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Sample records for hepatic radionuclide angiography

  1. Equilibrium radionuclide gated angiography in patients with tricuspid regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, B.; Pavel, D.G.; Pietras, R.; Swiryn, S.; Byrom, E.; Lam, W.; Rosen, K.M.

    1983-01-15

    Equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography was performed in 2 control groups (15 patients with no organic heart disease and 24 patients with organic heart disease but without right- or left-sided valvular regurgitation) and in 9 patients with clinical tricuspid regurgitation. The regurgitant index, or ratio of left to right ventricular stroke counts, was significantly lower in patients with tricuspid regurgitation than in either control group. Time-activity variation over the liver was used to compute a hepatic expansion fraction which was significantly higher in patients with tricuspid regurgitation than in either control group. Fourier analysis of time-activity variation in each pixel was used to generate amplitude and phase images. Only pixels with values for amplitude at least 7% of the maximum in the image were retained in the final display. All patients with tricuspid regurgitation had greater than 100 pixels over the liver automatically retained by the computer. These pixels were of phase comparable to that of the right atrium and approximately 180 degrees out of phase with the right ventricle. In contrast, no patient with no organic heart disease and only 1 of 24 patients with organic heart disease had any pixels retained by the computer. In conclusion, patients with tricuspid regurgitation were characterized on equilibrium gated angiography by an abnormally low regurgitant index (7 of 9 patients) reflecting increased right ventricular stroke volume, increased hepatic expansion fraction (7 of 9 patients), and increased amplitude of count variation over the liver in phase with the right atrium (9 of 9 patients).

  2. Hepatic Artery Angiography and Embolization for Hemobilia Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Tony; Travis, Simon; Ettles, Duncan; Dyet, John; Sedman, Peter; Wedgewood, Kevin; Royston, Christopher

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: The effectiveness of angiography and embolization in diagnosis and treatment were assessed in a cohort of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods: Over a 6-year period 1513 laparoscopic cholecystectomies were carried out in our region. Nine of these patients (0.6%) developed significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 5-43 days after surgery. All underwent emergency celiac and selective right hepatic artery angiography. All were treated by coil embolization of the right hepatic artery proximal and distal to the bleeding point. Results: Pseudoaneurysms of the hepatic artery adjacent to cholecystectomy clips were demonstrated in all nine patients at selective right hepatic angiography. In three patients celiac axis angiography alone failed to demonstrate the pseudoaneurysm. Embolization controlled hemorrhage in all patients with no further bleeding and no further intervention. One patient developed a candidal liver abscess in the post-procedure period. All patients are alive and well at follow-up. Conclusion: Selective right hepatic angiography is vital in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Embolization offers the advantage of minimally invasive treatment in unstable patients, does not disrupt recent biliary reconstruction, allows distal as well as proximal control of the hepatic artery, and is an effective treatment for this potentially life-threatening complication.

  3. Diagnosis of jugular paraganglioma by radionuclide angiography: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Zwas, S.T.; Kronenberg, J.; Tadmor, R.; Leventon, G.

    1983-11-01

    Jugular paraganglioma is a highly vascular tumor, slowly growing, extending into the surrounding stuctures and causing otologic and /or neurologic symptoms according to its location in the jugular bulb region or the middle-ear. In our study, modified vertex and posterior head scintiangiography was used in seven cases. Scintiangiography was positive in all seven, whereas concomitant radiographic studies were limited: four of the seven gave positive findings by transmission computerized tomography (TCT). Only four patients underwent angiography, with positive results in two. Hypocycloidal tomography was positive in three cases. However, some radiographic studies, particularly TCT, may be useful in detecting local extension, bone destruction, and soft-tissue infiltration. Radionuclide angiography proved highly reliable and should be used initially whenever a jugular paraganglioma is suspected.

  4. Computed tomography, angiography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the nonoperative management of hepatic and splenic trauma.

    PubMed

    Delgado Millán, M A; Deballon, P O

    2001-11-01

    There is a marked trend toward nonoperative management of abdominal trauma. This has been possible thanks to the advances in imaging and interventional techniques. In this work we review in which way computed tomography (CT) abdominal scans, angiography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) can guide the nonoperative management of hepatic and splenic trauma. The CT abdominal scan with intravenous contrast is the "departure imaging" of choice for the nonoperative management of hepatic and splenic trauma in the hemodynamically stable patient. It is the most accurate test for detecting, defining, and characterizing these injuries, the associated hemoperitoneum, and other abdominal abnormalities (the hollow viscus injuries missed on the CT scan were detected by clinical parameters and had no negative consequences in the outcome). It has an accuracy of more than 95% for these injuries, but CT grading alone cannot decide which patient can be treated conservatively and which patient requires surgery. Its usefulness for follow-up seems challenging. Angiography can be therapeutic, thereby avoiding surgery (some report that angiography can be performed even in patients with active bleeding as damage control); if vessel injury, active bleeding or hemobilia are suspected on the basis of a CT scan in a stable patient, angiography should be carried out. ERCP should be performed in patients with suspected injury to the biliary tree, even with normal iminodiacetic acid radionuclide scanning (HIDA) if symptoms persist. A biliary stent can be placed. Indications for angiography and ERCP remain unclear. PMID:11760741

  5. External accumulation of radionuclide in hepatic hydrothorax

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, R.J.; Johnston, G.S.

    1989-05-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is a complication in approximately 5% of patients with cirrhosis. Ascites is almost always present and helps to suggest the correct diagnosis. However, when ascites is absent, radionuclide imaging has proven to be helpful in establishing that the pleural effusion originated from ascitic fluid. When pleural fluid is rapidly removed, such as by thoracostomy tube drainage, the radioisotope may accumulate outside the thorax and produce a negative scan of the chest. When the radionuclide scan is nondiagnostic and the pleural space is being rapidly drained, the pleural fluid collecting system should always be imaged before rejecting a diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax.

  6. Hepatic tumor angiography: a subject review

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, V.P.

    1983-09-01

    The dual blood supply of the normal hepatic parenchyma and the single arterial supply of hepatic neoplasms are important factors in the interpretation of celiac and hepatic arteriograms. Depending on whether the hepatic artery, portal vein, or both are opacified, three types of hepatogram can occur: arterial, portal, or mixed. On the celiac arteriogram, the densely opacified hepatic parenchyma makes the less well opacified tumor appear relatively hypovascular; and conversely, on the hepatic arteriogram the nonopacified portal flow has a ''wash-out'' effect on the normal parenchyma so that the neoplasm remains hypervascular. Thus most hepatic neoplasms are hypervascular on the hepatic arteriogram, and conversion of a hypervascular tumor to a hypovascular one is indicative of its response to treatment.

  7. Tricuspid regurgitation by radionuclide angiography and contrast right ventriculography: a preliminary observation

    SciTech Connect

    Lumia, F.J.; Patil, A.; Germon, P.A.; Maranhao, V.

    1981-09-01

    In a retrospective study correlating the degree of tricuspid regurgitation seen on first-pass radionuclide angiography with that seen on contrast right ventriculography in 51 patients, ten had no tricuspid regurgitation by contrast ventriculography, whereas by radionuclide angiography nine had no regurgitation and one had minimal regurgitation. Of eight patients with minimal tricuspid regurgitation by contrast ventriculography, five had minimal regurgitation by nuclide angiography and three had no regurgitation. Of the 11 patients with mild to moderate tricuspid regurgitation by contrast studies, ten had mild to moderate regurgitation and one had severe regurgitation by nuclide angiography. Of 22 patients with moderate to severe tricuspid regurgitation by contrast studies, 15 had moderate to severe regurgitation and seven had mild to moderate regurgitation by nuclear angiography. In this preliminary study comparing radionuclide angiography with contrast right ventriculography, there were three false-negative and one false-positive nuclide angiograms, giving a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 90%.

  8. Superselective catheterization technique in hepatic angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, V.P.; Soo, C.S.; Carrasco, C.H.; Wallace, S.

    1983-10-01

    The techniques for superselective catheterization of hepatic artery are described. The catheters have five major configurations in various sizes: (1) simple curve, (2) reverse curve, (3) double curve, (4) modified double curve, and (5) hepatic and splenic curves. Since the celiac artery may be directed caudad, horizontally, or cephalad, the techniques vary accordingly. The basic approach of the system described is to tailor the catheter to fit the vascular anatomy. These various techniques have produced a 95% success rate in the hepatic artery catheterization of 1000 patients.

  9. Glucagon-Induced Vasospasm of Hepatic Artery Branches During Visceral Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dziedzic, T. Scott; Smith, Tony P.

    2008-07-15

    Glucagon is often used in radiology to decrease bowel motility for enhanced imaging, including visceral digital subtraction angiography. We present a case in which branch hepatic artery vasospasm followed the intravenous administration of glucagon during visceral angiography.

  10. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  11. Detection of a traumatic renal aterial venous fistula by radionuclide angiography (RNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, J.C.; Weitzman, A.F.; Lee, V.W.; Grosso, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A case of post-traumatic A-V fistula was detected by radionuclide angiography. A 40-yr-old male, with a stab wound in left upper quadrant of abdomen, had undergone exploratory laparotomy that disclosed lacerations of the stomach and proximal portions of small bowel and superior mesenteric artery. The patient continued to have quaiac-positive stools postoperatively. One week later a radionuclide sequential image of the abdomen using 8 mCi of Tc-99m sulfur colloid revealed an area of increased radionuclide concentration in the left midabdomen seen only during aterial phase and not visible on the subsequent static images. The findings were confirmed to be A-V fistula by angiogram and subsequently by renal surgery. The patient had an uneventful elective closure of the fistula. The cause of quaiac-positive stool was unexplained. Eight cases of renal A-V fistula have been well demonstrated by radionuclide angiography in the literature. The authors emphasized the radionuclide angiography is a suitable screening procedure for patients with suspected traumatic vascular injury, and contrast angiography should be used for the confirmation of diagnosis.

  12. A rare case of coronary fistula evaluated by first-pass radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Song, Bong Il

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery fistula (CAF) is a rare anomaly that originates from the coronary artery and drains into the cardiac chamber or the adjacent vasculature. We report a case of CAF in a 77 years old woman with dyspnea on exertion. Using coronary angiography and cardiac multidetector computed tomography, this patient was diagnosed with CAF draining into the left bronchial arteries. First-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA) showed early pulmonary recirculation through a left to right shunt. The pulmonary to systemic blood flow ratio was 1.24. The patient received supportive care with vasodilator and antiplatelet therapy. First-pass radionuclide angiography was used to provide physiologic informations, to plan the treatment course for this patient. PMID:27331213

  13. The use of gated radionuclide angiography in the diagnosis of cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, J.E.; Knopp, R.; Lee, B.; dos Santos, P.A.; Wessel, R.J.; Dang, C.V.; Parks, S.N.

    1984-09-01

    No currently used diagnostic test is an accurate predictor of patients who will develop morbidity or mortality from cardiac contusion. In a prospective study we used gated cardiac radionuclide angiography to assess cardiac function in 30 patients with blunt chest trauma, and we compared the results of this test with those of other diagnostic studies for cardiac contusion to determine whether gated angiography is a more accurate predictor of serious cardiac injury. Diagnostic tests included the following: serial electrocardiograms (ECG), serial creatine phosphokinase muscle-brain isoenzyme (CPK-MB) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes, gated cardiac radionuclide angiography, and technetium-99m (Tc-99m) pyrophosphate scintigraphy. Abnormal studies were present in 26 patients; 22 showed abnormalities in CPK-MB, 19 on ECG, and five on gated scan. No patient demonstrated an abnormal Tc-99m pyrophosphate scan or abnormal elevation of LDH isoenzyme. Although no diagnostic test was predictive of morbidity and mortality, CPK-MB isoenzyme was the only test to correlate with morbidity and mortality. Morbidity and mortality correlated most closely with the number of associated major injuries and the presence of hypotension or hypoxia.

  14. Long-term follow-up of patients with silent ischemia during exercise radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenbuecher, A.P.; Pfisterer, M.; Hoffmann, A.; Burckhardt, D. )

    1990-04-01

    A retrospective 5 year follow-up study was performed in 140 patients with unequivocal ischemia during exercise radionuclide angiography (greater than or equal to 10% decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction or greater than or equal to 5% decrease in ejection fraction together with a distinct regional wall motion abnormality). In 84 patients (60%), ischemia during radionuclide angiography was silent (silent ischemia group), whereas 56 patients experienced angina during the test (symptomatic group). Work load and antianginal medication were similar in both groups. Critical cardiac events (unstable angina, myocardial infarction, cardiac death) occurred in 27% of patients in the silent ischemia group and 16% of those in the symptomatic group (p = NS); however, myocardial infarction or death was more frequent in patients with silent ischemia (22% versus 9%; p less than 0.05). If there was additional exercise-induced ST segment depression, the rate of critical events was further increased (p less than 0.05). The difference in critical cardiac events seemed to be influenced by the higher incidence of revascularization procedures in symptomatic patients, whereas medical therapy had no similar effect. Thus, these findings suggest that patients with documented severe ischemia should undergo left heart catheterization and revascularization irrespective of symptoms to improve their prognosis.

  15. Celiac Axis, Common Hepatic and Hepatic Artery Variants as Evidenced on MDCT Angiography in South Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the increase in the hepatobiliary, pancreatic surgeries and liver transplantation, being aware of the anatomic variations of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries is of paramount importance. Aim To illustrate the normal anatomy and variants of the celiac axis and the hepatic arteries with multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography in South Indian population and determine the potential variations in the celiac axis anatomy and the hepatic arteries, thus assisting the hepatobiliary surgeon and the interventional radiologist in avoiding iatrogenic injury to the arteries. Materials and Methods Two hundred patients undergoing abdominal CT angiography from July 2014 till July 2015 were retrospectively studied for hepatic arterial and celiac axis anatomical variation. The anatomic variations in our study were correlated with other studies. Results The celiac axis (CA) and the hepatic artery (HA) variations were analysed as per criteria laid by Song et al., and Michel. Out of 15 possible CA variations, 5 types of celiac artery variations were seen in 14 patients. A normal CA was seen in 179(89.5%) patients of the 200 patients. In the remaining 7 patients, the CA anatomy was classified as ambiguous since there was separate origin of the right and left hepatic arteries from the CA with absent common hepatic artery (CHA). The CHA originated normally from the celiac axis in 94% of the cases. Variation of CHA origin was seen in 5 patients. Normal HA anatomy was seen in 114 (57%) patients. Variation in HA anatomy was seen in 86 (43%) patients. Origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from the hepatic artery proper was seen in 182 (91%) patients and replaced origin of RHA from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was seen in 18 (9%) of the cases. Accessory RHA was seen in 7(3.5%) patients. The left hepatic artery (LHA) originated from the hepatic artery proper in 186 (93%) patients and replaced origin of LHA from the left gastric artery (LGA) was

  16. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Hepatic, Pancreatic, and Splenic Circulation.

    PubMed

    Price, Melissa; Patino, Manuel; Sahani, Dushyant

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) has become a routine imaging tool to assess visceral vascular anatomy and abdominal parenchymal pathology. Enhanced temporal resolution and rapid acquisition allow for precise delineation of arterial and venous anatomy. The excellent spatial resolution permits assessment of small parenchyma lesions and vasculature. The ability of CT to rapidly acquire data and reconstruct with thinner slices allows robust 3D mapping using maximum intensity projection before definitive surgical or interventional therapy. Emerging novel techniques of image acquisition offer sensitive methods for detecting enhancement and allow for virtual imaging subtraction, all while limiting the total radiation burden. PMID:26654391

  17. The evaluation of ischemic heart disease using thallium-210 with comments on radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Leppo, J.A.; Scheuer, J.; Pohost, G.M.; Freeman, L.M.; Strauss, H.W.

    1980-04-01

    Coronary artery disease causing myocardial ischemia and infarction is the leading cause of death in America. Methods that can be used to diagnose and follow the response to therapy of coronary artery disease or its effect on myocardial ischemia should help control the morbidity and mortality of ischemic heart disease. The use of ECG monitoring is less sensitive and specific for ischemia than thallium (TI) imaging or the use of radionuclide angiography (RNA). In large patient populations, the findings of a positive ECG and TI or RNA study will be highly predictive for the presence of coronary artery disease, while negative test results make the disease unlikely. A combined approach to the patient with possible ischemic heart disease is presented.

  18. Response of left ventricular ejection fraction to recovery from general anesthesia: measurement by gated radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Coriat, P.; Mundler, O.; Bousseau, D.; Fauchet, M.; Rous, A.C.; Echter, E.; Viars, P.

    1986-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that, after anesthesia for noncardiac surgical procedures, the increased cardiac work during recovery induces wall motion and ejection fraction (EF) abnormalities in patients with mild angina pectoris, gated radionuclide angiography was performed in patients undergoing simple cholecystectomy under narcotic-relaxant general anesthesia. The ejection fraction was determined during anesthesia at the end of surgery, and then determined 3 min and 3 hr after extubation. A new angiography was performed 24 hr later, and a myocardial scintigraphy (Thallium 201) was performed during infusion of the coronary vasodilator, dipyridamole. In the first part of the investigation, eight patients without coronary artery disease (CAD) (group 1) and 20 patients with mild angina (group 2) were studied. In the second part of the study, seven patients (group 3) with mild angina pectoris received an intravenous infusion of 0.4 microgram X kg-1 X min-1 of nitroglycerin started before surgery and gradually decreased 4 hr after extubation. In group 1, EF remained unchanged at recovery. In contrast in group 2, EF responded abnormally to recovery: EF decreased from 55% during anesthesia to 45% 3 min after extubation (P less than 0.001). Patients in group 3, who received intravenous nitroglycerin, showed no change of EF at recovery. This study demonstrates that recovery from general anesthesia causes abnormalities in left ventricular function in patients suffering from CAD. These abnormalities are prevented by prophylactic intravenous nitroglycerin.

  19. Angiography of Hepatic Vascular Malformations Associated with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Manabu Tate, Etuko; Nishii, Toshiaki; Watarai, Jiro; Shioya, Takanobu; White, Robert I.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: To describe the angiographic features of hepatic involvement in hereditary hemorrhagictelangiectasia (HHT), particularly the presence of portovenous shunts. Methods: We reviewed the angiographic findings of seven patients with HHT. The patients comprised three women and four men with a mean age of 51 years. Results: Intrahepatictelangiectasias were found in all seven patients and shunts between three vascular channels were found in six of seven patients. In the four patients who had portovenous shunts combined with arterioportal shunts, the portovenous shunts were large. Three patients had noportovenous shunts. Two of these patients had arteriovenous shunts, and one had no shunt. The mean age (69 years) of the patients with portovenous shunts was older than those without portovenous shunts (26 years). Conclusions: Hepatic vascular lesions in HHT are varied, ranging from telangiectasias to large shunts between three vascular channels. In an advanced stage of involvement, large portovenous shunts are present.

  20. Increased left ventricular ejection fraction after a meal: potential source of error in performance of radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.M.; White, C.J.; Sobol, S.M.; Lull, R.J.

    1983-06-01

    The effect of a standardized meal on left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was determined by equilibrium radionuclide angiography in 16 patients with stable congestive heart failure but without pulmonary or valvular heart disease. LVEF was determined in the fasting state and 15, 30, and 45 minutes after a meal. Patients with moderately depressed fasting LVEF (30 to 50%), Group I, had a mean increase of 6.9 +/- 2.9% (p less than 0.005) in the LVEF at 45 minutes after the meal. Patients with severely depressed fasting LVEF (less than 30%), Group II, had no change after the meal. It is concluded that significant increases in LVEF may occur after meals in patients with moderate but not severe left ventricular dysfunction. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography studies that are not standardized for patients' mealtimes may introduce an important unmeasured variable that will affect the validity of data in serial studies of left ventricular function.

  1. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.3/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 {+-} 0.8/2.2 {+-} 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 {+-} 0.8/2.6 {+-} 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  2. Evaluation of hepatic arterial anatomy by multidetector computed tomographic angiography in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Keles, Papatya; Yuce, Ihsan; Keles, Sait; Kantarci, Mecit

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to define the different courses and percentages of hepatic artery that were detected during preoperative evaluation of living liver donors by multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA). We evaluated 150 donors before hepatic transplantation. All of the donors were evaluated by multislice CT scan with 256 detectors. For each patient, arterial, portal and venous phase images were obtained. The hepatic arterial variations were evaluated by the same radiologist according to Michels' classification. Common hepatic arterial anatomy (type I) was observed in 95 donors (63.3%). Other arterial variations were determined in the remaining 55 donors (36.6%). The second common variation was type XI which did not match with the description of Michels' classification variation in 15 donors (10%). The remaining variations described in Michels' classification were seen at lower rates. Type VII or X variation was not seen. MDCTA is a useful method to identify the blood supply of the liver before the liver transplantations, and surgeons can make their plan on the basis of CT data. PMID:26910605

  3. Relationship of hepatic steatosis severity and coronary artery disease characteristics assessed by coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Nobuo; Inoh, Shinichi; Nojo, Takeshi; Nakamura, Sunao

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the severity of hepatic steatosis and coronary artery disease characteristics assessed by coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography. This retrospective analysis consisted of 2028 patients. Hepatic steatosis was evaluated by liver attenuation on unenhanced CT and the patients were divided into four groups (≥60 HU, 54-59 HU, 43-53 HU, ≤42 HU). Coronary calcification was calculated using the Agatston method. Obstructive disease was defined as ≥50 % stenosis assessed by CT. A high-risk plaque was defined by a remodeling index >1.1 and low attenuation (<30 HU). Patients with a segment involvement score >4 were determined to have extensive disease. Logistic regression analysis was performed to study multivariate associations. Severity of hepatic steatosis was associated with coronary calcification (p = 0.02), obstructive disease (p < 0.0001), presence of a high-risk plaque (p = 0.0001) and extensive disease (p = 0.001) in the univariate analysis. However, the relationships were attenuated in the multivariate analysis with the exception of obstructive disease (p = 0.04). Liver attenuation of <54 HU was significantly associated with obstructive coronary artery disease independent of conventional risk factors such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia and smoking (hepatic attenuation 43-53 HU, odds ratio 1.52, 95 % confidence interval 1.11-2.10, p = 0.01; ≤42 HU, odds ratio 1.65, 95 % confidence interval 1.10-2.45, p = 0.02). Although conventional risk factors were stronger predictors of coronary calcification and plaque formation, the severity of hepatic steatosis remained an independent risk factor for obstructive coronary artery disease. Coronary CT angiography may play a potential role in risk stratification for patients with hepatic steatosis. PMID:26831056

  4. [Study of post-myocardial infarction ventricular aneurysms with equilibrium radionuclide angiography. Significance of Fourier analysis].

    PubMed

    de Sá, M E; Ferreira, R; Rebelo, J R; Nogueira, A; Baptista, A M; Ribeiro, C

    2001-05-01

    The concept of left ventricular aneurysm has been a subject of controversy and it's not yet completely settled. This has some implications on the patients selection for surgery and explains the various non-invasive methods so far developed for the clinical assessment of patients with ventricular aneurysms. Seventy-one patients with ischemic heart disease, 65 with recent myocardial infarction, were studied by equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) in order to define left ventricular wall motion abnormalities. One hundred ERNA were undertaken, through the usual erytrocites in vivo labelling technic, employing a GE 400 T Gama-Camera GP. Image acquisition was through 400 cardiac cycles, on LAO (30 and 60 degrees) and left lateral. PAGE protocol was employed. Fourier transform was used in the present work to obtain phase and amplitude images, which actually became the main criteria to define aneurysmatic areas. Global ejection fraction, regional wall motion and regional ejection fraction were other parameters investigated. Wall motion abnormalities have been identified in all the 65 patients having suffered a myocardial infarction. Extensive areas of akinesia or localized dyskinesia were present in 40 patients (16.5%), while remainder 25 had just localized hypoakinesia. Phase image enabled the selection of LV areas of contraction delay in 19 of the 40 patients with extensive wall motion abnormalities (Group I). In such Group I we could identify an LV area with contrasting colour, defining the aneurysmatic LV portion. In the order 21 patients with extensive akinesia, no significant changes of colour were present on ventricular phase image (Group II) meaning absence of aneurysm. No phase disturbances were seen in the remainder 25 patients with MI (Group III) and the 6 patients with CAD without MI had normal phase images (Group IV). The percentage of akinetic segments was 39.1 and 35.4 in Group I and II, respectively (p = .53) while it was significantly lower in Group

  5. FDG cardiac SPECT versus PET: Relation to SPECT radionuclide angiography and thallium scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G.; Kitsiou, A.N.; Bacharach, S.L.

    1996-05-01

    To determine whether fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging with SPECT, using high-energy collimation, provides comparable viability information to FDG-PET, 16 pts with chronic CAD undergoing FDG-PET studies were reimaged with SPECT immediately after the PET acquisition was completed. All pts had stress (S)-redistribution (RD)-reinjection (RI) thallium (TL) studies and a subset of 12 pts had SPECT radionuclide angiography (RNA). The LV was divided into 4 long-axis tomograms encompassing the entire LV and the myocardial activity of 11 sectors per tomogram was assessed quantitatively. The mean counts per pixel of corresponding FDG-SPECT, FDG-PET, RD and RI-TL images were normalized to that sector having peak activity on TL-S and compared on the basis of severity of reduction in FDG and TL activity as follows: normal (NI = >85% of peak), mild-moderate (50-86%) and severe (<50%). FDG-SPECT provided concordant viability information with FDG-PET (NI/mild-mod vs severe) in 581 of 615 (94%) sectors and with TL S-RD-RI(NI/reversible/mild-mod vs severe irreversible) in 555 or 615 (90%) sectors. To facilitate comparison of FDG and TK uptake with regional contraction, these sectors were grouped into 5 regions (anterior, septal, apex, inferior and lateral). These data suggest that most normal/HK regions are viable both by FDG and TL. Among a total of 33 sHK and AK/DK regions, in which viability is a clinical concern, 17 (52%) were viable by TL, 22 (67%) by FDG-SPECT and 24 (73%) by FDG-PET (p=NS). These data suggest that most normal/HK regions are viable both by FDG and TL. Among a total of 33 sHK and AK/DK regions, in which viability is a clinical concern, 17 (52%) were viable by TL, 22 (67%) by FDG-SPECT and 24 (73%) by FDG-PET (p=NS). These data affirm the good overall correlation between FDG uptake and TL for differentiating viable from nonviable myocardium in asynergic regions regardless of the technology applied, PET or SPECT.

  6. Assessment of single vessel coronary artery disease: results of exercise electrocardiography, thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging and radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Port, S.C.; Oshima, M.; Ray, G.; McNamee, P.; Schmidt, D.H.

    1985-07-01

    The sensitivity of the commonly used stress tests for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was analyzed in 46 patients with significant occlusion (greater than or equal to 70% luminal diameter obstruction) of only one major coronary artery and no prior myocardial infarction. In all patients, thallium-201 perfusion imaging (both planar and seven-pinhole tomographic) and 12 lead electrocardiography were performed during the same graded treadmill exercise test and radionuclide angiography was performed during upright bicycle exercise. Exercise rate-pressure (double) product was 22,307 +/- 6,750 on the treadmill compared with 22,995 +/- 5,622 on the bicycle (p = NS). Exercise electrocardiograms were unequivocally abnormal in 24 patients (52%). Qualitative planar thallium images were abnormal in 42 patients (91%). Quantitative analysis of the tomographic thallium images were abnormal in 41 patients (89%). An exercise ejection fraction of less than 0.56 or a new wall motion abnormality was seen in 30 patients (65%). Results were similar for the right (n = 11) and left anterior descending (n = 28) coronary arteries while all tests but the planar thallium imaging showed a lower sensitivity for isolated circumflex artery disease (n = 7). The specificity of the tests was 72, 83, 89 and 72% for electrocardiography, planar thallium imaging, tomographic thallium imaging and radionuclide angiography, respectively. The results suggest that exercise thallium-201 perfusion imaging is the most sensitive noninvasive stress test for the diagnosis of single vessel coronary artery disease.

  7. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: normal anatomy and main variants *

    PubMed Central

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Duarte, Cláudia Martina Araújo; Borges, Rafael Farias; de Magalhães, Ana Guardiana Ximenes

    2016-01-01

    Although digital angiography remains as the gold standard for imaging the celiac arterial trunk and hepatic arteries, multidetector computed tomography in association with digital images processing by software resources represents a useful tool particularly attractive for its non invasiveness. Knowledge of normal anatomy as well as of its variations is helpful in images interpretation and to address surgical planning on a case-by-case basis. The present essay illustrates several types of anatomical variations of celiac trunk, hepatic artery and its main branches, by means of digitally reconstructed computed tomography images, correlating their prevalence in the population with surgical implications. PMID:26929461

  8. Implications of Discordant Findings Between Hepatic Angiography and Cross-Sectional Imaging in Transplant Candidates With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kellie; Fidelman, Nicholas; Yao, Francis Y.; Hills, Nancy K.; Kohi, Maureen P.; Kolli, K. Pallav; Taylor, Andrew G.; Kerlan, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether the detection of discordant numbers of hypervascular foci at hepatic angiography versus contrast-enhanced (CE) cross-sectional imaging [computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who are listed for liver transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 218 consecutive patients with HCC who were listed for a liver transplant and who underwent transarterial chemoembolization at our institution between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2010. Patients were grouped into 3 categories: (1) the number of nodules at CT/MRI was concordant with the number of hypervascular foci detected at angiography (n = 136), (2) the number of nodules at CT/MRI was greater than the number of hypervascular foci at angiography (n = 45), and (3) the number of nodules at CT/MRI was fewer than the number of hypervascular foci at angiography (n = 37). The study outcomes were liver transplantation and tumor recurrence after transplantation. The detection of at least 3 more hypervascular foci at angiography versus the number of HCC nodules on CT/MRI was associated with a significantly lower rate of transplantation [multivariate subhazard ratio (SHR), 0.39; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.17–0.92]. The detection of fewer hypervascular foci at angiography versus the number of HCC nodules on CT/MRI was associated with a significantly higher rate of tumor recurrence after transplantation (multivariate SHR, 3.49; 95% CI, 1.27–9.56). In conclusion, liver transplant candidates with HCC who demonstrate discordant findings between angiography and CE CT or MRI may be at a higher risk for dropout from the transplant list and for tumor recurrence after transplantation. PMID:25678220

  9. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  10. The effect of nitroglycerin on response to tracheal intubation. Assessment by radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, A.P.; Camporesi, E.M.; Sell, T.L.; Croughwell, N.; Silva, R.; Jones, R.H.; McIntyre, R.W.; Stanley, T.E.; Reves, J.G. )

    1989-06-01

    The effect of intravenous (IV) nitroglycerin (NTG) on perioperative myocardial ischemia as detected by single pass radionuclide angiocardiography was studied in 20 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Ten patients, selected at random, received IV NTG 1 microgram.kg-1.min-1 (NTG group) and 10 others, IV saline (control group). Anesthetic induction consisted of midazolam 0.2 mg.kg-1, vecuronium 0.1 mg.kg-1, and 50% N{sub 2}O in O{sub 2}. ECG leads I, II, and V5 were monitored for ST segment changes. Single pass radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) was performed at 5 times: prior to induction, prior to tracheal intubation, and at 1, 3.5, and 6 min following intubation. The presence of new regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) was determined from each RNA study as compared with the preinduction measurement. Apart from one patient in the control group who developed a new v wave after intubation, there was no evidence of ischemia by pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. No ECG evidence of ischemia was detected in any patient. Despite this, new regional wall motion abnormalities were observed in 3 patients in the control group and 1 patient in the NTG group. Blood pressure and heart rate responses of patients with new RWMA were not significantly different from other patients. The low incidence of ischemia in this population precludes a definitive statement regarding the efficacy of IV NTG, but the lower incidence of RWMA in the NTG group suggests a protective effect.

  11. Estimation of brain perfusion using Va value as initial distribution volume in radionuclide angiography with technetium-99m HMPAO

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, M.; Ikegami, T.

    1994-05-01

    Matsuda reported a non-invasive, simple method for the quantitative measurements of brain perfusion using radionuclide angiography with Tc-99m. HMPAO and showed graphical analysis of the ratio of brain activity to aortic arch activity gave two parameters, which are the slope of the fitted line (Ku:unidirectional influx constant) and its intercept with the yards (Vn:initial volume of distribution). Brain perfusion index (BPI),which is a connected Ku value, showed good correlation with cerebral blood flow determined with Xe-133 SPECT. The aim of our study is to elucidate the clinical significance of another parameter, Vn value, determined inpatients with cerebral vessel disease. Eighty-nine cases were studied and classified into three groups on the basis of clinical history and images of CT and/or MR: Group A, normal, 36 cases; Group B, infarction, 44 cases; Group C, subarachnoid hemorrhage, 9 cases. The average age of each group were not different statistically (63.3, 67.4 and 59.8, respectively). The average BPI values for group B and C were significantly lower than that of group A(7.7, 6. 8 and 9.5, respectively ). On the other hand, Vn for group C(0.23) was significantly lower than that for group A(0.45); however that for group B(0.49) was not. These findings indicate that cerebral blood flow in both infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage decrease but their circumstances near vessels differ from the aspect of initial volume of tracer distribution. This might help to understand or diagnose cerebral vessel diseases.

  12. Imaging of hepatic low density lipoprotein receptors by radionuclide scintiscanning in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huettinger, M; Corbett, J R; Schneider, W J; Willerson, J T; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1984-12-01

    The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor mediates the cellular uptake of plasma lipoproteins that are derived from very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). Most of the functional LDL receptors in the body are located in the liver. Here, we describe a radionuclide scintiscanning technique that permits the measurement of LDL receptors in the livers of intact rabbits. 123I-labeled VLDL were administered intravenously, and scintigraphic images of the liver and heart were obtained at intervals thereafter. In seven normal rabbits, radioactivity in the liver increased progressively between 1 and 20 min after injection, while radioactivity in the heart (reflecting that in plasma) decreased concomitantly. In Watanabe-heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, which lack LDL receptors on a genetic basis, there was little uptake of 123I-labeled VLDL into the liver and little decrease in cardiac radioactivity during this interval. These findings demonstrate that the LDL receptor is necessary for the hepatic uptake of VLDL-derived lipoproteins in the rabbit. Two conditions that diminish hepatic LDL receptor activity, cholesterol-feeding and prolonged fasting, also reduced the uptake of 123I-labeled VLDL in the liver as measured by scintiscanning. The data suggest that radionuclide scintiscanning can be used as a noninvasive method to quantify the number of LDL receptors expressed in the liver in vivo. PMID:6594702

  13. Effect of diltiazem on myocardial infarct size estimated by enzyme release, serial thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography and radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zannad, F.; Amor, M.; Karcher, G.; Maurin, P.; Ethevenot, G.; Sebag, C.; Bertrand, A.; Pernot, C.; Gilgenkrantz, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    Diltiazem is a calcium antagonist with demonstrated experimental cardioprotective effects. Its effects on myocardial infarct size were studied in 34 patients admitted within 6 hours after the first symptoms of acute myocardial infarction. These patients were randomized, double-blind to placebo or diltiazem (10-mg intravenous bolus followed by 15 mg/hr intravenous infusion during 72 hours, followed by 4 X 60 mg during 21 days). Myocardial infarct size was assessed by plasma creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB indexes, perfusion defect scores using single-photon emission computed tomography with thallium-201 and left ventricular ejection fraction measured by radionuclide angiography. Tomographic and angiographic scanning was performed serially before randomization, after 48 hours and 21 days later. Groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, inclusion time and baseline infarct location and size. Results showed no difference in creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB data between controls and treated patients, a significant decrease in the perfusion defect scores in the diltiazem group (+0.1 +/- 3.0 placebo vs -2.2 +/- 1.9 diltiazem, p less than 0.02) and a better ejection fraction recovery in the diltiazem group (-4.2 +/- 7.4 placebo vs +7.7 +/- 11.2 diltiazem, p less than 0.05). Myocardial infarct size estimates from perfusion defect scores and enzyme data were closely correlated. These preliminary results suggest that diltiazem may reduce ischemic injury in acute myocardial infarction.

  14. Quantitative radionuclide angiography in assessment of hemodynamic changes during upright exercise: observations in normal subjects, patient with coronary artery disease and patients with aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Kane, S.A.; Segal, B.L.

    1981-08-01

    Quantitative radionuclide angiography was used to evaluate hemodynamic changes in three subject groups during symptom-limited upright exercise. The 12 normal subjects had significant increases in heart rate, stroke volume, left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output during exercise; changes in end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were not significant. In the 24 patients with coronary artery disease there were significant increases in heart rate and cardiac output during exercise, but insignificant changes in end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes and ejection fraction. The change in diastolic volume in these patients was determined by the extent of coronary artery disease, propranolol therapy, end point of exercise and presence of collateral vessels. Furthermore, patients with previous myocardial infarction had a lower ejection fraction and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes during exercise than those without myocardial infarction. In the 12 patients with chronic aortic regurgitation of moderate to severe degree, there was a decrease in the end-diastolic volume during exercise. This response was distinctly different from that of the normal subjects or the patients with coronary artery disease. All three groups had a significant decrease in pulmonary transit time during exercise. It is concluded that changes in cardiac output in normal subjects during upright exercise are related to augmentation of stroke volume and tachycardia, whereas in patients with coronary artery disease they are related mainly to tachycardia.

  15. Catheter Angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  16. Use of multivariate analysis to improve the accuracy of radionuclide angiography with stress in detecting coronary artery disease in men

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, P.S.; Bible, M.; Ellestad, M.H.; Berge, R.; Johnson, K.; Hayes, M.

    1983-01-01

    A multivariate analysis (MVA) system was derived retrospectively from a population of 76 males with coronary artery disease and 18 control subjects. Posterior probabilities were then derived from such a system prospectively in a new male population of 11 subjects with normal coronary arteries and hemodynamics and 63 patients with coronary artery disease. The sensitivity was 84% compared to that for change in ejection fraction (delta EF) greater than or equal to 5 criterion of 71% (p less than 0.01), the specificity was 91% compared to 73% for the delta EF greater than or equal to 5 criterion (p greater than 0.05), and the correct classification rate was 85% compared to 72% for the delta EF greater than or equal to 5 criterion (p less than 0.01). The significant variables were: change in EF with exercise, percent maximal heart rate, change in end-diastolic volume (delta EDV) with exercise, change in R wave, and exercise duration. Application of the multivariate approach to radionuclide imaging with stress, including both exercise and nuclear parameters, significantly improved the diagnostic accuracy of the test and allowed for a probability statement concerning the likelihood of disease.

  17. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  18. Radionuclide Ventriculography or Radionuclide Angiography (MUGA Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Attack Heart Failure Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) ... today ! Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure 4 ...

  19. Extremity angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... angiography. Angiography uses x-rays and a special dye to see inside the arteries. Arteries are blood ... like monitor, and uses them as a guide. Dye flows through the catheter and into the arteries. ...

  20. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  1. Cerebral angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral angiography is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on an x-ray table. ... be done in preparation for medical treatment (interventional radiology procedures) by way of certain blood vessels. What ...

  2. Cerebral angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... computer removes the bones and tissues on the images being viewed, so that only the blood vessels filled with the dye are seen. This is called digital subtraction angiography (DSA). After the x-rays are ...

  3. Coronary angiography

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary angiography is often done along with cardiac catheterization . This is a procedure which measures pressures in ... Cardiac catheterization carries a slightly increased risk when compared with other heart tests. However, the test is very safe ...

  4. Coronary angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... angiography is a procedure that uses a special dye (contrast material) and x-rays to see how ... the catheter. Once the catheter is in place, dye (contrast material) is injected into the catheter. X- ...

  5. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  6. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  7. Video instrumentation for radionuclide angiocardiography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of videoscintiscopes for performing radioisotopic angiocardiography with a scintillation camera are described, and use of these instruments in performing clinical studies is illustrated. Radionuclide angiocardiography is a simple, quick and accurate procedure recommended as a screening test for patients with a variety of congenital and acquired cardiovascular lesions. When performed in conjunction with coronary arterial catheterization, dynamic radionuclide angiography may provide useful information about regional myocardial perfusion. Quantitative capabilities greatly enhance the potential of this diagnostic tool.

  8. Magnetic resonance angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... angiography is an MRI exam of the blood vessels. Unlike traditional angiography that involves placing a tube ( ... MRA is used to look at the blood vessels in all parts of the body, including the ...

  9. Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    Radionuclide therapy utilizes unsealed sources of radionuclides as a treatment for cancer or other pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of β and α particles, as well as those that emit Auger electrons, have been used for this purpose. In this chapter, radiochemical aspects of radionuclide therapy, including criteria for radionuclide selection, radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, and radiation dosimetry are discussed.

  10. What Is Coronary Angiography?

    MedlinePlus

    ... OG-rah-fee) is a test that uses dye and special x rays to show the insides ... the coronary arteries. Overview During coronary angiography, special dye is released into the bloodstream. The dye makes ...

  11. Radionuclide trap

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  12. Radionuclide cisternogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. A radionuclide cisternogram is a nuclear scan test. It is used to diagnose problems ... damage. The amount of radiation used during the nuclear scan is very small. Almost all of the ...

  13. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  14. Pediatric digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, G.M.; Wesenberg, R.L.; Mueller, D.L.; Reid, R.H.

    1984-12-01

    Experience with intravenous digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in infants and children is limited, although its relative rate of performance, low complication rate, and diagnostic accuracy indicate great potential. The authors performed 87 DSA examinations (74 patients) and obtained sufficient detail to facilitate diagnosis in most cases. The major problems of patient movement and overlapping vessels can be minimized by judicious use of sedation and strict attention to technique. Exposure of patients to radiation has not been a limiting factor since our system uses low exposure factors. Our results demonstrate that DSA has wide applicability to many organ systems and is especially useful in intracranial disease and for preoperative evaluation of neoplasms.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Angiography: Scientific Principles and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas which occurs naturally in the atmosphere and human body. With the advent of digital subtraction angiography, the gas has been used as a safe and useful alternative contrast agent in both arteriography and venography. Because of its lack of renal toxicity and allergic potential, CO2 is a preferred contrast agent in patients with renal failure or contrast allergy, and particularly in patients who require large volumes of contrast medium for complex endovascular procedures. Understanding of the unique physical properties of CO2 (high solubility, low viscosity, buoyancy, and compressibility) is essential in obtaining a successful CO2 angiogram and in guiding endovascular intervention. Unlike iodinated contrast material, CO2 displaces the blood and produces a negative contrast for digital subtraction imaging. Indications for use of CO2 as a contrast agent include: aortography and runoff, detection of bleeding, renal transplant arteriography, portal vein visualization with wedged hepatic venous injection, venography, arterial and venous interventions, and endovascular aneurysm repair. CO2 should not be used in the thoracic aorta, the coronary artery, and cerebral circulation. Exploitation of CO2 properties, avoidance of air contamination and facile catheterization technique are important to the safe and effective performance of CO2 angiography and CO2-guided endovascular intervention. PMID:26509137

  16. Carbon Dioxide Angiography: Scientific Principles and Practice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung Jae

    2015-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas which occurs naturally in the atmosphere and human body. With the advent of digital subtraction angiography, the gas has been used as a safe and useful alternative contrast agent in both arteriography and venography. Because of its lack of renal toxicity and allergic potential, CO2 is a preferred contrast agent in patients with renal failure or contrast allergy, and particularly in patients who require large volumes of contrast medium for complex endovascular procedures. Understanding of the unique physical properties of CO2 (high solubility, low viscosity, buoyancy, and compressibility) is essential in obtaining a successful CO2 angiogram and in guiding endovascular intervention. Unlike iodinated contrast material, CO2 displaces the blood and produces a negative contrast for digital subtraction imaging. Indications for use of CO2 as a contrast agent include: aortography and runoff, detection of bleeding, renal transplant arteriography, portal vein visualization with wedged hepatic venous injection, venography, arterial and venous interventions, and endovascular aneurysm repair. CO2 should not be used in the thoracic aorta, the coronary artery, and cerebral circulation. Exploitation of CO2 properties, avoidance of air contamination and facile catheterization technique are important to the safe and effective performance of CO2 angiography and CO2-guided endovascular intervention. PMID:26509137

  17. Fluorescent blood cell angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-nun, Joshua; Constable, Ian J.

    1994-06-01

    Fluorescein angiography is currently the main method for evaluation of the retinal vascular patency. Ashton noted that capillary patency to the small fluorescein molecule may differ from that of the larger red blood cells. He concluded that fluorescein angiography is not able to demonstrate a developing stenosis, that might be the precipitating cause of a later capillary closure in various microvasculopathies. Sarelius et al have shown, in hamster cheek pouch and cremaster muscle, that fluorescently labeled erythrocytes in known concentrations can be used for the direct measurement of capillary flow parameters. The only assumption that this method relies on, is that the labeled cells are rheologically normal and therefore reflect the behavior of the total cell population. We have developed a new method for an in-vivo, real-time demonstration of the blood cell flow in the retinal capillary net. Based on the assumption presented by Sarelius et al, measurement and analysis of the retinal capillary blood cell flow is also possible from the results achieved by the new method.

  18. Radionuclide cisternogram

    MedlinePlus

    A radionuclide cisternogram is a nuclear scan test. It is used to diagnose problems with the flow of spinal fluid. ... a lumbar puncture include pain at the injection site, bleeding, and ... used during the nuclear scan is very small. Almost all of the ...

  19. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  20. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  1. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  2. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  3. Tricuspid insufficiency detected by equilibrium gated radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, B.; Pavel, D.G.; Lam, W.; Byrom, E.; Swiryn, S.; Pietras, R.; Rosen, K.M.

    1981-10-01

    The results of a gated radionuclide cardiac study are reported in a patient with biventricular failure and tricuspid insufficiency demonstrated by clinical evaluation, M-mode and 2-D sector echocardiography, and cardia catheterization. The processed gated radionuclide cardiac study showed a left ventricular/right ventricular stroke volume ratio of 0.5; expansion of the hepatic blood pool demonstrated by hepatic time activity curve and calculation of an '''expansion fraction''; and synchronous changes of count rate of the atrial and hepatic regions detected by phase analysis (similar phase shifts).

  4. Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

    MedlinePlus

    ... jointly produced, collaborated with, or endorsed by the Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. Press & News » Review ... SCAI Member? Create an Account Advertisement Advertisement The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Foundation, 1100 17th ...

  5. Radionuclide scanning in children with rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weinblatt, M.E.; Miller, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy was performed in 46 children with rhabdomyosarcoma. Of the 63 radiologically confirmed sites of bone disease, 76% were detected by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled phosphate uptake. All 15 sites of hepatic involvement and eight of the nine cranial sites of disease exhibited isotope accumulation. Gallium 67 scans showed 57% of the 43 proven sites of disease, including four previously unsuspected areas. Twelve false-positive sites were obtained with gallium. Radionuclide scanning is a valuable aid in the diagnostic evaluation and management of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

  6. Digital subtraction angiography of the pulmonary arteries for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, J.W.; Verhoeven, L.A.J.; Kersbergen, J.J.; Overtoom, T.T.C.

    1983-06-01

    A comparative study of radionuclide scanning (perfusion studies in all 18 patients and ventilation studies in 9) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed in 18 patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism. In 17 patients good visualization of the arteries was obtained with DSA; 10 of these patients had no pre-existing lung disease, and 7 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The information provided by DSA in this small group was equal to or better than that of scintigraphy, especially in patients with COPD, and the reliability of DSA was superior to that of the radionuclide scintigraphy. Methods for preventing motion artifacts with DSA are also described.

  7. Hepatic Artery Pseudoaneurysm; Simple or Difficult to Diagnose?

    PubMed

    Bashiri, Kiandokht; Roushan, Nader; Hamidian, Seyyed Mohammadtaghi

    2016-07-01

    Ruptured hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (HAP) generally leads to the hemobilia and can be diagnosed by endoscopy. This condition mostly occurs after an iatrogenic trauma. The management of the HAP is still a big challenge. Due to an increased rate of HAP cases over the last decade, appropriate management is necessary for the optimal outcomes achievement. Here, we report a 59-year-old woman presenting with hematemesis, melena, hematochezia, and epigastric pain. The CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliay dilation with hypodense material, probably a clot inside it. Subsequently, the patient was transferred to an angiography unit. Celiac artery angiography demonstrated a right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm, which subsequently embolized. PMID:27362248

  8. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... or past infection, or immunity to hepatitis A Hepatitis B tests: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you have ...

  9. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living ...

  10. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  11. Hepatitis Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by viruses. They include hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. To diagnose hepatitis, your health care provider will ask you about your medical history and symptoms, do a physical exam, and order blood tests. There are blood tests for each type of ...

  12. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary vasculature resulting in intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cuntaeous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  13. Radionuclide demonstration of intrapulmonary shunting in cirrhosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, E.R.; Thrall, J.H.; Dantzker, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The association of hepatic cirrhosis and severe arterial hypoxemia has been well described. Although alterations in ventilatory function may partially account for the hypoxemia, the principal mechanism is thought to be a microangiopathic change in the pulmonary arteriovenous shunting with resultant systemic desaturation. Whole-body radionuclide scans with technetium-99m macroaggrregated albumin (/sup 99m/Tc MAA) labeling have been diagnostic of right-to-left shunting by their demonstration of tracer accumulation within the extrapulmonary circulation. A case of severe pulmonary arteriovenous shunting in an alcoholic patient in whom hepatic disease had not been of apparent clinical significance before radionuclide scanning is reported. He did not have cutaneous angiomata as have all other patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and hypoxemia.

  14. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  15. Surgical management of hepatic arterioportal fistula in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Priya; Shanmugam, N P; Vij, M; Rela, M

    2014-05-01

    Congenital arterioportal fistulae in the liver are rare malformations which can lead to portal hypertension. We report a hepatic arterioportal fistula in a neonate who presented with intestinal hypoperfusion. Computerised tomography angiography showed a fistulous communication between the left hepatic artery and portal vein with hypoperfusion of small and large bowel. A formal left hepatectomy was done followed by clinical improvement and reduction in portal venous pressures. The case and the literature pertaining to it are discussed. PMID:24448912

  16. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected with the hepatitis B virus, can I breastfeed? • If I am infected with the hepatitis B ... infected with the hepatitis C virus, can I breastfeed? • Glossary What are hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  17. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... There are different tests for hepatitis A and B. A positive test is ... may mean: You currently have a hepatitis infection. This may ...

  18. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  19. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ... medical care is an important factor in staying as healthy as possible. The American Liver Foundation is ...

  1. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the hepatitis B virus is also present. Transmission Hepatitis D can be found in the blood, ... other body fluids of people who are infected. Transmission happens when infected body fluid enters another person’s ...

  2. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  3. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  4. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  5. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  6. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  7. Radionuclide deposition control

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, William F.; McGuire, Joseph C.

    1980-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  8. Simultaneous technetium-99m MIBI angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baillet, G.Y.; Mena, I.G.; Kuperus, J.H.; Robertson, J.M.; French, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Resting first-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA) was performed with the myocardial perfusion agent technetium-99m MIBI. In 27 patients, it was compared with technetium-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid FPRNA. A significant correlation was present in left (r = 0.93, p less than 0.001) as well as right (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001) ventricular ejection fraction measured with both radiopharmaceuticals. In 13 patients, MIBI derived segmental wall motion was compared with contrast ventriculography. A high correlation was present (p less than 0.001), and qualitative agreement was found in 38/52 segments. In 19 patients with myocardial infarction a significant correlation was present between MIBI segmental wall motion and perfusion scores (p less than 0.001). In ten patients with a history of myocardial infarction, 18 myocardial segments demonstrated diseased coronary vessels and impaired wall motion at contrast angiography. These segments were all identified by the MIBI wall motion and perfusion study. We conclude that MIBI is a promising agent for simultaneous evaluation of cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at rest.

  9. An Unusual Case of Hepatic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Frena, Antonio; Zanetti, Gianfranco; Gozzetti, Giuseppe

    1991-01-01

    A case is reported of a large hepatic tumor in a patient aged 71. Preoperative diagnostic techniques, including echography, CT and angiography, did not provide sufficient criteria for a precise diagnosis. The mass was removed with an extended right hepatectomy with no particular physiopathological consequences. Histological analysis revealed that this was a metastasis from a melonoma of the choroid, operated on 17 years previously. PMID:1859802

  10. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... suggest medicines to help relieve your symptoms. The hepatitis A vaccine can prevent HAV. Good hygiene can also ...

  11. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Hepatitis A Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis * A is a virus , or infection, ...

  12. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  13. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  14. Clinical Brain Death with False Positive Radionuclide Cerebral Perfusion Scans

    PubMed Central

    Venkatram, Sindhaghatta; Bughio, Sara; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Practice guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology for the determination of brain death in adults define brain death as “the irreversible loss of function of the brain, including the brainstem.” Neurological determination of brain death is primarily based on clinical examination; if clinical criteria are met, a definitive confirmatory test is indicated. The apnea test remains the gold standard for confirmation. In patients with factors that confound the clinical determination or when apnea tests cannot safely be performed, an ancillary test is required to confirm brain death. Confirmatory ancillary tests for brain death include (a) tests of electrical activity (electroencephalography (EEG) and somatosensory evoked potentials) and (b) radiologic examinations of blood flow (contrast angiography, transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), and radionuclide methods). Of these, however, radionuclide studies are used most commonly. Here we present data from two patients with a false positive Radionuclide Cerebral Perfusion Scan (RCPS). PMID:26167307

  15. Cognitive function in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Devapalasundarum, A N; Silbert, B S; Evered, L A; Scott, D A; MacIsaac, A I; Maruff, P T

    2010-01-01

    Objective To measure cognition in patients before and after coronary angiography. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting University teaching hospital. Patients 56 patients presenting for elective coronary angiography. Main outcome measures Computerised cognitive test battery administered before coronary angiography, before discharge from hospital and 7 days after discharge. A matched healthy control group was used as a comparator. Results When analysed by group, coronary angiography patients performed worse than matched controls at each time point. When the cognitive change was examined for each individual, of the 48 patients tested at discharge, 19 (39.6%) were classified as having a new cognitive dysfunction, and of 49 patients tested at day 7, six (12.2%) were classified as having a new cognitive dysfunction. Conclusions The results confirm that cognitive function is decreased in patients who have cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, coronary angiography may exacerbate this impaired cognition in some patients.

  16. The interval ejection fraction: a cineangiographic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, A.J.; Bianco, J.A.; Shulman, R.M.; Folland, E.D.; Parisi, A.F.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of the first-third ejection fraction (1/3 EF) for detecting patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), resting contrast ventriculography and first-pass radionuclide angiography with a high-count-rate, multicrystal camera system were performed in 47 subjects: 22 normal controls and 25 patients with clinically stable angina pectoris and severe CAD without and with resting wall motion abnormalities. By contrast angiography, only group 3 had depressed global EF or 1/3 EF compared with control. Whereas 11 of 25 CAD patients had global EF outside the normal range, only two of 25 had depressed 1/3 EF. Both had left ventricular asynergy and a depressed global EF. Studies performed using first-pass radionuclide angiography revealed similar results. A wide range of 1/3 EF values was found in normal subjects by both techniques. Thus, the ejection fraction during the first third of systole at rest is of limited value for detecting patients with CAD.

  17. Hepatitis Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  18. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  19. Impact of Cardiac Service Availability on Case-Selection for Angiography and Survival Associated with Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Dendukuri, Nandini; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; McNeil, Barbara J

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine whether availability of cardiac services at the admitting hospital affects case-selection for angiography and one-year survival following angiography, within groups of patients who have similar clinical need for angiography according to published criteria. Study Setting Elderly Medicare beneficiaries (37,788) discharged with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) from hospitals in seven U.S. states between February 1994 and July 1995. We focused on patients who were eligible to receive angiography 12 or more hours after symptom onset. Data Collection Data were abstracted from patient's medical records, Medicare National Claims Standard Analytic Files, Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Provider of Service File and Health Insurance Master File. Methods Admitting hospitals were classified as offering no cardiac services, angiography only, or revascularization. Case-selection differences across these three types of hospitals were examined by comparing relative risk of receiving angiography for various patient and hospital characteristics. Relative differences in one-year survival rate, comparing patients who received angiography to those who did not, were estimated within each hospital type and clinical need category (necessary, appropriate, or uncertain) after matching on propensity to receive angiography. Principal Findings Compared to patients for whom angiography was deemed necessary, the relative risk of receiving angiography among those for whom it was deemed of uncertain benefit was 0.58, 0.79, and 0.92 (p-value of homogeneity test < 0.001) at hospitals offering no cardiac services, angiography only, and revascularization, respectively. There was no significant difference in survival following angiography across hospital types, overall as well as within clinical need categories. Conclusions Despite increased case selection at hospitals with on-site cardiac services, there was no evidence of increase in the survival rate

  20. Digital subtraction angiography of the heart and lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Moodie, D.S.; Yiannikas, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Physical Principles of Cardiac Digital Subtraction Angiography, The Use of Intravenous Digital Subtraction Angiography in Evaluating Patients with Complex Congenital Heart Disease, Exercise Intravenous Digital Subtraction Angiograpny, Cardiomyopathic and Cardiac Neoplastic Disease, Digital Subtraction Angiography in the Catheterization Laboratory, and Cardiac Digital Subtraction Angiography - Future Directions.

  1. "Geyser" leakage on fluorescein angiography.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jaime; Fagan, Xavier J; Lifshitz, Tova; Schneck, Marina

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old patient with diabetes was followed up due to moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema in the right eye. Visual acuity was 6/36. Focal macular laser was conducted (A). Three years later, the patient presented with blurry vision in the right eye. Visual acuity was 3/60. Vitreous hemorrhage was observed (B), and neovascularization of the disc was suspected (C). Fluorescein angiography (D, mid venous phase; E-F, recirculation phase) confirmed neovascularization of the disc and depicted a striking vertical leakage. Panretinal photocoagulation was started. Possible explanations for the "geyser" leakage may be either a partial posterior vitreous detachment allowing the fluorescein to track upwards but not elsewhere or a pocket of syneretic vitreous allowing the fluorescein passage in which to diffuse, much like the passage the blood would have taken. PMID:24548789

  2. [Nursing care in fluorescein angiography].

    PubMed

    Santos-Blanco, Feliciano

    2008-01-01

    Fluoresceinic angiography of the ocular fundus is a diagnostic technique to study retinal and choroidal circulation. This technique consists of parenteral administration of 500 mg of sodium fluorescein 10% and photographing the fluorescence in the eye vessels. Although this substance is fairly safe, it may also produce mild, moderate or severe local and/or general adverse reactions. The nursing process is routinely used in hospital units but not always in outpatient clinics, even through the use of invasive procedures with intravenous medication administration is common. Therefore, nurses, as those reponsible for intravenous administration, should use the nursing process to guarantee the quality of care required by the patient. To do this, we describe an individualized care plan based on evaluation by Marjorie Gordon's functional health patterns, NANDA's nursing diagnoses Taxonomy II, Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC) and potential complications of the procedure. PMID:18579067

  3. Radionuclide bone imaging and densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclides and the Normal Bone Scan; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Malignant Disease; Pediatric Applications of Radionuclide Bone Imaging; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Arthritis and Metabolic and Miscellaneous Disorders; and Soft Tissue Activity on the Radionuclide Bone Scan.

  4. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  5. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  6. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  7. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family ...

  8. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive ... possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, it’s ...

  10. CT angiography in complex upper extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, M A; Klein, M B; Rubin, G D; McAdams, T R; Chang, J

    2004-10-01

    Computed tomography angiography is a new technique that provides high-resolution, three-dimensional vascular imaging as well as excellent bone and soft tissue spatial relationships. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of computed tomography angiography in planning upper extremity reconstruction. Seventeen computed tomography angiograms were obtained in 14 patients over a 20-month period. All studies were obtained on an outpatient basis with contrast administered through a peripheral vein. All the studies demonstrated the pertinent anatomy and the intraoperative findings were as demonstrated in all cases. Information from two studies significantly altered pre-operative planning. The average charge for computed tomography angiography was 1,140 dollars, compared to 3,900 dollars for traditional angiography. PMID:15336751

  11. Giant coronary aneurysm caused by Kawasaki disease: consistency between catheter angiography and electrocardiogram gated dual-source computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun-Ha; Ju, Jung-Ki; Cho, Min-Jung; Lee, Ji-Won; Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 5-year-old child with coronary complications due to Kawasaki disease; this patient unintentionally underwent both dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography and invasive coronary angiographic examination in 2 months. This case highlights the strong consistency of the results between DSCT coronary angiography and invasive coronary angiography. Compared to conventional invasive coronary angiography, DSCT coronary angiography offered additional advantages such as minimal invasiveness and less radiation exposure. PMID:26770226

  12. Radionuclides in haematology

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, S.M.; Bayly, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: Some prerequisites to the use of radionuclides in haematology; Instrumentation and counting techniques; In vitro techniques; Cell labelling; Protein labelling; Autoradiography; Imaging and quantitative scanning; Whole body counting; Absorption and excretion studies; Blood volume studies; Plasma clearance studies; and Radionuclide blood cell survival studies.

  13. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  14. Gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive jaundice: Think of hepatic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Fabrice; Morère, Pierre-Henri; Constantin, Christophe; Christodoulou, Michel; Roulin, Didier

    2016-06-27

    Hemobilia is an uncommon and potential life-threatening condition mainly due to hepato-biliary tree traumatic or iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneously ruptured aneurysm of the hepatic artery is seldom described. We report the case of an 89-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding, whose ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a non-traumatic, spontaneous aneurysm of the right hepatic artery. The oeso-gastro-duodenoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal any bleeding at the ampulla of Vater, nor anywhere else. Selective angiography confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic artery aneurysm and revealed a full hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was successfully treated by selective embolization of microcoils. We discuss the etiologies of hemobilia and its treatment with selective embolization, which remains favored over surgical treatment. Although aneurysm of the hepatic artery is rare, especially without trauma, a high index of suspicion is needed in order to ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:27358680

  15. Coronary angiography in rats using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, S.; Hyodo, K.; Akishima, S.; Sato, F.; Imazuru, T.; Noma, M.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Shigeta, O.; Sakakibara, Y.

    2005-08-01

    Monochromatic X-rays obtained from synchrotron radiation (SR), provide a high-quality tool for medical imaging including, coronary angiography. To pursue higher resolution in experimental coronary angiography, a smaller visual field had seemed to be inevitable. However, there are cases in which whole coronary angiography is preferable in order to investigate such vasomotor activities as coronary vasospasm. To meet these requirements, we are trying to develop a new type of SR coronary angiography using Langendorff excised rat hearts. Experiments were performed at Photon Factory Accelerator Ring (PF-AR), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan. SR was obtained from a 6.5 GeV electron beam. The energy of the monochromatic X-rays was 33.3 keV, which is just above the K-edge energy of iodine. Iodine (35%) was infused as a contrast material to the aorta at the rate of 1 ml/min for 1 s. In the image obtained from coronary angiography, the resolution was 13 μm and the width of the visual field 26 mm×26 mm. Whole heart coronary vasculature identifying small arteries down to those 100 μm in diameter was obtained in beating hearts. Arteries as small as 50 μm were identified in arrested hearts. This method of SR coronary angiography is useful for the investigation of whole coronary configurations simultaneously in one visual field to the level of microvasculature.

  16. Three-dimensional coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suurmond, Rolf; Wink, Onno; Chen, James; Carroll, John

    2005-04-01

    Three-Dimensional Coronary Angiography (3D-CA) is a novel tool that allows clinicians to view and analyze coronary arteries in three-dimensional format. This will help to find accurate length estimates and to find the optimal viewing angles of a lesion based on the three-dimensional vessel orientation. Various advanced algorithms are incorporated in this 3D processing utility including 3D-RA calibration, ECG phase selection, 2D vessel extraction, and 3D vessel modeling into a utility with optimized workflow and ease-of-use features, which is fully integrated in the environment of the x-ray catheterization lab. After the 3D processing, the 3D vessels can be viewed and manipulated interactively inside the operating room. The TrueView map provides a quick overview of gantry angles with optimal visualization of a single or bifurcation lesion. Vessel length measurements can be performed without risk of underestimating a vessel segment due to foreshortening. Vessel cross sectional diameters can also be measured. Unlike traditional, projection-based quantitative coronary analysis, the additional process of catheter calibration is not needed for diameter measurements. Validation studies show a high reproducibility of the measurements, with little user dependency.

  17. MD CT Angiography and MR Angiography of Nonatherosclerotic Renal Artery Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Flors, Lucia; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos; Ahmad, Ehab Ali; Norton, Patrick T.; Turba, Ulku C.; Bozlar, Ugur; Hagspiel, Klaus D.

    2011-12-15

    We reviewed the computed tomographic and magnetic resonance angiographic appearances of the various nonatherosclerotic renal artery pathologies. Rapid progress in cross-sectional techniques has allowed computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography to replace digital subtraction angiography in most circumstances. When state-of-the-art equipment and optimized protocols are used, diagnosing a wide range of nonatherosclerotic pathologies is possible.

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  19. Radionuclides in US coals

    SciTech Connect

    Bisselle, C. A.; Brown, R. D.

    1984-03-01

    The current state of knowledge with respect to radionuclide concentrations in US coals is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the levels of uranium in coal (and lignite) which are considered to represent a concern resulting from coal combustion; areas of the US where such levels have been found; and possible origins of high radionuclide levels in coal. The report reviews relevant studies and presents new data derived from a computerized search of radionuclide content in about 4000 coal samples collected throughout the coterminous US. 103 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Superiority of radionuclide over oximetric measurement of left to right shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, E J; Ellam, S V; Lorber, A; Jones, O D; Tynan, M J; Maisey, M N

    1985-01-01

    In 100 children with suspected left to right shunts the ratio of pulmonary to systemic flow was measured both by oximetry and first pass radionuclide angiography. The pulmonary time activity curve from the radionuclide study was analysed by the method of gamma variate fits. There was strong correlation between the two techniques; weaker correlation was found when the shunt was at atrial rather than ventricular level. This difference can be explained only by problems with the oximetric rather than the radionuclide technique. Although there are important limitations to the radionuclide method, it is the more precise and less invasive of the two and is to be preferred when the accurate measurement of left to right shunts is required. PMID:3994867

  1. The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional Angiography with a Flat Panel Detector of Direct Conversion Type in a Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization Procedure for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kakeda, Shingo Korogi, Yukunori; Hatakeyama, Yoshihisa; Ohnari, Norihiro; Oda, Nobuhiro; Nishino, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Wataru

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a three-dimensional (3D) angiography system using a flat panel detector of direct conversion type in treatments with subsegmental transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Thirty-six consecutive patients who underwent hepatic angiography were prospectively examined. First, two radiologists evaluated the degree of visualization of the peripheral branches of the hepatic arteries on 3D digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Then the radiologists evaluated the visualization of tumor staining and feeding arteries in 25 patients (30 HCCs) who underwent subsegmental TACE. The two radiologists who performed the TACE assessed whether the additional information provided by 3D DSA was useful for treatments. In 34 (94.4%) of 36 patients, the subsegmental branches of the hepatic arteries were sufficiently visualized. The feeding arteries of HCCs were sufficiently visualized in 28 (93%) of 30 HCCs, whereas tumor stains were sufficiently visualized in 18 (60%). Maximum intensity projection images were significantly superior to volume recording images for visualization of the tumor staining and feeding arteries of HCCs. In 27 (90%) of 30 HCCs, 3D DSA provided additional useful information for subsegmental TACE. The high-quality 3D DSA with flat panel detector angiography system provided a precise vascular road map, which was useful for performing subsegmental TACE .of HCCs.

  2. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . 2014;161(1):58-66. PMID 24863637 ... Development Conference Statement: Management of hepatitis B. Ann Intern Med . 2009;150:104-10. PMID: 19124811 www. ...

  3. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Change Plan Wallet card for patients to record their alcohol use over a 4-week period as a way to monitor and reduce their drinking behavior. Glossary Definitions of terms commonly used with viral hepatitis and ...

  4. Radionuclides in Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, E. D.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a radionuclide imaging technique, including the gamma camera, image analysis computer, radiopharmaceuticals, and positron emission tomography. Several pictures showing the use of this technique are presented. (YP)

  5. Radionuclide Behavior in Containments.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-02-14

    MATADOR analyzes the transport and deposition of radionuclides as vapor or aerosol through Light Water Reactor (LWR) containments during severe accidents and calculates environmental release fractions of radionuclides as a function of time. It is intended for use in system risk studies. The principal output is information on the timing and magnitude of radionuclide releases to the environment as a result of severely degraded core accidents. MATADOR considers the transport of radionuclides through the containmentmore » and their removal by natural deposition and the operation of engineered safety systems such as sprays. Input data on the source term from the primary system, the containment geometry, and thermal-hydraulic conditions are required.« less

  6. Late hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare complication after resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Javier; Naranjo, Alvaro; Ciria, Ruben; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Juan-Manuel; Zurera, Luis; López-Cillero, Pedro

    2008-10-14

    We report an unusual pathological entity of a pseudoaneurysm of the right hepatic artery, which developed two years after the resection of a type II hilar cholangiocarcinoma and secondary to an excessive skeletonization for regional lymphadenectomy and neoadjuvant external-beam radiotherapy. After a sudden and massive hematemesis, a multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA) showed a hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. Angiography with embolization of the pseudoaneurysm was attempted using microcoils with adequate patency of the hepatic artery and the occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm. A new episode of hematemesis 3 wk later revealed a partial revascularization of the pseudoaneurysm. A definitive interventional radiological treatment consisting of transarterial embolization (TAE) of the right hepatic artery with stainless steel coils and polyvinyl alcohol particles was effective and well-tolerated with normal liver function tests and without signs of liver infarction. PMID:18855995

  7. Hepatitis C - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus (HCV). Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis A and hepatitis B . ... Elisofon SA, Jonas MMF. Viral hepatitis in children. In: Boyer TD, Manns MP, Sanyal AJ, eds. Zakim & Boyer's Hepatology: A Textbook of Liver Disease. 6th ed. ...

  8. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  9. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis D virus ... Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is found only in people who carry the hepatitis B virus. HDV may make liver ... B virus but who never had symptoms. Hepatitis D infects about 15 million people worldwide. It occurs ...

  10. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  11. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  12. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  13. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis A FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  14. Full-field optical micro-angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingyi; Zeng, Yaguang; Liang, Xianjun; Lu, Xuanlong; Feng, Guanping; Han, Dingan; Yang, Guojian

    2014-02-01

    We present a detailed description of full-field optical micro-angiography on the basis of frequency-domain laser speckle imaging with intensity fluctuation modulation (LSI-IFM). The imaging approach works based on the instantaneous local intensity fluctuation realized via the combination of short exposure and low sampling rate of a camera and appropriate magnification of a microscope. In vivo experiments on mouse ear verify the theoretical description we made for the imaging mechanism and demonstrate the ability of LSI-IFM as optical micro-angiography. By introducing a fundus camera into LSI-IFM system, our approach has a potential application in label-free retina optical micro-angiography.

  15. Three-phase radionuclide bone scanning in evaluation of local radiation injury. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Monsein, L.; Davis, M.; Rosenberg, R.; Kelsey, C.; Listrom, M.

    1987-10-01

    The management of local radiation injuries is influenced by the degree of vascular compromise within the skin and underlying tissues. Other authors have used thermography and angiography in assessing the blood flow to radiation damaged tissues. This report describes the use of radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of a patient who developed necrosis of his distal digits following a radiation accident. In addition to determining the vascular status of the hands, imaging helped indicate an appropriate level for amputation.

  16. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... Stomach ache Nausea Diarrhea No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will ...

  17. Method and apparatus for separating radionuclides from non-radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Harp, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    In an apparatus for separating radionuclides from non-radionuclides in a mixture of nuclear waste, a vessel is provided wherein the mixture is heated to a temperature greater than the temperature of vaporization for the non-radionuclides but less than the temperature of vaporization for the radionuclides. Consequently the non-radionuclides are vaporized while the non-radionuclides remain the solid or liquid state. The non-radionuclide vapors are withdrawn from the vessel and condensed to produce a flow of condensate. When this flow decreases the heat is reduced to prevent temperature spikes which might otherwise vaporize the radionuclides. The vessel is removed and capped with the radioactive components of the apparatus and multiple batches of the radionuclide residue disposed therein. Thus the vessel ultimately provides a burial vehicle for all of the radioactive components of the process.

  18. Aberrant systemic arterial supply to normal lung arising from the proper hepatic artery discovered during transarterial chemoembolization.

    PubMed

    Walsworth, Matthew K; Yap, Felix Y; McWilliams, Justin P

    2015-11-01

    We report a rare case of dual arterial supply to an otherwise normal lung discovered incidentally during initial angiography performed with the intent of chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition to normal hepatic arterial supply, the proper hepatic artery provided systemic arterial supply to the lower lobe of the left lung. Subsequent chest computed tomography angiography demonstrated a normal tracheobronchial tree and normal pulmonary arterial supply to the lung. Although other anatomic variants have been reported, there are no other reported cases of systemic arterial supply from the proper hepatic artery to the lung. Identifying systemic arterial supply to the lung during angiography is important while performing transcatheter chemoembolization or radioembolization in the liver in order to minimize non-target embolization of the lung. PMID:27252792

  19. Aberrant systemic arterial supply to normal lung arising from the proper hepatic artery discovered during transarterial chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Walsworth, Matthew K; Yap, Felix Y; McWilliams, Justin P

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of dual arterial supply to an otherwise normal lung discovered incidentally during initial angiography performed with the intent of chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition to normal hepatic arterial supply, the proper hepatic artery provided systemic arterial supply to the lower lobe of the left lung. Subsequent chest computed tomography angiography demonstrated a normal tracheobronchial tree and normal pulmonary arterial supply to the lung. Although other anatomic variants have been reported, there are no other reported cases of systemic arterial supply from the proper hepatic artery to the lung. Identifying systemic arterial supply to the lung during angiography is important while performing transcatheter chemoembolization or radioembolization in the liver in order to minimize non-target embolization of the lung. PMID:27252792

  20. Fluorescein and Indocyanine Green Angiography for Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Herbort, Carl P

    2009-01-01

    In recent years enormous progress has been achieved in investigational procedures for uveitis. Imaging is one such example with the advent of new methods such as indocyanine green angiography, ultrasound biomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography to cite only the most important. This tremendous increase in precision and accuracy in the assessment of the level and degree of inflammation and its monitoring comes in parallel with the development of extremely potent and efficacious therapies. In view of these developments, our whole attitude in the appraisal and investigation of the uveitis patient has to be adapted and correctly reoriented integrating the recent developments and this is no different for ocular angiography. PMID:20404985

  1. Radiologic Damage Control: Evaluation of a Combined CT and Angiography Suite with a Pivoting Table

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, Xavier; Fanchamps, Jean-Marc; Trotteur, Genevieve; Dondelinger, Robert F.

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic management of severely polytraumatized patients using a combined computed tomography (CT) and angiography suite with a single pivoting table. Methods: Eleven patients, aged 16-74 years (median 30 years), were managed with spiral CT and angiography without patient transfer. Four patients were unstable, seven had received blood transfusions (2-18 units) and six were intubated. In 10 patients in whom active bleeding was demonstrated (splenic 5, hepatic 2, renal 2, left inferior epigastric artery 1), hemostatic embolization was obtained. Results: Total procedure time did not exceed 80 min. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients. Recurrent bleeding from the liver required additional embolization in one patient. Median length of stay in the intensive care unit was 4 days and median hospital stay was 27 days. All patients survived without significant sequelae. Conclusion: The use of a combined CT-angiography suite enables rapid diagnostic investigation and hemostatic embolization in actively bleeding trauma patients.

  2. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  3. Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Chawla, Sumit; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following acute infection, 20% of people eliminate the virus over weeks or months and are often asymptomatic. The remaining 80% of people will develop chronic disease, of which approximately 20% will eventually develop liver cirrhosis and 1–5% will develop liver cancer. About 150 million people are chronically infected with HCV, and more than 350 000 people die every year from hepatitis C related liver diseases. The economic cost of hepatitis C is significant both to the individual and to the society. In the United States the average lifetime cost of the disease was estimated at $33 407 USD with the cost of a liver transplant approximately $200 000 USD. PEG-IFN and ribavirin treatment is also expensive and, at an average cost of approximately GB £7000 in the UK for a treatment course, is unaffordable in developing countries. Hepatitis C, not only brings down the quality of the life of individuals but also affect progress of the nation by adding financial burden. If we prevent the disease from occurring or find a perfect cure of the disease, in form of a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine, it will be a boon to not only to the individual but to the nation as a whole. PMID:24165512

  4. Comparative analysis of fluorescent angiography, computed tomographic angiography and magnetic resonance angiography for planning autologous breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Michael P.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The high incidence of breast cancer and growing number of breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy has led to breast reconstruction becoming an important part of holistic treatment for these patients. In planning autologous reconstructions, preoperative assessment of donor site microvascular anatomy with advanced imaging modalities has assisted in the appropriate selection of flap donor site, individual perforators, and lead to an overall improvement in flap outcomes. In this review, we compare the accuracy of fluorescent angiography, computed tomographic angiography (CTA), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and their impact on clinical outcomes. Methods A review of the published English literature dating from 1950 to 2015 using databases, such as PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and EMBASE was undertaken. Results Fluorescent angiography is technically limited by its inability to evaluate deep-lying perforators and hence, it has a minimal role in the preoperative setting. However, it may be useful intraoperatively in evaluating microvascular anastomotic patency and the mastectomy skin perfusion. CTA is currently widely considered the standard, due to its high accuracy and reliability. Multiple studies have demonstrated its ability to improve clinical outcomes, such as operative length and flap complications. However, concerns surrounding exposure to radiation and nephrotoxic contrast agents exist. MRA has been explored, however despite recent advances, the image quality of MRA is considered inferior to CTA. Conclusions Preoperative imaging is an essential component in planning autologous breast reconstruction. Fluorescent angiography presents minimal role as a preoperative imaging modality, but may be a useful intraoperative adjunct to assess the anastomosis and the mastectomy skin perfusion. Currently, CTA is the gold standard preoperatively. MRA has a role, particularly for women of younger age, iodine allergy, and renal impairment. PMID

  5. Renal Artery Stenting Using CO2 Gas Angiography in Combination with Iodinated Contrast Angiography.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yuya; Endo, Akihiro; Nakashima, Ryuma; Sugamori, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihisa; Tanabe, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman was hospitalized repeatedly due to unexplained heart failure. On admission, she had hypertensive acute heart failure. Her symptoms disappeared promptly after the initial treatment; however, her systolic blood pressure remained at over 160 mmHg despite her taking three antihypertensive drugs. Closer examination revealed hemodynamically significant right renal artery stenosis and a lack of left kidney function. We performed percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty using CO2 angiography in combination with iodinated contrast agents. The patient's renal function and blood pressure improved, however, CO2 gas-induced mild ischemic colitis occurred. We discuss the possibility of the use of combined iodinated contrast angiography and CO2 angiography to avoid contrast-induced nephropathy and the complications peculiar to CO2 angiography. PMID:27580543

  6. Interval ejection fraction: a cineangiographic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, A.J.; Bianco, J.A.; Shulman, R.M.; Folland, E.D.; Paris, A.F.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of the first-third ejection fraction (1/3 EF) for detecting patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), resting contrast ventriculography and first-pass radionuclide angiography with a high-count-rate, multicrystal camera system were performed in 47 subjects: 22 normal controls (group 1) and 25 patients with clinically stable angina pectoris and severe CAD (mean 2.3 vessels) without (group 2, n = 12) and with (group 3, n = 13) resting wall motion abnormalities. By contrast angiography, only group 3 had depressed global EF or 1/3 EF compared with control (global EF: group 1, 0.71 = 0.09; group 2, 0.67 = 0.09 (NS); group 3, 0.49 = 0.05 (p < 0.01 vs groups 1 and 2); 1/3 EF: group 1, 0.29 = 0.06; group 2, 0.28 = 0.05 (NS); group 3, 0.22 = 0.05 (p < 0.01 vs groups 1 and 2)). Whereas 11 of 25 CAD patients had global EF outside the normal range, only two of 25 had depressed 1/3 EF. Both had left ventricular asynergy and a depressed global EF. Studies performed using first-pass radionuclide angiography revealed similar results, i.e., only four of 25 CAD patients, all with left ventricular asynergy and depressed global EF, had depressed 1/3 EF values. A wide range of 1/3 EF values was found in normal subjects by both techniques. Thus, the ejection fraction during the first third of systole at rest is of limited value for detecting patients with CAD.

  7. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  8. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mur, Rafael Esteban

    2014-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (EH) is a severe complication of hepatic cirrhosis that is characterized by multiple neuropsychiatric manifestations. EH is usually triggered by a precipitating factor and occurs in patients with severely impaired hepatic function. Minimal EH is characterized by minor cognitive impairments that are difficult to specify but represent a risk for the patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism of EH is considered to be an increase in blood ammonia with an impairment in the patency of the blood-brainbarrier and its metabolism to glutamine in astrocytes. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroimaging techniques can be complementary. The diagnosis of minimal EH requires specific neurocognitive tests. The clinical evaluation should be directed towards identifying the trigger. Nonabsorbable disaccharides and rifaximin constitute the treatment of choice, along with prophylaxis for new episodes. PMID:25087716

  9. Angiography contrast injector safety. Visualizing the marketplace.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    The most common risk associated with angiography contrast injectors is air embolism. Injector manufacturers have attempted to address this concern by adding air detection systems and other safety features. Find out which injectors do the best job of protecting patients. PMID:21309283

  10. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Coscas, Gabriel; Lupidi, Marco; Coscas, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography provide information about normal retinal and choroidal anatomy that is nearly comparable to histological findings. These results are absolutely fundamental for the evaluation of retinal and choroidal vascular diseases and allow the clinician to define and diagnose several pathological conditions. Fluorescein angiography has become the 'gold standard' in retinal imaging due to its capacity to allow visualization of the retinal capillary bed and its changes, particularly in the macular area. Although the fluorescence of the injected dye enables improved visualization of retinal capillaries, not all of the different layers of the retinal capillary network can be visualized using this bi-dimensional examination technique, possibly because of a light scattering phenomenon. Optical coherence tomography angiography allows depth-resolved visualization of the retinal and choroidal microvasculature by calculating the difference between static and nonstatic tissue. Given that the main moving elements in the eye fundus are contained within vessels, determining a vascular decorrelation signal enables three-dimensional visualization of the retinal and choroidal vascular network without the administration of intravenous dye and therefore reduces the risk of potential adverse events. PMID:27023473

  11. An unusual complication of transradial coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    McEntegart, Margaret B; Dalzell, Jonathan R; Lindsay, M Mitchell

    2009-05-01

    We report the first case of extensive cellulitis and staphylococcal bacteremia with the subsequent development of a remote mycotic pseudoaneurysm in the ipsilateral brachial artery following right transradial coronary angiography in a diabetic patient with previous right axillary node clearance. The potential for serious complication should be borne in mind when deciding on the site of vascular access in such patients. PMID:19411734

  12. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Neurovascular Circulation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Suyash; Agarwal, Mohit; Pukenas, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography angiography of the head and neck is a powerful tool for imaging and diagnosis of a plethora of disorders of the cervicocerebral vasculature. This article reviews the technique, indications, and interpretation of many of these disorders. A standard report checklist is also presented. PMID:26654397

  13. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H

    2005-07-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  14. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  15. Radionuclide studies in impotence

    SciTech Connect

    Hilson, A.J.; Lewis, C.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Impotence may be of physiological origin with causes including vascular or neurological pathology. Alternatively, it may be of psychogenic origin. Clinicians can distinguish between psychological and organic impotence by observing nocturnal penile tumescence. Non-radionuclide investigations for organic impotence include penile plethysmography or pulse Doppler analysis for arterial supply, cavernosometry for venous drainage, and biothesiometry or evoked potentials for neurological pathology. Radionuclide studies are primarily based on the use of technetium 99m-pertechnetate, 99mTc-red blood cells, or xenon 133 to study the blood flow, with or without pharmacological intervention, commonly papaverine. 26 references.

  16. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advisory Board Sponsors Sponsorship Opporunities Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician ... Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There ...

  17. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low-grade fever Nausea and vomiting Pale or clay-colored stools Yellow skin (jaundice) ... The virus does not remain in the body after the infection is gone. Most people with hepatitis A recover within 3 months. Nearly all people get better within 6 months. There ...

  18. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will closely monitor and manage any side effects that may occur, as high doses of prednisone are often prescribed to treat autoimmune hepatitis. Immune system suppressors. Medications that suppress the immune system prevent the body from making autoantibodies and block the immune reaction ...

  19. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gallbladder radionuclide scan is a test that uses radioactive material to check gallbladder function. It is also used to look for bile duct blockage or leak. How the Test is Performed The health care provider will inject ...

  20. Patients with Life-Threatening Arterial Renal Hemorrhage: CT Angiography and Catheter Angiography with Subsequent Superselective Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Ramsauer, S.; Loenard, B. M.; Haferkamp, A.; Hallscheidt, P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success of superselective embolization in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage undergoing preinterventional CT angiography. Forty-three patients with clinical signs of life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage underwent CT angiography and catheter angiography. Superselective embolization was indicated in the case of a positive catheter angiography. Primary study goals were technical and clinical success of superselective embolization. Secondary study goals were CT angiographic and catheter angiographic image findings and clinical follow-up. The mean time interval between CT angiography and catheter angiography was 8.3 {+-} 10.3 h (range, 0.2-34.1 h). Arterial renal hemorrhage was identified with CT angiography in 42 of 43 patients (98%) and catheter angiography in 39 of 43 patients (91%) (overview angiography in 4 of 43 patients [9%], selective angiography in 16 of 43 patients [37%], and superselective angiography in 39 of 43 patients [91%]). Superselective embolization was performed in 39 of 43 patients (91%) and technically successful in 37 of 39 patients (95%). Therefore, coil embolization was performed in 13 of 37 patients (35%), liquid embolization in 9 of 37 patients (24%), particulate embolization in 1 of 37 patients (3%), and a combination in 14 of 37 patients (38%). Clinical failure occurred in 8 of 39 patients (21%) and procedure-related complications in 2 of 39 patients (5%). The 30-day mortality rate was 3%. Hemoglobin decreased significantly prior to intervention (P < 0.001) and increased significantly after intervention (P < 0.005). In conclusion, superselective embolization is effective, reliable, and safe in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage. In contrast to overview and selective angiography, only superselective angiography allows reliable detection of arterial renal hemorrhage. Preinterventional CT angiography is excellent for detection

  1. Hepatic artery injury during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastasis treated by portal vein arterialization

    PubMed Central

    Hokuto, Daisuke; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been applied as a salvage procedure in hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries, including transplantation and liver resection, with revascularization for malignancies. Here we describe the use PVA as a salvage procedure following accidental injury of the hepatic artery to the remnant liver occurred during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). A 60-year-old man with cancer of the sigmoid colon and initially unresectable CRLM received 11 cycles of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (1500 mg/week), after which CRLM was downstaged to resectable. One month after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, a left trisectionectomy and wedge resection of segment 6 were performed. The posterior branch of the right hepatic artery, the only feeding artery to the remnant liver, was injured and totally dissected. Because microsurgical reconstruction of the artery was impossible, PVA was used; PVA is the sole known procedure available when hepatic artery reconstruction is impossible. The patient then suffered portal hypertension, and closure of arterio-portal anastomosis using an interventional technique with angiography was eventually performed on postoperative day 73. Therefore, it is considered that because PVA is associated with severe postoperative portal hypertension, closure of the arterio-portal shunt should be performed as soon as possible on diagnosing portal hypertension. PMID:26197094

  2. Hepatic artery injury during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastasis treated by portal vein arterialization.

    PubMed

    Hokuto, Daisuke; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been applied as a salvage procedure in hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries, including transplantation and liver resection, with revascularization for malignancies. Here we describe the use PVA as a salvage procedure following accidental injury of the hepatic artery to the remnant liver occurred during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). A 60-year-old man with cancer of the sigmoid colon and initially unresectable CRLM received 11 cycles of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (1500mg/week), after which CRLM was downstaged to resectable. One month after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, a left trisectionectomy and wedge resection of segment 6 were performed. The posterior branch of the right hepatic artery, the only feeding artery to the remnant liver, was injured and totally dissected. Because microsurgical reconstruction of the artery was impossible, PVA was used; PVA is the sole known procedure available when hepatic artery reconstruction is impossible. The patient then suffered portal hypertension, and closure of arterio-portal anastomosis using an interventional technique with angiography was eventually performed on postoperative day 73. Therefore, it is considered that because PVA is associated with severe postoperative portal hypertension, closure of the arterio-portal shunt should be performed as soon as possible on diagnosing portal hypertension. PMID:26197094

  3. Spontaneous rupture of hepatic hemangiomas: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Jr, Marcelo AF Ribeiro; Papaiordanou, Francine; Gonçalves, Juliana M; Chaib, Eleazar

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic hemangiomas are congenital vascular malformations, considered the most common benign mesenchymal hepatic tumors, composed of masses of blood vessels that are atypical or irregular in arrangement and size. Hepatic hemangiomas can be divided into two major groups: capillary hemangiomas and cavernous hemangiomas These tumors most frequently affect females (80%) and adults in their fourth and fifth decades of life. Most cases are asymptomatic although a few patients may present with a wide variety of clinical symptoms, with spontaneous or traumatic rupture being the most severe complication. In cases of spontaneous rupture, clinical manifestations consist of sudden abdominal pain, and anemia secondary to a haemoperitoneum. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy can also occur. Haemodynamic instability and signs of hypovolemic shock appear in about one third of cases. As the size of the hemangioma increases, so does the chance of rupture. Imaging studies used in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas include ultrasonography, dynamic contrast-enchanced computed tomography scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, hepatic arteriography, digital subtraction angiography, and nuclear medicine studies. In most cases hepatic hemangiomas are asymptomatic and should be followed up by means of periodic radiological examination. Surgery should be restricted to specific situations. Absolute indications for surgery are spontaneous or traumatic rupture with hemoperitoneum, intratumoral bleeding and consumptive coagulopathy (Kassabach-Merrit syndrome). In a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain due to unknown abdominal disease, spontaneous rupture of a hepatic tumor such as a hemangioma should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. PMID:21191518

  4. Coronary angiography in Lebanon: Use and overuse.

    PubMed

    Sibai, Abla-Mehio; Tohme, Rania A; Saade, Georges A

    2008-04-25

    Coronary angiography remains the gold standard for coronary artery disease diagnosis. In Lebanon, the density of cardiac catheterization centers is almost three times that of France (9.32 vs. 2.92 per 1,000,000 individuals) and recently collated national data indicate notably a high utilization rate of 53 per 10,000 individuals, placing Lebanon third after the United States and Germany. PMID:17399809

  5. Tomosynthesis applied to digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, R.A.; Sedaghati, M.; Roy, D.G.; Liu, P.; Nelson, J.A.; Kubal, W.; Del Rio, P.

    1984-09-01

    This extension of the author's previous work on tomographic digital subtraction angiography (DSA) describes the theory of tomosynthetic DSA image reconstruction techniques. In addition to developing the resolution limits resulting from x-ray exposure length and image intensifier field curvature, the authors describe one method of image formation and show tomosynthetic DSA images of animal and human anatomy. Methods for improving the present technique are discussed.

  6. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, K. V.; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Sambhav, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a new, non-invasive imaging system that generates volumetric data of retinal and choroidal layers. It has the ability to show both structural and blood flow information. Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm (a vital component of OCTA software) helps to decrease the signal to noise ratio of flow detection thus enhancing visualization of retinal vasculature using motion contrast. Published studies describe potential efficacy for OCTA in the evaluation of common ophthalmologic diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular occlusions and sickle cell disease. OCTA provides a detailed view of the retinal vasculature, which allows accurate delineation of microvascular abnormalities in diabetic eyes and vascular occlusions. It helps quantify vascular compromise depending upon the severity of diabetic retinopathy. OCTA can also elucidate the presence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in wet AMD. In this paper, we review the knowledge, available in English language publications regarding OCTA, and compare it with the conventional angiographic standard, fluorescein angiography (FA). Finally, we summarize its potential applications to retinal vascular diseases. Its current limitations include a relatively small field of view, inability to show leakage, and tendency for image artifacts. Further larger studies will define OCTA's utility in clinical settings and establish if the technology may offer a non-invasive option of visualizing the retinal vasculature, enabling us to decrease morbidity through early detection and intervention in retinal diseases. PMID:27195091

  9. Sources of error in quantitative coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Herrington, D M; Siebes, M; Walford, G D

    1993-08-01

    Many studies have reported the accuracy of quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) based on experiments using moderated-size phantoms imaged under unrealistic radiographic conditions. However, these observations may not be generalizable to the setting of clinical angiography. To determine QCA accuracy in a realistic radiographic setting and evaluate the impact of the x-ray system line spread function, plexiglass phantoms were imaged inside and out of a human thorax. A realistic radiographic background was associated with a 38% increase in variability of results (p < 0.05). Low concentrations of contrast and large image intensifier input screens were associated with significantly larger errors and variability in results (p < 0.05). There was a systematic overestimation of diameter in the smallest phantom. A mathematical model of the x-ray line spread function was developed that explains the observed overestimation of the smallest phantom and provide a rational approach for correction of the line spread function for QCA. Many factors encountered in clinical coronary angiography such as nonuniform radiographic background, low concentrations of contrast, and small vessel diameters have a significant adverse impact on the accuracy and/or variability of gradient-based edge detection QCA systems. PMID:8221856

  10. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of liver cirrhosis and is an important therapeutic challenge, with a social and economic issue. If, now, the pathophysiology is not totally understood (main role of ammonia, but a better understanding of cerebral mechanisms), the clinical presentation is well-known. Some treatments are useful (disaccharides, treatment of the trigger) but their efficiency is limited. Nevertheless, the emergence of new treatments, such as non-absorbable antibiotics (rifaximin essentially), is an interesting therapeutic tool. PMID:26597584

  11. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... have the virus and do not practice good hygiene. Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis B ... where diapers are changed to ensure that proper hygiene is followed. If your child gets hepatitis A, ...

  12. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  13. Preventing hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  14. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  15. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  16. Diagnostic yield and accuracy of CT angiography, MR angiography, and digital subtraction angiography for detection of macrovascular causes of intracerebral haemorrhage: prospective, multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Velthuis, Birgitta K; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; Algra, Ale; de Kort, Gérard A P; Witkamp, Theo D; de Ridder, Johanna C M; van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Schonewille, Wouter J; de Kort, Paul L M; Dippel, Diederik W; Raaymakers, Theodora W M; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Wermer, Marieke J H; Kerkhoff, Henk; Jellema, Korné; Bronner, Irene M; Remmers, Michel J M; Bienfait, Henri Paul; Witjes, Ron J G M; Greving, Jacoba P; Klijn, Catharina J M

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the diagnostic yield and accuracy of early computed tomography (CT) angiography followed by magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage? Methods This prospective diagnostic study enrolled 298 adults (18-70 years) treated in 22 hospitals in the Netherlands over six years. CT angiography was performed within seven days of haemorrhage. If the result was negative, MRI/MRA was performed four to eight weeks later. DSA was performed when the CT angiography or MRI/MRA results were inconclusive or negative. The main outcome was a macrovascular cause, including arteriovenous malformation, aneurysm, dural arteriovenous fistula, and cavernoma. Three blinded neuroradiologists independently evaluated the images for macrovascular causes of haemorrhage. The reference standard was the best available evidence from all findings during one year’s follow-up. Study answer and limitations A macrovascular cause was identified in 69 patients (23%). 291 patients (98%) underwent CT angiography; 214 with a negative result underwent additional MRI/MRA and 97 with a negative result for both CT angiography and MRI/MRA underwent DSA. Early CT angiography detected 51 macrovascular causes (yield 17%, 95% confidence interval 13% to 22%). CT angiography with MRI/MRA identified two additional macrovascular causes (18%, 14% to 23%) and these modalities combined with DSA another 15 (23%, 18% to 28%). This last extensive strategy failed to detect a cavernoma, which was identified on MRI during follow-up (reference strategy). The positive predictive value of CT angiography was 72% (60% to 82%), of additional MRI/MRA was 35% (14% to 62%), and of additional DSA was 100% (75% to 100%). None of the patients experienced complications with CT angiography or MRI/MRA; 0.6% of patients who underwent DSA experienced permanent sequelae. Not all patients with negative CT angiography and

  17. Osteoid osteoma: radionuclide diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Hattner, R.S.; Vogler, J.B. III

    1984-06-01

    The double-density sign, seen on radionuclide bone scans, is described for diagnosing osteoid osteomas and for localizing the nidus. Its use in differentiating the nidus of an osteoid osteoma from osteomyelitis is also described. The utility of computed tomography in localization of the nidus is also illustrated. The double-density sign was helpful in diagnosing seven cases of surgically confirmed osteoid osteoma.

  18. Radionuclide bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Webber, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Radionuclide bone imaging of the skeleton, now well established as the most important diagnostic procedure in detecting bone metastases, is also a reliable method for the evaluation of the progression or regression of metastatic bone disease. The article concentrates on the technetium-99m agents and the value of these agents in the widespread application of low-dose radioisotope scanning in such bone diseases as metastasis, osteomyelitis, trauma, osteonecrosis, and other abnormal skeletal conditions.

  19. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, viral hepatitis, and liver cancer make liver disease one of the 10 leading ... disease are decreasing, those for viral hepatitis and liver cancer are on the rise, both in the U.S. ...

  20. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiogrpahy: comparison with conventional hepatic arteriography

    SciTech Connect

    Flannigan, B.D.; Gomes, A.S.; Stambuk, E.C.; Lois, J.F.; Pais, S.O.

    1983-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA), 28 patients with a variety of hepatic lesions underwent intra-arterial DSA immediately following conventional celiac or hepatic arteriography. Thirty-one studies were obtained and the results of DSA were compared with the conventional arteriograms. DSA showed good visualization of the arteries in the early arterial phase of the examination. The late arterial phase was better evaluated on conventional arteriograms due to the decreased spatial resolution of DSA. Arterial DSA was most useful in the evaluation of the parenchyma of the liver; the use of remasking techniques allowed improved visualization of hepatic lesions, particularly in the left lobe of the liver. It is concluded that arterial DSA is useful in hepatic imaging and may supplant conventional hepatic arteriography as the technology improves.

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatic Recurrence after Curative Resection of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eugene K.; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Gwon, Dong Il

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite curative resection, hepatic recurrences cause a significant reduction in survival in patients with primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) has recently been used successfully to treat primary and secondary hepatic malignancy. Methods Between 2003 and 2008, 15 patients underwent TACE because of hepatic recurrence after curative resection of a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumor response was evaluated based on computed tomography scans after TACE. The overall duration of patient survival was measured. Results After TACE, a radiographically evident response occurred in six patients whose tumors demonstrated a tumor blush on angiography. Four patients demonstrated stabilization of a hypovascular mass. The remaining five patients demonstrated continued progression of hypovascular hepatic lesions. The median survival periods from the time of diagnosis and from the time of initial TACE were 9.6 and 7.5 months, respectively. Conclusions TACE may represent a viable therapeutic modality in patients with hepatic recurrence after curative resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:20981218

  2. Radionuclide angiography in evaluation of left ventricular function following aortic valve replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1981-05-01

    Congestive heart failure in patients surviving aortic valve replacement has been associated with a high late mortality. To determine whether myocardial dysfunction in these patients occurred preoperatively, perioperatively, or during the early postoperative period, 19 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using cardioplegia and hypothermia were studied by multiple-gated cardiac blood pool imaging. The resting ejection fractions for 8 patients with aortic stenosis did not show significant changes following operation. The 11 patients with aortic insufficiency has resting preoperative values of 58 +/- 15%, which fell to 38 +/- 18% immediately postoperatively (p less than 0.01), with the late values being 51 +/- 16%. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed deterioration of regional wall motion immediately after operation, which persisted in 3 during the late evaluation. The occurrence of new perioperative regional wall motion abnormalities and persistent perioperative depression in left ventricular function in some patients suggest the need for further improvement in myocardial protection during cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic valve replacement.

  3. Frequency of myocardial injury after blunt chest trauma as evaluated by radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; Driedger, A.A.; Holliday, R.L.; Cheung, H.W.; Sibbald, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Seventy-seven patients who had sustained multisystem trauma, including severe blunt chest injury, were prospectively evaluated to assess the frequency of associated traumatic myocardial injury. Traumatic injury to either the right or left ventricle was defined by the presence of discrete abnormalities of wall motion on electrocardiographically gated cardiac scintigraphy in patients without a clinical history of heart disease. Forty-two patients (55%) (Group 1) had focal abnormalities of wall motion; 27 involved the right ventricle, 7 the left ventricle, 7 were biventricular, and 1 involved only the septum. Both the right and left ventricular ejection fractions were significantly lower (31 +/- 11% and 47 +/- 14%, respectively) than those in the 35 traumatized patients without wall motion abnormalities on scintigraphy (Group 2) (49 +/- 8% and 58 +/- 11%, respectively). Repeat scintigraphic examination in 32 Group 1 patients at a time remote from initial injury showed improvement or resolution of previously defined focal wall motion abnormalities in 27 of 32 patients (84%). The electrocardiogram and serum enzyme tests were insensitive indexes of traumatic myocardial injury when defined by the scintigraphic abnormalities. Thus, severe blunt chest trauma results in a higher frequency of traumatic myocardial injury than heretofore recognized, and frequently involves the anteriorly situated right ventricle.

  4. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  5. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2005-09-01

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest.

  6. Protect Yourself from Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop yellowish eyes and skin. All the hepatitis viruses can cause acute, or short-term, hepatitis. Some can also cause chronic hepatitis, in which the infection lasts a long time, sometimes for your whole life. Chronic hepatitis can eventually lead to scarring of ...

  7. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  8. Hepatic osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Angelo; Verardo, Alberto; Di Pascoli, Marco; Giannini, Sandro; Bolognesi, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    Metabolic disturbances of bone are frequent in patients with chronic liver disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with advanced chronic liver disease is reported between 12% and 55%; it is higher in primary biliary cirrhosis. All patients with advanced liver disease should be screened for osteoporosis with a densitometry, especially if the etiology is cholestatic and in the presence of other risk factors. Clinical relevance of hepatic osteodystrophy increases after liver transplantation. After liver transplant, a rapid loss of bone mineral density can be detected in the first 6 months, followed by stabilization and slight improvement of the values. At the time of transplantation, bone density values are very important prognostic factors. Therapy of hepatic osteodystrophy is based primarily on the control of risk factors: cessation of tobacco and alcohol assumption, reduction of caffeine ingestion, exercise, supplementation of calcium and vitamin D, limitation of drugs such as loop diuretics, corticosteroids, cholestyramine. Bisphosphonates have been proposed for the therapy of osteoporosis in patients with liver disease, particularly after liver transplantation. The possible side effects of oral administration of bisphosphonates, such as the occurrence of esophageal ulcerations, are of particular concern in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension, due to the risk of gastrointestinal hemorrhage from ruptured esophageal varices, although this risk is probably overestimated. PMID:25568651

  9. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Lower Extremities.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    CT angiography (CTA) of the lower extremities is an important and versatile, noninvasive tool for diagnosis as well as surgical or endovascular interventional planning. Although lower extremity CTA is most commonly performed in patients with peripheral artery disease or trauma affecting the lower extremities, it also plays a role in the workup of nonischemic etiologies such as vasculitis, aneurysms, and congenital vascular malformations. CT scan protocols should adjust bolus timing and multiphasic imaging to account for the clinical question of interest, and 3-dimensional postprocessing plays an important role in the visualization and interpretation of these high-resolution imaging examinations. PMID:26654395

  10. Diagnostic angiography of the cerebrospinal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rabinov, James D; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic catheter angiography remains the gold standard for evaluation of vascular lesions of the brain, head and neck, and spine. It is often combined with cross-sectional and functional imaging to provide a complete anatomic and physiologic workup of patients. Such data are combined with clinical information to help make treatment decisions. This chapter describes the specific techniques for arterial access and catheter navigation of the cerebrospinal vasculature. Discussion of patient positioning, injection rates, and basic anatomy of arterial and venous systems is included. Finally, important safety issues related to contrast allergy, renal failure, and complications are considered. PMID:27432664

  11. Prostaglandin E1 in hand angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.M.; Joseph, R.B.; Bodell, L.S.; Nykamp, P.W.; Hessel, S.J.

    1983-11-01

    Prostaglandin E1 (PG1) is a rapid, potent vasodilator which, when infused into the arterial system in low doses by bolus injection, has no significant systemic effects and has a relatively long duration of action. Sixty-three hand angiograms were done on 55 patients, comparing PGE1 to tolazoline and to angiograms done with no vasodilation. There was no significant difference between PGE1 and tolazoline in digital artery opacification; however, venous opacification was very significantly better with PGE1. PGE1 should be a drug of choice in hand angiography.

  12. Mass Spectrometric Radionuclide Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, John F.; Eiden, Greg C.; Lehn, Scott A.

    2006-02-01

    Measurement of ionized atoms by mass spectrometry is an alternative to radiation detection for measuring radioactive isotopes. These systems are large and complex; they require trained operators and extensive maintenance. They began as research systems but have been developed commercially for measuring amounts of radioactive isotopes and their atom ratios to other isotopes. Several types of mass spectrometer systems are in use. This chapter covers the basics of mass spectrometry and surveys the application of these instruments for radionuclide detection and discusses the circumstances under which use of mass spectrometers is advantageous, the type of mass spectrometer used for each purpose, and the conditions of sample preparation, introduction and analysis.

  13. Technetium-99m NGA functional hepatic imaging: preliminary clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Stadalnik, R.C.; Vera, D.R.; Woodle, E.S.; Trudeau, W.L.; Porter, B.A.; Ward, R.E.; Krohn, K.A.; O'Grady, L.F.

    1985-11-01

    Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin ( (Tc)NGA) is a radiolabeled ligand to hepatic binding protein, a receptor which resides at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. This receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical and its kinetic model provide a noninvasive method for the assessment of liver function. Eighteen patients were studied: seven with hepatoma, eight with liver metastases, four with cirrhosis, and one patient with acute fulminant non-A, non-B hepatitis. Technetium-99m NGA liver imaging provided anatomic information of diagnostic quality comparable to that obtained with other routine imaging modalities, including computed tomography, angiography, ultrasound, and (Tc)sulfur colloid scintigraphy. Kinetic modeling of dynamic (Tc)NGA data produced estimates of standardized hepatic blood flow, Q (hepatic blood flow divided by total blood volume), and hepatic binding protein concentration, (HBP). Significant rank correlation was obtained between (HBP) estimates and CTC scores. This correlation supports the hypothesis that (HBP) is a measure of functional hepatocyte mass. The combination of decreased Q and markedly reduced (HBP) may have prognostic significance; all three patients with this combination died of hepatic failure within 6 wk of imaging.

  14. Lateral rectus palsy following coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Luke; Jones, Ruth; Hughes, David S

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of unilateral lateral rectus palsy following an elective coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention in a 78-year-oldwoman. Ophthalmoplegia following coronary angiography is extremely rare and this is the first case of a unilateral lateral rectus palsy following the procedure. PMID:24536054

  15. Preoperative imaging of liver metastases. Comparison of angiography, CT scan, and ultrasonography.

    PubMed Central

    Gunvén, P; Makuuchi, M; Takayasu, K; Moriyama, N; Yamasaki, S; Hasegawa, H

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with mostly colorectal cancer metastases to the liver had preoperative selective/superselective angiograms (24 cases), computed tomography (CT) [26 cases, mostly enhanced by contrast administered by a peripheral vein (9), the common hepatic artery (9), or the portal vein (5)], and ultrasonography (26 cases). Intraoperative ultrasonography and palpation and examination of the resected specimens revealed 113 tumors. CT detected almost half of the masses smaller than 1 cm, and ultrasonography and angiography about one-third of lesions 1-2 cm in size. Ultrasonography was less powerful for examination of the posterior segment of the liver. CT and ultrasonography placed the tumors into subsegments more accurately than did angiography. Almost 40% of the preoperative plans had to be changed: in two-thirds by extended resections and in one-third by a change from curative to palliative intent. Most changes were due to extrahepatic tumor growth, often within areas screened before surgery. The use of all three imaging modalities for liver metastases is recommended for preoperative planning. PMID:3901943

  16. Characterization of uncommon portosystemic collateral circulations in patients with hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qin; Shen, Lijun; Chu, Jindong; Ma, Xuemei; Jin, Bo; Meng, Fanping; Chen, Jinpin; Wang, Yanling; Wu, Libing; Han, Jun; Zhang, Wenhui; Ma, Wei; Wang, Huaming; Li, Hanwei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to characterize uncommon portosystemic collateral circulation in hepatic cirrhosis. Portosystemic uncommon collateral circulation (UCC) was detected, characterized and evaluated by a combination of spiral computed tomography angiography, three-dimensional imaging angiography and electronic gastroscopy in patients diagnosed with hepatic cirrhosis. In total, 118 cases with UCC were detected from a pool of 700 hepatic cirrhosis patients with portal hypertension. The incidence was 16.86% and included cases with splenic-renal, gastro-renal, paravertebral, retroperitoneal, gastric-splenic and cardio-phrenic angle vein shunts. The occurrence rate of UCC formation increased with the Child-Pugh grade. Compared with common collateral circulations, the incidence of severe esophageal or gastric fundus varicose veins, severe portal hypertensive gastropathy and the incidence of a large quantity of ascites was much lower in the patients with UCC (P<0.01), whereas the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy and chronic elevated blood ammonia levels was significantly higher (P<0.01). The incidence of uncommon portosystemic collateral circulation is extremely common in patients with liver cirrhosis and is associated with the Child-Pugh grades of hepatic function. UCC can aid in the relief of the complications derived from portal hypertension, but it may increase the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy and chronic elevated blood ammonia levels. PMID:25435990

  17. Radionuclides in nephrology

    SciTech Connect

    Lausanne, A.B.D.

    1987-01-01

    In 47 expert contributions, this volume provides a summary of the latest research on radionuclides in nephro-urology together with current and new clinical applications especially in renovascular hypertension, kidney transplantation, and metabolic and urological diseases. In addition, attention is given to aspects of basic renal physiology and function and possible applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy in nephro-urology. New testing procedures which promise to improve diagnosis, and new radiopharmaceuticals are described. The reports are divided into eight sections, the first of which features studies on the renin-angiotensin system, cisplatin, atrial natriuretic factor and determining plasma oxalate. Four papers describe a number of new radiopharmaceuticals which have the potential to replace hippuran. In the third section, radionuclide methods for the measurement of renal function parameters are discussed. The book then focuses on the potential role of captopril in the improved diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy are demonstrated in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, kidney assessment after lithotripsy, kidney evaluation prior to transplantation, and in monitoring renal ischemia during hypotension.

  18. Motion analysis and removal in intensity variation based OCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Kirby, Mitchell; Zhao, Feng

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigated how bulk motion degraded the quality of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography that was obtained through calculating interframe signal variation, i.e., interframe signal variation based optical coherence angiography (isvOCA). We demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that the spatial average of isvOCA signal had an explicit functional dependency on bulk motion. Our result suggested that the bulk motion could lead to an increased background in angiography image. Based on our motion analysis, we proposed to reduce image artifact induced by transient bulk motion in isvOCA through adaptive thresholding. The motion artifact reduced angiography was demonstrated in a 1.3μm spectral domain OCT system. We implemented signal processing using graphic processing unit for real-time imaging and conducted in vivo microvasculature imaging on human skin. Our results clearly showed that the adaptive thresholding method was highly effective in the motion artifact removal for OCT angiography. PMID:25426314

  19. Angiography with a multifunctional line scanning ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Patel, Ankit H.; Vazquez, Vanessa; Husain, Deeba

    2012-02-01

    A multifunctional line scanning ophthalmoscope (mLSO) was designed, constructed, and tested on human subjects. The mLSO could sequentially acquire wide-field, confocal, near-infrared reflectance, fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) retinal images. The system also included a retinal tracker (RT) and a photodynamic therapy laser treatment port. The mLSO was tested in a pilot clinical study on human subjects with and without retinal disease. The instrument exhibited robust retinal tracking and high-contrast line scanning imaging. The FA and ICGA angiograms showed a similar appearance of hyper- and hypo-pigmented disease features and a nearly equivalent resolution of fine capillaries compared to a commercial flood-illumination fundus imager. An mLSO-based platform will enable researchers and clinicians to image human and animal eyes with a variety of modalities and deliver therapeutic beams from a single automated interface. This approach has the potential to improve patient comfort and reduce imaging session times, allowing clinicians to better diagnose, plan, and conduct patient procedures with improved outcomes.

  20. Intraoperative fluorescence vascular angiography: during tibial bypass.

    PubMed

    Perry, Diana; Bharara, Manish; Armstrong, David G; Mills, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Preventing amputations in persons with lower extremity complications of diabetes is a complex endeavor, particularly in those with concomitant ischemia and tissue loss. Fluorescence angiography (Novadaq SPY system) may provide a tool for objective evaluations of tissue viability in the diabetic foot, which is an important indicator of the ability of the diabetic ulcer to heal adequately. The SPY system uses a low-power laser coupled with a charge-coupled device camera and indocyanine green (ICG) to sequence perfusion at the surface of the skin. We present an illustrated example of the potential utility of ICG fluorescence angiography (ICGFA) before and after vascular intervention in a high-risk limb. ICGFA appeared to reveal demarcation between viable and nonviable tissue and real-time perfusion, specifically capillary fill. ICGFA clarified the extent of necessary debridement and provided an immediate indication of improvement in regional perfusion status following revascularization. Future studies involving ICGFA may include pre- and postdebridement and closure perfusion, comparison of tissue perfusion pre- and post-endovascular therapy, and lower extremity flap viability. Future works will also address the consistency of results with ICGFA by analyzing a larger cohort of patients being treated by our unit. PMID:22401340

  1. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and T max, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  2. Computed tomography imaging and angiography - principles.

    PubMed

    Kamalian, Shervin; Lev, Michael H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with diverse neurologic disorders was forever changed in the summer of 1973, when the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanners were introduced. Until then, the detection and characterization of intracranial or spinal lesions could only be inferred by limited spatial resolution radioisotope scans, or by the patterns of tissue and vascular displacement on invasive pneumoencaphalography and direct carotid puncture catheter arteriography. Even the earliest-generation CT scanners - which required tens of minutes for the acquisition and reconstruction of low-resolution images (128×128 matrix) - could, based on density, noninvasively distinguish infarct, hemorrhage, and other mass lesions with unprecedented accuracy. Iodinated, intravenous contrast added further sensitivity and specificity in regions of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The advent of rapid multidetector row CT scanning in the early 1990s created renewed enthusiasm for CT, with CT angiography largely replacing direct catheter angiography. More recently, iterative reconstruction postprocessing techniques have made possible high spatial resolution, reduced noise, very low radiation dose CT scanning. The speed, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and low radiation dose capability of present-day scanners have also facilitated dual-energy imaging which, like magnetic resonance imaging, for the first time, has allowed tissue-specific CT imaging characterization of intracranial pathology. PMID:27432657

  3. Angiography with a multifunctional line scanning ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Daniel; Patel, Ankit H.; Vazquez, Vanessa; Husain, Deeba

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. A multifunctional line scanning ophthalmoscope (mLSO) was designed, constructed, and tested on human subjects. The mLSO could sequentially acquire wide-field, confocal, near-infrared reflectance, fluorescein angiography (FA), and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) retinal images. The system also included a retinal tracker (RT) and a photodynamic therapy laser treatment port. The mLSO was tested in a pilot clinical study on human subjects with and without retinal disease. The instrument exhibited robust retinal tracking and high-contrast line scanning imaging. The FA and ICGA angiograms showed a similar appearance of hyper- and hypo-pigmented disease features and a nearly equivalent resolution of fine capillaries compared to a commercial flood-illumination fundus imager. An mLSO-based platform will enable researchers and clinicians to image human and animal eyes with a variety of modalities and deliver therapeutic beams from a single automated interface. This approach has the potential to improve patient comfort and reduce imaging session times, allowing clinicians to better diagnose, plan, and conduct patient procedures with improved outcomes. PMID:22463040

  4. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  5. Indocyanine green angiography in posterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh V; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Gunasekaran, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Literature review for indocyanine green angiography and evaluate the role of indocyanine green angiogram (ICGA) in patients with posterior uveitis seen at a tertiary referral eye care centre. Detailed review of the literature on ICGA was performed. Retrospective review of medical records of patients with posterior uveitis and dual fundus and ICGA was done after institutional board approval. Eighteen patients (26 eyes) had serpiginous choroiditis out of which 12 patients had active choroiditis and six patients had healed choroiditis, six patients (12 eyes) had ampiginous choroiditis, six patients (12 eyes) had acute multifocal posterior placoid pigment epitheliopathy, eight patients (10 eyes) had multifocal choroiditis, four patients (eight eyes) had presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, four patients (eight eyes) had presumed tuberculous choroiditis, two patients (four eyes) had multiple evanescent white dot syndrome and two patients (four eyes) had Vogt Koyanagi Harada (VKH) syndrome. The most characteristic feature noted on ICGA was the presence of different patterns of hypofluorescent dark spots, which were present at different stages of the angiogram. ICGA provides the clinician with a powerful adjunctive tool in choroidal inflammatory disorders. It is not meant to replace already proven modalities such as the fluorescein angiography, but it can provide additional information that is useful in establishing a more definitive diagnosis in inflammatory chorioretinal diseases associated with multiple spots. It still needs to be determined if ICGA can prove to be a follow up parameter to evaluate disease progression. PMID:23685486

  6. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, H.D.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-rays and an iodine containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic x-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the x-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation x-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contains a contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Angiography of the Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Yasuo; Yamashita, Shuhei; Sakahara, Harumi; Masui, Takayuki; Isoda, Haruo

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is capable of imaging arteries in the half to whole body by a single acquisition without a nephrotoxic contrast medium, and acquired images can be reconstructed into a specific cross-sectional view in an arbitrary directions. MRA is applicable for vessels non-reachable by a catheter approach, and collateral vessels can be fully visualized. Since MRA is minimally-invasive with no exposure to ionized radiation, it can be repeatedly applied for follow-up. However, there are also disadvantages: the temporal and spatial resolutions are inferior to those of X-ray angiography, and, at present, it cannot be used as a guide for intervention. Moreover, gadolinium administrations may cause NSF in patients who have lost renal function, as a new risk. Accordingly, strict consideration is required for an indication of its application. Development of non-contrast MRA and evaluation of the wall itself may draw more attention in the future. Plaque imaging is being routinely performed nowadays, and the measurement of vascular wall shear stress, which has a close association with arteriosclerosis, may become possible by utilizing the time-resolved phase-contrast method capable of measuring the time-resolved velocity vectors of blood flow throughout the body. (*English Translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol, 2009, 49: 503-516.) PMID:23555465

  8. Imaging findings and endovascular management of iatrogenic hepatic arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Güneyli, Serkan; Gök, Mustafa; Çınar, Celal; Bozkaya, Halil; Korkmaz, Mehmet; Parıldar, Mustafa; Oran, İsmail

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic hepatic arterial injuries (IHAIs) include pseudoaneurysm, extravasation, arteriovenous fistula, arteriobiliary fistula, and dissection. IHAIs are usually demonstrated following percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, percutaneous liver biopsy, liver surgery, chemoembolization, radioembolization, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The latency period between the intervention and diagnosis varies. The most common symptom is hemorrhage, and the most common lesion is pseudoaneurysm. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is mostly performed prior to angiography, and IHAIs are demonstrated on CTA in most of the patients. Patients with IHAI are mostly treated by coils, but some patients may be treated by liquid embolic materials or stent-grafts. CTA can also be used in the follow-up period. Endovascular treatment is a safe and minimally invasive treatment option with high success rates. PMID:26359873

  9. Hepatic regenerating nodules in hereditary tyrosinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.L.; Letourneau, J.G.; Allan, B.T.; Sharp, H.L.; Ascher, N.; Dehner, L.P.; Thompson, W.M.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is an autosomal recessive, enzymatic disorder that results in micro- and macronodular cirrhosis in early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in approximately one-third of affected children. We evaluated the imaging studies performed in five children with this disorder. Pathologic examination of all five of the livers revealed cirrhosis and multiple regenerating nodules; hepatocellular carcinoma was present in two of the five livers. All five patients had high-attenuation or high- and low-attenuation foci within the liver. These high-attenuation foci were not apparent as focal lesions in three of four hepatic sonograms or in one of two hepatic nuclear scans. Angiography showed tumor vascularity in one patient with a focal hepatocellular carcinoma, but was indeterminate in a second patient with severe cirrhosis and multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma. Children with cirrhosis due to tyrosinemia may develop regenerating nodules that appear as high-attenuation hepatic foci on CT scans. It is difficult to differentiate regenerating nodules from multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma in these patients.

  10. Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Mausner, Leonard; Garland, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by beta emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

  11. Radionuclide stroke count ratios for assessment of right and left ventricular volume overload in children

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, M.D.; Graham, T.P. Jr.; Born, M.L.; Jones, J.P.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Artman, M.; Partain, C.L.

    1983-01-15

    The ratio of left ventricular to right ventricular stroke counts measured by radionuclide angiography has been used in adults to estimate the severity of left-sided valvular regurgitation. The validation of this technique in children for assessment of right and left ventricular volume overload is reported herein. Radionuclide stroke count ratios in 60 children aged 0.5 to 19 years (mean 11) were determined. Based on their diagnoses, the patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) normal--40 patients with no shunts or valvular regurgitation, (2) left ventricular volume overload--13 patients with mitral or aortic regurgitation, or both, and (3) right ventricular volume overload--7 patients, 2 with severe tricuspid regurgitation, 3 with atrial septal defects, and 2 with total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage. The radionuclide stroke count ratio clearly differentiated these groups (p less than 0.05): normal patients had a stroke count ratio of 1.04 +/- 0.17 (mean +/- 1 standard deviation), the left ventricular volume overload group had a stroke count ratio of 2.43 +/- 0.86, and the right ventricular volume overload group had a stroke count ratio of 0.44 +/- 0.17. In 22 of our 60 patients, radionuclide stroke count ratios were compared with cineangiographic stroke volume ratios, resulting in a correlation coefficient of 0.88. It is concluded that radionuclide ventriculography is an excellent tool for qualitative and quantitative assessment of valvular regurgitation in children.

  12. Scintigraphic evaluation of liver masses: cavernous hepatic hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Rubin, R A; Lichtenstein, G R

    1993-05-01

    Hepatic cavernous hemangioma must be included in the differential diagnosis of any hepatic solid mass. It is the second most common neoplasm of the liver, following intrahepatic metastases. With the exception of giant or symptomatic HCH, it does not require specific intervention. The ability to diagnose HCH radiologically (Table 2) has significant clinical importance. When confronted with clinical data and a preliminary radiologic study suggestive of HCH, serial planar blood-pool scintigraphy (with SPECT if the lesion is < 3-4 cm) should probably be the initial diagnostic examination. In comparison to MRI, it is safer, less expensive and easier for some patients to tolerate. For small, deep seated lesions or those adjacent to the heart or large vessels, MRI is the preferred test. Dynamic CT is probably most useful in patients with normal renal function in whom optimal imaging of the extrahepatic abdomen is desired. If the etiology of an incidental hepatic mass suspected to be an HCH is still not evident after these studies, angiography or biopsy are the remaining options. As described, angiography is sensitive and relatively specific for HCH. Although percutaneous biopsy may be associated with increased risk of bleeding, fine-needle biopsy has been shown to be safe for hemangiomas. However, fine-needle biopsy is more useful for confirming a suspected malignancy than for actually diagnosing hemangioma. PMID:8478723

  13. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  14. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  15. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  16. Hepatitis B Blood Tests: FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working on ... people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See More ...

  17. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  18. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Features of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Thomas S.; Jia, Yali; Gao, Simon S.; Bailey, Steven T.; Lauer, Andreas K.; Flaxel, Christina J.; Wilson, David J.; Huang, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography features of diabetic retinopathy Methods Using a 70kHz OCT and the split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm, 6 × 6 mm 3-dimensional angiograms of the macula of 4 patients with diabetic retinopathy were obtained and compared with fluorescein angiography (FA) for features catalogued by the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study. Results OCT angiography detected enlargement and distortion of the foveal avascular zone, retinal capillary dropout, and pruning of arteriolar branches. Areas of capillary loss obscured by fluorescein leakage on FA were more clearly defined on OCT angiography. Some areas of focal leakage on FA that were thought to be microaneurysms were found to be small tufts of neovascularization that extended above the inner limiting membrane. Conclusion OCT angiography does not show leakage, but can better delineate areas of capillary dropout and detect early retinal neovascularization. This new noninvasive angiography technology may be useful for routine surveillance of proliferative and ischemic changes in diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26308529

  20. Patient radiation dose from computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netwong, Y.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2016-03-01

    The 64-row multidetector computed tomography angiography (64-MDCTA) provides vascular image quality of the brain similar to digital subtraction angiography (DSA), but the effective dose of CTA is lower than DSA studied in phantom. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effective dose from 64-MDCTA and DSA. Effective dose (according to ICRP 103) from 64-MDCTA and DSA flat panel detector for cerebral vessels examination of the brain using standard protocols as recommended by the manufacturer was calculated for 30 cases of MDCTA (15 male and 15 female).The mean patient age was 49.5 (23-89) yrs. 30 cases of DSA (14 male and 16 female), the mean patient age was 46.8 (21-81) yrs. For CTA, the mean effective dose was 3.7 (2.82- 5.19) mSv. For DSA, the mean effective dose was 5.78 (3.3-10.06) mSv. The effective dose of CTA depends on the scanning protocol and scan length. Low tube current can reduce patient dose whereas the number of exposures and number of series in 3D rotational angiography (3D RA) resulted in increasing effective dose in DSA patients.

  1. Coronary CT angiography: current status and continuing challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z; Choo, G H; Ng, K H

    2012-01-01

    Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease owing to rapid technological developments, which are reflected in the improved spatial and temporal resolution of the images. High diagnostic accuracy has been achieved with multislice CT scanners (64 slice and higher), and in selected patients coronary CT angiography is regarded as a reliable alternative to invasive coronary angiography. With high-quality coronary CT imaging increasingly being performed, patients can benefit from an imaging modality that provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis while avoiding an invasive procedure. Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to cardiac imaging, study results reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution as there are some limitations existing within the study design or related to patient risk factors. In addition, some attention must be given to the potential health risks associated with the ionising radiation received during cardiac CT examinations. Radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the role of coronary CT angiography on cardiac imaging, with focus on coronary artery disease in terms of the diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography. Various approaches for dose reduction commonly recommended in the literature are discussed. Limitations of coronary CT angiography are identified. Finally, future directions and challenges with the use of coronary CT angiography are highlighted. PMID:22253353

  2. Coronary CT angiography: current status and continuing challenges.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Choo, G H; Ng, K H

    2012-05-01

    Coronary CT angiography has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease owing to rapid technological developments, which are reflected in the improved spatial and temporal resolution of the images. High diagnostic accuracy has been achieved with multislice CT scanners (64 slice and higher), and in selected patients coronary CT angiography is regarded as a reliable alternative to invasive coronary angiography. With high-quality coronary CT imaging increasingly being performed, patients can benefit from an imaging modality that provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis while avoiding an invasive procedure. Despite the tremendous contributions of coronary CT angiography to cardiac imaging, study results reported in the literature should be interpreted with caution as there are some limitations existing within the study design or related to patient risk factors. In addition, some attention must be given to the potential health risks associated with the ionising radiation received during cardiac CT examinations. Radiation dose associated with coronary CT angiography has raised serious concerns in the literature, as the risk of developing malignancy is not negligible. Various dose-saving strategies have been implemented, with some of the strategies resulting in significant dose reduction. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the role of coronary CT angiography on cardiac imaging, with focus on coronary artery disease in terms of the diagnostic and prognostic value of coronary CT angiography. Various approaches for dose reduction commonly recommended in the literature are discussed. Limitations of coronary CT angiography are identified. Finally, future directions and challenges with the use of coronary CT angiography are highlighted. PMID:22253353

  3. Digital subtraction angiography: overview of technical principles.

    PubMed

    Harrington, D P; Boxt, L M; Murray, P D

    1982-10-01

    The rapid development of equipment for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) has created a new diagnostic imaging method, the limits of which have not been scientifically determined. Yet through aggressive marketing, the technique is already beginning to permeate radiologic practice. The radiologist requires technical understanding of the instrumentation for informed judgment on clinical applications. DSA depends on the mating of high-resolution image-intensifier and television technology with computerized information manipulation and storage. In this overview, the individual components of the system are analyzed, from the generator to the image intensifier to the television system to the associated computer. By examining the role of each component, the current limitations and the areas of possible future development of DSA can be understood. This provides a basis for dealing with current technology and for evaluating the rapid technological changes that will occur over the next few years. PMID:6751053

  4. Projection-resolved optical coherence tomographic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Hwang, Thomas S.; Campbell, J. Peter; Bailey, Steven T.; Wilson, David J.; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Shadowgraphic projection artifacts from superficial vasculature interfere with the visualization of deeper vascular networks in optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A). We developed a novel algorithm to remove this artifact by resolving the ambiguity between in situ and projected flow signals. The algorithm identifies voxels with in situ flow as those where intensity-normalized decorrelation values are higher than all shallower voxels in the same axial scan line. This “projection-resolved” (PR) algorithm effectively suppressed the projection artifact on both en face and cross-sectional angiograms and enhanced depth resolution of vascular networks. In the human macula, the enhanced angiograms show three distinct vascular plexuses in the inner retina and no vessels in the outer retina. We demonstrate that PR OCT-A cleanly removes flow projection from the normally avascular outer retinal slab while preserving the density and continuity of the intermediate and deep retinal capillary plexuses. PMID:27231591

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography: physical principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Kiruluta, Andrew J M; González, R Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is the visualization of hemodynamic flow using imaging techniques that discriminate flowing spins in blood from those in stationary tissue. There are two classes of MRA methods based on whether the magnetic resonance imaging signal in flowing blood is derived from the amplitude of the moving spins, the time-of-flight methods, or is based on the phase accumulated by these flowing spins, as in phase contrast methods. Each method has particular advantages and limitations as an angiographic imaging technique, as evidenced in their application space. Here we discuss the physics of MRA for both classes of imaging techniques, including contrast-enhanced approaches and the recent rapid expansion of the techniques to fast acquisition and processing techniques using parallel imaging coils as well as their application in high-field MR systems such as 3T and 7T. PMID:27432663

  6. Digital subtraction angiography in extremity trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, P.C.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-10-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) may have considerable impact on the work-up of patients who have suffered trauma. The angiographic evaluation of vascular injuries can be accomplished rapidly and with minimal catheter use and manipulation, which is particularly important for those critically ill patients who have significant immobility because of multiple fractures. The authors retrospectively reviewed the digital subtraction angiograms in 50 consecutive cases of extremity trauma. The quality of the images in 44 of these permitted a confident diagnosis, the accuracy of which was confirmed by surgical or clinical follow-up. DSA reduces the time required to perform the procedure, the amount of contrast material injected, patient discomfort, and film cost. Its major disadvantage is the limited field size of the image intensifier.

  7. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  8. Transient Cortical Blindness Following Vertebral Angiography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ho Fung; Ma, Ka Fai; Cheng, Lik Fai; Chan, Tony KT

    2015-01-01

    Transient cortical blindness (TCB) is a rare but well-known complication of cerebral angiography. Its pathophysiology remains uncertain. We would like to report a case of TCB in a patient during a follow up vertebral angiogram for post-coil embolization of left posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Patient's vision was resumed spontaneously within 24 hours after angiography, with no residual neurological deficit in subsequent clinical follow up. Multi-modality imaging evaluation including vertebral angiography, brain CT and MRI performed on same day are presented. PMID:25763297

  9. Multimodality Imaging of Normal Hepatic Transplant Vasculature and Graft Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jeffrey H; Mazzariol, Fernanda S; Frank, Susan J; Oh, Sarah K; Koenigsberg, Mordecai; Stein, Marjorie W

    2011-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is an important treatment option for patients with end-stage liver disease. Advances in surgical technique, along with improvements in organ preservation and immunosuppression have improved patient outcomes. Post-operative complications, however, can limit this success. Ultrasound is the primary imaging modality for evaluation of hepatic transplants, providing real-time information about vascular flow in the graft. Graft vascular complications are not uncommon, and their prompt recognition is crucial to allow for timely graft salvage. A multimodality approach including CT angiography, MRI, or conventional angiography may be necessary in cases of complex transplant vascular anatomy or when sonography and Doppler are inconclusive to diagnose the etiologies of these complications. The purpose of this article is to familiarize radiologists with the normal post-transplant vascular anatomy and the imaging appearances of the major vascular complications that may occur within the hepatic artery, portal vein, and venous outflow tract, with an emphasis on ultrasound. PMID:22184543

  10. Radionuclide therapy for arthritic knees

    SciTech Connect

    Doepel, L.K.

    1985-02-08

    A new radionuclide therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis of the knee is described. This therapy combines a short-lived radionuclide with a carrier whose physical and chemical characteristics aid retention of the radioactive particles within the joint. Joining a radionuclide to a particulate carrier had not been explored previously as a potential method for inhibiting radiation leakage. The treatment couples the rare earth element dysprosium 165 to ferric hydroxide in macroaggregate form (size range: 3 to 10 ..mu..m). After the relatively inert iron complex penetrates the synovium, it causes cell death. Macrophages and phagocytes clear away the cellular debris, essentially eliminating the synovium.

  11. Hepatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S.; Langer, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses are potentially lethal diseases if early diagnosis and treatment are not instituted. They are prevalent all over the globe and pyogenic abscesses are predominant over amoebic. With better control of intra abdominal and systemic infections by a spectrum of antibiotics, aetiology of pyogenic abscesses are secondary to interventions and diseases in the biliary tree to a large extent today. The common organisms isolated are the Gram negative group. Amoebic abscesses continue to plague some regions of the world where hygiene and sanitation are questionable. Over the years, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis have evolved remarkably. Imaging modalities like ultrasonography and CT scan have become the cornerstone of diagnosis. The absence of ionizing radiation makes MRI an attractive alternative in patients who require multiple follow up scans. Serological testing in amoebic abscesses has become more reliable. Though antibiotics have remained the principal modality of management, percutaneous drainage of abscesses have vastly improved the chances of cure and bring down the morbidity drastically in pyogenic abscesses. Amoebic abscesses respond well to medical treatment with nitroimidazoles, and minimally invasive surgical drainage is an option in cases where open surgery is indicated. PMID:24532886

  12. Scintigraphic evaluation of hepatic mass lesions: emphasis on hemangioma detection.

    PubMed

    Middleton, M L

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging techniques continue to play a unique role in the evaluation of hepatic masses. Although many useful radiodiagnostic agents are available, the predominant nuclear medicine study used to evaluate hepatic masses in this decade is technetium-labeled red blood cell "blood-pool" scintigraphy. Hepatic blood-pool scintigraphy is extremely useful for the confirmation or exclusion of benign hepatic hemangiomas. This technique was first described in the 1970s and has vastly improved since that time. This improvement has been caused predominantly by advancements in instrumentation, especially the development of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. However, a perfusion/blood-pool mismatch remains unchanged as the hallmark finding for hepatic hemangiomas. The sensitivity and specificity of blood-pool scanning for the detection of hemangiomas has continued to increase over the years, and has not been equaled or surpassed by other radiographic modalities, with the possible exception of magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, blood-pool imaging is relatively inexpensive, simple to perform, and highly accurate. When a suspected hepatic hemangioma is confirmed by a positive radionuclide blood-pool study, the clinical evaluation of patients with hepatic masses can generally be terminated. PMID:8623050

  13. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePlus

    ... partner – it's your best friend. Welcome. The Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) is a 501 (c) 3 non- ... and cures is your participation in the Hepatitis Foundation International Registry. Whether you are affected, a caregiver, ...

  14. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... hepatitis A. Children can get hepatitis A at day care center from other children or from child care ... treatment with immunoglobulin therapy. If your child attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the ...

  15. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  16. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  17. Coil Embolization of an Arteriobiliary Fistula Caused by Hepatic Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Hidemasa Doi, Ippei; Makita, Kohzoh; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2005-12-15

    Arteriobiliary fistula is a rare complication of hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy. We report successful coil embolization of an arteriobiliary fistula. An 80-year-old woman underwent percutaneous placement of an indwelling catheter into the replaced right hepatic artery for intra-arterial chemotherapy of liver metastases. Coil embolization of the left hepatic artery was not performed. The patient complained of abdominal pain during intra-arterial chemotherapy. Angiography revealed a fistula between the replaced right hepatic artery and the common bile duct. The fistula was successfully treated by coil embolization via the indwelling catheter, and the indwelling catheter was removed. Although such complications usually herald the termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy, the patient underwent percutaneous implantation of a new catheter-port system, and intra-arterial chemotherapy was restarted.

  18. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  19. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  20. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  1. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  2. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A Text Size ... Prevented? How Is It Treated? What Is It? Hepatitis (pronounced: hep-uh-TIE-tiss) is a disease ...

  3. Treating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Karmen

    2014-10-01

    (1) New treatments for hepatitis C are curing more people than before. (2) Baby boomers make up an estimated 75 percent of all cases of hepatitis C. (3) Medicare and some insurance plans cover screening for hepatitis C as a preventive service without a copayment. PMID:25514812

  4. Nuclide angiography in Paget's disease of the skull: Case report.

    PubMed

    Fitzer, P M

    1975-07-01

    Early-appearing and persistent uptake on nuclear angiography in a patient with early Paget's disease of the skull is described. The diagnosis of subdural hematoma may be ruled out at the time of brain scanning. PMID:1167280

  5. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  6. Digital subtraction angiography in pediatric cerebrovascular occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Faerber, E.N.; Griska, L.A.B.; Swartz, J.D.; Capitanio, M.A.; Popky, G.L.

    1984-08-01

    While conventional angiography has been used to demonstrate cerebrovascular occlusive disease in the past, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is capable of showing progressive vascular involvement with ease, simplicity, and extremely low morbidity, making it particularly well suited for children and outpatients either alone or coordinated with computed tomography. The authors discuss the usefulness and advantages of DSA as demonstrated in 7 infants and children with hemiplegia, 4 of whom had sickle-cell disease.

  7. Postmortem angiography using femoral cannulation and postmortem microbiology.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Egger, Coraline; Grabherr, Silke; Jaton-Ogay, Katia; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    Despite the undeniable advantages of postmortem angiography, numerous questions have arisen concerning the influence that the injected contrast media may exercise on biological fluids and tissues collected for toxicological and biochemical investigations. Moreover, cardiac blood for microbiological investigations cannot be obtained post-angiography. In this study, we examined whether the peripheral blood collected prior to postmortem angiography, using percutaneous access to femoral vessels after skin surface disinfection, could be suitable for microbiological investigations when postmortem angiography with femoral vessel cannulation is also performed. A total of 66 cases were included in the study and were divided into two subgroups (angiography and bacteriology group, 33 cases and control group, 33 cases). Autopsies, histology, toxicology, bacteriology, and biochemical investigations (procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and soluble triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells type 1) were performed in all cases. No statistically significant differences between the two groups were noted, and identified category distribution (death unrelated to infection, true infection, false positive, and undetermined) was rather similar in both studied populations. These preliminary results suggest that postmortem angiography using a femoral approach does not constitute an impediment to the collection of peripheral blood for microbiology and vice versa. Moreover, the use of femoral blood for microbiology does not lead to an increased risk of doubtful results. PMID:25381195

  8. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  9. Mirizzi syndrome associated with hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Oliver; Faroug, Radwane; Davidson, Brian R; Goode, J Antony

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This is the first case report of Mirizzi syndrome associated with hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. Case presentation A 54-year-old man presented with painful obstructive jaundice and weight loss. Computed tomography showed a hilar mass in the liver. Following an episode of haemobilia, angiography demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm of a branch of the right hepatic artery that was embolised. At surgery, a gallstone causing Mirizzi type II syndrome was found to be responsible for the biliary obstruction and a necrotic inflammatory mass and haematoma were found to be extending into the liver. The mass was debrided and drained, the obstructing stones removed and the bile duct drained with a t-tube. The patient made a full recovery. Conclusion This case highlights another situation where there may be difficulty in differentiating Mirizzi syndrome from biliary tract cancer. PMID:19014690

  10. Contrast agent choice for intravenous coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, H. D.; Siddons, D. P.

    1990-05-01

    The screening of the general population for coronary artery disease would be practical if a method existed for visualizing the extent of occlusion after an intravenous injection of contrast agent. Measurements performed with monochromatic synchrotron radiation X-rays and an iodine-containing contrast agent at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory have shown that such an intravenous angiography procedure would be possible with an adequately intense monochromatic X-ray source. Because of the size and cost of synchrotron radiation facilities it would be desirable to make the most efficient use of the intensity available, while reducing as much as possible the radiation dose experienced by the patient. By choosing contrast agents containing elements with a higher atomic number than iodine, it is possible to both improve the image quality and reduce the patient radiation dose, while using the same synchrotron radiation source. By using Si monochromator crystals with a small mosaic spread, it is possible to increase the X-ray flux available for imaging by over an order of magnitude, without any changes in the storage ring or wiggler magnet. The most critical imaging task for intravenous coronary angiography utilizing synchrotron radiation X-rays is visualizing a coronary artery through the left ventricle or aorta which also contain contrast agent. Calculations have been made of the signal to noise ratio expected for this imaging task for various contrast agents with atomic numbers between that of iodine and bismuth. The X-ray energy spectrum of the X-17 superconduction wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been used for these calculations. Both perfect Si crystals and Si crystals with a small mosaic spread are considered as monochromators. Contrast agents containing Gd or Yb seem to have about the optimal calculated signal to noise ratio. Gd-DTPA is already approved for use as a contrast agent for