti-TNF-alpha agent, and/or topical or systemic steroids. There was a clear chronologic relationship with, and clinical remission upon withdrawal or steroid suppression of the anti-TNF-alpha agents. The mechanism for such diverse cutaneous eruptions among this class of medications remains poorly understood. The cutaneous adverse reaction profile of TNF-alpha inhibitors is broad and should be considered in the histopathologic differential in this clinical setting. PMID:22515220

  9. Normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis is caused by deleterious mutations in SAMD9, encoding a TNF-alpha responsive protein.

    PubMed

    Chefetz, Ilana; Ben Amitai, Danny; Browning, Sarah; Skorecki, Karl; Adir, Noam; Thomas, Mark G; Kogleck, Larissa; Topaz, Orit; Indelman, Margarita; Uitto, Jouni; Richard, Gabriele; Bradman, Neil; Sprecher, Eli

    2008-06-01

    Normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (NFTC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by calcium deposition in skin and mucosae and associated with unremitting pain and life-threatening skin infections. A homozygous missense mutation (p.K1495E), resulting in SAMD9 protein degradation, was recently shown to cause NFTC in five families of Jewish-Yemenite origin. In this study, we evaluated another Jewish-Yemenite NFTC kindred. All patients were compound heterozygous for two mutations in SAMD9: K1495E and a previously unreported nonsense mutation, R344X, predicted to result in a markedly truncated molecule. Screening of unaffected population-matched controls revealed heterozygosity for K1495E and R344X only in individuals of Jewish-Yemenite ancestry, but not in more than 700 control samples of other origins, including 93 non-Jewish Yemenite. These data may be suggestive of positive selection, considering the rarity of NFTC and the small size of the Jewish-Yemenite population; alternatively, they may reflect genetic drift or the effect of a population-specific modifier trait. Calcifications in NFTC generally develop over areas subjected to repeated trauma and are associated with marked inflammatory manifestations, indicating that SAMD9 may play a role in the inflammatory response to tissue injury. We therefore assessed the effect of cellular stress and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine, on SAMD9 gene expression. Whereas exogenous hydrogen peroxide and heat shock did not affect SAMD9 transcription, osmotic shock was found to markedly upregulate SAMD9 expression. In addition, incubation of endothelial cells with TNF-alpha caused a dose-related, p38-dependant increase in SAMD9 expression. These data link NFTC and SAMD9 to the TNF-alpha signaling pathway, suggesting a role for this system in the regulation of extra-osseous calcification. PMID:18094730

  10. Adenosine decreases post-ischaemic cardiac TNF-alpha production: anti-inflammatory implications for preconditioning and transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, D R; Cain, B S; Cleveland, J C; Meng, X; Ayala, A; Banerjee, A; Harken, A H

    1997-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an autocrine contributor to myocardial dysfunction and cardiomyocyte death in ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), sepsis, chronic heart failure and cardiac allograft rejection. Cardiac resident macrophages, infiltrating leucocytes, and cardiomyocytes themselves produce TNF-alpha. Although adenosine reduces macrophage TNF-alpha production and protects myocardium against I/R, it remains unknown whether I/R induces an increase in cardiac TNF-alpha in a crystalloid-perfused model (in the absence of blood), and, whether adenosine decreases cardiac TNF-alpha and protects function after I/R. To study this, isolated rat hearts were crystalloid-perfused using the Langendorff method and subjected to I/R, with or without adenosine pretreatment. Post-ischaemic cardiac TNF-alpha (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and bioassay) and function were determined (Langendorff). I/R increased cardiac TNF-alpha and impaired myocardial function. Adenosine decreased cardiac TNF-alpha and improved post-ischaemic functional recovery. This study demonstrates that: first, I/R induces an increase in cardiac tissue TNF-alpha in a crystalloid-perfused model: second, adenosine decreases cardiac TNF-alpha and improves post-ischaemic myocardial function; third, decreased cardiac TNF-alpha may represent a mechanism by which adenosine protects myocardium; and fourth, adenosine-induced suppression of cardiac TNF-alpha may provide an anti-inflammatory link to preconditioning and have implications for cardiac allograft preservation. PMID:9497488

  11. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) in leishmaniasis. II. TNF-alpha-induced macrophage leishmanicidal activity is mediated by nitric oxide from L-arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Liew, F Y; Li, Y; Millott, S

    1990-01-01

    Peritoneal macrophages from CBA mice incubated with recombinant murine tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) are effective in killing the protozoa parasite Leishmania major in vitro. The leishmanicidal activity is directly correlated with the level of nitrite (NO2-) in the culture supernatants. The killing of intracellular parasites can be completely inhibited by L-NG-monomethyl arginine (L-NMMA), a specific inhibitor of the L-arginine:nitric oxide (NO) pathway. The level of NO2-, which is also a measurement of NO production, in the culture supernatant of TNF-alpha-activated macrophages can be progressively decreased to basal level with increasing concentrations of L-NMMA, but not with its D-enantiomer, D-NMMA. These data demonstrate that NO is an important effector mechanism in the TNF-alpha-induced macrophage killing of intracellular protozoa. PMID:2279740

  12. Treatment of THP-1 cells with Uncaria tomentosa extracts differentially regulates the expression if IL-1beta and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Allen-Hall, Lisa; Cano, Pablo; Arnason, John T; Rojas, Rosario; Lock, Olga; Lafrenie, Robert M

    2007-01-19

    Uncaria tomentosa, commonly known as cat's claw, is a medicinal plant native to Peru, which has been used for decades in the treatment of various inflammatory disorders. Uncaria tomentosa can be used as an antioxidant, has anti-apoptotic properties, and can enhance DNA repair, however it is best know for its anti-inflammatory properties. Treatment with Uncaria tomentosa extracts inhibits the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha, which is a critical mediator of the immune response. In this paper, we showed that treatment of THP-1 monocyte-like cells with Uncaria tomentosa extracts inhibited the MAP kinase signaling pathway and altered cytokine expression. Using ELISA assays, we showed that treatment with Uncaria tomentosa extracts augmented LPS-dependent expression of IL-1beta by 2.4-fold, while inhibiting the LPS-dependent expression of TNF-alpha by 5.5-fold. We also showed that treatment of LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells with Uncaria tomentosa extracts blocked ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that treatment of THP-1 cells with Uncaria tomentosa extracts has opposite effects on IL-1beta and TNF-alpha secretion, and that these changes may involve effects on the MAP kinase pathway. PMID:16959454

  13. Transcellular signalling pathways and TNF-alpha release involved in formation of reactive oxygen species in rat alveolar macrophages exposed to tert-butylcyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Aam, Berit Bjugan; Myhre, Oddvar; Fonnum, Frode

    2003-12-01

    In the present work, the effects of aliphatic ( n-nonane and n-decane), alicyclic (1,2,4-trimethylcyclohexane and tert-butylcyclohexane, t-BCH) and aromatic (trimethylbenzene and tert-butylbenzene) hydrocarbon solvents on formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha in rat alveolar macrophages (AM) have been investigated. Formation of ROS was assessed by monitoring oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin to 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), and the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DCF fluorescence was elevated in a concentration-dependent manner by the alicyclic hydrocarbons. The involvement of transcellular signalling pathways in the production of ROS by t-BCH, the most active compound, was elucidated by use of specific inhibitors. Preincubation of the AM with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK 1/2) inhibitor U0126, the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide, the superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate, and the iron ion chelating agent deferoxamine reduced the DCF fluorescence significantly. t-BCH gave an increase in TNF-alpha release. Further, nitric oxide production measured by a modified Griess method, and intracellular calcium concentration measured by fura-2, were increased in the rat AM after exposure to t-BCH. PMID:13680096

  14. Target effector role of vascular endothelium in the inflammatory response: insights from the clinical trial of anti-TNF alpha antibody in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Paleolog, E

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by chronic joint inflammation and infiltration by cells from the blood, especially activated T cells and macrophages, together with formation of new blood vessels. The overgrowth of the synovial lesion results eventually in destruction of cartilage and bone. Cytokines play a major role in RA, both in systemic inflammatory processes, such as induction of acute phase protein synthesis, and in the stimulation of new blood vessel development and recruitment of leucocytes to developing lesions. The focus for the interplay of many cytokines is the endothelium, the lining layer of the vasculature. This is the primary target for circulating mediators, and it controls the traffic of cells and molecules from the bloodstream into underlying tissues. Targeting the action of individual cytokines--for example, using antibody against tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), has been shown to be very effective in the treatment of RA. Blockade of TNF alpha activity results in deactivation of the endothelium, manifested as reduced expression of adhesion molecules and chemoattractant cytokines, leading to diminished trafficking of inflammatory cells to synovial joints. In addition anti-TNF alpha decreases circulating levels of the potent angiogenic cytokine VEGF, suggesting that new blood vessel formation, and hence the supply of nutrients to the growing synovial lesion, is also affected. These observations lend further support to the hypothesis that interruption of a component of the cytokine network in RA may modulate disease progression, and point the way towards the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease states. PMID:9497911

  15. Cytochalasin B triggers a novel pertussis toxin sensitive pathway in TNF-alpha primed neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Bylund, Johan; Pellmé, Sara; Fu, Huamei; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Karlsson, Anna; Dahlgren, Claes

    2004-01-01

    Background Cytochalasin B does not directly activate the oxygen-radical-producing NADPH oxidase activity of neutrophils but transfers desensitized G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) into an active signaling state by uncoupling GCPR from the cytoskeleton. The receptor uncoupling results in respiratory burst activity when signals generated by reactivated formyl peptide receptors trigger the NADPH-oxidase to produce superoxide anions. Results Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) primes neutrophils for subsequent activation by cytochalasin B. Pretreatment with TNF-alpha induced mobilization of receptor-storing neutrophil organelles, suggesting that receptor up-regulation significantly contributes to the response, but the receptor mobilization was not sufficient for induction of the cytochalasin B sensitive state. The TNF-alpha primed state resembled that of the desensitized non-signaling state of agonist-occupied neutrophil formyl peptide receptors. The fact that the TNF-alpha primed, cytochalasin B-triggered activation process was pertussis toxin sensitive suggests that the activation process involves a GPCR. Based on desensitization experiments the unidentified receptor was found to be distinct from the C5a receptor as well as the formyl peptide receptor family members FPR and FPRL1. Based on the fact the occupied and desensitized receptors for interleukin-8 and platelet activating factor could not be reactivated by cytochalasin B, also these could be excluded as receptor candidates involved in the TNF-alpha primed state. Conclusions The TNF-alpha-induced priming signals could possibly trigger a release of an endogenous GPCR-agonist, amplifying the response to the receptor-uncoupling effect of cytochalasin B. However, no such substance could be found, suggesting that TNF-alpha can transfer G-protein coupled receptors to a signaling state independently of agonist binding. PMID:15157285

  16. TNF-Alpha Represses Transcription of Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nian-Ling; Li, Changgong; Huang, Hao Hao; Sebald, Matthew; Londhe, Vedang A.; Heisterkamp, Nora; Warburton, David; Bellusci, Saverio; Minoo, Parviz

    2007-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins are key signaling molecules in vertebrate development. Little is known about Bmp gene regulation in any organ. In Drosophila, the Bmp gene, dpp is regulated by Dorsal, the invertebrate homologue of Rel-NFkB. In this study we examined whether TNF-alpha, which activates NF-kB, can regulate Bmp4 gene expression. TNF-alpha reduced Bmp4 mRNA in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and repressed transcriptional activity of the human Bmp4 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Similar repression was observed when the Bmp4 promoter was co-transfected with a p65 (RelA) expression vector in the absence of TNF-alpha treatment, suggesting that RelA mediates the effect of TNF-alpha. In support of this finding, the repressor effect of TNF-alpha on Bmp4 was abrogated by a co-transfected dominant negative mutant of IkB (S32A/S36A). The human Bmp4 promoter contains 3 putative consensus binding sites for NF-kB. Surprisingly, only one of the latter binding sites was capable of binding NFkB. Repressor effect of NFkB was not dependent on any of the three binding sites, but localized to a 122 bp fragment which bound both RelA and SP1. SP1stimulated transcription, whereas increasing doses of RelA opposed this effect. In vivo, TNF-alpha inhibited branching morphogenesis and LacZ gene expression in Bmp4-lacz transgenic lungs. These data support a model in which TNF-alpha-induced RelA interacts with SP1 to bring about transcriptional repression of Bmp4 gene. These findings provide a mechanistic paradigm for interactions between mediators of inflammation and morphogenesis with relevant implications for normal lung development and pathogenesis of disease. PMID:17350185

  17. LASSBio-468: a new achiral thalidomide analogue which modulates TNF-alpha and NO production and inhibits endotoxic shock and arthritis in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Alexandre-Moreira, Magna S; Takiya, Christina M; de Arruda, Luciana B; Pascarelli, Bernardo; Gomes, Raquel N; Castro Faria Neto, Hugo C; Lima, Lídia M; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2005-03-01

    As part of a program researching the synthesis and immunopharmacological evaluation of novel synthetic compounds, we have described the immune modulatory profile of the new achiral thalidomide analogue LASSBio-468 in the present work. This compound was planned as an N-substituted phthalimide derivate, structurally designed as a hybrid of thalidomide and aryl sulfonamides, which were previously described as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and PDE4 inhibitors. LASSBio-468 was recently demonstrated to inhibit the TNF-alpha production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in vivo. Here, we investigated whether this compound would affect chronic inflammation processes associated with the production of this pro-inflammatory cytokine. Treatment with LASSBio-468 before a lethal dose injection of LPS in animals greatly inhibited endotoxic shock. This effect seems to be mediated by a specific down regulation of TNF-alpha and nitric oxide production, regulated mainly at the RNA level. In another model, histopathological analysis indicated that this compound also inhibited adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Taken together, our data demonstrated a potent anti-inflammatory effect of LASSBio-468, suggesting its use as a potential drug against chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:15683845

  18. Cytokine inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling: a new mechanism of growth hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Lang, Charles H; Hong-Brown, Ly; Frost, Robert A

    2005-03-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I are potent regulators of muscle mass in health and disease. This somatomedin axis is markedly deranged in various catabolic conditions in which circulating and tissue levels of inflammatory cytokines are elevated. The plasma concentration of IGF-I, which is primarily determined by hepatic synthesis and secretion of the peptide hormone, is dramatically decreased during catabolic and inflammatory conditions. Moreover, many of these conditions are also associated with an inability of GH to stimulate hepatic IGF-I synthesis. This defect results from an impaired phosphorylation and activation of the traditional JAK2/STAT5 signal transduction pathway. Numerous lines of evidence support the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha as a prominent but probably not the sole mediator of the sepsis-induced impairment in basal and GH-stimulated IGF-I synthesis in liver. Additionally, catabolic conditions produce comparable alterations in skeletal muscle. However, in contrast to liver, the GH resistance in muscle is not mediated by a defect in STAT5 phosphorylation. Muscle is now recognized to respond to infectious stimuli with the production of numerous inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-alpha. Furthermore, myocytes cultured with TNF-alpha are GH resistant and this defect appears mediated via a STAT5-independent but JNK-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these changes act to limit IGF-I availability in muscle, which disturbs protein balance and results in the loss of protein stores in catabolic and inflammatory conditions. PMID:15549417

  19. Recombinant HCV core protein and the secretion of associated cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ) in immunized mice.

    PubMed

    Torbati, Elham; Ghassab, Romina Karimzadeh; Davachi, Navid Dadashpour

    2013-12-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of acute and chronic hepatitis which is a disorder with a high worldwide prevalence. HCV core protein was considered as immunogenic counterpart of the HCV vaccine and it is an ideal candidate for HCV vaccine. Since cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-Gamma are responsible for the prevention of viral infection, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of HCV core protein as a vaccine. Ten BALB/c mice were immunized with HCV core protein and after 42 days the splenocytes were isolated and the IL-6 and INF-gamma secretion were measured using ELISpot technique, at the same time TNF-alpha was determined by ELISA in the sera. The MTT assay was done to assess the viability of the cultured splenocytes. For evaluating the humoral immune response against the recombinant HCV core protein the DOT Blot test was used. Data was compared using one-way ANOVA test and significant results were considered at p < 0.05. In the present study the IL-6, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha levels were dramatically higher in the immunized mice compared to the control group (respectively, 22.9 +/- 1.26; 18.53 +/- 3.87; 53.96 +/- 4.54 and p < 0.05). The immunized mice with recombinant HCV core protein showed higher amount of IL-6, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha in the current study. Since the level of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma is high in patients with acute HCV infection, thus a vaccine which could stimulate the secretion of these cytokines in advance may have a preventive role. PMID:24517026

  20. Sensitization of vascular smooth muscle cell to TNF-{alpha}-mediated death in the presence of palmitate

    SciTech Connect

    Rho, Mun-Chual; Ah Lee, Kyeong; Mi Kim, Sun; Sik Lee, Chang; Jeong Jang, Min; Kook Kim, Young; Sun Lee, Hyun; Hyun Choi, Yung; Yong Rhim, Byung; Kim, Koanhoi . E-mail: koanhoi@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-05-01

    Saturated free fatty acids (FFAs), including palmitate, can activate the intrinsic death pathway in cells. However, the relationship between FFAs and receptor-mediated death pathway is still unknown. In this study, we have investigated whether FFAs are able to trigger receptor-mediated death. In addition, to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the activation, we examined the biochemical changes in dying vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and the effects of various molecules to the receptor-mediated VSMC death. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-mediated VSMC death occurred in the presence of sub-cytotoxic concentration of palmitate as determined by assessing viability and DNA degradation, while the cytokine did not influence VSMC viability in the presence of oleate. The VSMC death was inhibited by the gene transfer of a dominant-negative Fas-associated death domain-containing protein and the baculovirus p35, but not by the bcl-xL or the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) binding domain of JNK-interacting protein-1, in tests utilizing recombinant adenoviruses. The VSMC death was also inhibited by a neutralizing anti-TNF receptor 1 antibody, the caspase inhibitor z-VAD, and the cathepsin B inhibitor CA074, a finding indicative of the role of both caspases and cathepsin B in this process. Consistent with this finding, caspase-3 activation and an increase in cytosolic cathepsin B activity were detected in the dying VSMC. Palmitate inhibited an increase of TNF-{alpha}-mediated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, the survival pathway activated by the cytokine, by hindering the translocation of the NF-{kappa}B subunit of p65 from the cytosol into the nucleus. The gene transfer of inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B predisposed VSMC to palmitate-induced cell death. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report to demonstrate the activation of TNF-{alpha}-mediated cell death in the presence of palmitate. The current study proposes that FFAs would take part in

  1. Increased mRNA expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in psoriasis skin lesions and in cultured human keratinocytes exposed to IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Löntz, W; Sirsjö, A; Liu, W; Lindberg, M; Rollman, O; Törmä, H

    1995-02-01

    Because reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various hyperproliferative and inflammatory diseases, the mRNA expression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase was studied in psoriatic skin tissue. By using reverse transcription-PCR we found similar expression of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in the involved vs. uninvolved psoriatic skin. In contrast, the level of the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mRNA message was consistently higher in lesional psoriatic skin as compared to adjacent uninvolved skin and healthy control skin. Parallel investigation of those cytokines that are thought to be direct or indirect inducers of the MnSOD activity revealed an increased mRNA expression of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF in lesional psoriatic skin. To study if these cytokines exert a direct effect on dismutase expression in epidermal cells, human keratinocytes in culture were challenged with IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF. It was found that IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, but not GM-CSF, induced the mRNA expression of MnSOD, and an additive effect was demonstrated for the two former cytokines. Further, the expression of both CuZnSOD and MnSOD transcripts was similar in cultured keratinocytes maintained at low differentiation (low Ca2+ medium) and cells forced to terminal differentiation (by high Ca2+ medium). Our results indicate that the abnormal expression of MnSOD mRNA in lesional psoriatic skin is not directly linked to the pathologic state of keratinocyte differentiation in the skin. It seems more likely that the cutaneous overexpression of MnSOD in psoriatic epidermis represents a protective cellular response evoked by cytokines released from inflammatory cells invading the diseased skin. PMID:7744320

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Kenji . E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kawakubo, Yo; Inoue, Shota; Hirano, Toshihiko; Oka, Kitaro

    2006-12-08

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  3. Omentin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Xia; Li, Xiaonan; Liu, Fuli; Tan, Hui; Shang, Deya

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin reduces expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-{alpha} in HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced ERK and NF-{kappa}B activation in HUVECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Omentin supreeses TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 via ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway. -- Abstract: In the present study, we investigated whether omentin affected the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our data showed that omentin decreased TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in HUVECs. In addition, omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs. Further, we found that omentin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-activated signal pathway of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) by preventing NF-{kappa}B inhibitory protein (I{kappa}B{alpha}) degradation and NF-{kappa}B/DNA binding activity. Omentin pretreatment significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced ERK activity and ERK phosphorylation in HUVECs. Pretreatment with PD98059 suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Omentin, NF-kB inhibitor (BAY11-7082) and ERK inhibitor (PD98059) reduced the up-regulation of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 induced by TNF-{alpha}. These results suggest that omentin may inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells via blocking ERK/NF-{kappa}B pathway.

  4. Polymorphism of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) at position -308 in relation to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, G M; Brinkman, B M; Van Doornik, C E; Kijlstra, A; Verweij, C L

    1994-01-01

    In addition to HLA-B27, other genetic factors are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Because of the localization, in the proximity of the HLA-B locus, and the biological activities of TNF-alpha, we investigated the association between AS and a single base polymorphism located at position -308 of the TNF-alpha gene. An allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was developed to monitor this polymorphism. The frequency of the TNF-alpha alleles was determined in 66 AS patients and 37 healthy controls. The TNF-alpha allele frequency was not significantly different between AS patients and controls. PMID:8033419

  5. TNF-alpha released by comigrating monocytes promotes transendothelial migration of activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Green, D M; Trial, J; Birdsall, H H

    1998-09-01

    We investigated mechanisms that increase motility and transendothelial trafficking of activated lymphocytes. Freshly isolated lymphocytes stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 for 2 h migrate into polymerized collagen in 1.99+/-0.25-fold greater numbers and across confluent endothelial monolayers in 4.8+/-0.5-fold greater numbers compared with leukocytes incubated with non-specific IgG. Activated lymphocytes form clusters with monocytes, and their increased motility was dependent on the presence of comigrating monocytes. Five lines of evidence support the idea that monocytes modulate lymphocyte motility through the release of TNF-alpha: 1) flow-cytometric analyses, using highly specific and avid mAbs to probe permeabilized whole blood leukocytes, showed that >80% of circulating monocytes contain intracellular TNF-alpha, whereas <5% contain IL-1 and none contain IL-6; 2) stimulation with immobilized anti-CD3 that was intended to activate lymphocytes also induced monocytes to release increased quantities of TNF-alpha; 3) rTNF-alpha, added in doses of 1 to 20 pg/ml to purified anti-CD3-stimulated lymphocytes, reproduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the motility-enhancing effect of adding monocytes; 4) the transient increase in the expression of TNF R-I on CD3-activated T lymphocytes parallels their transiently increased motility; and 5) addition of anti-TNF-alpha, anti-TNF R-I, anti-TNF R-II, or soluble TNF R-I decreased the motility of stimulated lymphocytes. These results suggest that T lymphocyte stimulation via the CD3-TCR complex signals nearby monocytes to release TNF-alpha, which feeds back on the lymphocytes to increase their locomotor activity. PMID:9725247

  6. Endogenous glucocorticoids released during acute toxic liver injury enhance hepatic IL-10 synthesis and release.

    PubMed

    Swain, M G; Appleyard, C; Wallace, J; Wong, H; Le, T

    1999-01-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids are known to play a role in the regulation of the inflammatory response possibly by modulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression. We examined endogenous glucocorticoid secretion, hepatic damage, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA expression and release in rats treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) after treatment with vehicle or a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist (RU-486). Rats treated with CCl4 demonstrated striking elevations of plasma corticosterone levels. Inhibition of endogenous glucocorticoid activity by pretreatment with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486 resulted in augmented CCl4-mediated hepatotoxicity, as reflected by histology and serum transaminase levels, which were independent of alterations in serum TNF-alpha levels or hepatic mRNA expression. CCl4 treatment resulted in enhanced hepatic IL-10 mRNA expression and elevated serum IL-10 levels, which were markedly attenuated by glucocorticoid receptor blockade. In summary, significant endogenous glucocorticoid release occurs during acute toxic liver injury in the rat and suppresses the inflammatory response independent of effects on TNF-alpha but possibly by upregulating hepatic IL-10 production. PMID:9886996

  7. Effects of antioxidant polyphenols on TNF-alpha-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kiichiro; Matsumoto, Tsukasa; Kumazawa, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory responses sustained for a long period of time cause many diseases. A proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of chronic and auto-immune diseases. The present review, supplemented by hitherto unpublished data of the authors and their coworkers, shows that the intake of polyphenols contained in natural sources, such as hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, oleuropein (olives), naringin and hesperidin (Citrus fruits), resveratrol, procyanidins or oligomeric procyanidin (grapes or grape seed extracts), (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (green tea) and quercetin (grapes, green tea) etc., are able to modulate chronic inflammatory diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and affect the formation and interaction of advanced glycation end products with their respective receptors. Furthermore, potent activities of fermented grape marc, prepared as a fine lyophilized powder from fresh skin and seeds of a Japanese grape strain (Koshu) and then fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum, are described. Finally, the bioavailability of representative polyphenols will be discussed. PMID:21506932

  8. Cross-linking staphylococcal enterotoxin A bound to major histocompatibility complex class I is required for TNF-alpha secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, A. D.; Chapes, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of how superantigens function to activate cells has been linked to their ability to bind and cross-link the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecule. Cells that lack the MHCII molecule also respond to superantigens, however, with much less efficiency. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to confirm that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) could bind the MHCI molecule and to test the hypothesis that cross-linking SEA bound to MHCII-deficient macrophages would induce a more robust cytokine response than without cross-linking. We used a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an immunprecipitation assay to directly demonstrate that MHCI molecules bind SEA. Directly cross-linking MHCI using monoclonal antibodies or cross-linking bound SEA with an anti-SEA antibody or biotinylated SEA with avidin increased TNF-alpha and IL-6 secretion by MHCII(-/-) macrophages. The induction of a vigorous macrophage cytokine response by SEA/anti-SEA cross-linking of MHCI offers a mechanism to explain how MHCI could play an important role in superantigen-mediated pathogenesis. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. TNF-alpha and IL-8: serum levels and gene polymorphisms (-308G>A and -251A>T) are associated with classical biomarkers and medical history in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Cajado, C; Cerqueira, B A V; Couto, F D; Moura-Neto, J P; Vilas-Boas, W; Dorea, M J; Lyra, I M; Barbosa, C G; Reis, M G; Goncalves, M S

    2011-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a disorder characterized by a heterogeneous clinical outcome. In the present study, we investigated the associations between Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) -308G>A and Interleukin 8 (IL-8) -251A>T gene polymorphisms, medical history and classical biomarkers in children with steady-state SCA. In total, 210 SCA patients aged 2-21 years and 200 healthy controls were studied. Gene polymorphisms, betaS-globin haplotypes and a 3.7-kb deletion in alpha2-thalassemia (α2-thal3.7 kb) were investigated by PCR/RFLP analysis, and cytokine levels were determined by ELISA. Splenomegaly (p=.032) was more prevalent among children younger than 5 years of age. The A allele of the TNF-alpha -308G>A gene polymorphism and the presence of α2-thal3.7 kb were associated with an increase risk of splenic sequestration events (p=.001; p=.046), while the T allele of the IL-8 -251A>T gene polymorphism was considered to be a protective factor for splenomegaly events (p=.032). Moreover, the A allele of the TNF-alpha -308G>A gene polymorphism was associated with high TNF-alpha levels (p=.021), and the hemoglobin F and hemoglobin S haplotypes were correlated with serum levels of IL-8. The logistic regression analysis showed significant effects of the TNF-alpha and IL-8 gene polymorphisms, beta(S)-globin gene haplotypes and α2-thal3.7 kb on the occurrence of splenic sequestration events. Our study emphasizes that the identification of new genetic and immunological biomarkers and their associations with classical markers is an important strategy to elucidate the underlying causes of different SCA phenotypes and their effects on patient outcome. PMID:21802960

  10. Prevention of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice by tumor necrosis factor (TNF): similarities between TNF-alpha and interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, C O; Aiso, S; Michie, S A; McDevitt, H O; Acha-Orbea, H

    1990-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes mellitus was tested in the nonobese mouse (NOD) model system. The effects of TNF-alpha were assessed on three levels: (i) insulitis development, (ii) development of overt diabetes, (iii) adoptive transfer of diabetes by splenic lymphocytes. Spontaneous diabetes mellitus was blocked in NOD mice by long-term treatment with recombinant TNF-alpha. Treatment with TNF-alpha caused a significant reduction in the lymphocytic infiltration associated with the destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Class II major histocompatibility complex Ia expression by islet cells was not up-regulated by TNF-alpha. Moreover, TNF-alpha was able to suppress the induction of diabetes in adoptive transfer of lymphocytes from diabetic female mice to young nondiabetic male NOD mice. These activities of TNF-alpha were shared by interleukin 1 alpha in this system. These studies have implications for the pathogenesis and therapy of autoimmune diabetes mellitus. Images PMID:2405400

  11. Generation, characterization and therapeutic potential of anti-feline TNF-alpha MAbs for feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Nishiyama, Yuri; Nakamura, Michiyo; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2013-12-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal infectious disease affecting domestic and wild cats. Several reports suggested that TNF-alpha is related to the progression of FIP. Thus, the administration of a feline TNF-alpha-neutralizing antibody to cats with FIP may reduce the disease progression. In this study, we have prepared nine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize feline TNF-alpha. All MAbs neutralized recombinant TNF-alpha. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of the MAbs for the cytotoxicity of recombinant TNF-alpha were 5-684 ng/ml. MAb 2-4 exhibited high neutralizing activity against natural TNF-alpha derived from FIPV-infected macrophages, and was confirmed to inhibit the following feline TNF-alpha-induced conditions in vitro: (i) an increase in the survival rate of neutrophils from cats with FIP, (ii) aminopeptidase N (APN) mRNA expression in macrophages, and (iii) apoptosis of a feline T-lymphocyte cell line. PMID:24095161

  12. Regulation of monocyte MMP-9 production by TNF-alpha and a tumour-derived soluble factor (MMPSF).

    PubMed Central

    Leber, T. M.; Balkwill, F. R.

    1998-01-01

    The matrix metalloprotease MMP-9 localizes to tumour-associated macrophages in human ovarian cancer but little is known of its regulation. Co-culture of human ovarian cancer cells (PEO-1) and a monocytic cell line (THP-1) led to production of 92-kDa proMMP-9. PEO-1-conditioned medium (CM) also stimulated THP-1 cells or isolated peripheral blood monocytes to produce proMMP-9. Expression of TIMP-1, however, remained unaffected. There was evidence that tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was involved in tumour-stimulated monocytic proMMP-9 production. Antibody to TNF-alpha inhibited proMMP-9 production, and synthesis of TNF-alpha mRNA and protein preceded proMMP-9 release. In addition, the synthetic matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPI) BB-2116, which blocks TNF-alpha shedding, inhibited proMMP-9 release in the co-cultures and from CM-stimulated monocytic cells. Further experiments suggested that the stimulating factor present in CM was not TNF-alpha, but acted synergistically with autocrine monocyte-derived TNF-alpha to release monocytic proMMP-9. Thus, ovarian cancer cells can stimulate monocytic cells in vitro to make proMMP-9 without affecting the expression of its inhibitor TIMP-1. This induction is mediated via a soluble factor (provisionally named MMPSF) that requires synergistic action of autocrine or paracrine TNF-alpha. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9743290

  13. Off-label use of TNF-alpha inhibitors in a dermatological university department: retrospective evaluation of 118 patients.

    PubMed

    Sand, Freja Lærke; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF)-alpha inhibitors are licensed for patients with severe refractory psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. However, TNF-alpha inhibitors have also been used off-label for various recalcitrant mucocutaneous diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of TNF-alpha inhibitors used for off-label dermatological indications. We retrospectively evaluated patient records of 118 patients treated off-label with TNF-alpha inhibitors in a dermatological university department. Patients presented with severe aphthous stomatitis/genital aphthous lesions (26), chronic urticaria (25), hidradenitis suppurativa (29), acne conglobata (11), dissecting cellulitis of the scalp (two), orofacial granulomatosis (four), sarcoidosis (four), granuloma annulare (two), granulomatous rosacea (one), granuloma faciale (one), subcorneal pustulosis (one), pyoderma gangrenosum (four), Sweet's syndrome (four), Well's syndrome (one), benign familial pemphigus (one), lichen planus (one), and folliculitis decalvans (one). A significant number of these patients went into remission during therapy with TNF-alpha inhibitors. A total of 11 patients (9%) experienced severe adverse effects during therapy. Off-label therapy with TNF-alpha inhibitors may be considered for selected patients with severe recalcitrant mucocutaneous diseases. The risk of severe adverse effects signals that a thorough benefit-risk assessment should be performed before initiating off-label treatment with TNF-alpha inhibitors for these conditions. PMID:25731720

  14. Local delivery of soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 gene reduces infarct size following ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Masahiro; Hata, Tomoji; Tsuchida, Keiko; Suematsu, Nobuhiro; Oyama, Jun-Ichi; Satoh, Shinji; Makino, Naoki

    2004-11-01

    Apoptosis in the myocardium is linked to ischemia/reperfusion injury, and TNF-alpha induces apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. A significant amount of TNF-alpha is detected after ischemia and reperfusion. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 (sTNFR1) is an extracellular domain of TNF-alpha receptor 1 and is an antagonist to TNF-alpha. In the present study, we examined the effects of sTNFR1 on infarct size in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) following ischemia/reperfusion. Male Wistar rats were subjected to left coronary artery (LCA) ligation. After 30 min of LCA occlusion, the temporary ligature on the LCA was released and blood flow was restored. Immediately after reperfusion, a total of 200 microg of sTNFR1 or LacZ plasmid was injected into three different sites of the left ventricular wall. At 6 h, 1 and 2 days after reperfusion, the TNF-alpha bioactivity in the myocardium was significantly higher in rats receiving LacZ plasmid than in sham-operated rats, whereas sTNFR1 plasmid significantly suppressed the increase in the TNF-alpha bioactivity. The sTNFR1 plasmid significantly reduced DNA fragmentation and caspase activity compared to the LacZ plasmid. Finally, the sTNFR1 expression-plasmid treatment significantly reduced the area of myocardial infarction at 2 days after ischemia/reperfusion compared to LacZ plasmid. In conclusion, the TNF-alpha bioactivity in the heart increased from the early stage of ischemia/reperfusion, and this increase was thought to contribute in part to the increased area of myocardial infarction. Suppression of TNF-alpha bioactivity with the sTNFR1 plasmid reduced the infarct size in AMI following ischemia and reperfusion. PMID:15646033

  15. Alcohol depletes coenzyme-Q(10) associated with increased TNF-alpha secretion to induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Nandakumar, Krishna S; Patki, Pralhad S

    2012-12-01

    Alcohol consumption has been implicated to cause severe hepatic steatosis which is mediated by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and CYP(450) 2E1 expression. In this context, the effect of ethanol was studied for its influence on lipogenesis in HepG2 cell which is deficient of ADH and does not express CYP(450) 2E1. The results showed that ethanol at 100mM concentration caused 40% cytotoxicity at 72h as determined by MTT assay. The incorporation of labeled [2-(14)C] acetate into triacylglycerol and phospholipid was increased by 40% and 26% respectively upon 24h incubation, whereas incorporation of labeled [2-(14)C] acetate into cholesterol was not significantly increased. Further, ethanol inhibited HMG-CoA reductase which is a rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis. It was observed that, HMG-CoA reductase inhibition was brought about by ethanol as a consequence of decreased cell viability, since incubation of HepG2 cells with mevalonate could not increase the cholesterol content and increase the cell viability. Addition of ethanol significantly increased TNF-alpha secretion and depleted mitochondrial coenzyme-Q(10) which is detrimental for cell viability. But vitamin E (10mM) could partially restore coenzyme-Q(10) and glutathione content with decreased TNF-alpha secretion in ethanol treated cells. Further, lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzyme activities remained unaffected. Ethanol decreased glutathione content while, GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly higher compared to other groups showing cellular pro-oxidant and antioxidant balance remained intact. Alanine amino transferase activity was increased by 4.85 folds in cells treated with ethanol confirming hepatocyte damage. Hence, it is inferred that ethanol induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells due to coenzyme-Q(10) depletion and increased TNF-alpha secretion. PMID:22841563

  16. The discovery of novel tartrate-based TNF-[alpha] converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, Kristin E.; Guo, Zhuyan; Orth, Peter; Shipps, Jr., Gerald W.; Belanger, David B.; Chan, Tin Yau; Curran, Patrick J.; Dai, Chaoyang; Deng, Yongqi; Girijavallabhan, Vinay M.; Hong, Liwu; Lavey, Brian J.; Lee, Joe F.; Li, Dansu; Liu, Zhidan; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Ting, Pauline C.; Vaccaro, Henry; Wang, Li; Wang, Tong; Yu, W.; Zhou, G.; Niu, X.; Sun, J.; Kozlowski, J.A.; Lundell, D.J.; Madison, V.; McKittrick, B.; Piwinski, J.J.; Shih, N.Y.; Siddiqui, M. Arshad; Strickland, Corey O.

    2010-09-17

    A novel series of TNF-{alpha} convertase (TACE) inhibitors which are non-hydroxamate have been discovered. These compounds are bis-amides of L-tartaric acid (tartrate) and coordinate to the active site zinc in a tridentate manner. They are selective for TACE over other MMP's. We report the first X-ray crystal structure for a tartrate-based TACE inhibitor.

  17. A functional polymorphism of the TNF-{alpha} gene that is associated with type 2 DM

    SciTech Connect

    Susa, Shinji; Daimon, Makoto Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hidenori; Oizumi, Toshihide; Karasawa, Shigeru; Wada, Kiriko; Jimbu, Yumi; Kameda, Wataru; Emi, Mitsuru; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Kato, Takeo

    2008-05-09

    To examine the association of the tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) gene region with type 2 diabetes (DM), 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the region were analyzed. The initial study using a sample set (148 cases vs. 227 controls) showed a significant association of the SNP IVS1G + 123A of the TNF-{alpha} gene with DM (p = 0.0056). Multiple logistic regression analysis using an enlarged sample set (225 vs. 716) revealed the significant association of the SNP with DM independently of any clinical traits examined (OR: 1.49, p = 0.014). The functional relevance of the SNP were examined by the electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from the U937 and NIH3T3 cells and luciferase assays in these cells with Simian virus 40 promoter- and TNF-{alpha} promoter-reporter gene constructs. The functional analyses showed that YY1 transcription factor bound allele-specifically to the SNP region and, the IVS1 + 123A allele had an increase in luciferase expression compared with the G allele.

  18. Cryptotanshinone, a lipophilic compound of Salvia miltiorrriza root, inhibits TNF-alpha-induced expression of adhesion molecules in HUVEC and attenuates rat myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yong Chun; Kim, Chun Wook; Kim, Young Min; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Ha, Yu Mi; Kim, Hye Jung; Seo, Han Geuk; Son, Kun Ho; Jeon, Su Jin; Kang, Sam Sik; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kam, Sung-Chul; Lee, Jea Heun; Chang, Ki Churl

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of cryptotanshinone (CTS), one of active ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza root, on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat due to inhibition of some inflammatory events that occur by NF-kappaB-activation during ischemia and reperfusion. Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury was induced by occluding the left anterior descending coronary artery for 30 min followed by either 2 h (biochemical analysis) or 24 h (myocardial function and infarct size measurement) reperfusion. CTS injected (i.v.) 10 min before ischemia and reperfusion insult. CTS significantly reduced the infarct size and improved ischemia and reperfusion-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction. Furthermore, CTS inhibited NF-kappaB translocation, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6), neutrophil infiltration and MPO activity in ischemic myocardial tissues. CTS also significantly reduced plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta due to ischemia and reperfusion. Interestingly, H(2)O(2)-stimulated NF-kappaB-luciferase activity and TNF-alpha-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were significantly inhibited by CTS. Taken together, it is concluded that CTS may attenuate ischemia and reperfusion-induced microcirculatory disturbances by inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production, reduction of neutrophil infiltration and possibly inhibition of adhesion molecules through inhibition of NF-kappaB-activation during ischemia and reperfusion. PMID:19401198

  19. Inhibition of TNF-{alpha}-mediated inflammatory responses by a benzodioxolylacetylamino-linked benzothiazole analog in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Rae; Jin, Guo Hua; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Park, Jin-Woo; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Raok; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} We synthesized SPA0537, a benzothiazole analog. {yields} SPA0537 is a potent NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. {yields} SPA0537 suppresses the production of proinflammatory mediators in human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes. {yields} SPA0537 is effective at suppressing osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: The pathologic processes of rheumatoid arthritis are mediated by a number of cytokines, chemokines, and matrix metalloproteinases, the expressions of which are controlled by NF-{kappa}B. This study was performed to explore the effects of a benzothiazole analog, SPA0537, on the control of the NF-{kappa}B activation pathway. We also investigated whether SPA0537 had any anti-inflammatory effects in human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). SPA0537 inhibited the nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of NF-{kappa}B subunits, which correlated with the inhibitory effects on IKK phosphorylation and I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated rheumatoid FLS. These events further suppressed chemokine production, matrix metalloproteinase secretion, and TNF-{alpha}-induced cell proliferation. In addition, SPA0537 inhibited the osteoclast differentiation induced by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) and receptor activator of the NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in bone marrow macrophages. These findings suggest that SPA0537 exerts anti-inflammatory effects in rheumatoid FLS through the inhibition of the NF-{kappa}B pathway. Therefore, it may have therapeutic value for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Candida albicans and Streptococcus salivarius modulate IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha expression and secretion by engineered human oral mucosa cells.

    PubMed

    Mostefaoui, Yakout; Bart, Christian; Frenette, Michel; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the involvement of oral epithelial cells via two cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and one chemokine (IL-8) in local defences against live yeast (Candida albicans) and bacteria (Streptococcus salivarius) using an engineered human oral mucosa model. We report that the yeast changed from the blastospore to the hyphal form and induced significant tissue disorganization at later contact periods (24 and 48 h) compared to the bacteria. However, this effect did not reduce the viability or total number of epithelial cells. Gene activation analyses revealed that IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha mRNA levels rose in tissues in contact with live C. albicans or S. salivarius. Gene activation was followed by an upregulation of protein secretion. IL-6 levels were higher after contact with C. albicans than with S. salivarius. IL-8 levels after contact with S. salivarius were higher than with C. albicans. Our study suggests that S. salivarius is more efficient at inducing proinflammatory mediator release than C. albicans. These results provide additional evidence for the contribution of oral epithelial cells to the inflammatory response against fungi and bacteria. PMID:15469436

  1. Alpha1-antitrypsin suppresses TNF-alpha and MMP-12 production by cigarette smoke-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Rong D; Meixner, Scott C; Pryzdial, Edward L G; Wright, Joanne L

    2007-08-01

    We have previously observed that mice exposed to cigarette smoke and treated with exogenous alpha(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) were protected against the development of emphysema and against smoke-induced increases in serum TNF-alpha. To investigate possible mechanisms behind this latter observation, we cultured alveolar macrophages lavaged from C57 mice. Smoke-conditioned medium caused alveolar macrophages to increase secretion of macrophage metalloelastase (MMP-12) and TNF-alpha, and this effect was suppressed in a dose-response fashion by addition of A1AT. Macrophages from animals exposed to smoke in vivo and then lavaged also failed to increase MMP-12 and TNF-alpha secretion when the animals were pretreated with A1AT. Because proteinase activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) is known to control MMP-12 release, macrophages were treated with the G protein-coupled receptor inhibitor, pertussis toxin; this suppressed both TNF-alpha and MMP-12 release, while a PAR-1 agonist (TRAP) increased TNF-alpha and MMP-12 release. Smoke-conditioned medium caused increased release of the prothrombin activator, tissue factor, from macrophages. Hirudin, a thrombin inhibitor, and aprotinin, an inhibitor of plasmin, reduced smoke-mediated TNF-alpha and MMP-12 release, and A1AT inhibited both plasmin and thrombin activity in a cell-free functional assay. These findings extend our previous suggestion that TNF-alpha production by alveolar macrophages is related to MMP-12 secretion. They also suggest that A1AT can inhibit thrombin and plasmin in blood constituents that leak into the lung after smoke exposure, thereby preventing PAR-1 activation and MMP-12/TNF-alpha release, and decreasing smoke-mediated inflammatory cell influx. PMID:17395890

  2. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in human keratinocytes, HaCaT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyeon Ho; Lee, Youngae; Eun, Hee Chul Chung, Jin Ho

    2008-04-04

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is an omega-3 ({omega}-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), which has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Some reports have demonstrated that EPA inhibits NF-{kappa}B activation induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in various cells. However, its detailed mode of action is unclear. In this report, we investigated whether EPA inhibits the expression of TNF-{alpha}-induced matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9 in human immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT). TNF-{alpha} induced MMP-9 expression by NF-{kappa}B-dependent pathway. Pretreatment of EPA inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression and p65 phosphorylation. However, EPA could not affect I{kappa}B-{alpha} phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and DNA binding activity of NF-{kappa}B. EPA inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced p65 phosphorylation through p38 and Akt inhibition and this inhibition was IKK{alpha}-dependent event. Taken together, we demonstrate that EPA inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression through inhibition of p38 and Akt activation.

  3. TNF-alpha, but not IL-6, stimulates plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Plomgaard, Peter; Keller, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2005-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is produced by adipose tissue, and elevated PAI-1 levels in plasma are a risk factor in the metabolic syndrome. We investigated the regulatory effects of TNF-alpha and IL-6 on PAI-1 gene induction in human adipose tissue. Twenty healthy men underwent a 3-h infusion of either recombinant human TNF-alpha (n = 8), recombinant human IL-6 (n = 6), or vehicle (n = 6). Biopsies were obtained from the subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue at preinfusion, at 1, 2, and 3 h during the infusion, and at 2 h after the infusion. The mRNA expression of PAI-1 in the adipose tissue was measured using real-time PCR. The plasma levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 reached 18 and 99 pg/ml, respectively, during the infusions. During the TNF-alpha infusion, adipose PAI-1 mRNA expression increased 2.5-fold at 1 h, 6-fold at 2 h, 9-fold at 3 h, and declined to 2-fold 2 h after the infusion stopped but did not change during IL-6 infusion and vehicle. These data demonstrate that TNF-alpha rather than IL-6 stimulates an increase in PAI-1 mRNA in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, suggesting that TNF-alpha may be involved in the pathogenesis of related metabolic disorders. PMID:15677734

  4. Does Dietary Deoxynivalenol Modulate the Acute Phase Reaction in Endotoxaemic Pigs?—Lessons from Clinical Signs, White Blood Cell Counts, and TNF-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, Tanja; Bannert, Erik; Kluess, Jeannette; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Breves, Gerhard; Renner, Lydia; Kahlert, Stefan; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Dänicke, Sven

    2015-01-01

    We studied the interaction between deoxynivalenol (DON)-feeding and a subsequent pre- and post-hepatic immune stimulus with the hypothesis that the liver differently mediates the acute phase reaction (APR) in pigs. Barrows (n = 44) were divided into a DON-(4.59 mg DON/kg feed) and a control-diet group, surgically equipped with permanent catheters pre- (V. portae hepatis) and post-hepatic (V. jugularis interna) and infused either with 0.9% NaCl or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW). Thus, combination of diet (CON vs. DON) and infusion (CON vs. LPS, jugular vs. portal) created six groups: CON_CONjug.-CONpor., CON_CONjug.-LPSpor., CON_LPSjug.-CONpor., DON_CONjug.-CONpor., DON_CONjug.-LPSpor., DON_LPSjug.-CONpor.. Blood samples were taken at −30, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180 min relative to infusion and analyzed for leukocytes and TNF-alpha. Concurrently, clinical signs were scored and body temperature measured during the same period. LPS as such induced a dramatic rise in TNF-alpha (p < 0.001), hyperthermia (p < 0.01), and severe leukopenia (p < 0.001). In CON-fed pigs, an earlier return to physiological base levels was observed for the clinical complex, starting at 120 min post infusionem (p < 0.05) and persisting until 180 min. DON_LPSjug.-CONpor. resulted in a lower temperature rise (p = 0.08) compared to CON_LPSjug.-CONpor.. In conclusion, APR resulting from a post-hepatic immune stimulus was altered by chronic DON-feeding. PMID:26703732

  5. Prolactin modulation of nitric oxide and TNF-alpha production by peripheral neutrophils in rats.

    PubMed

    Meli, R; Raso, G M; Gualillo, O; Pacilio, M; Di Carlo, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that prolactin (PRL) is a potent immunomodulator that exerts stimulatory effects on physiological responses of immune cells. In the present research we have investigated whether PRL may influence nitric oxide (NO) and/or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production in neutrophils obtained from inflammatory exudate of carrageenin-induced experimental pleurisy in the rat. In this acute model of inflammation the role of endogenous NO was evaluated using an inhibitor of NO-synthase, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). A treatment of animals with L-NAME (10 mg/kg s.c.) induced a reduction of volume and cell number of pleural exudate and a decrease of nitrite production (measured by the Griees reaction) by polymorphonuclear cells after 24 h of incubation, while D-NAME, the inactive isomer, was without effect. Neutrophils from ovine prolactin (oPRL) treated rats (5 mg/kg for 5 times s.c.) or from rats with a hyperprolactinaemia induced by pituitary gland graft produced higher amounts of NO both after 24 and 48 h of incubation. On the contrary, a clear reduction in the production of NO was found in neutrophils from rats treated with bromocriptine (BRC) (2 mg/kg s.c.), a dopamine D2-receptor agonist. TNF-alpha production (measured by MTT/cytotoxic assay) by neutrophils was markedly increased in PRL-treated or pituitary-grafted rats in comparison to controls, whereas BRC treatment reduced TNF-alpha production. PMID:9335229

  6. The IL-6/sIL-6R treatment of a malignant melanoma cell line enhances susceptibility to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wagley, Yadav; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Seo, Han Geuk; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Kang, Keon Wook; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Oh, Jae-Wook . E-mail: ohjw@mail.chosun.ac.kr

    2007-03-23

    Melanoma is an intractable tumor that has shown very impressive and promising response to local administration of high dose recombinant TNF-{alpha} in combination with IFN-{gamma} in clinical studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-6/sIL-6R on TNF-{alpha}-resistant B16/F10.9 melanoma cells. A low dose of TNF-{alpha} or IL-6/sIL-6R had minimal affect on the cell growth. However, the highly active fusion protein of sIL-6R and IL-6 (IL6RIL6), covalently linked by a flexible peptide, sensitized TNF-{alpha}-resistant F10.9 melanoma cells to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis. Stimulation of the cells with IL6RIL6 plus TNF-{alpha} resulted in both the activation of caspase-3 and the reduction of bcl-2 expression. Flow cytometry analysis showed that IL6RIL6-upregulated TNF-R55 and TNF-R75 expression, suggesting an increase in TNF-{alpha} responsiveness by IL6RIL6 resulting from the induction of TNF receptors. Moreover, exposure of F10.9 cells to neutralizing antibody to TNF-R55 significantly inhibited IL6RIL6/TNF-{alpha}-induced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that the IL6/sIL6R/gp130 system, which sensitizes TNF-{alpha}-resistant melanoma cells to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis, may provide a new target for immunotherapy.

  7. TNF-{alpha} promotes cell survival through stimulation of K{sup +} channel and NF{kappa}B activity in corneal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ling; Reinach, Peter; Lu, Luo . E-mail: lluou@ucla.edu

    2005-11-15

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-{alpha}) in various cell types induces either cell death or mitogenesis through different signaling pathways. In the present study, we determined in human corneal epithelial cells how TNF-{alpha} also promotes cell survival. Human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells were cultured in DMEM/F-12 medium containing 10% FBS. TNF-{alpha} stimulation induced activation of a voltage-gated K{sup +} channel detected by measuring single channel activity using patch clamp techniques. The effect of TNF-{alpha} on downstream events included NF{kappa}B nuclear translocation and increases in DNA binding activities, but did not elicit ERK, JNK, or p38 limb signaling activation. TNF-{alpha} induced increases in p21 expression resulting in partial cell cycle attenuation in the G{sub 1} phase. Cell cycle progression was also mapped by flow cytometer analysis. Blockade of TNF-{alpha}-induced K{sup +} channel activity effectively prevented NF{kappa}B nuclear translocation and binding to DNA, diminishing the cell-survival protective effect of TNF-{alpha}. In conclusion, TNF-{alpha} promotes survival of HCE cells through sequential stimulation of K{sup +} channel and NF{kappa}B activities. This response to TNF-{alpha} is dependent on stimulating K{sup +} channel activity because following suppression of K{sup +} channel activity TNF-{alpha} failed to activate NF{kappa}B nuclear translocation and binding to nuclear DNA.

  8. Comparable TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and GM-CSF production by purified normal marrow CD3 cells in response to horse anti-lymphocyte and rabbit antithymocyte globulin.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, G; Podestá, M; Pitto, A; Pittaluga, G B; Isaza, A; Benvenuto, F; Bruno, B; Bacigalupo, A

    1998-04-01

    In vitro priming of T cell with horse antilymphocyte globulin (HALG) results in cytokine release, and this has been associated with its clinical efficacy in patients with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA). Rabbit antithymocyte globulin (RATG) has been studied less extensively. In this study we compare the in vitro priming effect of HALG and RATG on purified normal marrow T cells: end-points of the study were 1) levels of TNF-alpha (TNF-alpha), IFN-gamma (IFN-gamma) GM-CSF in T cell supernatants, and 2) effect of T cell supernatants on colony formation with or without exogenous GM-CSF TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and GM-CSF levels were comparable for HALG, RATG and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). T cell supernatants showed comparable enhancement of colony formation in the presence of recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF) and supported colony forming unit granulomacrophage (CFU-GM) growth in the absence of growth factor. This study shows that horse and rabbit derived ALG/ATG and PHA have a comparable in vitro priming effect on T cells: both agents should probably be tested for their clinical efficacy in SAA patients. PMID:9579877

  9. Influence of cytokine and cytokine receptor gene polymorphisms on the degree of liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Sara Tatiana; Silva, Giovanni Faria; de Moraes, Camila Fernanda Verdichio; Grotto, Rejane Maria Tomasini; de Moura Campos Pardini, Maria Inês; Bicalho, Maria da Graça; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis may be the result of repetitive injury to hepatocytes caused by HCV infection and the immune response to it. Cytokines regulate the inflammatory response to injury and modulate hepatic fibrogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in cytokine genes may influence the cytokine expression and secretion that may contribute to hepatic fibrogenesis in HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the genotype of 22 SNPs found in the genes of 13 cytokines/cytokine receptors to assess the influence of polymorphic variants on the stage of liver damage in Brazilian patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1 only. 141 unrelated patients were grouped according to their stage of fibrosis: absence of fibrosis or patients in the initial stages of fibrosis (F0-F2, n = 84), patients with advanced stages of fibrosis or cirrhosis (F3-F4, n = 57), without cirrhosis (F0-F3, n = 103), and with cirrhosis (F4, n = 38). The comparison of frequencies in each sub-sample was performed by 2 × 2 contingency tables using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Stepwise logistic regression was also used to assess independent associations between cirrhosis or fibrosis with polymorphic variants. The TNFA-308G:A genotype conferred increased risk of fibrosis and cirrhosis. The TNFA-238G:G genotype was associated with protection from cirrhosis. The IL10-819C:T genotype conferred protection from fibrosis and the IL1B-511C:T genotype conferred increased risk of cirrhosis. Some of these genotypes showed results on the borderline of statistical significance in the bivariate analysis. We conclude that gene variants of cytokines/receptors may influence liver damage in patients chronically infected by HCV genotype 1. PMID:27200267

  10. Influence of cytokine and cytokine receptor gene polymorphisms on the degree of liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Sara Tatiana; Silva, Giovanni Faria; de Moraes, Camila Fernanda Verdichio; Grotto, Rejane Maria Tomasini; de Moura Campos Pardini, Maria Inês; Bicalho, Maria da Graça; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic fibrosis may be the result of repetitive injury to hepatocytes caused by HCV infection and the immune response to it. Cytokines regulate the inflammatory response to injury and modulate hepatic fibrogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in cytokine genes may influence the cytokine expression and secretion that may contribute to hepatic fibrogenesis in HCV infection. The aim of this study was to determine the genotype of 22 SNPs found in the genes of 13 cytokines/cytokine receptors to assess the influence of polymorphic variants on the stage of liver damage in Brazilian patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1 only. 141 unrelated patients were grouped according to their stage of fibrosis: absence of fibrosis or patients in the initial stages of fibrosis (F0-F2, n = 84), patients with advanced stages of fibrosis or cirrhosis (F3-F4, n = 57), without cirrhosis (F0-F3, n = 103), and with cirrhosis (F4, n = 38). The comparison of frequencies in each sub-sample was performed by 2 × 2 contingency tables using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Stepwise logistic regression was also used to assess independent associations between cirrhosis or fibrosis with polymorphic variants. The TNFA-308G:A genotype conferred increased risk of fibrosis and cirrhosis. The TNFA-238G:G genotype was associated with protection from cirrhosis. The IL10-819C:T genotype conferred protection from fibrosis and the IL1B-511C:T genotype conferred increased risk of cirrhosis. Some of these genotypes showed results on the borderline of statistical significance in the bivariate analysis. We conclude that gene variants of cytokines/receptors may influence liver damage in patients chronically infected by HCV genotype 1. PMID:27200267

  11. [Association of TNF-alpha and IL-13 genes polymorphisms with bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenhua; Zhou, Zhaoshan; Ji, Zhongqiang; Wang, Yanqing; Xue, Weilin; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the association of polymorphisms of TNF-alpha gene (rs1799724, rs1800630, rs1799964 and rs769178) and IL-13 gene (rs2158177 and rs1295687) with susceptibility to asthma among ethnic Chinese in Qingdao region. METHODS For 400 asthma patients and 200 healthy subjects, above polymorphisms were detected with a SNaPshot method. RESULTS For rs2158177, the frequency of genotype of GG in the asthma group was significantly lower than the control group (2.8% vs. 5%, OR = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.12-0.82, P = 0.021). No significant difference was detected in the genotypic frequencies for the remaining 5 polymorphisms between the two groups (All P > 0.05). CONCLUSION The study has indicated that rs2158177 polymorphism of the IL-13 gene is associated with asthma in ethnic Han Chinese from Qingdao. No association has been found between polymorphisms of TNF-alpha gene with susceptibility to asthma. PMID:26418997

  12. DNA-binding activity of TNF-{alpha} inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, T. Suganuma, M.; Oka, K.; Fujiki, H.

    2007-11-03

    Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) inducing protein (Tip{alpha}) is a carcinogenic factor secreted from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), mediated through both enhanced expression of TNF-{alpha} and chemokine genes and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Since Tip{alpha} enters gastric cancer cells, the Tip{alpha} binding molecules in the cells should be investigated. The direct DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was observed by pull down assay using single- and double-stranded genomic DNA cellulose. The surface plasmon resonance assay, indicating an association between Tip{alpha} and DNA, revealed that the affinity of Tip{alpha} for (dGdC)10 is 2400 times stronger than that of del-Tip{alpha}, an inactive Tip{alpha}. This suggests a strong correlation between DNA-binding activity and carcinogenic activity of Tip{alpha}. And the DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was first demonstrated with a molecule secreted from H. pylori.

  13. Tat-APE1/ref-1 protein inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced endothelial cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yun Jeong; Lee, Ji Young; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Hyo Shin; Lee, Sang Ki; Lee, Kwon Ho; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2008-03-28

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/ref-1) is a multifunctional protein involved both in DNA base excision repair and redox regulation. In this study we evaluated the protective role of Tat-mediated APE1/ref-1 transduction on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-activated endothelial activation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. To construct Tat-APE1/ref-1 fusion protein, human full length of APE1/ref-1 was fused with Tat-protein transduction domain. Purified Tat-APE1/ref-1 fusion protein efficiently transduced cultured endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner and reached maximum expression at 1 h after incubation. Transduced Tat-APE1/ref-1 showed inhibitory activity on the TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in cultured endothelial cells. These results suggest Tat-APE1/ref-1 might be useful to reduce vascular endothelial activation or vascular inflammatory disorders.

  14. Acute effect of cigarette smoke on TNF-alpha release by macrophages mediated through the erk1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, Loutfig; Abboud, Raja T; Li, Hong; Duronio, Vincent

    2006-06-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of pulmonary emphysema. In this study, we investigated the acute effect of cigarette smoke in vitro on the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) using differentiated U937 cells, a macrophage model system. We found that stimulation of the macrophages with cigarette smoke media (CSM) leads to a rapid activation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (erk1/2), p90RSK and a transient decrease in phosphorylation of PKB/akt. The CSM also caused the subsequent induction of TNF-alpha release. Our studies revealed that U0126, an inhibitor of the erk1/2 pathway, markedly suppressed CSM-induced TNF-alpha release. Consistent with this finding, U0126 blocked CSM-stimulated erk1/2 phosphorylation, as well as phosphorylation of the downstream kinase, p90RSK. On the other hand, the PI3-K inhibitor, LY294002, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-specific inhibitor, AG1478, did not suppress the release of TNF-alpha. Thus, CSM induction of TNF-alpha production by differentiated macrophages is regulated primarily via the erk1/2 pathway. PMID:16777389

  15. [Systemic versus local therapy with recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (r-TNF-alpha) in patients with advanced tumors].

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H H; Pfizenmaier, K; Schröder, M; Nagel, G A

    1989-06-01

    44 patients with different advanced malignant tumors were treated with recombinant Tumor-necrosis factor alpha (rTNF-alpha) in two Phase-I trials. 30 patients received rTNF-alpha 3 x/week intramuscular in doses between 25-300 mcg. 14 patients were treated intra/peritumoral with rTNF-alpha in the same dose range. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) was 150 mcg/m2 for both ways of application. The duration of therapy was 1-26 weeks for systemic application and 2-20 weeks for local treatment. 25 patients treated systemically were evaluable for response. In 2 patients a minor response (MR) and in 9 patients stable disease was observed. 5/14 patients receiving rTNF-alpha locally showed a significant tumor regression (3 PR, 2 MR). Main side effects were dose dependent fever, chills, anorexia and nausea. In doses greater than 50mcg/m2 a decrease of blood pressure according to WHO III was noted. Hematologic toxicity included a transient decrease of leucocytes and platelets without indicating a cumulative hematologic toxicity. There were no further organ toxicities. The experience from both phase-I trials indicate a definite antitumoral activity of rTNF-alpha suggesting that locoregional treatment might be superior to systemic application. The side effects observed might be a limitation for larger clinical trials. PMID:2668836

  16. TNF{alpha} acting on TNFR1 promotes breast cancer growth via p42/P44 MAPK, JNK, Akt and NF-{kappa}B-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, Martin A.; Carnevale, Romina P.; Proietti, Cecilia J.; Rosemblit, Cinthia; Beguelin, Wendy; Salatino, Mariana; Charreau, Eduardo H.; Frahm, Isabel; Sapia, Sandra; Brouckaert, Peter; Elizalde, Patricia V.; Schillaci, Roxana

    2008-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha}) enhances proliferation of chemically-induced mammary tumors and of T47D human cell line through not fully understood pathways. Here, we explored the intracellular signaling pathways triggered by TNF{alpha}, the participation of TNF{alpha} receptor (TNFR) 1 and TNFR2 and the molecular mechanism leading to breast cancer growth. We demonstrate that TNF{alpha} induced proliferation of C4HD murine mammary tumor cells and of T47D cells through the activation of p42/p44 MAPK, JNK, PI3-K/Akt pathways and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) transcriptional activation. A TNF{alpha}-specific mutein selectively binding to TNFR1 induced p42/p44 MAPK, JNK, Akt activation, NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activation and cell proliferation, just like wild-type TNF{alpha}, while a mutein selective for TNFR2 induced only p42/p44 MAPK activation. Interestingly, blockage of TNFR1 or TNFR2 with specific antibodies was enough to impair TNF{alpha} signaling and biological effect. Moreover, in vivo TNF{alpha} administration supported C4HD tumor growth. We also demonstrated, for the first time, that injection of a selective inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activity, Bay 11-7082, resulted in regression of TNF{alpha}-promoted tumor. Bay 11-7082 blocked TNF{alpha} capacity to induce cell proliferation and up-regulation of cyclin D1 and of Bcl-x{sub L}in vivo and in vitro. Our results reveal evidence for TNF{alpha} as a breast tumor promoter, and provide novel data for a future therapeutic approach using TNF{alpha} antagonists and NF-{kappa}B pharmacological inhibitors in established breast cancer treatment.

  17. Hepatic expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M J; Lau, J Y; Williams, R; Vergani, D

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To determine the hepatic expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. METHODS--Frozen liver biopsy sections from 19 patients with chronic HBV infection were studied, 12 of whom were HBeAg positive and 10 serum HBV DNA positive. Hepatic expression of TNF alpha was determined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS--Only infiltrating mononuclear cells showed immunoreactive staining for TNF alpha (median 2, range 0-3; n = 19) which appeared as diffuse positive staining material in the cytoplasm. Patients with active liver disease, assessed histologically and biochemically, had a higher level of expression, both in the number of TNF alpha positive cells and the proportion of TNF alpha positive infiltrating mononuclear cells. There was no correlation between the expression of TNF alpha and serological parameters of viral infection (HBeAg and HBV DNA status and HBV DNA concentrations). CONCLUSION--Hepatic expression of TNF alpha is increased in chronic HBV infection and is related to the activity of liver disease and not to the level of HBV replication. Images PMID:7876386

  18. Comparative Analysis of Liver Injury-Associated Cytokines in Acute Hepatitis A and B

    PubMed Central

    Shin, So Youn; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Sung, Pil Soo; Lee, Jino; Kim, Hyung Joon; Lee, Hyun Woong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acute hepatitis A (AHA) and acute hepatitis B (AHB) are caused by an acute infection of the hepatitis A virus and the hepatitis B virus, respectively. In both AHA and AHB, liver injury is known to be mediated by immune cells and cytokines. In this study, we measured serum levels of various cytokines and T-cell cytotoxic proteins in patients with AHA or AHB to identify liver injury-associated cytokines. Materials and Methods Forty-six patients with AHA, 16 patients with AHB, and 14 healthy adults were enrolled in the study. Serum levels of 17 cytokines and T-cell cytotoxic proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or cytometric bead arrays and analyzed for correlation with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Results Interleukin (IL)-18, IL-8, CXCL9, and CXCL10 were significantly elevated in both AHA and AHB. IL-6, IL-22, granzyme B, and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) were elevated in AHA but not in AHB. In both AHA and AHB, the serum level of CXCL10 significantly correlated with the peak ALT level. Additionally, the serum level of granzyme B in AHA and the serum level of sFasL in AHB correlated with the peak ALT level. Conclusion We identified cytokines and T-cell cytotoxic proteins associated with liver injury in AHA and AHB. These findings deepen the existing understanding of immunological mechanisms responsible for liver injury in acute viral hepatitis. PMID:26996565

  19. Gene silencing of TNF-alpha in a murine model of acute colitis using a modified cyclodextrin delivery system.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J; O'Neill, M J; Bourre, L; Walsh, D; Quinlan, A; Hurley, G; Ogier, J; Shanahan, F; Melgar, S; Darcy, R; O'Driscoll, C M

    2013-05-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The cytokine TNF-alpha (TNF-α) plays a pivotal role in mediating this inflammatory response. RNA interference (RNAi) holds great promise for the specific and selective silencing of aberrantly expressed genes, such as TNF-α in IBD. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of an amphiphilic cationic cyclodextrin (CD) vector for effective TNF-α siRNA delivery to macrophage cells and to mice with induced acute-colitis. The stability of CD.siRNA was examined by gel electrophoresis in biorelevant media reflecting colonic fluids. RAW264.7 cells were transfected with CD.TNF-α siRNA, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TNF-α and IL-6 responses were measured by PCR and ELISA. Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) and treated by intrarectal administration with either CD.siRNA TNF-α or a control solution. In vitro, siRNA in CD nanocomplexes remained intact and stable in both fed and fasted simulated colonic fluids. RAW264.7 cells transfected with CD.TNF-α siRNA and stimulated with LPS displayed a significant reduction in both gene and protein levels of TNF-α and IL-6. CD.TNF-α siRNA-treated mice revealed a mild amelioration in clinical signs of colitis, but significant reductions in total colon weight and colonic mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-6 compared to DSS-control mice were detected. This data indicates the clinical potential of a local CD-based TNF-α siRNA delivery system for the treatment of IBD. PMID:23500058

  20. Direct hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells induced by valproic acid and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Zhou, Qing-Jun; Pan, Ruo-Lang; Chen, Ye; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a protocol for direct hepatic lineage differentiation from early developmental progenitors to a population of mature hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatic progenitor cells and then mature hepatocytes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were obtained in a sequential manner, induced by valproic acid (VPA) and cytokines (hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and insulin). Morphological changes of the differentiated cells were examined by phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analyses were used to evaluate the gene expression profiles of the VPA-induced hepatic progenitors and the hepatic progenitor-derived hepatocytes. Glycogen storage, cytochrome P450 activity, transplantation assay, differentiation of bile duct-like structures and tumorigenic analyses were performed for the functional identification of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, FACS and electron microscopy were used for the analyses of cell cycle profile and apoptosis in VPA-induced hepatic differentiated cells. RESULTS: Based on the combination of VPA and cytokines, mouse ES cells differentiated into a uniform and homogeneous cell population of hepatic progenitor cells and then matured into functional hepatocytes. The progenitor population shared several characteristics with ES cells and hepatic stem/progenitor cells, and represented a novel progenitor cell between ES and hepatic oval cells in embryonic development. The differentiated hepatocytes from progenitor cells shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including the patterns of gene expression, immunological markers, in vitro hepatocyte functions and in vivo capacity to restore acute-damaged liver function. In addition, the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells from ES cells was accompanied by significant cell cycle arrest and selective survival of differentiating cells towards hepatic lineages. CONCLUSION: Hepatic cells

  1. Intracellular production of IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha by peripheral blood CD3+ and CD4+ T cells in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Machura, Edyta; Mazur, Bogdan; Kwiecień, Jarosław; Karczewska, Krystyna

    2007-08-01

    The role of the type-2 T helper (Th2) cell-mediated immune response in the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) is well documented. Whether polarized immunoresponse is confined to antigen-specific T cells or is distributed among all T cell subsets is still controversial. We investigated frequencies of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) producing CD3(+) and CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood from children with atopic dermatitis and healthy subjects with and without in vitro stimulation. Children with severe AD had a significantly lower percentage of CD4(+) T cells spontaneously expressing IL-4 compared with healthy controls (p <0.01). Polyclonal stimulation significantly increased cytokine production in both AD patients and healthy individuals. Frequencies of CD3(+) and CD4(+) producing IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha after in vitro stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) + ionomycin were comparable in the AD and control groups. In response to PMA/ionomycin, children with AD and asthma symptoms had a significantly lower percentage of CD3(+) T cells producing TNF-alpha. We failed to demonstrate evidence of an imbalance with respect to type-2 cytokine productions in children with AD. Comparable induction of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in polyclonally stimulated peripheral CD3(+) and CD4(+)T cells from AD patients and controls puts into question the polarized Th2 immune response as a general characteristic of T cells in children with atopic dermatitis. PMID:17120040

  2. [THE ROLE OF CYTOKINES AND CHEMOKINES IN LABORATORY DIAGNOSTIC OF CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS C].

    PubMed

    Semenov, A V; Arsentieva, N A; Lubimova, N E; Tulienev, S V; Basina, V V; Esaulenko, E V; Totolyan, A A

    2015-08-01

    The chronic viral hepatitis C is widely prevalent disease with prolonged persistence of virus and obliterated clinical picture. The present techniques of diagnostic of degree of fibrosis of liver and prognosis of course of disease have particular shortcomings. Hence, search of safe low invasive methods based on blood biomarkers is an actual task. The cytokines/chemokines (mediators of chronic inflammation) directly involved into immunopathogenesis of chronic viral hepatitis C can act in the capacity of biomarkers. The study was carried out to comprehensively analyze content of cytokines/chemokines in peripheral blood of patients with chronic viral hepatitis C at various stages of disease and infected by different genotypes of virus of hepatitis C. The concentration of cytokines/chemokines was identified in blood plasma of patients with chronic viral hepatitis C (n = 73) and conditionally healthy donors (n =3 7): IFNα, IFNγ, IFNλ/IL28α, TNFα, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-lα, CCL4/MIP-lβ, CCL5/RANTES, CCL8/MCP-2, CCL20/AIP-3α, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/P-10, CXCLII/ITAC. The multiplex analysis using technology xMAP was applied. The increasing of level of TNFα, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL4/ MIP-l, CCL8/ACP-2, CCL20/MIP-3α, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-10, CXCL11/ITA C was established in blood plasma of patients with chronic viral hepatitis C as compared with control group. The levels of analyzed interferons IFNα, IFNγ, IFNλ/IL28α had no difference in studied groups. As far as chronic viral hepatitis C progresses and fibrosis of hepatic tissue develops the concentrations of TNFα, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL20/MIP-3α, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-l0, CXCL11/ITAC increased significantly. The concentrations of chemokine CXCL11/IT4 C can be used as informative indicator for differentiating diagnostic of early stages of liver fibrosis. Depending on genotype of virus of hepatitis C, in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C change in content of CCL8/MCP-2 was established. Hence, detection in blood plasma of

  3. [How to optimize the antiTNF alpha therapy in spondylitis?].

    PubMed

    Castro Villegas, Maria del Carmen; Escudero Contreras, Alejandro; Miranda García, Maria Dolores; Collantes Estévez, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    TNFalpha inhibitors have been a major advance in the treatment of spondyloarthropathies, having demonstrated their safety and efficacy, with higher response and survival rates than those observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The fact that disease modifying anti-arthritic drugs (DMARD) have shown utility in the treatment of this disease, especially in the axial forms, gives them greater importance, since it is known that up to 30%of patients do not respond to treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, we must take into account that these drugs are expensive and not without side effects, so it is necessary to optimize their use. We intend to review the use of antiTNF alpha in spondyloarthropathies and review the available evidence on strategies that can help with their rational use. PMID:22418285

  4. Mountain grown ginseng induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells and its mechanism have little relation with TNF-alpha production.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Choi, In-Young; An, Hyo-Jin; Moon, Phil-Dong; Kim, Seong-Jin; Jee, Seon-Young; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon; Shin, Soon-Shik; Yang, Deok-Chun; Seo, Yong-Suk; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2007-01-01

    The root of ginseng is one of the most popular natural tonics in Oriental countries. Ginseng grown in the wild, deep in the mountains, is known as Sansam (mountain grown ginseng, MGG). MGG belongs to Araliaceae and Panax. In this study, we investigated the effects of MGG on the cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis and the putative pathways of its actions in human promyelocytic leukemia cells, HL-60. Using apoptosis analysis, we found that MGG is a potent inducer of apoptosis, but it has less effect on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Caspase-3 activation and subsequent apoptotic cell death in MGG-treated cells were partially blocked by the caspase-3 inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK. MGG also inhibited the caspase-8 activity. To determine whether MGG-induced apoptosis is involved in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion, TNF-alpha secretion was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Unexpectedly, MGG significantly decreased the TNF-alpha secretion compared to the control. These results suggest that MGG-induced cytotoxicity have little relation with the secretion of TNF-alpha in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, MGG with rIFN-gamma synergistically increased nitric oxide (NO) production in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, our data indicate that MGG is a potent inducer of apoptosis on HL-60 cells and these abilities could be used clinically for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17265560

  5. Cinnamon extract attenuates TNF-alpha-induced intestinal lipoprotein ApoB48 overproduction by regulating inflammatory, insulin, and lipoprotein pathways in enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated whether a water extract of cinnamon (CE = Cinnulin PF®) attenuates the dyslipidemia induced by TNF-alpha in Triton WR-1339-treated hamsters, and whether CE inhibited the over-secretion of apoB48-induced by TNF-alpha in enterocytes in a 35S-labelling study. In vivo, oral treatment with C...

  6. TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial alterations in human T cells requires FADD and caspase-8 activation but not RIP and caspase-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Sung, Bokyung; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-09-15

    Although much is known about how TNF-alpha induces apoptosis in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, little is known about how it induces apoptosis without these inhibitors. In this report we investigated temporal sequence of events induced by TNF-alpha in the absence of protein synthesis. Regardless of whether we measured the effects by plasma membrane phosphotidylserine accumulation, by DNA strand breaks, or activation of caspases, significant changes were observed only between 12-24 h of TNF-alpha treatment. One of the earliest changes observed after TNF-alpha treatment was mitochondrial swelling at 10 min; followed by cytochrome c and Smac release at 10-30 min, and then heterochromatin clumping occurred at 60 min. While genetic deletion of receptor-interaction protein (RIP) had no effect on TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial damage, deletion of Fas-associated death domain (FADD) abolished the TNF-induced mitochondrial swelling. Since pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk abolished the TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial changes, z-DEVD-fmk, an inhibitor of caspase-3 had no effect, suggesting that TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial changes or cytochrome c and Smac release requires caspase-8 but not caspase-3 activation. Overall, our results indicated that mitochondrial changes are early events in TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis and that these mitochondrial changes require recruitment of FADD and caspase-8 activation, but not caspase-3 activation or RIP recruitment. PMID:20136500

  7. Differential effects of ginsenosides on NO and TNF-alpha production by LPS-activated N9 microglia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun Fu; Bi, Xiu Li; Yang, Jing Yu; Zhan, Jia Yang; Dong, Ying Xu; Wang, Jin Hui; Wang, Ji Ming; Zhang, Ruiwen; Li, Xian

    2007-03-01

    Ginsenosides, the main active components of ginseng, have been reported to exert neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system. In this report, the effects of ginsenoside-Rd and -Rb2, two protopanaxadiols, and ginsenoside-Rg1 and -Re, two protopanaxatriols, on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-alpha (TNF-alpha) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated N9 microglial cells were studied. All ginsenosides studied potently suppressed TNF-alpha production in LPS-activated N9 cells. Ginsenoside-Rg1 and -Re, but not ginsenoside-Rb2 and -Rd, inhibited the production of NO in LPS-activated N9 cells. Ginsenosides inhibited the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), c-Jun and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), The findings herein show that the inhibition of LPS-induced ERK1/2 and JNK activation may be a contributing factor to the main mechanisms by which ginsenosides inhibits RAW264.7. To clarify the mechanistic basis for its ability to inhibit TNF-alpha and NO induction, the effect of ginsenosides on transcription factor NF-kappaB protein level was also examined. These activities were associated with the down-regulation of inhibitor kappaB (IkappaB). These findings suggest that the inhibition of LPS-induced NO formation and TNF-alpha production in microglia by ginsenosides is due to its inhibition of NF-kappaB, which may be the mechanistic basis for the anti-inflammatory effects of ginsenosides. The significant suppressive effects of ginsenosides on proinflammatory responses of microglia implicate their therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative diseases accompanied by microglial activation. PMID:17276889

  8. Use of serum levels of proinflammatory cytokine IL-1α in chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Vanis, Nenad; Mehmedović, Amila; Mesihović, Rusmir

    2015-03-01

    Immunoregulatory cytokines influence the persistence of hepatitis C virus chronic infection and the extent of liver damage. Interleukin-1 plays an important role in the inflammatory process. Some studies have demonstrated that IL-1 production was impaired in patients with chronic infections of hepatitis C virus, implying that IL-1 may play a role in viral clearance. In this study, along with routine laboratory tests, has been performed the analysis of serum levels of proinflammatory cytokine IL-1α in order of better understanding and monitoring of chronic hepatitis C. The aim of study was to analyze the usefulness of laboratory tests, which are routinely used in the assessment of liver disease with specified immunological parameters, in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Total of 60 subjects were divided into two groups: HCV-PCR positive and negative group. The control group of 30 healthy participans was included. Apart from standard laboratory tests, the analysis included serum levels of cytokine IL-1α. IL-1α had the highest mean concentration in group of viral hepatitis C, with PCR positive test (5.73 pg/mL), and then in of chronic viral hepatitis C, PCR negative test (5.39 pg/mL). ANOVA test proves that IL-1α in the healthy group was different from other groups as follows: in relation to HCV-RNA-PCR positive patients statistical significance level was p < 0.001 (F = 32,755); in relation to HCV-RNA-PCR negative was also statistically significant at p < 0.001 (F = 182,361); Cytokine IL-1 was statistically analyzed separately and compared by group 1 and 2 using Student t-test for independent samples. Statistical significance was observed at p = 0.026. IL-1α was positively correlated with the duration of the illness (p < 0.01) and with serum ALT activity (p < 0.01) and serum AST activity (p < 0.01). Using multivariate analysis model "Factor Analysis", was made significant stratification predic- tive parameters in relation to the cytokine IL-1α, stratified

  9. Immunologic changes in TNF-alpha, sE-selectin, sP-selectin, sICAM-1, and IL-8 in pediatric patients treated for psoriasis with the Goeckerman regimen

    SciTech Connect

    Borska, L.; Fiala, Z.; Krejsek, J.; Andrys, C.; Vokurkova, D.; Hamakova, K.; Kremlacek, J.; Ettler, K.

    2007-11-15

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease which is often manifested during childhood. The present study investigated changes in the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and soluble forms of adhesion molecules in children with psoriasis. The observed patient group of 26 children was treated with the Goeckerman regimen. This therapy combines dermal application of crude coal tar with ultraviolet radiation. The Psoriasis Area Severity Index decreased significantly after treatment by with the Goeckerman regimen (p < 0.001). Serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and adhesion molecules sICAM-1, sP-selectin and sE-selectin decreased after the Goeckerman regimen. The TNF-alpha and sICAM-1 decreased significantly (p < 0.05). Our findings support the complex role of these immune parameters in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis in children. The serum level of IL-8 increased after the Goeckerman regimen. This fact indicates that the chemokine pathway of IL-8 activity could be modulated by this treatment, most likely by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  10. CEL-I, an invertebrate N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin, induces TNF-alpha and G-CSF production by mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2007-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that CEL-I, an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific C-type lectin purified from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata (Holothuroidea) showed potent cytotoxicity to several cell lines such as HeLa, MDCK and XC cells. In this study, we found that CEL-I induced increased secretion of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF) by mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas this cell line was highly resistant to CEL-I cytotoxicity. The cytokine-inducing activity of CEL-I was stronger than that of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA-L). A binding study using FITC-labelled CEL-I (F-CEL-I) indicated that the amount of bound F-CEL-I on RAW264.7 cells was greater than that of F-PHA-L, suggesting that the greater activity of CEL-I to induce cytokine secretion by RAW264.7 cells is partly due to the higher binding ability. Since the cell binding and cytokine-inducing activity of CEL-I were partly but significantly inhibited by the specific sugar (GalNAc), it is considered that the binding of CEL-I to cell-surface-specific saccharide moieties, which may be recognized by CEL-I with higher affinity than GalNAc, is essential for the induction of cytokine secretion. The secretion of TNF-alpha and G-CSF from CEL-I-treated RAW264.7 cells were almost completely prevented by brefeldin A (BFA), whereas increase in mRNA levels of these cytokines were not affected by BFA. Bio-Plex beads assay suggested that temporal increase in phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase occurred at relatively early time following CEL-I treatment. Furthermore, the secretion of TNF-alpha and G-CSF were inhibited by specific inhibitors for these MAP kinases. These results suggest that the intracellular signal transduction through the activation of MAP kinase system is involved in CEL-I-induced cytokine secretion. PMID:17846063

  11. Skin manifestations induced by TNF-alpha inhibitors in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pontikaki, Irene; Shahi, Edit; Frasin, Lucretia Adina; Gianotti, Raffaele; Gelmetti, Carlo; Gerloni, Valeria; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2012-04-01

    The tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitors have been used with good clinical results in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Anti TNFα therapy is generally well tolerated. Besides the site injection reactions, other various cutaneous manifestations have been encountered as adverse events. Here, we report four young patients receiving treatment with anti-TNFα (infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept) for JIA developing different skin manifestations more than 1 year after the initiation of therapy. They underwent a dermatological exam. All four patients were ACR-Ped 30 responders to anti-TNF drugs. The first patient developed cutaneous vasculitis, the second one had lichen planus manifestations, while the third and the fourth developed psoriatic palmoplantar pustulosis accompanied by plaque-type psoriasis localized to the scalp. None of the patients had a personal or family history of dermatological diseases. In the first two patients, skin lesions healed with topical treatment after the discontinuation of anti-TNF agent, while psoriatic lesions did not resolve despite discontinuation of the drug and dermatological treatment. TNF inhibition can be both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory. Cutaneous manifestations could be considered as a paradoxical adverse event of the anti-TNF-alpha treatment not only in rheumatoid arthritis but also in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:21403999

  12. Recombinant production of bioactive human TNF-alpha by SUMO-fusion system--high yields from shake-flask culture.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas; Müller, Mathias Q; Gloser, Manja; Sinz, Andrea; Rudolph, Rainer; Pfeifer, Sven

    2010-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) inhibitors, used for the treatment of common inflammatory diseases, currently belong among the most important biotechnologically produced pharmaceuticals. So far four TNF-alpha antagonists have been approved by regulatory authorities for defined subsets of applications. Furthermore, numerous approaches are being taken to develop new protein-based pharmaceuticals and to broaden their application areas in the treatment of TNF-alpha -related diseases. Both the fundamental understanding of disease-related TNF-alpha activity and the subsequent development of corresponding drug candidates demand the availability of large amounts of TNF-alpha as a bioactive protein. We have therefore established a protocol for the rapid high-level synthesis of recombinant human TNF-alpha in Escherichia coli shake-flask cultures and the subsequent purification of the mature protein. Using the advantages of SUMO-fusion technology we were able to produce protein with an authentic N-terminus in high yield. Two immobilized metal ion-affinity chromatography steps with a protease cleavage step in between and subsequent size-exclusion chromatography were utilized to purify the protein. The protein was obtained from the last chromatography step as a trimer, while purity was at least 96% as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The identity of the protein was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Recombinant mature TNF-alpha was correctly folded as assessed by CD spectroscopy and its biological activity was confirmed by an L929 cell assay. PMID:20363332

  13. Human eosinophils can express the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, J J; Matossian, K; Resnick, M B; Beil, W J; Wong, D T; Gordon, J R; Dvorak, A M; Weller, P F; Galli, S J

    1993-01-01

    By in situ hybridization, 44-100% of the blood eosinophils from five patients with hypereosinophilia and four normal subjects exhibited intense hybridization signals for TNF-alpha mRNA. TNF-alpha protein was detectable by immunohistochemistry in blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic subjects, and purified blood eosinophils from three atopic donors exhibited cycloheximide-inhibitable spontaneous release of TNF-alpha in vitro. Many blood eosinophils (39-91%) from hypereosinophilic donors exhibited intense labeling for macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) mRNA, whereas eosinophils of normal donors demonstrated only weak or undetectable hybridization signals for MIP-1 alpha mRNA. Most tissue eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps were strongly positive for both TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. By Northern blot analysis, highly enriched blood eosinophils from a patient with the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome exhibited differential expression of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. These findings indicate that human eosinophils represent a potential source of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha, that levels of expression of mRNA for both cytokines are high in the blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic donors and in eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps, that the eosinophils of normal subjects express higher levels of TNF-alpha than MIP-1 alpha mRNA, and that eosinophils purified from the blood of atopic donors can release TNF-alpha in vitro. Images PMID:8514874

  14. Relative abundance and patterns of correlation among six cytokines in pleural fluid measured by cytometric bead array.

    PubMed

    Aoe, Keisuke; Hiraki, Akio; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Kazuo; Makihata, Kiyoshi; Takao, Kazushi; Eda, Ryosuke; Maeda, Tadashi; Sugi, Kazuro; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Takeyama, Hiroyasu

    2003-08-01

    Several cytokines play significant roles in the development and pathogenesis of pleural effusion. Little is known, however, about possible interactions between individual cytokines in terms of regulation of their relative abundance in the effusion. We studied 93 patients presenting with pleural effusion to the National Sanyo Hospital (68 men and 25 women; mean age, 64 years). Twenty-two patients had tuberculous pleurisy, 40 had malignant pleuritis, and 31 had effusions due to an etiology other than tuberculosis or cancer (miscellaneous). Pleural fluid concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and INF-gamma were simultaneously measured by cytometric bead array (CBA). The ratios of IL-4/IL-5, IL-4/TNF-alpha, IL-2/TNF-alpha, and IL-10/TNF-alpha were lower in patients with tuberculosis pleurisy compared with other patients. In all three groups of patients significant correlation was seen between abundance of IL-2 vs. IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, or TNF-alpha, between IL-4 vs. IL-10, and between TNF-alpha vs. INF-gamma. In malignant pleural fluid patients, the significant correlation was between IL-2 vs. IL-4, TNF-alpha, or INF-gamma, between IL-4 vs. INF-gamma, and between TNF-alpha vs. INF-gamma. In tuberculosis pleural fluid patients, the significant correlation was between IL-2 vs. TNF-alpha, between IL-4 vs. IL-10, and between TNF-alpha vs. INF-gamma. In miscellaneous pleural fluid patients, the significant correlation was between IL-2 vs. IL-4, IL-10, or TNF-alpha, between IL-4 vs. IL-10, TNF-alpha, and between IL-10 vs. TNF-alpha. No significant correlation was observed between other pairs of cytokines. Strong correlation in abundance between particular cytokines in pleural fluids suggests cross-talk between them, in terms that an altered level of one of them provides a feedback mechanism regulating synthesis and/or secretion of another one. Such interactions may play important roles in pathogenesis and severity of the effusion. The CBA methodology provides a

  15. TNF-{alpha} promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin; Yao, Jin

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-{alpha} promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-{alpha} promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  16. Monocyte/macrophage androgen receptor suppresses cutaneous wound healing in mice by enhancing local TNF-alpha expression.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chuang, Kuang-Hsiang; Chang, Philip; Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Wen-Jye; Chang, Chawnshang

    2009-12-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal more slowly in elderly males than in elderly females, suggesting a role for sex hormones in the healing process. Indeed, androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been shown to inhibit cutaneous wound healing. AR is expressed in several cell types in healing skin, including keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, and infiltrating macrophages, but the exact role of androgen/AR signaling in these different cell types remains unclear. To address this question, we generated and studied cutaneous wound healing in cell-specific AR knockout (ARKO) mice. General and myeloid-specific ARKO mice exhibited accelerated wound healing compared with WT mice, whereas keratinocyte- and fibroblast-specific ARKO mice did not. Importantly, the rate of wound healing in the general ARKO mice was dependent on AR and not serum androgen levels. Interestingly, although dispensable for wound closure, keratinocyte AR promoted re-epithelialization, while fibroblast AR suppressed it. Further analysis indicated that AR suppressed wound healing by enhancing the inflammatory response through a localized increase in TNF-alpha expression. Furthermore, AR enhanced local TNF-alpha expression via multiple mechanisms, including increasing the inflammatory monocyte population, enhancing monocyte chemotaxis by upregulating CCR2 expression, and enhancing TNF-alpha expression in macrophages. Finally, targeting AR by topical application of a compound (ASC-J9) that degrades AR protein resulted in accelerated healing, suggesting a potential new therapeutic approach that may lead to better treatment of wound healing. PMID:19907077

  17. CTLA-4 +49 and TNF-alpha-308 gene polymorphisms in celiac patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Licul, Vanja; Cizmarević, Nada Starcević; Ristić, Smiljana; Mikolasević, Ivana; Mijandrusić, Brankica Sincić

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a life-long gluten sensitive autoimmune disease of the small intestine affecting genetically susceptible individuals. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype contributes to the genetic risk for CD, but "non-HLA" genes also play a role. Clinical presentation could be classical, but majority of patients present with non-classical, atypical signs and symptoms. Endocrine and/or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EXPI) is common in celiac patients. The aim of our study was to assess EXPI among our CD patients by measurement of faecal pancreatic elastase (FE1) and to find potential association of CTLA-4 +49 and TNF-alpha-308 gene polymorphism and EXPI. Eighty three patients entered the study. Tissue transglutaminase antibodies (anti-TTG), faecal elastase-1 (FE1) assays and genotyping for the CTLA-4 +49A/G and TNF-alpha308 were performed. Of 83 patients with CD EXPI had 13 (15.6 %). There was no statistically significant difference in frequency of polymorphisms for both genes (CTL-4 +49 i TNF-alpha-308) in the group with and without EXPI. In conclusion, EXPI is common in symptomatic CD patients, but further genetic studies with larger number of patients are needed. PMID:24611333

  18. Altered TNF-Alpha, Glucose, Insulin and Amino Acids in Islets Langerhans Cultured in a Microgravity Model System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of a microgravity model system upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-1 17,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS, 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS. TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity model system (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  19. Simulated Microgravity Reduces TNF-Alpha Activity, Suppresses Glucose Uptake and Enhances Arginine Flux in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of microgravity upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF - alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-117,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity paradigm (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV paradigm. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  20. Direct bone formation during distraction osteogenesis does not require TNF alpha receptors and elevated serum TNF alpha fails to inhibit bone formation in TNFR1 deficient mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a process which induces direct new bone formation as a result of mechanical distraction. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a cytokine that can modulate osteoblastogenesis. The direct effects of TNF on direct bone formation in rodents are hypothetically mediated th...

  1. Modulation of cytokine release from colonic explants by bacterial antigens in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Dionne, S; Laberge, S; Deslandres, C; Seidman, E G

    2003-07-01

    The intestinal flora play an important role in experimental colitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using colonic explant cultures from 132 IBD and control subjects, we examined tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) production in vitro in response to bacterial activators. Unstimulated TNF-alpha release was increased significantly in rectal biopsies from involved IBD tissue, correlating with inflammation severity. Whereas lipopolysaccharide (LPS) only moderately stimulated TNF-alpha production from inflamed tissue, pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced its release in all groups, with a stronger response in involved IBD tissue. Superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) had a similar, but weaker effect. SEB was observed to be the strongest inducer of TNF-alpha for all groups, again with a more marked response in inflamed tissue. Stimulated release of IL-1 was considerably less than for TNF-alpha. The superantigens' superior potency over LPS was not as marked for IL-1 as it was for TNF-alpha. In addition to IL-1, IL-1RA release was also triggered by the bacterial products. The net effect of activation on the IL-1RA/IL-1 ratio was relatively modest. Release of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1, as well as that of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1RA was increased by incubation of colonic tissue with bacterial factors. TNF-alpha production and release was increased significantly in involved colonic explants from IBD. SEB was even capable of inducing TNF-alpha release from uninvolved colonic tissue. PMID:12823284

  2. Stability study of full-length antibody (anti-TNF alpha) loaded PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Marquette, S; Peerboom, C; Yates, A; Denis, L; Langer, I; Amighi, K; Goole, J

    2014-08-15

    Antibodies (Abs) require the development of stable formulations and specific delivery strategies given their susceptibility to a variety of physical and chemical degradation pathways. In this study, the encapsulation of an antibody into polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) based microspheres was explored to obtain a controlled-release of the incorporated drug. In order to avoid stability issues, a solid-in-oil-in-water (s/o/w) method was preferred. The solid phase was made of anti-TNF alpha monoclonal antibody (MAb) spray-dried microparticles, and the PLGA microspheres were produced using two different polymers (i.e., Resomer(®) RG505 and Resomer(®) RG755S). The stability of the MAb incorporated into the microspheres was investigated under three conditions (5 ± 3°C, 25 ± 2°C/60% RH and 40 ± 2°C/75% RH) for 12 weeks. During this stability study, it was demonstrated that the MAb loaded PLGA microspheres were stable when stored at 5 ± 3°C and that the Resomer(®) RG755S, composed of 75%(w/w) lactic acid as PLGA, was preferred to preserve the stability of the system. Storage at temperatures higher than 5°C led to antibody stability issues such as aggregation, fragmentation and loss of activity. The release profiles were also altered. Physical ageing of the system associated with changes in the glass transition temperature and enthalpy of relaxation was noticed during the storage of the MAb loaded PLGA microspheres. PMID:24792974

  3. In vitro protective effects of two extracts from bergamot peels on human endothelial cells exposed to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha).

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Domenico; Cimino, Francesco; Cristani, Mariateresa; Mandalari, Giuseppina; Saija, Antonella; Ginestra, Giovanna; Speciale, Antonio; Chirafisi, Joselita; Bisignano, Giuseppe; Waldron, Keith; Narbad, Arjan; Faulds, Craig B

    2010-07-28

    Bergamot ( Citrus bergamia Risso) is a less commercialized Citrus fruit, mainly used for its essential oil extracted from the peel. Bergamot peel (BP) represents about 60% of the processed fruits and is regarded as primary waste. However, it contains good amounts of useful compounds, such as pectins and flavonoids. Many of the bioactivities of Citrus flavonoids appear to impact vascular endothelial cells. Herein, we report the protective effect of two flavonoid-rich extracts from BP (endowed with radical-scavenging properties and lacking genotoxic activity) against alterations in cell modifications induced by the pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), as demonstrated by monitoring intracellular levels of malondialdehyde/4-hydroxynonenal, reduced and oxidized glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity, and the activation status of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Thus, BP appears to be a potential source of natural antioxidant/anti-inflammatory phytocomplexes to be employed as ingredients of nutraceutical products or functional foods. PMID:20578719

  4. Moraxella catarrhalis lipooligosaccharide selectively upregulates ICAM-1 expression on human monocytes and stimulates adjacent naïve monocytes to produce TNF-alpha through cellular cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hang; Gu, Xin-Xing

    2008-07-01

    To elucidate the role of Moraxella catarrhalis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in otitis media with effusion (OME), the effects of LOS on adhesion antigens of human monocytes were investigated. M. catarrhalis LOS selectively enhanced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 or CD54) expression on human monocytes by significantly increasing both the surface expression intensity and the percentage of ICAM-1(+) cells. ICAM-1 upregulation on human monocytes by the LOS required surface CD14, TLR4, NF-kappaB p65 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. Our study also revealed that the LOS-induced surface ICAM-1 expression was partially mediated through a TNF-alpha dependent autocrine mechanism and could be further augmented by lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in serum. In addition, M. catarrhalis LOS also stimulated human monocytes to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines in both TLR4- and CD14-dependent pathways. Our results also indicated that enhanced surface ICAM-1 expression on monocytes may hinder their adherence to the lung epithelial monolayer. Furthermore, the LOS-activated human monocytes secreted a significantly high level of IL-8, and could stimulate adjacent naïve monocytes to produce TNF-alpha which was partially mediated via membrane ICAM-1 and IL-8/IL-8RA. These results suggest that M. catarrhalis LOS could induce excessive middle ear inflammation through a cellular cross-talk mechanism during OME. PMID:18363879

  5. Induction of TNF-alpha production from human peripheral blood monocytes with beta-1,3-glucan oligomer prepared from laminarin with beta-1,3-glucanase from Bacillus clausii NM-1.

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Nobumitsu; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Etsuo; Odaz, Tatsuya

    2003-01-01

    We prepared a beta-1,3-glucan oligomer (DP> or = 4) from laminarin (DP: 25-30) derived from Laminaria digitata with beta-1,3-glucanase, and examined its effect on human peripheral blood monocytes. Conditioned medium prepared by incubating monocytes (MC-CM) with the beta-1,3-glucan oligomer showed strong inhibitory activity against the proliferation of human leukemic U937 cells. Since the beta-1,3-glucan oligomer had no direct cytotoxic effect on U937 cells up to 1000 microg/ml, the cytotoxicity of the MC-CM may be due to cytotoxic cytokines produced from monocytes stimulated by the beta-1,3-glucan oligomer. On the other hand, the MC-CM prepared with original laminarin had little effect on the growth of U937 cells. The cytotoxicity of the MC-CM prepared with the beta-1,3-glucan oligomer was significantly reduced by an anti-TNF-alpha antibody, but the anti-TNF-beta antibody had no effect. Our results suggest that the enzymatically depolymerized beta-1,3-glucan oligomer induces TNF-alpha production from human monocytes. PMID:16233391

  6. The role of cytokine mRNA stability in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Seko, Yuko; Cole, Steven; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Shapiro, Bruce A; Ragheb, Jack A

    2006-05-01

    Inflammatory cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-2, tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-17 play an important role in the pathogenesis of cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Cytokine gene expression is tightly regulated at the post-transcriptional level. Cytokine mRNA decay is dependent not only upon cis-elements in the RNA but also upon trans-acting factors such as the RNA binding proteins TTP, HuR, AUF-1, Nucleolin and YB-1. Physiologic signals, for instance signaling through the CD28 receptor on T cells, can modulate the half-life of a select subset of cytokine mRNAs, such as IL-2. Distinct cis- and trans-acting elements in human and mouse IL-2 mRNA may account for the different pattern of CD28-mediated mRNA stabilization in these two species. TTP-deficient mice or mice with a deletion of the TNF-alpha mRNA ARE element develop a complex inflammatory syndrome that is associated with a prolonged TNF-alpha mRNA half-life and elevated levels of circulating TNF-alpha. This syndrome can be prevented by treatment with TNF-alpha blocking antibodies. Evidence from mice with altered cytokine mRNA stability, along with human data, suggests that imbalance between the stability and decay of inflammatory cytokine mRNAs could represent a basic mechanism leading to autoimmunity. PMID:16782553

  7. Heat-induced superaggregation of amphotericin B modifies its interaction with serum proteins and lipoproteins and stimulation of TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hartsel, S C; Baas, B; Bauer, E; Foree, L T; Kindt, K; Preis, H; Scott, A; Kwong, E H; Ramaswamy, M; Wasan, K M

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of heat-induced superaggregation of Amphotericin B (AmB) in the Fungizone (FZ) formulation on its interaction with human serum components and relate this to reduced toxicity. Whole serum distribution studies showed that a significantly lower percentage of AmB from HFZ was recovered in the high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) fractions and a greater percentage recovered in the lipoprotein-deficient plasma (LPDP), though the majority of both preparations were recovered in LPDP. Circular dichroism (CD) and difference absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the stability of FZ and heat-treated FZ (HFZ) in the presence of HDL, LDL, serum, and albumin. The CD studies indicate that the "core" aggregate of HFZ is more stable in the presence of HDL and LDL, whereas the FZ is less stable and more dynamic with the core aggregate dissociating to a greater extent in the presence of either purified lipoprotein. Absorption studies with whole serum and purified albumin suggest that FZ aggregates are far less stable in the presence of albumin than HFZ and that interaction with serum albumin is a dominant feature for both drug preparations. HFZ also has a different effect on the cytokine response in vitro. Studies using THP-1 human monocytes show that HFZ provokes a smaller release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha than FZ. This cytokine may be associated with the unpleasant side effects of AmB. These findings suggest that heat-induced superaggregation of AmB alters its interaction with HDL, LDL, serum proteins, and monocytes, and these findings may be important in explaining the reduced toxicity of the superaggregated form of AmB. PMID:11169529

  8. VEGF, TNF-alpha and 8-isoprostane levels in exhaled breath condensate and serum of patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalaveris, Eleftherios; Kerenidi, Theodora; Katsabeki-Katsafli, Alexandra; Kiropoulos, Theodoros; Tanou, Kalliopi; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Kostikas, Konstantinos

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the levels of VEGF, 8-isoprostane and TNF-alpha in EBC and serum of patients with primary lung cancer prior to the initiation of any treatment, in order to evaluate their possible diagnostic role. Furthermore, associations between VEGF, 8-isoprostane and TNF-alpha levels in EBC and serum with clinicopathologic factors were investigated. We enrolled 30 patients with lung cancer (mean age 65.2+/-10.5 years) and 15 age and gender-matched healthy smokers as controls. Serum and EBC were collected before any treatment. TNF-alpha, VEGF and 8-isoprostane levels in EBC and serum were analyzed by an immunoenzymatic method (ELISA). A statistically significant difference was observed between lung cancer patients and the control group regarding the values of TNF-alpha, both in EBC (52.9+/-5.0 pg/ml vs. 19.4+/-3.9 pg/ml, p<0.0001) and serum (44.5+/-6.3 pg/ml vs. 22.2+/-4.3 pg/ml, p=0.035). Moreover, EBC VEGF levels were higher in patients with T3-T4 tumor stage compared to T1-T2 (9.3+/-2.8 pg/ml vs. 2.3+/-0.7pg/ml, p=0.047). A statistically significant correlation was also observed between serum and EBC values of VEGF (r=0.52, p=0.019). In addition, serum levels of VEGF were higher in lung cancer patients than in controls (369.3+/-55.1 pg/ml vs. 180.5+/-14.7 pg/ml, p=0.046). VEGF serum levels were also found higher in patients with advanced stage of disease (IIIB-IV) and distant nodal metastasis (N2-N3). No differences were observed in 8-isoprostane in EBC between lung cancer patients and controls. In contrast, serum 8-isoprostane levels were higher in lung cancer patients compared to controls (24.9+/-3.6 pg/ml vs. 12.9+/-1.6 pg/ml, p=0.027) and were higher in patients with advanced disease. All three biomarkers presented acceptable reproducibility in the EBC on two consecutive days. In conclusion, we have shown that TNF-alpha, VEGF and 8-isoprostane are elevated in the serum of lung cancer patients and increased serum VEGF and 8

  9. Inhibition of TNF-alpha reduces myocardial injury and proinflammatory pathways following ischemia-reperfusion in the dog.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiuping; Yang, Xiao Ping; Bonde, Pramod; DiPaula, Anthony; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Becker, Lewis C

    2006-12-01

    We examined whether tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) promotes postischemic inflammation and myocardial injury via activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in an in vivo canine model. Isoflurane-anesthetized dogs underwent closed-chest balloon occlusion of the anterior descending coronary artery for 90 minutes, followed by reperfusion for 3 hours. Dogs randomly received a soluble TNF inhibitor (etanercept, 0.5 mg/kg intravenously) or saline before occlusion. Collateral blood flow and risk region size (RISK) were measured with radioactive microspheres, infarct size (INF) was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining, inflammation was measured by tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, intercellular adhesion molecular-1 (ICAM-1) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) was measured by Northern blotting, and ICAM-1 protein expression was measured by Western blotting. NFkappaB activation was measured in nuclear extracts by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. INF/RISK was significantly smaller in the etanercept group than in the saline control group after adjusting for collateral flow (P < 0.009 by analysis of covariance, mean reduction in INF/RISK = 40%, 0.32 +/- 0.09 versus 0.53 +/- 0.09). MPO activity, ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression, and NFkappaB binding activity were all significantly reduced in the etanercept group. Administration of a soluble TNF-alpha inhibitor reduced NFkappaB activation, ICAM-1 upregulation, and myocardial injury following ischemia-reperfusion. TNF-alpha appears to play a significant role in vivo in the genesis of postischemic inflammation. PMID:17204912

  10. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates TNF-alpha-induced MCP-1 gene expression in endothelial cells: upregulation by oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi-Lin; Grey, Janice Y; Thomas, Suzanne; Qiu, Fei-Hua; Medford, Russell M; Wasserman, Martin A; Kunsch, Charles

    2004-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a focal inflammatory disease and preferentially occurs in areas of low fluid shear stress and oscillatory flow, whereas the risk of atherosclerosis is decreased in regions of high fluid shear stress and steady laminar flow. Sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) catalyzes the conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P), a sphingolipid metabolite that plays important roles in angiogenesis, inflammation, and cell growth. In the present study, we demonstrated that exposure of human aortic endothelial cells to oscillatory flow (shear stress, +/-5 dyn/cm(2) for 48 h) resulted in a marked increase in SphK1 mRNA levels compared with endothelial cells kept in static culture. In contrast, laminar flow (shear stress, 20 dyn/cm(2) for 48 h) decreased SphK1 mRNA levels. We further investigated the role of SphK1 in TNF-alpha-induced expression of inflammatory genes, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and VCAM-1 by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) specifically for SphK1. Treatment of endothelial cells with SphK1 siRNA suppressed TNF-alpha-induced increase in MCP-1 mRNA levels, MCP-1 protein secretion, and activation of p38 MAPK. SphK1 siRNA also inhibited TNF-alpha-induced cell surface expression of VCAM-1, but not ICAM-1, protein. Exposure of endothelial cells to S1P led to an increase in MCP-1 protein secretion and MCP-1 mRNA levels and activation of NF-kappaB-mediated transcriptional activity. Treatment of endothelial cells with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 suppressed S1P-induced MCP-1 protein secretion. These data suggest that SphK1 mediates TNF-alpha-induced MCP-1 gene expression through a p38 MAPK-dependent pathway and may participate in oscillatory flow-mediated proinflammatory signaling pathway in the vasculature. PMID:15191888

  11. Expression Profiles of Circulating Cytokines, Chemokines and Immune Cells in Patients With Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Jian-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Rong-Rong; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Li, Yu; Zhang, Ye; Huang, Chang-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Background: Immune cells and molecules play a vital role in initiating, maintaining, regulating immunological homeostasis and inflammation in many pathological and physiological processes; however, the changes on expressions and functions of these cells and molecules in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have not been elucidated well. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the expression pattern of different cytokines, chemokines, immune cells in HBV infection and their association with disease progression. Patients and Methods: Sixty-nine patients with chronic HBV infection were enrolled. Five immune cell subsets and 46 cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by flow cytometry and Luminex 200. Results: In comparison to healthy individuals and asymptomatic HBV carriers, expression of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and IL-10 were elevated in patients with chronic active HBV and had positive correlation with ALT levels. In contrast, G-CSF, MCP-3, and IFN-γ levels were significantly decreased in patients with chronic active HBV infection in contrast to carriers and healthy individuals; however, these down regulations did not show any correlation with either virological findings or liver inflammation. Although the proportion of CD4+ CD25 high regulatory T cells (Tregs) was higher in patients with HBV infection than in healthy controls, no correlations were found between Tregs and other cytokines or chemokines. Conclusions: CXCR3-associated chemokines might contribute to liver inflammation in chronic hepatitis B, while MCP-3 and G-CSF were inhibited by HBV infection. Host immune response was suppressed as manifested by an increase in CD4+ CD25high Tregs and IL-10 as well as a decrease in IFN-γ. Exploiting the expression pattern of cytokine and chemokine may help to develop a better understanding of chronic HBV infection pathogenesis. PMID:24976843

  12. Cytokines in children with otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Skotnicka, B; Hassmann, E

    2000-01-01

    We assayed 38 middle ear effusions from 23 children aged 4-13 years (mean 7) undergoing tympanostomy tube placements. All fluid was assayed for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL-8, and IL-10. Cytokine concentrations were measured by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Detectable levels of IL-1beta, IL-8, and IL-10 were found in all of the effusions. TNF-alpha was detected in 18 of the middle ear effusions (47.4%). The mean concentration of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta , IL-8, and IL-10 was, respectively, 0.423 +/- 1.39, 30.58 +/- 68.7, 7001.9 +/- 6743, and 56 +/- 58.7 pg/ml. There was a strong, statistically significant correlation between the concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta (r = 0.87, P = 0.001) and between IL-1beta and IL-8 (r = 0.53, P = 0.001). There was no correlation between the concentrations of IL-10 and other cytokines examined or between tympanic membrane pathology and the concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta , IL-8, or IL-10. The presence of IL-10 in middle ear effusions may be one of the causes of a lack of clinical features of acute inflammation and may lead to a chronic inflammatory state. PMID:10993552

  13. TNF-{alpha} similarly induces IL-6 and MCP-1 in fibroblasts from colorectal liver metastases and normal liver fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Lars; Seggern, Lena von; Schumacher, Jennifer; Goumas, Freya; Wilms, Christian; Braun, Felix; Broering, Dieter C.

    2010-07-02

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the predominant cell type of the neoplastic stroma of solid tumors, yet their biology and functional specificity for cancer pathogenesis remain unclear. We show here that primary CAFs from colorectal liver metastases express several inflammatory, tumor-enhancing factors, including interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Both molecules were intensely induced by TNF-{alpha} on the transcript and protein level, whereas PDGF-BB, TGF-{beta}1 and EGF showed no significant effects. To verify their potential specialization for metastasis progression, CAFs were compared to fibroblasts from non-tumor liver tissue. Interestingly, these liver fibroblasts (LFs) displayed similar functions. Further analyses revealed a comparable up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by TNF-{alpha}, and of alpha-smooth muscle actin, by TGF-{beta}1. Moreover, the proliferation of both cell types was induced by PDGF-BB, and CAFs and LFs displayed an equivalent migration towards HT29 colon cancer cells in Boyden chamber assays. In conclusion, colorectal liver metastasis may be supported by CAFs and resident fibroblastic cells competent to generate a prometastatic microenvironment through inflammatory activation of IL-6 and MCP-1.

  14. Affinity maturation of anti-TNF-alpha scFv with somatic hypermutation in non-B cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaopeng; Qiu, Junkang; Chen, Chuan; Liu, Chunchun; Liu, Yuheng; An, Lili; Jia, Junying; Tang, Jie; Wu, Lijun; Hang, Haiying

    2012-06-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for the generation of antibody diversity through initiating both somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination. A few research groups have successfully used the feature of AID for generating mutant libraries in directed evolution of target proteins in B cells in vitro. B cells, cultured in suspension, are not convenient for transfection and cloning. In this study, we established an AID-based mutant accumulation and sorting system in adherent human cells. Mouse AID gene was first transfected into the human non-small cell lung carcinoma H1299 cells, and a stable cell clone (H1299-AID) was selected. Afterwards, anti-hTNF-α scFv (ATscFv) was transfected into H1299-AID cells and ATscFv was displayed on the surface of H1299-AID cells. By 4-round amplification/flow cytometric sorting for cells with the highest affinities to hTNF-alpha, two ATscFv mutant gene clones were isolated. Compared with the wild type ATscFv, the two mutants were much more efficient in neutralizing cytotoxicity of hTNF-alpha. The results indicate that directed evolution by somatic hypermutation can be carried out in adherent non-B cells, which makes directed evolution in mammalian cells easier and more efficient. PMID:22467272

  15. Hypoxia reduces constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human proximal renal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuan; Kimura, Hideki . E-mail: hkimura@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Hirota, Kiichi; Sugimoto, Hidehiro; Yoshida, Haruyoshi

    2005-10-07

    Chronic hypoxia has been reported to be associated with macrophage infiltration in progressive forms of kidney disease. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of hypoxia on constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-stimulated expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in cultured human proximal renal tubular cells (HPTECs). Hypoxia reduced constitutive MCP-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent fashion for up to 48 h. Hypoxia also inhibited MCP-1 up-regulation by TNF-{alpha}. Treatment with actinomycin D showed that hypoxic down-regulation of MCP-1 expression resulted mainly from a decrease in the transcription but not the mRNA stability. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that treatment with hypoxia or an iron chelator, desferrioxamine, induced nuclear accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in HPTECs. Desferrioxamine mimicked hypoxia in the reduction of MCP-1 expression. However, overexpression of a dominant negative form of HIF-1{alpha} did not abolish the hypoxia-induced reduction of MCP-1 expression in HPTECs. These results suggest that hypoxia is an important negative regulator of monocyte chemotaxis to the renal inflamed interstitium, by reducing MCP-1 expression partly via hypoxia-activated signals other than the HIF-1 pathway.

  16. TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappa B in human osteoblastic HOS-TE85 cells is repressed in vector-averaged gravity using clinostat rotation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Kambe, F; Kurokouchi, K; Sakai, T; Ishiguro, N; Iwata, H; Koga, K; Gruener, R; Seo, H

    2000-12-01

    Effects of vector-averaged gravity on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-dependent activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) in human osteoblastic HOS-TE85 cells were investigated by culturing the cells using clinostat rotation (clinorotation). Cell cultures were rotated for 72 h at 40 rpm in a clinostat. At the end of clinorotation, the cells were treated with TNF-alpha for 30 min under stationary conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that TNF-alpha-dependent activation of NF-kappa B was markedly reduced in the clinorotated cells when compared with the cells in control stationary cultures or after horizontal rotation (motional controls). The NF-kappa B-dependent transactivation was also impaired in the clinorotated cells, as evidenced by a transient transfection assay with a reporter plasmid containing multimerized NF-kappa B sites. Consistent with these findings, the TNF-alpha-dependent induction of endogenous NF-kappa B-responsive genes p105, I kappa B-alpha, and IL-8, was significantly attenuate in clinorotated cells. These results demonstrate that vector-averaged gravity inhibits the responsiveness of osteoblasts to TNF-alpha by repressing NF-kappa B activation. PMID:11112449

  17. Regulation of extracellular matrix synthesis by TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 in type II cells exposed to coal dust.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Rannels, D E

    1998-10-01

    Type II pulmonary epithelial cells respond to anthracite coal dust PSOC 867 with increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Alveolar macrophages modulate this response by pathways that may involve soluble mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1). The effects of TNF-alpha (10 ng/ml) and/or TGF-beta1 (2 ng/ml) were thus investigated in dust-exposed primary type II cell cultures. In control day 1 or day 3 cultures, TNF-alpha and/or TGF-beta1 had little or no effect on the synthesis of type II cellular proteins, independent of whether the cells were exposed to dust. With PSOC 867 exposure, where ECM protein synthesis is elevated, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 further increased both the absolute and relative rates of ECM synthesis on day 3 but had little effect on day 1. Each mediator increased expression of fibronectin mRNA, as well as of ECM fibronectin content, in a manner qualitatively similar to their effects on synthesis. Thus TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 modulate both ECM synthesis and fibronectin content in coal dust-exposed type II cell cultures. PMID:9755095

  18. Silymarin Reduces Profibrogenic Cytokines and Reverses Hepatic Fibrosis in Chronic Murine Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hílton Antônio; Dutra, Fabianno Ferreira; Rocha, Carolina Carneiro; Lino, Fabiana Gonçalves; Xavier, Fabiola Ramos; Chinalia, Leandro Andrade; Hossy, Bryan Hudson; Castelo-Branco, Morgana Teixeira Lima; Teodoro, Anderson Junger; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2014-01-01

    In chronic schistosomiasis, hepatic fibrosis is linked to the portal hypertension that causes morbidity in Schistosoma mansoni infection. Silymarin (SIL) is a hepatoprotective and antioxidant medicament largely prescribed against liver diseases that has previously been shown to prevent fibrosis during acute murine schistosomiasis. Here we employed silymarin to try to reverse established hepatic fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis. Silymarin or vehicle was administered to BALB/c mice every 48 h, starting on the 40th (80 days of treatment), 70th (50 days), or 110th (10 days) day postinfection (dpi). All mice were sacrificed and analyzed at 120 dpi. Treatment with silymarin reduced liver weight and granuloma sizes, reduced the increase in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, and reduced the established hepatic fibrosis (assessed by hydroxyproline contents and picrosirius staining). Treatment with silymarin also reduced the levels of interleukin-13 (IL-13) in serum and increased the gamma interferon (IFN-γ)/IL-13 ratio. There was a linear correlation between IL-13 levels in serum and hydroxyproline hepatic content in both infected untreated and SIL-treated mice, with decreased IL-13 levels corresponding to decreased hydroxyproline hepatic contents. Treatment with either SIL or N-acetylcysteine reduced both proliferation of fibroblast cell lines and basal/IL-13-induced production of collagen I, indicating that besides inhibiting IL-13 production during infection, SIL antioxidant properties most likely contribute to inhibition of collagen production downstream of IL-13. These results show that silymarin interferes with fibrogenic cytokines, reduces established fibrosis, and inhibits downstream effects of IL-13 on fibrogenesis, indicating the drug as a safe and cheap treatment to liver fibrotic disease in schistosomiasis. PMID:24449779

  19. Indole derivatives inhibit hepatitis C virus replication through induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Jin, G; Kim, D; Son, S; Lee, K; Lee, C

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we discovered a series of indole derivatives as a new class of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication inhibitors by using a target-free chemical genetic strategy. Through a structure-activity relationship study, the compound 12e was identified as the most potent inhibitor of this class (EC50 = 1.1 μmol/l) with minimal cytotoxicity (CC50 = 61.8 μmol/l). In order to gain insight into its detailed antiviral mechanism of action, we performed PCR array analyses and found that 12e was able to activate transcription of a number of pro-inflammatory as well as antiviral cytokine genes including CXCL-8, IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-3, IRAK-1, and DDX58. Their induction by 12e was verified by individual RT-PCR analyses. In addition, 12e was found to stimulate secretion of soluble factors with anti-HCV replication activity. Among the 12e-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, CXCL-8 showed a strong positive correlation between its transcriptional activation and antiviral potency. Interestingly, a recombinant CXCL-8 protein also reduced HCV replication, though only moderately. In conclusion, we found a novel mode of action of indole derivatives in inhibiting HCV replication, particularly the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25790053

  20. Are circulating cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha involved in chlorpyrifos-induced fever?

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J; Rowsey, P J

    1999-05-01

    Oral exposure to chlorpyrifos (CHP) in the rat results in an initial hypothermic response followed by a delayed fever. Fever from infection is mediated by the release of cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha). This study determined if the CHP-induced fever involves cytokine-mediated mechanisms similar to that of infectious fevers. Long-Evans rats were gavaged with the corn oil vehicle or CHP (10-50 mg/kg). The rats were euthanized and blood collected at various times that corresponded with the hypothermic and febrile effects of CHP. Plasma IL-6, TNF alpha, cholinesterase activity (ChE), total iron, unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC), and zinc were measured. ChE activity was reduced by approximately 50% 4 h after CHP. There was no effect of CHP on IL-6 when measured during the period of CHP-induced hypothermia or fever. TNF alpha levels nearly doubled in female rats 48 h after 25 mg/kg CHP. The changes in plasma cytokine levels following CHP were relatively small when compared to > 1000-fold increase in IL-6 and > 10-fold rise in TNF alpha following lipopolysaccharide (E. coli; 50 microg/kg; i.p.)-induced fever. This does not preclude a role of cytokines in CHP-induced fever. Nonetheless, the data suggest that the delayed fever from CHP is unique, involving mechanisms other than TNF alpha and IL-6 release into the circulation characteristic of infectious fevers. PMID:10413184

  1. Blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor type 1-mediated TNF-alpha signaling protected Wistar rats from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huifang; Yin, Bingjiao; Zhang, Hailong; Zhang, Shu; Zeng, Qingling; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Xiaodan; Yuan, Li; Wang, Cong-Yi; Li, Zhuoya

    2008-06-01

    TNF-alpha plays an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance in which the effect of TNF-alpha signaling via TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1) largely remains controversial. To delineate the role of TNFR1-mediated TNF-alpha signaling in the pathogenesis of this disorder, a TNFR1 blocking peptide-Fc fusion protein (TNFR1BP-Fc) was used for the present study. Wistar rats were fed a high-fat/high-sucrose (HFS) diet for 16 wk until obesity and insulin resistance developed. In comparison with increased body weight and fat weight, enlarged adipocytes, and hypertriglyceridemia in the obese state, the subsequent 4-wk treatment with TNFR1BP-Fc resulted in significant weight loss characterized by decreased fat pad weight and adipocyte size and reduced plasma triglycerides. Furthermore, obesity-induced insulin resistance, including hyperinsulinemia, elevated C-peptide, higher degree of hyperglycemia after glucose challenge, and less hypoglycemic response to insulin, was markedly improved, and the compensatory hyperplasia and hypertrophy of pancreatic islets were reduced. Interestingly, treatment with TNFR1BP-Fc markedly suppressed systemic TNF-alpha release and its local expression in pancreatic islets and muscle and adipose tissues. In addition, blockage of TNFR1-mediated TNF-alpha signaling in obese rats significantly enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in the muscle and fat tissues. Our results strongly suggest a pivotal role for TNFR1-mediated TNF-alpha signaling in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. Thus, TNFR1BP-Fc may be a good candidate for the treatment of this disease. PMID:18339717

  2. In vivo transfer of soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 gene improves cardiac function and reduces infarct size after myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Masahiro; Tsuchida, Keiko; Hata, Tomoji; Makino, Naoki

    2004-05-01

    Increased circulating and cardiac TNF-alpha levels during myocardial ischemia have been found in both experimental animals and patients with ischemic heart disease and advanced heart failure. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 (sTNFR1) is an antagonist to TNF-alpha. In the present study, we examined whether sTNFR1 improves cardiac function in rats after myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to left coronary artery (LCA) ligation. Immediately after the ligation, a total of 200 microg of either the sTNFR1 or LacZ plasmid was injected into three different sites in the left ventricular wall. From 1 to 21 days after LCA ligation, TNF-alpha bioactivity in the heart was higher in rats receiving LacZ plasmid than in sham-operated rats, whereas sTNFR1 plasmid significantly suppressed the increase. The LV diastolic dimension was significantly lower, and the fractional shortening was significantly higher in rats treated with the sTNFR1 plasmid than in those treated with the LacZ plasmid. At 21 days after LCA ligation, the LV end-diastolic pressure was also significantly lower in the rats treated with the sTNFR1 plasmid. In addition, the sTNFR1 expression plasmid had significantly reduced the infarct size. In conclusion, TNF-alpha bioactivity in the heart increased during the early stage of infarction and remained elevated. This elevation seemed partially responsible for the impairment of LV function and the increased infarct size. Suppression of TNF-alpha bioactivity from the early stage of infarction with the sTNFR1 plasmid improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size. PMID:15117889

  3. Uroepithelial cells are part of a mucosal cytokine network.

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, S; Agace, W; Svensson, M; Sjögren, A C; Ceska, M; Svanborg, C

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the cytokine production of uroepithelial cell lines in response to gram-negative bacteria and inflammatory cytokines. Human kidney (A498) and bladder (J82) epithelial cell lines were stimulated with either Escherichia coli Hu734, interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Supernatant samples were removed, and the RNA was extracted from cells at 0, 2, 6, and 24 h. The secreted cytokine levels were determined by bioassay or immunoassay; mRNA was examined by reverse transcription-PCR. The two cell lines secreted IL-6 and IL-8 constitutively. IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA were constitutively produced in both cell lines; IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in J82 cells. IL-1 alpha induced significantly higher levels of IL-6 secretion than did E. coli Hu734 or TNF-alpha. IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha induced significantly higher levels of IL-8 secretion than did E. coli Hu734. Secreted IL-1 beta was not detected; IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha were not detected above the levels used for stimulation. IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8 mRNAs were detected in both cell lines after exposure to the stimulants. TNF-alpha mRNA was occasionally detected in the J82 cell line after TNF-alpha stimulation. Cytokine (IL-6 and IL-8) and control (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [G3PDH] and beta-actin) mRNA concentrations were quantitated with internal PCR standards. Cytokine mRNA levels relative to beta-actin mRNA levels were the highest in E. coli-stimulated cells. In comparison, the cytokine mRNA levels relative to G3PDH mRNA levels were the highest in IL-1 alpha-stimulated cells. beta-Actin mRNA levels decreased after bacterial stimulation but not after cytokine stimulation, while G3PDH mRNA levels increased in response to all of the stimulants tested. These results suggested that E. coli Hu734 lowered the beta-actin mRNA levels in uroepithelial cells, thus distorting the IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels relative to this control. In summary, E. coli IL

  4. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Javaid, Alia; Kennedy, Patrick T F; Schurich, Anna; Dunn, Claire; Pallant, Celeste; Ellis, Gidon; Khanna, Pooja; Dusheiko, Geoffrey; Gilson, Richard J; Maini, Mala K

    2010-01-01

    NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB), allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright) NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade. PMID:21187913

  5. Combination of pGL1-TNF-alpha gene and radiation (proton and gamma-ray) therapy against brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Li, J; Kajioka, E H; Andres, M L; Moyers, M F; Slater, J M

    2000-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine if treatment with the newly constructed plasmid vector for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (pGL1-TNF-alpha) could enhance the radiation-induced growth reduction of C6 rat glioma. In addition, two different forms of ionizing radiation (gamma-rays and protons) were utilized. Body and spleen mass, leukocyte blastogenesis, and flow cytometry analysis of cell populations in blood and spleen were performed to detect toxicity, if any, and to identify mechanisms that may correlate with the anti-tumor action of combination therapy. C6 tumor cells were implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice and allowed to become established before treatment initiation. pGL1-TNF-alpha was injected into the implanted tumors, which were then irradiated 16-18 hr later; each modality was administered three times over 8-9 days. The addition of pGL1-TNF-alpha significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of radiation (p < 0.05). The effect was more than additive, since pGL1-TNF-alpha alone did not slow tumor progression and radiation alone had only a modest effect. Administration of pGL1-TNF-alpha together with proton radiation resulted in tumor volumes that were 23% smaller than those following pGL1-TNF-alpha + gamma-ray treatment; a similar differential in tumor size was observed in the groups receiving only radiation. Body weights and blood and spleen cell analyses did not reveal treatment-related toxicity. High basal proliferation of blood leukocytes and increased B cell levels in the spleen were associated with pGL1-TNF-alpha + 60Co (gamma-radiation) or proton treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the pGL1-TNF-alpha/radiation combination is effective and safe under the conditions employed. This is the first study to combine gene and proton radiation therapy and to show, under controlled experimental conditions, that proton radiation may have a greater effect against malignant tumors compared to the same physical dose of gamma-radiation. PMID

  6. Myeloid STAT3 inhibits T-cell–mediated hepatitis by regulating T helper 1 cytokine and interleukin-17 production

    PubMed Central

    Lafdil, Fouad; Wang, Hua; Park, Ogyi; Zhang, Weici; Moritoki, Yuki; Yin, Shi; Fu, Xin Yuan; Gershwin, M. Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Gao, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims T-cell–mediated hepatitis is a leading cause of acute liver failure; there is no effective treatment and the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are obscure. The aim of this study was to investigate the immune-cell signaling pathways involved—specifically the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)—in T-cell–mediated hepatitis in mice. Methods T-cell–mediated hepatitis was induced in mice by injection of concanavalin A (Con A). Mice with myeloid cell-specific and T-cell–specific deletion of STAT3 were generated. Results STAT3 was activated in myeloid and T cells following Con A injection. Deletion of STAT3 specifically from myeloid cells exacerbated T-cell hepatitis and induced STAT1-dependent production of a Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ), and to a lesser extent of Th17 cytokines (IL-17 and IL-22), in a STAT1-independent manner. In contrast, deletion of STAT3 in T cells reduced T-cell mediated hepatitis and IL-17 production. Furthermore, deletion of IFN-γ completely abolished Con A-induced T-cell hepatitis whereas deletion of IL-17 slightly but significantly reduced such injury. In vitro experiments indicated that IL-17 promoted liver inflammation but inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis. Conclusion Myeloid STAT3 activation inhibits T-cell–mediated hepatitis via suppression of a Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) in a STAT1-dependent manner whereas STAT3 activation in T cells promotes T-cell hepatitis to a lesser extent, via induction of IL-17. Therefore, activation of STAT3 in myeloid cells could be a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with T-cell hepatitis. PMID:19686746

  7. Viral cross talk: intracellular inactivation of the hepatitis B virus during an unrelated viral infection of the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, L G; Borrow, P; Hobbs, M V; Matzke, B; Gresser, I; Oldstone, M B; Chisari, F V

    1996-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is thought to be controlled by virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have recently shown that HBV-specific CTL can abolish HBV replication noncytopathically in the liver of transgenic mice by secreting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) after antigen recognition. We now demonstrate that hepatocellular HBV replication is also abolished noncytopathically during lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, and we show that this process is mediated by TNF-alpha and IFN-alpha/beta produced by LCMV-infected hepatic macrophages. These results confirm the ability of these inflammatory cytokines to abolish HBV replication; they elucidate the mechanism likely to be responsible for clearance of HBV in chronically infected patients who become superinfected by other hepatotropic viruses; they suggest that pharmacological activation of intrahepatic macrophages may have therapeutic value in chronic HBV infection; and they raise the possibility that conceptually similar events may be operative in other viral infections as well. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643448

  8. Poly(I:C) reduces expression of JAM-A and induces secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} via distinct NF-{kappa}B pathways in human nasal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Fuchimoto, Jun; Kamekura, Ryuta; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Himi, Tetsuo; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-01-01

    Human nasal epithelium is an important physical barrier and innate immune defense protecting against inhaled substances and pathogens. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, which plays a key role in the innate immune response, has not been well characterized in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs), including the epithelial tight junctional barrier. In the present study, mRNAs of TLR1-10 were detected in hTERT-transfected HNECs, which can be used as an indispensable and stable model of normal HNECs, similar to primary cultured HNECs. To investigate the changes of tight junction proteins and the signal transduction pathways via TLRs in HNECs in vitro, hTERT-transfected HNECs were treated with TLR2 ligand P{sub 3}CSK{sub 4}, TLR3 ligand poly(I:C), TLR4 ligand LPS, TLR7/8 ligand CL097, TLR8 ligand ssRNA40/LyoVec, and TLR9 ligand ODN2006. In hTERT-transfected HNECs, treatment with poly(I:C) significantly reduced expression of the tight junction protein JAM-A and induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-{alpha}. Both the reduction of JAM-A expression and the induction of secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} after treatment with poly(I:C) were modulated by distinct signal transduction pathways via EGFR, PI3K, and p38 MAPK and finally regulated by a TLR3-mediated NF-{kappa}B pathway. The control of TLR3-mediated signaling pathways in HNECs may be important not only in infection by viral dsRNA but also in autoimmune diseases caused by endogenous dsRNA released from necrotic cells.

  9. New pterocarpanquinones: synthesis, antineoplasic activity on cultured human malignant cell lines and TNF-alpha modulation in human PBMC cells.

    PubMed

    Netto, Chaquip D; da Silva, Alcides J M; Salustiano, Eduardo J S; Bacelar, Thiago S; Riça, Ingred G; Cavalcante, Moises C M; Rumjanek, Vivian M; Costa, Paulo R R

    2010-02-15

    A new pterocarpanquinone (5a) was synthesized through a palladium catalyzed oxyarylation reaction and was transformed, through electrophilic substitution reaction, into derivatives 5b-d. These compounds showed to be active against human leukemic cell lines and human lung cancer cell lines. Even multidrug resistant cells were sensitive to 5a, which presented low toxicity toward peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cells and decreased the production of TNF-alpha by these cells. In the laboratory these pterocarpanquinones were reduced by sodium dithionite in the presence of thiophenol at physiological pH, as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoredutase-1 (NQO1) catalyzed two-electron reduction, and the resulting hydroquinone undergo structural rearrangements, leading to the formation of Michael acceptors, which were intercepted as adducts of thiophenol. These results suggest that these compounds could be activated by bioreduction. PMID:20117936

  10. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 2. Induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) on human leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulesu, L.; Luzzi, E.; Bocci, V. )

    1991-10-01

    The effect of ozone as a probable inducer of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) has been investigated on human blood and on Ficoll-purified blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Samples were exposed at different ozone concentrations ranging from 2.2 to 108 micrograms/ml and incubated at 37 degrees C in an 95% air-5% CO2 atmosphere. At predetermined times, all cell supernatants were tested for TNF activity and some PBMC cultures were examined for DNA synthesis. The authors have shown that ozone concentration is critical in terms of TNF production and of cell mitogenesis and that, owing to the presence of erythrocytes, higher ozone concentrations are required to be effective in blood than in PBMC. Because ozonization of blood is a procedure followed in several European countries for the treatment of viral diseases and tumors, the release of factors with antiviral and immunomodulatory activities by leukocytes may explain the mechanism of action of ozone and of autohemotherapy.

  11. Neutrophil killing of human umbilical vein endothelial cells is oxygen radical-mediated and enhanced by TNF-. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, M.K.; Varani, J.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells are sensitive to killing by activated human neutrophils. Killing is inhibited in the presence of catalase and deferoxamine mesylate but not soybean trypsin inhibitor. Reagent hydrogen peroxide can substitute for activated neutrophils in producing endothelial cell injury. These data suggest that lethal injury is due to the production of oxygen radicals by activated neutrophils. In these respects, the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in that pretreatment with TNF-{alpha} increases sensitivity to injury by activated neutrophils. In part, the increased endothelial cell sensitivity to killing by neutrophils may be due to up-regulation of surface adhesion molecules. However, it was observed that cells passaged more than two times in culture did not demonstrate increased killing after treatment with TNF-{alpha} while up-regulation of neutrophil adhesion could be detected through several additional passages. Although the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are qualitatively similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in their sensitivity to killing, they are quantitatively much more resistant. What accounts for the relative resistance of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells is not fully understood. In the rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, killing is known to be dependent on an intraendothelial source of iron. Pre-treatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 8-hydroxyquinoline-bound iron increased their sensitivity to oxidant injury. These data suggest that the availability of iron within the human umbilical vein endothelial cells may be a limiting factor in sensitivity to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  12. Association between cytokine gene polymorphisms and outcome of hepatitis B virus infection in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gusatti, Carolina de Souza; Costi, Cintia; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Halon, Maria Laura; Grandi, Tarciana; Medeiros, Arlete Ferrari Rech; da Silva, Cláudia Maria Dornelles; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Silva, Márcia Susana Nunes; Niel, Christian; Rossetti, Maria Lucia Rosa

    2016-10-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated associations between cytokine gene polymorphisms and outcome of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, no general consensus has been reached, possibly due to differences between ethnic groups. In this study, 345 individuals living in southern Brazil, including 196 chronic HBV carriers and 149 subjects who had spontaneously recovered from acute infection, were enrolled to evaluate the influence of cytokine gene polymorphisms on the outcome of HBV infection. Most participants were of European descent. Genotyping of IL2-330 G/T, IL4-589C/T, IL6-174 G/C, IL10-592C/A, IL10-1082 A/G, IL17A-197 G/A, IL17A-692 T/C, TNF-α-238 G/A, and TNF-α-308 G/A single nucleotide polymorphisms was performed by using the minisequencing (single base extension) method. By multivariable analysis, a statistically significant association was found between genotypic profile AA + GA in TNF-α-308 and chronic HBV infection (OR, 1.82; 95%CI, 1.01-3.27; P = 0.046). In southern Brazil, the carriers of the -308A allele in the TNF-α gene promoter have a moderately higher risk of becoming chronic carriers in case of HBV infection. In addition, patients with chronic active hepatitis B (n = 60) exhibited a decreased frequency (3.3%) of the TNF-238A allele when compared to that (14.8%) found among asymptomatic HBV carriers (n = 136), suggesting that this could be a protective factor against liver injury (OR, 0.17; 95%CI, 0.04-0.076; P = 0.023). J. Med. Virol. 88:1759-1766, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26959287

  13. Cognitive function and endogenous cytokine levels in children with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Abu Faddan, N H; Shehata, G A; Abd Elhafeez, H A; Mohamed, A O; Hassan, H S; Abd El Sameea, F

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about how hepatitis C (HCV) infection affects cognitive function in children. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of HCV infection on cognitive function of children with normal liver functions and their relationships to endogenous IFN-α, IL-6 and TNF-α. IFN-α, IL-6 and TNF-α were measured and the Arabic version of the Stanford-Binet test used to assess cognitive functions in 35 children with HCV infection and 23 controls. Serum levels of IL-6 and IFN-α were significantly higher in patients compared to controls. There was a significant effect on vocabulary, comprehension, and abstract visual reasoning, quantitative reasoning and bead memory tests, as well as total short-term memory and intelligence quotient in patients compared to controls. There was a significant positive correlation between IFN-α and IL-6. Also there were significant negative correlations between IFN-α and Abstract visual reasoning test, Quantitative reasoning test, Bead memory test, Total short-term memory and Intelligence quotient; and between IL-6 and Abstract visual reasoning test, Quantitative reasoning test and Intelligence quotient. There was no significant correlation between TNF-α and any of the cognitive functions. Cytokine levels were not related to demographic characteristics of the patients or viral load (PCR). Children with chronic hepatitis C infection in its early stages showed signs of cognitive impairment, with the memory tasks being mostly affected. There was a significant correlation between endogenous cytokines and cognitive impairment in these children. Further studies are needed to define the effect of successful antiviral treatment. PMID:25496114

  14. TNF{alpha} induced FOXP3-NF{kappa}B interaction dampens the tumor suppressor role of FOXP3 in gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Qiang; Li, Weina; Zhang, Cun; Qin, Xin; Xue, Xiaochang; Li, Meng; Shu, Zhen; Xu, Tianjiao; Xu, Yujin; Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FOXP3 inhibition of cell proliferation is p21-dependent under basal conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation induced by TNF{alpha} inhibits the tumor suppressor role of FOXP3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between p65 and FOXP3 inhibits p21 transcription activation. -- Abstract: Controversial roles of FOXP3 in different cancers have been reported previously, while its role in gastric cancer is largely unknown. Here we found that FOXP3 is unexpectedly upregulated in some gastric cancer cells. To test whether increased FOXP3 remains the tumor suppressor role in gastric cancer as seen in other cancers, we test its function in cell proliferation both at basal and TNF{alpha} mimicked inflammatory condition. Compared with the proliferation inhibitory role observed in basal condition, FOXP3 is insufficient to inhibit the cell proliferation under TNF{alpha} treatment. Molecularly, we found that TNF{alpha} induced an interaction between FOXP3 and p65, which in turn drive the FOXP3 away from the promoter of the well known target p21. Our data here suggest that although FOXP3 is upregulated in gastric cancer, its tumor suppressor role has been dampened due to the inflammation environment.

  15. Learning abilities, NGF and BDNF brain levels in two lines of TNF-alpha transgenic mice, one characterized by neurological disorders, the other phenotypically normal.

    PubMed

    Aloe, L; Properzi, F; Probert, L; Akassoglou, K; Kassiotis, G; Micera, A; Fiore, M

    1999-09-01

    In this study we used two lines of transgenic mice overexpressing tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the central nervous system (CNS), one characterized by reactive gliosis, inflammatory demyelination and neurological deficits (Tg6074) the other showing no neurological or phenotypical alterations (TgK3) to investigate the effect of TNF-alpha on brain nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and learning abilities. The results showed that the amount of NGF in the brain of Tg6074 and TgK3 transgenic mice is low in the hippocampus and in the spinal cord, increases in the hypothalamus of Tg6074 and showed no significant changes in the cortex. BDNF levels were low in the hippocampus and spinal cord of TgK3. BDNF increased in the hypothalamus of TgK3 and Tg6074 while in the cortex, BDNF increased only in Tg6074 mice. Transgenic mice also had memory impairments as revealed by the Morris Water Maze test. These findings indicate that TNF-alpha significantly influences BDNF and NGF synthesis, most probably in a dose-dependent manner. Learning abilities were also differently affected by overexpression of TNF-alpha, but were not associated with inflammatory activity. The possible functional implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:10517960

  16. Wogonin suppresses TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression by blocking the NF-{kappa}B activation via MAPK signaling pathways in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Syng-Ook; Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Yu, Mi Hee; Lee, Ji-Won; Hwangbo, Mi Hyang; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, In-Seon . E-mail: inseon@kmu.ac.kr

    2006-12-08

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis by regulating both migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) after an arterial injury. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effect of three major flavonoids in Scutellariae Radix, baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin, on TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). Wogonin, but not baicalin and baicalein, significantly and selectively suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression in HASMC. Reporter gene, electrophoretic mobility shift, and Western blotting assays showed that wogonin inhibits MMP-9 gene transcriptional activity by blocking the activation of NF-{kappa}B via MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, the Matrigel migration assay showed that wogonin reduced TNF-{alpha}-induced HASMC migration. These results suggest that wogonin effectively suppresses TNF-{alpha}-induced HASMC migration through the selective inhibition of MMP-9 expression and represents a potential agent for the prevention of vascular disorders related to the migration of VSMC.

  17. Virus infection-associated bone marrow B cell depletion and impairment of humoral immunity to heterologous infection mediated by TNF-alpha/LTalpha.

    PubMed

    Borrow, Persephone; Hou, Sam; Gloster, Simone; Ashton, Miranda; Hyland, Lisa

    2005-02-01

    We previously showed that influenza virus infection of mice induces a depletion of bone marrow B lineage cells due to apoptosis of early B cells mediated by a mechanism involving TNF-alpha/LTalpha. Here we demonstrate that this effect is also observed with acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection and resulted in a deficiency of both splenic transitional B cells and mature follicular B cells. To determine whether there was an associated impairment of humoral immunity, we infected mice with LCMV and 10 days later at the peak of the B cell depletion, inoculated them with influenza virus. We found that influenza virus-specific antibody titers were dramatically reduced in mice recovering from LCMV infection compared to those in mice infected with influenza virus alone. Further, we showed that there was no reduction of the influenza virus-specific antibody response in LCMV-infected TNF-alpha/LTalpha-deficient mice, suggesting that TNF-alpha/LTalpha-mediated effects on bone marrow and/or peripheral lymphocytes were responsible for the observed impairment in humoral immunity. These results show that the TNF-alpha/LTalpha production induced following infection with diverse viruses has detrimental effects on early B cells in the bone marrow, and may be among the factors that lead to the severely compromised humoral immunity observed to subsequent heterologous infections. PMID:15657949

  18. Fumigaclavine C improves concanavalin A-induced liver injury in mice mainly via inhibiting TNF-alpha production and lymphocyte adhesion to extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Liu, Junyan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Lei; Yin, Hao; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Qiang

    2004-06-01

    Fumigaclavine C, an alkaloidal metabolite, was produced by Aspergillus fumigatus (strain No. CY018). This study examined the effect of this compound on concanavalin A (Con A)-induced liver injury in mice, a T cell-dependent model of liver damage. Con A administration resulted in severe liver injury, T lymphocyte activation and a strong increment in spleen cell adhesion, as well as in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Against this liver injury, the intraperitoneal administration of fumigaclavine C dose-dependently inhibited the elevation in transaminase activity, TNF-alpha production in serum and the histological changes, including inflammatory infiltration, hepatocyte necrosis and degeneration and Kupffer cell hyperplasia. In addition, this compound in-vitro also inhibited the proliferation of spleen cells induced by Con A, and reduced their IL-2 and TNF-alpha production. Moreover, the intraperitoneal administration of fumigaclavine C inhibited the potential of spleen cells isolated from the liver-injured mice to adhere to fibronectin, laminin and type IV collagen. These results suggest that the improvement of this T cell-mediated liver injury by fumigaclavine C may be related to the inhibition of lymphocyte activation, proliferation and adhesion to extracellular matrices as well as the reduction in TNF-alpha production. PMID:15231043

  19. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations from whole blood cultures correlate with isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cellular immune assays are impractical because they require labor-intensive isolation of cells from their natural environment. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between cell culture supernatant TNF-alpha from isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and w...

  20. Ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 induced by protein synthesis inhibitors regulates TNF-{alpha}-mediated activation of NF-{kappa}B and caspase-8

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Hirotsugu; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Sugimoto, Hikaru; Igarashi, Masayuki; Nagai, Kazuo; Kataoka, Takao

    2008-04-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) plays a major role in the inducible resistance to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. It has been established that the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) sensitizes many types of cells to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced apoptosis, mainly due to its ability to block de novo synthesis of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). Nevertheless, we have surprisingly found that CHX, as well as its structural analogue acetoxycycloheximide (Ac-CHX), prevents TNF-{alpha}-mediated activation of NF-{kappa}B and caspase-8 in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Both CHX and Ac-CHX reduced the expression of cell surface TNF receptor 1 (TNF-R1) in a dose-dependent manner, while Ac-CHX was approximately 100-fold more effective than CHX. Consistent with this observation, Ac-CHX induced the proteolytic cleavage of TNF-R1 and its release into the culture medium. CHX and Ac-CHX profoundly decreased constitutive and inducible expression of c-FLIP, whereas these compounds potentiated TNF-{alpha}-induced caspase-8 activation only when metalloprotease inhibitors were present. Thus, our results indicate that ectodomain shedding of TNF-R1 induced by protein synthesis inhibitors regulates TNF-{alpha}-mediated activation of NF-{kappa}B and caspase-8.

  1. Association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha)gene promoter polymorphisms with hyper-responsiveness to endotoxin (LPS)in calves.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we identified a subpopulation of beef calves that failed to develop normal immune tolerance as defined by the patterns and magnitude of changes in plasma TNF-alpha concentration after 2 repeated LPS challenges. In these hyper responding calves (HRC), impaired LPS tolerance was related to...

  2. Induction of immune response in macaque monkeys infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus having the TNF-{alpha} gene at an early stage of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Yuya; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Ibuki, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hajime; Kaneyasu, Kentaro; Goto, Yoshitaka; Hayami, Masanori; Miura, Tomoyuki; Haga, Takeshi . E-mail: a0d518u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp

    2005-12-20

    TNF-{alpha} has been implicated in the pathogenesis of, and the immune response against, HIV-1 infection. To clarify the roles of TNF-{alpha} against HIV-1-related virus infection in an SHIV-macaque model, we genetically engineered an SHIV to express the TNF-{alpha} gene (SHIV-TNF) and characterized the virus's properties in vivo. After the acute viremic stage, the plasma viral loads declined earlier in the SHIV-TNF-inoculated monkeys than in the parental SHIV (SHIV-NI)-inoculated monkeys. SHIV-TNF induced cell death in the lymph nodes without depletion of circulating CD4{sup +} T cells. SHIV-TNF provided some immunity in monkeys by increasing the production of the chemokine RANTES and by inducing an antigen-specific proliferation of lymphocytes. The monkeys immunized with SHIV-TNF were partly protected against a pathogenic SHIV (SHIV-C2/1) challenge. These findings suggest that TNF-{alpha} contributes to the induction of an effective immune response against HIV-1 rather than to the progression of disease at the early stage of infection.

  3. Negative regulation of the hepatic fibrogenic response by suppressor of cytokine signaling 1.

    PubMed

    Kandhi, Rajani; Bobbala, Diwakar; Yeganeh, Mehdi; Mayhue, Marian; Menendez, Alfredo; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-06-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is an indispensable regulator of IFNγ signaling and has been implicated in the regulation of liver fibrosis. However, it is not known whether SOCS1 mediates its anti-fibrotic functions in the liver directly, or via modulating IFNγ, which has been implicated in attenuating hepatic fibrosis. Additionally, it is possible that SOCS1 controls liver fibrosis by regulating hepatic stellate cells (HSC), a key player in fibrogenic response. While the activation pathways of HSCs have been well characterized, the regulatory mechanisms are not yet clear. The goals of this study were to dissociate IFNγ-dependent and SOCS1-mediated regulation of hepatic fibrogenic response, and to elucidate the regulatory functions of SOCS1 in HSC activation. Liver fibrosis was induced in Socs1(-/-)Ifng(-/-) mice with dimethylnitrosamine or carbon tetrachloride. Ifng(-/-) and C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Following fibrogenic treatments, Socs1(-/-)Ifng(-/-) mice showed elevated serum ALT levels and increased liver fibrosis compared to Ifng(-/-) mice. The latter group showed higher ALT levels and fibrosis than C57BL/6 controls. The livers of SOCS1-deficient mice showed bridging fibrosis, which was associated with increased accumulation of myofibroblasts and abundant collagen deposition. SOCS1-deficient livers showed increased expression of genes coding for smooth muscle actin, collagen, and enzymes involved in remodeling the extracellular matrix, namely matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases. Primary HSCs from SOCS1-deficient mice showed increased proliferation in response to growth factors such as HGF, EGF and PDGF, and the fibrotic livers of SOCS1-deficient mice showed increased expression of the Pdgfb gene. Taken together, these data indicate that SOCS1 controls liver fibrosis independently of IFNγ and that part of this regulation may occur via regulating HSC proliferation and limiting growth factor availability

  4. Inactivation of a common OGG1 variant by TNF-alpha in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Morreall, Jordan; Limpose, Kristin; Sheppard, Clayton; Kow, Yoke Wah; Werner, Erica; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species threaten genomic integrity by inducing oxidative DNA damage. One common form of oxidative DNA damage is the mutagenic lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG). One driver of oxidative stress that can induce 8-oxodG is inflammation, which can be initiated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Oxidative DNA damage is primarily repaired by the base excision repair pathway, initiated by glycosylases targeting specific DNA lesions. 8-oxodG is excised by 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1). A common Ogg1 allelic variant is S326C-Ogg1, prevalent in Asian and Caucasian populations. S326C-Ogg1 is associated with various forms of cancer, and S326C-OGG1 is inactivated by oxidation. However, whether oxidative stress caused by inflammatory cytokines compromises OGG1 variant repair activity remains unknown. We addressed whether TNF-α causes oxidative stress that both induces DNA damage and inactivates S326C-OGG1 via cysteine 326 oxidation. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that S326C-OGG1 was inactivated only after exposure to H2O2 or TNF-α. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prior to oxidative stress rescued S326C-OGG1 activity, demonstrated by in vitro and cellular repair assays. In contrast, S326C-OGG1 activity was unaffected by potassium bromate, which induces oxidative DNA damage without causing oxidative stress, and presumably cysteine oxidation. This study reveals that Cys326 is vulnerable to oxidation that inactivates S326C-OGG1. Physiologically relevant levels of TNF-α simultaneously induce 8-oxodG and inactivate S326C-OGG1. These results suggest a mechanism that could contribute to increased risk of cancer among S326C-Ogg1 homozygous individuals. PMID:25534136

  5. Induction of murine macrophage TNF-alpha synthesis by Mycobacterium avium is modulated through complement-dependent interaction via complement receptors 3 and 4 in relation to M. avium glycopeptidolipid.

    PubMed

    Irani, Vida R; Maslow, Joel N

    2005-05-15

    We studied whether complement receptor (CR) mediated Mycobacterium avium interaction modulated macrophage TNF-alpha expression. Compared to control conditions, infections performed with C3-depletion yielded significantly higher TNF-alpha levels. Blockage of the CR4 iC3b site yielded increases in TNF-alpha for all morphotypic variants of a virulent serovar-8 strain (smooth transparent (SmT), smooth opaque (SmO), serovar-specific glycopeptidolipid (ssGPL) deficient knockout mutant) whereas CR3 blockage increased TNF-alpha only for SmT and ssGPL-deficient strains. Thus, complement-mediated binding of M. avium to CR3 and CR4 was shown to modulate TNF-alpha expression. The differential activation of morphotypic and isogenic variants of a single strain provides an excellent model system to delineate signaling pathways. PMID:15899409

  6. Tosylphenylalanine chloromethyl ketone inhibits TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis in the presence of activated NF-kappa B in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, J Y; Kim, K U; Jue, D M

    1997-01-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors such as N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) and N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) were shown to inhibit production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The proteinase inhibitors were also reported to inhibit activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) by blocking the signalling pathway for stimuli-induced phosphorylation of the inhibitory subunit (I kappa B alpha) and thus preventing its degradation. In RAW 264.7 cells TPCK and TLCK significantly suppressed LPS-induced increase in TNF-alpha mRNA, induction of nuclear kappa B-binding activity and degradation of I kappa B alpha. TPCK and TLCK effectively blocked TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis even when they were added after LPS stimulation. In these cells, however, the inhibitory modes of the two inhibitors were found to be different: while addition of TLCK suppressed I kappa B alpha degradation and reduced NF-kappa B activity, a comparable decrease in the nuclear kappa B-binding activity or in I kappa B alpha degradation was not observed in cells treated with TPCK. Our results show that TPCK inhibits LPS-induced TNF-alpha mRNA synthesis in the presence of activated NF-kappa B and suggests that mechanisms other than NF-kappa B activation are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the TNF-alpha gene. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9415036

  7. 3'-untranslated region of SP-B mRNA mediates inhibitory effects of TPA and TNF-alpha on SP-B expression.

    PubMed

    Pryhuber, G S; Church, S L; Kroft, T; Panchal, A; Whitsett, J A

    1994-07-01

    Surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is a small hydrophobic polypeptide that enhances spreading and stability of surfactant phospholipids in the alveolus of the lung. Decreased expression of SP-B is associated with respiratory failure in premature infants and in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA) cause ARDS-like lung injury in vivo. Inhibitory effects of TPA and TNF-alpha on SP-B mRNA expression in vitro were mediated by decreased SP-B mRNA stability rather than by decreased rate of SP-B gene transcription. In the present study, a human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line, NCI H441-4, was stably transfected with expression vectors consisting of the thymidine kinase (TK) promotor and human growth hormone (hGH) gene, in which the hGH 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) was replaced by the 2.0-kb human SP-B cDNA [pTKGH(SP-B2.0)] or the 837-bp human SP-B 3'-UTR [pTKGH(SP-B.837)]. The mRNAs and cellular growth hormone protein generated from the chimeric TKGH(SP-B2.0) and TKGH(SP-B.837) genes were each inhibited by approximately 50% by TPA and TNF-alpha. Dexamethasone decreased the inhibitory effects of TPA and TNF-alpha. The inhibition of steady-state hGH-SP-B mRNA by TPA and TNF-alpha was mediated by a cis-active element located in the 3-UTR region of SP-B mRNA. PMID:8048538

  8. Cell-cell interaction promotes rat marrow stromal cell differentiation into endothelial cell via activation of TACE/TNF-alpha signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Liu, Xinfeng; Chen, Jieli; Zacharek, Alex; Cui, Xu; Savant-Bhonsale, Smita; Chopp, Michael; Liu, Zhenguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiating into various cell types including endothelial cells. Microenvironment is important in cell fate determination. Tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme (TACE), a well characterized “sheddase”, participates in the differentiation process of multiple lineages by the proteolytic release of membrane-bound proteins such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Methods and Results We investigated the endothelial differentiation of MSCs under two co-culture conditions: 1) direct MSCs-rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (rBMECs) contact co-culture; and 2) indirect co-culture of MSCs and rBMECs. Also, we examined the role of TACE/TNF-alpha signaling in the process of differentiation under direct co-culture condition. We found that endothelial differentiation of MSCs was substantially enhanced in MSCs-rBMECs direct contact co-culture, but not in indirect transwell co-culture condition. Transcript levels of TACE and TNF-alpha as well as TACE protein expression were significantly upregulated in direct, but not in indirect co-culture condition. Addition of human recombinant TACE promoted gene expression of endothelial specific markers including vWF, CD31, VE-cadherin, Flk-1 and Flt-1 in the differentiating MSCs. Furthermore, inhibition of TACE with TAPI-2 or inhibition of TNF-alpha with Etanercept attenuated endothelial differentiation of MSCs in the direct co-culture condition. Conclusions We demonstrated for the first time that direct MSCs-rBMECs interaction stimulated the endothelial differentiation of MSCs via TACE/TNF alpha signaling. PMID:19796498

  9. High dose lycopene supplementation increases hepatic CYP2E1 protein and TNF-alpha expression in alcohol fed rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lycopene (LYC) has attracted considerable attention due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, in vivo knowledge of possible interactions between escalating doses of LYC and chronic alcohol ingestion are lacking. F-344 rats (6 groups, n = 10) were fed either a liquid ethanol Lie...

  10. Decreased behavioral impairments in an Alzheimer mice model by interfering with TNF-alpha metabolism.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Fabienne; Vernay, André; Leuba, Geneviève; Schenk, Françoise

    2009-10-28

    The performance of mice expressing PDAPP (+/+ or +/-) was studied in the Morris place navigation task. Different lines of questions were investigated using PDAPP+/- mice in which the activity of the cytokine Tumor Necrosing Factor alpha (TNFalpha) was attenuated by chronic treatment with anti-TNF or deleting TNFalpha (TNF-/-). Two different categories of behavior were analyzed in adult (6 months) and middle aged (15 months) subjects. Classically, the cognitive performance was assessed from the escape efficacy and quantitative bias toward the training position in a Morris water maze. Second, stereotyped circling was quantified, along with more qualitative behavioral impairments such as self-mutilation or increased reactivity. Our results can be summarized as follows. (1) All of the PDAPP mice expressed reduced cognitive performance in the Morris task, but only those with a clear-cut amyloid burden in the hippocampus showed behavioral abnormalities such as stereotyped circling. (2) Chronic treatment with anti-TNF prevented the development of pathological circling in the 6-month-old mice but not in the 15-month-old mice and had no significant effect on amyloid burden. (3) The absence of TNFalpha prevented the development of stereotyped circling in 6- and 15-month-old mice but increased amyloid burden after 15 months. These data indicate that PDAPP mice express cognitive impairments disregarding absence of TNF. The pathological behavioral anomalies related to the PDAPP mutation seem reduced by treatments interfering with TNFalpha. PMID:19622386

  11. TNF-alpha antagonism and cancer risk in rheumatoid arthritis: is continued vigilance warranted?

    PubMed

    Park, Hyon Ju; Ranganathan, Prabha

    2012-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory arthritis that can lead to significant damage and dysfunction of involved joints. Prior to 1998, treatment options were limited to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, commonly referred to as DMARDs like methotrexate, sulfasalazine, hydroxychloroquine, and gold salts. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a central cytokine that drives the inflammation in RA; hence inhibition of TNF-α offers an attractive treatment strategy in RA. The introduction of TNF-α inhibitors, a class of biologic DMARDs, has dramatically changed the treatment of RA as these are highly effective therapies. Medication-related adverse events remain a major problem in health care. This is true of the TNF-α antagonists as well, with particular concerns about increased risks of infections and malignancy. Because clinical trials performed prior to medication approval are limited by the number and clinical complexity of participants and the duration of the trials, post-marketing surveillance is critical in identifying adverse events. In order to better clarify the safety issues related to the use of TNF-α inhibitors in RA, several studies using large observational registries along with pooled meta-analyses of these studies have been published. This review will summarize the data from these recent studies on the question of malignancy risk associated with TNF-α inhibitor use in RA. It is comforting that the data from these studies do not support an increased risk of cancer, except non-melanoma skin cancer, with the use of TNF-α antagonists in adults with RA. PMID:22463799

  12. Sulforaphane has opposing effects on TNF-alpha stimulated and unstimulated synoviocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by progressive inflammation associated with rampantly proliferating synoviocytes and joint destruction due to oxidative stress. Recently, we described nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as a major requirement for limiting cartilage destruction. NF-κB and AP-1 are the main transcription factors triggering the inflammatory progression in RA. We used sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate, which is both an Nrf2 inducer and a NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitor. Methods Cultured synoviocytes were stimulated with sulforaphane (SFN) with or without TNF-α pre-treatment. NF-κB, AP-1, and Nrf2 activation was investigated via dual luciferase reporter gene assays. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured via zymography and luminex technique. Cytokine levels were detected using ELISA. Cell viability, apoptosis and caspase activity were studied. Cell proliferation was analysed by real-time cell analysis. Results SFN treatment decreased inflammation and proliferation dose-dependently in TNF-α-stimulated synoviocytes. SFN did not reduce MMP-3 and MMP-9 activity or expression significantly. Interestingly, we demonstrated that SFN has opposing effects on naïve and TNF-α-stimulated synoviocytes. In naïve cells, SFN activated the cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2. In marked contrast to this, SFN induced apoptosis in TNF-α-pre-stimulated synoviocytes. Conclusions We were able to show that SFN treatment acts contrary on naïve and inflammatory synoviocytes. SFN induces the cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2 in naïve synoviocytes, whereas it induces apoptosis in inflamed synoviocytes. These findings indicate that the use of sulforaphane might be considered as an adjunctive therapeutic strategy to combat inflammation, pannus formation, and cartilage destruction in RA. PMID:23072510

  13. NIR and MR imaging supported hydrogel based delivery system for anti-TNF alpha probiotic therapy of IBD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjic, Jelena M.; Berlec, Ales; Bagia, Christina; Liu, Lu S.; Jeric, Irenej; Gach, Michael; Janjic, Bratislav M.; Strukelj, Borut

    2016-03-01

    Current treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is largely symptomatic and consists of anti-inflammatory agents, immune-suppressives or antibiotics, whereby local luminal action is preferred to minimize systemic side-effects. Recently, anti-TNFα therapy has shown considerable success and is now being routinely used. Here we present a novel approach of using perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsion containing hydrogels (nanoemulgels) as imaging supported delivery systems for anti-TNF alpha probiotic delivery in IBD. To further facilitate image-guided therapy a food-grade lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis capable of TNFα-binding was engineered to incorporate infrared fluorescent protein (IRFP). This modified bacteria was then incorporated into novel PFC nanoemulgels. The nanoemulgels presented here are designed to deliver locally anti-TNFα probiotic in the lower colon and rectum and provide dual imaging signature of gel delivery (MRI) across the rectum and lower colon and bacteria release (NIR). NIR imaging data in vitro demonstrates high IRFP expressing and TNFα-binding bacteria loading in the hydrogel and complete release in 3 hours. Stability tests indicate that gels remain stable for at least 14 days showing no significant change in droplet size, zeta potential and pH. Flow cytometry analyses demonstrate the NIRF expressing bacteria L. lactis binds TNFα in vitro upon release from the gels. Magnetic resonance and near-infrared imaging in vitro demonstrates homogeneity of hydrogels and the imaging capacity of the overall formulation.

  14. Anoikis-resistant MDCK cells carrying susceptibilities to TNF-alpha and verotoxin that are suitable for influenza virus cultivation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Reiko; Fujisaki, Shigemi; Shozushima, Masanori; Saito, Koichi; Sato, Shigehiro

    2006-10-01

    Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were originally anchorage-dependent epithelial cells. Here, we have isolated a novel MDCK-derived cell population, termed 6 M-4, by means of culturing MDCK cells in suspension for nearly 6 months in the presence of Streptomyces griseus metalloendopeptidase (MEP). The isolated cells showed unique proliferation characteristics, which differed from parental MDCK cells. They proliferated adherently on a polystyrene matrix, but proliferated non-adherently both in the presence of MEP and on a non-adhesive matrix coated with poly 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC). The 6 M-4 cells consisted of at least two cell types. One type, termed 6 M-4-TR7, would not grow in soft agar and showed a novel phenotype in that the cells were susceptible to both TNF-alpha and verotoxin 1 (VT1). In addition, the isolated adhesion-independent cells sustained epithelial traits of parental MDCK cells. We further show that these MDCK-derivative cells are suitable for influenza virus cultivation. Hemagglutination (HA) titers of influenzaviruses A and B were increased in the suspension culture of 6 M-4-TR7 cells supplemented with the MEP in comparison to adherently growing cells in the presence of trypsin. PMID:19002866

  15. Induction of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA in bladders and spleens of mice after intravesical administration of bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, J S; Park, J H; Kim, J D; Lee, J M; Kim, S J

    1995-01-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy is highly effective in the therapy of carcinoma in situ of the bladder, but the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy is not clearly understood. We studied the production of TNF-alpha in spleens and bladders of mice after intravesical BCG or BCG/interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) instillation. Significant change of TNF-alpha mRNA expression of spleens and bladders of C3H/He mice was observed after intravesical BCG instillation, although intravesical IFN-gamma therapy 3 days after BCG instillation to maintain the activated state of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells did not show a significant change of TNF-alpha mRNA, compared with that of BCG therapy alone. Maximal production of TNF-alpha mRNA in spleens of mice was seen after the first or second intravesical BCG instillation, and production of TNF-alpha mRNA in bladders was also increased after intravesical BCG instillation. The increment of TNF-alpha production by BCG stimulation in HL-60, a promyelocytic leukaemic cell line, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro may support the in vivo effect of BCG therapy on the bladder. These data show that local production of TNF-alpha as well as systemic production by intravesical BCG treatment may correlate with one of the mechanisms of BCG immunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7697918

  16. Cytokine expression of macrophages in HIV-1-associated vacuolar myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Tyor, W R; Glass, J D; Baumrind, N; McArthur, J C; Griffin, J W; Becker, P S; Griffin, D E

    1993-05-01

    Macrophages are frequently present within the periaxonal and intramyelinic vacuoles that are located primarily in the posterior and lateral funiculi of the thoracic spinal cord in HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy. But the role of these macrophages in the formation of the vacuoles is unclear. One hypothesis is that cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, are produced locally by macrophages and have toxic effects on myelin or oligodendrocytes. The resulting myelin damage eventually culminates in the removal of myelin by macrophages and vacuole formation. We studied thoracic spinal cord specimens taken at autopsy from HIV-positive (+) and HIV-negative individuals. The predominant mononuclear cells present in HIV+ spinal cords are macrophages. They are located primarily in the posterior and lateral funiculi regardless of the presence or absence of vacuolar myelopathy. Macrophages and microglia are more frequent in HIV+ than HIV-negative individuals and these cells frequently stain for class I and class II antigens, IL-1, and TNF-alpha. Activated macrophages positive for IL-1 and TNF-alpha are great increased in the posterior and lateral funiculi of HIV+ individuals with and without vacuolar myelopathy, suggesting they are present prior to the development of vacuoles. Cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, may be toxic for myelin or oligodendrocytes, leading to myelin damage and removal by macrophages and vacuole formation. PMID:8492917

  17. Saponin Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Propagation by Up-regulating Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 2

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang-Min; Min, Saehong; Son, Kidong; Lee, Han Sol; Park, Eun Mee; Ngo, Huong T. T.; Tran, Huong T. L.; Lim, Yun-Sook; Hwang, Soon B.

    2012-01-01

    Saponins are a group of naturally occurring plant glycosides which possess a wide range of pharmacological properties, including anti-tumorigenic and antiviral activities. To investigate whether saponin has anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) activity, we examined the effect of saponin on HCV replication. HCV replication was efficiently inhibited at a concentration of 10 µg/ml of saponin in cell culture grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. Inhibitory effect of saponin on HCV replication was verified by quantitative real-time PCR, reporter assay, and immunoblot analysis. In addition, saponin potentiated IFN-α-induced anti-HCV activity. Moreover, saponin exerted antiviral activity even in IFN-α resistant mutant HCVcc-infected cells. To investigate how cellular genes were regulated by saponin, we performed microarray analysis using HCVcc-infected cells. We demonstrated that suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) protein level was distinctively increased by saponin, which in turn resulted in inhibition of HCV replication. We further showed that silencing of SOCS2 resurrected HCV replication and overexpression of SOCS2 suppressed HCV replication. These data imply that saponin inhibits HCV replication via SOCS2 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that saponin may be a potent therapeutic agent for HCV patients. PMID:22745742

  18. Adipokines, cytokines and body fat stores in hepatitis C virus liver steatosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Reimers, Emilio; López-Prieto, Javier; Quintero-Platt, Geraldine; Pelazas-González, Ricardo; Alemán-Valls, M Remedios; Pérez-Hernández, Onán; de-la-Vega-Prieto, M José; Gómez-Rodríguez, M Angeles; Martín-González, Candelaria; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify patients with or without liver steatosis and its severity in treatment-naïve patients affected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. METHODS: We included 56 HCV infected patients, and assessed the amount of liver fat by histomorphometry, and its relationships with fat and lean mass at different parts of the body (by densitometry), hormones [insulin, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)], adipokines (resistin, adiponectin, leptin), and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6). RESULTS: Although the intensity of liver steatosis is related to trunk fat mass and HOMA, 33% of patients showed no liver steatosis, and this finding was not related to body mass index or genotype. Besides trunk fat mass, no other factor was related to the presence or not of liver steatosis, or to the intensity of it, by multivariate analysis. Lean mass was not related to liver steatosis. Adiponectin levels were lower among patients. No differences were observed in leptin and resistin. CONCLUSION: Steatosis in HCV infection is common (67.2%), and closely related to trunk fat, and insulin resistance, but not with leg fat mass or adipokines. PMID:26783423

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human macrophages modulates the cytokine response to Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Kandil, O; Fishman, J A; Koziel, H; Pinkston, P; Rose, R M; Remold, H G

    1994-01-01

    The present studies examined production of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and IL-6 by human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Pneumocystis carinii in vitro and the impact of concurrent macrophage infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on these cytokine responses. Macrophages were infected with the HIV-1 BaL monocytotropic strain for 10 to 14 days and then exposed to P. carinii. At various times following P. carinii treatment, culture supernatants were harvested to assess the cytokine profile. Addition of P. carinii to HIV-uninfected macrophages resulted in augmented production of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 beta protein. By contrast, in HIV-infected macrophages exposed to P. carinii, only the release of IL-6 was increased compared with that for HIV-uninfected macrophages, while the levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta decreased. This altered response was confirmed at the molecular level for TNF-alpha mRNA. Preventing physical contact between P. carinii and macrophages by a membrane filter inhibited all cytokine release. Substituting P. carinii with a preparation of P. carinii 95- to 115-kDa major membrane glycoprotein A yielded a response similar to that obtained by addition of intact P. carinii. These results suggest that HIV-1 infection of human macrophages modulates cytokine responses to P. carinii. Images PMID:8300221

  20. Induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine alveolar macrophages following stimulation with Pasteurella haemolytica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, H S; Maheswaran, S K; Lin, G; Townsend, E L; Ames, T R

    1995-01-01

    Bovine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) cDNAs were generated by reverse transcription and then by PCR amplification from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated alveolar macrophage RNA. The amplified cDNAs were cloned into pPow and expressed in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. The expressed proteins were confirmed as TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and bioassays. We then used the cloned genes as probes in Northern (RNA) blots and investigated the kinetics of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression in bovine alveolar macrophages stimulated with purified LPS from Pasteurella haemolytica 12296. The effect of LPS on TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression was dose dependent, and induction was observed at a concentration of 0.01 microgram/ml. Both TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression were detectable within 0.5 h after stimulation with 1 microgram of LPS per ml, peaked at 1 to 2 h, steadily declined up to 16 h, and were undetectable by 24 h. Secreted TNF-alpha measured by bioassay peaked at 4 h and accumulated at a lesser concentration in conditioned medium throughout the 24 h. By contrast, secreted IL-1 beta was induced at 8 h and reached a maximal concentration at 24 h after stimulation. The ability of LPS to induce TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression and secretion of bioactive proteins were suppressed by polymyxin B. Our findings support a role for LPS from P. haemolytica in the induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. PMID:7822000

  1. High dexamethasone concentration prevents stimulatory effects of TNF-alpha and LPS on IL-6 secretion from the precursors of human muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Prelovsek, Oja; Mars, Tomaz; Jevsek, Marko; Podbregar, Matej; Grubic, Zoran

    2006-12-01

    A frequent finding in patients surviving critical illness myopathy is chronic muscle dysfunction. Its pathogenesis is mostly unknown; one explanation could be that muscle regeneration, which normally follows myopathy, is insufficient in these patients because of a high glucocorticoid level in their blood. Glucocorticoids can prevent stimulatory effects of proinflammatory factors on the interleukin (IL)-6 secretion, diminishing in this way the autocrine and paracrine IL-6 actions known to stimulate proliferation at the earliest, myoblast stage of muscle formation. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of major proinflammatory agents [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] on the IL-6 secretion from the muscle precursors and then studied the influence of dexamethasone (Dex) on these effects. Mononuclear myoblasts, which still proliferate, were compared with myotubes in which this capacity is already lost. For correct interpretation of results, cultures were examined for putative apoptosis and necrosis. We found that constitutive secretion of IL-6 did not differ significantly between myoblasts and myotubes; however, the TNF-alpha- and LPS-stimulated IL-6 release was more pronounced (P < 0.001) in myoblasts. Dex, applied at the 0.1-100 nM concentration range, prevented constitutive and TNF-alpha- and LPS-stimulated IL-6 release at both developmental stages but only at high concentration (P < 0.01). Although there are still missing links to it, our results support the concept that high concentrations of glucocorticoids, met in critically ill patients, prevent TNF-alpha- and LPS-stimulated IL-6 secretion. This results in reduced IL-6-mediated myoblast proliferation, leading to the reduced final mass of the regenerated muscle. PMID:16857895

  2. Distinct osteoclast precursors in the bone marrow and extramedullary organs characterized by responsiveness to Toll-like receptor ligands and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Yamada, Takayuki; Tsuneto, Motokazu; Yamane, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Masayuki; Shultz, Leonard D; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi

    2003-11-15

    Osteoclasts are derived from hemopoietic stem cells and play critical roles in bone resorption and remodeling. Multinucleated osteoclasts are attached tightly to bone matrix, whereas precursor cells with the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts in culture are widely distributed. In this study, we assessed the characteristics of osteoclast precursors in bone marrow (BM) and in extramedullary organs as indicated by their responsiveness to ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and to TNF-alpha. Development of osteoclasts from precursor cells in the BM was inhibited by CpG oligonucleotides, a ligand for TLR9, but not by LPS, a ligand for TLR4. BM osteoclasts were induced by TNF-alpha as well as receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand in the presence of M-CSF. Splenic osteoclast precursors, even in osteoclast-deficient osteopetrotic mice, differentiated into mature osteoclasts following exposure to TNF-alpha or receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand. However, splenic osteoclastogenesis was inhibited by both LPS and CpG. Osteoclastogenesis from peritoneal precursors was inhibited by not only these TLR ligands but also TNF-alpha. The effects of peptidoglycan, a ligand for TLR2, were similar to those of LPS. BM cells precultured with M-CSF were characterized with intermediate characteristics between those of splenic and peritoneal cavity precursors. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that osteoclast precursors are not identical in the tissues examined. To address the question of why mature osteoclasts occur only in association with bone, we may characterize not only the microenvironment for osteoclastogenesis, but also the osteoclast precursor itself in intramedullary and extramedullary tissues. PMID:14607912

  3. Pentoxifylline Neuroprotective Effects Are Possibly Related to Its Anti-Inflammatory and TNF-Alpha Inhibitory Properties, in the 6-OHDA Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Kelly Rose Tavares; Nobre, Hélio Vitoriano; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A. M.; de Andrade, Geanne Matos; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-TNF-alpha activity, associated with its anti-inflammatory action. Considering Parkinson's disease (PD) as a neuroinflammatory disorder, the objectives were to evaluate PTX neuroprotective properties, in a model of PD. Male Wistar rats, divided into sham-operated (SO), untreated 6-OHDA, and 6-OHDA treated with PTX (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) groups, received a unilateral 6-OHDA injection, except the SO group administered with saline. Treatments started 24 h after surgery and continued for 15 days when the animals were submitted to apomorphine-induced rotations, open field, and forced swimming tests. At the next day, they were euthanized and their striata processed for neurochemical (DA and DOPAC determinations), histological, and immunohistochemical (Fluoro-Jade, TH, DAT, OX-42, TNF-alpha, COX-2, and iNOS) studies. PTX reversed the behavioral changes observed in the untreated 6-OHDA animals. Furthermore, PTX partially reversed the decrease in DA contents and improved neuronal viability. In addition, decreases in immunostaining for TH and dopamine transporter (DAT) were reversed. The untreated 6-OHDA group showed intense OX-42, TNF-alpha, COX-2, and iNOS immunoreactivities, which were attenuated by PTX. In conclusion, we demonstrated a neuroprotective effect of PTX, possibly related to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions, indicating its potential as an adjunct treatment for PD. PMID:26491600

  4. Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via suppressing ERK activation

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Li, Jinqing; Dong, Xiaoyu; Potts, Jay D.; Tang, Dong-Qi; Li, Dong-Sheng; Cui, Taixing

    2010-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) appear to be critical regulators of a multitude of processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and inflammation. We have recently demonstrated that a DUB of ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) inhibits vascular lesion formation via suppressing inflammatory responses in vasculature. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Herein, we report that a posttranscriptional up-regulation of UCH-L1 provides a negative feedback to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In rat adult VSMCs, adenoviral over-expression of UCH-L1 inhibited TNF{alpha}-induced activation of ERK and DNA synthesis. In contrast, over-expression of UCH-L1 did not affect platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced VSMC proliferation and activation of growth stimulating cascades including ERK. TNF{alpha} hardly altered UCH-L1 mRNA expression and stability; however, up-regulated UCH-L1 protein expression via increasing UCH-L1 translation. These results uncover a novel mechanism by which UCH-L1 suppresses vascular inflammation.

  5. Cytokine-induced patterns of gene expression in skeletal muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Alon, Tamar; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Socci, Nicholas D

    2003-08-22

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and other cytokines induce a state of negative energy balance leading to the breakdown of skeletal muscle. Leptin, another member of the cytokine superfamily, also induces a state of negative energy balance but does not alter lean body mass. The transcription profile of skeletal muscle was compared in animals treated with TNF-alpha or leptin or in animals pair-fed over a 7-day time course using 11,000-gene microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Ten clusters of skeletal muscle genes were identified, each of which showed significantly different expression between TNF-alpha treatment and pair feeding. Studies comparing leptin treatment and pair feeding revealed that both activate nearly identical programs of gene expression in skeletal muscle. These data indicate that the effects of leptin on skeletal muscle are markedly different from those of TNF-alpha and that the effects of leptin on skeletal muscle can be largely ascribed to its anorectic effects. Subtle differences between leptin and pair feeding were evident only after 7 days of treatment. In general, pair feeding altered gene expression after the 7-day treatment, whereas leptin did not. The effects of TNF-alpha on skeletal muscle are distinct from those of pair feeding, a result consistent with its known catabolic effects on this tissue. Analyses of the data from food-restricted animals also identified a set of transcriptional changes associated with this state. Further studies of many newly identified leptin-, TNF-alpha-, and starvation-regulated genes and the apparent coordinate regulation of these clusters may reveal important insights into the different effects of cytokines on skeletal muscle. PMID:12750389

  6. Triptolide inhibits COX-2 expression by regulating mRNA stability in TNF-{alpha}-treated A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Huang, Xin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xiao; Li, Han; Zhang, Luyong

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression and the half-life of COX-2 mRNA is decreased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HuR protein shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm is inhibited by triptolide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triptolide inhibited 3 Prime -UTR fluorescence reporter gene activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COX-2 mRNA binding to HuR is decreased by triptolide in pull-down experiments. -- Abstract: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression is frequently associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and involved in tumor proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis. In the present study, the effects of triptolide on COX-2 expression in A549 cells were investigated and triptolide was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression. In our further studies, it was found that triptolide decreased the half-life of COX-2 mRNA dramatically and that it inhibited 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) fluorescence reporter gene activity. Meanwhile, triptolide inhibited the HuR shuttling from nucleus to cytoplasm. After triptolide treatment, decreased COX-2 mRNA in pull-down experiments with anti-HuR antibodies was observed, indicating that the decreased cytoplasmic HuR is responsible for the decreased COX-2 mRNA. Taken together, our results provided evidence for the first time that triptolide inhibited COX-2 expression by COX-2 mRNA stability modulation and post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a novel mechanism of action for triptolide which may be important in the treatment of lung cancer.

  7. Expression of TNF-Alpha-Dependent Apoptosis-Related Genes in the Peripheral Blood of Malagasy Subjects with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Doherty, T. Mark; Andriamihantasoa, Lova H.; Richard, Vincent; Gicquel, Brigitte; Soares, Jean-Louis; Zumla, Alimuddin; Razanamparany, Voahangy Rasolofo

    2013-01-01

    The majority of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections remain asymptomatic with only up to 10% progressing to clinical tuberculosis. However, the constituents of the effective “protective immunity” against tuberculosis responsible for containing most infections remain unknown. Evaluating gene transcriptional profiles in tuberculosis clinical cohorts is one approach to understanding the spectrum of tuberculosis progression. It is clear that apoptosis plays a role in the control of tuberculosis but the utility of apoptosis-related genes as surrogate markers of protection against tuberculosis has not been well investigated. To characterize potential surrogate markers that could discriminate different phases of the clinical tuberculosis spectrum, we investigated gene expression of several TNF-alpha dependent apoptotic genes (TNFR1, TNFR2, FLICE, FLIPs) by real-time RT-PCR of peripheral blood cells from cohorts of individuals with active tuberculosis or potential exposure to tuberculosis. Newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients (n = 23), their close household contacts (n = 80), and community controls (n = 46) were tested at intervals over a period of up to two years. Latent infection or previous Mtb contact was assessed by ELISPOT and TST and complete blood counts were performed during the follow up. Results showed significant upregulation of FLIPs expression by infected individuals regardless of clinical status at entry to the study. A higher percentage of lymphocytes was found in the infected household contacts that remained healthy. In contrast, in individuals with active TB, a significant upregulation of TNFR2 expression, a significantly higher percentage of monocytes and a significantly decreased lymphocyte count were seen, compared to subjects that remained healthy. Moreover, the household contacts who subsequently developed signs of TB also had a significantly high number of monocytes. These data suggest tuberculosis may be associated with

  8. Th1/Th2 cytokines and their genotypes as predictors of hepatitis B virus related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Roli; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant type of primary liver cancer, is one of the most serious life-threatening malignancies, worldwide. In majority of the cases, HCC develops after prolonged and persistent chronic liver disease. hepatitis B virus (HBV) or HCV infection is prominent etiological factors, attributing to this condition. It has been well documented that HBV, being the inducer of chronic inflammation, is the main causative agent in causing HCC, particularly in Asian countries. The HBV infection leads to a wide range of clinical symptoms from carrier state to malignancy. Cytokines being immune-modulatory molecules, are the key mediators in the defense mechanism against viral infection. In this regard, this review will detail the substantial role of key Th1: interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-2, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ; Th2: IL-4, IL-10 and non Th1/Th2: IL-6, transforming growth factor-β1 cytokines genotypes in analyzing the variability in the clinical manifestations in an HBV-afflicted individual, which might finally, culminates into HCC. Since cytokine production is regulated genetically, the cytokine promoter region single-nucleotide polymorphisms induced changes, greatly affects the cytokine production, thus resulting into differential outcome of immune balance. PMID:26085916

  9. Activation of human monocytes by streptococcal rhamnose glucose polymers is mediated by CD14 antigen, and mannan binding protein inhibits TNF-alpha release.

    PubMed

    Soell, M; Lett, E; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1995-01-15

    The present work was initiated to define mechanisms that account for the binding on human monocytes of streptococcal cell wall polysaccharides formed by rhamnose glucose polymers (RGPs), and subsequent stimulatory activities. We show here that RGPs bind to and stimulate human monocytes to produce TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. To detect cell surface RGPs binding proteins, intact monocytes were biotinylated before lysis with Nonidet P-40 and solubilized proteins were incubated with RGPs Affi-Prep beads. One major membrane protein of 55 kDa was specifically detected and identified as CD14 because it reacted with anti-CD14 mAbs. Furthermore, anti-CD14 mAbs were able to perform a dose-dependent inhibition of RGPs binding, and suppressed TNF-alpha release from RGPs-stimulated monocytes. Moreover, we demonstrated that RGPs also bind to CD11b; however, this binding is not implicated in synthesis of TNF-alpha. Interestingly, RGPs binding to monocytes was enhanced by human normal serum (HNS) whereas HNS inhibits the TNF-alpha-stimulating activity of RGPs. Western blotting analysis of HNS proteins purified on RGPs Affi-prep beads revealed three specific bands of 75, 55, and 32 kDa reactive with anti-C3 Abs, anti-CD14 mAbs (TUK4), and anti-human mannan binding protein (hMBP)-derived peptide IgG, respectively. These results suggest that C3, soluble CD14, and hMBP form complexes that are probably active in enhancing the binding of RGPs to monocytes. Additional studies have shown that hMBP that recognizes RGPs prevents, unlike the LPS binding protein, TNF-alpha release by inhibiting the binding of RGPs to CD14 Ag. By incubating cells with a constant amount of RGPs-hMBP complexes in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of C1q, we also demonstrated that C1q receptor mediates the binding and probably the uptake of RGPs-hMBP complexes by human monocytes. PMID:7529289

  10. Influence of High Aspect Ratio Vessel Cell Culture on TNF-Alpha, Insulin Secretion and Glucose Homeostasis in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans from Wistar Furth Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.a; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.

    1999-01-01

    The present studies were carried out to determine the influence of a ground based microgravity paradigm, utilizing the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) cell culture upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. An additional aim was to elucidate alterations in insulin secretion and glucose utilization using the HARV low shear, gravity averaged vector, cell culture technique. Islets were isolated (1726 +/- 117, 150 micron islet equivalent units) from Wistar Furth rats and assigned to four treatment groups: 1) HARV, 2) HARV plus LPS, 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS. Following 48 hours of culture, insulin concentration was increased in both HARV and static cultures (p<0.05). Islet medium from HARV and static cultures were assayed for TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) and was measured at selected time points for 48 hours. TNF-alpha was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). This is a novel observation and indicates that TNF producing cells are present in islets and that LPS stimulates TNF secretion in isolated islets. A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the islet medium of the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). That TNF-alpha is associated with a decreased insulin secretion is intriguing, both as it relates to in-flight investigations, and as it may provide insight into the pathophysiology of Type I and Type 11 diabetes. Glucose concentration in islet medium was lesser throughout the experiment in static cultures, suggesting a decreased reliance upon glucose as a metabolic substrate in the islets cultured in HARVS. In conclusion, the present studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF production in the microgravity HARV paradigm. Additionally, alterations in fuel

  11. Increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and natural killer cell (NK) function using an integrative approach in late stage cancers.

    PubMed

    See, Darryl; Mason, Stephanie; Roshan, Ramesh

    2002-05-01

    Natural products may increase cytotoxic activity of Natural Killer Cells (NK) Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-alpha) while decreasing DNA damage in patients with late-stage cancer. Pilot studies have suggested that a combination of Nutraceuticals can raise NK cell function and TNF-alpha alpha activity and result in improved clinical outcomes in patients with late stage cancer. The objective of the study is to determine if Nutraceuticals can significantly raise NK function and TNF levels in patients with late stage cancer. After informed consent was obtained, 20 patients with stage IV, end-stage cancer were evaluated (one bladder, five breast, two prostate, one neuroblastoma, two non-small cell lung, three colon, 1 mesothelioma, two lymphoma, one ovarian, one gastric, one osteosarcoma). Transfer Factor Plus (TFP+, 3 tablets 3 times per day), IMUPlus (non denatured milk whey protein, 40 gm/day); Intravenous (50 to 100 gm/day) and oral (1-2 gm/day) ascorbic acid; Agaricus Blazeii Murill teas (10 gm/day); Immune Modulator Mix (a combination of vitamin, minerals, antioxidants and immune-enhancing natural products); nitrogenated soy extract (high levels of genistein and dadzein) and Andrographis Paniculata (500 mg twice, daily) were used. Baseline NK function by standard 4 h 51Cr release assay and TNF alpha and receptor levels were measured by ELISA from resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated adherent and non-adherent Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell (PBMC). Total mercaptans and glutathione in plasma were taken and compared to levels measured 6 months later. Complete blood counts and chemistry panels were routinely monitored. As of a mean of 6 months, 16/20 patients were still alive. The 16 survivors had significantly higher NK function than baseline (p < .01 for each) and TNF-alpha levels in all four cell populations studied (p < .01 for each). Total mercaptans (p < .01) and TNF-alpha receptor levels were significantly reduced (p < .01). It was also observed

  12. Pentoxifylline inhibits superantigen-induced toxic shock and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, T; Stiles, B G

    1999-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a critical cytokine that mediates the toxic effects of bacterial superantigens like staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Pentoxifylline, an anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits endotoxemia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of TNF-alpha, was tested for its ability to inhibit SEB- and TSST-1-induced activation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro and toxin-mediated shock in mice. Stimulation of PBMCs by SEB or TSST-1 was effectively blocked by pentoxifylline (10 mM), as evidenced by the inhibition of TNF-alpha, interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and T-cell proliferation. The levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha, and IFN-gamma in serum after an SEB or TSST-1 injection were significantly lower in mice given pentoxifylline (5.5 mg/animal) versus control mice. Additionally, pentoxifylline diminished the lethal effects and temperature fluctuations elicited by SEB and TSST-1. Thus, in addition to treating endotoxemias, the cumulative in vitro and in vivo data suggest that pentoxifylline may also be useful in abrogating the ill effects of staphylococcal enterotoxins and TSST-1. PMID:10391869

  13. Involvement of IL-18 in the Expansion of Unique Hepatic T Cells with Unconventional Cytokine Profiles during Schistosoma mansoni Infection

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Keishi; Nakamura, Risa; Osada, Yoshio; Senba, Masachika; Tamada, Koji; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2014-01-01

    Infection with schistosomes invokes severe fibrotic granulomatous responses in the liver of the host. Schistosoma mansoni infection induces dramatic fluctuations in Th1 or Th2 cytokine responses systemically; Th1 reactions are provoked in the early phase, whilst Th2 responses become dominant after oviposition begins. In the liver, various unique immune cells distinct from those of conventional immune competent organs or tissues exist, resulting in a unique immunological environment. Recently, we demonstrated that S. mansoni infection induces unique CD4+ T cell populations exhibiting unconventional cytokine profiles in the liver of mice during the period between Th1- and Th2-phases, which we term the transition phase. They produce both IFN-γ and IL-4 or both IFN-γ and IL-13 simultaneously. Moreover, T cells secreting triple cytokines IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-4 were also induced. We term these cells Multiple Cytokine Producing Hepatic T cells (MCPHT cells). During the transition phase, when MCPHT cells increase, IL-18 secretion was up-regulated in the liver and sera. In S. mansoni-infected IL-18-deficient mice, expansion of MCPHT cells was curtailed. Thus our data suggest that IL-18 produced during S. mansoni infection play a role in the expansion of MCPHT cells. PMID:24824897

  14. Cytokine expression in dogs with natural Leishmania infantum infection.

    PubMed

    Panaro, M A; Brandonisio, O; Cianciulli, A; Cavallo, P; Lacasella, V; Paradies, P; Testini, G; De Caprariis, D; Mitolo, V; Otranto, D

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine expression in 22 Leishmania infantum naturally infected dogs, in order to correlate this parameter with the clinical status of infected animals. After 4 and 8 months from the first diagnosis of Leishmania infection, clinical and laboratory examination of dogs was performed and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated. The cytokine profile was analysed in terms of IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-alpha mRNA expression in cultured PBMC by a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. Thirteen out of 22 Leishmania-infected dogs remained asymptomatic in the follow-up, while 9 showed clinical signs of leishmaniasis. IL-4, IL-10, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma mRNA levels were not significantly different in asymptomatic compared to symptomatic animals 4 months from the diagnosis of Leishmania infection, but were significantly higher in symptomatic versus asymptomatic dogs after 8 months from diagnosis. In addition, IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-alpha mRNA levels significantly increased only in symptomatic dogs at 8 months, in comparison to the levels found at 4 months. These results show a mixed Th1 and Th2 cytokine response in Leishmania-infected dogs, with higher cytokine expression in dogs with manifest clinical disease, during the second follow-up after 8 months from the first diagnosis of infection. PMID:19490725

  15. Cachectin/tumor necrosis factor-alpha formation in human decidua. Potential role of cytokines in infection-induced preterm labor.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, M L; Cox, S M; Beutler, B; Milewich, L; MacDonald, P C

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted as part of an investigation to evaluate the hypothesis that bacterial toxins (LPS or lipoteichoic acid), acting on macrophage-like uterine decidua to cause increased formation of cytokines, may be involved in the pathogenesis of infection-associated preterm labor. We found that cachectin/tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was synthesized and secreted into the culture medium by human decidual cells and explants in response to treatment with LPS. LPS treatment also caused an increase in PGF2 alpha production by decidual cells and explants. In amnion cells in monolayer culture, TNF-alpha stimulated PGE2 formation, and TNF-alpha was cytostatic (inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA) but not cytolytic in amnion cells. TNF-alpha was not detectable (less than 0.34 ng/ml) in the amniotic fluid of normal pregnancies at midtrimester or at term before or after the onset of labor (n = 44); but TNF-alpha was present at concentrations between 2.8 and 22.3 ng/ml in amniotic fluids of 4 of 20 pregnancies with intact membranes complicated by preterm labor (less than 34 wk gestational age). LPS was present in 10 of the 20 amniotic fluids of preterm labor pregnancies, including all four in which TNF-alpha was present. Bacteria were identified in only one of the four LPS-positive, TNF-alpha-positive fluids. Cytokine formation in macrophage-like decidua may serve a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of preterm labor, including increased prostaglandin formation and premature rupture of the membranes. Images PMID:2913048

  16. A diet supplemented with husks of Plantago ovata reduces the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and obesity by affecting adiponectin and TNF-alpha in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Galisteo, Milagros; Sánchez, Manuel; Vera, Rocío; González, Mercedes; Anguera, Anna; Duarte, Juan; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze whether consumption of a fiber-supplemented diet containing 3.5% Plantago ovata husks prevented many of the abnormalities clustered in the metabolic syndrome, including obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. For this purpose, obese Zucker rats, a model of type 2 diabetes, and their lean littermates were studied. Rats consumed a standard control diet or that diet supplemented with 3.5% P. ovata husks for 25 wk. Body weights were measured weekly. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured monthly. At the end of the treatment, plasma concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, FFAs, glucose, insulin, adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were determined, and studies on vascular function were performed using aortic rings. Rats fed the P. ovata husk-supplemented diet had a significantly reduced body weight gain compared with those fed the standard diet. Decreased endothelium-dependent relaxation in response to acetylcholine (ACh) by aortic rings from obese Zucker rats was improved in those fed the fiber-supplemented diet. The greater SBP, higher plasma concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, FFA, glucose, insulin, and TNF-alpha, and the hypoadinectinemia that occurred in obese Zucker rats that consumed the control diet were significantly improved in those fed the fiber-supplemented diet. We conclude that intake of a P. ovata husk-supplemented diet prevents endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and obesity development, and ameliorates dyslipidemia and abnormal plasma concentrations of adiponectin and TNF-alpha in obese Zucker rats. PMID:16177203

  17. UVB radiation suppresses the TNF-alpha-induced expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, M; Futamura, S; Horio, T

    1996-10-01

    Endothelial cells, which are involved in the development of inflammatory and immune responses, can express various kinds of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) including E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecules-I (ICAM-I). These cell adhesion molecules and their ligands on leukocytes play an essential role in the control of extravasation of inflammatory cells. Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation can reach the upper dermis and modulate CAM expressions on vascular endothelial cells (EC). We examined the direct effect of UVB on E-selectin and ICAM-I expression on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and also examined its effect on these cells induced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which is a potent CAM-inducer and is released by UVB radiation on the skin. Various doses of UVB were exposed to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and these expressions were examined by flow cytometric analysis using FACScan; 5, 10 and 25 mJ/cm2 UVB induced neither E-selectin nor ICAM-I expression. Irradiation of HUVEC with UVB 30 min after treatment with TNF-alpha inhibited these expressions. Although the inhibition of E-selectin was observed until 12 h in a dose-dependent manner, ICAM-I expression was almost completely inhibited, even at 5 mJ/cm2 UVB. UVB irradiation before TNF-alpha stimulation showed similar effects to those obtained post-irradiation. This study has demonstrated that UVB can directly down-regulate EC functions, and the results may have implications in action mechanisms of UVB therapy. PMID:8902648

  18. Functional analysis of a human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) promoter polymorphism related to joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Kaijzel, E. L.; van Krugten, M. V.; Brinkman, B. M.; Huizinga, T. W.; van der Straaten, T.; Hazes, J. M.; Ziegler-Heitbrock, H. W.; Nedospasov, S. A.; Breedveld, F. C.; Verweij, C. L.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional heterogeneity in the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene may be responsible for the TNF-alpha response in infectious and autoimmune diseases. Recently, the TNF-238 promoter polymorphism was observed as being associated with a more destructive disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To determine the relation between TNF-238 and disease progression, the extent of joint destruction in a cohort of 101 RA patients followed for 12 years was analyzed. Furthermore, we have attempted to link this polymorphism to TNF-alpha gene transcription in monocytes and lymphocytes in vitro. PATIENTS, MATERIALS, AND METHODS: The extent of joint destruction determined on X-rays of hands and feet assessed after 0, 3, 6, and 12 years was compared with TNF-238 genotypes. Functional consequences of TNF-alpha gene polymorphisms using reporter gene constructs were analyzed in cells of the monocyte and lymphocyte lineage by means of transient transfection systems. RESULTS: The rate of joint damage in -238GA patients was lower than that in the -238GG patients, independent of HLA-DR4. Damage after 12 years was 76 +/- 30 for the -238GA versus 126 +/- 13 for the -238GG patients as determined by the van der Heijde's modification of Sharp's method. Furthermore, TNF-238A was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with an additional polymorphism at position -376. Functional assays revealed no significant differences in the level of inducible reporter gene expression between the TNF-238/-376 promoter constructs in the cell types tested. CONCLUSION: In a prospective study, we show that the TNF-238GG genotype contributes to progression of joint destruction in RA, independent of the presence of HLA-DR4. However, in vitro transfection assays indicate that TNF-238A by itself or in combination with TNF-376A is not likely to be of direct functional relevance for transcriptional activation. Therefore, these polymorphisms may serve as markers for additional polymorphisms in the TNF

  19. [The off-label-prescription of TNF-alpha blocking agents for spondyloarthropathies in the context of recent statement by a German federal court].

    PubMed

    Sieper, J

    2002-12-01

    With the TNF alpha-blocking agents for the first time a very efficient and probably disease-modifying treatment for the spondyloarthropathies, especially ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, has become available. Because these drugs have not yet been approved for this indication in the European Community they are regarded as off-label-therapy in Germany. It is the purpose of this article to discuss a recently released statement by a German federal court whether the herein formulated conditions for the prescription of off-label therapies is met for TNF-blocker treatment for this indication. PMID:12491132

  20. Overexpression of cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis via NF-{kappa}B in mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Cheng-Fei; Han, Ya-Ling; Jie-Deng,; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Jian-Kang,; Bo-Luan,; Jie-Li

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} CREG protected MSCs from tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced apoptosis. {yields} CREG inhibits the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and prevents the activation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} CREG inhibits NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and pro-apoptosis protein transcription. {yields} CREG anti-apoptotic effect involves inhibition of the death receptor pathway. {yields} p53 is downregulated by CREG via NF-{kappa}B pathway under TNF-{alpha} stimulation. -- Abstract: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show great potential for therapeutic repair after myocardial infarction. However, poor viability of transplanted MSCs in the ischemic heart has limited their use. Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been identified as a potent inhibitor of apoptosis. This study therefore aimed to determine if rat bone marrow MSCs transfected with CREG-were able to effectively resist apoptosis induced by inflammatory mediators, and to demonstrate the mechanism of CREG action. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling assays. The pathways mediating these apoptotic effects were investigated by Western blotting. Overexpression of CREG markedly protected MSCs from tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced apoptosis by 50% after 10 h, through inhibition of the death-receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway, leading to attenuation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Moreover, CREG resisted the serine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and prevented the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) under TNF-{alpha} stimulation. Treatment of cells with the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) significantly increased the transcription of pro-apoptosis proteins (p53 and Fas) by NF-{kappa}B, and attenuated the anti-apoptotic effects of CREG on MSCs. The results of this study

  1. Cytokine Response Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Clearance in HIV Coinfected Patients Initiating Peg Interferon-α Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Truong Tam; Niloofar, Reihani; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Nils, Kuster; Bollore, Karine; Ducos, Jacques; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Reynes, Jacques; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on peginterferon-α (pegIFNα) and ribavirin induces important changes in cytokine release and T cell activation. Objective Immune response to pegIFNα-ribavirin therapy was explored in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. Methods Concentrations of 25 cytokines and CD8+ T cell activation were monitored in HCV/HIV coinfected patients classified as sustained virological responders (SVR, n=19) and non-responders (NR, n=11). Results High pretreatment concentrations of IP-10 (CXCL-10) and MCP-1 (CCL-2) were associated with a poor anti-HCV response. PegIFNα-ribavirin therapy increased CD8+ T cell activation and induced significant changes in levels of eleven cytokines related to both Th1 and Th2 responses in SVR (IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, IP-10, eotaxin, MCP-1) but of only six cytokines in NR (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-12p40/70, IL-13, eotaxin). The highest rise in MIP-1β and MCP-1 levels was observed four weeks after anti-HCV treatment initiation in SVR compared to NR (p=0.002 and p=0.03, respectively), whereas a decrease in IL-8 concentration was associated with treatment failure (p= 0.052). Conclusions Higher and broader cytokine responses to pegIFNα-ribavirin therapy were observed in SVR patients compared to NR. Changes in IL-8, MIP-1β, and MCP-1 serum concentrations may be associated with efficacy of pegIFNα- and ribavirin-based therapies in patients coinfected by HCV and HIV. PMID:26740864

  2. Th1 and Th2 cytokine profiles induced by hepatitis C virus F protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ming; Deng, Xiaozhao; Zhai, Xiangjun; Xu, Ke; Kong, Jing; Zhang, Jinhai; Zhou, Zhenxian; Yu, Xiaojie; Xu, Xiaodong; Liu, Yunxi; Zhu, Danyan; Zhang, Yun

    2013-05-01

    Th1 and Th2 cytokine response has been confirmed to be correlated with the pathogenesis of HCV infection. The aim of the study is to investigate the Th1 and Th2 cytokine profiles induced by HCV alternate reading frame protein (F protein) in chronic hepatitis C patients. We assessed the immune responses specific to HCV F protein in 55 chronic HCV patients. IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) post F protein stimulation were compared among HCV patients and healthy donors. Finally, the associations between HCV F protein and HLA class II alleles were explored. We found that the seroprevalence of anti-F antibodies in HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients was significantly higher than that of patients without HCC, but such a significant difference in humoral immune responses to F protein was not observed in HCV 1b-infected- and non-HCV 1b-infected-patients. Additionally, the PBMC proliferation of HCC patients was significantly lower than that of patients without HCC. Furthermore, F protein stimulation of PBMCs from F-seropositive patients resulted in Th2 biased cytokine responses (significantly decreased IFN-γ and/or IL-2 and significantly increased IL-4 and/or IL-5 levels) that reportedly may contribute to HCC progression and pathogenesis. However, no significant difference in the association between HCV F protein and HLA-DRB1*0201, 0301, 0405, 1001 and HLA-DQB1*0201, 0401, 0502, 0602 was observed in this study. These findings suggest that F protein may contribute to the HCV-associated bias in Th1/Th2 responses of chronic hepatitis C patients including the progress of HCC pathogenesis. PMID:23680070

  3. Dynamics of hepatic gene expression and serum cytokine profiles in single and double-hit burn and sepsis animal models

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rohit; Orman, Mehmet A.; Berthiaume, Francois; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the pathophysiology of severe burn trauma and burn-induced sepsis, using rat models of experimental burn injury and cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) either individually (singe-hit model) or in combination (double-hit model). The experimental burn injury simulates a systemic but sterile pro-inflammatory response, while the CLP simulates the effect of polymicrobial sepsis. Given the liver׳s central role in mediating the host immune response and onset of hypermetabolism after burn injury, elucidating the alterations in hepatic gene expression in response to injury can lead to a better understanding of the regulation of the inflammatory response, whereas circulating cytokine protein expression, reflects key systemic inflammatory mediators. In this article, we present both the hepatic gene expression and circulating cytokine/chemokine protein expression data for the above-mentioned experimental model to gain insights into the temporal dynamics of the inflammatory and hypermetabolic response following burn and septic injury. This data article supports results discussed in research articles (Yang et al., 2012 [1,4]; Mattick et al. 2012, 2013 [2,3]; Nguyen et al., 2014 [5]; Orman et al., 2011, 2012 [6–8]). PMID:26217749

  4. Fluid shear stress inhibits TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts: a role for fluid shear stress-induced activation of PI3-kinase and inhibition of caspase-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavalko, Fredrick M.; Gerard, Rita L.; Ponik, Suzanne M.; Gallagher, Patricia J.; Jin, Yijun; Norvell, Suzanne M.

    2003-01-01

    In bone, a large proportion of osteoblasts, the cells responsible for deposition of new bone, normally undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis). Because mechanical loading of bone increases the rate of new bone formation, we hypothesized that mechanical stimulation of osteoblasts might increase their survival. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of fluid shear stress (FSS) on osteoblast apoptosis using three osteoblast cell types: primary rat calvarial osteoblasts (RCOB), MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, and UMR106 osteosarcoma cells. Cells were treated with TNF-alpha in the presence of cyclohexamide (CHX) to rapidly induce apoptosis. Osteoblasts showed significant signs of apoptosis within 4-6 h of exposure to TNF-alpha and CHX, and application of FSS (12 dyne/cm(2)) significantly attenuated this TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. FSS activated PI3-kinase signaling, induced phosphorylation of Akt, and inhibited TNF-alpha-induced activation of caspase-3. Inhibition of PI3-kinase, using LY294002, blocked the ability of FSS to rescue osteoblasts from TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis and blocked FSS-induced inhibition of caspase-3 activation in osteoblasts treated with TNF-alpha. LY294002 did not, however, prevent FSS-induced phosphorylation of Akt suggesting that activation of Akt alone is not sufficient to rescue cells from apoptosis. This result also suggests that FSS can activate Akt via a PI3-kinase-independent pathway. These studies demonstrate for the first time that application of FSS to osteoblasts in vitro results in inhibition of TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis through a mechanism involving activation of PI3-kinase signaling and inhibition of caspases. FSS-induced activation of PI3-kinase may promote cell survival through a mechanism that is distinct from the Akt-mediated survival pathway. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Temporal pattern and effect of sex on lipopolysaccharide-induced stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal pattern and gender effect on immune and stress hormone responses to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was assessed using a pig model. Secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta and IL-6 increased (P < 0.05) in a time-depend...

  6. Temporal pattern and effect of sex on lipopolysaccharide-induced stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal pattern and gender effect of immune and stress hormone responses to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge were assessed using a pig model. Secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 increased in a time-dependent manner f...

  7. Regulation of the syncytin-1 promoter in human astrocytes by multiple sclerosis-related cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Mameli, Giuseppe . E-mail: viross@uniss.it; Astone, Vito; Khalili, Kamel; Serra, Caterina; Sawaya, Bassel E.; Dolei, Antonina

    2007-05-25

    Syncytin-1 has a physiological role during early pregnancy, as mediator of trophoblast fusion into the syncytiotrophoblast layer, hence allowing embryo implantation. In addition, its expression in nerve tissue has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Syncytin-1 is the env glycoprotein of the ERVWE1 component of the W family of human endogenous retroviruses (HERV), located on chromosome 7q21-22, in a candidate region for genetic susceptibility to MS. The mechanisms of ERVWE1 regulation in nerve tissue remain to be identified. Since there are correlations between some cytokines and MS outcome, we examined the regulation of the syncytin-1 promoter by MS-related cytokines in human U-87MG astrocytic cells. Using transient transfection assays, we observed that the MS-detrimental cytokines TNF{alpha}, interferon-{gamma}, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 activate the ERVWE1 promoter, while the MS-protective interferon-{beta} is inhibitory. The effects of cytokines are reduced by the deletion of the cellular enhancer domain of the promoter that contains binding sites for several transcription factors. In particular, we found that TNF{alpha} had the ability to activate the ERVWE1 promoter through an NF-{kappa}B-responsive element located within the enhancer domain of the promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift and ChIP assays showed that TNF{alpha} enhances the binding of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B, to its cognate site within the promoter. The effect of TNF{alpha} is abolished by siRNA directed against p65. Taken together, these results illustrate a role for p65 in regulating the ERVWE1 promoter and in TNF{alpha}-mediated induction of syncytin-1 in multiple sclerosis.

  8. Cytokine production by cell cultures from bronchial subepithelial myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Howarth, P H; Roche, W R

    1996-09-01

    Myofibroblasts have been previously described beneath the bronchial epithelium and were found to increase in number proportional to the accumulation of extracellular matrix in the bronchial lamina reticularis in asthma. The aim of this study was to assess further the contribution of these structural cells to allergic inflammation in the bronchial mucosa through their cytokine expression. Cell cultures were established from the lamina reticularis of human bronchial biopsies from asthmatic and non-asthmatic subjects. Cytokine secretion was measured by ELISA in supernatants of cultures with or without tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The mRNA levels for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the cultures were examined by ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs). Bronchial myofibroblasts grown from bronchial biopsies were capable of producing GM-CSF, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and stem cell factor (SCF) constitutively. The GM-CSF production by myofibroblasts was significantly increased in response to TNF-alpha simulation with a corresponding increase in GM-CSF mRNA expression. The enhancement of GM-CSF production by TNF-alpha in myofibroblasts was blocked by the inhibition of RNA synthesis. Prednisolone abolished the GM-CSF production. This study provides evidence for the role of bronchial myofibroblasts in the regulation of inflammatory cell recruitment and activation by interaction in the cytokine network in the bronchial mucosa. PMID:8943823

  9. Heat stress and/or endotoxin effects on cytokine expression by human whole blood.

    PubMed

    DuBose, David A; Balcius, James; Morehouse, David

    2002-03-01

    Immune system cytokines induce vascular shock. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), and bacterial endotoxin (E) circulate in human heatstroke to suggest that E release from a heat-damaged gut may stimulate cytokines that contribute to hypovolemia. However, immune activation by heat-induced tissue necrosis might stimulate cytokine generation in the absence of E. To evaluate this potential and heat stress effects on the anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and IL-1 soluble receptor II (IL-1srII), a human whole blood (HWB) model was employed in which the presence or absence of E could be controlled. Using thermoelectric technology to regulate the HWB heat exposures, the temperature modulations of lethal heatstroke were precisely replicated (maximum temperature = 42.4 degrees C +/- 0.04 degrees C; thermal area = 52.3 degrees C +/- 1.5 degrees C per min). Cytokine and mRNA measurements employed enzyme-linked immunosorbant-based assay systems. Significant elevations in TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-1ra resulted when HWB was exposed to E concentrations (10 ng/ml) reported to circulate in heatstroke. While E-stimulated IL-1ra was significantly decreased by the presence of prior heat stress (PPHS), E-stimulated IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 were not significantly altered by PPHS, but tended to be elevated. IL-1srII expression was unchanged by PPHS and/or E. PPHS in the absence of E did not induce cytokine responses, nor were there elevations in TNF-alpha or IL-1beta mRNA. Thus, some factor normally absent under in vitro conditions, like endotoxin, was required to provoke HWB cytokine expressions and the heat stress and E conditions that characterize heatstroke affected HWB cytokine metabolism to favor a proinflammatory environment. PMID:11900341

  10. Influence of lipopolysaccharides and lipids A from some marine bacteria on spontaneous and Escherichia coli LPS-induced TNF-alpha release from peripheral human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Vorobeva, E V; Krasikova, I N; Solov'eva, T F

    2006-07-01

    Some endotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipids A (LA) from the marine bacteria Marinomonas communis ATCC 27118(T), Marinomonas mediterranea ATCC 700492(T), and Chryseobacterium indoltheticum CIP 103168(T) were studied. The preparations tested were shown to have high 50% lethal doses (4 microg per mouse for LPS from M. mediterranea and more than 12 microg per mouse for two other LPS and LA from C. indoltheticum) and were moderate (371 +/- 37 pg/ml at 10 microg/ml of C. indoltheticum LPS), weak (148 +/- 5 pg/ml at 1 microg/ml of M. mediterranea LPS), and zero (LA and LPS from M. communis and LA from C. indoltheticum) inducers of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release from peripheral human blood cells. The capacity of the LA and LPS samples from marine bacteria to inhibit TNF-alpha release induced by LPS from Escherichia coli O55 : B5 (10 ng/ml) was also studied. PMID:16903830

  11. Modulation of the plasminogen activation system by inflammatory cytokines in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Trân-Thang, C.; Kruithof, E.; Lahm, H.; Schuster, W. A.; Tada, M.; Sordat, B.

    1996-01-01

    Inflammation may promote malignant invasion by enhancing cancer cell-associated proteolysis. Here we present the effect of inflammatory cytokines on the plasminogen activation system of eight human colon carcinoma cell lines. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) increased in several, but not all, cell lines the production of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue-type PA (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) as analysed by zymography, enzyme immunoassays and Northern analysis. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) had no effect. uPA receptor (uPAR) mRNA levels were also upregulated. However, each individual cell line responded differently following exposure to TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta. For example, there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of uPA and PAI-1 in SW 620 cells, whereas increased uPA production in SW 1116 cells was not accompanied by an increase in PAI-1. The TNF-alpha stimulatory effect was blocked by anti-TNF-alpha Fab fragments. All cell lines expressed both types of TNF receptor mRNAs, whereas no transcript for TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-6 receptor or the IL-1 receptors was found. Our results demonstrate that TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta stimulate the plasminogen activation system in tumour cell but the responses differed even in cells derived from the same tissue origin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8826848

  12. Functional role of gap junctions in cytokine-induced leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in vivo.

    PubMed

    Véliz, Loreto P; González, Francisco G; Duling, Brian R; Sáez, Juan C; Boric, Mauricio P

    2008-09-01

    To assess the hypothesis that gap junctions (GJs) participate on leukocyte-endothelium interactions in the inflammatory response, we compared leukocyte adhesion and transmigration elicited by cytokine stimulation in the presence or absence of GJ blockers in the hamster cheek pouch and also in the cremaster muscle of wild-type (WT) and endothelium-specific connexin 43 (Cx43) null mice (Cx43e(-/-)). In the cheek pouch, topical tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 150 ng/ml, 15 min) caused a sustained increment in the number of leukocytes adhered to venular endothelium (LAV) and located at perivenular regions (LPV). Superfusion with the GJ blockers 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA; 75 microM) or 18-beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (50 microM) abolished the TNF-alpha-induced increase in LAV and LPV; carbenoxolone (75 microM) or oleamide (100 microM) reduced LAV by 50 and 75%, respectively, and LPV to a lesser extent. None of these GJ blockers modified venular diameter, blood flow, or leukocyte rolling. In contrast, glycyrrhizin (75 microM), a non-GJ blocker analog of AGA, was devoid of effect. Interestingly, when AGA was removed 90 min after TNF-alpha stimulation, LAV started to rise at a similar rate as in control. Conversely, application of AGA 90 min after TNF-alpha reduced the number of previously adhered cells. In WT mice, intrascrotal injection of TNF-alpha (0.5 microg/0.3 ml) increased LAV (fourfold) and LPV (threefold) compared with saline-injected controls. In contrast to the observations in WT animals, TNF-alpha stimulation did not increase LAV or LPV in Cx43e(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate an important role for GJ communication in leukocyte adhesion and transmigration during acute inflammation in vivo and further suggest that endothelial Cx43 is key in these processes. PMID:18599597

  13. Mast cells, cytokines, and metalloproteinases at the rheumatoid lesion: dual immunolocalisation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Tetlow, L C; Woolley, D E

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the distribution and activation of mast cells (MCs) in the rheumatoid lesion (cartilage-pannus junctions demonstrating cartilage erosion), and to determine whether or not their tissue distribution is related to that for tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), stromelysin-1, and collagenase. METHODS--Immunolocalisation of MC-tryptase was used to identify MCs and their states of degranulation in 35 specimens of cartilage-pannus junctions. Dual immunolocalisation techniques using alkaline phosphatase and peroxidase conjugated antibodies were used to compare the distributions of MCs with the proinflammatory cytokines TNF alpha and IL-1, and the cartilage or matrix degrading enzymes stromelysin-1 and collagenase. RESULTS--Stromelysin-1, TNF alpha, and IL-1 beta were especially prominent at the cartilage-pannus junctions, albeit with patchy distributions. Extracellular MC tryptase, indicative of MC activation/degranulation, was commonly observed at sites of cartilage erosion, and was often associated with the microenvironmental expression of TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, stromelysin-1, and collagenase. Such observations were often associated with localised sites of tissue oedema and stromal disruption. CONCLUSION--MC activation was frequently associated with proinflammatory cytokine and metalloproteinase expression by neighbouring cells, thereby suggesting an important contributory role for the MC in mediating matrix degradation and oedematous changes within microfoci of the rheumatoid lesion. Images PMID:7492239

  14. Anti-human cytomegalovirus activity of cytokines produced by CD4+ T-cell clones specifically activated by IE1 peptides in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davignon, J L; Castanié, P; Yorke, J A; Gautier, N; Clément, D; Davrinche, C

    1996-01-01

    The control of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections by the immune system is poorly understood. We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells specific for the human CMV major regulatory protein IE1 are frequent in latently infected healthy blood donors. In order to learn about the possible role of these cells, we have developed IE1-specific CD4+ T-cell clones and, in this study, analyzed their epitope specificity and function in vitro. We measured their cytokine production when stimulated with specific IE1 peptides or whole recombinant IE1 protein. Their cytokine profiles, as deduced from gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-6 production, were of the Th0- and Th1-like phenotypes. Supernatants from IE1-specific clones producing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were shown to inhibit CMV replication in U373 MG cells. This effect was due, as found by using cytokine-specific neutralizing antibodies, mostly to IFN-gamma, which was secreted at higher levels than TNF-alpha. To better assess the anti-CMV activity of cytokines, recombinant IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were used and shown to have a synergistic effect on the inhibition of CMV replication and protein expression. Thus, IE1-specific CD4+ T cells display in vitro anti-CMV activity through cytokine secretion and may play a role in the control of in vivo latent infections. PMID:8642638

  15. Genomic profiling of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) receptor and interleukin-1 receptor knockout mice reveals a link between TNF-alpha signaling and increased severity of 1918 pandemic influenza virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 was one of the worst global pandemics in recent history. The highly pathogenic nature of the 1918 virus is thought to be mediated in part by a dysregulation of the host response, including an exacerbated pro-inflammatory cytokine response. In the present study, we...

  16. Response to stimulation with recombinant cytokines and synthesis of cytokines by murine intestinal macrophages infected with the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, N; Young, L S; Bermudez, L E

    1995-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the gut is the chief portal of entry for organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in AIDS patients. Bacterial invasion of intestinal mucosa presumably occurs through epithelial cells, and M cells in the Peyer's patches, where the bacteria have contact with immunocompetent cells such as macrophages and T and B lymphocytes. As mucosal macrophages are probably the first line of defense against MAC, we examined their ability to inhibit intracellular growth of MAC when properly stimulated. Mouse intestinal macrophages were purified, infected with MAC 101, serovar 1, and MAC 86-2686, serovar 16, and subsequently stimulated with recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Viable intracellular bacteria were quantitated at 24 h after infection and again after 4 days of infection. Stimulation with TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and GM-CSF, but not M-CSF, was associated with mycobacteriostatic and/or mycobactericidal activity in macrophages. Treatment with 10(3) U of TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and IFN-gamma per ml at 24 h prior to infection with MAC resulted in a significant enhancement in killing of MAC at 4 days after infection, compared with that observed for macrophages exposed to cytokines after infection. When stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or live MAC, intestinal macrophages had produced significantly less TNF-alpha and transforming growth factor beta than had splenic and peritoneal macrophages, although the levels of production of interleukin 6 and interleukin 10 among the three populations of cells were similar. Intestinal macrophages can be stimulated with cytokines to inhibit the intracellular growth of MAC, but they have differentiated abilities to produce cytokines which can modulate the anti-MAC immune response. PMID:7822018

  17. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide stimulates bovine neutrophil production of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-12 and IFN-gamma.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid recruitment and bacterial phagocytosis and killing by neutrophils (PMN) are the most effective defenses against establishment of bacterial infection. In addition to their phagocytic and bactericidal properties, PMN may play a key supportive role through secretion of cytokines during the innat...

  18. The Potential Role of Th9 Cell Related Cytokine and Transcription Factors in Patients with Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuxun, Tuerhongjiang; Apaer, Shadike; Ma, Hai-Zhang; Zhang, Heng; Aierken, Amina; Lin, Ren-Yong; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a lethal parasitic infectious disease which may lead to liver failure if left untreated. It is caused by the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis and usually develops a substantial infiltrative occupation in solid organs. During the infection, T helper subsets are known to play crucial role in crosstalk between the parasite and human host. Th9 cells, a new member of CD4+ T cell family which is characterized by its specific cytokine IL-9 and transcription factors PU.1 and IRF-4, have been known recently to have a critical role in allergic diseases, and cancers as well as the parasitic infection. To assess the potential role of Th9 cells during the infection, the mRNA levels of IL-9, PU.1, and IRF-4 both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in liver tissues were, respectively, detected by using real-time PCR. The plasma concentration levels of IL-9 were detected by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Th9 related cytokine IL-9 and transcription factors PU.1 and IRF-4 mRNA levels elevated both in PBMCs, and in hepatic lesion and paralesion tissues in AE patients. This may facilitate the infiltrative growth of the parasite and its persistence in human host. PMID:26509179

  19. Expression of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 and Related Cytokines in Patients with Hepatic Cystic and Alveolar Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuxun, Tuerhongjiang; Ma, Hai-Zhang; Apaer, Shadike; Zhang, Heng; Aierken, Amina; Li, Yu-Peng; Lin, Ren-Yong; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Jin-Hui; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the important role of Toll-like receptors in various parasitic infections. This study aims to explore expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and related cytokines in patients with human cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE). 78 subjects including AE group (N = 28), CE group (N = 22), and healthy controls (HC, N = 28) were enrolled in this study. The mRNA expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4 in blood and hepatic tissue and plasma levels related cytokines were detected by using ELISA. Median levels of TLR2 mRNA in AE and CE groups were significantly elevated as compared with that in healthy control group. Median levels of TLR4 expression were increased in AE and CE. Plasma concentration levels of IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10 were slightly increased in AE and CE groups compared with those in HC group with no statistical differences (p > 0.05). The IL-23 concentration levels were significantly higher in AE and CE groups than that in HC subjects with statistical significance. The increased expression of TLR2 and IL-23 might play a potential role in modulating tissue infiltrative growth of the parasite and its persistence in the human host. PMID:26635448

  20. The Potential Role of Th9 Cell Related Cytokine and Transcription Factors in Patients with Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Tuxun, Tuerhongjiang; Apaer, Shadike; Ma, Hai-Zhang; Zhang, Heng; Aierken, Amina; Lin, Ren-Yong; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a lethal parasitic infectious disease which may lead to liver failure if left untreated. It is caused by the larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis and usually develops a substantial infiltrative occupation in solid organs. During the infection, T helper subsets are known to play crucial role in crosstalk between the parasite and human host. Th9 cells, a new member of CD4(+) T cell family which is characterized by its specific cytokine IL-9 and transcription factors PU.1 and IRF-4, have been known recently to have a critical role in allergic diseases, and cancers as well as the parasitic infection. To assess the potential role of Th9 cells during the infection, the mRNA levels of IL-9, PU.1, and IRF-4 both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in liver tissues were, respectively, detected by using real-time PCR. The plasma concentration levels of IL-9 were detected by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Th9 related cytokine IL-9 and transcription factors PU.1 and IRF-4 mRNA levels elevated both in PBMCs, and in hepatic lesion and paralesion tissues in AE patients. This may facilitate the infiltrative growth of the parasite and its persistence in human host. PMID:26509179

  1. Differential regulation of lipoprotein lipase in the macrophage J774.2 cell line by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Tengku-Muhammad, T S; Hughes, T R; Cryer, A; Ramji, D P

    1996-07-01

    The regulation of macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) by cytokines is of potentially crucial importance in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and in the responses to endotoxin challenge. However, the precise mechanisms by which different cytokines modulate the expression of macrophage LPL activity are poorly understood. The action of six cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on LPL function using the murine J774.2 cell line as a model system has, therefore, been studied. Although exposure to LPS, interleukin 11 (IL-11), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-1, over the physiological range of concentrations, resulted in a decrease in the heparin-releasable LPL activity, LPL-mRNA levels and LPL-protein content of the cells, stimulation with IL-6 and leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) had no effect. The maximum suppression of LPL activity and mRNA levels in the cells by IFN-gamma (60%) was lower than that produced by LPS, IL-11, TNF-alpha and IL-1 (78-97%). Each cytokine displayed a characteristic dose-dependent pattern for the suppression of LPL activity and mRNA levels with IL-11/TNF-alpha being more potent than IFN-gamma/IL-1. More than 80% of the decrease in the LPL activity, at all doses of IL-11, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-1, was due to a corresponding reduction in the mRNA levels. The time course of responses to LPS, IL-11, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-1 were similar, with the time required to achieve half maximal suppression of LPL activity being between 7 and 9.5 h in each case. These results indicate that LPL in J774.2 macrophages is regulated differentially by various cytokines and that the major control responsible for the reduction of LPL activity by IL-11, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-1 is exerted at the level of mRNA metabolism (decreased transcription or RNA stability). The responses identified also displayed several differences to those described previously for adipocytes (e.g. 3T3-L1 cell line

  2. Changes in proinflammatory cytokine activity after menopause.

    PubMed

    Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Köditz, Roland; Pfohl, Martin; Schatz, Helmut

    2002-02-01

    There is now a large body of evidence suggesting that the decline in ovarian function with menopause is associated with spontaneous increases in proinflammatory cytokines. The cytokines that have obtained the most attention are IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha. The exact mechanisms by which estrogen interferes with cytokine activity are still incompletely known but may potentially include interactions of the ER with other transcription factors, modulation of nitric oxide activity, antioxidative effects, plasma membrane actions, and changes in immune cell function. Experimental and clinical studies strongly support a link between the increased state of proinflammatory cytokine activity and postmenopausal bone loss. Preliminary evidence suggests that these changes also might be relevant to vascular homeostasis and the development of atherosclerosis. Better knowledge of the mechanisms and the time course of these interactions may open new avenues for the prevention and treatment of some of the most prevalent and important disorders in postmenopausal women. PMID:11844745

  3. Inhibition of MAP kinases and down regulation of TNF-alpha, IL-beta and COX-2 genes by the crude extracts from marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Krishnaveni, M; Jayachandran, S

    2009-08-01

    Crude ethyl acetate extracts from marine bacterial isolates Staphylococcus arlettae KP2 (GenBank accession No. EU594442) and Planococcus maritimus KP8 (GenBank accession No. EU594443) isolated from Andaman seas were studied for their anti-inflammatory effect by lymphocyte proliferation assay (LPA) employing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The crude extracts from both the bacteria down regulated the synthesis of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), besides markedly inhibiting p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. These results suggest that the crude ethyl acetate extracts from both the isolates do contain compounds capable of inhibiting inflammation in mitogen induced PBMC and efforts to score potential bioactive molecules from these extracts may prove to be a promising preposition. PMID:18996678

  4. Pulmonary Nocardiosis in an Adolescent Patient with Crohn’s Disease Treated with Infliximab: a Serious Complication of TNF-Alpha Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rishi; Walia, Ritu; Sondike, Stephen B.; Khan, Raheel

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a serious complication of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blockers. With the increasing use of biologics for inflammatory bowel disease, it is to be anticipated that opportunistic infections such as nocardia will be more frequently encountered in children. We present the case of a 16 year old male with Crohn’s disease who developed pulmonary nocardiosis during the course of his treatment with infliximab. This case illustrates the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges faced in patients with inflammatory bowel disease infected with opportunistic organisms. Pediatric health care providers need to be aware so that early diagnosis and treatment can be provided thereby preventing disseminated disease and having favorable outcomes. Although TNF blocker therapy must be discontinued in the presence of such infections, biologic therapy may be reintroduced after successful treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to control underlying symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26050296

  5. The anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide inhibits neutrophil adherence to and migration across monolayers of cytokine-activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dapino, P; Ottonello, L; Dallegri, F

    1994-01-01

    Neutrophil migration through the microvascular endothelium represents a fundamental event for the cell accumulation at sites of tissue injury. Owing to their capacity to modify the structural and functional characteristics of endothelial cells, inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) play a pivotal role in directing circulating neutrophils away from the bloodstream to the interstitial tissue. In order to study neutrophil transendothelial migration, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown to confluence on the polycarbonate filter of two-compartment migration chambers. Pretreatment of the endothelial cell monolayers with TNF alpha for 4 h resulted in rapid migration of approximately 50% of subsequently added neutrophils across the layers. In contrast, < 10% of added neutrophils penetrated untreated endothelial monolayers. Using TNF alpha-treated endothelium, neutrophil transmigration was inhibited by the methane sulfonanilide anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. Moreover, neutrophil adherence to TNF alpha-treated endothelial monolayers, cultured in microtiter wells, was markedly reduced by nimesulide. A linear correlation between the drug-dependent inhibition of neutrophil transmigration and neutrophil adherence was found. Finally, nimesulide did not interfere with the TNF alpha ability to convert resting endothelium into a pro-adhesive and pro-locomotory cell layer. The data suggest that nimesulide reduces neutrophil transendothelial migration primarily by limiting the cell anchorage to the TNF alpha-activated endothelium. Therefore, the drug has the potential to down-regulate neutrophil extravasation and, in turn, the burden of neutrophil oxidants and proteases leading to tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:7824814

  6. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Takasawa, Wataru; Ohnuma, Kei; Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  7. Elevated on-treatment levels of serum IFN-gamma is associated with treatment failure of peginterferon plus ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Ying; Huang, Ching-I; Dai, Chia-Yen; Wang, Shu-Chi; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Liang, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Hung; Hou, Nai-Jen; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection had been associated with cytokine imbalance. Cytokine dynamics in response to peginterferon/ribavirin therapy have an impact on the treatment efficacy for HCV patients. Ninety-two treatment-naive chronic hepatitis C patients were treated with 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy according to their viral genotypes. Sustained virologic response (SVR) is defined as undetectable HCV RNA throughout a 24-week post-treatment follow-up period. Dynamic serum levels of the following cytokines: (1) Th1-mediated cytokines: IFN-γ, interleukin-2, and TNF-alpha; (2)Th2-mediated cytokines: interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-6, and interleukin-10 and (3)immuno-modulatory cytokines: interleukin-1β, interleukin-8, and interleukin-12 were determined by Fluorescent Bead immunoassay. Serial dynamic cytokine expression demonstrated that not only elevated IFN-γ concentrations at specific time points but also the total IFN-γ amount was strongly linked to non-response in peginterferon/ribavirin therapy. IFN-γ levels could serve as an independent predictor for SVR analyzed by multivariate logistic regression test. The accuracy of discriminating responders from non-responders was acceptable when IFN-γ cut-off levels were set at 180, 120, and 40 pg/ml at the 4th week, 12th week, and end-of-treatment of therapy, respectively. Elevated on-treatment IFN-γ concentration was significantly associated with treatment failure among interleukin-28B rs8099917TT carriers and those patients failed to achieve rapid virologic response. PMID:26965318

  8. In situ changes in the relative abundance of human epidermal cytokine messenger RNA levels following exposure to the poison ivy/oak contact allergen urushiol.

    PubMed

    Boehm, K D; Yun, J K; Strohl, K P; Trefzer, U; Häffner, A; Elmets, C A

    1996-06-01

    Abstract: Epidermal keratinocytes in culture have been shown to produce many cytokines, and their proteins have been identified in skin tissue samples. It has therefore been assumed that these cytokines are transcribed in vivo by the epidermis in response to contact allergens. In this report, in situ hybridization was used to detect the messenger RNAs for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in samples of human skin prior to and at various times after application of urushiol, the immunogenic component of poison ivy/oak. In sensitive subjects, IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha mRNAs showed a progressive increase in transcript levels that paralleled the clinical and histological features of the inflammatory process. The time-course of the IL-1 beta response differed from that of IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha, in that there was an early (by 6 h after urushiol administration) elevation in IL-1 beta mRNA that occurred before there was evidence of inflammation and had returned to background levels by 72 h when the reaction had reached its peak. In contrast to urushiol-sensitive subjects, urushiol-anergic individuals did not exhibit an increase in IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha mRNA levels. The data provide evidence for an in vivo role for epidermal IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha transcription in the regulation of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha polypeptide levels in the epidermis in response to this common contact allergen. PMID:8840155

  9. Increases in intrahepatic CD68 positive cells, MAC387 positive cells, and proinflammatory cytokines (particularly interleukin 18) in chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, P; Painter, D; Davies, S; McCaughan, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Upregulation of Th1 associated intrahepatic cytokines in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection should lead to a significant non-specific cellular immune response, a prerequisite for viral clearance. However, to date, the role of this non-specific response in HCV has been understudied.
AIMS—To analyse the intrahepatic macrophage activity in chronic HCV infection by immunostaining and by quantitation of cytokine mRNA.
METHODS—HCV positive liver tissues (chronic hepatitis, n=10; cirrhosis, n=5) were immunostained for CD68, MAC387, and semiquantitated by polymerase chain reaction for intrahepatic cytokine mRNAs (interferon γ (IFNγ), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-18, tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β)). HCV negative normal liver tissues (for cytokines, n=6; for immunostaining, n=5) were included as controls.
RESULTS—MAC387+ cells were focally increased in areas of erosion at the limiting plate while lobular staining was minimal. CD68+ staining was diffuse in both portal (increased in HCV) and lobular areas. The portal tract (mean) density of CD68+ and MAC387+ cells was significantly increased in patients with HCV compared with normal tissue. IFNγ and IL-18 mRNA levels were highly correlated and significantly upregulated in chronic hepatitis and cirrhotic tissue versus controls. TNFα mRNA was upregulated in chronic hepatitis without cirrhosis, while IL-6 mRNA was significantly downregulated. IL-1β, IL-6, and MIP1β mRNA levels were significantly correlated with portal tract MAC387+ cell density.
CONCLUSIONS—The significant upregulation of IFNγ and IL-18 mRNA and significant correlations between IFNγ and other proinflammatory cytokines, suggest a Th1/cell mediated intrahepatic immune response in chronic HCV infection. However, further clarification of the cellular sources of these cytokines is required.


Keywords: hepatitis C; macrophage; cytokine; interleukin; MAC387

  10. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  11. [Influence of immunotropic preparation cycloferon and phytopreparations of Cynara scolimus L. on blood cytokines profile of the patients with chronic viral hepatitis C in medical rehabilitation period].

    PubMed

    Frolov, V M; Sotskaia, Ia A; Kruglova, O V

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the immunotropic drug cycloferon and herbal medicine resources on the basis of Cynara scolimus L. on the blood cytokine profile in the patients with chronic viral hepatitis C (CVHC) in medical rehabilitation (MR) period. Established that prior to MR period in the patients with CVHC was noted significantly increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (CK) at the blood serum, and the level of antiinflammatory CK changed significantly. The use of cycloferon and herbal medicine resources on the basis of Cynara scolimus L. in the MR complex provided to normalize the studied CK concentration in the serum of the patients with CVHC. PMID:23035608

  12. Gene expression and TNF-alpha secretion profile in rainbow trout macrophages following exposures to copper and bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Teles, M; Mackenzie, S; Boltaña, S; Callol, A; Tort, L

    2011-01-01

    Fish macrophage function can be altered after exposure to pathogens as well as to xenobiotics. Considering that wild and farmed fish can be exposed in their habitats simultaneously to different types of stressors, including chemical contaminants (e.g. heavy metals) and pathogens (e.g. bacteria), it is fundamental to study their impact either isolated or in combination. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effects of copper and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), alone and in combination, on the transcription of target genes related with immune system, respiratory burst activity and cell death, using rainbow trout macrophages as in vitro model. A cell viability experiment was performed to determine the sub-lethal concentrations of copper for rainbow trout macrophages and the LC50-24 h was estimated at 60 μM. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) increased after copper and copper plus LPS exposure. Copper and LPS interact positively inducing an increase in cytokine expression, which may be indicative of an increased inflammatory response. However, the increase in TNFα mRNA expression induced by 50 μM copper was not accompanied by protein secretion indicating that mRNA abundance does not always reflect the level of protein and that the translation of the TNFα mRNA is somehow inhibited. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and trout C-polysaccharide binding protein (TCPBP) mRNA expression also increased after copper, LPS or LPS plus copper exposure, indicating a role of acute phase proteins in the local response to inflammation. NADPH oxidase and glutathione peroxidase gene expression increased in macrophages after 24 h exposure to copper, LPS or LPS plus copper. The results from the present study improve the understanding of mechanisms involved in copper toxicity, as well as the interaction with a simulated-inflammatory process. PMID:21078395

  13. Prospective randomized study of the benefits of preoperative corticosteroid administration on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury and cytokine response in patients undergoing hepatic resection1

    PubMed Central

    Aldrighetti, Luca; Arru, Marcella; Finazzi, Renato; Soldini, Laura; Catena, Marco; Ferla, Gianfranco

    2007-01-01

    Background. Hepatic injury secondary to warm ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) remains an important clinical issue following liver surgery. The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to determine whether steroid administration may reduce liver injury and improve short-term outcome. Patients and methods. Forty-three patients undergoing liver resection were randomized to a steroid group or a control group. Patients in the steroid group received 500 mg of methylprednisolone preoperatively. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate amminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin, anti-thrombin III (AT-III), prothrombin time (PT), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were compared between the two groups. Length of stay and type and number of complications were recorded. Results. Postoperative serum levels of ALT, AST, total bilirubin, and inflammatory cytokines were significantly lower in the steroid group than in controls. The postoperative level of AT-III in the control group was significantly lower than in the steroid group (ANOVA p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications in the control group tended to be significantly higher than that in the steroid group. Conclusion. These results suggest that steroid pretreatment represents a potentially important biologic modifier of I/R injury and may contribute to maintenance of coagulant/anticoagulant homeostasis. PMID:18333219

  14. Localized External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) to the Pelvis Induces Systemic IL-1Beta and TNF-Alpha Production: Role of the TNF-Alpha Signaling in EBRT-Induced Fatigue.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Tasha L; Hung, Arthur Y; Thomas, Charles R; Wood, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients undergoing localized external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) can experience a progressive increase in fatigue, which can affect physical functioning and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to develop a mouse EBRT prostate cancer treatment model with which to determine the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the genesis of EBRT-related fatigue. We assessed voluntary wheel-running activity (VWRA) as a proxy for fatigue, food intake and body weight in male C57BL/6 mice undergoing EBRT to the pelvis. In the first experiment, anesthetized male C57BL/6 mice underwent fractionated EBRT to the pelvis for a total dose of 68.2 Gy, thereby mimicking a clinically relevant therapeutic dose and frequency. The day after the last treatment, levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in plasma along with mRNA levels in liver, colon and whole brain were measured. EBRT-induced fatigue resulted in reduced body weight, diminished food intake, and increased plasma and tissue levels of IL-1β and TNF-α. In a follow-up experiment, we used TNF-α-deficient mice to further delineate the role of TNF-α signaling in EBRT-induced sickness behavior. EBRT-induced changes in fatigue, food intake and body weight were no different between TNF-α deficient mice and their wild-type counterparts. Taken together our data demonstrate that a clinically relevant localized irradiation of the pelvis induces a systemic IL-1β and TNF-α response and sickness behavior in mice, but the TNF-α signaling pathway alone does not independently mediate these effects. PMID:26720802

  15. Cytokine production in arthritis susceptible and resistant rats: a study with arthritogenic and non-arthritogenic Lactobacillus cell walls.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2001-02-01

    The basis of the different susceptibility to bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis between Lewis and Fischer rats is unclear. Likewise, it is not known why cell walls of some species of Lactobacillus are arthritogenic and those of others are not. With these two questions in mind, we investigated the role of anti-inflammatory (interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4) and proinflammatory (tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-1 beta) cytokines in Lewis and Fischer rats injected intraperitoneally with cell walls from arthritogenic or nonarthritogenic species of Lactobacillus. Cytokine levels in the serum and in vitro production by peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes were studied. The results obtained indicate that the differences in the production of IL-10, IL-4, TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta do not explain the difference in the arthritis susceptibility between Lewis and Fischer rats. Likewise, the arthritogenicity of different Lactobacillus cell walls appears not to be dependent on their capacity to stimulate cytokine production. PMID:11169216

  16. Kupffer cells suppress perfluorononanoic acid-induced hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α expression by releasing cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xuemei; Zou, Shanshan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Cui, Ruina; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2012-10-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) have been demonstrated to play a role in the regulation of intra-hepatic lipid metabolism through the synthesis and secretion of biologically active products. The involvement of KCs in the disturbance of lipid metabolism that induced by perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a known agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), was investigated in this study. Rats were exposed to PFNA or PFNA combined with gadolinium chloride, an inhibitor of KCs, for 14 days. PFNA exposure dose-dependently increased absolute and relative liver weights, induced triglyceride accumulation, up-regulated the expression of both SERBP-1c and PPARα, and stimulated the release of TNFα and IL-1β. Inactivation of KCs markedly lowered TNFα and IL-1β level, enhanced PFNA-induced expression of PPARα and its target genes, and reduced liver triglyceride levels. In vitro, PFNA-induced expression of PPARα in primary cultured hepatocytes was suppressed by recombinant rat TNFα and IL-1β. However, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway prevented this. Transient transfection and promoter analysis further revealed that these two cytokines and NF-κB were coordinately involved in the suppression of PPARα promoter activity. Our data demonstrate that TNFα and IL-1β released from KCs following PFNA exposure can suppress the expression of PPARα via NF-κB pathway, which partially contribute to the evident accumulation of triglycerides in rat liver. PMID:22648072

  17. Apoptosis and the FLIP and NF-kappa B proteins as pharmacodynamic criteria for biosimilar TNF-alpha antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Paulo César Martins; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó

    2014-01-01

    Various criteria are necessary to assess the efficacy and safety of biological medications in order to grant companies the right to register these medications with the appropriate bodies that regulate their sale. The imminent expiration of the patents on reference biological products which block the cytokine TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) raises the possibility of bringing so-called biosimilars to the market (similar to the biologicals of reference products). This occurrence is inevitable, but criteria to adequately evaluate these medications are now needed. Even among controversy, there is a demand from publications correlating the pro-apoptotic mechanism of the original TNF-α antagonists (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab pegol) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. In this article, the authors discuss the possibility of utilizing the pro-apoptotic effect correlated with the regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins FLIP and NF-κB as new criteria for analyzing the pharmacodynamics of possible biosimilar TNF-α antagonists which should be submitted to regulatory agencies for evaluation. PMID:25114503

  18. Strategies for the development of an electrochemical bioassay for TNF-alpha detection by using a non-immunoglobulin bioreceptor.

    PubMed

    Baydemir, Gozde; Bettazzi, Francesca; Palchetti, Ilaria; Voccia, Diego

    2016-05-01

    TNF-α is an inflammatory cytokine produced by the immune system. Serum TNF-α level is elevated in some pathological states such as septic shock, graft rejection, HIV infection, neurodegenerative diseases, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. Detecting trace amount of TNF-α is, also, very important for the understanding of tumor biological processes. Detection of this key biomarker is commonly achieved by use of ELISA or cytofluorimetric based methods. In this study the traditional optical detection was replaced by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and an affinity molecule, produced by evolutionary approaches, has been tested as capture bioreceptor. This molecule, namely a combinatorial non-immunoglobulin protein (Affibody®) interacts with TNF-α selectively and was here tested in a sandwich assay format. Moreover magnetic beads were used as support for bioreceptor immobilization and screen printed carbon electrodes were used as transducers. TNF-α calibration curve was performed, obtaining the detection limit of 38pg/mL, the quantification range of 76-5000pg/mL and RSD%=7. Preliminary results of serum samples analysis were also reported. PMID:26946021

  19. Treatment with silybin-vitamin E-phospholipid complex in patients with hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Falasca, Katia; Ucciferri, Claudio; Mancino, Paola; Vitacolonna, Ester; De Tullio, Domenico; Pizzigallo, Eligio; Conti, Pio; Vecchiet, Jacopo

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of silybin-phospholipids and vitamin E complex (SPV complex), by determining cytokine patterns and various markers of liver disease. Forty Caucasian patients with chronic HCV infection were recruited and divided into two groups: 30 were treated with SPV complex for 3 months, while the other 10 did not receive any treatment. Ten other subjects without HCV infection but with staeatosic diagnosis were recruited and treated with SPV complex. Biochemical and hepatic principal parameters were investigated at 0 (T0) and 3 months (T3). The group of HCV patients treated showed an improvement trend of hepatic indecises and viral load, and had a significant and persistent reduction of ALT (P = 0.02) and AST serum level (P = 0.01). In this group cytokines showed a statistically significant increase of IL-2 (P = 0.03) and IL-6 were significantly reduced (P = 0.02) at T0 and T3. After the treatment the group of hepatic steatosics showed a significant decrease in ALT (P = 0.02), AST (0.008), gammaGT (0.004) alkaline phosphatase (0.05), total cholesterol (P = 0.03), fasting glucose (P = 0.008), insulinemia (0.0006), HOMA value (0.002) and C-reactive protein (CRP; 0.04). There was a significant reduction of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 (P = 0.02, 0.05 and 0.04, respectively). The data suggest that the SPV complex exerts hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects. This new compound may therefore be useful in clinical practice in patients with chronic hepatitis C who cannot undergo conventional antiviral therapy. PMID:18814247

  20. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present study we report that cotreatment of human endothelial cells with certain hydroxyflavones and flavanols blocks cytokine-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells. One of the most potent flavones, apigenin, exhibited a dose- and time-dependent, reversible effect on adhesion protein expression as well as inhibiting adhesion protein upregulation at the transcriptional level. Apigenin also inhibited IL-1 alpha-induced prostaglandin synthesis and TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production, suggesting that the hydroxyflavones may act as general inhibitors of cytokine-induced gene expression. Although apigenin did not inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B(p50(NFKB1)/p65(RelA)) we found this flavonoid did inhibit TNF-alpha induced beta-galactosidase activity in SW480 cells stably transfected with a beta-galactosidase reporter construct driven by four NF-kappa B elements, suggesting an action on NF-kappa B transcriptional activation. Adhesion of leukocytes to cytokine-treated endothelial cells was blocked in endothelial cells cotreated with apigenin. Finally, apigenin demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and delayed type hypersensitivity in the mouse. We conclude that flavonoids offer important therapeutic potential for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases involving an increase in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:7543732

  1. Altered energy balance and cytokine gene expression in a murine model of chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Arsenijevic, D; Girardier, L; Seydoux, J; Chang, H R; Dulloo, A G

    1997-05-01

    The temporal pattern of changes in energy balance and cytokine mRNA expression in spleen and brain were examined in a mouse model of infection with Toxoplasma gondii. During days 1-7 postinfection, food intake was unaltered, but energy expenditure was significantly increased, and this was associated with elevated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-5, and interferon (IFN)-gamma. The hypermetabolic state persisted during subsequent anorexia, whose onset coincided with elevated IL-2, and at the end of the acute phase of cachexia, the dual anorexic and hypermetabolic states were associated with the cytokines examined: TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-gamma. In the chronic phase of the infection, the mice showed either partial weight recovery (gainers) or no weight regain (nongainers). The infected gainers, though still hypophagic, were no longer hypermetabolic, and their cytokine mRNA was no longer elevated, except for TNF-alpha and IL-10. In contrast, the infected nongainers continued to show both anoroxia and hypermetabolism, which were associated with elevations in all cytokines examined and particularly those of the TH2 profile (IL-4 and IL-5) and IL-6. Taken together, these studies reveal a distinct pattern of cytokine mRNA expression underlying 1) hypermetabolism vs. anorexia, 2) acute vs. chronic cachexia, and 3) stable weight loss vs. partial weight recovery. PMID:9176193

  2. Genome-wide analysis of TNF-alpha response in pigs challenged with porcine circovirus 2b.

    PubMed

    Kreikemeier, C A; Engle, T B; Lucot, K L; Kachman, S D; Burkey, T E; Ciobanu, D C

    2015-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine with a role in activating adaptive immunity to viral infections. By inhibiting the capacity of plasmacytoid dendritic cells to produce interferon-α and TNF-α, porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) limits the maturation of myeloid dendritic cells and impairs their ability to recognize viral and bacterial antigens. Previously, we reported QTL for viremia and immune response in PCV2-infected pigs. In this study, we analyzed phenotypic and genetic relationships between TNF-α protein levels, a potential indicator of predisposition to PCV2 co-infection, and PCV2 susceptibility. Following experimental challenge with PCV2b, TNF-α reached the peak at 21 days post-infection (dpi), at which time a difference was observed between pigs that expressed extreme variation in viremia and growth (P < 0.10). A genome-wide association study (n = 297) revealed that genotypes of 56,433 SNPs explained 73.9% of the variation in TNF-α at 21 dpi. Major SNPs were identified on SSC8, SSC10 and SSC14. Haplotypes based on SNPs from a SSC8 (9 Mb) 1-Mb window were associated with variation in TNF-α (P < 0.02), IgG (P = 0.05) and IgM (P < 0.13) levels at 21 dpi. Potential overlap of regulatory mechanisms was supported by the correlations between genomic prediction values of TNF-α and PCV2 antibodies (21 dpi, r > 0.22), viremia (14-21 dpi, P > 0.29) and viral load (r = 0.31, P < 0.0001). Characterization of the QTL regions uncovered genes that could influence variation in TNF-α levels as well as T- and B-cell development, which can affect disease susceptibility. PMID:25643812

  3. Identification and characterization of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha factor gene from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Li, Xuejing; Gen, Xuyun; Chen, Yue; Wei, Junli; Sun, Jinsheng

    2014-02-15

    Lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF) is an important transcription factor participating in innate immunity through regulating TNF-α and other inflammatory cytokines expression. However, the expression and biological relevance of LITAF in fish is still very limited. In this study, a full-length LITAF cDNA, termed PoLITAF, was identified from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. PoLITAF contains a 67 bp 5'-untranslated sequence, a 435 bp open reading frame, and a 647 bp 3'-untranslated sequence. PoLITAF protein is comprised of 144 amino acids with a conserved C-terminal LITAF-like domain and shows 51-76% sequence similarity and 40-65% sequence identity with other LITAF homologues. Characterization of this new gene revealed that PoLITAF mRNA was detected in all examined tissues with the highest expression in gill. In head kidney primary culture, the expression of Japanese flounder PoLITAF and TNF-α was significantly up-regulated in response to Poly(I:C) and bacterial endotoxin LPS stimulation. Further in vivo experiments demonstrated that PoLITAF expression was up-regulated in head kidney, gill and spleen post bacterial challenge with Edwardsiella tarda. Moreover, the up-regulated expression of Japanese flounder TNF-α following the enhanced expression of PoLITAF was detected as early as 4h in both gill and head kidney tissues and 12h in spleen after the bacterial infection in vivo. Our findings suggest that PoLITAF is a novel inducible gene possibly involved in Japanese flounder innate immunity. PMID:24359872

  4. Age-Related Increases in Basal Ganglia Glutamate are Associated with TNF-Alpha, Reduced Motivation and Decreased Psychomotor Speed During IFN-alpha Treatment: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Ebrahim; Felger, Jennifer C.; Woolwine, Bobbi J.; Chen, Xiangchuan; Parekh, Samir; Spivey, James; Hu, Xiaoping; Miller, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation-induced alterations in central nervous system (CNS) metabolism have focused on glutamate. At excessive concentrations, glutamate is toxic to glia and neurons, and inflammatory cytokines have been shown to influence glutamate metabolism by blocking glutamate reuptake and increasing glutamate release. Increased glutamate has also been found in depression, a disorder associated with increased inflammation. Data by our group have shown increased glutamate as measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in basal ganglia and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex of patients administered the inflammatory cytokine interferon (IFN)-alpha. Given data that increasing age is associated with an exaggerated CNS inflammatory response, we examined whether older age (>55 years) would be associated with a greater IFN-alpha-induced increase in CNS glutamate. Using a longitudinal design, 31 patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) underwent MRS, blood sampling for inflammatory markers, and behavioral assessments before (Visit1) and after four weeks (Visit 2) of either IFN-alpha (n=17) or no treatment (n=14). Older patients treated with IFN-alpha exhibited a significantly increased glutamate from Visit 1 to Visit 2 as reflected by the glutamate/creatine ratio (Glu/Cr) in left basal ganglia compared to older controls and younger IFN-alpha-treated and untreated subjects. In addition, increased Glu/Cr in older but not younger IFN-alpha-treated and untreated patients was associated with increased tumor necrosis factor, reduced motivation as measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory and increased choice movement time on the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Taken together, these preliminary data support the notion that older age may interact with inflammation to exaggerate the effects of inflammatory stimuli on CNS glutamate and behavior. PMID:25500218

  5. Effect of Gly-Gly-His, Gly-His-Lys and their copper complexes on TNF-alpha-dependent IL-6 secretion in normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gruchlik, Arkadiusz; Jurzak, Magdalena; Chodurek, Ewa; Dzierzewicz, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Cosmeceuticals represent a marriage between cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. There are numerous cosmeceutically active products which can be broadly classified into the following categories: antioxidants, oligopeptides, growth factors and pigment lightning agents. Much attention has been focused on the tripeptides such as Gly-His-Lys (GHK) and Gly-Gly-His (GGH) and their copper complexes, which have a high activity and good skin tolerance. Recent data suggested their physiological role in process of wound healing, tissue repair and skin inflammation. The mechanism of anti-inflammatory properties of these peptides is not clear. The aim of the study was evaluation of influence of two peptides GGH. GHK and their copper complexes and saccharomyces/copper ferment (Oligolides Copper) on secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-6 in normal human dermal fibroblasts NHDF cell line. IL-6 was evaluated using the ELISA kit. GGH, GHK, CuCl2 and their copper complexes decreased TNF-alpha-dependent IL-6 secretion in fibroblasts. IL-6 is crucial for normal wound healing, skin inflammation and UVB-induced erythema. Because of the anti-inflammatory properties, the copper-peptides could be used on the skin surface instead of corticosteroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which have more side effects. Our observations provide some new information about the role of these tripeptides in skin inflammation. PMID:23285694

  6. Cytokine-mediated induction of metallothionein in Hepa-1c1c7 cells by oleanolic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Dong Hee; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Choi, Young Muk; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2004-12-17

    Oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpene acid, has been reported to possess inducing activity of hepatic metallothionein (MT). However, the mechanism underlying its effects is unknown. This study investigated the effects of OA on the regulation of MT expression in an in vitro model. OA that was added directly to Hepa-1c1c7 cells had no effect on MT induction. However, MT and its mRNA levels increased markedly when the Hepa-1c1c7 cells were cultured with the OA-treated conditioned media from the RAW 264.7 cells. Co-treating the RAW 264.7 cells with OA and pentoxifylline, a TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitor, resulted in a decrease in the effects of OA on the MT induction. In the OA-exposed RAW 264.7 cell cultures, production and mRNA levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 were increased. However, the MT induction activity was inhibited when antibodies to TNF-alpha and/or IL-6 were added to the OA-treated conditioned media from the RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that the up-regulation of MT expression by OA was mediated by the TNF-alpha and IL-6 released from UA-activated macrophages. PMID:15541359

  7. The correlation of intragraft cytokine expression with rejection in rat small intestine transplantation.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, S V; Farmer, D G; Kuniyoshi, J S; Robert, M; Khadavi, A; Shaked, A; Busuttil, R W

    1994-09-27

    Rejection continues to be a major cause of graft loss in small intestine transplantation (SIT). We have studied, by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (rtPCR), the intragraft expression of cytokines relevant to rejection in a rat model. Heterotopic SIT grafts were performed from Lewis x Brown Norway F1 donors into Lewis recipients. The isograft control was Lewis into Lewis. Five animals in each isograft and allograft group were sacrificed on POD 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14. mRNA was isolated from portions of the terminal ileum and rtPCR performed to amplify message for interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). Semiquantitative analysis was performed using 32P radionuclide incorporation and scintillation counting. The results were expressed as percent activity compared with beta-actin. Histologic correlation with cytokine expression was made. On POD 3 after SIT there was no evidence of rejection by histology and all cytokines studied showed no difference between the isograft and the allograft. On POD 5 the first evidence of mild rejection was seen on histology and IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha showed a significant up regulation in the allograft that persisted through POD 14. mRNA for IL-2 was not significantly upregulated until POD 7 and persisted until POD 14. IL-2R was constitutively expressed in both isograft and allograft and was not a reliable predictor of rejection. Histologic rejection was moderately severe by POD 7 and severe between POD 8 and 14 correlating with the increasing expression of IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha. In summary, we have shown that increasing expression of mRNA for IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha not only correlated with severity of rejection but that upregulation began early when histologic evidence of rejection first occurred. PMID:7940688

  8. Cytokine gene expression in Helicobacter pylori associated antral gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, S F; Legon, S; Davies, J; Calam, J

    1994-01-01

    Infection of the gastric antrum by Helicobacter pylori is characterised by a cellular inflammatory infiltrate. Whether cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of this gastritis has been investigated by studying the effect of eradicating H pylori on the expression of genes encoding the cytokines interleukin 8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the antral mucosa. Gastric antral biopsy specimens were taken from nine patients with duodenal ulcers and cytokine transcripts were identified and quantified by northern blotting. After H pylori had been eradicated the chronic inflammatory infiltrate decreased in all the patients and the polymorphonuclear infiltrate virtually disappeared. Expression of genes also decreased. After eradication, the median TNF-alpha mRNA/rRNA fell to 48% (p = 0.02) and the median IL-8 mRNA/rRNA fell to 5% (p = 0.004) of initial values. These results support the role of increased synthesis of these cytokines in the pathogenesis of the gastritis. Images Figure 1 PMID:7828974

  9. S100B/RAGE-dependent activation of microglia via NF-kappaB and AP-1 Co-regulation of COX-2 expression by S100B, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Roberta; Giambanco, Ileana; Donato, Rosario

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular S100B is known to affect astrocytic, neuronal and microglial activities, with different effects depending on its concentration. Whereas at relatively low concentrations S100B exerts trophic effects on neurons and astrocytes, at relatively high concentrations the protein causes neuronal apoptosis and activates astrocytes and microglia, thus potentially representing an endogenous factor implicated in neuroinflammation. We have reported that RAGE ligation by S100B in BV-2 microglia results in the upregulation of expression of the pro-inflammatory cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2) via parallel Ras-Cdc42-Rac1-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2) terminal protein kinase (JNK) and Ras-Rac1-dependent stimulation of NF-kappaB transcriptional activity. We show here that: (1) S100B also stimulates AP-1 transcriptional activity in microglia via RAGE-dependent activation of JNK; (2) S100B upregulates IL-1beta and TNF-alpha expression in microglia via RAGE engagement; and (3) S100B/RAGE-induced upregulation of COX-2, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha expression requires the concurrent activation of NF-kappaB and AP-1. We also show that S100B synergizes with IL-1beta and TNF-alpha to upregulate on COX-2 expression in microglia. Given the crucial roles of COX-2, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in the inflammatory response, we propose that, by engaging RAGE, S100B might play an important role in microglia activation in the course of brain damage. PMID:18599158

  10. Anti-tumor effects of paeonol in a HepA-hepatoma bearing mouse model via induction of tumor cell apoptosis and stimulation of IL-2 and TNF-alpha production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guo-Ping; Wang, Hua; Xu, Shu-Ping; Shen, Yu-Xian; Wu, Qiang; Chen, Zhen-Dong; Wei, Wei

    2008-04-28

    Paeonol, a phenolic component from the root bark of Paeonia moutan, is traditionally used as a Chinese herbal medicine to activate the blood flow and remove blood stasis. Evidence shows that paeonol have anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which paeonol exerts the anti-tumor effects by using a murine model of hepatoma established by in vivo injection of mouse HepA-hepatoma cells. Treatment of mice with 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg/day of paeonol significantly inhibited the growth of the HepA tumor in mice, induced HepA cell apoptosis as demonstrated by light microscopy and electron microscopy analyses, decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of Bax in HepA tumor tissues in a dose-related manner. Administration of paeonol in vivo also elevated serum levels of IL-2 and TNF-alpha in tumor-bearing mice. Moreover, splenocytes and macrophages isolated from paeonol-treated HepA tumor-bearing mice produced higher levels of IL-2 and TNF-alpha in response to concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide stimulation, respectively, compared to these isolated from non-treated HepA tumor-bearing mice. In vitro treatment with paeonol was able to directly stimulate IL-2 and TNF-alpha production in splenocytes and macrophages from tumor-bearing mice, respectively. In conclusion, paeonol has the anti-tumor effect against hepatoma cells, which are likely mediated via induction of tumor cell apoptosis and stimulation of IL-2 and TNF-alpha production. Paeonol could be a promising drug to treat hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:18329639

  11. Inhibition of bacterial cell wall-induced leukocyte recruitment and hepatic granuloma formation by TGF-beta gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Zeng, L; Pilo, C M; Zagorski, J; Wahl, S M

    1999-10-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of streptococcal cell walls (SCW) into Lewis rats results in dissemination of SCW to the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral joints. The uptake of SCW by Kupffer cells in the liver initiates a chain of events largely mediated by T lymphocytes and macrophages. Local synthesis and secretion of cytokines and growth factors in response to the persistent SCW lead to the evolution and maintenance of a chronic T cell-dependent granulomatous response and result in granuloma formation and irreversible hepatic fibrosis. In an attempt to impede the development of the chronic granulomatous lesions in the liver, we injected a plasmid DNA encoding TGF-beta 1 i.m. to the SCW animals to determine the effect of TGF-beta 1 gene transfer on the course of liver inflammation and fibrosis. A single injection of plasmid DNA encoding TGF-beta 1 resulted in virtual abolition of the development of the SCW-induced hepatic granuloma formation and matrix expansion. TGF-beta 1 DNA not only reduced key proinflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma, and IL-18, but also inhibited both CXC and CC chemokine production, thereby blocking inflammatory cell recruitment and accumulation in the liver. Moreover, TGF-beta 1 gene delivery inhibited its own expression in the liver tissue, which is otherwise up-regulated in SCW-injected animals. Our study suggests that TGF-beta 1 gene transfer suppresses hepatic granuloma formation by blocking the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the liver, and thus may provide a new approach to the control of hepatic granulomatous and fibrotic diseases. PMID:10491005

  12. Contradictory effects of chlorpromazine on endothelial cells in a rat model of endotoxic shock in association with its actions on serum TNF-alpha levels and antioxidant enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Can, Cenk; Demirci, Buket; Uysal, Ayşegül; Akçay, Yasemin Delen; Koşay, Sezen

    2003-09-01

    We examined the effects of the phenothiazine derivative, chlorpromazine on thoracic aortic endothelial cell histology (14 h after LPS challenge) in a model of endotoxic shock in rats. Since excessive formation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and oxygen-derived free radicals contribute to endothelial injury in endotoxemia, we also evaluated the effect of the drug on the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in liver tissue in this model and tried to find out whether this possible effect was associated with a change in serum TNF-alpha levels (measured 90 min after chlorpromazine administration). Endotoxemia was induced by a single i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg kg(-1) in 1.5 ml of saline; LPS from Escherichia coli serotype 055:B5, L-2880, Sigma Chemical Company). Electron microscopic evaluation of the aortas revealed that chlorpromazine (administered 30 min prior to LPS challenge), in smaller doses (3 mg kg(-1)) ameliorated the endothelial cell injury caused by LPS, whereas it caused deterioration of endothelial cell morphology in higher doses (10 and 25 mg kg(-1)). Chlorpromazine administration caused a significant reduction in serum TNF-alpha levels, which was correlated well with an increase in SOD activity in all drug doses (3, 10 and 25 mg kg(-1)). Catalase activity was increased only in the 25 mg kg(-1) chlorpromazine group. PMID:12860438

  13. Prediction of novel and selective TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitors and characterization of correlative molecular descriptors by machine learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yong; Yang, Xue-Gang; Lv, Wei; Xue, Ying

    2009-10-01

    The inhibition of TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE) has been explored as a feasible therapy for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease (CD). Recently, large numbers of novel and selective TACE inhibitors have been reported. It is desirable to develop machine learning (ML) models for identifying the inhibitors of TACE in the early drug design phase and test the prediction capabilities of these ML models. This work evaluated four ML methods, support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), back-propagation neural network (BPNN) and C4.5 decision tree (C4.5 DT), which were trained and tested by using a diverse set of 443 TACE inhibitors and 759 non-inhibitors. A well-established feature selection method, the recursive feature elimination (RFE) method, was used to select the most appropriate descriptors for classification from a large pool of descriptors, and two evaluation methods, 5-fold cross-validation and independent evaluation, were used to assess the performances of these developed models. In this study, all these ML models have already achieved promising prediction accuracies. By using the RFE method, the prediction accuracies are further improved. In k-NN, the model gives the best prediction for TACE inhibitors (98.32%), and the SVM bears the best prediction for non-inhibitors (99.51%). Both the k-NN and SVM model give the best overall prediction accuracy (98.45%). To the best of our knowledge, the SVM model developed in this work is the first one for the classification prediction of TACE inhibitors with a broad applicability domain. Our study suggests that ML methods, particularly SVM, are potentially useful for facilitating the discovery of TACE inhibitors and for exhibiting the molecular descriptors associated with TACE inhibitors. PMID:19729328

  14. Three NF-kappa B sites in the I kappa B-alpha promoter are required for induction of gene expression by TNF alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, C Y; Kazantsev, A G; Baldwin, A S

    1994-01-01

    NF-kappa B was first identified as a postive regulator which bound to a 10 bp sequence in the first intron of the Ig kappa light chain gene. Further characterization of this transcription factor has revealed that NF-kappa B is kept from binding to its consensus sequence by its inhibitor, IkB-alpha, which retains NF-kappa B in the cytoplasm. Upon receiving various extra- and intracellular signals, I kappa B-alpha is rapidly degraded and NF-kappa B is induced to translocate into the nucleus. This process precedes the rapid induction of I kappa B-alpha mRNA and protein. To understand how I kappa B-alpha is replenished, we have cloned and sequenced the 5' flanking region of the I kappa B-alpha gene and have identified the transcription start site and three NF-kappa B sites in this region. Further characterization of these NF-kappa B sites show that they have different affinities for three specific protein complexes which we identify here to consist of various members of the Rel family. In transient assays, cotransfection with a p65 expression vector is able to activate an I kappa B-alpha promoter-CAT reporter construct and all three NF-kappa B sites are required for full activation of the I kappa B-alpha gene following stimulation with TNF-alpha. Our data confirm a transcriptional autoregulatory loop involved in maintaining appropriate NF-kappa B and I kappa B-alpha levels in the cell. Images PMID:7937093

  15. Involvement of proton-sensing TDAG8 in extracellular acidification-induced inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production in peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mogi, Chihiro; Tobo, Masayuki; Tomura, Hideaki; Murata, Naoya; He, Xiao-dong; Sato, Koichi; Kimura, Takao; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Sasaki, Takehiko; Sato, Takashi; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Harada, Akihiro; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2009-03-01

    Extracellular acidification inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha protein production, which was associated with an inhibition of TNF-alpha mRNA expression, in mouse peritoneal macrophages. The LPS-induced cytokine production was also inhibited by G(s) protein-coupled receptor agonists prostaglandin E(1) and isoproterenol. Among OGR1 family proton-sensing GTP-binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors, TDAG8, OGR1, and G2A are expressed in the cells. The inhibitory action by acidic pH on TNF-alpha production was significantly attenuated in macrophages from TDAG8(Tp/Tp) mice but not in those from OGR1(geo/geo) mice. Moreover, small interfering RNA specific to TDAG8, but not to G2A, clearly attenuated the acidification-induced inhibition of TNF-alpha production. On the other hand, the down-regulation or deficiency of TDAG8 hardly affected prostaglandin E(1)- or isoproterenol-induced actions. LPS-induced IL-6 production was also inhibited by extracellular acidification in a manner that was sensitive to TDAG8 expression. The acidic pH-induced inhibitory action on the cytokine production was significantly reversed either by a small interfering RNA specific to G(s) proteins or by a protein kinase A (PKA)-specific inhibitor H89. Indeed, a PKA-specific cAMP derivative inhibited LPS-induced cytokine production. Moreover, acidification induced cAMP accumulation in a TDAG8-specific way. We conclude that TDAG8, at least partly, mediates the extracellular acidification-induced inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production through the G(s) protein/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in mouse macrophages. PMID:19234222

  16. Antibody array-generated profiles of cytokine release from THP-1 leukemic monocytes exposed to different amphotericin B formulations.

    PubMed

    Turtinen, Lloyd W; Prall, David N; Bremer, Lindsay A; Nauss, Rachel E; Hartsel, Scott C

    2004-02-01

    Cytokine antibody arrays were used to establish the profiles of cytokine release from THP-1 monocytes exposed to different amphotericin B (AMB) drug delivery systems. Fungizone (FZ) and Amphotec (ABCD) caused the release of significantly more inflammatory molecules and the release of inflammatory molecules at higher levels than either AmBisome (L-AMB) or Abelcet (ABLC) after 6 h of treatment. Specifically, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-8 (IL-8), GRO-(alphabetagamma), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), RANTES, IL-10, and IL-6 were detected and semiquantified with a chemiluminscence imaging system. TNF-alpha, IL-8, and MCP-1 were the most predominant; however, little if any TNF-alpha was present in ABLC- or L-AMB-treated cultures. The TNF- alpha and IL-8 levels determined by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay correlated with the relative cytokine levels measured by using the antibody arrays. Although the viabilities of THP-l monocytes in all AMB-treated cultures were similar by trypan blue exclusion, the amount of lactic dehydrogenase released was significantly larger in FZ- and ABCD-treated cultures than in L-AMB- and ABLC-treated cultures, indicating more membrane perturbations with those formulations. Membrane cation channel formation was also measured in model cholesterol-containing large unilamellar vesicles to directly assess the ion channel formation ability of the system. Only FZ and ABCD induced significant ion currents at concentrations less than 1.5 x 10(-5) M. These results may help provide rationales for the immediate cytokine-mediated side effects observed with FZ and ABCD and the reduced side effects observed with L-AMB and ABLC. PMID:14742187

  17. 1H-Imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline derivatives as novel potent TNF-alpha suppressors: synthesis and structure-activity relationship of 1-, 2-and 4-substituted 1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines or 1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridines.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Tomoyuki; Sakaguchi, Jun; Takeshita, Makoto; Tawara, Harumi; Kato, Ken-ichi; Dose, Hitomi; Tsujino, Tomomi; Watanabe, Yoshinari; Kato, Hideo

    2003-06-12

    Structural modification of imiquimod (1), which is known as an interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) inducer, for the aim of finding a novel and small-molecule tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) suppressor and structure-activity relationship (SAR) are described. Structural modification of a imiquimod analogue, 4-amino-1-[2-(1-benzyl-4-piperidyl)ethyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline (2), which had moderate TNF-alpha suppressing activity without IFN-alpha inducing activity, led to a finding of 4-chloro-2-phenyl-1-[2-(4-piperidyl)ethyl]-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline (10) with potent TNF-alpha suppressing activity. The relation between conformational direction of 2-(4-piperidyl)ethyl group at position 1 and TNF-alpha suppressing activity is also demonstrated by NMR. PMID:12757722

  18. Dynamics of the intracerebral and splenic cytokine mRNA production in Toxoplasma gondii-resistant and -susceptible congenic strains of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Deckert-Schlüter, M; Albrecht, S; Hof, H; Wiestler, O D; Schlüter, D

    1995-01-01

    Oral infection with a low-virulence strain of Toxoplasma gondii (Tg) induced a persisting encephalitis in resistant strains of mice. In the present study we have examined transcripts of various cytokines during acute and chronic stages of murine Tg encephalitis. In the brain of infected animals, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12 mRNA were induced to a significant extent, but only low levels of IL-4 mRNA were detectable. A similar cytokine profile was observed in the spleen. However, in contrast to the brain, the increase of IL-2 mRNA was particularly pronounced in the spleen, whereas the opposite was found for IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha mRNA. Thus, cytokines involved in T-cell proliferation were more prevalent in the spleen, but in the brain, where Tg actively multiplies, the effector molecules IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were preferentially up-regulated. In addition, a detailed analysis of cytokine mRNA levels in major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-congenic strains of BALB and B10 mice revealed that the genetically regulated susceptibility to Tg was correlated with the amount of intracerebrally produced cytokine mRNA for IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-6. Mice with a strong increase of these cytokine mRNA were significantly better protected against Tg. This indicates that the outcome of toxoplasmosis may be critically dependent on an adequately regulated intracerebral immune response. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7558129

  19. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  20. Role of cytokines in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H S; Das, D K

    1997-01-01

    Mediators of myocardial inflammation, predominantly cytokines, have for many years been implicated in the healing processes after infarction. In recent years, however, more attention has been paid to the possibility that the inflammation may result in deleterious complications for myocardial infarction. The proinflammatory cytokines may mediate myocardial dysfunction associated with myocardial infarction, severe congestive heart failure, and sepsis. A growing body of literature suggests that inflammatory mediators could play a crucial role in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Furthermore, ischemia-reperfusion not only results in the local transcriptional and translational upregulation of cytokines but also leads to tissue infiltration by inflammatory cells. These inflammatory cells are a ready source of a variety of cytokines which could be lethal for the cardiomyocytes. At the cellular level it has been shown that hypoxia causes a series of well documented changes in cardiomyocytes that includes loss of contractility, changes in lipid metabolism and subsequent irreversible cell membrane damage leading to cell death. For instance, hypoxic cardiomyocytes produce interleukin-6 (IL-6) which could contribute to the myocardial dysfunction observed in ischemia reperfusion injury. Ischemia followed by reperfusion induces a number of other multi-potent cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) as well as an angiogenic cytokine/ growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in the heart. Intrestingly, these multipotent cytokines (e.g. TNF-alpha) may induce an adaptive cytoprotective response in the reperfused myocardium. In this review, we have included a number of cytokines that may contribute to ventricular dysfunction and/or to the cytoprotective and adaptive changes in the reperfused heart. PMID:18472818

  1. Apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rat hepatocyte cell lines expressing hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot, S.; Miller, T.; Cornman, G.; Isom, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    Three well differentiated SV40-immortalized rat hepatocyte cell lines, CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14, and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-producing cell lines derived from them were examined for sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14 cells were co-transfected with a DNA construct containing a dimer of the HBV genome and the neo gene and selected in G418 to generate stable cell lines. Characterization of these cell lines indicated that they contain integrated HBV DNA, contain low molecular weight HBV DNA compatible with the presence of HBV replication intermediates, express HBV transcripts, and produce HBV proteins. The viability of CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV2 cells was not significantly altered when they were treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations as high as 20,000 U/ml. The HBV-expressing CWSV1 cell line, SV1di36, and the HBV-expressing CWSV14 cell line, SV14di208, were also not killed when treated with TNF-alpha. However, the HBV-expressing CWSV2 cell line, SV2di366, was extensively killed when treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations ranging from 200 to 20,000 U/ml. Analysis of several different HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines indicated that TNF-alpha killing depended upon the level of HBV expression. The TNF-alpha-induced cell killing in high HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines was accompanied by the presence of an oligonucleosomal DNA ladder characteristic of apoptosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8774135

  2. Cytokine-mediated down-regulation of CYP1A1 in Hepa1 cells.

    PubMed

    Paton, T E; Renton, K W

    1998-06-01

    The activation of host defense mechanisms down-regulates microsomal cytochrome P450 in cell culture, humans, and animals. Investigation into various aspects of this effect using in vivo models has yet to define clearly the role that cytokines play in this phenomenon. The mechanism of down-regulation by immunostimulants, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is explored with an in vitro model, utilizing a murine hepatoma (Hepa1) and a murine macrophage (IC-21) cell line. It is hypothesized that down-regulation of P450 activity by immunostimulants involves the activation of immune cells and the subsequent release of cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The effects of immunostimulation on P450 activity are assessed by ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase, an assay that measures CYP1A activity in Hepa1 cells. Initial studies demonstrated that LPS added directly to hepatoma cells had no effect on the levels of CYP1A1 activity. In contrast, a significant down-regulation in CYP1A1 activity occurred when hepatoma cells were incubated with monocyte conditioned medium obtained by incubating LPS with IC-21 cells. When pentoxifylline, a TNF-alpha synthesis inhibitor, was co-administered with LPS to macrophages, the down-regulation of CYP1A1 activity was prevented. The direct administration of murine recombinant TNF-alpha to hepatoma cells resulted in a down-regulation of CYP1A1 activity. These results implicated the release of TNF-alpha from macrophages as an important step in the down-regulation of CYP1A1 by LPS. PMID:9714297

  3. Lung macrophage-epithelial cell interactions amplify particle-mediated cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Tao, Florence; Kobzik, Lester

    2002-04-01

    Interactions between alveolar macrophages (AMs) and epithelial cells may promote inflammatory responses to air pollution particles. Normal rat AMs, the alveolar type II epithelial cell line RLE-6TN (RLE), or cocultures of both cell types were incubated with various particles (0-50 microg/ml) for 24 h, followed by assay of released TNF-alpha and MIP-2. The particles used included titanium dioxide (TiO2), alpha-quartz (SiO2), residual oil fly ash (ROFA), or urban air particles (UAP). For all particles, a dose-dependent increase in TNF-alpha and MIP-2 release was observed in AM+RLE co-cultures but not in RLE or AM monoculture. AM+RLE co-culture also synergistically enhanced basal levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2. In contrast, when AMs were co-cultured with fibroblasts, basal and particle-induced TNF-alpha and MIP-2 were similar to levels found in AM monoculture. Particle uptake by AMs was similar in mono- or AM+RLE co-culture. Increased basal and particle-induced cytokine release were not observed when the AMs were physically separated from the RLE. This contact-dependent cytokine potentiation could not be blocked with anti-CD18/anti-CD54, arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptide, or heparin. We conclude that in vitro inflammatory responses to particles are amplified by contact-dependent interactions between AMs and epithelial cells. AM-epithelial co-culture may provide a useful model of in vivo particle effects. PMID:11919087

  4. Plasma cytokines profile in older subjects with late onset Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, G; Ranzini, M; Guerra, G; Rossi, L; Munari, M R; Zurlo, A; Volpato, S; Atti, A R; Blè, A; Fellin, R

    2007-10-01

    Some cytokines have been involved in the pathogenesis of late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). A possible increase in plasma cytokines levels has been reported in LOAD and vascular dementia (VD), but the results of previous studies are conflicting. We evaluated the plasma levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-10 in four groups of older individuals: 60 patients with LOAD, 80 patients with VD, 40 subjects with cerebrovascular disease but without dementia (CDND), and 42 controls (C). By analysis of covariance (adjustment for age, gender, coronary heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and alcohol consumption) we found that: *IL-1beta was higher in VD, LOAD, and CDND compared with controls (p<0.005). *TNF-alpha was higher in VD and LOAD compared to C (p<0.05), and in VD compared to LOAD (p<0.03). *IL-6 was higher in VD compared with LOAD (p<0.03). No differences in IL-10 values were found (Kruskal-Wallis, Asymp. Sig. 0.14). By logistic regression analysis, we demonstrated that high levels (defined as above the median) of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, but not of IL-6, were associated with increased likelihood of having VD and LOAD compared to C, while high IL-6 levels were associated with a increased probability of having VD, compared with LOAD. Our study support the notion of a low-grade systemic inflammation in older patients with LOAD or VD, characterized by an increase in plasma IL-1beta and TNF-alpha levels. The high IL-6 levels found in VD might be not a specific finding, as it might come from several conditions including atherosclerosis and related vascular risk factors, comorbidity, and frailty. PMID:16600299

  5. Regulation of sucrase-isomaltase gene expression in human intestinal epithelial cells by inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ziambaras, T; Rubin, D C; Perlmutter, D H

    1996-01-12

    Using metabolic labeling techniques in human intestinal epithelial cell lines in tissue culture and in situ hybridization techniques in normal and inflamed (Crohn's) intestine, recent studies have shown that there is synthesis of acute phase proteins in enterocytes. Moreover, these studies have shown that acute phase protein biosynthesis in enterocytes is regulated by inflammatory cytokines in a manner characteristic of the physiologic acute phase response. In the course of these studies it was noticed that one inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), mediated selective down-regulation of the enterocyte-specific, differentiation-dependent integral membrane protein sucrase-isomaltase (SI) in the Caco2 intestinal epithelial cell line. In the current study we examined the effect of several other inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), and interferon gamma (IFN gamma) on synthesis of SI in Caco2 cells, examined the possibility that inflammatory cytokines affect the synthesis of other enterocyte integral membrane proteins using lactase as a prototype, and examined the possibility that SI gene expression was down-regulated in villous enterocytes in vivo during the local inflammatory response of Crohn's disease. The results show that IL-6 and IFN gamma each mediate a decrease and TNF alpha mediates an increase in synthesis of SI in Caco2 cells. The magnitude of down-regulation by IL-6 and IFN gamma is significantly greater than the up-regulation by TNF alpha. IL-1 beta has no effect on synthesis of SI. Synthesis of lactase is not affected by any of the cytokines. There is a marked specific decrease in SI gene expression in villous enterocytes in acutely inflamed Crohn's ileum as compared to adjacent uninflamed ileum and normal ileum. Taken together, these data show that inflammatory cytokines have specific and selective effects on the expression of the brush border hydrolase SI in tissue culture and in vivo and

  6. IL-10 plays a central regulatory role in the cytokines induced by hepatitis C virus core protein and polyinosinic acid:polycytodylic acid.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhai, Naicui; Zhang, Qianqian; Song, Hongxiao; Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Tianyang; Li, Haijun; Su, Lishan; Niu, Junqi; Tu, Zhengkun

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cause persistent infection and chronic liver disease, and viral factors are involved in HCV persistence. HCV core protein, a highly conserved viral protein, not only elicits an immunoresponse, but it also regulates it. In addition, HCV core protein interacts with toll-like receptors (TLRs) on monocytes, inducing them to produce cytokines. Polyinosinic acid:polycytodylic acid (polyI:C) is a synthetic analogue of double-stranded RNA that binds to TLR3 and can induce secretion of type I IFN from monocytes. Cytokine response against HCV is likely to affect the natural course of infection as well as HCV persistence. However, possible effects of cytokines induced by HCV core protein and polyI:C remain to be investigated. In this study, we isolated CD14(+) monocytes from healthy donors, cultured them in the presence of HCV core protein and/or polyI:C, and characterized the induced cytokines, phenotypes and mechanisms. We demonstrated that HCV core protein- and polyI:C-stimulated CD14(+) monocytes secreted tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and type I interferon (IFN). Importantly, TNF-α and IL-1β regulated the secretion of IL-10, which then influenced the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) and subsequently the production of type I IFN. Interestingly, type I IFN also regulated the production of IL-10, which in turn inhibited the nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit, reducing TNF-α and IL-1β levels. Therefore, IL-10 appears to play a central role in regulating the production of cytokines induced by HCV core protein and polyI:C. PMID:27337528

  7. Cytokines, atherogenesis, and hypercatabolism in chronic kidney disease: a dreadful triad.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesus; Park, Sun-Hee; Axelsson, Jonas; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The term cytokine clusters denotes a copious family of molecules and correspondent receptors implicated in numerous processes mediating health and disease. In the context of chronic kidney disease (CKD), generation and metabolism of most of these cytokines are disturbed. Available evidence suggests that cytokine imbalances contribute to the progression of common CKD complications, such as atherosclerosis, mineral-bone disease, and protein-energy wasting via pleiotropic effects. The belief that cytokine CKD research is solely represented by interleukins (IL) and tumor-necrosis factors (TNF) (mainly IL-6 and TNF-alpha) is a common misconception among nephrologists. We here explore recent findings concerning the pathophysiological role of various cytokines in uremic complications, and discuss how cytokines could be used as novel potential therapeutic targets in CKD. At the same time, we provide a brief overview of current discoveries in the main transforming growth factors and chemokines. PMID:19708986

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Down-Regulates Insulin Receptor Substrates 1 and 2 through Up-Regulation of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Yoshida, Takafumi; Harada, Masaru; Hisamoto, Takao; Nagao, Yumiko; Ide, Tatsuya; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Kumemura, Hiroto; Hanada, Shinichiro; Maeyama, Michiko; Baba, Shinji; Koga, Hironori; Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Ueno, Takato; Ogata, Hisanobu; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Sata, Michio

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated insulin resistance remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated mechanisms for HCV-associated insulin resistance. Homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance was increased in patients with HCV infection. An increase in fasting insulin levels was associated with the presence of serum HCV core, the severity of hepatic fibrosis and a decrease in expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS) 1 and IRS2, central molecules of the insulin-signaling cascade, in patients with HCV infection. Down-regulation of IRS1 and IRS2 was also seen in HCV core-transgenic mice livers and HCV core-transfected human hepatoma cells. Carbobenzoxy-l-leucyl-l-leucyl-l-leucinal, a potent proteosomal proteolysis inhibitor, blocked down-regulation of IRS1 and IRS2 in HCV core-transfected hepatoma cells. In human hepatoma cells, HCV core up-regulated suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 3 and caused ubiquitination of IRS1 and IRS2. HCV core-induced down-regulation of IRS1 and IRS2 was not seen in SOCS3−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Furthermore, HCV core suppressed insulin-induced phosphorylation of p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt, activation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase, and glucose uptake. In conclusion, HCV infection changes a subset of hepatic molecules regulating glucose metabolism. A possible mechanism is that HCV core-induced SOCS3 promotes proteosomal degradation of IRS1 and IRS2 through ubiquitination. PMID:15509521

  9. Rheumatoid cachexia: cytokine-driven hypermetabolism accompanying reduced body cell mass in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Roubenoff, R; Roubenoff, R A; Cannon, J G; Kehayias, J J; Zhuang, H; Dawson-Hughes, B; Dinarello, C A; Rosenberg, I H

    1994-01-01

    The cytokines IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha cause cachexia and hypermetabolism in animal models, but their role in human inflammation remains controversial. The relationship between in vitro cytokine production and metabolism was examined in 23 adults with RA and 23 healthy control subjects matched on age, sex, race, and weight. Body composition was measured by multicompartmental analysis of body cell mass, water, fat, and bone mass. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured by indirect calorimetry. Cytokine production by PBMC was measured by radioimmunoassay. Usual energy intake, physical activity, disability scores, medication use, and other confounders were also measured. Body cell mass was 13% lower (P < 0.00001), REE was 12% higher (P < 0.008), and physical activity was much lower (P < 0.001) in subjects with RA. Production of TNF-alpha was higher in RA than controls, both before and after stimulation with endotoxin (P < 0.05), while production of IL-1 beta was higher with endotoxin stimulation (P < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, cytokine production was directly associated with REE (P < 0.001) in patients but not in controls. While energy and protein intake were similar in the two groups and exceeded the Recommended Dietary Allowances, energy intake in subjects with RA was inversely associated with IL-1 beta production (P < 0.005). In this study we conclude that: loss of body cell mass is common in RA; cytokine production in RA is associated with altered energy metabolism and intake, despite a theoretically adequate diet; and TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta modulate energy metabolism and body composition in RA. PMID:8200971

  10. Kinetics of cytokine expression during primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, C; Gantt, K R; Vaccarezza, M; Demarest, J F; Daucher, M; Saag, M S; Shaw, G M; Quinn, T C; Cohen, O J; Welbon, C C; Pantaleo, G; Fauci, A S

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we have determined the kinetics of constitutive expression of a panel of cytokines [interleukin (IL) 2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)] in sequential peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from nine individuals with primary human immunodeficiency virus infection. Expression of IL-2 and IL-4 was barely detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, substantial levels of IL-2 expression were found in mononuclear cells isolated from lymph node. Expression of IL-6 was detected in only three of nine patients, and IL-6 expression was observed when transition from the acute to the chronic phase had already occurred. Expression of IL-10 and TNF-alpha was consistently observed in all patients tested, and levels of both cytokines were either stable or progressively increased over time. Similar to IL-10 and TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma expression was detected in all patients; however, in five of nine patients, IFN-gamma expression peaked very early during primary infection. The early peak in IFN-gamma expression coincided with oligoclonal expansions of CD8+ T cells in five of six patients, and CD8+ T cells mostly accounted for the expression of this cytokine. These results indicate that high levels of expression of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with primary infection and that the cytokine response during this phase of infection is strongly influenced by oligoclonal expansions of CD8+ T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8633076

  11. Plasma cytokine concentration and the cytokine producing ability of whole blood cell cultures from healthy females with pharmacologically induced hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Lackovic, V; Veselková, Z; Horváthová, M; Koska, J; Blazícková, S; Vigas, M

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effect of domperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia on plasma cytokine concentration and blood leukocyte cytokine production in healthy female volunteers. No changes were found in the plasma concentration of interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-6 and IL-13 during hyperprolactinemia when compared with control values. Using unseparated blood leukocytes, we found that the spontaneous production of IL-6 (4-8 h) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 (2-4 h) was significantly decreased and that the in vitro stimulated production of IFN-gamma (2-8 h) and TNF (4 h) was significantly increased compared with control. Our data concerning the increased IFN-gamma and TNF producing capacity of unseparated leukocytes during pharmacologically induced hyperprolactinemia strongly support the possibility that the lymphocyte production of these cytokines can be rapidly amplified by prolactin via a priming mechanism. PMID:10568223

  12. Cytokine and Eicosanoid Production by Cultured Human Monocytes Exposed to Titanium Particulate Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Timothy M.; Manley, Paul A.; Sims, Paul A.; Albrecht, Ralph; Darien, Benjamin J.

    1999-10-01

    Phagocytosis of particulate wear debris from arthroplasties by macrophages induces an inflammatory response that has been linked to implant loosening and premature failure of artificial joints. Inflammatory mediators released by phagocytic macrophages such as tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-[alpha]), interleukin-1[beta] (IL-1[beta]), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening. The objective of this study was to characterize titanium alloy particulates that closely match wear debris found around joint arthroplasties and to study their effects on the biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators by cultured monocytes. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human volunteers. Monocytes were cultured in 96-well plates for 24 h, washed, and exposed to three concentrations of titanium particulates and controls from 18Ð24 h. Supernatants were assayed for TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], IL-6, and PGE2 activity. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) verified the titanium alloy to be Ti6A14V. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed significant titanium particulate heterogeneity with approximately 95% of the particles <1 micrometer in diameter. SEM and EDX technology was useful in the characterization of the titanium particulates utilized for in vitro models of titanium-induced cytokine release by monocytes. Incubation of titanium particulates (in concentrations similar to those found around loosened prosthetic joints) with cultured monocytes significantly increased their production of TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], and PGE2.

  13. Waste management - cytokines, growth factors and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Al-Shanti, Nasser; Nasser, Al-Shanti; Stewart, Claire E H

    2006-12-01

    Muscle damage with a lack of regeneration, manifests itself in several life-threatening diseases, including cancer cachexia, congestive heart failure, AIDS and sepsis. Often misdiagnosed as a condition simply of weight loss, cachexia is actually a highly complex metabolic disorder involving features of anorexia, anaemia, lipolysis and insulin resistance. A significant loss of lean body mass arises from such conditions, resulting in wasting of skeletal muscle. Unlike starvation, the weight loss seen in chronic illnesses arises equally from loss of muscle and of fat. The cachectic state is particularly problematic in cancer, typifying poor prognosis and often lowering responses to chemotherapy and radiation treatment. More than half of cancer patients suffer from cachexia, and strikingly, nearly one-third of cancer deaths are related to cachexia rather than the tumour burden. In considering this disorder, we are faced with a conundrum; how is it possible for uncontrolled growth to prevail in the tumour, in the face of unrestrained tissue loss in our muscles? Consistently, the catabolic state has been associated with a shift in the homeostatic balance between muscle synthesis and degradation mediated by the actions of growth factors and cytokines. Indeed, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels are raised in several animal models of cachectic muscle wasting, whereas the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system acts potently to regulate muscle development, hypertrophy and maintenance. This concept of skeletal muscle homeostasis, often viewed as the net balance between two separate processes of protein synthesis and degradation has however changed. More recently, the view is that these two biochemical processes are not occurring independently of each other but in fact are finely co-ordinated by a web of intricate signalling networks. This review, therefore, aims to discuss data currently available regarding the mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration with

  14. Soluble cytokine receptors in biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Crespo, Fabian A; Sun, Xichun

    2002-08-01

    Due to their fundamental involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases, cytokines constitute key targets for biotherapeutic approaches. The discovery that soluble forms of cytokine receptors are involved in the endogenous regulation of cytokine activity has prompted substantial interest in their potential application as immunotherapeutic agents. As such, soluble cytokine receptors have many advantages, including specificity, low immunogenicity and high affinity. Potential disadvantages, such as low avidity and short in vivo half-lifes, have been addressed by the use of genetically-designed receptors, hybrid proteins or chemical modifications. The ability of many soluble cytokine receptors to inhibit the binding and biological activity of their ligands makes them very specific cytokine antagonists. Several pharmaceutical companies have generated a number of therapeutic agents based on soluble cytokine receptors and many of them are undergoing clinical trials. The most advanced in terms of clinical development is etanercept (Enbrel, Immunex), a fusion protein between soluble TNF receptor Type II and the Fc region of human IgG1. This TNF-alpha; antagonist was the first soluble cytokine receptor to receive approval for use in humans. In general, most agents based on soluble cytokine receptors have been safe, well-tolerated and have shown only minor side effects in the majority of patients. Soluble cytokine receptors constitute a new generation of therapeutic agents with tremendous potential for applications in a wide variety of human diseases. Two current areas of research are the identification of their most promising applications and characterisation of their long-term effects. PMID:12171504

  15. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  16. St. John's wort attenuates irinotecan-induced diarrhea via down-regulation of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Zeping; Yang Xiaoxia; Chan Suiyung; Xu Anlong; Duan Wei; Zhu Yizhun; Sheu, F.-S.; Boelsterli, Urs Alex; Chan, Eli; Zhang Qiang; Wang, J.-C.; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel; Koh, H.L.; Huang Min; Zhou Shufeng . E-mail: phazsf@nus.edu.sg

    2006-10-15

    Diarrhea is a common dose-limiting toxicity associated with cancer chemotherapy, in particular for drugs such as irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluouracil, oxaliplatin, capecitabine and raltitrexed. St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) has anti-inflammatory activity, and our preliminary study in the rat and a pilot study in cancer patients found that treatment of SJW alleviated irinotecan-induced diarrhea. In the present study, we investigated whether SJW modulated various pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukins (IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-6), interferon (IFN-{gamma}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and intestinal epithelium apoptosis in rats. The rats were treated with irinotecan at 60 mg/kg for 4 days in combination with oral SJW or SJW-free control vehicle at 400 mg/kg for 8 days. Diarrhea, tissue damage, body weight loss, various cytokines including IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} and intestinal epithelial apoptosis were monitored over 11 days. Our studies demonstrated that combined SJW markedly reduced CPT-11-induced diarrhea and intestinal lesions. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1{beta}, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} was significantly up-regulated in intestine. In the mean time, combined SJW significantly suppressed the intestinal epithelial apoptosis induced by CPT-11 over days 5-11. In particular, combination of SJW significantly inhibited the expression of TNF-{alpha} mRNA in the intestine over days 5-11. In conclusion, inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and intestinal epithelium apoptosis partly explained the protective effect of SJW against the intestinal toxicities induced by irinotecan. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential for STW as an agent in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs to lower their dose-limiting toxicities.

  17. Effect of exhaustive exercise stress on the cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, C; König, D; Harnischmacher, R; Keul, J; Berg, A; Northoff, H

    1997-03-01

    Fifteen athletes were investigated 24 h before, 1 h after, and 20 h after an exhaustive exercise stress test (mean duration 68 min). Testing for cytokines was done in serum, urine, and the supernatants of whole blood cell cultures, which were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), concanavalin A (Con A), or phythaemagglutinin (PHA). Elevated levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) were found 1 h after the run in both serum and urine samples. TNF-alpha in serum was also increased, whereas IL-2 in urine was decreased after the exercise. All other testings in serum and urine (including IFN-gamma) gave borderline or negative results. In cell cultures, the LPS-induced release of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6 was suppressed 1 h after exercise. Also, the Con-A-induced and LPS-induced release of IFN-gamma, and the PHA-induced release of IL-2 were suppressed 1 h after exercise. In contrast, Con-A-induced release of IL-2 was mildly increased after the run. We conclude that exercise of the intensity and duration described here causes an activation of the immune system, which is immediately counter-regulated. Twenty hours after the exercise, most of the observed changes were back to pre-exercise levels, indicating only a short duration for this suppressive counter-regulation. PMID:9139173

  18. The cytomegalovirus homolog of interleukin-10 requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity for inhibition of cytokine synthesis in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Juliet V

    2007-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) has evolved numerous strategies for evading host immune defenses, including piracy of cellular cytokines. A viral homolog of interleukin-10, designated cmvIL-10, binds to the cellular IL-10 receptor and effects potent immune suppression. The signaling pathways employed by cmvIL-10 were investigated, and the classic IL-10R/JAK1/Stat3 pathway was found to be activated in monocytes. However, inhibition of JAK1 had little effect on cmvIL-10-mediated suppression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway had a more significant impact on TNF-alpha levels but did not completely relieve the immune suppression, demonstrating that cmvIL-10 stimulates multiple signaling pathways to modulate cell function. PMID:17121792

  19. Phenotypic changes caused by melatonin increased sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to cytokine-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Mayo, Juan C; Hevia, David; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Navarro, Maria; Sainz, Rosa M

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin has antiproliferative properties in prostate cancer cells. Melatonin reduces proliferation without increasing apoptosis, and it promotes cell differentiation into a neuroendocrine phenotype. Because neuroendocrine cells displayed an androgen-independent growth and high resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the role of molecules that induce neuroendocrine differentiation was questioned in terms of their usefulness as oncostatic agents. By using human epithelial androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, the role of melatonin in drug-induced apoptosis was studied after acute treatments. In addition to cytokines such as hrTNF-alpha and TRAIL, chemotherapeutic compounds, including doxorubicin, docetaxel, or etoposide, were employed in combination with melatonin to promote cell death. Melatonin promotes cell toxicity caused by cytokines without influencing the actions of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, antioxidant properties of melatonin were confirmed in prostate cancer cells. However, its ability to increase cell death caused by cytokines was independent of the redox changes. Finally, phenotypic changes caused by chronic treatment with the indole, that is, neuroendocrine differentiation, make cells significantly more sensitive to cytokines and slightly more sensitive to some chemotherapeutic compounds. Thus, melatonin is a good inhibitor of the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, promoting phenotypic changes that do not increase survival mechanisms and make cells more sensitive to cytokines such as TNF-alpha or TRAIL. PMID:22738066

  20. A distinct array of proinflammatory cytokines is expressed in human colon epithelial cells in response to bacterial invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, H C; Eckmann, L; Yang, S K; Panja, A; Fierer, J; Morzycka-Wroblewska, E; Kagnoff, M F

    1995-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria that penetrate the intestinal epithelial barrier stimulate an inflammatory response in the adjacent intestinal mucosa. The present studies asked whether colon epithelial cells can provide signals that are important for the initiation and amplification of an acute mucosal inflammatory response. Infection of monolayers of human colon epithelial cell lines (T84, HT29, Caco-2) with invasive strains of bacteria (Salmonella dublin, Shigella dysenteriae, Yersinia enterocolitica, Listeria monocytogenes, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli) resulted in the coordinate expression and upregulation of a specific array of four proinflammatory cytokines, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, GM-CSF, and TNF alpha, as assessed by mRNA levels and cytokine secretion. Expression of the same cytokines was upregulated after TNF alpha or IL-1 stimulation of these cells. In contrast, cytokine gene expression was not altered after infection of colon epithelial cells with noninvasive bacteria or the noninvasive protozoan parasite, G. lamblia. Notably, none of the cell lines expressed mRNA for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-gamma, or significant levels of IL-1 or IL-10 in response to the identical stimuli. The coordinate expression of IL-8, MCP-1, GM-CSF and TNF alpha appears to be a general property of human colon epithelial cells since an identical array of cytokines, as well as IL-6, also was expressed by freshly isolated human colon epithelial cells. Since the cytokines expressed in response to bacterial invasion or other proinflammatory agonists have a well documented role in chemotaxis and activation of inflammatory cells, colon epithelial cells appear to be programmed to provide a set of signals for the activation of the mucosal inflammatory response in the earliest phases after microbial invasion. Images PMID:7814646

  1. Vitamin C modulates the metabolic and cytokine profiles, alleviates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress, and increases the life span of Gulo−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Warren, Alessandra; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Paquet, Eric R.; Le Couteur, David G.; Marette, André; Cogger, Victoria C.; Lebel, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal intake of dietary vitamin C (ascorbate) increases the risk of several chronic diseases but the exact metabolic pathways affected are still unknown. In this study, we examined the metabolic profile of mice lacking the enzyme gulonolactone oxidase (Gulo) required for the biosynthesis of ascorbate. Gulo−/− mice were supplemented with 0%, 0.01%, and 0.4% ascorbate (w/v) in drinking water and serum was collected for metabolite measurements by targeted mass spectrometry. We also quantified 42 serum cytokines and examined the levels of different stress markers in liver. The metabolic profiles of Gulo−/− mice treated with ascorbate were different from untreated Gulo−/− and normal wild type mice. The cytokine profiles of Gulo−/− mice, in return, overlapped the profile of wild type animals upon 0.01% or 0.4% vitamin C supplementation. The life span of Gulo−/− mice increased with the amount of ascorbate in drinking water. It also correlated significantly with the ratios of serum arginine/lysine, tyrosine/phenylalanine, and the ratio of specific species of saturated/unsaturated phosphatidylcholines. Finally, levels of hepatic phosphorylated endoplasmic reticulum associated stress markers IRE1α and eIF2α correlated inversely with serum ascorbate and life span suggesting that vitamin C modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress response and longevity in Gulo−/− mice. PMID:26922388

  2. MicroRNA-122 Inhibits the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines by Targeting the PKR Activator PACT in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) is one of the most abundant miRs in the liver. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR-122 plays a role in inflammation in the liver and functions in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which reside in the space of Disse. Here, we showed that the transient inhibition of PKR-activating protein (PACT) expression, by miR-122 or siRNA targeting of PACT, suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IL-1β, in human HSC LX-2. Sequence and functional analyses confirmed that miR-122 directly targeted the 3′-untranslated region of PACT. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that miR-122 blocked NF-κB-nuclear translocation in LX-2 cells. We also showed that conditioned medium from miR-122-transfected LX-2 cells suppressed human monocyte-derived THP-1 cell migration. Taken together, our study indicates that miR-122 may downregulate cytokine production in HSCs and macrophage chemotaxis and that the targeting of miR-122 may have therapeutic potential for preventing the progression of liver diseases. PMID:26636761

  3. MicroRNA-122 Inhibits the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines by Targeting the PKR Activator PACT in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) is one of the most abundant miRs in the liver. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR-122 plays a role in inflammation in the liver and functions in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which reside in the space of Disse. Here, we showed that the transient inhibition of PKR-activating protein (PACT) expression, by miR-122 or siRNA targeting of PACT, suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IL-1β, in human HSC LX-2. Sequence and functional analyses confirmed that miR-122 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region of PACT. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that miR-122 blocked NF-κB-nuclear translocation in LX-2 cells. We also showed that conditioned medium from miR-122-transfected LX-2 cells suppressed human monocyte-derived THP-1 cell migration. Taken together, our study indicates that miR-122 may downregulate cytokine production in HSCs and macrophage chemotaxis and that the targeting of miR-122 may have therapeutic potential for preventing the progression of liver diseases. PMID:26636761

  4. Anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine microenvironment mediated by IL-4 and IL-10 coordinates the immune response in hemophilia A patients infected chronically with hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, João Paulo; Chaves, Daniel Gonçalves; Araújo, Ana Ruth Silva; de Araújo, Erbênia Maria Martins; da Silva Fraporti, Liziara; Neves, Walter Luiz Lima; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; Torres, Katia Luz; Gentz, Solange Henschke Lima; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Malheiro, Adriana

    2013-06-01

    In the past decades patients with hemophilia were infected commonly by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and a significant number of patients are infected chronically. Focusing on the role of the immune system for controlling and or maintaining HCV infection, the leukocyte and cytokine profiles of peripheral blood from hemophilia A patients and other patients with and without HCV infection were studied. The results demonstrated that hemophilia A is characterized by a general state of circulating leukocytes activation along with an overall increase in the frequency of IL-6 and IL-10 with decrease of IL-8 and IL-12. HCV infection of patients with hemophilia A does not influence further the activation state of circulating leukocytes but is accompanied by lower levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and a prominent anti-inflammatory/regulatory serum cytokine pattern, mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Additionally, the results demonstrated that hemophilia A patients infected with HCV displaying No/Low antibody response to C33c and C22 have significant lower viral load and higher serum levels of IL-12 and IL-4. This finding suggests that the differential RIBA reactivity to C33c/C22 HCV core proteins may have a putative value as a prognostic biomarker for the infection in hemophilia A patients. PMID:23591975

  5. Effects of hepatitis C virus on suppressor of cytokine signaling mRNA levels: comparison between different genotypes and core protein sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Stéphanie; Clément, Sophie; Guilloux, Kévin; Conzelmann, Stéphanie; Penin, François; Negro, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Glucose metabolism disturbances, including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, are frequent and important cofactors of hepatitis C. Increasing epidemiological and experimental data suggest that all major genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV), albeit to a different extent, cause insulin resistance. The HCV core protein has been shown to be sufficient to impair insulin signaling in vitro through several post-receptorial mechanisms, mostly via the activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members and the consequent decrease of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). The levels of IRS-1 and SOCS were investigated upon expression of the core protein of HCV genotypes 1-4. Furthermore, the core protein sequences were analyzed to identify the amino acid residues responsible for IRS-1 decrease, with particular regard to SOCS mRNA deregulation. The results suggest that the activation of SOCS family members is a general mechanism associated with the common HCV genotypes. A rare genotype 1b variant, however, failed to activate any of the SOCS tested: this allowed to analyze in detail the distinct amino acid sequences responsible for SOCS deregulation. By combining approaches using intergenotypic chimeras and site-directed mutagenesis, genetic evidence was provided in favor of a role of amino acids 49 and 131 of the HCV core-encoding sequence in mediating SOCS transactivation. PMID:21503913

  6. Curative Effects of Thiacremonone against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Hepatic Failure via Inhibition of Proinflammatory Cytokines Production and Infiltration of Cytotoxic Immune Cells and Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Ri; Ban, Jung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Lee, Yong Moon; Yoon, Yeo Pyo; Eum, So Young; Jeong, Heon Sang; Yoon, Do-young; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-01-01

    High doses of acetaminophen (APAP; N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) cause severe hepatotoxicity after metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 2E1. This study was undertaken to examine the preventive effects of thiacremonone, a compound extracted from garlic, on APAP-induced acute hepatic failure in male C57BL/6J. Mice received with 500 mg/kg APAP after a 7-day pretreatment with thiacremonone (10–50 mg/kg). Thiacremonone inhibited the APAP-induced serum ALT and AST levels in a dose-dependent manner, and markedly reduced the restricted area of necrosis and inflammation by administration of APAP. Thiacremonone also inhibited the APAP-induced depletion of intracellular GSH, induction of nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation as well as expression of P450 2E1. After APAP injection, the numbers of Kupffer cells, natural killer cells, and cytotoxic T cells were elevated, but the elevated cell numbers in the liver were reduced in thiacremonone pretreated mice. The expression levels of I-309, M-CSF, MIG, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-7, and IL-17 were increased by APAP treatment, which were inhibited in thiacremonone pretreated mice. These data indicate that thiacremonone could be a useful agent for the treatment of drug-induced hepatic failure and that the reduction of cytotoxic immune cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine production may be critical for the prevention of APAP-induced acute liver toxicity. PMID:23935693

  7. Generalized Liver- and Blood-Derived CD8+ T-Cell Impairment in Response to Cytokines in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Burke Schinkel, Stephanie C.; Carrasco-Medina, Lorna; Cooper, Curtis L.; Crawley, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the contribution of liver-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells to the immunopathogenesis of this infection remain poorly understood. It is hypothesized that this impairment is partially due to reduced CD8+ T-cell activity in response to cytokines such as IL-7, particularly within the liver. To investigate this, the phenotype and cytokine responsiveness of blood- and liver-derived CD8+ T-cells from healthy controls and individuals with HCV infection were compared. In blood, IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression on bulk CD8+ T-cells in HCV infection was no different than controls yet was lower on central memory T-cells, and there were fewer naïve cells. IL-7-induced signalling through phosphorylated STAT5 was lower in HCV infection than in controls, and differed between CD8+ T-cell subsets. Production of Bcl-2 following IL-7 stimulation was also lower in HCV infection and inversely related to the degree of liver fibrosis. In liver-derived CD8+ T-cells, STAT5 activation could not be increased with cytokine stimulation and basal Bcl-2 levels of liver-derived CD8+ T-cells were lower than blood-derived counterparts in HCV infection. Therefore, generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in HCV infection is characterized, in part, by impaired IL-7-mediated signalling and survival, independent of CD127 expression. This impairment is more pronounced in the liver and may be associated with an increased potential for apoptosis. This generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment represents an important immune dysfunction in chronic HCV infection that may alter patient health. PMID:27315061

  8. Impaired liver regeneration in Ldlr−/− mice is associated with an altered hepatic profile of cytokines, growth factors and lipids

    PubMed Central

    Pauta, Montse; Rotllan, Noemi; Vales, Frances; Allen, Ryan M.; Ford, David A.; Marí, Montserrat; Jiménez, Wladimiro; Baldán, Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims It is widely recognized that in the early stages of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy the hepatocytes accumulate a significant amount of lipids. The functional meaning of this transient steatosis and its effect on hepatocellular proliferation are not well defined. In addition, the basic mechanisms of this lipid accumulation are not well understood although some studies suggest the participation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (Ldlr). Methods To address these questions we studied the process of liver regeneration in Ldlr null mice and wild-type mice following 75% partial hepatectomy. Results Ldlr deficiency was associated with a significant decrease in serum albumin concentration, during early stages of liver regeneration, and a delayed hepatic regeneration. Remnant livers of Ldlr−/− showed a time-shifted expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and a defective activation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) expression in early phases of liver regeneration. Unexpectedly, Ldlr−/− showed no significant differences in the content of lipid droplets after partial hepatectomy compared to wild-type mice. However, lipidomic analysis of the regenerating liver from Ldlr−/− revealed a lipid profile compatible with liver quiescence: high content of cholesterol esters and ceramide, and low levels of phosphatidylcholine. Conclusion Ldlr deficiency is associated with significant changes in the hepatic lipidome that affect cytokine-growth factor signaling and impair liver regeneration. These results suggest that the analysis of the hepatic lipidome may help to predict the success of liver regeneration in the clinical environment, specifically in the context of pre-existing liver steatosis. PMID:23712050

  9. Tissue cytokine patterns distinguish variants of rheumatoid synovitis.

    PubMed Central

    Klimiuk, P. A.; Goronzy, J. J.; Björ nsson, J.; Beckenbaugh, R. D.; Weyand, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary manifestations in the synovial membrane. Tissue infiltrates are composed of T cells, B cells, and macrophages, but histopathological appearances vary widely and are rarely pathognomonic. Mechanisms underlying the phenotypic heterogeneity of rheumatoid synovitis are not known. To explore whether a correlation exists between the microscopic patterns of rheumatoid synovitis and in situ production of cytokines, tissue samples from 21 consecutive patients with clinically active RA were examined. Based upon the organization of the lymphocyte infiltrate, the synovial biopsies were categorized into three distinct subsets. Ten samples were characterized by diffuse lymphoid infiltrates without further microarrangement. In seven samples, lymphoid follicles with germinal center formation were detected, and in four specimens, granuloma formation was identified. In all specimens, cytokine transcription of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 was semiquantified with polymerase chain reaction and liquid phase hybridization. Each of the morphologically defined variants of synovitis displayed a unique cytokine profile. Low-level transcription of IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha was typical of diffuse synovitis. In follicular synovitis, IFN-gamma was the dominant cytokine, IL-4 was virtually undetectable, and IL-10 was abundant. Granulomatous synovitis demonstrated high transcription of IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha and could be clearly distinguished from the other phenotypes. To investigate whether differences in the synovial lesions were related to host factors, patients were compared for clinical parameters. Diffuse synovitis was seen in most of the patients with seronegative RA, the mildest form of the disease. In contrast, extra-articular spreading of RA with nodule formation was typically

  10. Rosiglitazone and 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2, PPARgamma agonists, differentially regulate cigarette smoke-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine release in monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Caito, Samuel; Yang, Se-Ran; Kode, Aruna; Edirisinghe, Indika; Rajendrasozhan, Saravanan; Phipps, Richard P; Rahman, Irfan

    2008-02-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands have the potential for use as anti-inflammatory agents in chronic airway diseases. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS)-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine release would be downregulated in the monocyte-macrophage cell line (MonoMac6) by synthetic and natural PPARgamma ligands. Surprisingly, treatment of MonoMac6 cells with the natural PPARgamma ligand 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 led to increased cytokine (IL-8) release in response to either TNF-alpha or CS extract (CSE). However, exposure to rosiglitazone, a synthetic agonist, led to decreased TNF-alpha, but not CSE, mediated cytokine release. Cytokine release correlated with nuclear PPARgamma localization; CSE reduced the amount of activated PPARgamma located in the nucleus and formed aldehyde adducts as PPARgamma protein carbonyls. Furthermore, it was shown that PPARgamma interacts with the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB under TNF-alpha exposure conditions, but this interaction was disrupted by CS exposure, suggesting that CS blocks this important anti-inflammatory pathway involving PPARgamma. Thus, these new data show that activation of PPARgamma with natural or synthetic ligands have differential inhibitory effects on CS-mediated pro-inflammatory mediator release. These data have implications in designing therapies for treatment of COPD and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:17970647

  11. Age-related dynamics of constitutive cytokine transcription levels of feline monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; Baptiste, K; Meli, M L; Barth, A; Knietsch, M; Reinacher, M; Lutz, H

    2005-03-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are central mediators of inflammation and immunity and therefore of major interest in the study of immunosenescence. In healthy adult cats, monocytes have been shown to constitutively transcribe pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. However, in order to characterize the effect of age, feline monocyte functions were examined for changes in cytokine transcription levels in early stages of immunosenescence. For this purpose, isolated, short-term cultured monocytes from barrier-maintained adult cats of different ages (15 mo to 10 yr) were examined for transcription of IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 p40 and TNF-alpha by real-time PCR. Transcription levels of cytokines varied and were generally highest for IL-1 beta. For IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-12 p40, both young and old cats exhibited highest levels. The age association was significant. TNF-alpha appeared to be transcribed at similar levels over the examination period, whereas IL-10 tended to decline with age but without any statistical significant differences. The observed age association of the constitutive transcription of some cytokines indicates a drop in monocyte activities from youth to middle age, which is then followed by a (progressive) increase with increasing age. This provides evidence that monocytes are in part responsible for the pro-inflammatory status observed with ageing. PMID:15763402

  12. Semi-quantitative analysis of cytokine expression in asymptomatic canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, Cristina; Moreno, Javier; Alvar, Jorge

    2005-01-10

    The dog is the main reservoir of Leishmania infantum, the parasite responsible for visceral leishmaniasis in Mediterranean countries. The infection in dogs shows different clinical presentations, from subclinical/asymptomatic to a fully developed disease, depending on the host's immune responses. The Th1/Th2 dichotomy is not clear in the different forms of canine leishmaniasis, since the data available from studies of immunity response in canine leishmaniasis are scarce and fragmented. The present work describes the cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from asymptomatic dogs experimentally infected with L. infantum that present a cellular protective immune response. The results obtained from freshly isolated PBMC showed expressions of TNF-alpha, IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-10 and IL-18 mRNA, similar to those from non-infected dogs. However, there was almost no expression of IL-4 mRNA detected in the asymptomatic infected dogs compared to the control dogs. Unspecific stimulation with ConA promoted the expression in a greater or lower degree of all the cytokines studied. In vitro stimulation of PBMC with soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) promoted the expression of IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-18, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA, with the two first being specifically induced. Although both Th1 and Th2 cytokines are produced, cell mediated immunity observed in these L. infantum-infected asymptomatic dogs depended on the preferential expression of Th1 cytokines. PMID:15626462

  13. Mechanisms associated with defective TH1 cytokine production in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, N; Yano, N; Eylar, E; Yamamura, Y

    1997-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative changes in immune functions of different T-cell subsets associated with infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were analyzed by flow cytometric assessment of intracytoplasmic cytokines. The T(H)1 cytokines, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), were produced by both CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets. When normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were activated in culture, both cytokines were produced predominantly by CD4 (CD4) cell and only a minor fraction of normal CD8 cells produced these cytokines. In the cultures of PBMC from HIV-1-infected individuals (HIV+PBMC), more HIV+CD8 cells produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. Production of IFN-gamma by HIV+CD4 cells was markedly reduced, while IL-2nd tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by HIV+CD4 remained relatively intact until the disease progressed further. Normal CD4 cells which were isolated by using a cell sorter, FACSCalibur was still able to produce IL-2 and TNF-alpha. But for full production of IFN-gamma, normal CD4 required some accessory cells, the identity of which could not yet be established. PMID:9449527

  14. Enhanced exercise-induced plasma cytokine response and oxidative stress in COPD patients depend on blood oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Yves; Steinberg, Jean Guillaume; Ba, Abdoulaye; Delliaux, Stéphane; Brégeon, Fabienne

    2008-05-01

    In healthy subjects, hypoxemia and exercise represent independent stressors promoting the exercise-induced cytokine response and oxidative stress. We hypothesized that hypoxemia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may affect the cytokine production and/or the changes in oxidant-antioxidant status in response to maximal exercise. Exercise-induced changes in PaO2 allowed to transiently increase or decrease baseline hypoxemia and to point out its specific action on muscle metabolism. COPD patients with severe to moderate hypoxemia (56 < PaO2 < 72 mmHg) performed an incremental cycling exercise until volitional exhaustion. Two cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] and three blood indices of oxidative stress [plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and two antioxidants, reduced erythrocyte glutathione (GSH), and reduced plasma ascorbic acid, RAA] were measured at rest, then during and after exercise. The changes in the cytokine levels and oxidant-antioxidant status were analysed in relation with the baseline PaO2 and its exercise-induced variations. Data were compared with those obtained in an age- and body mass index-matched group of healthy subjects. Compared with healthy subjects, COPD patients presented a marked accentuation of exercise-induced increase in IL-6 level and earlier changes in their oxidant-antioxidant status. Resting levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha and exercise-induced peak variations of TBARS, IL-6 and TNF-alpha were negatively correlated with the baseline PaO2. In COPD patients, the peak increases in IL-6 and TBARS were attenuated when exercise hyperventilation reduced the baseline hypoxemia. Our study indicates that the PaO2 level affects both the exercise-induced oxidative stress and cytokine response in hypoxemic COPD patients. PMID:18312445

  15. Analytical Assessment of Interleukin - 23 and -27 Cytokines in Healthy People and Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection (Genotypes 1 and 3a)

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi Hafez, Asghar; Ahmadi Vasmehjani, Abbas; Baharlou, Rasoul; Mousavi Nasab, Seyed Dawood; Davami, Mohammad Hasan; Najafi, Ahmad; Joharinia, Negar; Rezanezhad, Hasan; Ahmadi, Nayeb Ali; Imanzad, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The immune system plays important roles in determining the outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Interleukin-23 and -27 (IL-23 and IL-27) are two novel IL-12 cytokine family members known to enhance the T-lymphocyte response, but their precise involvement in HCV infection is not well known. Objectives: We investigated the serum IL-27 and IL-23 levels in patients with HCV infection and in healthy individuals. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study, we assessed IL-23 and IL-27 levels in serum of 37 healthy individuals and 64 patients with chronic HCV using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The relationship of cytokines level with liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and ALP), HCV genotype and viral load were analyzed. The differences of these cytokine levels in the groups of treatment and no treatment was compared. HCV genotypes were classified by HCV-specific primers methods. HCV RNA loads were determined by fluorescence quantitative PCR. Results: Serum level of IL-23 was higher in HCV infected patients compared to control group (P = 0.005). However, no significant difference was seen in IL-27 serum level between patients compared to the control group (P = 0.65). There was no significant difference in IL-23 and IL-27 level between genotype 1 HCV-infected- and 3a HCV-infected- patients. Positive moderate correlation between IL-23 and IL-27 with viral load was found in type 3a and 1 HCV-infected patient. Positive relative correlation was seen between ALT and IL-23 in 1a HCV-infected patients, which was higher than 3a HCV-infected patients; but there were no significant difference between serums liver enzymes with IL-23 and IL-27 in respect to genotype 3a and 1a HCV-infected patients Conclusions: These findings may reflect a vigorous pro-inflammatory reaction orchestrated by the host immune system against chronic HCV. Also, a better understanding of the involvement mechanism considering the correlation between other genotypes with

  16. Selected Cytokines Serve as Potential Biomarkers for Predicting Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients With Normal to Mildly Elevated Aminotransferases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yong-Qiong; Zhao, Hong; Ma, An-Lin; Zhou, Ji-Yuan; Xie, Shi-Bin; Zhang, Xu-Qing; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Xie, Qing; Zhang, Guo; Shang, Jia; Cheng, Jun; Zhao, Wei-Feng; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Gui-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies of small cohorts have implicated several circulating cytokines with progression of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). However, to date there have been no reliable biomarkers for assessing histological liver damage in CHB patients with normal or mildly elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between circulating cytokines and histological liver damage in a large cohort. Also, this study was designed to assess the utility of circulating cytokines in diagnosing liver inflammation and fibrosis in CHB patients with ALT less than 2 times the upper limit of normal range (ULN). A total of 227 CHB patients were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent liver biopsy and staging by Ishak system. Patients with at least moderate inflammation showed significantly higher levels of CXCL-11, CXCL-10, and interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (R) than patients with less than moderate inflammation (P < 0.001). Patients with significant fibrosis had higher levels of IL-8 (P = 0.027), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) (P = 0.011), IL-2R (P = 0.002), and CXCL-11 (P = 0.032) than the group without significant fibrosis. In addition, 31.8% and 29.1% of 151 patients with ALT < 2 × ULN had at least moderate inflammation and significant fibrosis, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that CXCL-11 was independently associated with at least moderate inflammation, and TGF-α and IL-2R independently correlated with significant fibrosis in patients with ALT < 2 × ULN. Based on certain cytokines and clinical parameters, an inflammation-index and fib-index were developed, which showed areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) of 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.84) for at least moderate inflammation and 0.82 (95% CI 0.75-0.90) for significant fibrosis, correspondingly. Compared to existing scores, fib-index was significantly superior to aspartate aminotransferase

  17. Circulating cytokines and chemokines associated with plasma leakage and hepatic dysfunction in Brazilian children with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ralph Antonio Xavier; de Oliveira, Solange Artimos; Gandini, Mariana; Ferreira, Laura da Cunha; Correa, Gladys; Abiraude, Fernanda Mattos; Reid, Mariana Mancebo; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2015-09-01

    Dengue fever is usually a benign acute viral infection transmitted by arthropods but may evolve to severe clinical manifestations such as coagulation and/or hemodynamic disorders, caused mainly by an increase of vascular permeability. Deregulated circulating immunological factors have been associated with severity. In Brazil severe cases appeared in children only recently and we evaluated the profile of cytokine/chemokine kinetics in 134 hospitalized young patients during the epidemic in Rio de Janeiro in 2008. Inflammatory cytokines TNF and IFNγ were found elevated during the acute phase in children as well as the anti-inflammatory IL10 and chemokines MIF and CXCL10/IP10, all last three persisting longer during the recovery phase. Severe disease fitting the dengue hemorrhagic fever pattern (WHO, 1997) was associated with higher IL10 and CXCL10/IP10 circulating levels (peak levels at seven days with P<0.01 and P<0.001 respectively as compared to DF). These factors were higher in patients pulmonary effusion or ascites (P<0.05 for IL10 and P<0.01 for CXCL10/IP10). Both factors were also associated with liver changes such as AST increase correlated with CXCL10/IP10 (r=0.4300 with P<0.0001) and patients presenting painful hepatomegaly showed higher circulating levels of IL10 (P<0.01, at 7-9 days) and of CXCL10/IP10 (P<0.05, 4-6 days and P<0.001, 7-9 days) when compared to patients without apparent liver alterations. Most cases presented a history of prior infection (93%). This is the first study demonstrating cytokine and chemokine association with severity during dengue fever in Brazilian children. IL10 and CXCL10/IP10 play a role in the disease severity associated with induction of vascular leakage and a novel association with changes in liver dysfunction. PMID:25944351

  18. Enhanced cytokine production and collagen synthesis of gingival fibroblasts from patients with denture fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Nakao, K; Yoneda, K; Osaki, T

    1995-04-01

    The mechanisms of denture-induced gingival hypertrophy remain to be explored. Since fibroblast proliferation and bone resorption characterize this disorder, the possible involvement of cytokines was investigated. Gingival fibroblasts were obtained from six patients with denture fibromatosis (Den-Fb) and six healthy persons (Nor-Fb). Cells were compared for proliferation, collagen synthesis, and cytokine production. Incorporation of [3H]thymidine (TdR) was increased in 3 Den-Fb and 3 Nor-Fb lines in the presence of interleukin-1-beta (IL-1 beta) (10 U/mL) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) (from 10 to 100 U/mL). Proline incorporation in Den-Fb was higher than that in Nor-Fb, and the mean collagen synthesis level in Den-Fb was significantly higher than that in Nor-Fb. Although there was no difference between the up-regulation of protein synthesis in Den-Fb and Nor-Fb induced by IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha, the receptors for these cytokines were expressed at higher levels in cell lines which exhibited higher protein synthesis. Between Nor-Fb and Den-Fb, there was no difference in the generation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, most Den-Fb produced more GM-CSF and IL-6 in the presence of TNF-alpha. Enhancement of IL-6 generation by GM-CSF was also more prominent in Den-Fb. GM-CSF and IL-6 were synergistically generated after co-culture of the fibroblasts with gingival keratinocytes. GM-CSF and IL-6 generation of Den-Fb was markedly enhanced by co-culture of Den-Fb with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), especially PBMC from patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7782537

  19. Proinflammatory cytokines promote glial heme oxygenase-1 expression and mitochondrial iron deposition: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mehindate, K; Sahlas, D J; Frankel, D; Mawal, Y; Liberman, A; Corcos, J; Dion, S; Schipper, H M

    2001-06-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, pathological iron deposition, and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). HO-1 mRNA levels and mitochondrial uptake of [(55)Fe]Cl(3)-derived iron were measured in rat astroglial cultures exposed to interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) alone or in combination with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitors, tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) or dexamthasone (DEX), or interferon beta1b (INF-beta). HO-1 expression in astrocytes was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of spinal cord tissue derived from MS and control subjects. IL-1beta or TNF-alpha promoted sequestration of non-transferrin-derived (55)Fe by astroglial mitochondria. HO-1 inhibitors, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MTP) blockers and antioxidants significantly attenuated cytokine-related mitochondrial iron sequestration in these cells. IFN-beta decreased HO-1 expression and mitochondrial iron sequestration in IL-1beta- and TNF-alpha-challenged astroglia. The percentage of astrocytes coexpressing HO-1 in affected spinal cord from MS patients (57.3% +/- 12.8%) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than in normal spinal cord derived from controls subjects (15.4% +/- 8.4%). HO-1 is over-expressed in MS spinal cord astroglia and may promote mitochondrial iron deposition in MS plaques. In MS, IFN-beta may attenuate glial HO-1 gene induction and aberrant mitochondrial iron deposition accruing from exposure to proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:11389189

  20. Hydrogen peroxide mediates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression from interleukin-18-activated hepatic sinusoidal endothelium: implications for circulating cancer cell arrest in the murine liver.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, L; Carrascal, T; De Luca, M; Fuentes, A M; Salado, C; Blanco, J; Vidal-Vanaclocha, F

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of intrasinusoidal arrest of circulating cancer cells, which is a critical step in liver metastasis, appears to be facilitated by tumor-derived proinflammatory factors that increase sinusoidal cell adhesion receptors for cancer cells. However, how this prometastatic microenvironment is up-regulated remains unknown. Using intrasplenically injected B16 melanoma (B16M) cells, we show that the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) significantly increased in hepatic sinusoidal endothelium (HSE) cells over physiologic baseline within the first 24 hours of metastatic cancer cell infiltration in the liver. This correlated with increased in vitro adhesion of B16M cells to HSE cells isolated from B16M cell-injected mice. In vivo VCAM-1 blockade with specific antibodies before B16M cell injection decreased sinusoidal retention of luciferase-transfected B16M cells by 85%, and metastasis development by 75%, indicating that VCAM-1 expression on tumor-activated HSE cells had a prometastatic contribution. Because VCAM-1 expression is oxidative stress-inducible, recombinant catalase was in vivo administered, resulting in a complete abrogation of both VCAM-1 expression and B16M cell adhesion increases in HSE cells isolated from B16M cell-injected mice. Catalase also abrogated the proadhesive response of HSE cells to B16M-conditioned medium (B16M-CM) in vitro, although this did not affect the concomitant release of major proinflammatory cytokines by HSE cells. HSE cells treated with B16M-CM released interleukin (IL)-18 via tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent IL-1beta in vitro. In turn, H(2)O(2) production from B16M-CM-treated HSE cells was regulated by IL-18. Thus, liver-infiltrating B16M cells activated their adhesion to HSE through a sequential process involving TNF-alpha-dependent IL-1beta, which induced IL-18 to up-regulate VCAM-1 via H(2)O(2). The pivotal position of H(2)O(2) was further supported by the fact that incubation of HSE

  1. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen stimulates production of chemotactic factors and inflammatory cytokines by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, N; Yamashita, Y; Ikeda, D; Koga, T

    1996-01-01

    Serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen (SPA) was extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300. SPA induced the release of monocyte and leukocyte chemotactic factors by human monocytes. Polymyxin B had almost no effect on the release of monocyte chemotactic factor, but a monoclonal antibody against SPA markedly inhibited it. Human monocytes stimulated with SPA exhibited the increased mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and a neutrophil chemotactic factor, interleukin-8 (IL-8). On the other hand, SPA induced the release of IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and enhanced the expression of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Human monocytes expressed MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNAs when stimulated by human recombinant IL-1alpha, I1-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, suggesting that these inflammatory cytokines induced by SPA might participate in the production of chemotactic factors in human monocytes. PMID:8698480

  2. Inflammatory cytokines cause coronary arteriosclerosis-like changes and alterations in the smooth-muscle phenotypes in pigs.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Y; Shimokawa, H; Ito, A; Kadokami, T; Yonemitsu, Y; Aikawa, M; Owada, M K; Egashira, K; Sueishi, K; Nagai, R; Yazaki, Y; Takeshita, A

    1997-02-01

    We recently developed a porcine model in which chronic, local treatment with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) causes coronary arteriosclerosis-like changes and hyperconstrictive responses. This study was designed to examine whether or not other major inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) might also cause similar coronary responses and whether those responses are associated with alterations in the smooth-muscle phenotypes. A segment of the porcine coronary artery was aseptically wrapped with cotton mesh, absorbing IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 alpha. Two weeks after the operation, coronary arteriography showed the development of mild stenotic lesions at the cytokine-treated sites, where hyperconstrictive responses were repeatedly induced by intracoronary serotonin or histamine. Histologically mild intimal thickening was noted at those cytokine-treated sites. Immunostaining and immunoblotting demonstrated that all three myosin heavy chain isoforms, SM1, SM2 (smooth-muscle type), and SMemb (nonmuscle type), were noted in the normal coronary segments, whereas in the segments treated with inflammatory cytokines, SM1 and SM2 were markedly reduced, and only SMemb was noted. These results indicate that inflammatory cytokines all have a similar ability to induce coronary arteriosclerosis-like changes and hyperconstrictive responses, which are associated with alterations in smooth-muscle phenotypes toward dedifferentiation. PMID:9057072

  3. Hepatitis C virus genotype and HIV coinfection affect cytokine mRNA levels in unstimulated PBMC but do not shift the T1/T2 balance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Silvia; Watson, Mark W; Clark, Ben; Flexman, James P; Cheng, Wendy; French, Martyn A H; Price, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Rapid progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease in patients with HIV/HCV may reflect different cytokine responses and be influenced by HCV genotype. This is addressed by a study of patients with HIV/HCV coinfection and infection with HCV genotype 2 or 3 (2/3). They are compared with coinfected patients infected with genotype 1 and HCV monoinfected patients matched for HCV genotype. IFN-gamma, IL-10, IL-4 and IL-4delta2 mRNA were quantified by real-time PCR in unstimulated PBMC and after in vitro stimulation with HCV core or nonstructural 3/4A antigen. In unstimulated PBMC, levels of IFN-gamma and IL-4 mRNA were lowest in HIV/HCV genotype 1 patients, intermediate in HIV/HCV genotype 2/3 patients and highest in HCV genotype 2/3 patients. Neither HCV genotype nor HIV affected levels of IL-10 mRNA in unstimulated PBMC or IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10 mRNA in PBMC stimulated with HCV antigens. Levels of IL-4 and IL-4delta2 mRNA correlated in mitogen-stimulated PBMC from all patient groups but both were low in HIV/HCV genotype 1 patients. Serum soluble CD30 levels (a putative marker of a T2 cytokine environment) did not differ between patient groups. The data do not suggest a shift in the T1/T2 balance driven by HIV coinfection or HCV genotype but either may affect IL-4 bioavailability. PMID:16834574

  4. A soy protein diet alters hepatic lipid metabolism gene expression and reduces serum lipids and renal fibrogenic cytokines in rats with chronic nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Armando R; Murguía, Fernanda; Cruz, Cristino; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Torres, Nimbe

    2002-09-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by the presence of proteinuria and hyperlipidemia. However, ingestion of soy protein has a hypolipidemic effect. The present study was designed to determine whether the ingestion of a 20% soy protein diet regulates the expression of hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, fatty acid synthase (FAS), malic enzyme, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase (r) and synthase (s), and LDL receptor (r), and to assess whether soy protein improves lipid and renal abnormalities in rats with chronic NS. Male Wistar rats were injected with vehicle or with puromycin aminonucleoside to induce NS and were fed either 20% casein or soy protein diets for 64 d. NS rats fed 20% soy protein had improved creatinine clearance and reduced proteinuria, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, as well as VLDL-triglycerides and LDL cholesterol compared with NS rats fed the 20% casein diet. In addition, the soy protein diet decreased the incidence of glomerular sclerosis, and proinflammatory cytokines in kidney. Ingestion of the soy protein diet by control rats reduced the gene expression of SREBP-1, malic enzyme, FAS and increased HMG-CoAr, HMG-CoAs and LDLr. However, NS rats fed either casein or soy protein diets had low insulin concentrations with reductions in SREBP-1, FAS and malic enzyme expression compared with control rats fed the casein diet. NS rats fed the soy diet also had lower HMG-CoAr and LDLr mRNA levels than NS rats fed casein. In conclusion, the beneficial effects of soy protein on lipid metabolism are modulated in part by SREBP-1. However, in NS rats, the benefit may be through a direct effect of this protein on kidney rather than mediated by changes in expression of hepatic lipid metabolism genes. PMID:12221209

  5. Quercetin ameliorate insulin resistance and up-regulates cellular antioxidants during oleic acid induced hepatic steatosis in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Sandeep Varma, R; Patki, Pralhad Sadashiv

    2013-03-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Thus, we hypothesized that the hypolipidemic and antioxidant activity of quercetin would attenuate events leading to NAFLD. Addition of 2.0mM oleic acid (OA) into the culture media induced fatty liver condition in HepG2 cells by 24h. It was marked by significant accumulation of lipid droplets as determined by Oil-Red-O (ORO) based colorimetric assay, increased triacylglycerol (TAG) and increased lipid peroxidation. The inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-8 levels were significantly increased with decreased antioxidant molecules. OA induced insulin resistance which was evident by inhibition of glucose uptake and cell proliferation. Quercetin (10 μM) increased cell proliferation by 3.05 folds with decreased TAG content (45%) and was effective in increasing insulin mediated glucose uptake by 2.65 folds. The intracellular glutathione content was increased by 2.0 folds without substantial increase in GSSG content. Quercetin (10 μM) decreased TNF-α and IL-8 by 59.74% and 41.11% respectively and inhibited generation of lipid peroxides by 50.5%. In addition, RT-PCR results confirmed quercetin (10 μM) inhibited TNF-alpha gene expression. Further, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were increased by 1.68, 2.19 and 1.71 folds respectively. Albumin and urea content was increased while the alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) activity was significantly decreased by quercetin. Hence, quercetin effectively reversed NAFLD symptoms by decreased triacyl glycerol accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammatory cytokine secretion and increased cellular antioxidants in OA induced hepatic steatosis in HepG2 cells. PMID:23348005

  6. Activation of natural killer cells and cytokine production in man by bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Wybran, J; Libin, M; Schandene, L

    1989-01-01

    Broncho-Vaxon (OM-85 BV) is a bacterial extract of eight bacterias usually involved in the respiratory tract infections. Since Broncho-Vaxom is clinically active in decreasing the incidence of such infections, its immunological effect was investigated, in vitro, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The experimental data indicate that Broncho-Vaxom can modulate various immune functions. It was shown, using a radioimmunoassay for these cytokines, that Broncho-Vaxom will spontaneously enhance TNF alpha and IL-2 production whereas it has no action on IF gamma production. However, when the PBMC are stimulated with PHA, an increased production for IF gamma, TNF alpha and IL-2 was observed suggesting that, under appropriate conditions, Broncho-Vaxom enhances the production of these cytokines. In other experiments, Broncho-Vaxom was shown to markedly increase the natural killer activity of PBMC. All these results demonstrate that Broncho-Vaxom is an immunomodulator affecting multiple immunological mechanisms including the activation of natural killer cells, of monocytes and of T cells through direct mechanisms or through the cytokine cascade. PMID:2503554

  7. Mucin gene 19 (MUC19) expression and response to inflammatory cytokines in middle ear epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kerschner, Joseph E; Khampang, Pawjai; Erbe, Christy B; Kolker, Alexander; Cioffi, Joseph A

    2009-12-01

    Mucin gene 19 (MUC19) has been identified as a major gel-forming mucin in the human middle ear (ME). The objectives of this investigation were to characterize the expression and assess the regulation of MUC19 in the ME cell culture models utilized in the study of otitis media (OM). Findings demonstrate that MUC19 is expressed in both human immortalized cell culture (HMEEC) and chinchilla primary epithelial culture (CMEEC). ME exposure to inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 up-regulate MUC19 transcription, most robustly after exposure to TNF-alpha. Kinetic experiments suggest a relative early response in MUC19 transcription and a down-regulation after prolonged exposure. Glycoprotein production was increased in response to the increased transcription as well. Similar to other mucin genes in the ME, MUC19 is differentially regulated after exposure to inflammatory cytokines. The large size, gel-forming properties and up-regulation in response to important inflammatory cytokines of MUC19 suggest that it has significant potential to play a role in both physiology and pathophysiology of the ME. PMID:19533339

  8. Diabetes and infections-hepatitis C: is there type 2 diabetes excess in hepatitis C infection?

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Mak, Joon Wah; Wai, Nyunt; Maung, Mala

    2013-06-01

    Individual epidemiologic studies as well as the pooled analysis of observational studies have indicated the association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). Whether HCV infection is the cause of diabetes or diabetic patients are more prone to get HCV infection is still in question. The objective of the present review was to provide answers to this issue, based on available evidence from epidemiologic, molecular, experimental and therapeutic studies. Our current understanding of how chronic HCV infection could induce T2D is incomplete, but it seems twofold based on both direct and indirect roles of the virus. HCV may directly induce insulin resistance (IR) through its proteins. HCV core protein was shown to stimulate suppressor of cytokine signaling, resulting in ubiquitination and degradation of tyrosine kinase phosphorylated insulin receptor substrates (IRS1/2) in proteasomes. HCV-nonstructural protein could increase protein phosphatase 2A which has been shown to inactivate the key enzyme Akt by dephosphorylating it. Insulin signaling defects in hepatic IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and PI3-kinase association/activation may contribute to IR, which leads to the development of T2D in patients with HCV infection. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are also implicated. PPARα/γ, together with their obligate partner RXR, are the main nuclear receptors expressed in the liver. PPARα upregulates glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycerol kinase, and glycerol transport proteins, which allows for glucose synthesis during fasting states. Decreased activity of PPARs could attribute to HCV-induced IR. Immune-mediated mechanisms may be involved in the indirect role of HCV in inducing IR. It is speculated that TNF-alpha plays a major role in the pathogenesis of IR through lowering IRS1/2. Furthermore, HCV infection- triggered ER stress could lead to the activation of PP2A, which inhibits both Akt and the AMP

  9. Determination of the cytokine profile in American cutaneous leishmaniasis using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres-Dittmar, G; Tapia, F J; Sánchez, M A; Yamamura, M; Uyemura, K; Modlin, R L; Bloom, B R; Convit, J

    1993-01-01

    The lymphokine profiles were determined in the skin lesions of the three distinct clinical forms of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL), using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and primers for various lymphokines. The message for interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-beta (TNF-beta), and IL-8 was expressed in the three clinical forms of ACL. IL-1 beta mRNA was expressed in most localized (LCL) and mucocutaneous (MCL) leishmaniasis, but in only few of the diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL). IL-2 mRNA was detected in about half of the lesions, with more prominent values for MCL. IL-4 mRNA was present in most lesions from the three clinical forms, but markedly increased in DCL. IL-5 and IL-10 mRNAs were expressed in all MCL and in half of the DCL lesions and weakly expressed in LCL lesions. IL-10 mRNA was more abundant in MCL lesions. In contrast, IL-6 and TNF-alpha mRNAs were expressed in a large number of LCL. In MCL, IL-6 mRNA was expressed in most cases and TNF-alpha mRNA in all the cases. In DCL, IL-6 mRNA was absent and TNF-alpha mRNA was weakly expressed. These results suggest that most T cells present in the MCL and DCL lesions secrete a mixture of type 1 and type 2 cytokine patterns, but in DCL granulomas type 2 cytokines predominate. In LCL the cytokine patterns show a mixture of type 1 and type 0 with a preponderance of IFN-gamma over IL-4, and low levels of IL-5 and IL-10. The lack of IL-6 and TNF-alpha mRNAs, and the low expression of IL-1 beta in DCL lesions suggest a defect in the antigen-processing cells that may account for the state of unresponsiveness in these patients. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8443970

  10. Structure-activity relationships of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and induction of macrophage cell death in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX) in a murine macrophage-like cell line, J774.1.

    PubMed

    Karahashi, H; Amano, F

    1998-10-01

    The structure-activity relationships of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and induction of macrophage cell death in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX) were examined in a murine macrophage-like cell line, J774.1. TNF-alpha production is one of the characteristic phenotypes of LPS-activated macrophages, and is observed upon incubation with LPS. On the contrary, macrophage cell death, which had been found in our laboratory (Amano F., Karahashi H., J. Endotoxin Res., 3, 415423 (1996)) and was examined as the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from cells into the culture supernatant, was observed 2.5 h after the addition of LPS in the presence of CHX. However, both TNF-alpha production and macrophage cell death were similarly dependent on the structures of LPS and lipid A. At more than 10 ng/ml, wild-type LPS from E.coli and S. minnesota exhibited the highest activity, and LPS as well as diphosphoryl lipid A from S. minnesota rough mutants also exhibited activity, but E. coli LPS detoxified by alkaline treatment or monophosphoryl lipid A from S. minnesota exhibited no activity even at 100 ng/ml. These results suggest that LPS-induced macrophage cell death in the presence of CHX shows similar requirements for LPS and/or lipid A structures as for the macrophage activation at higher doses than 10 ng/ml, although the former was not observed at 1 ng/ml LPS, while the latter was. However, TNF-alpha does not seem to be involved in the induction of macrophage cell death, because a neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha antibody failed to block the macrophage cell death and because recombinant TNF-alpha had little effect on the extent of LDH release in the presence or absence of LPS and/or CHX, and also because TNF-alpha production by LPS was abolished in the presence of CHX. PMID:9821819

  11. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Okunieff, Paul . E-mail: paul_okunieff@urmc.rochester.edu; Xu Jianhua; Hu Dongping; Liu Weimin; Zhang Lurong; Morrow, Gary; Pentland, Alice; Ryan, Julie L.; Ding, Ivan M.D.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-{alpha}, and lymphotoxin-{beta}) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-{beta}) during the same acute and chronic phases. Methods and Materials: Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Results: Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-{alpha}, and lymphotoxin-{beta}) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-{beta}, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Conclusion: Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy.

  12. Effects of FK506 and cyclosporin A on cytokine production studied in vitro at a single-cell level.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, J; Nagy, S; Groth, C G; Andersson, U

    1992-01-01

    Mononuclear cells obtained from human blood were mitogen or antigen activated in vitro in the presence or absence of FK506 or cyclosporin A (CsA). Cytokine production was studied at a single-cell level by ultraviolet (UV) microscopy of fixed permeabilized cells using cytokine-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Phenotypic characterization of the monokine-producing cells was achieved by two-colour immunofluorescent staining. Cytokine production after antigen activation with Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A (SEA) was significantly reduced. FK506 or CsA inhibited SEA-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production both in monocytes (P less than 0.01) and in lymphocytes (P less than 0.001), at a drug concentration of 1-25 ng/ml for FK506 and 100-500 ng/ml for CsA. Lymphocyte synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and TNF-beta after SEA activation was also significantly reduced by either of the drugs. In contrast, endotoxin-induced monokine production (TNF-alpha and IL-6) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation was unaffected by FK506 or CsA even when added in concentrations as high as 1000 ng/ml. When the cells were stimulated by phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA) plus calcium ionophore (ionomycin), FK506 and CsA inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for FK506 or CsA on the cellular synthesis of the various cytokines varied between 0.6 and 1.0 ng/ml and 20 and 60 ng/ml, respectively. Further stimulation by addition of anti-CD28 mAb to the cultures resulted in an augmented IL-2 and IFN-gamma production which was resistant to both FK506 and CsA. This report delineates extensive similarities between the two drugs in mechanisms of immunosuppression by blockade of identical interleukin production. Depending on the mode of cell activation the two drugs inhibited not only cytokine production in lymphocytes but

  13. HIV-1 Nef Induces Proinflammatory State in Macrophages through Its Acidic Cluster Domain: Involvement of TNF Alpha Receptor Associated Factor 2

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, Gianna; Vaccari, Gabriele; Acconcia, Filippo; Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Leone, Stefano; Noto, Alessia; Horenkamp, Florian A.; Manrique, Santiago; Romeo, Giovanna; Polticelli, Fabio; Geyer, Matthias; Affabris, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 Nef is a virulence factor that plays multiple roles during HIV replication. Recently, it has been described that Nef intersects the CD40 signalling in macrophages, leading to modification in the pattern of secreted factors that appear able to recruit, activate and render T lymphocytes susceptible to HIV infection. The engagement of CD40 by CD40L induces the activation of different signalling cascades that require the recruitment of specific tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (i.e. TRAFs). We hypothesized that TRAFs might be involved in the rapid activation of NF-κB, MAPKs and IRF-3 that were previously described in Nef-treated macrophages to induce the synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and IFNβ to activate STAT1, -2 and -3. Methodology/Principal Findings Searching for possible TRAF binding sites on Nef, we found a TRAF2 consensus binding site in the AQEEEE sequence encompassing the conserved four-glutamate acidic cluster. Here we show that all the signalling effects we observed in Nef treated macrophages depend on the integrity of the acidic cluster. In addition, Nef was able to interact in vitro with TRAF2, but not TRAF6, and this interaction involved the acidic cluster. Finally silencing experiments in THP-1 monocytic cells indicate that both TRAF2 and, surprisingly, TRAF6 are required for the Nef-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Conclusions Results reported here revealed TRAF2 as a new possible cellular interactor of Nef and highlighted that in monocytes/macrophages this viral protein is able to manipulate both the TRAF/NF-κB and TRAF/IRF-3 signalling axes, thereby inducing the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as IFNβ. PMID:21886773

  14. Kinetics of IFN-Gamma and TNF-Alpha Gene Expression and Their Relationship with Disease Progression after Infection with Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Roh, In Soon; Cho, Sungae; Eum, Seok-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Guinea pig is one of the most suitable animal models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection since it shows similarities to pulmonary infection in humans. Although guinea pig shows hematogenous spread of M. tb infection into the whole body, immunological studies have mainly focused on granulomatous tissues in lungs and spleens. In order to investigate the time-course of disease pathogenesis and immunological profiles in each infected organ, we performed the following approaches with guinea pigs experimentally infected with M. tb over a 22-week post-infection period. Materials and Methods We examined body weight changes, M. tb growth curve, cytokine gene expression (IFN-γ and TNF-α), and histopathology in liver, spleen, lungs and lymph nodes of infected guinea pigs. Results The body weights of infected guinea pigs did not increase as much as uninfected ones and the number of M. tb bacilli in their organs increased except bronchotracheal lymph node during the experimental period. The gene expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α was induced between 3 and 6 weeks of infection; however, kinetic profiles of cytokine gene expression showed heterogeneity among organs over the study period. Histophathologically granulomatous lesions were developed in all four organs of infected guinea pigs. Conclusion Although IFN-γ and TNF-α gene expression profiles showed heterogeneity, the granuloma formation was clearly observed in every organ regardless of whether the number of bacilli increased or decreased. However, this protective immunity was accompanied with severe tissue damage in all four organs, which may lead to the death of guinea pigs. PMID:23549819

  15. A Novel Strategy for TNF-Alpha Production by 2-APB Induced Downregulated SOCE and Upregulated HSP70 in O. tsutsugamushi-Infected Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jui-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Yen, Chia-Jung; Li, Hsiu-Wen; Chiu, Siou-Jin; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Lin, Ming-Wei; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Orientia (O.) tsutsugamushi-induced scrub typhus is endemic across many regions of Asia and the Western Pacific, where an estimated 1 million cases occur each year; the majority of patients infected with O. tsutsugamushi end up with a cytokine storm from a severe inflammatory response. Previous reports have indicated that blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α reduced cell injury from a cytokine storm. Since TNF-α production is known to be associated with intracellular Ca2+ elevation, we examined the effect of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) inhibitors on TNF-α production in O. tsutsugamushi-infected macrophages. We found that 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), but not SKF96365, facilitates the suppression of Ca2+ mobilization via the interruption of Orai1 expression in O. tsutsugamushi-infected macrophages. Due to the decrease of Ca2+ elevation, the expression of TNF-α and its release from macrophages was repressed by 2-APB. In addition, a novel role of 2-APB was found in macrophages that causes the upregulation of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression associated with ERK activation; upregulated TNF-α production in the case of knockdown HSP70 was inhibited with 2-APB treatment. Furthermore, elevated HSP70 formation unexpectedly did not help the cell survival of O. tsutsugamushi-infected macrophages. In conclusion, the parallelism between downregulated Ca2+ mobilization via SOCE and upregulated HSP70 after treatment with 2-APB against TNF-α production was found to efficiently attenuate an O. tsutsugamushi-induced severe inflammatory response. PMID:27472555

  16. Reduced constitutive cytokine transcription in isolated monocytes of clinically healthy cats, infected with an FIV strain of low pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; Boretti, F S; Meli, M M; Failing, K; Reinacher, M; Lutz, H

    2004-04-01

    Twenty-five barrier-maintained cats had been experimentally infected for 9.5 months with an FIV strain of low pathogenicity, FIV Zurich 2. Animals were clinically healthy and did not exhibit any haematological changes. FIV proviral DNA was demonstrated in peripheral blood lymphocytes of all cats and in monocytes of most animals, identifying FIV Zurich 2 as a both lympho- and monocytotropic strain. Monocytes were isolated from FIV-infected cats as well as from age-matched uninfected control cats, short-term cultured and examined for cytokine (IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 p40 and TNF-alpha) transcription by real-time PCR. Constitutive transcription of cytokines in monocytes from FIV-infected cats was restricted to IL-1beta and, in the majority of samples, TNF-alpha. For all cytokines, transcription levels were significantly lower in FIV-infected cats than in control cats. Transcription was often least intense in those samples where FIV infection of the monocyte fraction was not demonstrated. Results show that infection of cats with an FIV strain of low pathogenicity was associated with depression of constitutive cytokine transcription in monocytes even if clinical and haematological changes were not observed. PMID:15010230

  17. Inhibitory effects of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids on induction of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Onai, N; Tsunokawa, Y; Suda, M; Watanabe, N; Nakamura, K; Sugimoto, Y; Kobayashi, Y

    1995-12-01

    Bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids are known to affect immune responses as well as inflammatory responses, and have been used for the treatment of inflammatory symptoms in China. This study is aimed at elucidating the inhibitory effects of two alkaloids, fangchinoline and isotetrandrine, on the induction of the proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), by Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 (SAC)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These two alkaloids inhibited cytokine production in a dose-dependent manner, and they inhibited it by more than 90% at 10 micrograms/ml at every time point examined. Of note was that these two alkaloids appeared to inhibit IL-1 beta production more effectively than IL-1 alpha production. When the levels of cytokine mRNA were measured by semiquantitative RT-PCR, these alkaloids reduced the levels of the mRNAs of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, but not that of beta 2-microglobulin, suggesting that these alkaloids may suppress cytokine transcription selectively. PMID:8824940

  18. Increased circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and imbalanced regulatory T-cell cytokines production in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Juliana Cristina; Azor, Mayce Helena; Nojima, Viviane Yoshimi; Lourenço, Francinelson Duarte; Prearo, Erica; Maruta, Celina Wakisaka; Rivitti, Evandro Ararigbóia; da Silva Duarte, Alberto José; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2008-10-01

    The immunologic characterization of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), mainly regarding cytokine profile needs more investigation. We examined circulating inflammatory cytokine levels, T-cell induced secretion, and cytokine mRNA expression in patients with CIU subjected to the intradermal autologous serum skin test (ASST). Increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-12p70, and IL-6 have been observed in most of patients with CIU, together with an enhancement of IL-2 secretion following T-cell stimulation. Highlighting the inflammatory profile in CIU found in ASST positive, is the enhanced B-cell proliferative responsiveness and increased IL-17 secretion levels. ASST-positive patients also exhibited impaired IL-4 secretion associated with increased IL-10 production. Altered cytokine expression in patients with ASST-negative, was the down-modulation of spontaneous IL-10 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our findings support the concept of immunologic dysregulation in CIU, revealing a systemic inflammatory profile associated with disturbed cytokine production by T cells, mainly related to IL-17 and IL-10 production. PMID:18586117

  19. TNF-alpha inhibition prevents cognitive decline and maintains hippocampal BDNF levels in the unpredictable chronic mild stress rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Tuğçe Demirtaş; Karson, Ayşe; Balcı, Fuat; Yazır, Yusufhan; Bayramgürler, Dilek; Utkan, Tijen

    2015-10-01

    Previous findings have shown that patients with depression express higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6. We have recently found that Infliximab (a TNF-α inhibitor) decreased anhedonia and despair-like behavior in the rat unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) model of depression suggesting that inflammation might play an important role in depression. An increasing number of studies suggest that inflammation is also associated with cognitive impairments. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of UCMS on the cognitive performance of rats and their hippocampal BDNF levels and the effect of chronic Infliximab (5mg/kg/weekly, i.p.) treatment on these measures. Rats were subjected to different types of stressors daily for a period of 56 days to induce depression-like state. The UCMS resulted in impairments in spatial and emotional memory acquisition and retention with no effect on the level of locomotor activity. These behavioral effects of UCMS were accompanied by reduction in the level of BDNF in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Chronic Infliximab treatment prevented the UCMS-induced cognitive impairments as well as the reduction in the levels of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These results suggest that Infliximab improves the spatial and emotional memory impairments induced by chronic stress in rats likely through its effects on hippocampal function by modulating inflammation. PMID:26112756

  20. Sequestration of neutrophils in the hepatic vasculature during endotoxemia is independent of beta 2 integrins and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, H; Farhood, A; Fisher, M A; Smith, C W

    1996-11-01

    Antibodies against cellular adhesion molecules protect against neutrophil-induced hepatic injury during ischemia-reperfusion and endotoxemia. To test if beta 2 integrins on neutrophils and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells are involved in neutrophil sequestration in the hepatic vasculature, neutrophil accumulation in the liver was characterized during the early phase of endotoxemia. Intravenous injection of Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin induced a dose-dependent activation of complement, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) formation, and an increase of hepatic neutrophils with maximal numbers at 5 mg/kg (90 min: 339 +/- 14 cells/50 high power fields; controls: 18 +/- 2). Administration of 15 micrograms/kg TNF-alpha and intravascular complement activation with cobra venom factor (75 micrograms/kg) had additive effects on hepatic neutrophil accumulation compared with each mediator alone. Monoclonal antibodies (2 mg/kg) to ICAM-1 and the alpha-chain (CD11a, CD11b) or the beta-chain (CD18) of beta 2 integrins had no significant effect on hepatic neutrophil count after endotoxin. In contrast, these antibodies inhibited peritoneal neutrophil infiltration in response to glycogen administration by 28% (CD11b), 60% (CD11a, ICAM-1), and 92% (CD18). Our data suggest that TNF-alpha and complement factors contribute to hepatic neutrophil sequestration during the early phase of endotoxemia. Despite the fact that these inflammatory mediators can up-regulate integrins and ICAM-1, these adhesion molecules are not necessary for neutrophil accumulation in hepatic sinusoids. The protective effect of these antibodies against neutrophil-induced liver injury appears to be due to inhibition of transendothelial migration and adherence to parenchymal cells. PMID:8946651

  1. Trauma scores and neuron-specific enolase, cytokine and C-reactive protein levels as predictors of mortality in patients with blunt head trauma.

    PubMed

    Sogut, O; Guloglu, C; Orak, M; Sayhan, M B; Gokdemir, M T; Ustundag, M; Akkus, Z

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), cytokine and high-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP) levels, along with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Revised Trauma Score (RTS), as predictors of mortality in the early posttraumatic period, in 100 Turkish patients with blunt head trauma. Overall patient mortality was 27%. There was a significant association between age and mortality, and mortality was negatively correlated with GCS and RTS. Head injury severity (GCS) was significantly related to NSE, hs-CRP, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels. Mortality correlated positively with IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha and hs-CRP levels. NSE, hs-CRP, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha levels were significantly higher in non-survivors compared with survivors. GCS score < or =8, younger age and NSE levels were significant independent predictors of mortality. During the early post-traumatic period, NSE may be an objective alternative criterion to the GCS, in the management of patients with blunt head trauma. PMID:21309485

  2. Similar cytokine induction profiles of a novel streptococcal exotoxin, MF, and pyrogenic exotoxins A and B.

    PubMed Central

    Norrby-Teglund, A; Norgren, M; Holm, S E; Andersson, U; Andersson, J

    1994-01-01

    The cytokine production induced by a newly discovered streptococcal exotoxin, MF, and the pyrogenic exotoxins SpeA and SpeB was determined by in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy blood donors. The induction and kinetics of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were studied at the single-cell level by use of cytokine-specific monoclonal antibodies and intracellular immunofluorescent juxtanuclear staining. The cytokine-producing cells, with the exception of IL-1-expressing cells, had a characteristic morphology generated by the accumulation of cytokines in the Golgi organelle. MF, SpeA, and SpeB induced a massive gamma interferon and TNF-beta response in 10 to 16% of the PBMCs after 48 to 96 h of cell stimulation. In contrast, IL-2 and TNF-alpha production was detected in only 1 to 3% of the PBMCs. The induction of a lymphocyte TH2 phenotype response, including production of IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10, was weak. However, the monokines, IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and IL-8, were consistently found and gradually produced, peaking at 24 h in approximately 5 to 8% of the PBMCs. MF showed extensive cytokine- and proliferation-inducing capacities equal to those of SpeA and SpeB, which suggests that MF is also a superantigen. A marked interindividual variation could be noted both in the proliferative response and in the cytokine induction of lymphocytes isolated from different individuals, which may be one explanation for the varying clinical severity noticed during group A streptococcal infections. Images PMID:8063387

  3. A comparative analysis of cytokine production and tolerance induction by bacterial lipopeptides, lipopolysaccharides and Staphyloccous aureus in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, M; Ackermann, U; Hauschildt, S; Krause, S W; Riedel, D; Bessler, W; Andreesen, R

    1997-01-01

    Monocytes (MO) and macrophages (MAC) are important producers of cytokines involved in the pathophysiology of bacterial sepsis. Most studies concentrate on the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) regarding the induction of cytokine gene expression and secretion in MO/MAC. Here we report that besides LPS, the synthetic lipoprotein analogue lipopeptide N-palmitoyl-S-(2,3-bis(palmitoyl)-(2RS)-propyl)-(R)-cysteinyl-alanyl- glycine (Pam3-Cys-Ala-Gly), another component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, as well as heat-killed Staphyloccocus aureus (S. aureus/SAC) are potent stimuli for cytokines in human MO. For all three investigated stimuli we found an individual pattern of cytokine induction: LPS was most potent in inducing interleukin-6 (IL-6) synthesis, whereas for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion SAC was the best stimulus. Comparable amounts of IL-8 were induced by either LPS or Pam3-Cys-Ala-Gly, with SAC being less effective even at higher concentrations. The addition of serum led to an increase in LPS-, SAC- and Pam3-Cys-Ala-Gly-stimulated TNF-alpha secretion, indicating that the presence of serum is critical not just for LPS stimulation. Furthermore, as is known for LPS, Pam3-Cys-Ala-Gly and SAC rendered MO refractory to a second bacterial stimulus. Pam3-Cys-Ala-Gly and SAC induced tolerance for itself, but LPS could partially overcome this effect. As the CD14 molecule is discussed as a common receptor for different bacterial components, we investigated whether the TNF-alpha response of MO could be blocked by anti-CD14 antibodies. MY4, a CD14 antibody, selectively blocked the TNF-alpha secretion induced by LPS but not by Pam3-Cys-Ala-Gly or SAC. In summary, we conclude that besides LPS, lipopeptide Pam3-Cys-Ala-Gly and SAC are potent stimuli for human MO, while the mechanisms of activation seem to be partially different from LPS. Images Figure 2 PMID:9486114

  4. Plasma cell survival is mediated by synergistic effects of cytokines and adhesion-dependent signals.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Giuliana; Arce, Sergio; Hauser, Anja E; Lehnert, Katja; Moewes, Beate; Mostarac, Miro; Muehlinghaus, Gwendolin; Szyska, Martin; Radbruch, Andreas; Manz, Rudolf A

    2003-08-15

    Recent results suggest that plasma cell longevity is not an intrinsic capacity, but depends on yet unknown factors produced in their environment. In this study, we show that the cytokines IL-5, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha as well as signaling via CD44 support the survival of isolated bone marrow plasma cells. The cytokines IL-7 and stem cell factor, crucially important for early B cell development, do not mediate plasma cell survival, indicating that plasma cells and early B cells have different survival requirements. As shown in IL-6-deficient mice, IL-6 is required for a normal induction, but not for the maintenance of plasma cell responses in vivo, indicating that the effects of individual survival factors are redundant. Optimal survival of isolated plasma cells requires stimulation by a combination of factors acting synergistically. These results strongly support the concept that plasma cell survival depends on niches in which a combination of specific signals, including IL-5, IL-6, stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha, TNF-alpha, and ligands for CD44, provides an environment required to mediate plasma cell longevity. PMID:12902466

  5. Serum antibodies and cytokines in C4-deficient mice and their responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Visetnoi, Supawan; Chawengkirttikul, Runglawan; Chaiyaroj, Sansanee C; Kitiyanant, Yindee; Pholpramool, Chumpol

    2009-12-01

    Psychological stress is believed to be one of the predisposing factors for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), whereas physical stress such as exercise has never been reported to be related. We measured the circulating levels of antibodies (IgM, IgG, anti-dsDNA IgG), Th1 (IFN-gamma), Th2 (IL-4, IL-6), and of pro-inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta) and anti-inflammatory (TGF-beta) cytokines of C4(-l-) female mice at rest, after acute exercise and after exercise training, using an antibody-capture ELISA. Prior to the exercise, the C4(-l-) mice had higher levels of IgG and anti-dsDNA IgG but lower levels of IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-4 than wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice. A single bout of exercise to exhaustion increased serum IgG, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and TGF-beta in the B6 mice but only TGF-beta in the C4(-l-) mice was increased. We conclude that exhaustive or moderate exercise has no effect on the levels of serum antibodies and cytokines and is thus unlikely to promote the onset of SLE. PMID:20232574

  6. Combined impact of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 and interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α polymorphisms on serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Brazilian HCV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tarragô, Andréa Monteiro; da Costa, Allyson Guimarães; Pimentel, João Paulo Diniz; Gomes, Samara Tatielle Monteiro; Freitas, Felipe Bonfim; Lalwani, Pritesh; de Araújo, Ana Ruth S; Victória, Flamir da Silva; Victória, Marilú Barbieri; Vallinoto, Antônio Carlos Rosário; Sadahiro, Aya; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Malheiro, Adriana

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and host cytokine gene polymorphisms and serum cytokine levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Serum IL-6, TNF-α, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17A levels were measured in 67 HCV patients (68.2% genotype 1 [G1]) and 47 healthy controls. The HCV patients had higher IL-6, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-17A levels than the controls. HCV G1 patients had higher IL-2 and IFN-γ levels than G2 patients. The -174IL6G>C, -308TNFαG>A, and -1082IL10A>G variants were similarly distributed in both groups. However, HCV patients with the -174IL6GC variant had higher IL-2 and IFN-γ levels than patients with the GG and CC variants. Additionally, HCV patients with the -308TNFαGG genotype had higher IL-17A levels than patients with the AG genotype, whereas patients with the -1082IL10GG variant had higher IL-6 levels than patients with the AA and AG variants. A significant proportion of HCV patients had high levels of both IL-2 and IFN-γ. The subgroup of HCV patients with the G1/IL6CG/TNFαGG association displayed the highest proportions of high producers of IL-2 and IFN-γ whereas the subgroup with the G1/TNFαGG profile showed high proportions of high producers of IL-6 and IL-17A. HCV patients with other HCV/cytokine genotype associations showed no particular cytokine profile. Our results suggest that HCV genotype G1 and IL-6 and TNF-α polymorphisms have a clinically relevant influence on serum pro-inflammatory cytokine profile (IL-2 and IFN-γ) in HCV patients. PMID:25193024

  7. TNF-alpha expression, evaluation of collagen, and TUNEL of Matricaria recutita L. extract and triamcinolone on oral ulcer in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    OLIVEIRA, Bruna Vasconcelos; BARROS SILVA, Paulo Goberlânio; NOJOSA, Jacqueline de Santiago; BRIZENO, Luiz André Cavalcante; FERREIRA, Jamile Magalhães; SOUSA, Fabrício Bitú; MOTA, Mário Rogério Lima; ALVES, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease associated with delayed wound healing of oral ulcers by increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cellular apoptosis. Objective to evaluate the influence of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) and apoptosis in rats with DM treated with chamomile extract or triamcinolone. Material and Methods Wistar male rats (210.0±4.2 g) were divided into five groups: negative control group (NCG) without diabetes; positive control group (PCG) with DM (alloxan, 45 mg/kg); and groups treated with chamomile extract (normoglycemic= NCG group and diabetic= DCG group) and with triamcinolone (TG). Traumatic ulcers were performed on all animals that received topical triamcinolone, chamomile extract or saline 12/12 hours for ten days. Results On days five and ten the animals were euthanized and the ulcers were analyzed by light microscopy, TUNEL assay, and immunohistochemically (TNF-α). The NCG (p=0.0062), PCG (p=0.0285), NCG (p=0.0041), and DCG (p<0.0001) groups were completely healed on the 10th day, however, there was no healing on the TG (p=0.5127) group. The TNF-α expression showed a significant reduction from the 5th to the 10th day in NCG (p=0.0266) and DCG (p=0.0062). In connective tissue, the TUNEL assay showed a significant reduction in the number of positive cells in NCG (p=0.0273) and CNG (p=0.0469) and in the epithelium only in CDG (p=0.0320). Conclusions Chamomile extract can optimize the healing of traumatic oral ulcers in diabetic rats through the reduction of apoptosis in the epithelium and TNF-α expression. PMID:27383710

  8. Increased concentration of serum TNF alpha and its correlations with arterial blood pressure and indices of renal damage in dogs infected with Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Zygner, Wojciech; Gójska-Zygner, Olga; Bąska, Piotr; Długosz, Ewa

    2014-04-01

    Canine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease caused by parasites of the genus Babesia. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine that plays a role in the pathogenesis of canine babesiosis. In this study, the authors determined the concentration of serum TNF-α in 11 dogs infected with Babesia canis and calculated Spearman's rank correlations between the concentration of TNF-α and blood pressure, and between TNF-α and indices of renal damage such as: fractional excretion of sodium (FE(Na(+))), urinary creatinine to serum creatinine ratio (UCr/SCr), renal failure index (RFI), urine specific gravity (USG) and urinary protein to urinary creatinine ratio (UPC). The results demonstrated statistically significant strong negative correlations between TNF-α and systolic arterial pressure (r = -0.7246), diastolic arterial pressure (r = -0.6642) and mean arterial pressure (r = -0.7151). Serum TNF-α concentration was also statistically significantly correlated with FE(Na(+)) (r = 0.7056), UCr/SCr (r = -0.8199), USG (r = -0.8075) and duration of the disease (r = 0.6767). The results of this study show there is an increase of serum TNF-α concentration during canine babesiosis, and the increased TNF-α concentration has an influence on the development of hypotension and renal failure in canine babesiosis. This probably results from the fact that TNF-α is involved in the production of nitric oxide and induction of vasodilation and hypotension, which may cause renal ischaemia and hypoxia, and finally acute tubular necrosis and renal failure. PMID:24553975

  9. In situ expression of cytokines in human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoffen, E.; Van Wichen, D.; Stuij, I.; De Jonge, N.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.; Van Den Tweel, J.; Gmelig-Meyling, F.; De Weger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Although allograft rejection, the major complication of human organ transplantation, has been extensively studied, little is known about the exact cellular localization of the cytokine expression inside the graft during rejection. Therefore, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to study local cytokine mRNA and protein expression in human heart allografts, in relation to the phenotypical characteristics of the cellular infiltrate. Clear expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-9, and IL-10 and weak expression for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was detected in biopsies exhibiting high rejection grades (grade 3A/B). Also at lower grades of rejection, mRNA for IL-6 and IL-9 was present. Some mRNA for IL-1 beta, TNF-beta, and interferon (IFN)-gamma was detected in only a few biopsies. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 protein was detected in biopsies with high rejection grades, whereas few cells expressed IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-gamma. In biopsies with lower grades of rejection, a weaker expression of these cytokines was observed. IL-4 was hardly detected in any of the biopsies. The level of IL-12 expression was equal in all biopsies. Although mRNA expression of several cytokines was expressed at a low level compared with the protein level of those cytokines, there was a good correlation between localization of cytokine mRNA and protein. Expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma was mainly detected in lymphocytes. IL-3, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 were not detected or not only detected in lymphocytes but also in other stromal elements (eg, macrophages). Macrophage production of IL-3 and IL-12 was confirmed by immunofluorescent double labeling with CD68. We conclude that cardiac allograft rejection is not simply regulated by T helper cell cytokine production, but other intragraft elements contribute considerably to this process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952534

  10. [Immunostimulating drugs and cytokines].

    PubMed

    Lehners, Nicola; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Raab, Marc S

    2011-11-01

    Cytokines are essential regulators of hematopoesis and the immune system. Genetic engineering of recombinant cytokines has facilitated their implementation in many clinical areas. In the field of oncology the granulopoetic human growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF are of particular importance. They can be applied to prevent chemotherapy induced neutropenia. Furthermore, they allow for mobilization of hematopoetic stem cells in order to obtain peripheral blood stem cell transplants. Another class of cytokines, the interferons, possess immunomodulating, antiproliferative, and antiviral properties. While the significance of interferon alfa as an antitumor agent is dwindling, it still plays a very important role in the therapy of chronic hepatitis b and c. Interferon beta is successfully used to treat multiple sclerosis. Among the heterogenous group of interleukines in particular interleukin 2 has reached clinical practice as an immunostimulating agent in the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Many other cytokines have yet to undergo clinical trials. PMID:22045528

  11. In vitro activation of cord blood mononuclear cells and cytokine production in a remote coastal population exposed to organochlorines and methyl mercury.

    PubMed

    Bilrha, Houda; Roy, Raynald; Moreau, Brigitte; Belles-Isles, Marthe; Dewailly, Eric; Ayotte, Pierre

    2003-12-01

    Remote coastal populations that rely on seafood for subsistence often receive unusually high doses of organochlorines and methyl mercury. Immunosuppression resulting from prenatal exposure to organochlorines has been reported in wildlife species and humans. In this study, we assessed lymphocyte activation and associated cytokine secretion in 47 newborns from a remote maritime population living on the Mid and Lower North Shore regions of the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada; subsistence fishing group) and 65 newborns from nearby urban settings (reference group). Cord blood samples were collected for organochlorine and mercury analyses and also to isolate cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) for the in vitro assessment of cytokine production and expression of surface markers after mitogenic stimulation (CD4(+)CD45RO(+), CD8(+)CD45RO(+), CD3(+)CD25(+), and CD8(+)HLA-DR(+)). Blood mercury and plasma concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were significantly higher in the subsistence fishing group than in the reference group (p < 0.001). No difference was observed between the two groups regarding subsets of lymphocytes showing markers of activation. In vitro secretion of cytokines by CBMCs after mitogenic stimulation was lower in the subsistence fishing group than in the reference group (p < 0.05). Moreover, we found an inverse correlation between tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion and plasma PCB, p,p'-DDE, and HCB concentrations (p < 0.05). Our data support a negative association between TNF-alpha secretion by CBMCs and prenatal organochlorine exposure. If the relationship between organochlorine and TNF-alpha secretion is causal, it would suggest a role for this important proinflammatory cytokine in mediating organochlorine-induced immunotoxicity in infants developmentally exposed to these compounds. PMID:14644672

  12. In vitro cytokine release from rat type II pneumocytes and alveolar macrophages following exposure to JP-8 jet fuel in co-culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengjun; Young, R Scotte; Sun, Nina N; Witten, Mark L

    2002-05-01

    Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AIIE) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) are involved in pulmonary toxicity of JP-8 jet fuel exposure. To further elucidate their inflammatory mechanisms, the effect(s) of JP-8 jet fuel on cytokine secretion were examined in a transformed rat AIIE cell line (RLE-6TN) culture alone, primary PAM (from Fischer 344 rats) culture alone, and the co-culture of AIIE and primary PAM. A series of JP-8 jet fuel concentrations (0-0.8 microg/ml), which may actually be encountered in alveolar space of lungs exposed in vivo, were placed in cell culture for 24 h. Cultured AIIE alone secreted spontaneously interleukin (IL)-1beta and -6 [below detectable limits for IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)], whereas cultured PAM alone secreted IL-1beta, -10, and TNF-alpha, in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that the release of cytokines, not only from PAM but also from AIIE cells, may contribute to JP-8 jet fuel-induced inflammatory response in the alveolar space. However, the co-cultures of AIIE and PAM showed no significant changes in IL-1beta, -6, and TNF-alpha at any JP-8 jet fuel concentration compared to control values. These cytokine levels in co-cultures of AIIE and PAM were inversely related to these of cultured AIIE or PAM alone. Interestingly, IL-10 levels in the co-culture system were concentration-dependently increased up to 1058% at JP-8 concentrations of 0.8 microg/ml, although under detectable limits in cultured AIIE alone and no significant concentration change in cultured PAM alone. It appears that PAM may possibly act via paracrine and/or autocrine pathways to signal AIIE cells to regulate cytokine release. PMID:11960674

  13. Inflammation induced by Bothrops asper venom: release of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids, and role of adhesion molecules in leukocyte infiltration.

    PubMed

    Zamuner, Stella Regina; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan; Fernandes, Cristina Maria; Gutiérrez, José Maria; de Fátima Pereira Teixeira, Catarina

    2005-12-01

    Bothrops asper venom (BaV) causes systemic and local effects characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction with accumulation of leukocytes and release of endogenous mediators. In this study, the effects of BaV on the release of the cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-alpha and the eicosanoids LTB4 and TXA2 in the peritoneal cavity of mice were analyzed. We also investigated the participation of beta2 integrin chain, l-selectin, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 adhesion molecules in the BaV-induced leukocyte accumulation. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha, as well as eicosanoids LTB4 and TXA2 were significantly increased after BaV injection (250 microg/kg), whereas no increment in IL-1 was observed. Anti-mouse l-selectin, LFA-1, ICAM-1, PECAM-1 and beta2 integrin chain monoclonal antibodies resulted in a reduction of neutrophil accumulation induced by BaV injection compared with isotype-matched control injected animals. These data suggest that BaV is able to induce the activation of leukocytes and endothelium to express adhesion molecules involved in the recruitment of neutrophils into the inflammed site. Furthermore, these results showed that BaV induces the release of cytokines and eicosanoids in the local of the venom injection; these inflammatory mediators may be important for the initiation and amplification of the inflammatory reaction characteristic from Bothrops sp envenomation. PMID:16198389

  14. Artemisolide is a typical inhibitor of I{kappa}B kinase {beta} targeting cysteine-179 residue and down-regulates NF-{kappa}B-dependent TNF-{alpha} expression in LPS-activated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byung Hak; Lee, Jun-Young; Seo, Jee Hee; Lee, Hwa Young; Ryu, Shi Yong; Ahn, Byung Woo; Lee, Chong-Kil; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2007-09-28

    Nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B regulates a central common signaling for immunity and cell survival. Artemisolide (ATM) was previously isolated as a NF-{kappa}B inhibitor from a plant of Artemisia asiatica. However, molecular basis of ATM on NF-{kappa}B activation remains to be defined. Here, we demonstrate that ATM is a typical inhibitor of I{kappa}B kinase {beta} (IKK{beta}), resulting in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-{kappa}B activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. ATM inhibited the kinase activity of highly purified IKK{beta} and also LPS-induced IKK activity in the cells. Moreover, the effect of ATM on IKK{beta} activity was completely abolished by substitution of Cys-179 residue of IKK{beta} to Ala residue, indicating direct targeting site of ATM. ATM could inhibit I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells and subsequently prevent NF-{kappa}B activation. Further, we demonstrate that ATM down-regulates NF-{kappa}B-dependent TNF-{alpha} expression. Taken together, this study provides a pharmacological potential of ATM in NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory disorders.

  15. MicroRNA-146a-5p Negatively Regulates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion and Cell Activation in Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuhan; Zeng, Zhaochong; Shen, Xiaoyun; Wu, Zhifeng; Dong, Yinying; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway is demonstrated to be involved in the hepatic fibrosis. MicroRNA (miR)-146a-5p is a key regulator of the innate immune response. The functional significance of miR-146a-5p during the LPS/TLR4 mediated hepatic fibrosis process remains unclear. In this study, we found that TLR4 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were up-regulated and miR-146a-5p was down-regulated in human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) line LX2 after LPS stimulation. Overexpression of miR-146a-5p inhibited LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion through down-regulating the expression levels of TLR-4, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), TNF receptor associated factor-6 (TRAF6) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Knockdown of IRAK1 and TRAF6 also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting NF-κB phosphorylation. In addition, miR-146a-5p mimic blocked LPS induced TRAF6 dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Smad2 activation as well as α-SMA production. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-146a-5p suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and cell activation of HSC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TLR4/TRAF6/JNK pathway. PMID:27399683

  16. MicroRNA-146a-5p Negatively Regulates Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion and Cell Activation in Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhan; Zeng, Zhaochong; Shen, Xiaoyun; Wu, Zhifeng; Dong, Yinying; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway is demonstrated to be involved in the hepatic fibrosis. MicroRNA (miR)-146a-5p is a key regulator of the innate immune response. The functional significance of miR-146a-5p during the LPS/TLR4 mediated hepatic fibrosis process remains unclear. In this study, we found that TLR4 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were up-regulated and miR-146a-5p was down-regulated in human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) line LX2 after LPS stimulation. Overexpression of miR-146a-5p inhibited LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion through down-regulating the expression levels of TLR-4, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), TNF receptor associated factor-6 (TRAF6) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Knockdown of IRAK1 and TRAF6 also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inhibiting NF-κB phosphorylation. In addition, miR-146a-5p mimic blocked LPS induced TRAF6 dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Smad2 activation as well as α-SMA production. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-146a-5p suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and cell activation of HSC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TLR4/TRAF6/JNK pathway. PMID:27399683

  17. Aqueous extracts of Cimicifuga racemosa and phenolcarboxylic constituents inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Diethart; Woehs, Florian; Svoboda, Martin; Thalhammer, Theresia; Chiba, Peter; Moeslinger, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) is commonly used in traditional medicines as treatment for menopausal symptoms and as an antiinflammatory remedy. To clarify the mechanism of action and active principle for the antiinflammatory action, the effects of aqueous C. racemosa root extracts (CRE) and its major constituents on the release of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and the chemokine IL-8 were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood of healthy volunteers. CRE (3 microg/microL and 6 microg/microL) reduced LPS-induced release of IL-6 and TNF-alpha in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and almost completely blocked release of IFN-gamma into the plasma supernatant. Except for IFN-gamma, these effects were attenuated at longer incubation periods. IL-8 secretion was stimulated by CRE. As shown by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, effects on cytokines were based on preceding changes in mRNA levels except for IL-8. According to their content in CRE, the phenolcarboxylic compounds caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and isoferulic acid, as well as the triterpene glycosides 23-epi-26-deoxyactein and cimigenol-3-O-xyloside, were tested at representative concentrations. Among these, isoferulic acid was the prominent active principle in CRE, responsible for the observed inhibition of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma, but not for IL-8 stimulation. The effect of this compound may explain the antiinflammatory activities of CRE and its beneficial actions in rheumatism and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:19935904

  18. Cytokine regulation of glutamate decarboxylase biosynthesis in isolated rat islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidli, R S; Faulkner-Jones, B E; Harrison, L C; James, R F; DeAizpurua, H J

    1996-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an autoimmune disease in which cytokines are thought to play an important role in beta-cell destruction and immune regulation. A major target of beta-cell autoimmunity in IDDM is the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). We hypothesized that cytokines in the insulitis lesion modulate the synthesis of GAD. This may, in turn, modify the rate of beta-cell destruction. Accordingly we cultured rat islets in the presence and absence of cytokines, and measured synthesis of both isoforms of GAD, GAD65 and GAD67, by [35S]methionine incorporation and immunoprecipitation with a rabbit antiserum that recognizes both GAD65 and GAD67. Incubation of islets with interleukin (IL)-1 beta (1 ng/ml, 24 h), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha; 200 units/ml, 24 h) or interferon gamma (IFN-gamma; 500 units/ml, 72 h) significantly decreased the synthesis of both GAD65 and GAD67, but reduced neither total protein synthesis nor insulin accumulation in the medium or content. Incubation of islets for 24 h in IFN-alpha (1000 units/ml), TNF-beta (50 ng/ml), IL 2 (1000 units/ml), IL-4 (100 ng/ml), IL-6 (10 ng/ml), IL-10 (20 ng/ml), IL-12 (10 ng/ml) or transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-beta 2; 5 ng/ml) did not significantly alter GAD65 or GAD67 synthesis. Inhibition of GAD65 and GAD67 protein synthesis by IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma was reversed by co-incubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl arginine (NMMA). Expression of both GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA, measured by RNase protection assay, was also decreased by IL-1 beta and completely restored to baseline levels by NMMA. Thus the synthesis of both isoforms of islet GAD is selectively decreased in the presence of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma by a NO-mediated mechanism, probably at the level of cytokine gene transcription. As GAD autoimmunity has been previously shown to have a pathogenic role in an animal model of IDDM, its inhibition by cytokines might limit

  19. Quantitative analysis of interferon alpha receptor subunit 1 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene transcription in blood cells of patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interferon (IFN)-α receptor 1 (ifnar1) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (socs1) transcription levels were quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 59 patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and 17 non-infected individuals. Samples were obtained from patients infected with HCV that were either untreated or treated with IFN-α2 plus ribavirin for 1 year and divided into responders and non-responders based on viral load reduction 6 months after treatment. Ifnar1 and socs1 transcription was quantified by real-time RT-PCR, and the fold difference (2-ΔΔCT) with respect to hprt housekeeping gene was calculated. Results Ifnar1 transcription increased significantly in HCV-infected patients either untreated (3.26 ± 0.31), responders (3.1 ± 0.23) and non-responders (2.18 ± 0.23) with respect to non-infected individuals (1 ± 0.34; P = 0.005). Ifnar1 transcription increased significantly (P = 0.003) in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a (4.74 ± 0.25) and 1b (2.81 ± 0.25) but not in 1a1b (1.58 ± 0.21). No association was found of Ifnar1 transcription with disease progress, initial viral load or other clinical factors. With respect to socs1 transcription, values were similar for non-infected individuals (1 ± 0.28) and untreated patients (0.99 ± 0.41) but increased in responders (2.81 ± 0.17) and non-responder patients (1.67 ± 0.41). Difference between responder and non-responder patients was not statistically significant. Socs1 transcription increased in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a and 1b (2.87 ± 0.45 and 2.22 ± 0.17, respectively) but not in 1a1b (1.28 ± 0.40). Socs1 transcript was absent in three patients infected with HCV genotype 1b. A weak correlation between ifnar1 and socs1 transcription was found, when Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated. Conclusion Our results suggest that HCV infection may up-regulate ifnar1 transcription. HCV genotypes differ in their capacity to affect ifnar1 and

  20. Immunotherapy of Cancer by IL-12-based Cytokine Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Subleski, Jeff J.; Wigginton, Jon M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is a multi-faceted disease comprising complex interactions between neoplastic and normal cells. Over the past decade, there has been considerable progress in defining the molecular, cellular and environmental contributions to the pathophysiology of tumor development. Despite these advances, the conventional treatment of patients still generally involves surgery, radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy and the clinical outcome for many of these efforts remains unsatisfactory. Recent studies have highlighted the feasibility of using immunotherapeutic approaches that seek to enhance host immune responses to developing tumors. These strategies include immunomodulatory cytokines, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, type I or type II Interferons (IFNs), Interleukins (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 being among the most potent inducers of anti-tumor activity in a variety of pre-clinical studies. More recently, some exciting new cytokines have been characterized, such as IL-21, IL-23, IL-27, and their immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo suggest that they may have considerable promise for future immunotherapy protocols. The promise of cytokine therapy does indeed derive from the identification of these novel cytokines, but even more fundamentally, the field is greatly benefiting from the ever-expanding amount of pre-clinical data that convincingly demonstrate synergistic and/or novel biological effects that may be achieved through the use of several combinations of cytokines with complementary immune-stimulating capabilities. One cytokine in particular, IL-12, holds considerable promise by virtue of the fact that it plays a central role in regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses, can by itself induce potent anti-cancer effects, and synergizes with several other cytokines for increased immunoregulatory and anti-tumor activities. This review will discuss the anti-tumor activity of IL-12, with a special emphasis on its ability to

  1. Direct exposure to nitrogen dioxide fails to induce the expression of some inflammatory cytokines in an IC-21 murine macrophage cell model.

    PubMed

    Tu, B; Wallin, A; Moldéus, P; Cotgreave, I A

    1995-12-15

    Biologically-active molecules secreted from alveolar macrophages, such as cytokines, have been proposed to be involved in the induction of pulmonary toxicity and inflammation in response to the inhalation of oxidant gas pollutants such as NO2 and O3. Despite this, mechanistic studies are hampered by the difficulty in obtaining control macrophages from human subjects, and the intrinsic variability of such primary cells. It is, thus, of importance to develop alternative models for such studies. Here, we have characterised expression kinetics of the mRNAs for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1 beta) in confluent cultures of the murine IC-21 macrophage line in response to LPS. The secretion of TNF-alpha protein into the medium, assayed by L-929 cell bioassay, closely followed the expression of its mRNA in response to the LPS stimulus. In contrast to LPS, the exposure of IC-21 cells to either air or various concentrations of NO2 in air between 2 and 20 ppm, in an inverted plate exposure model, failed to induce the expression of any of the cytokine mRNAs probed. We conclude that the IC-21 cell line may represent a suitable model for studying the role of stimulated cytokine gene expression in inflammation and that the early events in the pulmonary inflammatory response to the inhalation of NO2 do not involve stimulated release of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta or MIP-1 alpha/MIP-1 beta from macrophages. PMID:8560494

  2. Joint cytokine quantification in two rodent arthritis models: kinetics of expression, correlation of mRNA and protein levels and response to prednisolone treatment.

    PubMed

    Rioja, I; Bush, K A; Buckton, J B; Dickson, M C; Life, P F

    2004-07-01

    Biomarker quantification in disease tissues from animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can help to provide insights into the mechanisms of action of novel therapeutic agents. In this study we validated the kinetics of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA and protein expression levels in joints from DBA/1OlaHsd murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and Lewis rat Streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) TaqMan and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prednisolone was used as a reference to investigate any correlation between clinical response and cytokine levels at selected time-points. To our knowledge this is the first report showing a close pattern of expression between mRNA and protein for IL-1beta and IL-6, but not for TNF-alpha, in these two models of RA. The kinetics of expression for these biomarkers suggested that the optimal sampling time-points to study the effect of compounds on both inflammation and cytokine levels were day 4 postonset in CIA and day 3 after i.v challenge in SCW-induced arthritis. Prednisolone reduced joint swelling through a mechanism associated with a reduction in IL-1beta and IL-6 protein and mRNA expression levels. At the investigated time points, protein levels for TNF-alpha in arthritic joints were lower than the lower limit of detection of the ELISA, whereas mRNA levels for this cytokine were reliably detected. These observations suggest that RT-PCR TaqMan is a sensitive technique that can be successfully applied to the quantification of mRNA levels in rodent joints from experimental arthritis models providing insights into mechanisms of action of novel anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:15196245

  3. Senescence of human skeletal muscle impairs the local inflammatory cytokine response to acute eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Koichiro; Vannier, Edouard; Sacheck, Jennifer M; Witsell, Alice L; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2005-02-01

    The impact of aging on the cytokine response of human skeletal muscle to exercise-induced injury remains poorly understood. We enrolled physically active, young (23-35 years old, n=15) and old (66-78 years old, n=15) men to perform 45 min of downhill running (16% descent) at 75% VO2max. Biopsies of vastus lateralis were obtained 24 h before and 72 h after acute eccentric exercise. Transcripts for inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TGF-beta1) were quantified by real-time PCR. Before exercise, cytokine transcripts did not differ with age. At old age, exercise induced a blunted accumulation of transcripts encoding the pan-leukocyte surface marker CD18 (young: 10.1-fold increase, P<0.005; old: 4.7-fold increase, P=0.02; young vs. old: P<0.05). In both age groups, CD18 transcript accumulation strongly correlated with TNF-alpha (young, r=0.87, P<0.001; old, r=0.72, P=0.002) and TGF-beta1 transcript accumulation (young, r=0.80, P<0.001; old, r=0.64, P=0.008). At old age, there was no correlation between IL-1beta and CD18 transcript accumulation. Furthermore, exercise induced IL-6 transcript accumulation in young (3.6-fold, P=0.057) but not in old men. Our results suggest that aging impairs the adaptive response of human skeletal muscle to eccentric exercise by differential modulation of a discrete set of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes. PMID:15556970

  4. Effect of surgical menopause and estrogen replacement on cytokine release from human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, R; Brown, C; Puscheck, E; Friedrich, E; Slatopolsky, E; Maggio, D; McCracken, R; Avioli, L V

    1991-01-01

    To determine whether mononuclear cell secretory products contribute to the changes in bone turnover that characterize the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis, we evaluated the effects of oophorectomy and subsequent estrogen replacement on the spontaneous secretion of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and on the phytohemagglutinin A-induced secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In 15 healthy premenopausal women who underwent oophorectomy, increases in GM-CSF activity were observed as early as 1 week after surgery, whereas elevations in IL-1 and TNF-alpha and in hydroxyproline/creatinine and calcium/creatinine ratios, two urinary indices of bone resorption, were detectable 2 weeks after the surgical procedure. Six of the oophorectomized women received no estrogen therapy after surgery and in these subjects hydroxyproline/creatinine and calcium/creatinine ratios plateaued 6 weeks postoperatively, and all three cytokines reached the highest levels 8 weeks after oophorectomy, when the study ended. In the remaining 9 women, who were started on estrogen replacement therapy 4 weeks after oophorectomy, decreases in the indices of bone resorption paralleled decreases in the secretion of the cytokines, with lower levels detected after 2 weeks of therapy. In the women who did not receive estrogen therapy, circulating osteocalcin, a marker of bone formation, increased beyond preoperative levels 8 weeks after oophorectomy, whereas in the estrogen-treated subjects osteocalcin remained unchanged in the entire study period. In 9 female controls who underwent simple hysterectomy, cytokine release and biochemical indices of bone turnover did not change after surgery. These data indicate that changes in estrogen status in vivo are associated with the secretion of mononuclear cell immune factors in vitro and suggest that alterations in the local production of bone

  5. Sasa borealis leaves extract improves insulin resistance by modulating inflammatory cytokine secretion in high fat diet-induced obese C57/BL6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung-Hwa; Lim, Hyeon-Sook; Heo, Young-Ran

    2010-04-01

    Obesity is considered a mild inflammatory state, and the secretion of inflammation-related cytokines rises as adipose tissue expands. Inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interlukin 6 (IL-6) and monocyte-chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), are modulated by adipose tissue and known to play an important role in insulin resistance which is the common characteristics of obesity related disorders. In this study we analyzed the effects of Sasa borealis leaves extract on inflammatory cytokines and insulin resistance in diet induced obese C57/BL6J mice. The obese state was induced by a high fat diet for 20 weeks and then the mice were divided into two groups; obese control group (OBC, n = 7) and experimental group (OB-SBE, n = 7). The OBC group was fed a high fat diet and the OB-SBE group was fed a high fat diet containing 5% Sasa borealis leaves extract (SBE) for 12 weeks. We also used mice fed a standard diet as a normal control (NC, n = 7). The body weight and adipose tissue weight in the OB group were significantly higher than those in the NC group. The effects of the high fat diet were reduced by SBE treatments, and the body weight and adipose tissue deposition in the OB-SBE group were significantly decreased compared to the OBC group. The OBC group showed higher serum glucose and insulin levels which resulted in a significant increase of incremental area under the curve (IAUC) and HOMA-IR than the NC group. Also, serum leptin, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the OBC group than in the NC group. In contrast, the OB-SBE group showed a reversal in the metabolic defects, including a decrease in glucose, insulin, IAUC, HOMA-IR, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and leptin levels. These results suggest that BSE can suppress increased weight gain and/or fat deposition induced by a high fat diet and theses effects are accompanied by modulation of the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha and IL-6 secretion resulting in improved insulin

  6. Adenosine and cytokine levels following treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Caroline M; Stoy, Nicholas; Stone, Trevor W; Harman, Gillian; Mackay, Gillian M; Oxford, Lynn; Darlington, L Gail

    2006-11-01

    Adenosine can suppress the release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) from activated monocytes and macrophages, and may contribute to the anti-inflammatory activities of methotrexate and sulphasalazine. Dipyridamole inhibits the cellular uptake and metabolism of adenosine and we have, therefore, examined the effects of dipyridamole in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in an attempt to alleviate their symptoms. Forty patients aged 18-75 years were randomised to receive dipyridamole 400 mg/day or placebo. Blood samples were taken at baseline and at monthly intervals for 6 months. Purines were determined by HPLC and cytokines by ELISA. After 3 months of treatment there were significant reductions in neopterin levels and in the modified Health Assessment Questionnaire score, but these were not maintained. Dipyridamole had no effect on disease severity or the levels of purine metabolites, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, TNF-alpha, lipid peroxidation products, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein. In conclusion, rheumatoid arthritis patients showed no clinical improvement following treatment with dipyridamole for 6 months. PMID:17021714

  7. Selective suppression of cytokine secretion in whole blood cell cultures of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, H.; Schindel, M.; Frikart, L.; Cerottini, J. P.; Yilmaz, A.; Givel, J. C.; Fischer, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the secretion of interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-gamma, interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-2 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in whole blood cell cultures (WBCCs) of colorectal cancer patients upon mitogen stimulation. Whereas the values for IL-1beta and TNF-alpha remained virtually unchanged in comparison with healthy control subjects, WBCCs of colorectal cancer patients secreted significantly lower amounts of IFN-alpha (P < 0.005), IFN-gamma (P < 0.0001), IL-1alpha (P < 0.0001) and IL-2 (P < 0.05). This reduction correlated with the progression of the disease. The total leucocyte and monocyte population were almost identical in both groups. In contrast, a dramatic depletion of lymphocytes was observed in colorectal cancer patients, which affected both lymphocyte counts (P < 0.0005) and their distribution (P < 0.0001). Our results suggest a selective suppression of cytokines in colorectal cancer patients that is related to tumour burden. Several mechanisms might account for this phenomenon, one of which might be lymphocyte depletion. PMID:9792144

  8. DNAs from Brucella strains activate efficiently murine immune system with production of cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Zahra; Ardestani, Sussan K; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Kariminia, Amina; Zahraei Salehi, Taghi; Tavassoli, Nasser

    2009-09-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease with high impact on innate immune responses which is induced partly by its DNA. In the present study the potential differences of wild type and patients isolates versus attenuated vaccine strains in terms of cytokines, ROS and NO induction on murine splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. This panel varied in base composition and included DNA from B. abortus, B. melitensis, B.abortus strain S19 and melitensis strain Rev1, as attenuated live vaccine. Also we included Escherichia coli DNA, calf thymus DNA (a mammalian DNA), as controls. These DNA were evaluated for their ability to stimulate IL-12, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IFN-gamma and ROS production from spleenocytes as well as NO production from peritoneal macrophages. Spleen cells were cultured in 24 well at a concentration of 106 cells/ ml with subsequent addition of 10 microg/ml of Brucella or Ecoli DNAs. These cultures were incubated at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 for 5 days. Supernatants were harvested and cytokines, ROS and NOx were evaluated. It was observed that TNF-alpha was induced in days 1,3,5 by all Brucella strains DNAs and E. coli DNA, IL-10 only was induced in day 1, IFN- gamma was induced only in day 5 and IL-12 not induced. ROS and NOx were produced by all strains; however, we observed higher production of NOx which were stimulated by DNA of B. melitensis. PMID:20124603

  9. Cyclosporine A inhibits transcription of cytokine genes and decreases the frequencies of IL-2 producing cells in feline mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Kazufumi; Nishifuji, Koji; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2008-10-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) has been widely used for suppression of transplant rejection and controlling pruritus in allergic dermatitis in humans, dogs and cats. CsA is known to suppress the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in humans, dogs and experimental mice. However, little is known about the immunomodulating effect of CsA in cats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CsA on the expression of inflammatory cytokines in feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Real-time PCR analyses with Concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated PBMC obtained from 5 cats revealed that the expression of mRNAs for IL-2, IL-4, IFN- gamma and TNF-alpha was inhibited by CsA in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, which is capable of detecting IL-2 secreting cells as single spots, revealed that the frequency of IL-2 secreting cells in ConA-stimulated feline PBMC was significantly reduced in the presence of CsA. These results might provide an explanation for the mechanisms of action of CsA in the suppression of transplant rejection and the control of pruritus in cats. PMID:18981654

  10. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cytokine production and cytotoxicity of PAMAM dendrimers in J774A.1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naha, Pratap C.; Davoren, Maria; Lyng, Fiona M.; Byrne, Hugh J.

    2010-07-15

    The immunotoxicity of three generations of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (G-4, G-5 and G-6) was evaluated in mouse macrophage cells in vitro. Using the Alamar blue and MTT assays, a generation dependent cytotoxicity of the PAMAM dendrimers was found whereby G-6 > G-5 > G-4. The toxic response of the PAMAM dendrimers correlated well with the number of surface primary amino groups, with increasing number resulting in an increase in toxic response. An assessment of intracellular ROS generation by the PAMAM dendrimers was performed by measuring the increased fluorescence as a result of intracellular oxidation of Carboxy H{sub 2}DCFDA to DCF both quantitatively using plate reader and qualitatively by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The inflammatory mediators macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6, (IL-6) were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) following exposure of mouse macrophage cells to PAMAM dendrimers. A generation dependent ROS and cytokine production was found, which correlated well with the cytotoxicological response and therefore number of surface amino groups. A clear time sequence of increased ROS generation (maximum at {approx} 4 h), TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 secretion (maximum at {approx} 24 h), MIP-2 levels and cell death ({approx} 72 h) was observed. The intracellular ROS generation and cytokine production induced cytotoxicity point towards the mechanistic pathway of cell death upon exposure to PAMAM dendrimers.

  11. Curcumin, Silybin Phytosome(®) and α-R-Lipoic Acid Mitigate Chronic Hepatitis in Rat by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Cytokines Production.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shimaa O; Darwish, Hebatallah A; Ismail, Nabila A

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis is recognized as a worldwide health problem that gradually progresses towards cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the large number of experiments using animal models for allergic hepatitis, it is still difficult to produce a picture of chronic hepatitis. Therefore, this study was conducted to introduce an animal model approximating to the mechanism of chronicity in human hepatitis. The study also aimed to examine the hepatoprotective effects of curcumin, silybin phytosome(®) and α-R-lipoic acid against thioacetamide (TAA)-induced chronic hepatitis in rat model. TAA was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 200 mg/kg three times weekly for 4 weeks. At the end of this period, a group of rats was killed to assess the development of chronic hepatitis in comparison with their respective control group. TAA administration was then discontinued, and the remaining animals were subsequently allocated into four groups. Group 1 was left untreated, whereas groups 2-4 were allowed to receive daily oral doses of curcumin, silybin phytosome(®) or α-R-lipoic acid, respectively, for 7 weeks. Increases in hepatic levels of malondialdehyde associated with TAA administration were inhibited in groups receiving supplements. Furthermore, glutathione depletion, collagen deposition, macrophage activation and nuclear factor κappa-B expression as well as tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels were significantly decreased in response to supplements administration. Serological analysis of liver function and liver histopathological examination reinforced the results. The above evidence collectively indicates that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin, silybin phytosome(®) and α-R-lipoic acid may confer therapeutic efficacy against chronic hepatitis. PMID:26457982

  12. Synergistic upregulation of metalloproteinase-9 by growth factors and inflammatory cytokines: an absolute requirement for transcription factor NF-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Bond, M; Fabunmi, R P; Baker, A H; Newby, A C

    1998-09-11

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) enzymes are implicated in matrix remodelling during proliferative inflammatory processes including wound healing. We report here synergistic upregulation of MMP-9 protein and mRNA by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in combination with interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in primary rabbit and human dermal fibroblasts. The synergistic interaction between growth factors and cytokines implies that basement membrane remodelling is maximal physiologically when both are present together. The signalling pathways mediating this synergistic regulation are not understood, although analysis of the MMP-9 promoter has identified an essential proximal AP-1 element and an upstream nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) site. Using electromobility shift assays, binding to the AP-1 site was only slightly increased by growth factors and cytokines. NF-kappaB binding was rapidly induced by IL-1alpha or TNF-alpha but was neither induced nor potentiated by bFGF or PDGF. Neither AP-1 nor NF-kappaB was therefore sufficient on its own for synergistic regulation. Using a recently developed adenovirus that overexpresses the inhibitory subunit, IkappaB alpha, we demonstrated an absolute requirement for NF-kappaB in upregulation of MMP-9. Activation of NF-kappaB binding by inflammatory cytokines was therefore necessary but not sufficient for synergistic upregulation of MMP-9. PMID:9755853

  13. Effects of prostaglandin E2, cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP on lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression of cytokines in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, W W; Burke, P A; Drotar, M E; Chavali, S R; Forse, R A

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) appears to regulate macrophage cytokine production through the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs protein)-mediated cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent transmembrane signal transduction pathway. In this study, we used PGE2, cholera toxin (CT; a direct G alpha s protein stimulator) and 8-bromo-cAMP (a membrane permeable cAMP analogue) to stimulate this pathway, and investigated their influence on cytokine gene expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated human macrophages. The mRNA expression for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6 and IL-8 were determined employing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers. We demonstrated that PGE2, CT and 8-bromo-cAMP inhibited the LPS-induced gene activation of TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha, and had no effect on the gene activation of IL-1 beta and IL-8. Further, our data indicate that PGE2 suppressed the gene activation of IL-6 following LPS stimulation, but neither CT nor 8-bromo-cAMP had an effect. These data suggest that PGE2 alters LPS-stimulated gene activation of only some of the early macrophage cytokines, and does so either by a Gs transmembrane cAMP-dependent or an independent system. Images Figure 1 PMID:7751029

  14. Commensal bacteria can enter colonic epithelial cells and induce proinflammatory cytokine secretion: a possible pathogenic mechanism of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Sato, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Sumio; Tajiri, Hisao; Okayasu, Isao

    2009-05-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2)- and IL-10-knockout mice develop spontaneous colitis under conventional but not germ-free conditions, suggesting that commensal bacteria play an important role in the pathogenesis of colitis. However, interactions between commensal bacteria and colonic epithelial cells have not been fully investigated. We therefore assessed the ability of various commensal bacteria and probiotics to adhere to and invade colonic epithelial cells. Effects of the bacteria on production of proinflammatory cytokines were also measured. Commensal bacteria, including mucosal organisms isolated from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, such as Fusobacterium varium, reported as a possible pathogen in UC, Bacteroides vulgatus, Escherichia coli and Clostridium clostridioforme, as well as their type strains and probiotics, were assessed for their ability to adhere to and invade colonic epithelial cells using two cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our experiments employed co-incubation, a combination of scanning and transmission electron microscopy and recovery of bacteria from infected-cell lysates. F. varium and several other commensal bacteria, but not probiotics, adhered to colonic epithelial cells and invaded their cytoplasm. ELISA and real-time PCR revealed that the host cells, particularly those invaded by F. varium, showed significant increases in IL-8 and TNF-alpha concentrations in supernatants, with elevation of IL-8, TNF-alpha, MCP-1 and IL-6 mRNAs. Furthermore, IL-8 and TNF-alpha expression and nuclear phosphorylated NF-kappaB p65 expression could be immunohistochemically confirmed in inflamed epithelium with cryptitis or crypt abscess in UC patients. Certain commensal bacteria can invade colonic epithelial cells, activating early intracellular signalling systems to trigger host inflammatory reactions. PMID:19369513

  15. High glucose induces inflammatory cytokine through protein kinase C-induced toll-like receptor 2 pathway in gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shao-Yun; Wei, Cong-Cong; Shang, Ting-Ting; Lian, Qi; Wu, Chen-Xuan; Deng, Jia-Yin

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose increased NF-{kappa}B p65 nuclear activity, IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC-{alpha}/{delta}-TLR2 pathway is involved in periodontal inflammation under high glucose. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune response and inflammation, especially in periodontitis. Meanwhile, hyperglycemia can induce inflammation in diabetes complications. However, the activity of TLRs in periodontitis complicated with hyperglycemia is still unclear. In the present study, high glucose (25 mmol/l) significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts (p < 0.05). Also, high glucose increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) p65 nuclear activity, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-l{beta} (IL-1{beta}) levels. Protein kinase C (PKC)-{alpha} and {delta} knockdown with siRNA significantly decreased TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 expression (p < 0.05), whereas inhibition of PKC-{beta} had no effect on TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 under high glucose (p < 0.05). Additional studies revealed that TLR2 knockdown significantly abrogated high-glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Collectively, these data suggest that high glucose stimulates TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{beta} secretion via inducing TLR2 through PKC-{alpha} and PKC-{delta} in human gingival fibroblasts.

  16. Migration of eosinophils across endothelial cell monolayers: interactions among IL-5, endothelial-activating cytokines, and C-C chemokines.

    PubMed

    Shahabuddin, S; Ponath, P; Schleimer, R P

    2000-04-01

    Eosinophils are the predominant cell type recruited in inflammatory reactions in response to allergen challenge. The mechanisms of selective eosinophil recruitment in allergic reactions are not fully elucidated. In this study, the ability of several C-C chemokines to induce transendothelial migration (TEM) of eosinophils in vitro was assessed. Eotaxin, eotaxin-2, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-4, and RANTES induced eosinophil TEM across unstimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a concentration-dependent manner with the following rank order of potency: eotaxin approximately eotaxin-2 > MCP-4 approximately RANTES. The maximal response induced by eotaxin or eotaxin-2 exceeded that of RANTES or MCP-4. Preincubation of eosinophils with anti-CCR3 Ab (7B11) completely blocked eosinophil TEM induced by eotaxin, MCP-4, and RANTES. Activation of endothelial cells with IL-1beta or TNF-alpha induced concentration-dependent migration of eosinophils, which was enhanced synergistically in the presence of eotaxin and RANTES. Anti-CCR3 also inhibited eotaxin-induced eosinophil TEM across TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC. The ability of eosinophil-active cytokines to potentiate eosinophil TEM was assessed by investigating eotaxin or RANTES-induced eosinophil TEM across resting and IL-1beta-stimulated HUVEC in the presence or absence of IL-5. The results showed synergy between IL-5 and the chemokines but not between IL-5 and the endothelial activator IL-1beta. Our data suggest that eotaxin, eotaxin-2, MCP-4, and RANTES induce eosinophil TEM via CCR3 with varied potency and efficacy. Activation of HUVEC by IL-1beta or TNF-alpha or priming of eosinophils by IL-5 both promote CCR3-dependent migration of eosinophils from the vasculature in conjunction with CCR3-active chemokines. PMID:10725746

  17. Persistence of local cytokine production in shigellosis in acute and convalescent stages.

    PubMed Central

    Raqib, R; Lindberg, A A; Wretlind, B; Bardhan, P K; Andersson, U; Andersson, J

    1995-01-01

    Shigella infection is accompanied by an intestinal activation of epithelial cells, T cells, and macrophages within the inflamed colonic mucosa. A prospective study was carried out to elucidate the cytokine pattern in Shigella infection linked to development of immunity and eradication of bacteria from the local site and also to correlate the cytokine profile with histological severity. An indirect immunohistochemical technique was used to determine the production and localization of various cytokines at the single-cell level in cryopreserved rectal biopsies from 24 patients with either Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (n = 18) or Shigella flexneri (n = 6) infection. The histopathological profile included presence of chronic inflammatory cells with or without neutrophils and microulcers in the lamina propria, crypt distortion, branching, and less frequently crypt abscesses. Patients had significantly higher (P < 0.005) numbers of cytokine producing cells for all of the cytokines studied, interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-1ra, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IL-10, gamma interferon, TNF-beta, and transforming growth factor beta 1-3, in the biopsies than the healthy controls (n = 13). The cytokine production profile during the study period was dominated by IL-1 beta, transforming growth factor beta 1-3, IL-4, and IL-10. Significantly increased frequencies of cytokine-producing cells (P < 0.05) were observed for IL-1, IL-6, gamma interferon, and TNF-alpha in biopsies with severe inflammation in comparison with those with mild inflammation. During the acute stage of the disease, 20 of 24 patients exhibited acute inflammation in the rectal biopsies and the cellular infiltration was still extensive 30 days after the onset of diarrhea, although the disease was clinically resolved. In accordance with the histological findings, cytokine production was also upregulated during the convalescent phase; there was no significant difference (P

  18. Effect of probiotics Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on gut-derived lipopolysaccharides and inflammatory cytokines: an in vitro study using a human colonic microbiota model.

    PubMed

    Rodes, Laetitia; Khan, Afshan; Paul, Arghya; Coussa-Charley, Michael; Marinescu, Daniel; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Shao, Wei; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2013-04-01

    Gut-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are critical to the development and progression of chronic low-grade inflammation and metabolic diseases. In this study, the effects of probiotics Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on gut-derived lipopolysaccharide and inflammatory cytokine concentrations were evaluated using a human colonic microbiota model. Lactobacillus reuteri, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, Bifidobacterium animalis, B. bifidum, B. longum, and B. longum subsp. infantis were identified from the literature for their anti-inflammatory potential. Each bacterial culture was administered daily to a human colonic microbiota model during 14 days. Colonic lipopolysaccharides, and Gram-positive and negative bacteria were quantified. RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were stimulated with supernatant from the human colonic microbiota model. Concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-4 cytokines were measured. Lipopolysaccharide concentrations were significantly reduced with the administration of B. bifidum (-46.45 +/- 5.65%), L. rhamnosus (-30.40 +/- 5.08%), B. longum (-42.50 +/- 1.28%), and B. longum subsp. infantis (-68.85 +/- 5.32%) (p < 0.05). Cell counts of Gram-negative and positive bacteria were distinctly affected by the probiotic administered. There was a probiotic strain-specific effect on immunomodulatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. B. longum subsp. infantis demonstrated higher capacities to reduce TNF-alpha concentrations (-69.41 +/- 2.78%; p < 0.05) and to increase IL-4 concentrations (+16.50 +/- 0.59%; p < 0.05). Colonic lipopolysaccharides were significantly correlated with TNF-alpha and IL-1beta concentrations (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that specific probiotic bacteria, such as B. longum subsp. infantis, might decrease colonic lipopolysaccharide concentrations, which might reduce the proinflammatory tone. This study has noteworthy applications in the field of biotherapeutics for the prevention and/or treatment of inflammatory and metabolic

  19. Desflurane differentially affects the release of proinflammatory cytokines in plasma and bronchoalveolar fluid of endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed

    Boost, Kim A; Hofstetter, Christian; Flondor, Michael; Betz, Christian; Homann, Markus; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Muehl, Heiko; Zwissler, Bernhard

    2006-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that volatile anaesthetics can attenuate the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and other proinflammatory stimuli in vitro and in vivo. Thus far, no studies are available on the influences of desflurane on the cytokine-release. We therefore aimed to investigate the effects of desflurane on the systemic and pulmonary release of proinflammatory cytokines in endotoxemic rats. Eighteen anaesthetized and ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: LPS-only: Six animals received LPS (5 mg/kg, i.v.) with no further intervention. LPS-Desflurane: Six animals received continuous inhalation of 1MAC Desflurane before and during endotoxemia with LPS (5 mg/kg, i.v.). Sham: Six animals served as control without inhalation of desflurane and endotoxemia. After 4 h, levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma and bronchoalveolar fluid were analyzed. Nitrite production as a readout for nitric oxide (NO) release from alveolar macrophages was measured by Griess assay. IkappaB-alpha degradation and iNOS-protein in macrophage homogenates were determined by Western Blotting. Inhalation of desflurane during endotoxemia showed a significant decrease in release of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha (-61%, P< or =0.05) and IL-1beta (-47%, P< or =0.05) in plasma as compared to LPS-only group, whereas the release of IL-6 was not significantly affected by desflurane. Within the lung, the NO-release was notably increased in supernatants of cultured alveolar macrophages from desflurane-group compared to both LPS-only and Sham group. IkappaB-alpha degradation in alveolar macrophages was impaired in the Desflurane-group as compared to the LPS-only group. Our data implicate that inhalation of 1MAC Desflurane during experimental endotoxemia differentially affects the inflammatory response in rats. PMID:16685427

  20. Long-term exercise training selectively alters serum cytokines involved in fever.

    PubMed

    Rowsey, Pamela Johnson; Metzger, Bonnie L; Carlson, John; Gordon, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    Long-term exercise training selectively alters serum cytokines involved in fever. Chronic exercise training has a number of effects on the immune system that may mimic the physiological response to fever. Female rats that voluntarily exercise on running wheels develop an elevated daytime core temperature after several weeks of training. It remains to be seen whether the elevation in daytime temperature involves inflammatory patterns characteristic of an infectious fever. We assessed whether chronic exercise training in the rat would alter levels of cytokines involved in fever. Female Sprague Dawley rats at 45 days of age weighing 90-110 g were divided into two groups (exercise and sedentary) and housed at an ambient temperature of 22( degrees )C. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), iron, and zinc levels were analyzed. Rats underwent 8 weeks of exercise on running wheels. Exercise led to altered levels of some key cytokines that are involved in fever. Exercise animals had significantly higher IL-1beta levels and lower IL-10 levels compared to sedentary animals. Although IL-6 levels were slightly lower in the exercise animals, these levels were not significantly affected by training. TNF-alpha activity was similar in the two groups. Training also led to a slight increase in serum zinc and decrease in serum unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC). The data suggest that chronic exercise training evokes immune responses that mimic some, but not all, aspects of fever. This may explain why exercise leads to elevated daytime core temperature. PMID:19190031

  1. Antiviral activity of various interferons and pro-inflammatory cytokines in non-transformed cultured hepatocytes infected with hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Isorce, Nathalie; Testoni, Barbara; Locatelli, Maëlle; Fresquet, Judith; Rivoire, Michel; Luangsay, Souphalone; Zoulim, Fabien; Durantel, David

    2016-06-01

    In HBV-infected patients, therapies with nucleoside analogues or IFNα remain ineffective in eradicating the infection. Our aim was to re-analyze the anti-HBV activity of a large panel of IFNs and cytokines in vitro using non-transformed cultured hepatocytes infected with HBV, to identify new immune-therapeutic options. HepaRG cells and primary human hepatocytes were infected with HBV and, when infection was established, treated with various concentrations of different IFNs or inflammatory cytokines. Viral parameters were evaluated by quantifying HBV nucleic acids by qPCR and Southern Blot, and secreted HBV antigens were evaluated using ELISA. The cytokines tested were type-I IFNs, IFNγ, type-III IFNs, TNFα, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-18 as well as nucleos(t)ide analogues tenofovir and ribavirin. Cytokines and drugs, with the exception of IL-18 and ribavirin, exhibited a suppressive effect on HBV replication at least as strong as, but often stronger than, IFNα. The cytokine presenting the highest effect on HBV DNA was IL-1β, which exerted its inhibition within picomolar range. Importantly, we noticed differential effects on other parameters (HBV RNA, HBeAg, HBsAg) between both IFNs and inflammatory cytokines, thus suggesting different mechanisms of action. The combination of IL-1β and already used therapies, i.e. IFNα or tenofovir, demonstrated a stronger or similar anti-HBV activity. IL-1β was found to have a very potent antiviral effect against HBV in vitro. HBV was previously shown to promptly inhibit IL-1β production in Kupffer cells. Strategies aiming at unlocking this inhibition and restoring local production of IL-1β may help to further inhibit HBV replication in vivo. PMID:26971407

  2. Upregulation of cytokines is detected in the placentas of cattle infected with Neospora caninum and is more marked early in gestation when fetal death is observed.

    PubMed

    Rosbottom, Anne; Gibney, E Helen; Guy, Catherine S; Kipar, Anja; Smith, Robert F; Kaiser, Pete; Trees, Alexander J; Williams, Diana J L

    2008-06-01

    The protozoan parasite Neospora caninum causes fetal death after experimental infection of pregnant cattle in early gestation, but the fetus survives a similar infection in late gestation. An increase in Th1-type cytokines in the placenta in response to the presence of the parasite has been implicated as a contributory factor to fetal death due to immune-mediated pathological alterations. We measured, using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the levels of cytokines in the placentas of cattle experimentally infected with N. caninum in early and late gestation. After infection in early gestation, fetal death occurred, and the levels of mRNA of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), IL-12p40, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-18, IL-10, and IL-4, were significantly (P < 0.01) increased by up to 1,000-fold. There was extensive placental necrosis and a corresponding infiltration of CD4(+) T cells and macrophages. IFN-gamma protein expression was also highly increased, and a modest increase in transforming growth factor beta was detected. A much smaller increase in the same cytokines and IFN-gamma protein expression, with minimal placental necrosis and inflammatory infiltration, occurred after N. caninum infection in late gestation when the fetuses survived. Comparison of cytokine mRNA levels in separated maternal and fetal placental tissue that showed maternal tissue was the major source of all cytokine mRNA except for IL-10 and TNF-alpha, which were similar in both maternal and fetal tissues. These results suggest that the magnitude of the cytokine response correlates with but is not necessarily the cause of fetal death and demonstrate that a polarized Th1 response was not evident in the placentas of N. caninum-infected cattle. PMID:18362132

  3. Preliminary study of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the middle ear of acute otitis media due to Alloiococcus otitidis.

    PubMed

    Harimaya, Atsushi; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Himi, Tetsuo

    2009-05-01

    Alloiococcus otitidis is a newly discovered organism frequently detected in otitis media. However, the association of the organism with the development of otitis media has not been disclosed in detail yet. In the middle ear, proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines are released in association with infection by pathogens, and these cytokines contribute to the induction of an inflammatory reaction. To investigate the profile of inflammation-related cytokines in the acute phase of A. otitidis infection, we analyzed the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in middle ear effusions of acute otitis media due to A. otitidis, in comparison with acute otitis media due to the well-known Gram-positive middle ear pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. The amounts of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and CXC chemokines (IP-10, I-TAC) were significantly increased in the A. otitidis group as well as in the S. pneumoniae group. Various inflammation-related cytokines/chemokines were induced in the A. otitidis-infected middle ear, and the profile of cytokines was very similar to that in S. pneumoniae infection. This preliminary study suggests that A. otitidis has the potential to induce these cytokines, contributing to the development of an inflammatory reaction in the middle ear cavity in a similar manner to S. pneumoniae. PMID:19185927

  4. ORF3 of Hepatitis E Virus Inhibits the Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Chemotactic Factors in LPS-Stimulated Human PMA-THP1 Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lei, Qingsong; Li, Lin; Cai, Jia; Huang, Wenxiang; Qin, Bo; Zhang, Shujun

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the primary causative agents of acute hepatitis. It is noteworthy that HEV can develop chronic infection and even lead to liver cirrhosis; however, the mechanism has not been revealed. In this study, the ELISA assay was used to detect protein levels, and we found that HEV open reading frame 3 (ORF3) protein inhibited the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p40, and IL-18) and chemotactic factors (nitric oxide [NO], interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)] in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human PMA-THP1 cells. Further study showed that mRNA and protein levels of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2), decreased after infection of pLL3.7-ORF3 (pORF3); moreover, the inhibition produced corresponding upregulation of IκBα and downregulation of phosphorylated IκB kinase IKKɛ (p-IKKɛ) and phosphorylated nuclear factor (NF)-κB (p-NF-κB), but little variation was found in the concentration of IKKɛ and NF-κB. Taken together, our results demonstrated that HEV ORF3 attenuated LPS-induced cytokine production and chemotactic factors, predominantly by inhibiting various PRRs-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. The anti-inflammatory properties might be of great importance to clarify the role and mechanism of macrophages in chronic HEV infection and cirrhosis. PMID:26771290

  5. Glycine regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lean and monosodium glutamate-obese mice.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Aguilar, F J; Almanza-Perez, Julio; Blancas, Gerardo; Angeles, Selene; Garcia-Macedo, Rebeca; Roman, Ruben; Cruz, Miguel

    2008-12-01

    Fat tissue plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Increased visceral fat has been associated with a higher production of cytokines that triggers a low-grade inflammatory response, which eventually may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether glycine, an amino acid that represses the expression in vitro of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Kupffer and 3T3-L1 cells, can affect in vivo cytokine production in lean and monosodium glutamate-induced obese mice (MSG/Ob mice). Our data demonstrate that glycine treatment in lean mice suppressed TNF-alpha transcriptional expression in fat tissue, and serum protein levels of IL-6 were suppressed, while adiponectin levels were increased. In MSG/Ob mice, glycine suppressed TNF-alpha and IL-6 gene expression in fat tissue and significantly reduced protein levels of IL-6, resistin and leptin. To determine the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) in the modulation of this inflammatory response evoked by glycine, we examined its expression levels in fat tissue. Glycine clearly increased PPAR-gamma expression in lean mice but not in MSG/Ob mice. Finally, to identify alterations in glucose metabolism by glycine, we also examined insulin levels and other biochemical parameters during an oral glucose tolerance test. Glycine significantly reduced glucose tolerance and raised insulin levels in lean but not in obese mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that glycine suppresses the pro-inflammatory cytokines production and increases adiponectin secretion in vivo through the activation of PPAR-gamma. Glycine might prevent insulin resistance and associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:18930730

  6. Dose-dependent modulation of the in vitro cytokine production of human immune competent cells by lead salts.

    PubMed

    Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Emmrich, Frank; Adham, Khadiga; Wichmann, Gunnar; Lehmann, Irina; El-Massry, Azza; Ghoneim, Hossam; Lehmann, Jörg; Sack, Ulrich

    2005-07-01

    Lead pollution constitutes a major health problem that has been intensively debated. To reveal its effects on the immune response, the influence of lead on the in vitro cytokine production of human peripheral mononuclear blood cells was investigated. Isolated cells were exposed to lead acetate or lead chloride for 24 h in the presence of either heat-killed Salmonella enteritidis (hk-SE) or monoclonal antibodies (anti-CD3, anti-CD28, anti-CD40) as cell activators. Our results showed that while higher lead doses are toxic, lower ones evoke immunomodulatory effects. All tested lead doses significantly reduced cell vitality and/or proliferation and affected secretion of proinflammatory, T helper cell type (T(H))1 and T(H)2 cytokines. Expression of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was reduced at lower lead doses in both models of cell stimulation. Although hk-SE failed to induce detectable IL-4 levels, monoclonal antibody-induced IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion increased in the presence of lower lead doses. Also, levels of hk-SE-induced IL-10 and IL-6 secretion were increased at lower lead doses. Thus, exposure to lower doses leads to suppression of the T(H)1 cytokine IFN-gamma and the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. The elevated production of IL-4 and/or IL-10 can induce and maintain a T(H)2 immune response and might contribute to increased susceptibility to pathologic agents as well as the incidence of allergic hypersensitivity and/or T(H)2-dominated autoimmune diseases. PMID:15843504

  7. Nanoelectronic detection of triggered secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines using CMOS compatible silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Pui, Tze-Sian; Agarwal, Ajay; Ye, Feng; Huang, Yinxi; Chen, Peng

    2011-01-15

    Nanotechnology, such as nanoelectronic biosensors, is bringing new opportunities and tools to the studies of cell biology, clinical applications, and drug discovery. In this study, crystalline silicon nanowire based field-effect transistors fabricated using top-down approach were employed to parallelly detect pro-inflammatory cytokines in the complex biological fluids (cell culture medium and blood samples) with high specificity and femtomolar sensitivity. Using this technique, the dynamic secretion of TNF-alpha and IL6 was revealed during the immune response of macrophages and rats to the stimulation of bacteria endotoxin. This technique could provide a unique platform to examine the profile of complex immune responses for fundamental studies and diagnosis. PMID:20977978

  8. Mesoporous carbide-derived carbon with porosity tuned for efficient adsorption of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Yushin, Gleb; Hoffman, Elizabeth N; Barsoum, Michel W; Gogotsi, Yury; Howell, Carol A; Sandeman, Susan R; Phillips, Gary J; Lloyd, Andrew W; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2006-12-01

    Porous carbons can be used for the purification of various bio-fluids, including the cleansing blood of inflammatory mediators in conditions such as sepsis or auto-immune diseases. Here we show that the control of pore size in carbons is a key factor to achieving efficient removal of cytokines. In particular, the surface area accessible by the protein governs the rate and effectiveness of the adsorption process. We demonstrate that novel mesoporous carbon materials synthesized from ternary MAX-phase carbides can be optimized for efficient adsorption of large inflammatory proteins. The synthesized carbons, having tunable pore size with a large volume of slit-shaped mesopores, outperformed all other materials or methods in terms of efficiency of TNF-alpha removal and the results are comparable only with highly specific antibody-antigen interactions. PMID:16914195

  9. Macrophage cytokine response to particles and lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U; Barnes, F H; Charlebois, S J; Smith, R A

    2000-03-15

    Several investigators have suggested that biologic molecules adsorbed onto particles may play a key role in determining macrophage response. Adsorbed endotoxins (bacterial debris) may be of particular importance since they are widely present exogenously and endogenously and adhere strongly to many materials. Murine-transformed peritoneal macrophages (IC-21) were used in this in vitro study. Secretions of IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, and IL-6 were used as a measure of macrophage response to micron-range particles of high-density polyethylene and Co-Cr-Mo alloy, with and without adsorbed lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin. Little cytokine secretion was measured in response to particles (and to polypropylene experimental chambers) cleaned with ethanol and saline and not exposed to LPS. The lack of macrophage response to cleaned particles has been reported by others and may help reconcile conflicting reports in the literature. Cytokine secretion levels were high in all cases if the chambers (with or without particles) were exposed to LPS (and rinsed to minimize nonbound LPS). Secretion patterns were different with particles present and for polymer versus metal particles. Overall, these results suggest that (1) adsorbed molecules on material surfaces strongly affect macrophage response and (2) particle surface chemistry and microstructure affect the concentration and configuration of adsorbed molecules, further influencing particle interaction with macrophage surface receptors. PMID:10602080

  10. Cytokines and the molecular mechanisms of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Diehl, A M

    1999-09-01

    This manuscript was given as a plenary lecture at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism in July of 1999. It describes the general mechanisms by which tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, an injury-related cytokine, promotes liver regeneration and then details how TNF-initiated hepatotrophic signals are inhibited by chronic ethanol consumption. There is evidence that chronic ethanol exposure impairs the TNF-dependent activation of stress-activated protein kinases and some of their targets, including the growth-stimulatory DNA binding protein, c-Jun. Ethanol exposure also prevents TNF from activating the redox-sensitive transcription factor, NF kappa B, in regenerating hepatocytes. These effects are followed by decreased hepatocyte proliferation, as well as by impaired induction of TNF-regulated survival factors, such as Bcl-xL, in the liver. Thus, chronic ethanol consumption may damage the liver by inhibiting the hepatotrophic and hepatoprotective actions of TNFalpha and other growth-regulatory cytokines. PMID:10512305

  11. Anti-Ehrlichia chaffeensis antibody complexed with E. chaffeensis induces potent proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression in human monocytes through sustained reduction of IkappaB-alpha and activation of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E H; Rikihisa, Y

    1997-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that infects monocytes and macrophages and is the etiologic agent of human ehrlichiosis in the United States. Our previous studies showed that the exposure of human monocytes to E. chaffeensis induces the expression of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-8, and IL-10 genes in vitro but not the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 mRNAs. In this study, the effect of anti-E. chaffeensis antibody complexed with E. chaffeensis on the expression of major proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes was examined. Human monocytic cell line THP-1 was treated with E. chaffeensis which had been preincubated with human anti-E. chaffeensis serum for 2 h, and the levels of cytokine mRNAs were evaluated by competitive reverse transcription-PCR. Anti-E. chaffeensis antibody complexed with E. chaffeensis significantly enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1beta in THP-1 cells. The expression of TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNAs was also induced. The levels of secreted IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 during 24 h of stimulation were comparable to those induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide at 1 microg/ml. Fab fragment of anti-E. chaffeensis immunoglobulin G complexed with E. chaffeensis did not induce any of these three cytokines, indicating that ehrlichial binding is required for IL-1beta mRNA expression and that binding of the immune complex to the Fc gamma receptor is required for TNF-alpha and IL-6 mRNA expression and enhanced IL-1beta mRNA expression. Furthermore, prolonged degradation of IkappaB-alpha and activation of NF-kappaB were demonstrated in THP-1 cells exposed to anti-E. chaffeensis serum and E. chaffeensis. This result implies that development of anti-E. chaffeensis antibody in patients can result in the production of major proinflammatory cytokines, which may play an important role in the pathophysiology of ehrlichiosis and immune responses to it. PMID:9199464

  12. Induction of heme oxygenase 1 by arsenite inhibits cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xi; Pi Jingbo; Liu Wenlan; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian; Feng Changjian

    2009-04-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an oxidative stress responsive gene upregulated by various physiological and exogenous stimuli. Arsenite, as an oxidative stressor, is a potent inducer of HO-1 in human and rodent cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of arsenite-induced HO-1 in modulating tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Arsenite pretreatment, which upregulated HO-1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 protein expression by 50% and 40%, respectively. Importantly, knockdown of HO-1 by small interfering RNA abolished the arsenite-induced inhibitory effects. These results indicate that induction of HO-1 by arsenite inhibits the cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC by suppressing adhesion molecule expression. These findings established an important mechanistic link between the functional monocyte adhesion properties of HUVEC and the induction of HO-1 by arsenite.

  13. [An experimental study of the anti-inflammatory action of noopept and its effect on the level of cytokines].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, S V; Kovalenko, L P; Tallerova, A V; Gudasheva, T A; Durnev, A D

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of noopept (dipeptide analog of piracetam) upon a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration at doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg in comparison to the reference drug diclofenac (10 mg/kg, i.p.) have been studied on a model of acute exudative inflammation induced by carrageenan in outbred rats and concanavalin A (Con A) in CBA mice. The level of cytokines was studied on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model (single administration, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) with 5-day administration of noopept at a dose of 5 mg/kg (i.p., before endotoxin injection) in C57BL/6 mice. The administration of noopept led to a significant suppression of the inflammatory response to both carrageenan and Con A. The administration of Con A caused a 16-fold increase in the level of IL-6 interleukin in the blood serum of mice as compared to control. Noopept (5 mg/kg) reduced the level of IL-6 by a factor of 1.8 in the inflammatory response to Con A. The administration of LPS led to pronounced increase in the levels ofpro-inflammatory IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the blood serum of test mice as compared to intact animals. The course administration of noopept (5 mg/kg) significantly decreased the level of IL-6 and reduced by half the level of TNF-alpha. PMID:23156084

  14. 1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine release via suppression of NF-{kappa}B p65 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Xiaojie; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Nawa, Yuko; Miura, Naoki; Shrestha, Binita; Tancharoen, Salunya; Sameshima, Hisayo; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2009-03-06

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates macrophages by activating NF-{kappa}B, which contributes to the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6. 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose (1,5-AF), a monosaccharide formed from starch and glycogen, exhibits anti-oxidant activity and enhances insulin secretion. This study examined the effects of 1,5-AF on LPS-induced inflammatory reactions and elucidated its molecular mechanisms. Before LPS challenge, mice were pretreated with 1,5-AF (38.5 mg/kg). We found that 1,5-AF pretreatment attenuated cytokine release into the serum, including TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Furthermore, pretreatment with 1,5-AF (500 {mu}g/ml) attenuated cytokine release, and 1,5-AF directly inhibited the nuclear translocalization of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit in LPS-stimulated murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. This inhibition was responsible for decreased LPS-induced phosphorylation on Ser536 of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit, which is a posttranslational modification involved in the non-canonical pathway. Collectively, these findings indicate that the anti-inflammatory activity of 1,5-AF occurs via inactivation of NF-{kappa}B.

  15. Interleukin-10 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide suppresses IL-10 expression and effects on proinflammatory cytokine responses to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Charerntantanakul, Wasin; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2010-08-01

    Upregulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression has been suggested to be the mechanism by which the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) suppresses the innate and adaptive immune response in infected pigs. In this study we evaluated the potential of phosphorothioate-modified IL-10 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide specific to the translation initiation region of porcine IL-10 mRNA (IL-10AS) in enhancing proinflammatory cytokine responses to PRRSV. Naïve peripheral blood mononuclear cells from eight PRRSV-seronegative pigs were transfected with IL-10AS in vitro prior to PRRSV inoculation and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin or concanavalin A stimulation. The effects of IL-10AS on mRNA expression of IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IFN-alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-2, and IL-4 were tested by real-time PCR. The percentages of IFN-gamma-producing T-cell subsets were determined by flow cytometry. Compared to the controls, the levels of IL-10 and IL-2 mRNA were significantly reduced, while those of IFN-gamma mRNA were increased, and TNF-alpha, IFN-alpha, and IL-4 mRNA were unchanged. An increase in the percentage of the IFN-gamma+ population was also observed in lymphocytes and CD8beta+ T cells. Our results suggest that IL-10AS has the potential to enhance proinflammatory cytokine responses to PRRSV infection. PMID:20712487

  16. Depressed type 1 cytokine synthesis by superantigen-activated CD4+ T cells of women with human papillomavirus-related high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bang-Ning; Follen, Michele; Shen, De-Yu; Malpica, Anais; Adler-Storthz, Karen; Shearer, William T; Reuben, James M

    2004-03-01

    Carcinoma of the cervix is causally related to infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), and T cells play a pivotal role in the immune response of the host to rid itself of HPV infection. Therefore, we assessed the T-cell function of women with HPV-related cervical neoplasia against a superantigen, Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB). Each woman provided a cervical brush specimen for HPV DNA testing and Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for the staging of cervical lesions. They also provided a blood specimen for determination of the ability of CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells to synthesize Th1 (interleukin-2 [IL-2], gamma interferon [IFN-gamma], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha]) and Th2 (IL-10) cytokines in response to activation with SEB. Compared with control subjects with self-attested negative Pap smears, women with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) had significantly lower percentages of activated CD4(+) T cells that produced IL-2 (P = 0.045), IFN-gamma (P = 0.040), and TNF-alpha (P = 0.015) and a significantly lower percentage of activated CD8(+) T cells that produced IL-2 (P < 0.01). These data indicate that women with HPV-related cervical HSIL show a decrease in Th1 cytokine production by activated CD4(+) T cells and suggested that compromised T-helper functions may negatively impact the function of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. PMID:15013969

  17. Experimental and clinical studies of cytokine gene-modified tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tepper, R I; Mulé, J J

    1994-02-01

    Cytokines are key modulators of host immune and inflammatory responses. The expression of cytokine genes by tumor cells as a result of gene transfer has emerged as a novel strategy to augment in vivo host reactivity to various cancers. This review summarizes the knowledge obtained from experimental systems using this strategy and provides information on the current clinical trials employing this approach. In murine model systems, immunization with tumors expressing certain cytokines [e.g., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-7 (IL-7), and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating (GM-CSF)] has demonstrated their ability to promote the generation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by various mechanisms; in some cases, significant regressions of established microscopic tumor deposits result. Non T cell mechanisms of tumor killing, such as granulocytic inflammatory responses, may also be elicited by the localized elaboration of certain cytokines [e.g., IL-4, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)]. The potency of antitumor immune potentiation by cytokines, however, remains to be established by further animal studies and emerging clinical trials. The genetic modification of tumors for the expression of immunostimulatory gene products holds promise as a new approach for active immunotherapy of cancer and for the isolation of effector cell populations for use in adoptive immunotherapy protocols. PMID:8186297

  18. Proinflammatory cytokines and HIV-1 synergistically enhance CXCL10 expression in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rachel; Dhillon, Navneet K; Hegde, Sonia T; Yao, Honghong; Peng, Fuwang; Callen, Shannon; Chebloune, Yahia; Davis, Randall L; Buch, Shilpa J

    2009-05-01

    HIV encephalitis (HIVE), the pathologic correlate of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) is characterized by astrogliosis, cytokine/chemokine dysregulation, and neuronal degeneration. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation is actively involved in the pathogenesis of HAD. In fact, the severity of HAD/HIVE correlates more closely with the presence of activated glial cells than with the presence and amount of HIV-infected cells in the brain. Astrocytes, the most numerous cell type within the brain, provide an important reservoir for the generation of inflammatory mediators, including interferon-gamma inducible peptide-10 (CXCL10), a neurotoxin and a chemoattractant, implicated in the pathophysiology of HAD. Additionally, the proinflammatory cytokines, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, are also markedly increased in CNS tissues during HIV-1 infection. In this study, we hypothesized that the interplay of host cytokines and HIV-1 could lead to enhanced expression of the toxic chemokine, CXCL10. Our findings demonstrate a synergistic induction of CXCL10 mRNA and protein in human astrocytes exposed to HIV-1 and the proinflammatory cytokines. Signaling molecules, including JAK, STATs, MAPK (via activation of Erk1/2, AKT, and p38), and NF-kappaB were identified as instrumental in the synergistic induction of CXCL10. Understanding the mechanisms involved in HIV-1 and cytokine-mediated up-regulation of CXCL10 could aid in the development of therapeutic modalities for HAD. PMID:18985732

  19. LPS priming potentiates and prolongs proinflammatory cytokine response to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-02-15

    Simultaneous exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly amplifies induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression as well as IL-1-driven lymphocyte apoptosis by trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) in the mouse. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that LPS priming will sensitize a host to DON-induced proinflammatory cytokine induction and apoptosis. In mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg bw) ip. and treated 8 h later with DON po., the minimum DON doses for inducing IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} serum proteins and splenic mRNAs were significantly lower than the DON doses required for vehicle-primed mice. LPS priming also decreased onset time and dramatically increased magnitude and duration of cytokine responses. LPS-primed mice maintained heightened sensitivity to DON for up to 24 h. LPS priming doses as low as 50 {mu}g/kg bw evoked sensitization. DNA fragmentation analysis and flow cytometry also revealed that mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg) for 8 h and exposed to DON (12.5 mg/kg) exhibited massive thymocyte loss by apoptosis 12 h later compared to mice exposed to DON or LPS alone. LPS priming decreased DON-induced p38 and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was not involved in increased cytokine responses. Taken together, exposure to LPS rendered mice highly susceptible to DON induction of cytokine expression and this correlated with increased apoptosis in the thymus.

  20. Proinflammatory cytokine expression contributes to brain injury provoked by chronic monocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Sirén, A. L.; McCarron, R.; Wang, L.; Garcia-Pinto, P.; Ruetzler, C.; Martin, D.; Hallenbeck, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have proposed that an increased interaction between monocyte/macrophages and blood vessel endothelium predisposes subjects to strokes. The effect of chronic monocyte activation on the development of cerebral infarcts was thus studied in rats after provocation of a modified local Swartzman reaction, in brain vasculature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two weeks after an IV bolus of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), we studied spontaneous superoxide production, integrin expression, endothelial adhesion of monocytes and the neurological symptoms, brain histology, and cytokine immunoreactivity after a provocative dose of LPS (30-300 microg/rat i.c.v.). RESULTS: Monocyte migration into the brain was stimulated by BCG priming. The incidence of paralysis and death in response to LPS was markedly increased in BCG-primed rats. Histological evaluation of the brains of neurologically impaired and moribund animals revealed intravascular thrombosis and pale and hemorrhagic infarcts. Infiltrates of leukocytes expressing immunoreactive IL-1:, IL-6, and TNF-alpha were found around blood vessels, cerebral ventricles, and meninges, and were accompanied by a profound microglial expression of IL1P, endothelial expression of IL-6, and expression of TNF-alpha and TNF-R 1 in glia and neurons of cortex and hippocampus. Treatment (2 x 100 microg/10 ,I, i.c.v.) with recombinant human (rh-)TNF 55kDa receptor completely prevented, and treatment with rh-IL- I receptor antagonist significantly decreased the incidence of paralysis and death in response to BCG + LPS. The improvement of neurological symptoms was accompanied by reduced histological damage and supppression of IL-1P/ expression in the brain tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The data demonstrate that chronic monocyte activation predisposes subjects to thrombosis and hemorrhage via an exaggerated release of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:11471566

  1. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein expression by growth factors and cytokines alters IGF-mediated proliferation of postnatal lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Price, Wayne A

    2004-06-01

    Postnatal day 5 is the beginning of septation and the peak of postnatal fibroblast proliferation. The author and colleagues studied fibroblasts from this developmental time period to determine factors that regulate cell proliferation. Exposure of cells to insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I for 48 hours increased cell number whereas exposure to epithelial growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7, FGF-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), or interleukin (L)-1beta did not alter cell number. Long[R3]IGF-I (a synthetic IGF analog with reduced affinity for IGF-binding proteins [IGFBPs]) was more potent than IGF-I, with half-maximal stimulation at a dose of 0.6 nM for long[R3]IGF-I compared to 1.5 nM for IGF-I, suggesting that IGFBPs in the conditioned medium (CM) inhibit IGF activity. Addition of exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the IGF-stimulated increase in cell number. Addition of IGFBP-4 did not alter IGF activity because IGF-I stimulated proteolysis of IGFBP-4. The expression of mRNA for PAPP-A (a known IGFBP-4 protease) suggests that the clearance of IGFBP-4 is mediated by pregnancy-associated plasma protein (PAPP)-A. Exposure of cells to TNF-alpha or IL-1beta increased IGFBP-3 mRNA abundance and IGFBP-3 protein in CM. PDGF-BB and IL-1beta increased IGFBP-4 protein abundance and PDGF-BB and dibutyryl cAMP increased IGFBP-4 mRNA. The increase in CM IGFBP-3 following TNF-alpha exposure blocked IGF-mediated cell proliferation, suggesting that the growth factor- and cytokine-mediated changes in IGFBP abundance regulate postnatal fibroblast cell proliferation. PMID:15204833

  2. Cytokines modulate the sensitivity of human fibroblasts to stimulation with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) by altering endogenous IGF-binding protein production.

    PubMed

    Yateman, M E; Claffey, D C; Cwyfan Hughes, S C; Frost, V J; Wass, J A; Holly, J M

    1993-04-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts produce a number of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) including the main circulating form, IGFBP-3. It has been suggested that the regulation of IGFBP secretion may play a major role in modulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) bioactivity. We have quantified the effects of two cytokines, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) which have opposing actions on fibroblast IGFBP-3 production, and examined their subsequent role in IGF-I mitogenesis. TGF-beta 1 caused a dose-dependent increase in IGFBP-3 in serum-free fibroblast-conditioned media. TGF-beta 1 (1 microgram/l) resulted in immunoreactive IGFBP-3 levels reaching 286.5 +/- 22.4% of control after 20 h, the increase being confirmed by Western ligand blot. TNF-alpha caused a dose-dependent decrease in fibroblast IGFBP-3 secretion, 1 microgram TNF-alpha/l reducing IGFBP-3 levels to 32.1 +/- 11.% of control. This effect was not due to cytotoxicity and was not cell-density-dependent. Fibroblast proliferation was examined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric cytochemical bioassay. The addition of IGF-I resulted in dose-dependent growth stimulation after 48 h, the effective range being 20-100 micrograms/l. The IGF-I analogue Long-R3-IGF-I which has little affinity for the IGFBPs was approximately 20-fold more potent in this assay, and was unaffected by exogenous IGFBP-3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7684061

  3. Interleukin-12 gene expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages stimulated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG: cytokine regulation and effect of NK cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, H; Suzuki, K; Tsuyuguchi, K; Tanaka, E; Amitani, R; Maeda, A; Yamamoto, K; Sasada, M; Kuze, F

    1997-01-01

    Macrophage-derived interleukin-12 (IL-12) is essential for the activation of a protective immune response against intracellular pathogens. In this study, we examined the regulation of IL-12 mRNA expression by monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG stimulation. A reverse transcription-PCR assay detected p40 mRNA of IL-12 at 3 h and showed a peak at 6 to 12 h with a subsequent decline. Semiquantitation of mRNA levels by competitive PCR revealed that pretreatment with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) amplified the expression approximately 100-fold, while pretreatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor augmented this expression about 10-fold. In contrast, pretreatment with IL-10 and IL-4 inhibited IL-12 mRNA expression. These results were further confirmed by measuring the p70 bioactive protein level in each conditioned medium by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Since IL-12 mRNA expression was weak without cytokine pretreatment and IFN-gamma strongly augmented production, we speculated that IFN-gamma might have a role in BCG stimulation of IL-12 mRNA expression. Unexpectedly, the addition of three different kinds of anti-IFN-gamma antibodies and anti-IFN-gamma receptor antibody and the coaddition of anti-TNF-alpha antibody with anti-IFN-gamma receptor antibody all failed to inhibit IL-12 mRNA expression. However, the MiniMACS method used to remove NK cells from a mononuclear cell suspension inhibited the expression of p40 mRNA but not the expression of mRNA of TNF-alpha or IL-1beta. We concluded that the coexistence of NK cells was essential for the induction of IL-12 in MDM stimulated with BCG rather than through the secretion of IFN-gamma. PMID:9353012

  4. The severity of liver fibrosis is associated with high leptin levels in chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Piche, T; Vandenbos, F; Abakar-Mahamat, A; Vanbiervliet, G; Barjoan, E M; Calle, G; Giudicelli, J; Ferrua, B; Laffont, C; Benzaken, S; Tran, A

    2004-01-01

    Recent attention has focused on the liver profibrogenic role of leptin in animal models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of leptin and TNF-alpha in the severity of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). We used a radioimmunoassay to determine serum leptin concentrations in 77 consecutive patients with CHC and 22 healthy controls. Leptin was correlated with liver histological (METAVIR) and metabolic indices. Sixty five patients had none to moderate liver fibrosis (F0-F2) and twelve severe fibrosis (F3-F4). Steatosis was observed in all but 27 patients. Leptin was significantly increased in patients compared with controls and was significantly more elevated in females both in patients and controls. The age, age at infection, prothrombin index, body mass index (BMI), triglycerides, glycaemia, ferritin, leptin and TNF-alpha, were associated with severe fibrosis. Steatosis was significantly more pronounced in patients with severe than those without or moderate fibrosis (P = 0.04). Only leptin was significantly and independently associated with severe fibrosis (OR = 1.2, CI 95%: 1.1-1.4, P = 0.03). Leptin was significantly associated with BMI (r = 0.64, P < 0.001) and glycaemia (r = 0.43, P < 0.001). Significant correlations were found between steatosis and BMI (r = 0.30, P < 0.01) and glycaemia (r = 0.30, P < 0.01). In patients with CHC and higher BMI and glycaemia levels, the severity of liver fibrosis is associated with serum leptin. TNF-alpha is a putative candidate involved in the mechanism. PMID:14738564

  5. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-3 (SOCS-3) Induces Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin Type 9 (PCSK9) Expression in Hepatic HepG2 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ruscica, Massimiliano; Ricci, Chiara; Macchi, Chiara; Magni, Paolo; Cristofani, Riccardo; Liu, Jingwen; Corsini, Alberto; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-02-12

    The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are negative regulators of the JAK/STAT pathway activated by proinflammatory cytokines, including the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). SOCS3 is also implicated in hypertriglyceridemia associated to insulin resistance. Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) levels are frequently found to be positively correlated to insulin resistance and plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglycerides concentrations. The present study aimed to investigate the possible role of TNF-α and JAK/STAT pathway on de novo lipogenesis and PCSK9 expression in HepG2 cells. TNF-α induced both SOCS3 and PCSK9 in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was inhibited by transfection with siRNA anti-STAT3, suggesting the involvement of the JAK/STAT pathway. Retroviral overexpression of SOCS3 in HepG2 cells (HepG2(SOCS3)) strongly inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and induced PCSK9 mRNA and protein, with no effect on its promoter activity and mRNA stability. Consistently, siRNA anti-SOCS3 reduced PCSK9 mRNA levels, whereas an opposite effect was observed with siRNA anti-STAT3. In addition, HepG2(SOCS3) express higher mRNA levels of key enzymes involved in the de novo lipogenesis, such as fatty-acid synthase, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)-1, and apoB. These responses were associated with a significant increase of SCD-1 protein, activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1), accumulation of cellular triglycerides, and secretion of apoB. HepG2(SOCS3) show lower phosphorylation levels of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) Tyr(896) and Akt Ser(473) in response to insulin. Finally, insulin stimulation produced an additive effect with SOCS3 overexpression, further inducing PCSK9, SREBP-1, fatty acid synthase, and apoB mRNA. In conclusion, our data candidate PCSK9 as a gene involved in lipid metabolism regulated by proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in a SOCS3-dependent manner. PMID:26668321

  6. Plasma Cytokine Concentrations Indicate In-vivo Hormonal Regulation of Immunity is Altered During Long-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crician, Brian E.; Zwart, Sara R.; Mehta, Satish; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aspects of immune system dysregulation associated with long-duration spaceflight have yet to be fully characterized, and may represent a clinical risk to crewmembers during deep space missions. Plasma cytokine concentration may serve as an indicator of in vivo physiological changes or immune system mobilization. Methods: The plasma concentrations of 22 cytokines were monitored in 28 astronauts during long-duration spaceflight onboard the International Space Station. Blood samples were collected three times before flight, 3-5 times during flight (depending on mission duration), at landing and 30 days post-landing. Analysis was performed by bead array immunoassay. Results: With few exceptions, minimal detectable mean plasma levels (<10 pg/ml) were observed at baseline (launch minus 180) for innate inflammatory cytokines or adaptive regulatory cytokines, however IL-1ra and several chemokines were constitutively present. An increase in the plasma concentration IL-8, IL-1ra, Tpo, CCL4, CXCL5, TNF(alpha), GM-CSF and VEGF was observed associated with spaceflight. Significant post-flight increases were observed for IL-6 and CCL2. No significant alterations were observed during or following spaceflight for adaptive/T-regulatory cytokines (IL-2, IFN(gamma), IL-17, IL4, IL-5, IL-10). Conclusions: This pattern of cytokine dysregulation suggests multiple physiological adaptations persist during flight, including inflammation, leukocyte recruitment, angiogenesis and thrombocyte regulation.

  7. Hepatic acute phase proteins--regulation by IL-6- and IL-1-type cytokines involving STAT3 and its crosstalk with NF-κB-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Bode, Johannes G; Albrecht, Ute; Häussinger, Dieter; Heinrich, Peter C; Schaper, Fred

    2012-01-01

    The function of the liver as an important constituent of the immune system involved in innate as well as adaptive immunity is warranted by different highly specialized cell populations. As the major source of acute phase proteins, including secreted pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), short pentraxins, components of the complement system or regulators of iron metabolism, hepatocytes are essential constituents of innate immunity and largely contribute to the control of a systemic inflammatory response. The production of acute phase proteins in hepatocytes is controlled by a variety of different cytokines released during the inflammatory process with IL-1- and IL-6-type cytokines as the leading regulators operating both as a cascade and as a network having additive, inhibitory, or synergistic regulatory effects on acute phase protein expression. Hence, IL-1β substantially modifies IL-6-induced acute phase protein production as it almost completely abrogates production of acute phase proteins such as γ-fibrinogen, α(2)-macroglobulin or α(1)-antichymotrypsin, whereas production of for example hepcidin, C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A is strongly up-regulated. This switch-like regulation of IL-6-induced acute phase protein production by IL-1β is due to a complex processing of the intracellular signaling events activated in response to IL-6 and/or IL-1β, with the crosstalk between STAT3- and NF-κB-mediated signal transduction being of particular importance. Recent data suggest that in this context complex formation between STAT3 and the p65 subunit of NF-κB might be of key importance. The present review summarizes the regulation of acute phase protein production focusing on the role of the crosstalk of STAT3- and NF-κB-driven pathways for transcriptional control of acute phase gene expression. PMID:22093287

  8. Dynamic Changes of Treg and Th17 Cells and Related Cytokines Closely Correlate With the Virological and Biochemical Response in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Undergoing Nucleos(t)ide Analogues Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xue-Ping; Guo, Ru-Yi; Su, Mi-Long; Ming, De-Song; Lin, Cheng-Zu; Deng, Yong; Lin, Zhen-Zhong; Su, Zhi-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background: The restoration of HBV-specific T-cell response during antiviral therapy is associated with CD4+T-cell activity. Treg cells and Th17 cells are subtypes of CD4+T cell. However, it has remained unknown how the Treg and Th17 cells and their associated cytokines affect nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) antiviral efficacy. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to provide a new insight to evaluate the NA antiviral therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Patients and Methods: Forty-four CHB patients hospitalized between July 2010 and August 2011 were enrolled in this study. They were received NA (entecavir, lamivudine and adefovir) treatment for 14.42 ± 13.08 weeks, and the peripheral blood was collected. The frequencies of Treg and Th17 cells were detected by flow cytometric analysis, and the levels of IL-10, TGF-β1, IL-17 and IL-23 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In complete and partial-responders, Treg cells frequencies and IL-10, TGF-β1, IL-23 levels were all decreased significantly after NA therapy, while Th17 cells and the IL-17 levels were increased slightly. Treg/Th17 ratio was only dramatically declined in complete-responders. But there was no significant difference in non-responders. Either HBV DNA decreased by at least 2 log copies /mL or ALT turned to normal level, Treg cells frequencies and IL-10, TGF-β1, IL-23 levels were significantly reduced. Meanwhile, Treg cells were positively correlated with HBV DNA and ALT. Conclusions: The changes of Treg and Th17 cells and their associated cytokines were related to virological and biochemical responses. PMID:24403916

  9. Cytokines evaluation in nasal lavage of allergic children after Bacillus clausii administration: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Tosca, Maria Angela; Milanese, Manlio; Caligo, Giacomo; Ricca, Vittorio

    2004-04-01

    Respiratory infections are very frequent in children. Bacillus clausii has been demonstrated to exert some immunomodulatory activities and to be safe. We conducted a study to investigate whether B. clausii administration in allergic children with recurrent respiratory infections might modulate cytokine pattern. Ten children (mean age 4.4 yr) attending the nursery school were enrolled at the end of school year (i.e. in the summer). Bacillus clausii spores (Enterogermina): 2 billion spores per vial) were administered at the dosage schedule of two vials a day for 4 wk. A panel of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, interferon (IFN)-gamma, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, was measured by immunoassay in the fluid recovered from nasal lavage, performed before and after the treatment. Bacillus clausii treatment induced a significant decrease of IL-4 levels (p < 0.01) and a significant increase of IFN-gamma (p < 0.05), IL-12 (p < 0.001), TGF-beta (p < 0.05), and IL-10 (p < 0.05) levels. Other cytokines were not significantly modified. In conclusion, this study shows that the B. clausii may exert immunomodulating activity by affecting cytokine pattern at nasal level in allergic children with recurrent respiratory infections. PMID:15059191

  10. The acai flavonoid velutin is a potent anti-inflammatory agent: Blockade of LPS-mediated TNF-alpha and IL-6 production through inhibiting NF-kappa B activation and MAPK pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have shown that some flavonoids are modulators for pro-inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, velutin, an unique flavone isolated from the pulp of acai fruit (Euterpe oleracea Mart.), was examined for its effects in reducing lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytoki...

  11. Cytokine gene expression and activation of NF-{kappa}B in aniline-induced splenic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Kannan, Subburaj; Li Hui; Firoze Khan, M. . E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

    2005-02-15

    Exposure to aniline results in selective toxicity to the spleen, leading to a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats, and fibrosis appears to be an important initiating preneoplastic lesion of the spleen. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which aniline leads to fibrogenic response is not well understood. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload and induction of oxidative stress in the spleen. We hypothesized that aniline-induced oxidative stress in the spleen causes transcriptional up-regulation of fibrogenic cytokines via activation of redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). To test this hypothesis, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline hydrochloride via drinking water for 30 days. Cytokine mRNAs were measured by real-time quantitative PCR, while cytokine release was determined in the supernatants of the cultured splenocytes using specific ELISAs. IL-1{alpha}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha} mRNA levels showed 6.9-, 2.9-, and 2.6-fold increases, respectively, in the spleens of aniline-treated rats in comparison to the controls. The increases in mRNA levels were associated with enhanced secretion of these cytokines in the splenocyte culture supernatants. NF-{kappa}B p65 level in the nuclear extracts of cultured splenocytes of aniline-treated rats showed a 2-fold increase in comparison to the controls as quantitated by NF-{kappa}B p65-specific ELISA. The binding activity of NF-{kappa}B, determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), also showed an increase in NF-{kappa}B binding in the nuclear extracts of the splenocytes from aniline-treated rats. The specificity of NF-{kappa}B binding was further confirmed by supershift assays. The results indicate that aniline exposure causes enhanced expression of IL-1{alpha}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha}, both at mRNA and protein levels, suggesting their role in splenic fibrosis. Also, the increased NF-{kappa}B binding activity suggests

  12. Immune-enhancing diet and cytokine expression during chronic sepsis: an immune-enhancing diet containing L-arginine, fish oil, and RNA fragments promotes intestinal cytokine expression during chronic sepsis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ryan T; Matheson, Paul J; Mays, Michael P; Garrison, R Neal

    2006-01-01

    Chronic feeding with enteral immune-enhancing diets (IEDs) provides benefits based on composition of the diet, route of feeding, and timing of feeding in relation to timing of trauma or surgery. Our prior studies of acute feeding in naïve rats demonstrated that IED promotes blood flow and proinflammatory cytokines in the ileum. We hypothesized that chronic feeding with IED would shift gut immune status to an anti-inflammatory state during chronic sepsis, resulting in an altered state of cytokine expression in the gut. Five days prior to feeding, gauze was implanted subcutaneously in the backs of male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were fed for 3 days with either control diet (CD, Boost; Mead-Johnson, Evansville, IL) or IED (Impact; Novartis) and randomly assigned to one of four groups: saline control (NS) + control diet (CD), sepsis (EC) + CD, NS + IED, or EC + IED. EC rats were inoculated with 10(9) CFU Escherichia coli and 10(9) CFU Bacteroides fragilis in 2 ml normal saline into the back sponge while NS rats received 2 mL normal saline alone. After 3 days, animals were anesthetized and gut tissue samples were harvested and frozen at -80 degrees C. Tissue protein was extracted and ELISA was performed for interleukin (IL-1beta, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and interferon (IFN)-gamma. In saline controls, IED feeding decreased IL-1beta, IL-5, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma and increased IL-10 compared with CD-fed animals. In septic animals, IED feeding increased IL-5 and IL-6, while decreasing IFN-gamma and IL-10 in the distal third of the small intestine compared with CD-fed septic rats, whereas IL-1beta and TNF-alpha levels were unchanged. Chronic IED feeding produced a anti-inflammatory state via decreased IFN-gamma and increased IL-5 and IL-6, which both promote gut IgA class switching, suggesting that the gut is shifted toward humoral immunity during chronic IED feeding in septic rats. PMID:16368490

  13. Characterization of oak and birch dust-induced expression of cytokines and chemokines in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Juha; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Luukkonen, Ritva; Lauerma, Antti; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Alenius, Harri; Savolainen, Kai

    2005-11-01

    Occupational exposure to wood dust is related to several respiratory diseases, such as allergic rhinitis, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. However, virtually nothing is known about molecular mechanisms behind wood dust-induced pulmonary inflammation. To elucidate the effects of wood dust exposure on cytokine and chemokine expression in murine macrophage cell line cells, mouse RAW 264.7 cells were exposed to two selected hardwood dusts, oak and birch. TiO2 and LPS were used as controls. Expression patterns of several cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR system and by ELISA. Exposure to birch dust caused a major increase in TNF-alpha and IL-6 protein levels whereas a weaker induction of TNF-alpha protein was found after exposure to oak dust. Inorganic TiO2 dust did not induce significant cytokine expression. With respect to the chemokines, a dose-dependent, about 10-fold induction of CCL2 mRNA and protein was found after exposure to birch dust. Oak dust induced weakly CCL2 protein. Similarly, birch dust induced a strong expression of CCL3, CCL4, and CXCL2/3 mRNA whereas only moderate levels of these chemokine mRNAs were detected after oak dust exposure. In contrast, expression of CCL24 mRNA was inhibited by more than 40-fold by both oak and birch dusts. TiO2 dust induced about five-fold expression of CCL3 and CCL4 mRNA but did not affect significantly other chemokines. These results suggest that exposure to birch or oak dusts may influence the development of the inflammatory process in the airways by modulating the expression of macrophage-derived cytokines and chemokines. PMID:16122864

  14. Cytokines and persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and B or Epstein-Barr virus often cause chronic viral infections in humans. Persistence of these viruses in the host is associated with a dramatic loss of T-cell immune response due to functional T-cell exhaustion. Developing efficient immunotherapeutic approaches to prevent viral persistence and/or to restore a highly functional T-cell mediated immunity remains a major challenge. During the last two decades, numerous studies aimed to identify relevant host-derived factors that could be modulated to achieve this goal. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the role of cytokines in preventing or facilitating viral persistence. We concentrate on the impact of multiple relevant cytokines in T-cell dependent immune response to chronic viral infection and the potential for using cytokines as therapeutic agents in mice and humans. PMID:26907634

  15. Unilaterally and rapidly progressing white matter lesion and elevated cytokines in a patient with Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Tomomi; Shimizu, Jun; Goto, Tamako; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Mori, Masato; Takahashi, Naoto; Namba, Eiji; Yamagata, Takanori; Momoi, Mariko Y

    2010-03-01

    We report the case of a girl with Tay-Sachs disease who had convulsions and deteriorated rapidly after an upper respiratory infection at the age of 11 months. At the age of 16 months, her seizures became intractable and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and marked swelling in the white matter and basal nucelei of the right hemisphere. Her seizures and right hemisphere lesion improved with glycerol and dexamethasone treatment. When dexamethasone was discontinued, her symptoms worsened and lesions later appeared in the left hemisphere. Her cerebrospinal fluid showed elevated levels of the cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-5. It is considered that inflammation contributes to disease progression in Tay-Sachs disease. PMID:19278800

  16. Coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from two cases of toxic shock syndrome lack superantigenic activity, but induce cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Lina, G; Fleer, A; Etienne, J; Greenland, T B; Vandenesch, F

    1996-01-01

    Two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from patients with toxic shock symptoms have been reported to carry genes related to S. aureus enterotoxins B and C by dot-blot hybridisation, although the corresponding superantigenic toxins were not detected immunologically. We here show that these strains produce no superantigens capable of stimulating proliferation of human mononuclear leukocytes or rabbit splenocytes, and that no DNA homologous to the seb or sec genes can be detected by PCR. However, stimulation of human monocytes by whole killed bacteria induced dose-dependent production of the cytokines TNF alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6, which may be responsible for the clinical symptoms in these patients. PMID:8821402

  17. Severity of chronic Chagas disease is associated with cytokine/antioxidant imbalance in chronically infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Guégan, Jean-François; Barnabé, Christian; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Salgado-Rosas, Hilda; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Briones, Bernardo; Romero-Díaz, Mónica; Ramos-Jiménez, Judith; Sánchez-Guillén, María del Carmen

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the pathogenic mechanisms in chronic Chagas disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America, is essential for the design of rational therapeutic strategies. In this paper we show that the development of Chagas disease is a consequence of a long-term and complex relationship between parasite persistence and maladapted homeostatic mechanisms in the host which leads to pathologic changes. We performed a retrospective study on 50 patients with chronic Chagas disease and 50 healthy control individuals. The specific immune response was detected by ELISA and IHA tests using autochthonous antigens, inflammatory process with the cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), and antioxidant protection with glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. We developed generalised linear modelling procedures to assess simultaneously which explanatory variables and/or their interactions better explained disease severity in patients. Our results show the existence of a strong relationship between anti-Trypanosoma cruzi levels and chronic Chagas disease (P<0.0001). Taken together, the statistical data indicate both cumulative and complementary effects, where the increase in TNF-alpha (P=0.004) and NO (P=0.005) levels correlated with a reduction in glutathione peroxidase (P=0.0001) and SOD (P=0.01) levels drives the disease pathology in chronically infected patients. Our findings may have important implications for understanding host susceptibility to develop severe chronic infectious disease. In addition we show putative targets for the design of new therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression, considering both specific treatment against the aetiological agent and modulation of the different immunopathological reactions in chronically infected individuals with chronic Chagas disease. PMID:12670514

  18. Treatment with pirfenidone for two years decreases fibrosis, cytokine levels and enhances CB2 gene expression in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess whether two-years treatment with Pirfenidone influences necroinflammation, fibrosis and steatosis, serum levels of TGF-β1, IL-6, TNF-α and CB1 and CB2 gene expression, in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Methods Twenty-eight patients out of 34 with CHC virus infection were enrolled in the study and received Pirfenidone (1200 mg/day) for 24 months. Six patients dropped out after 12 months of PFD. Liver biopsies and serum samples were obtained at the beginning and end of treatment. Modified HAI was calculated. CB1 and CB2 gene expression was correlated with fibrosis progression alongside with necroinflammation and steatosis. TGF-β1, IL-6, TNF-α and liver transaminases were measured in serum at two-months intervals. HCV genotype and viral load were also assessed. Quality of life was evaluated by SF36 questionnaires and the prognosis of disease was assessed with Child-Pugh score. The Wilcoxon test matched-pair signed ranks were used to analyze the outcomes. Results Intention to treat analyses were performed for biochemistry and clinical parameters. At the end of treatment, necroinflammation grading was reduced in an average of 3.2 points in 82% of patients (p < 0.05) and Ishak’s fibrosis stage decreased 2-points average in 67% of patients (p < 0.05). Steatosis decreased in 61% of patients. IL-6 and TGF-β1 serum levels decreased significantly in 93% and 67% of patients (p < 0.05), respectively, while TNF-α diminished in 47% of patients. ALT and AST tended to normalize in 81% of patients; CB2 mRNA levels increased in 86% and CB1 expression diminished in 29% of patients. Both, quality of life and Child-Pugh score improvements were reported in all patients. Conclusions Pirfenidone for two years benefits CHC patients and improves inflammation, fibrosis and steatosis in higher number of patients as previously shown for 12-months treatment with PFD. Additionally, PFD improved TGFβ1 and IL-6 levels

  19. Triptolide suppresses proinflammatory cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase and aggrecanase-1 gene expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liacini, Abdelhamid; Sylvester, Judith; Zafarullah, Muhammad

    2005-02-01

    A hallmark of rheumatoid- and osteoarthritis (OA) is proinflammatory cytokine-induced degeneration of cartilage collagen and aggrecan by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases (ADAMTS). Effects of the Chinese herb, Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF), on cartilage and its anti-arthritic mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the impact of a purified derivative of TWHF, PG490 (triptolide), on cytokine-stimulated expression of the major cartilage damaging proteases, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS4. PG490 inhibited cytokine-induced MMP-3, MMP-13 gene expression in primary human OA chondrocytes, bovine chondrocytes, SW1353 cells, and human synovial fibroblasts. Triptolide was effective at low doses and blocked the induction of MMP-13 by IL-1 in human and bovine cartilage explants. TWHF extract and PG490 also suppressed IL-1-, IL-17-, and TNF-alpha-induced expression of ADAMTS-4 in bovine chondrocytes. Thus, PG490 could protect cartilage from MMP- and aggrecanase-driven breakdown. The immunosuppressive, cartilage protective, and anti-inflammatory properties could make PG490 potentially a new therapeutic agent for arthritis. PMID:15629465

  20. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Claudia A.; Fievez, Laurence; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Bureau, Fabrice; Vanbever, Rita

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol decreased NF-{kappa}B activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (I{kappa}B{alpha}) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  1. ACE expression in monocytes is induced by cytokines, phorbol ester and steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, D.; Lanzillo, J.; Fanburg, B. )

    1991-03-15

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels are elevated in the serum and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) of patients with granulomatous diseases. However, the role of ACE in (Mo) physiology and the regulation of the inflammatory response is not well understood. Since Mo can be stimulated to form giant cells using phorbol esters, glucocorticoids or certain inflammatory cytokines, the authors examined production of ACE protein by normal PBM, a Mo-like cell line, THP-1, and a macrophage-like cell line, U937 following stimulation with these agents. Using a sensitive ELISA assay, they found that in U937 cells, expression of ACE protein increased by 3.4 fold with dexamethasone, 3.7. fold with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA), and 5.8 fold with the two agents combined. The cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF substantially increased ACE expression, by 7.6 and 7.7 fold respectively, with maximal effect at 0.01 U/ml, while IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} had little effect. Similar results were found with PBM and THP-1 cells. The combination of dexamethasone and PMA also induced homotypic cluster formation in PBM, suggesting a correlation between cell adhesion and ACE production. The authors conclude that ACE expression in monocytes and macrophages is stimulated by low concentration of glucocorticoids and certain inflammatory cytokines. ACE may participate in the initiation and propagation of granulomatous inflammatory processes.

  2. FK506 inhibition of histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Sengoku, T; Kishi, S; Sakuma, S; Ohkubo, Y; Goto, T

    2000-03-01

    Histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils are thought to be closely involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Some reports show that FK506 (tacrolimus hydrate) inhibited histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils. However, as the effects of FK506 has not been compared with those of clinically used drugs in those reports, the clinical relevancy of FK506 inhibition remained unclear. In this paper, we compared the actions of FK506 with those of steroids or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) which has been clinically used. FK506 inhibited histamine release by Brown-Norway rat peritoneal mast cells more potently than steroids and especially DSCG. FK506 also inhibited histamine release by a mast rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cell line and human peripheral blood basophils, whereas steroids failed to inhibit histamine release by human basophils. FK506 as well as steroids inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-4 production by RBL-1 cells. FK506 was therefore more effective than steroids and DSCG in inhibiting histamine release, and it also had the ability of inhibiting cytokine production by mast cells as steroids do. We concluded that FK506 might regulate allergic diseases via these actions, judging from the viewpoint of clinical relevancy. PMID:10685002

  3. Use of cytokines in infection.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naoko; Xing, Zhou

    2004-11-01

    Infectious disease remains an ever-growing health concern worldwide due to increasing antibiotic-resistant microbial strains, immune-compromised populations, international traffic and globalisation, and bioterrorism. There exists an urgent need to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. In addition to classic antibiotic therapeutics, immune-modulatory molecules such as cytokines or their inhibitors represent a promising form of antimicrobial therapeutics or immune adjuvant used for the purpose of vaccination. These molecules, in the form of either recombinant protein or transgene, exert their antimicrobial effect by enhancing infectious agent-specific immune activation or memory development, or by dampening undesired inflammatory and immune responses resulting from infection and host defence mechanisms. In the last two decades, a number of cytokine therapy-based experimental and clinical trials have been conducted, and some of these efforts have led to the routine clinical use of cytokines. For instance, although IFNs have been used to treat hepatitis C with great success, many other cytokines are yet to be fully evaluated for their antimicrobial potential. This review discusses the biology and therapeutic potential of selected immune modulatory cytokines and their inhibitors, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IFN-gamma, IL-12 and TNF. PMID:15571481

  4. A case of severe acute pancreatitis treated with CTR-001 direct hemoperfusion for cytokine apheresis.

    PubMed

    Saotome, Takao; Endo, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Teiji; Tabata, Takahisa; Hamamoto, Tetsu; Fujino, Kazunori; Andoh, Akira; Eguchi, Yutaka; Tani, Tohru; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2005-08-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a clinical entity that can develop into multiple organ failure (MOF), and still has a poor prognosis. It is generally agreed that excessive humoral mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines play important roles in the pathogenesis of organ failure in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Furthermore, it has been reported that continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) can remove the excess humoral mediators during the hypercytokinemic state of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). We experienced a case of severe acute pancreatitis induced by alcohol abuse, on whom we performed cytokine apheresis. The patient was a 46 year-old male. He received 14 cytokine apheresis procedures, for about 4 hours in each session, using a CTR-001 direct hemoperfusion (DHP) cartridge. His serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6; 1649.1+/-667.1-1257.1+/-489.4 pg/mL, P=0.013) decreased significantly after the CTR-001 procedures. However tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) (26.2+/-1.7-24.3+/-1.9 pg/mL, P=0.087), IL-1beta (6.1+/-2.9-3.49+/-1.1 pg/mL, P=0.477), IL-8 (192.5+/-33.4-229.5+/-51.8 pg/mL, P=0.754) and IL-10 (14.4+/-2.7-14.0+/-1.9 pg/mL, P=0.726) did not decrease statistically. Therefore, we conclude that in this case, cytokine apheresis using a CTR-001 cartridge was effective for reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokines during severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:16076384

  5. Protein kinase B/Akt: a nexus of growth factor and cytokine signaling in determining muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Frost, Robert A; Lang, Charles H

    2007-07-01

    Although the boundaries of skeletal muscle size are fundamentally determined by genetics, this dynamic tissue also demonstrates great plasticity in response to environmental and hormonal factors. Recent work indicates that contractile activity, nutrients, growth factors, and cytokines all contribute to determining muscle mass. Muscle responds not only to endocrine hormones but also to the autocrine production of growth factors and cytokines. Skeletal muscle synthesizes anabolic growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and potentially inhibitory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and myostatin. These self-regulating inputs in turn influence muscle metabolism, including the use of nutrients such as glucose and amino acids. These changes are principally achieved by altering the activity of the protein kinase known as protein kinase B or Akt. Akt plays a central role in integrating anabolic and catabolic responses by transducing growth factor and cytokine signals via changes in the phosphorylation of its numerous substrates. Activation of Akt stimulates muscle hypertrophy and antagonizes the loss of muscle protein. Here we review the many signals that funnel through Akt to alter muscle mass. PMID:17332274

  6. Sequential production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in response to live bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed Central

    Sander, B; Skansén-Saphir, U; Damm, O; Håkansson, L; Andersson, J; Andersson, U

    1995-01-01

    Causes of individual variation in susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases are only partly understood. An efficient cell-mediated immune response is crucial for resistance. Macrophages and T cells interact to eliminate the mycobacteria, partially through the effects of secreted cytokines. A vigorous anti-bacterial inflammatory response is sometimes accompanied by severe tissue damage, while immunosuppression leads to progressive infection. Here, live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), was used as a model antigen to study cytokine production at the single-cell level in response to mycobacteria. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals were challenged in vitro and the kinetics and frequencies of cytokine-producing cells were studied by immunofluorescent visualization of intracellular cytokines. Fourteen cytokines were assayed; interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). A sequential production of T helper-1 (Th1) and T helper-2 (Th2) cytokines was induced by BCG. Early, at days 1-2 after stimulation, the response was dominated by monokines and a low IFN-gamma and TNF-beta production. At days 4-5 there was a marked production of Th1 lymphokines, with approximately 6% IFN-gamma+ cells, 4% TNF-beta+ cells and 2% IL-2+ cells. Late in the reaction, at days 10-12, a Th2 response with IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 was detected, while the synthesis of Th1 lymphokines and monokines declined. Overall, our results provide further evidence of IFN-gamma as the major cytokine induced by mycobacteria in healthy individuals, but also suggest that Th2 cytokines participate in the response. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8567014

  7. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines by a soluble factor of Propionibacterium acnes: implications for chronic inflammatory acne.

    PubMed

    Vowels, B R; Yang, S; Leyden, J J

    1995-08-01

    Although many cytokines have been implicated in the development and persistence of inflammatory immune responses, it is unknown if any of these are important in inflammatory acne. This study investigated the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-1 beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by human monocytic cell lines, ThP-1 and U937, and by freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from acne patients. Both Propionibacterium acnes and supernatants obtained from 72-h P. acnes cultures could induce significant concentrations of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-8 by both cell lines and by peripheral blood mononuclear cells as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was no significant difference between acne and non-acne subjects. Endotoxin quantification and addition of polymyxin B to assays indicated no lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. P. acnes supernatant was fractionated into components with molecular weights of < 3,000, < 10,000, and < 30,000 and assayed for the ability to induce IL-8 and TNF production in ThP-1 cells. Nearly 90% of the original activity was found in the < 30,000-molecular-weight fraction, 50% was in the < 10,000-molecular-weight fraction, and only 15% remained in the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction. The effluent from the < 3,000-molecular-weight fraction contained about 70% activity, indicating that the inducing factor was not retained in the membrane. Incubation of P. acnes supernatant with various concentrations of mutanolysin or lysozyme resulted in a loss of 60% of the original activity. The addition of jimson lectin, which binds peptidoglycan, resulted in a loss of 70% of the activity in a dose-response manner, whereas peanut lectin had little or no effect on the activity. Heating of the P. acnes supernatant to 65 degrees C also had no effect on the activity. Blocking of CD14, a receptor for both LPS and peptidoglycan, reduced cytokine production by > 50%, suggesting that

  8. Exposure to wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2006-04-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized to be a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries were studded tires are used. In this work, we investigated the inflammatory effect of PM10 generated from the wear of studded tires on two different types of pavement. As comparison, we also investigated PM10 from a traffic-intensive street, a subway station, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Human monocyte-derived macrophages, nasal epithelial cells (RPMI 2650), and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to the different types of particles, and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha into the culture medium was measured. The results show a significant release of cytokines from macrophages after exposure for all types of particles. When particles generated from asphalt/granite pavement were compared to asphalt/quartzite pavement, the granite pavement had a significantly higher capacity to induce the release of cytokines. The granite pavement particles induced cytokine release at the same magnitude as the street particles did, which was higher than what particles from both a subway station and DEP did. Exposure of epithelial cells to PM10 resulted in a significant increase of TNF-alpha secreted from BEAS-2B cells for all types of particles used (DEP was not tested), and the highest levels were induced by subway particles. None of the particle types were able to evoke detectable cytokine release from RPMI 2650 cells. The results indicate that PM10 generated by the wear of studded tires on the street surface is a large contributor to the cytokine-releasing ability of particles in traffic-intensive areas and that the type of pavement used is important for the level of this contribution

  9. The Relationship Between Cytokine Regulation and Anti-Inflammatory Action of Amine-Carboxyborane in L929 Fibroblasts and IC-21 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M E; Shrewsbury, R P; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Elkins, A L; Hall, I

    1995-01-01

    The amine-carboxyboranes anti-inflammatory agents were shown to block TNF alpha release at 90 min. and IL-1 release at 5 hr. from macrophages. The agenst competed with L929 fibroblasts high affinity receptors for endogenous cytokines which regulate the inflammation process. Blocking the TNFalpha receptor at 90 min. by the agents from 10 to 50 muMu, resulted in lysosomal hydrolytic enzyme inhibition and lowering of prostaglandin synthesis as well as reductions in calcitonin high affinity receptor binding and calcium influx into the cells. IL-1 receptors when blocked by the agents at 5 hr. resulted in a reduction of NAG activity and leukotriene synthesis. An elevation of proline incorporation into collagen occurred at 90 min. and 24 hr. in the presence of the agents. PMID:18472777

  10. Comparative characterization of cytokine production by concanavalin A-activated splenocytes from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice after cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Makarova, O V; Trunova, G V; Diatroptov, M E; Serebryakov, S N; Kondashevskaya, M V; Malaitsev, V V

    2005-02-01

    The level of cytokines produced by ConA activated splenocytes was studied in male BALB/c and C57Bl/6 mice after single and repeated cold exposure (-20 degrees C, 3 min). Single cold exposure significantly decreased IL-2, -3, -4, -5, -10, -12, IFN-gamma production in BALB/c mice and decreased IL-2 content and increased TNF-alpha level in C57Bl/6 mice. Repeated cold exposure normalized the content of IL-2, -4, -10, -12, and IFN-gamma in BALB/c mice, which reflects the development of adaptive immune reactions. In C57Bl/6 mice IL-2, -3, -5, -10, -12, and IFN-gamma production remained significantly decreased, which attested to dysadaptive processes. PMID:16027812

  11. Potassium humate inhibits complement activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Naude, P.J.

    2009-08-15

    The effects of brown coal derived potassium humate on lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and complement activation were investigated in vitro. Potassium humate increased lymphocyte proliferation of phytohaemaglutinin A (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated mononuclear lymphocytes (MNL) in vitro from concentrations of 20 to 80 {mu} g/ml, in a dose dependant manner. On the other hand potassium humate, at 40 {mu} g/ml, significantly inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 by PHA stimulated MNL. Regarding complement activation it was found that potassium humate inhibits the activation of both the alternative and classical pathways without affecting the stability of the red blood cell membranes. These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory potential of potassium humate could be partially due to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for the initiation of these reactions as well as inhibition of complement activation. The increased lymphocyte proliferation observed, might be due to increased IL-2 production as previously been documented.

  12. Isolation rearing impaired sensorimotor gating but increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and disrupted metabolic parameters in both sexes of rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chih-Yuan; Liu, Yia-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Social isolation rearing (SIR) is an early stress paradigm of deprivation of the social contact since weaning. SIR has been used to investigate the mechanisms behind certain mental illnesses with neurodevelopmental origins, including schizophrenia. In schizophrenia, metabolic dysfunction has become a critical issue with increasing evidence for a possible connection between metabolism and immune systems in which metabolic changes are associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine (pro-CK) levels. The present study employed a rat model of SIR with both sexes to examine behaviors [locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition (PPI)], inflammatory markers [C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon-gamma], and metabolism-related variables (body weight, blood pressure, and the profiles of glycemia and lipid). Our results revealed that around puberty, SIR rats of both sexes exhibited behaviorally a higher locomotor activity and a lower PPI performance. Biochemically, SIR rats had an elevated level of pro-CKs (IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and interferon-gamma), and metabolic abnormalities (increased insulin resistance, decreased insulin sensitivity, and high blood pressure) in a time-dependent manner. The relationships between pro-CKs and metabolism were sex specific as IL-1 beta and interferon-gamma were correlated to glycemia metabolic indexes in males. The present study demonstrated SIR-induced longitudinal concomitant changes of pro-CKs and metabolic abnormalities, implying a more direct role of these two things in mental dysfunctions with a developmental origin. PMID:25770703

  13. AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside) increases the production of toxic molecules and affects the profile of cytokines release in LPS-stimulated rat primary microglial cultures.

    PubMed

    Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Liber, Sebastian; Gabryel, Bozena; Okopień, Bogusław

    2010-01-01

    AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside, Acadesine, AICA riboside) is an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The results of recent studies suggest that AICAR, in addition to its application for treating metabolic disorders, may also have therapeutic potential for treating neuroinflammatory diseases where reactive microglia play an etiological role. However, the molecular mechanisms of action by which AICAR exerts its anti-inflammatory effects still remain unclear or controversial. In this paper we attempt to evaluate the effects of AICAR on non-stimulated and LPS-activated rat primary microglial cell cultures. The presented evidence supports the conclusion that AMPK activated by AICAR is involved in regulation of ROS and cytokine production (IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha (6h), IL-10 and TGF-beta) as well as arginase I and PGC-1alpha expression. Furthermore, we found that the effects of AICAR on IL-6 and TNF-alpha (12, 24h) release and on the expression of iNOS and NF-kappaB p65 are not AMPK-dependent because the pre-treatment of LPS-activated microglia with compound C (a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK) did not reverse the effect of AICAR. The results of the presented study provide additional data about AMPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms whereby AICAR may modulate inflammatory response of microglia. PMID:19853624

  14. Ceftiofur impairs pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion through the inhibition of the activation of NF-{kappa}B and MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Ci Xinxin; Song Yu; Zeng Fanqin; Zhang Xuemei; Li Hongyu; Wang Xinrui; Cui Junqing Deng Xuming

    2008-07-18

    Ceftiofur is a new broad-spectrum, third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic for veterinary use. Immunopharmacological studies can provide new information on the immunomodulatory activities of some drugs, including their effect on cytokine productions. For this reason, we investigated the effect of ceftiofur on cytokine productions in vitro. We found that ceftiofur can downregulate tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but did not affect interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. We further investigated signal transduction mechanisms to determine how ceftiofur affects. RAW 264.7 cells were pretreated with 1, 5, or 10 mg/L of ceftiofur 1 h prior to treatment with 1 mg/L of LPS. Thirty minutes later, cells were harvested and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation was measured by Western blot. Alternatively, cells were fixed and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activation was measured using immunocytochemical analysis. Signal transduction studies showed that ceftiofur significantly inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation protein expression. Ceftiofur also inhibited p65-NF-{kappa}B translocation into the nucleus. Therefore, ceftiofur may inhibit LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by blocking NF-{kappa}B and MAPKs signaling in RAW264.7 cells.

  15. Effects of quinapril on myocardial function, ventricular remodeling and cardiac cytokine expression in congestive heart failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    We, Ge Cheng; Siroi, Martin G; Qu, Rong; Liu, Peter; Roulea, Jean L

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines have been shown to be activated in congestive heart failure (CHF). This activation is likely the result of the convergence of a number of factors, several of which could be attenuated with the use of an Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. In order to assess this, rats had a myocardial infarction (MI) created by coronary artery ligation and were followed for 28 days without treatment to permit the development of CHF. At that time, the ACE inhibitor quinapril was started, or rats remained untreated and were followed a further 56 days for a total of 84 days. Half of the untreated rats had quinapril started 3 days prior to sacrifice, on day 81. Starting quinapril at either 28 or 81 days had little effect on cardiac hemodynamics, or ventricular remodeling. Quinapril did however attenuate the MI-induced rise in cardiac cytokine expression (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-alpha], interleukin-1beta, -5 and -6). Thus, in CHF, ACE inhibitors attenuate the rise in cardiac cytokine expression. This study helps to identify a new mechanism by which ACE inhibitors may exert their beneficial effects in CHF. PMID:12085975

  16. Effects of ventilation with different positive end-expiratory pressures on cytokine expression in the preterm lamb lung.

    PubMed

    Naik, A S; Kallapur, S G; Bachurski, C J; Jobe, A H; Michna, J; Kramer, B W; Ikegami, M

    2001-08-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury increases proinflammatory cytokines in the adult lung. We asked if positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) affects proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression in the preterm lung. Preterm lambs at 129 +/- 3 d gestation were treated with 100 mg/kg recombinant human surfactant protein-C surfactant and ventilated for 2 or 7 h with 0, 4, or 7 cm H(2)O of PEEP. Unventilated fetal lambs were used as controls. Within 2 h of ventilation, alveolar total protein and activated neutrophils were increased and expression of mRNAs for the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was increased in lung tissue of all ventilated animals relative to unventilated controls. Alveolar protein and neutrophils were higher for 0 and 7 PEEP animals than 4 PEEP animals. IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 mRNAs were significantly elevated in animals ventilated with 0 PEEP compared with 4 PEEP. The percentage fractional area of collapsed alveoli was significantly higher for 0 PEEP compared with 4 and 7 PEEP groups. Mechanical ventilation increased the expression of proinflammatory mediators in surfactant-treated preterm lungs and the use of 4 PEEP minimized this response. PMID:11500356

  17. Analysis of interleukin-18, interleukin-1 converting enzyme (ICE) and interleukin-18-related cytokines in Crohn's disease lesions.

    PubMed

    Pagès, F; Lazar, V; Berger, A; Danel, C; Lebel-Binay, S; Zinzindohoué, F; Desreumaux, P; Cellier, C; Thiounn, N; Bellet, D; Cugnenc, P H; Fridman, W H

    2001-03-01

    A local increase of interleukin-18 (IL-18) expression has been recently demonstrated in Crohn's disease (CD), suggesting a role for mature IL-18 (cleaved by ICE protease) in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and Th1 polarization observed in CD lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate IL-18 modulation and its potential immune consequences in CD lesions. We showed increased IL-18 production in chronic CD lesions and identified epithelial cells and macrophages as IL-18-producing cells. A twofold increase in ICE alpha, beta, and/or gamma mRNA that encodes for the complete mature peptide was required for ICE activity, and a marked increase in IL-18R-positive immune cells was observed in chronic lesions compared to uninvolved areas or normal control samples. Chronic lesions also displayed intense transcription of IL-18-induced cytokines, IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-8. By contrast, when neither IL-18 nor ICE mRNAs were enhanced (early asymptomatic CD lesions), IL-18-induced cytokines were not up-regulated. These results are in accordance with a putative role of mature IL-18 in the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:11282552

  18. In vitro cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy dogs to distemper virus, Malassezia and Toxocara.

    PubMed

    Valli, J L; Williamson, A; Sharif, S; Rice, J; Shewen, P E

    2010-04-15

    Naïve CD4+ T cells may differentiate into a number of subsets including T helper 1 (Th1) Th2, Th3, Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells depending on the type of antigen they encounter. These CD4+ families have been defined based on the array of cytokines they produce and the effects they have on adaptive immune responses. CD4+ subsets are cross regulatory and at times cooperative. The study of these adaptive immune modulators has revealed the important role that cytokines play in mounting effective as well as detrimental immune responses to pathogens. Examining the cytokine responses of lymphocytes in culture can provide important understanding of how immune responses to pathogens are orchestrated. For this purpose the in vitro cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy dogs was examined in response to stimulation with antigens from a common canine virus (canine distemper virus, CDV), a commensal skin yeast of dogs (Malassezia pachydermatis) and a common canine helminth (Toxocara canis (T. canis)). Cell culture supernatants were removed from antigen stimulated and unstimulated control PBMC after 4, 24, 48 and 72 h and the concentration of Th1 type cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha) and Th2 type cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10) was determined using sandwich ELISA assays. CDV induced low levels of cytokine production initially with a predominance of IL-10 at 24h and a balanced response at 48 h of incubation. Malassezia antigen stimulated an early type 2 cytokine response with dramatic production of IL-4 at 24h of incubation compared to the other stimulants examined. By 48 h of incubation, however, the cytokine mix in response to Malassezia had also moved toward a Th1 type response. T. canis induced early production of Th2 type cytokines with IL-5 predominating; however, with longer incubation (48-72 h) there was a switch to a balanced Th1/Th2 response. In conclusion, the cytokines produced in vitro by canine PBMC in response to

  19. Immunomodulatory capacity of fungal proteins on the cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jeurink, Prescilla V; Noguera, Cristina Lull; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wichers, Harry J

    2008-08-01

    Immunomodulation by fungal compounds can be determined by the capacity of the compounds to influence the cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC). These activities include mitogenicity, stimulation and activation of immune effector cells. Eight mushroom strains (Agaricus blazei, Coprinus comatus, Flammulina velutipes, Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa, Volvariella volvacea, Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus ostreatus) were tested for the immunomodulating activity of the isolated protein fractions and polysaccharides fractions present in mycelia and culture liquid. The fungal proteins and polysaccharides have been investigated for their in vitro effect on the cytokine profile (IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-alpha) of unstimulated or hPBMC stimulated with the polyclonal stimulations PMA/Ca-I, ConA or LPS. In addition to their influence on the cytokine profile, the hemagglutination activity of the fungal proteins on rabbit red blood cells was determined. Proteins from V. volvacea and G. lucidum showed immunomodulating activity without the presence of any mitogen, however, neither of them decreased the production of IL-4 and IFN-gamma in combination with a stimulus. All used stimuli resulted in an induction of IL-12 in the presence of the protein extracts, suggesting a direct effect on monocytes. This effect might lead to the indirect immunomodulation of T cell activation and cytokine production. In addition, both protein extracts showed more hemagglutination activity after trypsin treatment of the rabbit red blood cells, indicating the presence of carbohydrate-binding proteins, like lectins and FIPs. In conclusion, the protein extracts of V. volvacea and G. lucidum contain immunomodulating activity by acting directly on monocytes and thereby modulating T cell activation. Further purification of the fungal extracts is needed to clarify whether there are FIPs or lectins present that are responsible for this immunomodulating activity

  20. Anti-CD28 Antibody-Initiated Cytokine Storm in Canines

    PubMed Central

    Rosinski, Steven L.; Storb, Rainer; Strong, Roland K.; Sale, George E.; Stone, Diane M.; Gewe, Mesfin M.; Friend, Della J.; Abrams, V. Kraig; Randolph-Habecker, Julie; Graves, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    Background CD28 signal blockade following T cell receptor activation is under intense investigation as a tolerance-inducing therapy for transplantation. Our goal is to produce a CD28-specific reagent as a therapy for the prevention of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in the canine model of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Methods We infused a monoclonal mouse anti-canine CD28 antibody (1C6 mAb) into four dogs and a fragment of antigen-binding (1C6 Fab) into two dogs. Pharmacokinetics, pathology, cytokine release, and the crystal structure of 1C6 Fv were evaluated. Results Within an hour of an IV injection of the 1C6 mAb, the dogs became leukopenic and developed a steroid-refractory cytokine storm. Two of the dogs developed high fevers, one experienced diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, and another developed gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The cytokine storm was characterized by elevated plasma levels of MCP-1, IP-10, IL-10, IL-6, and TNF-α. In addition, one dog showed elevated levels of IL-2, IL-8, and IL-18. In contrast, infusion of 1C6 Fab was well tolerated without any side effects. Dry-coating 1C6 mAb onto tissue culture plates induced CD3-independent proliferation and TNF-alpha production. Crystal structure analysis revealed that 1C6 binds to canine CD28 in a manner different than previously reported for conventional agonistic or superagonistic antibodies. Conclusions These results indicate that dogs and humans develop a similar cytokine storm following infusion ofanti-CD28 mAb, providing an appropriate large animal for further study. 1C6 Fab warrants evaluation as a tolerance-inducing reagent in the canine model of allogeneic HCT. PMID:25988188

  1. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  2. Hexane fraction of Zingiberis Rhizoma Crudus extract inhibits the production of nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells via the NF-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyo Won; Yoon, Cheol-Ho; Park, Kwon Moo; Han, Hyung Soo; Park, Yong-Ki

    2009-06-01

    Excessive production of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) from activated microglia contributes to uncontrolled inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases. It seems possible that treatment with anti-inflammatory agents, including plants used in Oriental medicine, might delay the progression of neurodegeneration through the inhibition of microglial activation. The present study is focused on the inhibitory effect of the rhizome hexane fraction extract of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger hexan extract; GHE) on the production of inflammatory mediators such as NO, PGE(2), and proinflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells, a mouse microglial cell line. GHE significantly inhibited the excessive production of NO, PGE(2), TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. In addition, GHE attenuated the mRNA expressions and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and proinflammatory cytokines. The molecular mechanisms that underlie GHE-mediated attenuation are related to the inhibition of the phosphorylation of three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Our results indicate that GHE exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by suppressing the transcription of inflammatory mediator genes through the MAPK and NF-kappaB signaling pathways. The anti-inflammatory properties of GHE may make it useful as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19233241

  3. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  4. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  5. Resistin as an Intrahepatic Cytokine

    PubMed Central

    Bertolani, Cristiana; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Failli, Paola; Bataller, Ramon; Aleffi, Sara; DeFranco, Raffaella; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Romagnani, Paola; Milani, Stefano; Ginés, Pere; Colmenero, Jordi; Parola, Maurizio; Gelmini, Stefania; Tarquini, Roberto; Laffi, Giacomo; Pinzani, Massimo; Marra, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance accelerate the progression of fibrosis during chronic liver disease. Resistin antagonizes insulin action in rodents, but its role in humans is still controversial. The aims of this study were to investigate resistin expression in human liver and to evaluate whether resistin may affect the biology of activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), key modulators of hepatic fibrogenesis. Resistin gene expression was low in normal human liver but was increased in conditions of severe fibrosis. Up-regulation of resistin during chronic liver damage was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In a group of patients with alcoholic hepatitis, resistin expression correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, suggesting a possible action on HSCs. Exposure of cultured HSCs to recombinant resistin resulted in increased expression of the proinflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-8, throu