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Sample records for hepatic resection technique

  1. Anatomy of Hepatic Resectional Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Michael C; D'Angelica, Michael I

    2016-04-01

    Liver anatomy can be variable, and understanding of anatomic variations is crucial to performing hepatic resections, particularly parenchymal-sparing resections. Anatomic knowledge is a critical prerequisite for effective hepatic resection with minimal blood loss, parenchymal preservation, and optimal oncologic outcome. Each anatomic resection has pitfalls, about which the operating surgeon should be aware and comfortable managing intraoperatively. PMID:27017858

  2. Hepatic Resection Using a Water Jet Dissector

    PubMed Central

    Stain, S. C.; Guastella, T.; Maddern, G. J.; Blumgart, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity in major hepatic resection is often related to hemorrhage. A high pressure, high velocity water jet has been developed and has been utilized to assist in hepatic parenchymal transection. Sixty-seven major hepatic resections were performed for solid hepatic tumors. The tissue fracture technique was used in 51 patients (76%), and the water jet dissector was used predominantly in 16 patients (24%). The extent of hepatic resection using each technique was similar. The results showed no difference in operative duration (p = .499). The mean estimated blood loss using the water jet was 1386 ml, and tissue fracture technique 2450 ml (p = .217). Transfusion requirements were less in the water jet group (mean 2.0 units) compared to the tissue fracture group (mean 5.2 units); (p = .023). Results obtained with the new water dissector are encouraging. The preliminary results suggest that blood loss may be diminished. PMID:8387808

  3. [Preoperative assessment for extended hepatic resection].

    PubMed

    Martin, David; Roulin, Didier; Takamune, Yamaguchi; Demartines, Nicolas; Halkic, Nermin

    2016-06-15

    The number of major hepatectomy performed for the treatment of primary or secondary liver cancer has increased over the past two decades. By definition, a major hepatectomy includes the resection of at least three liversegments. Advances in anesthesiology, surgical and radiological techniques and perioperative management allowed a broad patient selection with increased security. Every case must be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board, and preoperative assessment should include biological, volumetric and functional hepatic parameters. In case of preoperative insufficient liver volume, portal vein embolization allows increasing the size of liver remnant. This paper aims describing preoperative work-up. PMID:27487623

  4. Major hepatic resection. A 25-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, H H; Tompkins, R K; Longmire, W P

    1983-01-01

    Major hepatic resections were performed on 138 patients for a variety of conditions. There was one intraoperative death. Including this patient, there were 15 deaths within 30 days of the operation (operative mortality 10.9%). Important postoperative complications were intra-abdominal sepsis (17%), biliary leak (11%), hepatic failure (8%), and hemorrhage (6%). The results of 30 resections for the benign lesions, liver cell adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, hemangioma, and cystadenoma showed no operative mortality and low morbidity. Of 26 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, seven died within a month of operation. The cumulative survival of the 26 at five years was 38%, and of the 19 who survived the procedure, 51%. Poor survival followed resections for cholangiocarcinoma and "mixed tumors." The five-year cumulative survival of 22 patients who had colorectal metastases excised was 31%. Apart from a patient with carcinoid, prolonged survival was rare after resection of other secondaries and after en bloc resections for tumors directly invading the liver. Hepatic resection was of value in the management of some patients with hepatic trauma, Caroli's disease, liver cysts, and intrahepatic stones. PMID:6299217

  5. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  6. Personal experience with 411 hepatic resections.

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, S; Starzl, T E

    1988-01-01

    Over a 24-year period, 411 partial hepatic resections were performed: 142 right or left trisegmentectomies, 158 lobectomies, 25 segmentectomies, and 86 local excisions. The operations were performed for benign lesions in 182 patients, for primary hepatic malignancies in 106, and for hepatic metastases in 123, including 90 from colorectal cancers. The 30-day (operative) mortality rate was 3.2%, and there were an additional six late deaths (1.5%) due to hepatic failure caused by the resection. The highest operative mortality rate (6.3%) resulted from the trisegmentectomies, but this merely reflected the extent of the disease being treated. A mortality rate of 8.5% for patients with primary hepatic malignancy was associated not only with the extensiveness of lesions, but also with cirrhosis in the remaining liver fragment. There was no mortality for 123 patients with metastatic disease, 100 patients with cavernous hemangioma, 22 with liver cell adenoma, 17 with focal nodular hyperplasia, 16 with congenital cystic disease, and five with hydatid cysts. Trauma, pre-existing iatrogenic injury, and cirrhosis were the only conditions that had lethal portent in patients with benign disease. Furthermore, patients with benign disease who survived operation had minimal liability from recurrence of their original disease and none from the resection per se. By contrast, tumor recurrence dominated the actuarial survival rates for cancer patients, which at 1 and 5 years were 68.5% and 31.9%, respectively, after resection for primary hepatic malignancy, and 84.2% and 29.5%, respectively, for hepatic metastases. In this report, the expanding role of partial hepatectomy in the treatment of liver disease was emphasized, as well as the need for considering, in some cases, the alternative of total hepatectomy and liver replacement. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 9. PMID:3178330

  7. Resection of hepatic metastases from colorectal carcinoma. The registry data.

    PubMed

    Asbun, H J; Tsao, J I; Hughes, K S

    1994-01-01

    When liver metastases from colorectal carcinoma are detected, the surgeon must decide whether or not the patient is a candidate for resection. Even though long-term survival after resection is far from optimal, the relegation of patients to nonresective treatment means denying them the only chance for cure currently available. Better understanding of liver anatomy and improvement in resection techniques have decreased the morbidity and mortality. The RHM and the GITSG reports have better defined the prognostic factors for resections of colorectal liver metastases and allowed for a better understanding of the indications for resection. During the last decades, liver resection has been extended to older patients, patients with multiple liver lesions, and patients with larger solitary metastases. At the same time, anatomic rather than wedge resections are more common, and it is preferable to perform the colon and liver resection at different stages. The end result has been a marked increase in the number of hepatic resections performed for colorectal liver metastases during the last two decades. PMID:8031663

  8. Major hepatic resections in infancy and childhood

    PubMed Central

    Howat, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    Nineteen infants and children who had hepatic lobectomy or segmental resection of the liver for tumours are described. Fourteen had lobectomy for malignant tumours but only three survived for more than a year. Four of the five patients who had resections for hamartomas have survived for 18 months or more. The main problem encountered at operation was haemorrhage, which was responsible for the entire operative mortality of 31%. A transient disturbance of liver function occurred after operation in both patients who had preoperative radiotherapy. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4324038

  9. Hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatic resection.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, K; Kawamura, T; Sanada, T; Kumashiro, Y; Okamoto, H; Nakamura, N; Arii, S

    2002-09-01

    Thanks to recent advances, performance of liver resection is now possible using laparoscopic procedures. However, still there are some difficulties to overcome. The hand-assisted method lends safety and reliability to the laparoscopic procedure. A 54-year-old man diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was referred for hepatectomy. Angiography with computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a 2-cm hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at segment V, close to the gallbladder. A hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatic resection was performed. Four 10-mm trocars, one for wall lifting and three for working, were placed in the upper abdomen. A small incision was added at the right side of umbilicus, and the operator's left hand was inserted through it. A microwave tissue coagulator and laparoscopic ultrasonic dissector were used for liver resection. Total operation time was 162 min; blood loss was 20 g. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the postoperative hospital stay was 7 days. We thus demonstrated that laparoscopic liver resection is safer and easier when the hand of the operator can be inserted into the abdomen. The small incision does not greatly diminish the benefits that accrue from minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. The hand-assisted procedure allows better access to the tumor. In addition, hand assistance restores the sense of touch to the operator and is an effective means of controlling sudden and unexpected bleeding. PMID:12235510

  10. Intra-abdominal sepsis after hepatic resection.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, R F; Blenkharn, J I; Edwards, W J; Orloff, M; Blumgart, L H; Benjamin, I S

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and thirty hepatic resections performed over an 8-year period were reviewed for evidence of postoperative intra-abdominal sepsis. Of 126 patients who survived for more than 24 hours after operation, 36 developed culture positive intra-abdominal collections (28.6%). Significant independent variables associated with the development of intra-abdominal sepsis were diagnoses of trauma or cholangiocarcinoma, and the need for reoperation to control hemorrhage during the postoperative period. Before 1984, infected fluid collections were treated predominantly by operative drainage, but this has largely been replaced by percutaneous methods, which have proven effective in most cases. Eighteen (50%) of the infections were caused by a mixed bacterial culture, with Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli being the most common isolates. Six patients with clinical signs of sepsis had a sterile fluid collection drained with complete relief of symptoms. This review suggests that intra-abdominal sepsis is a frequent complication after hepatic resection, and can often be managed successfully by nonoperative percutaneous drainage. PMID:2493775

  11. Liver Resection in Children with Hepatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Judson G.; Altman, R. Peter; Arensman, Robert M.; Matlak, Michael E.; Leikin, Sanford L.

    1978-01-01

    In the past ten years, 28 patients with primary tumors of the liver have been treated. There were 11 benign tumors, including four hamartomas, three patients with focal nodular hyperplasia, and two each with congenital cysts and hemangioma. Hamartomas and masses of focal nodular hyperplasia should be excised when possible, but both are benign lesions; therefore life threatening excisions at the porta hepatis should be avoided. Cysts are often resectable, but when occupying all lobes of the liver, they can be successfully managed by marsupialization into the free peritoneal cavity. If resectable, hemangiomas should be removed; when occupying most of the liver as they often do, patients may be subject to platelet trapping or to cardiac failure. In some instances these lesions have been controlled by steroids, radiation therapy or hepatic artery ligation. Of 17 malignant tumors seen, 12 proved to be hepatoblastomas. Nine of the 12 patients underwent liver resection, of whom four are cured, (33%). There were three children with hepatocellular carcinomas and two with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. One child from each of these groups is cured by surgical excision. At present the only known cures in children with primary malignant liver neoplasms have been achieved by operative removal. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:206216

  12. Perioperative chemotherapy and hepatic resection for resectable colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Toru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Baba, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    The role of perioperative chemotherapy in the management of initially resectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) is still unclear. The EPOC trial [the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 40983] is an important study that declares perioperative chemotherapy as the standard of care for patients with resectable CRLM, and the strategy is widely accepted in western countries. Compared with surgery alone, perioperative FOLFOX therapy significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) in eligible patients or those with resected CRLM. Overall survival (OS) data from the EPOC trial were recently published in The Lancet Oncology, 2013. Here, we discussed the findings and recommendations from the EORTC 40983 trial. PMID:25713806

  13. Hepatic metastasis from esophageal cancer treated by surgical resection and hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, K; Kuroda, T; Wakabayashi, M; Sodeyama, H; Yokoyama, S; Kusama, J

    1998-01-01

    We herein describe a successful surgical resection of esophageal cancer with syncronous liver metastasis and report the first case of a partial response to hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for recurrence of esophageal hepatic metastasis after hepatectomy. Hepatectomy and subsequent hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil is thus recommended as an effective treatment for liver metastasis from esophageal cancer. PMID:9496513

  14. Hepatic resection is associated with reduced postoperative opioid requirement

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Caitlyn Rose; Caldwell, Julia Christine; Afilaka, Babatunde; Iskandarani, Khaled; Chinchilli, Vernon Michael; McQuillan, Patrick; Cooper, Amanda Beth; Gusani, Niraj; Bezinover, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Postoperative pain can significantly affect surgical outcomes. As opioid metabolism is liver-dependent, any reduction in hepatic volume can lead to increased opioid concentrations in the blood. The hypothesis of this retrospective study was that patients undergoing open hepatic resection would require less opioid for pain management than those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Material and Methods: Data from 79 adult patients who underwent open liver resection and eighty patients who underwent open pancreaticoduodenectomy at our medical center between January 01, 2010 and June 30, 2013 were analyzed. All patients received both general and neuraxial anesthesia. Postoperatively, patients were managed with a combination of epidural and patient-controlled analgesia. Pain scores and amount of opioids administered (morphine equivalents) were compared. A multivariate lineal regression was performed to determine predictors of opioid requirement. Results: No significant differences in pain scores were found at any time point between groups. Significantly more opioid was administered to patients having pancreaticoduodenectomy than those having a hepatic resection at time points: Intraoperative (P = 0.006), first 48 h postoperatively (P = 0.001), and the entire length of stay (LOS) (P = 0.002). Statistical significance was confirmed after controlling for age, sex, body mass index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification (adjusted P = 0.006). Total hospital LOS was significantly longer after pancreaticoduodenectomy (P = 0.03). A multivariate lineal regression demonstrated a lower opioid consumption in the hepatic resection group (P = 0.03), but there was no difference in opioid use based on the type of hepatic resection. Conclusion: Patients undergoing open hepatic resection had a significantly lower opioid requirement in comparison with patients undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. A multicenter prospective

  15. Preoperative selection of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastasis for hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Rafif E; Al-alem, Faisal; Simoneau, Eve; Hassanain, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) has a well-documented improvement in survival. To benefit from this intervention, proper selection of patients who would be adequate surgical candidates becomes vital. A combination of imaging techniques may be utilized in the detection of the lesions. The criteria for resection are continuously evolving; currently, the requirements that need be met to undergo resection of CRLM are: the anticipation of attaining a negative margin (R0 resection), whilst maintaining an adequate functioning future liver remnant. The timing of hepatectomy in regards to resection of the primary remains controversial; before, after, or simultaneously. This depends mainly on the tumor burden and symptoms from the primary tumor. The role of chemotherapy differs according to the resectability of the liver lesion(s); no evidence of improved survival was shown in patients with resectable disease who received preoperative chemotherapy. Presence of extrahepatic disease in itself is no longer considered a reason to preclude patients from resection of their CRLM, providing limited extra-hepatic disease, although this currently is an area of active investigations. In conclusion, we review the indications, the adequate selection of patients and perioperative factors to be considered for resection of colorectal liver metastasis. PMID:26811608

  16. Prospective Evaluation of Ultrasonic Surgical Dissectors in Hepatic Resection: A Cooperative Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Millat, Bertrand; Hay, Jean-Marie; Descottes, Bernard; Fagniez, Pierre-Louis

    1992-01-01

    Blood loss is the major cause of postoperative mortality and morbidity associated with hepatic resection. A prospective multicenter study was conducted to determine if ultrasonic dissectors (USD) were useful in hepatic resection and could reduce this hemorrhagic risk. Forty-seven hepatic resections were performed in 42 consecutive patients during a two month period in 11 public, surgical centers. Twenty-one patients had primary or secondary malignancies, six had benign tumors, two had biliary cysts, one had cholangiocarcinoma, one had Caroli’s disease, and 11 had hydatid cysts of the liver. Two different USD devices were evaluated (CUSA System-Lasersonics and NIIC-DX 101 T). The hepatic resections tested included a wide range of procedures. Each surgeon had the possibility of choosing between the USD and his own usual technique for each operative step and according to local conditions. The average volume of blood infused, irrespective of the underlying pathology or the procedure performed, was 1.0 L (range 0-4.8 L). Fourteen patients required no transfusions. No operative or immediate postoperative deaths were recorded. Five major complications, all unrelated to the use of the USD, developed in three patients. Access to intra and extraparenchymal arterial and venous tributaries and particularly the control of the hepatic veins were facilitated by USD. While transection of hepatic parenchyma was neither easier nor faster than with conventional techniques, it was found to be less hemorrhagic. Overall appraisal was expressed on an analog scale; the USD was found to be helpful or very helpful in 75 percent of all resections. With regard to the pathology being treated, total or partial excision of hydatid cysts was greatly enhanced by the use of the USD while this benefit was not found for wedge resections of other hepatic lesions. With regard to user friendliness and maintenance, the NIIC-DX 101 T device was preferred. We conclude that the USD facilitates formal

  17. A novel technique for hepatic vein reconstruction during hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Surjan, Rodrigo C; Basseres, Tiago; Pajecki, Denis; Puzzo, Daniel B; Makdissi, Fabio F; Machado, Marcel A C; Battilana, Alexandre Gustavo Bellorio

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for malignant liver tumours. Nevertheless, surgical approach to tumours located close to the confluence of the hepatic veins is a challenging issue. Trisectionectomies are considered the first curative option for treatment of these tumours. However, those procedures are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates primarily due to post-operative liver failure. Thus, maximal preservation of functional liver parenchyma should always be attempted. We describe the isolated resection of Segment 8 for the treatment of a tumour involving the right hepatic vein and in contact with the middle hepatic vein and retrohepatic vena cava with immediate reconstruction of the right hepatic vein with a vascular graft. This is the first time this type of reconstruction was performed, and it allowed to preserve all but one of the hepatic segments with normal venous outflow. This innovative technique is a fast and safe method to reconstruct hepatic veins. PMID:27076622

  18. A novel technique for hepatic vein reconstruction during hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Surjan, Rodrigo C.; Basseres, Tiago; Pajecki, Denis; Puzzo, Daniel B.; Makdissi, Fabio F.; Machado, Marcel A.C.; Battilana, Alexandre Gustavo Bellorio

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for malignant liver tumours. Nevertheless, surgical approach to tumours located close to the confluence of the hepatic veins is a challenging issue. Trisectionectomies are considered the first curative option for treatment of these tumours. However, those procedures are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates primarily due to post-operative liver failure. Thus, maximal preservation of functional liver parenchyma should always be attempted. We describe the isolated resection of Segment 8 for the treatment of a tumour involving the right hepatic vein and in contact with the middle hepatic vein and retrohepatic vena cava with immediate reconstruction of the right hepatic vein with a vascular graft. This is the first time this type of reconstruction was performed, and it allowed to preserve all but one of the hepatic segments with normal venous outflow. This innovative technique is a fast and safe method to reconstruct hepatic veins. PMID:27076622

  19. Tailoring the area of hepatic resection using inflow and outflow modulation

    PubMed Central

    Donadon, Matteo; Procopio, Fabio; Torzilli, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The performance of hepatic surgery without a parenchyma-sparing strategy carries significant risks for patient survival because of the not negligible occurrence of postoperative liver failure. The key factor of modern hepatic surgery is the use of the intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS), not only to stage the disease, but more importantly to guide resection with the specific aim to maximize the sparing of the functional parenchyma. Whether in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and underlying liver cirrhosis, or in patients with colorectal liver metastasis, IOUS allows the performance of the so-called “radical but conservative surgery”, which is the pivotal factor to offer a chance of cure to an increasing proportion of patients, who until few years ago were considered only for palliative care. Using some new IOUS-guided surgical maneuvers, which are based on the liver inflow and outflow modulations, more precise anatomically subsegmental- and segmental-oriented resections can be effectively performed. The present work describes the rationale and the surgical technique for a precise tailoring of the area of hepatic resection using the most recent attainments in IOUS. Such important technical achievements should be a fundamental part of the surgical armamentarium of the modern liver surgeon. PMID:23466864

  20. Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion syndrome after partial liver resection (LR): hepatic venous oxygen saturation, enzyme pattern, reduced and oxidized glutathione, procalcitonin and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Michael; Krüger, Antie; Schirrmeister, Wulf

    2003-06-01

    The hepatic ischemia-reperfusion syndrome was investigated in 28 patients undergoing elective partial liver resection with intraoperative occlusion of hepatic inflow (Pringle maneuver) using the technique of liver vein catheterization. Hepatic venous oxygen saturation (ShvO2) was monitored continuously up to 24 hours after surgery. Aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, pseudocholinesterase, alpha-glutathione S-transferase, reduced and oxidized glutathione, procalcitonine, and interleukin-6 were serially measured both before and after Pringle maneuver during the resection and postoperatively in arterial and/or hepatic venous blood. ShvO2 measurement demonstrated that peri- and postoperative management was suitable to maintain an optimal hepatic oxygen supply. As expected, we were able to demonstrate a typical enzyme pattern of postischemic liver injury. There was a distinct decrease of reduced glutathione levels both in arterial and hepatic venous plasma after LR accompanied by a strong increase in oxidized glutathione concentration during the phase of reperfusion. We observed increases in procalcitonin and interleukin-6 levels both in arterial and hepatic venous blood after declamping. Our data support the view that liver resection in man under conditions of inflow occlusion resulted in ischemic lesion of the liver (loss of glutathione synthesizing capacity with disturbance of protection against oxidative stress) and an additional impairment during reperfusion (liberation of reactive oxygen species, local and systemic inflammation reaction with cytokine production). Additionally, we found some evidence for the assumption that the liver has an export function for reduced glutathione into plasma in man. PMID:12877355

  1. Elevator Muscle Anterior Resection: A New Technique for Blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zigiotti, Gian Luigi; Delia, Gabriele; Grenga, Pierluigi; Pichi, Francesco; Rechichi, Miguel; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; d'Alcontres, Francesco Stagno; Lupo, Flavia; Meduri, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Blepharoptosis is a condition of inadequate upper eyelid position, with a downward displacement of the upper eyelid margin resulting in obstruction of the superior visual field. Levator resection is an effective technique that is routinely used to correct aponeurotic ptosis. The anterior levator resection is the procedure of choice in moderate blepharoptosis when there is moderate to good levator muscle function, furthermore, with an anterior approach, a greater resection can be achieved than by a conjunctival approach. The authors describe a modification in the Putterman technique with a resection done over a plicated elevator, plication that was suggested by Mustardè. The technique has been named as elevator muscle anterior resection. The elevator muscle anterior resection inspires from the Fasanella-Servat operation by the use of a clamp, making the operation simple and predictable. PMID:26703054

  2. Hepatic resection, hepatic arterial infusion pump therapy, and genetic biomarkers in the management of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, John C.; Qadan, Motaz

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the most common site of colorectal cancer metastasis. Fortunately, improvements have been made in the care of patients with colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM). Effective management of CRLM requires a multidisciplinary approach that is tailored to individuals in order to achieve long-term survival, and cure. Resection and systemic chemotherapy provides benefit in selected individuals. An adjunct to resection and/or systemic chemotherapy is the use of hepatic arterial infusion pump (HAIP) therapy. Many studies show HAIP provides benefit for select patients with CRLM. Added to the crucible of a multidisciplinary approach to managing CRLM is the ever growing understanding of tumor biology and genetic profiling. In this review, we discuss the outcomes of resection, systemic therapies and HAIP therapy for CRLM. We also discuss the impact of recent advances in genetic profiling and mutational analysis, namely mutation of KRAS and BRAF, for this disease. PMID:26697204

  3. Hepatic resection or transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ninggang; Wei, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongzhi; Chai, Wenxiao; Che, Ming; Wang, Jiangye; Du, Binbin

    2016-06-01

    The role of hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with accompanying portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes of hepatic resection compared with those of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in HCC patients. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 230 HCC patients with portal vein invasion who underwent hepatic resection (96 patients) or TACE (134 patients). The baseline characteristics, tumor characteristics, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. The baseline and tumor characteristics were comparable between the hepatic resection and TACE groups. The overall complication rate was 35.4% in the hepatic resection group, which was significantly lower than that in the TACE group (73.0%, P <0.001). However, the serious complication rate (grade ≥3) in the hepatic resection group was 13.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the TACE group (P = 0.003). The cumulative overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in the hepatic resection group were 86.5%, 60.4%, and 33.3%, respectively. These rates were much higher than those in the TACE group (1-year: 77.6%; 3-year: 47.8%; and 5-year: 20.9%; P = 0.021). The long-term survival was notably better in the patients with types I and II PVTT than in the patients with types III and IV PVTT (P <0.05). The univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that types III and IV PVTT and TACE may have contributed to the poor overall survival following surgery. In HCC patients with PVTT and compensated liver function, hepatic resection is a safe and effective surgical protocol, particularly for patients with type I or II PVTT. PMID:27367992

  4. Hepatic resection or transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ninggang; Wei, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongzhi; Chai, Wenxiao; Che, Ming; Wang, Jiangye; Du, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with accompanying portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes of hepatic resection compared with those of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in HCC patients. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 230 HCC patients with portal vein invasion who underwent hepatic resection (96 patients) or TACE (134 patients). The baseline characteristics, tumor characteristics, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. The baseline and tumor characteristics were comparable between the hepatic resection and TACE groups. The overall complication rate was 35.4% in the hepatic resection group, which was significantly lower than that in the TACE group (73.0%, P <0.001). However, the serious complication rate (grade ≥3) in the hepatic resection group was 13.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the TACE group (P = 0.003). The cumulative overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in the hepatic resection group were 86.5%, 60.4%, and 33.3%, respectively. These rates were much higher than those in the TACE group (1-year: 77.6%; 3-year: 47.8%; and 5-year: 20.9%; P = 0.021). The long-term survival was notably better in the patients with types I and II PVTT than in the patients with types III and IV PVTT (P <0.05). The univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that types III and IV PVTT and TACE may have contributed to the poor overall survival following surgery. In HCC patients with PVTT and compensated liver function, hepatic resection is a safe and effective surgical protocol, particularly for patients with type I or II PVTT. PMID:27367992

  5. Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatic Recurrence after Curative Resection of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eugene K.; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Gwon, Dong Il

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite curative resection, hepatic recurrences cause a significant reduction in survival in patients with primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) has recently been used successfully to treat primary and secondary hepatic malignancy. Methods Between 2003 and 2008, 15 patients underwent TACE because of hepatic recurrence after curative resection of a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The tumor response was evaluated based on computed tomography scans after TACE. The overall duration of patient survival was measured. Results After TACE, a radiographically evident response occurred in six patients whose tumors demonstrated a tumor blush on angiography. Four patients demonstrated stabilization of a hypovascular mass. The remaining five patients demonstrated continued progression of hypovascular hepatic lesions. The median survival periods from the time of diagnosis and from the time of initial TACE were 9.6 and 7.5 months, respectively. Conclusions TACE may represent a viable therapeutic modality in patients with hepatic recurrence after curative resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:20981218

  6. Portal Vein Embolization as an Oncosurgical Strategy Prior to Major Hepatic Resection: Anatomic, Surgical, and Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Sonia T.; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Sultenfuss, Mark; Hailey, Brian S.; Sparks, Anthony; Satpathy, Bighnesh; Anaya, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is used to extend the indications for major hepatic resection, and it has become the standard of care for selected patients with hepatic malignancies treated at major hepatobiliary centers. To date, various techniques with different embolic materials have been used with similar results in the degree of liver hypertrophy. Regardless of the specific strategy used, both surgeons and interventional radiologists must be familiar with each other’s techniques to be able to create the optimal plan for each individual patient. Knowledge of the segmental anatomy of the liver is paramount to fully understand the liver segments that need to be embolized and resected. Understanding the portal vein anatomy and the branching variations, along with the techniques used to transect the portal vein during hepatic resection, is important because these variables can affect the PVE procedure and the eventual surgical resection. Comprehension of the advantages and disadvantages of approaches to the portal venous system and the various embolic materials used for PVE is essential to best tailor the procedures for each patient and to avoid complications. Before PVE, meticulous assessment of the portal vein branching anatomy is performed with cross-sectional imaging, and embolization strategies are developed based on the patient’s anatomy. The PVE procedure consists of several technical steps, and knowledge of these technical tips, potential complications, and how to avoid the complications in each step is of great importance for safe and successful PVE and ultimately successful hepatectomy. Because PVE is used as an adjunct to planned hepatic resection, priority must always be placed on safety, without compromising the integrity of the future liver remnant, and close collaboration between interventional radiologists and hepatobiliary surgeons is essential to achieve successful outcomes. PMID:27014696

  7. Portal Vein Embolization as an Oncosurgical Strategy Prior to Major Hepatic Resection: Anatomic, Surgical, and Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Sonia T; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Sultenfuss, Mark; Hailey, Brian S; Sparks, Anthony; Satpathy, Bighnesh; Anaya, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is used to extend the indications for major hepatic resection, and it has become the standard of care for selected patients with hepatic malignancies treated at major hepatobiliary centers. To date, various techniques with different embolic materials have been used with similar results in the degree of liver hypertrophy. Regardless of the specific strategy used, both surgeons and interventional radiologists must be familiar with each other's techniques to be able to create the optimal plan for each individual patient. Knowledge of the segmental anatomy of the liver is paramount to fully understand the liver segments that need to be embolized and resected. Understanding the portal vein anatomy and the branching variations, along with the techniques used to transect the portal vein during hepatic resection, is important because these variables can affect the PVE procedure and the eventual surgical resection. Comprehension of the advantages and disadvantages of approaches to the portal venous system and the various embolic materials used for PVE is essential to best tailor the procedures for each patient and to avoid complications. Before PVE, meticulous assessment of the portal vein branching anatomy is performed with cross-sectional imaging, and embolization strategies are developed based on the patient's anatomy. The PVE procedure consists of several technical steps, and knowledge of these technical tips, potential complications, and how to avoid the complications in each step is of great importance for safe and successful PVE and ultimately successful hepatectomy. Because PVE is used as an adjunct to planned hepatic resection, priority must always be placed on safety, without compromising the integrity of the future liver remnant, and close collaboration between interventional radiologists and hepatobiliary surgeons is essential to achieve successful outcomes. PMID:27014696

  8. Feasibility of bloodless liver resection using Lumagel, a reverse thermoplastic polymer, to produce temporary, targeted hepatic blood flow interruption

    PubMed Central

    Pomposelli, James J; Akoad, Mohamed; Flacke, Sebastian; Benn, James J; Solano, Mauricio; Kalra, Aarti; Madras, Peter N

    2012-01-01

    Background Lumagel, a reverse thermosensitive polymer (RTP), provides targeted flow interruption to the kidney by reversibly plugging segmental branches of the renal artery, allowing blood-free partial nephrectomy. Extending this technology to the liver requires the development of techniques for temporary occlusion of the hepatic artery and selected portal vein branches. Methods A three-phased, 15 swine study was performed to determine feasibility, techniques and survival implications of using Lumagel for occlusion of inflow vessels to targeted portions of the liver. Lumagel was delivered using angiographic techniques to sites determined by pre-operative 3-D vascular reconstructions of arterial and venous branches. During resection, the targeted liver mass was resected without vascular clamping. Three survival swine were sacrificed at 3 weeks; the remainder at 6 weeks for pathological studies. Results Six animals (100%) survived, with normal growth, blood tests and no adverse events. Three left lateral lobe resections encountered no bleeding during resection; one right median resection bled; two control animals bled significantly. Pre-terminal angiography and autopsy showed no local pathology and no remote organ damage. Conclusions Targeted flow interruption to the left lateral lobe of the swine liver is feasible and allows resection without bleeding, toxicity or pathological sequelae. Targeting the remaining liver will require more elaborate plug deposition owing to the extensive collateral venous network. PMID:22221572

  9. A 20-Year Experience of Hepatic Resection for Melanoma: Is There an Expanding Role?

    PubMed Central

    Faries, Mark B; Leung, Anna; Morton, Donald L; Hari, Danielle; Lee, Ji-Hey; Sim, Myung-shin; Bilchik, Anton J

    2014-01-01

    Background Melanoma liver metastasis is most often fatal with a 4–6 month median overall survival (OS). Over the past 20 years surgical techniques have improved in parallel with more effective systemic therapies. We reviewed our institutional experience of hepatic melanoma metastases. Study Design OS and disease specific survival (DSS) were calculated from hepatic metastasis diagnosis. Potential prognostic factors including primary tumor type, depth, medical treatment response, location and surgical approach were evaluated. Results Among 1,078 patients with melanoma liver metastases treated at our institution since 1991, 58 (5.4%) were received surgical therapy (resection+/−ablation). Median and 5-year OS were 8 months and 6.6 %, respectively, for 1,016 non-surgical patients versus 24.8 months and 30%, respectively, for surgical patients (p<0.001). Median OS was similar among patients undergoing ablation (with or without resection) relative to those undergoing surgery alone. On multivariate analysis of surgical patients, completeness of surgical therapy (HR3.4, 95%CI 1.4–8.1, p=0.007) and stabilization of melanoma on therapy prior to surgery (HR 0.38, 95%CI 0.19–0.78, p=0.008) predicted OS. Conclusions In this largest single-institution experience, patients selected for surgical therapy experienced markedly improved survival relative to those receiving only medical therapy. Patients whose disease stabilized on medical therapy enjoyed particularly favorable results, regardless of the number or size of their metastases. The advent of more effective systemic therapy in melanoma may substantially increase the fraction of patients who are eligible for surgical intervention, and this combination of treatment modalities should be considered whenever it is feasible in the context of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:24952441

  10. Successful case of pancreaticoduodenectomy with resection of the hepatic arteries preserving a single aberrant hepatic artery for a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ichida, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Kaneko, Junichi; Aoki, Taku; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-03-01

    A 65-year-old male with a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor presenting with a duodenal ulcer was referred to our department. The tumor involved the common hepatic artery, gastroduodenal artery, left hepatic artery and the right posterior hepatic artery, but not the right anterior hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The hepatic arteries, except the aberrant right anterior hepatic artery, were embolized using coils 18 days before the surgery. The patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with resection of the tumor-encased hepatic arteries, while preserving the aberrant artery. The patient was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 13 with no ischemic complications. A histopathological examination revealed a grade 2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor according to the classification of the World Health Organization, and the surgical margin was negative. The patient developed hepatic metastases 16 months after surgery; hence, hepatic resection was performed. The present surgical strategy is applicable in patients with relatively low-grade pancreatic malignancies involving major hepatic arteries. PMID:24477525

  11. Safety of an Enhanced Recovery Pathway for Patients Undergoing Open Hepatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Clancy J.; Ali, Shahzad M.; Zaydfudim, Victor; Jacob, Adam K.; Nagorney, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enhanced recovery pathways (ERP) have not been widely implemented for hepatic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of an ERP for patients undergoing open hepatic resection. Methods A single-surgeon, retrospective observational cohort study was performed comparing the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing open hepatic resection treated before and after implementation of an ERP. Morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay (LOS) were compared between pre-ERP and ERP groups. Results 126 patients (pre-ERP n = 73, ERP n = 53) were identified for the study. Patient characteristics and operative details were similar between groups. Overall complication rate was similar between pre-ERP and ERP groups (37% vs. 28%, p = 0.343). Before and after pathway implementation, the median LOS was similar, 5 (IQR 4–7) vs. 5 (IQR 4–6) days, p = 0.708. After adjusting for age, type of liver resection, and ASA, the ERP group had no increased risk of major complication (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.14–1.02, p = 0.055) or LOS greater than 5 days (OR 1.21, 95% CI 0.56–2.62, p = 0.627). Conclusions Routine use of a multimodal ERP is safe and is not associated with increased postoperative morbidity after open hepatic resection. PMID:26950852

  12. An extended toboggan technique for resection of substernal thyroid goiters.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Catherine F; Peters, Glenn E; Carroll, William R

    2016-01-01

    We describe our technique for the safe resection of substernal thyroid goiters. Early mobilization of the thyroid gland from tracheal attachments anteriorly and laterally facilitates extraction of the goiter from the mediastinum. Retrograde dissection through the ligament of Berry on the ipsilateral side can also facilitate identification of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and delivery of the substernal portion of the gland. We describe 2 representative cases in which we successfully used this technique. PMID:27140018

  13. The Feasibility of Hepatic Resections Using a Bipolar Radiofrequency Device (Habib®).

    PubMed

    Civil, Osman; Kement, Metin; Okkabaz, Nuri; Haksal, Mustafa; Gezen, Cem; Oncel, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    The bipolar radiofrequency device (Habib®) has been recently introduced in order to reduce intraoperative bleeding for a safe hepatic resection as an alternative to the conventional tools. However, indications, perioperative findings, and outcome of the device for hepatic resections remain and deserve to be analyzed. The current study aims to analyze the feasibility of the bipolar radiofrequency device (Habib®) for hepatic resections. Information of the patients that underwent hepatic resection using with the Habib® device between 2007 and 2011 was abstracted. Patient, disease, and operation-related findings and perioperative data were investigated. A total of 71 cases (38 [53.5 %] males, mean age was 56.8 ± 11.9) were analyzed. Metastatic disease (n = 55; 77.5 %) was the leading indication followed by primary liver and biliary malignancies (n = 7; 9.9 %), hemangioma (n = 5; 7 %), hydatid disease (n = 3; 2.8 %), and hepatic gunshot trauma (n = 1; 1.4 %). Metastasectomy was the most commonly performed procedure (n = 31; 56.3 %), but in 24 (77.4 %) cases, it was performed in addition to extended resections. Other procedures in the study patients include segmentectomy in 17, bisegmentectomy in 19, trisegmentectomy in 17, right or left hepatectomy in 8, and extended right/left hepatectomy in 3. The mean (±SD) operation time was 241.7 ± 78.2 min. The median amount of bleeding was 300 cc (range 25-2500), and 23 (32.4 %) cases required perioperative transfusion. The median hospitalization period was 5 days (range 1-47). Lengthened drainage (n = 9, 12.7 %) and intraabdominal abscess (n = 8, 11.23 %) were the most common problems. Hepatic resections using the Habib® device seem to be feasible in cases with primary and metastatic hepatic lesions and benign liver masses and even those with hepatic trauma. It may lessen the amount of intraoperative hemorrhage, although lengthened drainage and intraabdominal abscess

  14. Hepatic resection in liver transplant recipients: single center experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Guckelberger, Olaf; Stange, Barbara; Glanemann, Matthias; Lopez-Hänninen, Enrique; Heidenhain, Christoph; Jonas, Sven; Klupp, Jochen; Neuhaus, Peter; Langrehr, Jan M

    2005-10-01

    Biliary complications such as ischemic (type) biliary lesions frequently develop following liver transplantation, requiring costly medical and endoscopic treatment. If conservative approaches fail, re-transplantation is most often an inevitable sequel. Because of an increasing donor organ shortage and unfavorable outcomes in hepatic re-transplantation, efforts to prolong graft survival become of particular interest. From a series of 1685 liver transplants, we herein report on three patients who underwent partial hepatic graft resection for (ischemic type) biliary lesions. In all cases, left hepatectomy (Couinaud's segments II, III and IV) was performed without Pringle maneuver or mobilization of the right liver. All patients fully recovered postoperatively, but biliary leakage required surgical revision twice in one patient. At last follow-up, two patients presented alive and well. The other patient with persistent hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), however, demonstrated progression of disease in the right liver remnant and required re-transplantation 13 months after hepatic graft resection. Including our own patients, review of the literature identified 24 adult patients who underwent hepatic graft resection. In conclusion, partial graft hepatectomy can be considered a safe and beneficial procedure in selected liver transplant recipients with anatomical limited biliary injury, thereby, preserving scarce donor organs. PMID:16162188

  15. Telangiectatic variant of hepatic adenoma: clinicopathologic features and correlation between liver needle biopsy and resection.

    PubMed

    Mounajjed, Taofic; Wu, Tsung-Teh

    2011-09-01

    Telangiectatic hepatic adenoma (THA) is a benign neoplasm treated by resection. The role of liver needle biopsy in identifying THA before resection has not been evaluated. We identified 55 patients who have undergone resection for hepatic adenoma (HA), THA, or focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) after needle biopsy. Needle biopsies and resections were evaluated for the following: (1) abortive portal tracts; (2) sinusoidal dilatation; (3) ductular reaction; (4) inflammation; (5) aberrant naked vessels; (6) nodules, fibrous septa, and/or central stellate scar. THA diagnosis was made if the lesion had the first 4 criteria and lacked criterion 6. Most patients (36 of 55), including patients with THA (12 of 16), had multiple lesions (0.2 to 14.4 cm). Patients with THA showed no difference in age, body mass index, prevalence of diabetes or glucose intolerance, or presence of oral contraceptive (OCP) use from patients with HA or FNH, but patients with THA had longer periods of OCP use than patients with HA. Thirty-one percent of THAs had tumor hemorrhage. Of sampled THAs, 27% showed steatosis compared with 76% of sampled HAs (P<0.05). All resected HAs and FNHs were correctly diagnosed on needle biopsy. Of 14 patients with resected THA, 3 histologic patterns were noted on needle biopsy: (1) All THA criteria and naked vessels were present in 6 patients (43%). (2) Consistent with HA: naked vessels only were present in 4 patients (29%). (3) Suggestive of THA: some but not all THA criteria were present in 4 patients (29%). No needle biopsy of a THA was misdiagnosed as FNH. Although evaluation of resection specimens is the gold standard for diagnosis of THA, liver needle biopsy is a useful diagnostic tool that leads to adequate treatment. PMID:21836491

  16. Late hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare complication after resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Javier; Naranjo, Alvaro; Ciria, Ruben; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Juan-Manuel; Zurera, Luis; López-Cillero, Pedro

    2008-10-14

    We report an unusual pathological entity of a pseudoaneurysm of the right hepatic artery, which developed two years after the resection of a type II hilar cholangiocarcinoma and secondary to an excessive skeletonization for regional lymphadenectomy and neoadjuvant external-beam radiotherapy. After a sudden and massive hematemesis, a multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA) showed a hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. Angiography with embolization of the pseudoaneurysm was attempted using microcoils with adequate patency of the hepatic artery and the occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm. A new episode of hematemesis 3 wk later revealed a partial revascularization of the pseudoaneurysm. A definitive interventional radiological treatment consisting of transarterial embolization (TAE) of the right hepatic artery with stainless steel coils and polyvinyl alcohol particles was effective and well-tolerated with normal liver function tests and without signs of liver infarction. PMID:18855995

  17. Superselective catheterization technique in hepatic angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, V.P.; Soo, C.S.; Carrasco, C.H.; Wallace, S.

    1983-10-01

    The techniques for superselective catheterization of hepatic artery are described. The catheters have five major configurations in various sizes: (1) simple curve, (2) reverse curve, (3) double curve, (4) modified double curve, and (5) hepatic and splenic curves. Since the celiac artery may be directed caudad, horizontally, or cephalad, the techniques vary accordingly. The basic approach of the system described is to tailor the catheter to fit the vascular anatomy. These various techniques have produced a 95% success rate in the hepatic artery catheterization of 1000 patients.

  18. Hepatic resection beyond barcelona clinic liver cancer indication: When and how

    PubMed Central

    Garancini, Mattia; Pinotti, Enrico; Nespoli, Stefano; Romano, Fabrizio; Gianotti, Luca; Giardini, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the main common primary tumour of the liver and it is usually associated with cirrhosis. The barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) classification has been approved as guidance for HCC treatment algorithms by the European Association for the Study of Liver and the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease. According to this algorithm, hepatic resection should be performed only in patients with small single tumours of 2-3 cm without signs of portal hypertension (PHT) or hyperbilirubinemia. BCLC classification has been criticised and many studies have shown that multiple tumors and large tumors, as wide as those with macrovascular infiltration and PHT, could benefit from liver resection. Consequently, treatment guidelines should be revised and patients with intermediate/advanced stage HCC, when technically resectable, should receive the opportunity to be treated with radical surgical treatment. Nevertheless, the surgical treatment of HCC on cirrhosis is complex: The goal to be oncologically radical has always to be balanced with the necessity to minimize organ damage. The aim of this review was to analyze when and how liver resection could be indicated beyond BCLC indication. In particular, the role of multidisciplinary approach to assure a proper indication, of the intraoperative ultrasound for intra-operative restaging and resection guidance and of laparoscopy to minimize surgical trauma have been enhanced. PMID:27099652

  19. How Far Can We Go with Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma? Laparoscopic Sectionectomy of the Liver Combined with the Resection of the Major Hepatic Vein Main Trunk

    PubMed Central

    Morise, Zenichi; Kawabe, Norihiko; Tomishige, Hirokazu; Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kawase, Jin; Arakawa, Satoshi; Isetani, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Although the reports of laparoscopic major liver resection are increasing, hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) close to the liver hilum and/or major hepatic veins are still considered contraindications. There is virtually no report of laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) for HCC which involves the main trunk of major hepatic veins. We present our method for the procedure. We experienced 6 cases: 3 right anterior, 2 left medial, and 1 right posterior extended sectionectomies with major hepatic vein resection; tumor sizes are within 40–75 (median: 60) mm. The operating time, intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative hospital stay are within 341–603 (median: 434) min, 100–750 (300) ml, and 8–44 (18) days. There was no mortality and 1 patient developed postoperative pleural effusion. For these procedures, we propose that the steps listed below are useful, taking advantages of the laparoscopy-specific view. (1) The Glissonian pedicle of the section is encircled and clamped. (2) Liver transection on the ischemic line is performed in the caudal to cranial direction. (3) During transection, the clamped Glissonian pedicle and the peripheral part of hepatic vein are divided. (4) The root of hepatic vein is divided in the good view from caudal and dorsal direction. PMID:26448949

  20. Prognostic factors after hepatic resection for the single hepatocellular carcinoma larger than 5 cm

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ji Hyun; Kim, Tae-Seok; Ahn, Keun Soo; Kim, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to determine which factors affect the prognosis of hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) larger than 5 cm, including the prognostic difference between tumor sizes from 5–10 cm and larger than 10 cm. Methods The medical records of 114 patients who underwent hepatectomy for single HCC larger than 5 cm were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. Results In the analysis of the entire cohort of 114 patients, the 5-year overall and diseases-free survival rates were 50% and 29%, respectively. In a comparison of survival rates between groups, tumor sizes of 5 to 10 cm and larger than 10 cm, the overall and disease-free survival rates were not significantly different, respectively (54% vs. 41%, P = 0.433 and 33% vs. 23%, P = 0.083). On multivariate analysis, positive hepatitis B, high prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II levels over 200 mIU/mL, and vascular invasion (micro- and macrovascular invasion) were independent prognostic factors for recurrence after hepatic resection. However, tumor size larger than 10 cm was not significant for recurrence after resection. Conclusion This study shows that surgical resection of solitary HCC larger than 5 cm showed favorable overall survival. And there is no survival difference with tumors between 5–10 cm and larger than 10 cm.

  1. Clamp–crush technique vs. radiofrequency-assisted liver resection for primary and metastatic liver neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Delis, Spiros; Bakoyiannis, Andreas; Tassopoulos, Nikos; Athanassiou, Kostas; Papailiou, John; Brountzos, Elisa N; Madariaga, Juan; Papakostas, Pavlos; Dervenis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Background: Several techniques for liver resection have been developed. We compared radiofrequency-assisted (RF) and clamp–crush (CC) liver resection (LR) in terms of blood loss, operating time and short-term outcomes in primary and metastatic tumour resection. Methods: From 2002 to 2007, 196 consecutive patients with primary or metastatic hepatic tumours underwent RF-LR (n= 109; group 1) or CC-LR (n= 87; group 2) in our unit. Primary endpoints were intraoperative blood loss (and blood transfusion requirements) and total operative time. Secondary endpoints included postoperative complications, mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay. Data were collected retrospectively on all patients with primary or secondary liver lesions. Results: Blood loss was similar (P= 0.09) between the two groups of patients with the exception of high MELD score (>9) cirrhotic patients, in whom blood loss was lower when RF-LR was used (P < 0.001). Total operative time and transection time were shorter in the CC-LR group (P= 0.04 and P= 0.01, respectively), except for high MELD score (>9) cirrhotic patients, in whom total operation and transection times were shorter when RF-LR was used (P= 0.04). Rates of bile leak and abdominal abscess formation were higher after RF-LR (P= 0.04 for both). Conclusions: Clamp–crush LR is reliable and results in the same amount of blood loss and a shorter operating time compared with RF-LR. Radiofrequency-assisted LR is a unique, simple and safe method of resection, which may be indicated in cirrhotic patients with high MELD scores. PMID:19718362

  2. Barcelona clinic liver cancer stage B hepatocellular carcinoma: transarterial chemoembolization or hepatic resection?

    PubMed

    Jianyong, Lei; Lunan, Yan; Wentao, Wang; Yong, Zeng; Bo, Li; Tianfu, Wen; Minqing, Xu; Jiaying, Yang

    2014-11-01

    According to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) guidelines, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is recommended for BCLC stage B hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, an investigation of the use of resection for BCLC stage B is needed. Therefore, we compared the efficacy and safety of hepatic resection (HR) with that of TACE in treating intermediate HCC.We retrospectively enrolled 923 patients with BCLC stage B HCC who underwent TACE (490 cases) or HR (433 cases). The baseline characteristics, postoperative recoveries, and long-term overall survival rates of the patients in these 2 groups were compared. Subgroup analyses and comparisons were also performed between the 2 groups.The baseline demographic and tumor characteristics, in-hospital mortality rate, and 30-day mortality rate were comparable between the 2 groups. However, the patients in the resection group suffered from more serious complications compared with those in the TACE group (11.1% vs 4.7%, respectively, P < 0.01) as well as longer hospital stays (P < 0.05). The resection patients had significantly better overall survival rates than the TACE patients (P < 0.01). In the TACE group, patients with Lipiodol retention showed much higher 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates than those in the noncompact Lipiodol retention group (P < 0.01). Subgroup analyses revealed that patients with 1 to 3 tumor targets showed much better 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates in the resection group (P < 0.01), but no difference was observed for the patients with >3 targets.Our clinical analysis suggests that patients with BCLC stage B HCC should be recommended for resection when 1 to 3 targets are present, whereas TACE should be recommended when >3 targets are present. PMID:25474433

  3. Hepatic Parenchymal Preservation Surgery: Decreasing Morbidity and Mortality Rates in 4,152 Resections for Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, T Peter; Correa-Gallego, Camilo; D'Angelica, Michael I; Gönen, Mithat; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Fong, Yuman; Allen, Peter J; Blumgart, Leslie H; Jarnagin, William R

    2015-01-01

    Background Liver resection is used to treat primary and secondary malignancies. Historically, these procedures were associated with significant complications, which may affect cancer-specific outcome. This study analyzes the changes in morbidity and mortality after hepatic resection over time. Study Design Records of all patients undergoing liver resection for a malignant diagnosis from 1993 to 2012 at Memorial Sloan Kettering were analyzed. Patients were divided into early (1993-1999), middle (2000-2006), and recent (2007-2012) eras. Major hepatectomy was defined as resection of 3 or more segments. Univariate and multivariate analyses were made with t-tests or Mann-Whitney tests. Results 3,875 patients underwent 4,152 resections for malignancy. The most common diagnosis was metastatic colorectal cancer (n=2,476, 64% of patients). Over the study period, 90-day mortality rate decreased from 5% to 1.6% (p<0.001). Perioperative morbidity decreased from 53% to 20% (p<0.001). The percentage of major hepatectomies decreased from 66% to 36% (p<0.001). The rate of perioperative transfusion decreased from 51% to 21% (p<0.001). The spectrum of perioperative morbidity changed markedly over time, with abdominal infections (43% of complications) overtaking cardiopulmonary complications (22% of complications). Peak postoperative bilirubin (OR 1.1, p<0.001), blood loss (OR 1.5, p=0.001), major hepatectomy (OR 1.3, p=0.031), and concurrent partial colectomy (OR 2.4, p<0.001) were independent predictors of perioperative morbidity. The mortality associated with trisectionectomy (6%) and right hepatectomy (3%) remained unchanged over time. Conclusions Morbidity and mortality rates after partial hepatectomy for cancer have decreased substantially as the major hepatectomy rate dropped. Encouraging parenchymal preservation and preventing abdominal infections are vital for continued improvement of liver resection outcomes. PMID:25667141

  4. Synchronously resected double primary hepatic cancers - hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiolocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Masanori; Hara, Michio; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Kono, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    The frequency of double primary cancers in the liver is very low. All reported cases are double cancers consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC). We herein report a surgical patient who had simultaneous double cancers consisting of HCC and cholangiolocellular carcinoma (CoCC). This is the first case report of such a patient. A 70-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital for further examination of two hepatic nodules. He had a history of schistosomiasis japonica, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and diabetes mellitus. Laboratory data revealed that hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody was positive and hepatic enzymes were slightly elevated. The level of prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II was elevated. Computed tomography depicted two tumors; one, measuring 4.0 cm in diameter, was in the medial segment and the other, 2.2 cm in diameter, was in the posterior superior segment of the liver. The larger tumor showed contrast enhancement and the smaller one showed enhancement at the tumor periphery in the hepatic arterial phase. In the portal phase, the larger tumor became less dense than the liver parenchyma, but the periphery of the smaller one showed continuous enhancement. He underwent an operation under a diagnosis of double hepatic cancers, consisting of HCC and CCC. However, microscopic examination of the resected tumors revealed that the larger tumor was moderately differentiated HCC and the smaller one was CoCC. PMID:17139434

  5. Recurrence of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in the remnant liver 13 yr after resection.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Kunihiko; Miyamoto, Noriyuki; Sakurai, Yasuo; Mitsui, Shinya; Kang, Jong-Hon; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nomura, Masashi; Fuminori, Itokawa; Ishiwatari, Hirotoshi; Matsunaga, Takahiro; Osanai, Manabu; Katanuma, Akio; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Anbo, Yoshinori; Masuda, Tomoshige; Kashimura, Nobuichi; Shinohara, Toshiya; Maguchi, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    We report here a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor (PHCT) recurring in the remnant liver 13 yr and 10 mo after first resection. A 70-yr-old man developed four hypervascular tumors in the liver in December 2003. He had undergone curative left-lobe hepatectomy for PHCT in February 1990. Histopathological examination of the tumor biopsy specimen showed that the tumor was composed of uniform round-to-oval cells with solid arrangement and the tumor cells stained positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and neuron-specific enolase. We diagnosed this case as an intrahepatic metastasis of PHCT with a long latency period, based on the fact that no primary site of carcinoid tumor could be found despite intensive examination and the immunohistochemical findings of the resected tumors were essentially same as those of PHCT in 1990. Although PHCT is reported to have a more favorable prognosis than other hepatic cancer or metastatic carcinoid tumor in the liver, long-term observation is recommended. PMID:15879630

  6. Retrocaval liver lifting maneuver and modifications of total hepatic vascular exclusion for liver tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Saiho; Kirihataya, Yuuki; Matsumoto, Yayoi; Takagi, Tadataka; Matsusaka, Masanori; Mukogawa, Tomohide; Ishikawa, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of technical modifications of total hepatic vascular exclusion (THVE) for hepatectomy involving inferior vena cava (IVC). METHODS: Of 301 patients who underwent hepatectomy during the immediate previous 5-year period, 8 (2.7%) required THVE or modified methods of IVC cross-clamping for resection of liver tumors with massive involvement of the IVC. Seven of the patients had diagnosis of colorectal liver metastases and 1 had diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. All tumors involved the IVC, and THVE was unavoidable for combined resection of the IVC in all 8 of the patients. Technical modifications of THVE were applied to minimize the extent and duration of vascular occlusion, thereby reducing the risk of damage. RESULTS: Broad dissection of the space behind the IVC coupled with lifting up of the liver from the retrocaval space was effective for controlling bleeding around the IVC before and during THVE. The procedures facilitate modification of the positioning of the cranial IVC cross-clamp. Switching the cranial IVC cross-clamp from supra- to retrohepatic IVC or to the confluence of hepatic vein decreased duration of the THVE while restoring hepatic blood flow or systemic circulation via the IVC. Oblique cranial IVC cross-clamping avoided ischemia of the remnant hemi-liver. With these technical modifications, the mean duration of THVE was 13.4 ± 8.4 min, which was extremely shorter than that previously reported in the literature. Recovery of liver function was smooth and uneventful for all 8 patients. There was no case of mortality, re-operation, or severe complication (i.e., Clavien-Dindo grade of III or more). CONCLUSION: The retrocaval liver lifting maneuver and modifications of cranial cross-clamping were useful for minimizing duration of THVE. PMID:27004089

  7. A novel transurethral resection technique for superficial flat bladder tumor: Grasp and bite technique

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyung Jin; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Chung, Ho Suck; Hwang, Eu Chang; Jung, Seung Il; Kwon, Dong Deuk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) can be a challenging procedure for an inexperienced surgeon. We suggest an easy technique for TURBT, which we have named the "grasp and bite" technique. We describe this technique and compare its effectiveness and safety with that of conventional TURBT. Materials and Methods Monopolar TURBT (24-Fr Karl Storz) was performed in 35 patients who had superficial bladder tumors. After defining the tumor margin, the tumor and surrounding mucosa were grasped by use of a loop electrode and resectoscope sheath. With tight grasping, linear moving resection was performed. The patients' demographic, intraoperative, and postoperative data were analyzed between the conventional and grasp and bite TURBT groups. Results Of 35 patients, 16 patients underwent conventional TURBT (group 1), and the other 19 patients underwent grasp and bite TURBT (group 2). Both groups were similar in age, tumor multiplicity, size, anesthesia method, and location. Grasp and bite TURBT could be performed as safely and effectively as conventional TURBT. There were no significant differences in irrigation duration, urethral catheterization, postoperative hemoglobin drop, or length of hospital stay. No significant side effects such as bladder perforation, severe obturator reflex, or persistent bleeding occurred. There were no significant pathological differences between specimens according to the type of resection technique. Conclusions The grasp and bite TURBT technique was feasible for superficial bladder tumors. It may be a good tool for inexperienced surgeons owing to its convenient and easy manner. PMID:25763127

  8. A comparison of open and minimally invasive surgery for hepatic and pancreatic resections using the nationwide inpatient sample

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Aslam; Sachs, Teviah; He, Jin; Spolverato, Gaya; Hirose, Kenzo; Ahuja, Nita; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Makary, Martin A.; Weiss, Matthew; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques for pancreatic and liver operations remains ill defined. We sought to compare inpatient outcomes among patients undergoing open versus MIS pancreas and liver operations using a nationally representative cohort. Methods We queried the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database for all major pancreatic and hepatic resections performed between 2000 and 2011. Appropriate International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) coding modifiers for laparoscopy and robotic assist were used to categorize procedures as MIS. Demographics, comorbidities, and inpatient outcomes were compared between the open and MIS groups. Results A total of 65,033 resections were identified (pancreas, n = 36,195 [55.7%]; liver, n = 28,035 [43.1%]; combined pancreas and liver, n = 803 [1.2%]). The overwhelming majority of operations were performed open (n = 62,192, 95.6%), whereas 4.4% (n = 2,841) were MIS. The overall use of MIS increased from 2.3% in 2000 to 7.5% in 2011. Compared with patients undergoing an open operation, MIS patients were older and had a greater incidence of multiple comorbid conditions. After operation, the incidence of complications for MIS (pancreas, 35.4%; liver, 29.5%) was lower than for open (pancreas, 41.6%; liver, 33%) procedures (all P < .05) resulting in a shorter median length of stay (8 vs 7 days; P = .001) as well as a lower in-hospital mortality (5.1% vs 2.8%; P = .001). Conclusion During the last decade, the number of MIS pancreatic and hepatic operations has increased, with nearly 1 in 13 HPB cases now being performed via an MIS approach. Despite MIS patients tending to have more preoperative medical comorbidities, postoperative morbidity, mortality, and duration of stay compared favorably with open surgery. PMID:25017135

  9. [Endoscopic modified technique of ureteral resection during nephroureterectomy].

    PubMed

    Aguirre Benites, F; Blanco Carballo, O; Pamplona Casamayor, M; Díaz González, R; Leiva Galvis, O

    2007-01-01

    We show a technical modification of the ureteral endoscopic resection with which we try to avoid comunication between urine and surgical bed in order to prevent tumor local spread of upper urotelial tumor. PMID:17902476

  10. Negative Impact of Preoperative Platelet-Lymphocyte Ratio on Outcome After Hepatic Resection for Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing; Dai, Zhi; Yin, Dan; Yang, Liu-Xiao; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Yong-Sheng; Fan, Jia; Zhou, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The elevated platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), determined using an easy blood test based on platelet and lymphocyte counts, is reported to be a predictor of poor survival in patients with several cancers. The prognostic role of preoperative PLR in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) has, until now, been rarely investigated. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of PLR in a large cohort of ICC patients after hepatic resection. We obtained data from 322 consecutive nonmetastatic ICC patients who underwent hepatectomy without preoperative therapy between 2005 and 2011. Clinicopathological parameters, including PLR, were evaluated. Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were assessed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Using multivariate Cox regression models, the independent prognostic value of preoperative PLR was determined. Our results showed that PLR represents an independent adverse prognostic factor for OS and RFS in ICC patients using univariate and multivariate analyses. The optimal PLR cutoff value was 123 using receiver operating curve analyses. The 5-year OS and RFS rates after hepatectomy were 30.3% and 28.9% for the group with PLR 123 greater, compared with 46.2% and 39.4% for the group with PLR less than 123 (P = 0.0058 and 0.0153, respectively). In addition, high PLR values were associated with tumor size (P = 0.020). Our results suggest that preoperative PLR might represent a novel independent prognostic factor for OS and RFS in ICC patients with hepatic resection. PMID:25837750

  11. Hepatic parenchyma resection using stapling devices: peri-operative and long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Delis, Spiros G; Bakoyiannis, Andreas; Karakaxas, Dimitrios; Athanassiou, Kostantinos; Tassopoulos, Nikolaos; Manesis, Emanouel; ketikoglou, Ioannis; Papakostas, Pavlos; Dervenis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Background Stapler-assisted hepatectomy has not been well established, as a routine procedure, although few reports exist in the literature. This analysis assesses the safety and outcome of the method based on peri-operative data. Materials and Methods From February 2005 to December 2006, endo GIA vascular staplers were used for parenchymal liver transection in 62 consecutive cases in our department. There were 18 (29%) patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 31 (50%) with metastatic lesions and 13 (21%) with benign lesions [adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), simple cysts]. Twenty-one patients underwent major resections (33.9%) (i.e. removal of three segments or more) and 41 (66.1%) minor hepatic resections. Results Median blood loss was 260 ml. The median total operative time was 150 min and median transection time was 35 min. No patient required more than 2 days of intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. The median hospital stay was 8 days. Surgical complications included two (3%) cases of bile leak, two (3%) cases of pneumonia, two (3%) cases with wound infection and two (3%) cases with pleural effusion. The peri-operative mortality was zero. In a 30-month median follow-up, all patients with benign lesions were alive and free of disease. The 3-year disease-free survival for patients with HCC was 61% (57% for patients with colorectal metastases) and the 3-year survival 72% (68% for patients with colorectal metastases). Conclusion Stapler-assisted liver resection is feasible with a low incidence of surgical complications. It can be used as an alternative for parenchyma transection especially in demanding hepatectomies for elimination of the operating time and control of bleeding. PMID:19590622

  12. Hepatic resection of hepatocellular carcinoma after proton beam therapy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Nao; Ikeda, Yasuharu; Taguchi, Kenichi; Sugimoto, Rie; Maehara, Shinichiro; Tsujita, Eiji; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shohei; Egashira, Akinori; Minami, Kazuhito; Yamamoto, Manabu; Morita, Masaru; Toh, Yasushi; Okamura, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Despite the widespread use of proton beam therapy (PBT) as locoregional therapy, there is currently a lack of histological evidence about the therapeutic effect of PBT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We present a case of hepatectomy and histological examination of HCC initially treated by PBT. A 76-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C underwent routine ultrasound surveillance, which revealed a 22-mm HCC in segment 4 of the liver. His hepatic reserve was adequate for surgical resection of the tumor; however, he chose to undergo PBT because of his cardiac disease. The patient received 66 Gy in 10 fractions with no toxicity exceeding grade 1. Six months after completion of PBT, contrast computed tomography showed that the tumor had increased in size to 27 mm, and the marginal part of the tumor, but not the central region, was enhanced. Additionally, two new hypervascular nodules were present in segments 5 and 6. The patient underwent surgical treatment 7 months after PBT. The operation and postoperative clinical course were uneventful. Nine months later, however, computed tomography demonstrated new, small, enhanced nodules in the remnant liver (segments 3, 5 and 6) and sacrum. In conclusion, PBT is a valuable treatment for HCC; however, it is difficult to evaluate therapeutic effect of HCC during the early post-irradiation period and provide an alternative treatment if PBT is not effective, especially in HCC cases with good liver function. PMID:26286377

  13. Multiorgan resection with inferior vena cava reconstruction for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a life-threatening parasitic disease characterized by its tumor-like growth. Radical operation is deemed the curable method for AE treatment if R0-resection is achievable. We present a 26-year-old AE patient with AE lesions invading the right lobe of the liver, the inferior vena cava, inferior lobe of right lung, the right hemidiaphragm, and the right kidney. On the basis of precise preoperative and intraoperative evaluations, a radical surgery that removed the huge lesion en bloc was performed successfully with skillful surgical techniques. This patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and a good prognosis. Multiorgan resection is justified and unavoidable in selected patients when AE lesions invade different organs and the main vascular structures. PMID:27281076

  14. Prognosis after resection for hepatitis B virus-associated intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen-Feng; Wu, Xiao-Yu; Zhu, Nan; Xu, Zhe; Li, Wei-Su; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Yang, Ning; Yao, Xue-Quan; Liu, Fu-Kun; Yang, Guang-Shun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic factors after resection for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and to assess the impact of different extents of lymphadenectomy on patient survival. METHODS: A total of 85 patients with HBV-associated ICC who underwent curative resection from January 2005 to December 2006 were analyzed. The patients were classified into groups according to the extent of lymphadenectomy (no lymph node dissection, sampling lymph node dissection and regional lymph node dissection). Clinicopathological characteristics and survival were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: The cumulative 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were found to be 60%, 18%, and 13%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that liver cirrhosis (HR = 1.875, 95%CI: 1.197-3.278, P = 0.008) and multiple tumors (HR = 2.653, 95%CI: 1.562-4.508, P < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors for survival. Recurrence occurred in 70 patients. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival rates were 36%, 3% and 0%, respectively. Liver cirrhosis (HR = 1.919, P = 0.012), advanced TNM stage (stage III/IV) (HR = 2.027, P < 0.001), and vascular invasion (HR = 3.779, P = 0.02) were independent prognostic factors for disease-free survival. Patients with regional lymph node dissection demonstrated a similar survival rate to patients with sampling lymph node dissection. Lymphadenectomy did not significantly improve the survival rate of patients with negative lymph node status. CONCLUSION: The extent of lymphadenectomy does not seem to have influence on the survival of patients with HBV-associated ICC, and routine lymph node dissection is not recommended, particularly for those without lymph node metastasis. PMID:25624728

  15. Comparative analysis of intraoperative radiofrequency ablation versus non-anatomical hepatic resection for small hepatocellular carcinoma: short-term result

    PubMed Central

    Yune, Yongwoo; Kim, Seokwhan; Song, Insang

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims To compare the clinical outcomes of intraoperative radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and non-anatomical hepatic resection (NAHR) for small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods From February 2007 to January 2015, clinical outcomes of thirty four patients with HCC receiving RFA or NAHR were compared, retrospectively. Results There was no difference of patient and tumor characteristic between the two groups that received RFA or NAHR. The 1, 2, and 3-year recurrence rates following RFA were 32.2%, 32.2% and 59.3% respectively, and 6.7%, 33.3% and 33.3% following NAHR respectively (p=0.287). The 1, 2 and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates following RFA were 100%, 88.9% and 76.2% respectively, and 100%, 85.6% and 85.6%, respectively, following NAHR (p=0.869). We did not find a definite statistical difference in recurrence rate and OS rate between the two groups. In the multivariate analysis, number of tumor was an independent prognostic factor for recurrence and albumin was an independent prognostic factor for OS. Conclusions We recommend non-anatomical hepatic resection rather than intraoperative RFA in small sized HCC, due to a higher recurrence rate in intraoperative RFA. Intraoperative RFA was inferior to non-anatomical hepatic resection in terms of recurrence rate. We need to select the optimal treatment considering liver function and possibility of recurrence. PMID:26693237

  16. Predictors of long term survival after hepatic resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: A retrospective study of 5-year survivors

    PubMed Central

    Abd ElWahab, Mohamed; El Nakeeb, Ayman; El Hanafy, Ehab; Sultan, Ahmad M; Elghawalby, Ahmed; Askr, Waleed; Ali, Mahmoud; Abd El Gawad, Mohamed; Salah, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine predictors of long term survival after resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC) by comparing patients surviving > 5 years with those who survived < 5 years. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients with pathologically proven HC who underwent surgical resection at the Gastroenterology Surgical Center, Mansoura University, Egypt between January 2002 and April 2013. All data of the patients were collected from the medical records. Patients were divided into two groups according to their survival: Patients surviving less than 5 years and those who survived > 5 years. RESULTS: There were 34 (14%) long term survivors (5 year survivors) among the 243 patients. Five-year survivors were younger at diagnosis than those surviving less than 5 years (mean age, 50.47 ± 4.45 vs 54.59 ± 4.98, P = 0.001). Gender, clinical presentation, preoperative drainage, preoperative serum bilirubin, albumin and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase were similar between the two groups. The level of CA 19-9 was significantly higher in patients surviving < 5 years (395.71 ± 31.43 vs 254.06 ± 42.19, P = 0.0001). Univariate analysis demonstrated nine variables to be significantly associated with survival > 5 year, including young age (P = 0.001), serum CA19-9 (P = 0.0001), non-cirrhotic liver (P = 0.02), major hepatic resection (P = 0.001), caudate lobe resection (P = 0.006), well differentiated tumour (P = 0.03), lymph node status (0.008), R0 resection margin (P = 0.0001) and early postoperative liver cell failure (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Liver status, resection of caudate lobe, lymph node status, R0 resection and CA19-9 were demonstrated to be independent risk factors for long term survival. PMID:27358676

  17. Risk Factors and Post-Resection Independent Predictive Score for the Recurrence of Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Ronnie Tung-Ping; Fong, Daniel Yee-Tak; Chui, Ada Hang-Wai; Seto, Wai-Kay; Fung, James Yan-Yue; Chan, Albert Chi-Yan; Yuen, John Chi-Hang; Tiu, Randal; Choi, Olivia; Lai, Ching-Lung; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2016-01-01

    Background Independent risk factors associated with hepatitis B (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after resection remains unknown. An accurate risk score for HCC recurrence is lacking. Methods We prospectively followed up 200 patients who underwent liver resection for HBV-related HCC for at least 2 years. Demographic, biochemical, tumor, virological and anti-viral treatment factors were analyzed to identify independent risk factors associated with recurrence after resection and a risk score for HCC recurrence formulated. Results Two hundred patients (80% male) who underwent liver resection for HBV-related HCC were recruited. The median time of recurrence was 184 weeks (IQR 52–207 weeks) for the entire cohort and 100 patients (50%) developed HCC recurrence. Stepwise Cox regression analysis identified that one-month post resection HBV DNA >20,000 IU/mL (p = 0.019; relative risk (RR) 1.67; 95% confidence interval (C.I.): 1.09–2.57), the presence of lymphovascular permeation (p<0.001; RR 2.69; 95% C.I.: 1.75–4.12), microsatellite lesions (p<0.001; RR 2.86; 95% C.I.: 1.82–4.51), and AFP >100ng/mL before resection (p = 0.021; RR 1.63; 95% C.I.: 1.08–2.47) were independently associated with HCC recurrence. Antiviral treatment before resection (p = 0.024; RR 0.1; 95% C.I.: 0.01–0.74) was independently associated with reduced risk of HCC recurrence. A post-resection independent predictive score (PRIPS) was derived and validated with sensitivity of 75.3% and 60.6% and specificity of 55.7% and 79.2%, to predict the 1- and 3-year risks for the HCC recurrence respectively with the hazard ratio of 2.71 (95% C.I.: 2.12–3.48; p<0.001). The AUC for the 1- and 3-year prediction were 0.675 (95% C.I.: 0.6–0.78) and 0.746 (95% C.I.: 0.69–0.82) respectively. Conclusion Several tumor, virological and biochemical factors were associated with a higher cumulative risk of HCC recurrence after resection. PRIPS was derived for more accurate risk assessment

  18. A prospective cohort study of intrathecal versus epidural analgesia for patients undergoing hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Kasivisvanathan, Ramanathan; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Prout, Jeremy; Clevenger, Ben; Fusai, Giuseppe K; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective observational study was to compare peri/post-operative outcomes of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) versus intrathecal morphine and fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia (ITM+fPCA) for patients undergoing a hepatic resection (HR). Method Patients undergoing elective, one-stage, open HR for benign and malignant liver lesions, receiving central neuraxial block as part of the anaesthetic, in a high-volume hepato-pancreato-biliary unit, were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was post-operative length of stay (LoS). Results A total of 73 patients (36 TEA and 37 ITM+fPCA) were included in the study. The median (IQR) post-operative LoS was 13 (11–15) and 11 (9–13) days in the TEA and ITM+fPCA groups, respectively (P = 0.011). There was significantly lower median intra-operative central venous pressure (P < 0.001) and blood loss (P = 0.017) in the TEA group, and a significant reduction in the time until mobilization (P < 0.001), post-operative intra-venous fluid/vasopressor requirement (P < 0.001/P = 0.004) in the ITM+fPCA group. Pain scores were lower at a clinically significant level 12 h post-operatively in the TEA group (P < 0.001); otherwise there were no differences out to day five. There were no differences in quality of recovery or postoperative morbidity/mortality between the two groups. Conclusion ITM+fPCA provides acceptable post-operative outcomes for HR, but may also increase the incidence of intra-operative blood loss in comparison to TEA. PMID:24467320

  19. Anesthetic management of a patient with Marfan syndrome and severe aortic root dilatation undergoing cholecystectomy and partial hepatic resection.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Tanmoy; Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujoy

    2013-10-01

    Due to high mortality associated with aortic dissection, anesthetic management of patients with Marfan syndrome with severe aortic root dilation is a challenging situation. We describe the anesthetic management of a patient with Marfan syndrome with severe aortic root dilation, who required major surgery like cholecystectomy with partial liver resection under general anesthesia. A 47-year-old female presented to pre-anesthetic clinic for cholecystectomy with partial hepatic resection for gall bladder carcinoma. Clinical features, transthoracic echocardiography and computed tomography of thorax supported a diagnosis of Marfan syndrome with severely dilated aortic root. Aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome and severely dilated aortic root can be precipitated by major hemodynamic changes under anesthesia. Careful hemodynamic monitoring and avoidance of hemodynamic swings can prevent this life-threatening event. PMID:24348301

  20. Resection of the sidewall of superior vena cava using video-assisted thoracic surgery mechanical suture technique

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Qiu, Yuan; Pan, Hui; Mo, Lili; Chen, Hanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer invading the superior vena cava (SVC) is a locally advanced condition, for which poor prognosis is expected with conservative treatment alone. Surgical resection of the lesion can rapidly relieve the symptoms and significantly improve survival for some patients. Replacement, repair and partial resection of SVC via thoracotomy were generally accepted and used in the past. As the rapid development of minimally invasive techniques and devices, partial resection and repair of SVC are feasible via video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). However, few studies have reported the VATS surgical techniques. In this study, we reported the crucial techniques of partial resection of SVC via VATS. PMID:27076960

  1. [The vacuum sealing technique. A new procedure to cover soft tissue defects after resection of leiomyosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Bartels, C G; Voigt, C; Blume-Peytavi, U; Treudler, R; Dippel, E; Tebbe, B

    2001-07-01

    The vacuum sealing technique is a new, simple to use procedure for traumatic and chronic soft tissue defects, burns and soft tissue infections. We used this technique for the first time for temporary closure after the resection of deep infiltrating leiomyosarcoma. Radical excision of the tumor with partial resection of the forearm flexor muscles and safety margin of 3 cm led to a large skin defect (12 x 16 cm). For temporary closure of this defect we used the vacuum sealing technique for 7 days. Because of histologically proven incomplete resection of the tumor, we did a second excision and used the vacuum sealing technique a second time for 7 days. After this time period the granulation of the wound ground was excellent, and we closed the defect by split skin transplantation from the thigh. Bacterial infection or other complications were not seen during use of vacuum sealing technique. The vacuum sealing technique induced optimal local conditions for skin grafting: it facilitated granulation tissue production and maintained a clean wound bed without the necessity of changing wound dressing before skin grafting. This technique is painless and does not impair mobility. PMID:11475650

  2. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  3. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor’s dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  4. Bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate: Darwinian evolution of an instrumental technique.

    PubMed

    Mamoulakis, Charalampos; de la Rosette, Jean J M C H

    2015-05-01

    Bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate (B-TURP) represents a Darwinian evolution of an instrumental technique that has been justified by reinforcing the leading position of monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate. Notwithstanding limitations, the best available evidence recommends B-TURP as an attractive alternative. It may serve as a reliable training platform for modern residents. High-quality evidence is lacking to definitely define its position in treating special subpopulations (anticoagulation dependence, comorbidities, and large adenomas). Regarding economic issues, preliminary evidence supports B-TURP, warranting further investigation. Future perspectives include attempts toward improvements of the existing technology, combining advantages with those of other new techniques, and evolution to novel, potentially safer, or more efficient techniques to address remaining challenges. PMID:25704995

  5. [Hepatic Resection of Multiple Liver Metastases from Gastric Cancer after Molecular Targeted Chemotherapy(S-1 plus Cisplatin plus Trastuzumab)].

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongkook; Hosoda, Yohei; Nishino, Masaya; Okano, Miho; Kawada, Junji; Yamasaki, Masaru; Nagai, Ken-ichi; Yasui, Masayosi; Okuyama, Masaki; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa

    2015-11-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with gastric cancer and underwent distal gastrectomy, and D1+b lymph node dissection. He was diagnosed postoperatively with T1b (sm2) N0M0, StageⅠA gastric adenocarcinoma and did not receive any adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery. One year and 6 months after gastrectomy, blood analysis indicated high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA 262.1 ng/mL) while abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple liver tumors (S7: 15 mm, S7/8: 20 mm). The patient was diagnosed with metachronous multiple liver metastases from gastric cancer. Chemotherapy, combined with molecular targeted therapy (S-1 plus cisplatin [CDDP] plus trastuzumab), was administered because of overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein in the primary tumor as assessed by immunohistochemistry, the CEA levels decreased immediately after 2 cycles of the chemotherapy, and the liver metastases shrank markedly with no evidence of new lesions on abdominal CT. However, after treatment, Grade 3 neutropenia and diarrhea were observed. Chemotherapy was suspended and hepatic resection was performed. After hepatic resection, the liver tumors were histologically evaluated as Grade 2 metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma, and the HER2 expression of remnant carcinoma cells was established. The patient has been in good health and remained free of recurrences in the 2 years and 3 months after the liver resection. Surgery with preoperative chemotherapy (S-1 plus CDDP plus trastuzumab) can be an effective treatment for liver metastasis from HER2-positive gastric cancer. PMID:26805121

  6. Vasculature segmentation for radio frequency ablation of non-resectable hepatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemler, Paul F.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Cheng, Ruida; Wood, Brad; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2006-03-01

    In Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) procedures, hepatic tumor tissue is heated to a temperature where necrosis is insured. Unfortunately, recent results suggest that heating tumor tissue to necrosis is complicated because nearby major blood vessels provide a cooling effect. Therefore, it is fundamentally important for physicians to perform a careful analysis of the spatial relationship of diseased tissue to larger liver blood vessels. The liver contains many of these large vessels, which affect the RFA ablation shape and size. There are many sophisticated vasculature detection and segmentation techniques reported in the literature that identify continuous vessels as the diameter changes size and it transgresses through many bifurcation levels. However, the larger blood vessels near the treatment area are the only vessels required for proper RFA treatment plan formulation and analysis. With physician guidance and interaction, our system can segment those vessels which are most likely to affect the RFA ablations. We have found that our system provides the physician with therapeutic, geometric and spatial information necessary to accurately plan treatment of tumors near large blood vessels. The segmented liver vessels near the treatment region are also necessary for computing isolevel heating profiles used to evaluate different proposed treatment configurations.

  7. Preoperative Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI and Simultaneous Treatment of Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma Prolonged Recurrence-Free Survival of Progressed Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients after Hepatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Masanori; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Amemiya, Hidetake; Maki, Akira; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Sano, Katsuhiro; Motosugi, Utaroh; Fujii, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether preoperative gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) and simultaneous treatment of suspected early hepatocellular carcinoma (eHCC) at the time of resection for progressed HCC affected patient prognosis following hepatic resection. Methods. A total of 147 consecutive patients who underwent their first curative hepatic resection for progressed HCC were enrolled. Of these, 77 patients underwent EOB-MRI (EOB-MRI (+)) before hepatic resection and the remaining 70 patients did not (EOB-MRI (−)). Suspected eHCCs detected by preoperative imaging were resected or ablated at the time of resection for progressed HCC. Results. The number of patients who underwent treatment for eHCCs was significantly higher in the EOB-MRI (+) than in the EOB-MRI (−) (17 versus 6; P = 0.04). Recurrence-free survival (1-, 3-, and 5-year; 81.4, 62.6, 48.7% versus 82.1, 41.5, 25.5%, resp., P < 0.01), but not overall survival (1-, 3-, and 5-year; 98.7, 90.7, 80.8% versus 97.0, 86.3, 72.4%, resp., P = 0.38), was significantly better in the EOB-MRI (+). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that preoperative EOB-MRI was one of the independent factors significantly correlated with better recurrence-free survival. Conclusions. Preoperative EOB-MRI and simultaneous treatment of eHCC prolonged recurrence-free survival after hepatic resection. PMID:24701029

  8. Assessment of the reporting of quality and outcome measures in hepatic resections: a call for 90-day reporting in all hepatectomy series

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Michael E; Ohlendorf, Joanna M; Scoggins, Charles R; McMasters, Kelly M; Martin, Robert C G

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to assess the current state of quality and outcomes measures being reported for hepatic resections in the recent literature. Methods Medline and PubMed databases were searched for English language articles published between 1 January 2002 and 30 April 2013. Two examiners reviewed each article and relevant citations for appropriateness of inclusion, which excluded papers of liver donor hepatic resections, repeat hepatectomies or meta-analyses. Data were extracted and summarized by two examiners for analysis. Results Fifty-five studies were identified with suitable reporting to assess peri-operative mortality in hepatic resections. In only 35% (19/55) of the studies was the follow-up time explicitly stated, and in 47% (26/55) of studies peri-operative mortality was limited to in-hospital or 30 days. The time period in which complications were captured was not explicitly stated in 19 out of 28 studies. The remaining studies only captured complications within 30 days of the index operation (8/28). There was a paucity of quality literature addressing truly patient-centred outcomes. Conclusion Quality outcomes after a hepatic resection are inconsistently reported in the literature. Quality outcome studies for a hepatectomy should report mortality and morbidity at a minimum of 90 days after surgery. PMID:26228262

  9. [HEMIHEPATECTOMY FOR RESECTABLE HEPATIC METASTASIS FROM COLORECTAL CANCER WITH POOR PROGNOSIS].

    PubMed

    Patyutko, Yu I; Kotelnikov, A G; Mamontov, K G; Podluzhny, D V; Ponomarenko, A A

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed at improvement of treatment effects for patients with resectable metastases of colorectal cancer in the liver with a poor prognosis. Overall 437 patients were enrolled with metastatic colorectal cancer in the liver exhibiting at least one adverse factor of long-term prognosis: multiple metastases, bilobar liver metastases, large metastases, the presence of extrahepatic metastases, etc. Combined treatment was performed for 339 (78%) patients: combined treatment with adjuvant systemic chemotherapy (163 patients), combined treatment with perioperative systemic chemotherapy (54 patients), or combined treatment of perioperative regional chemotherapy (122 patients). Surgical treatment was performed in 66 (15%) patients. The remaining group of 32 (7%) patients with resectable metastases who received only systemic chemotherapy was considered separately. All liver resections were extensive due to the widespread metastases. The complication rate stood at 56%. Mortality among operated patients was 4%. Postoperative mortality and complications as well as the intraoperative blood loss were not statistically different in two groups. Adding bevacizumab to preoperative chemotherapy did not increase blood loss. After combined treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy a 5-year survival was 26 ± 4% that significantly outperforming a 5-year survival rate after surgery (17 ± 5%), after just drug treatment a 5-year survival has not been reached, and also after combined treatment with perioperative systemic chemotherapy (13 ± 5%) and not statistically significant exceeded a 5-year survival after combined treatment with perioperative regional chemotherapy (20 ±5%). Thus our study demonstrates the benefits of combined treatment with adjuvant systemic chemotherapy for resectable metastases of colorectal cancer in the liver with a poor prognosis. For initially unresectable metastases with extrahepatic manifestations of the disease treatment should be begun with

  10. Novel technique of endoscopic full-thickness resection for superficial nonampullary duodenal neoplasms to avoid intraperitoneal tumor dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Ken; Nonaka, Kouichi; Sakai, Eiji; Minato, Yohei; Satodate, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Kazuteru; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Recently, laparoscopic and/or endoscopic full-thickness resection (FTR) has been reported to be a useful technique for the treatment of superficial duodenal neoplasms (SDNs). In the current study, we evaluated clinical outcomes in 5 consecutive patients who underwent resection of nonampullary SDNs using laparoscopy-assisted endoscopic full-thickness resection with ligation Device (LAEFTR-L), which is an alternative FTR method developed to avoid peritoneal dissemination. Using a snare technique with a ligation band, the duodenal lesions were easily resected. The provisional and additional sutures for the resected site prevented delayed perforation and bleeding and they also protected the abdominal cavity from direct exposure to malignant cells. Complete resection could be achieved and FTR was histologically confirmed in all cases. The mean operation time was 173 minutes (range 138 – 217 minutes). Mean diameter of the resected specimen was 24 mm (range 18 – 32 mm). No adverse events (AEs) were observed. LAEFTR-L, which can achieve complete resection of nonampullary SDNs without severe AEs and peritoneal dissemination, could be a useful technique for the treatment of such lesions. PMID:27556096

  11. Surgical Technique: Endoscopic Endonasal Transphenoidal Resection of a Large Suprasellar Mixed Germ Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Vikram; Hanna, George; DeLos Reyes, Kennethy

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transphenoidal approach has proven to be a very versatile surgical approach for the resection of small midline skull base tumors. This is due to its minimally invasive nature, the potentially fewer neurological complications, and lower morbidity in comparison to traditional craniotomies. This surgical approach has been less commonly utilized for large midline tumors such as suprasellar germ cell tumors, due to numerous reasons including the surgeon’s comfort with the surgical approach, a higher chance of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, limited visualization due to arterial/venous bleeding, and limited working space. We present our surgical technique in the case of a large suprasellar and third ventricular mixed germ cell tumor that was resected via an endoscopic endonasal approach with favorable neurological outcome and no postoperative CSF leak. PMID:27014537

  12. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic wedge hepatic resection with a water-jet hybrid knife in a non-survival porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Li, Bin; Fu, Deng-Ke; Xin, Pei; Wang, Yong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of a water-jet hybrid knife to facilitate wedge hepatic resection using a natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach in a non-survival porcine model. METHODS: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system allows a needleless, tissue-selective hydro-dissection with a pre-selected pressure. Using this system, wedge hepatic resection was performed through three natural routes (trans-anal, trans-vaginal and trans-umbilical) in three female pigs weighing 35 kg under general anesthesia. Entry into the peritoneal cavity was via a 15-mm incision using a hook knife. The targeted liver segment was marked by an APC probe, followed by wedge hepatic resection performed using a water-jet hybrid knife with the aid of a 4-mm transparent distance soft cap mounted onto the tip of the endoscope for holding up the desired plane. The exposed vascular and ductal structures were clipped with Endoclips. Hemostasis was applied to the bleeding cut edges of the liver parenchyma by electrocautery. After the procedure, the incision site was left open, and the animal was euthanized followed by necropsy. RESULTS: Using the Erbe Jet2 water-jet system, trans-anal and trans-vaginal wedge hepatic resection was successfully performed in two pigs without laparoscopic assistance. Trans-umbilical attempt failed due to an unstable operating platform. The incision for peritoneal entry took 1 min, and about 2 h was spent on excision of the liver tissue. The intra-operative blood loss ranged from 100 to 250 mL. Microscopically, the hydro-dissections were relatively precise and gentle, preserving most vessels. CONCLUSION: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system can safely accomplish non-anatomic wedge hepatic resection in NOTES, which deserves further studies to shorten the dissection time. PMID:21412502

  13. Colorectal resection in deep pelvic endometriosis: Surgical technique and post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Marco; Vignali, Andrea; Milone, Francesco; Pignata, Giusto; Elmore, Ugo; Musella, Mario; De Placido, Giuseppe; Mollo, Antonio; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Coretti, Guido; Bracale, Umberto; Rosati, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of different surgical techniques on post-operative complications after colorectal resection for endometriosis. METHODS: A multicenter case-controlled study using the prospectively collected data of 90 women (22 with and 68 without post-operative complications) who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection for endometriosis was designed to evaluate any risk factors of post-operative complications. The prospectively collected data included: gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists risk class, endometriosis localization (from anal verge), operative time, conversion, intraoperative complications, and post-operative surgical complications such as anastomotic dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and bowel dysfunction. RESULTS: A similar number of complicated cases have been registered for the different surgical techniques evaluated (laparoscopy, single access, flexure mobilization, mesenteric artery ligation, and transvaginal specimen extraction). A multivariate regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for major clinical, demographic, and surgical characteristics, complicated cases were only associated with endometriosis localization from the anal verge (OR = 0.8, 95%CI: 0.74-0.98, P = 0.03). After analyzing the association of post-operative complications and each different surgical technique, we found that only bowel dysfunction after surgery was associated with mesenteric artery ligation (11 out of 44 dysfunctions in the mesenteric artery ligation group vs 2 out of 36 cases in the no mesenteric artery ligation group; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Although further randomized clinical trials are needed to give a definitive conclusion, laparoscopic colorectal resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis appears to be both feasible and safe. Surgical technique cannot be considered a risk factor of post-operative complications. PMID:26715819

  14. En bloc temporal bone resections in squamous cell carcinoma of the ear. Technique, principles, and limits.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Antonio; Zanoletti, Elisabetta; Marioni, Gino; Martini, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions En bloc resection should always be primarily considered in ear carcinoma, also in advanced tumors growing beyond the walls of the external auditory canal, because it achieves a full specimen for histopathological evaluation and allows a correlation between clinical, pathological features, and outcomes. Objective and methods Dismal outcome of surgical and radiotherapic therapies for advanced ear carcinoma required a critical discussion of the oncological principles of treatment. Our analysis involved preliminarily a detailed description of surgical technique including the contribution of modern skull base microsurgery. Results Evident limits in diagnostic protocols, surgical treatment and outcome evaluation modalities pointed to the need of a new approach towards an accurate definition of pre-operative tumor location, size, and behavior. En bloc resection achieved a specimen for a final pathological evaluation and an adjunctive piecemeal excision was necessary only whenever resection was not felt falling in safe, tumor-free tissue. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be considered in selected cases for adjuvant treatment. PMID:26824405

  15. Double-sleeve and carinal resections using the uniportal VATS technique: a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Lyscov, Andrei; Obukhova, Tatyana; Ryabova, Victoria; Zuiev, Vladimir; Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) double-sleeve lobectomy and carinal resections are two of the most complex procedures in thoracic surgery. The uniportal approach provides an advantage for performing these procedures successfully; however, knowledge of the important technical details is required. This study describes the experience of implementing these procedures by Russian specialists. Methods Six patients (one woman; mean age, 57.3±3.6 years) who underwent a uniportal VATS double sleeve and carinal resections were consecutively included in this study. A 5- to 6-cm incision was made at the fifth intercostal space on the middle axillary line. Results Double sleeve left upper lobectomy was completed in four cases. One case of the right sleeve carinal pneumonectomy and one case of the right sleeve carinal upper lobectomy were completed. The mean operation time was 280±13 minutes. There was no conversion to thoracotomy. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 10.8±0.8 days. There was no postoperative mortality. In one case of double-sleeve lobectomy, postoperative pneumonia developed. The postoperative diagnoses of the four uniportal double-sleeve cases were as follows: T2aN2M0 in one case, T3N1M0 in two cases, and T2aN0M0 in one case. The postoperative diagnoses of the two uniportal totally carinal resections were as follows: T4N0M0 and T3N0M0. Conclusions This study results suggest that a uniportal VATS approach might be a feasible option for complex sleeve resections with acceptable postoperative outcomes in the advanced stages of lung cancer. To further evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of this technique, more experience would be required. PMID:27014469

  16. Is Hepatic Resection for Large or Multifocal Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Justified? Results from a Multi-Institutional Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Spolverato, Gaya; Kim, Yuhree; Alexandrescu, Sorin; Popescu, Irinel; Marques, Hugo P.; Aldrighetti, Luca; Gamblin, T. Clark; Miura, John; Maithel, Shishir K.; Squires, Malcolm H.; Pulitano, Carlo; Sandroussi, Charbel; Mentha, Gilles; Bauer, Todd W.; Newhook, Timothy; Shen, Feng; Poultsides, George A.; Marsh, J. Wallis; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of surgical resection for patients with large or multifocal intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) remains unclear. This study evaluated the long-term outcome of patients who underwent hepatic resection for large (≥7 cm) or multifocal (≥2) ICC. Methods Between 1990 and 2013, 557 patients who underwent liver resection for ICC were identified from a multi-institutional database. Clinicopathologic characteristics, operative details, and long-term survival data were evaluated. Results Of the 557 patients, 215 (38.6 %) had a small, solitary ICC (group A) and 342 (61.4 %) had a large or multifocal ICC (group B). The patients in group B underwent an extended hepatectomy more frequently (16.9 vs. 30.4 %; P < 0.001). At the final pathology exam, the patients in group B were more likely to show evidence of vascular invasion (22.5 vs. 38.5 %), direct invasion of contiguous organs (6.5 vs. 12.9 %), and nodal metastasis (13.3 vs. 21.0 %) (all P < 0.05). Interestingly, the incidences of postoperative complications (39.3 vs. 46.8 %) and hospital mortality (1.1 vs. 3.7 %) were similar between the two groups (both P > 0.05). The group A patients had better rates for 5-year overall survival (OS) (30.5 vs. 18.7 %; P < 0.05) and disease-free survival (DFS) (22.6 vs. 8.2 %; P < 0.05) than the group B patients. For the patients in group B, the factors associated with a worse OS included more than three tumor nodules [hazard ratio (HR), 1.56], nodal metastasis (HR, 1.47), and poor differentiation (HR, 1.48). Conclusions Liver resection can be performed safely for patients with large or multifocal ICC. The long-term outcome for these patients can be stratified on the basis of a prognostic score that includes tumor number, nodal metastasis, and poor differentiation. PMID:25354576

  17. Technique of sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphatic mapping during laparoscopic colon resection for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, PP; Andreoni, B; Rottoli, M; Celotti, S; Chiappa, A; Montorsi, M

    2007-01-01

    Background: The utility of lymph node mapping to improve staging in colon cancer is still under evaluation. Laparoscopic colectomy for colon cancer has been validated in multi-centric trials. This study assessed the feasibility and technical aspects of lymph node mapping in laparoscopic colectomy for colon cancer. Methods: A total of 42 patients with histologically proven colon cancer were studied from January 2006 to September 2007. Exclusion criteria were: advanced disease (clinical stage III), rectal cancer, previous colon resection and contraindication to laparoscopy. Lymph-nodal status was assessed preoperatively by computed tomography (CT) scan and intra-operatively with the aid of laparoscopic ultrasound. Before resection, 2–3 ml of Patent Blue V dye was injected sub-serosally around the tumour. Coloured lymph nodes were marked as sentinel (SN) with metal clips or suture and laparoscopic colectomy with lymphadenectomy completed as normal. In case of failure of the intra-operative procedure, an ex vivo SN biopsy was performed on the colectomy specimen after resection. Results: A total number of 904 lymph nodes were examined, with a median number of 22 lymph nodes harvested per patient. The SN detection rate was 100%, an ex vivo lymph node mapping was necessary in four patients. Eleven (26.2%) patients had lymph-nodal metastases and in five (45.5%) of these patients, SN was the only positive lymph node. There were two (18.2%) false-negative SN. In three cases (7.1%) with aberrant lymphatic drainage, lymphadenectomy was extended. The accuracy of SN mapping was 95.2% and negative predictive value was 93.9%. Conclusions: Laparoscopic lymphatic mapping and SN removal is feasible in laparoscopic colectomy for colon cancer. The ex vivo technique is useful as a salvage technique in case of failure of the intra-operative procedure. Prospective studies are justified to determine the real accuracy and false-negative rate of the technique. PMID:22275957

  18. Transurethral En Bloc Resection of Bladder Tumor Using an Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Technique: Preliminary Results in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Morizane, Shuichi; Sejima, Takehiro; Iwamoto, Hideto; Masago, Toshihiko; Honda, Masashi; Ikebuchi, Yuichiro; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Ueki, Masaru; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) technique has been considered the routine method for removing most bladder tumors for decades. In contrast, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is the gold-standard treatment for gastrointestinal superficial tumors. We investigated the effectiveness and applicability of a new technique for en bloc bladder tumor resection using ESD procedure. Methods Four Landrace Large White Duroc female pigs were anesthetized with isoflurane prior endoscopic resection using a large-caliber prototype fiber bronchoscope. After local infiltration of the submucosa with sodium hyaluronate using an injector needle, a section of the target area (1.0–2.0 cm diameter circular area) was cut with the Dual Knife. Results In total, seven target sections were resected from the pigs. The median size of the resected sections was 1.8 cm (range 1.0–2.5 cm) and the median time taken to perform the resection of one section was 20 min (range 4–35 min). These target sections were completely resected en bloc. Although the small bladder perforations occurred on two occasions, no other short-term complications such as uncontrollable bleeding were observed. Conclusion This procedure is a slightly difficult in the pigs with thin bladder walls. However, this procedure with the slim flexible cystoscope may allow us to be able to remove bladder tumors using only light sedation, especially for cases when small tumor recurrence is observed during routine cystoscopy for the patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27493485

  19. Resection of Diminutive and Small Colorectal Polyps: What Is the Optimal Technique?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal polyps are classified as neoplastic or non-neoplastic on the basis of malignant potential. All neoplastic polyps should be completely removed because both the incidence of colorectal cancer and the mortality of colorectal cancer patients have been found to be strongly correlated with incomplete polypectomy. The majority of colorectal polyps discovered on diagnostic colonoscopy are diminutive and small polyps; therefore, complete resection of these polyps is very important. However, there is no consensus on a method to remove diminutive and small polyps, and various techniques have been adopted based on physician preference. The aim of this article was to review the diverse techniques used to remove diminutive and small polyps and to suggest which technique will be the most effective. PMID:27450226

  20. Simple, Safe, and Cost-Effective Technique for Resected Stomach Extraction in Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Derici, Serhan; Atila, Koray; Bora, Seymen; Yener, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has become a popular operation during the recent years. This procedure requires resection of 80–90% of the stomach. Extraction of gastric specimen is known to be a challenging and costly stage of the operation. In this paper, we report results of a simple and cost-effective specimen extraction technique which was applied to 137 consecutive LSG patients. Methods. Between October 2013 and October 2015, 137 laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy surgeries were performed at Dokuz Eylul University General Surgery Department, Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery Unit. All specimens were extracted through a 15 mm trocar site without using any special device. Results. We noticed one superficial incisional surgical site infection and treated this patient with oral antibiotics. No cases of trocar site hernia were observed. Conclusion. Different techniques have been described for specimen extraction. This simple technique allows extraction of specimen safely in a short time and does not require any special device.

  1. Novel Longitudinal Plate-Fixation Technique after Gross Resection of the Sternum

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Irfan; Lafci, Gokhan

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we describe a plate-fixation technique as an alternative method to close a fragile or fractured sternum. A 69-year-old obese woman with diabetes mellitus and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. One week postoperatively, sternal instability was detected, and traditional rewiring was performed. A week later, because of multiple sternal fractures, we performed sternal resection, with use of longitudinally affixed titanium plates and figure-8 steel wires for the anterior chest wall. The procedure was uneventful, and, on short-term follow-up, the anterior chest wall was stable. This longitudinal plate-fixation technique can be tailored to each patient. We think that the technique is safe, effective, economical, and easy to implement, and it is readily reproducible. To evaluate any associated risks, long-term follow-up in additional patients is warranted. PMID:22740734

  2. Arena Roof Technique for Complex Reconstruction After Extensive Chest Wall Resection.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; La Rocca, Antonello; La Manna, Carmine; Martucci, Nicola; De Luca, Giuseppe; Accardo, Rosanna

    2015-10-01

    Extensive primary resections or redos may produce significant chest wall defects requiring creative reconstructions in order to avoid reduction of the intrathoracic volume. We describe the successful use of an innovative technique for chest wall reconstruction based on the concept of roof coverage of sport arenas. In fact, titanium plates are anchored to the residual rib stumps along the parasternal and paravertebral lines. The acellular collagen matrix prosthesis was sutured to the free edges of the same titanium plates to create a roof, reproducing the chest wall dome geometric configuration. A 36-year-old female patient was diagnosed with an extensive desmoid tumor involving the lateral segments of second to fifth ribs on the right side. The arena roof technique allowed for adequate expansion of the uninvolved lung and optimal chest wall functional recovery. PMID:26434458

  3. A decision model and cost analysis of intra-operative cell salvage during hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Madeline; Eeson, Gareth; Lin, Yulia; Tarshis, Jordan; Hallet, Julie; Coburn, Natalie; Law, Calvin; Karanicolas, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraoperative cell salvage (ICS) can reduce allogeneic transfusions but with notable direct costs. This study assessed whether routine use of ICS is cost minimizing in hepatectomy and defines a subpopulation of patients where ICS is most cost minimizing based on patient transfusion risk. Methods A decision model from a health systems perspective was developed to examine adoption and non-adoption of ICS use for hepatectomy. A prospectively maintained database of hepatectomy patients provided data to populate the model. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to determine the probability of ICS being cost-minimizing at specified transfusion risks. One-way sensitivity analysis was used to identify factors most relevant to institutions considering adoption of ICS for hepatectomies. Results In the base case analysis (transfusion risk of 28.8%) the probability that routine utilization of ICS is cost-minimizing is 64%. The probability that ICS is cost-minimizing exceeds 50% if the patient transfusion risk exceeds 25%. The model was most sensitive to patient transfusion risk, variation in costs of allogeneic blood, and number of appropriate cases the device could be used for. Conclusions ICS is cost-minimizing for routine use in liver resection, particularly when used for patients with a risk of transfusion of 25% or greater. PMID:27154806

  4. Role of antiviral therapy in reducing recurrence and improving survival in hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma following curative resection (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZUO, CHAOHUI; XIA, MAN; WU, QUNFENG; ZHU, HAIZHEN; LIU, JINGSHI; LIU, CHEN

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide, with the majority of cases associated with persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus infection. In particular, chronic HBV infection is a predominant risk factor for the development of HCC in Asian and African populations. Hepatic resection, liver transplantion and radiofrequency ablation are increasingly used for the curative treatment of HCC, however, the survival rate of HCC patients who have undergone curative resection remains unsatisfactory due to the high recurrence rate. HCC is a complex disease that is typically resistant to the most commonly used types of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; therefore, the development of novel treatment strategies is required to improve the survival rate of this disease. A high viral load of HBV DNA is the most important correctable risk factor for HCC recurrence, for example nucleos(t)ide analogs improve the outcome following curative resection of HBV-associated HCC, and interferon-α exhibits antitumor activity against various types of cancer via direct inhibitory effects on tumor cells, anti-angiogenesis, enhanced immunogenicity of tumors, immunomodulatory effects and liver dysfunction. In the present review, antiviral treatment for HBV-associated HCC is described as a strategy to reduce recurrence and improve survival. PMID:25624883

  5. The Relation between Obesity and Survival after Surgical Resection of Hepatitis C Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Arimoto, Akira; Wakasa, Tomoko; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Osaki, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims. We aimed to investigate the relationship between obesity and survival in hepatitis C virus-(HCV-) related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who underwent curative surgical resection (SR). Methods. A total of 233 patients with HCV-related HCC who underwent curative SR were included. They included 60 patients (25.8%) with a body mass index (BMI) of > 25 kg/m2 (obesity group) and 173 patients with a BMI of < 25 kg/m2 (control group). Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were compared. Results. The median follow-up periods were 3.6 years in the obesity group and 3.1 years in the control group. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cumulative OS rates were 98.3%, 81.0%, and 63.9% in the obesity group and 90.0%, 70.5%, and 50.3% in the control group (P = 0.818). The corresponding RFS rates were 70.1%, 27.0%, and 12.0% in the obesity group and 70.1%, 39.0%, and 21.7% in the control group (P = 0.124). There were no significant differences between the obesity group and the control group in terms of blood loss during surgery (P = 0.899) and surgery-related serious adverse events (P = 0.813). Conclusions. Obesity itself did not affect survival in patients with HCV-related HCC after curative SR. PMID:23710167

  6. Semi-spherical Radiofrequency Bipolar Device - A New Technique for Liver Resection: Experimental In Vivo Study on the Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Vavra, P; Penhaker, M; Jurcikova, J; Skrobankova, M; Crha, M; Ostruszka, P; Ihnat, P; Grepl, J; Delongova, P; Dvorackova, J; Prochazka, V; Salounova, D; Skoric, M; Rauser, P; Habib, N; Zonca, P

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of colorectal carcinoma is still growing in the Czech Republic and also all around the world. With success of oncological treatment is also growing a number of potential patients with liver metastases, who can profit from surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to confirm on porcine models that this method by using new surgical device is effective and safe for patients who have to undergo liver resection. The primary hypothesis of the study was to evaluate whether this new device is able to consistently produce homogeneous and predictable areas of coagulation necrosis without the Pringle maneuver of vascular inflow occlusion. The secondary hypothesis of the study was to compare the standard linear radiofrequency device and a new semi-spherical bipolar device for liver ablation and resection in a hepatic porcine model. Twelve pigs were randomly divided into two groups. Each pig underwent liver resection from both liver lobes in the marginal, thinner part of liver parenchyma. The pigs in first group were operated with standard using device and in the second group we used new developed semi-spherical device. We followed blood count in 0(th), 14(th) and 30(th) day from operation. 14(th) day from resection pigs underwent diagnostic laparoscopy to evaluate of their state, and 30(th) day after operation were all pigs euthanized and subjected to histopathological examination. Histopathological evaluation of thermal changes at the resection margin showed strong thermal alteration in both groups. Statistical analysis of collected dates did not prove any significant (p < 0.05) differences between standard using device and our new surgical tool. We proved safety of new designed semi-spherical surgical. This device can offer the possibility of shortening the ablation time and operating time, which is benefit for patients undergoing the liver resection. PMID:24945372

  7. Prospective randomized study of the benefits of preoperative corticosteroid administration on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury and cytokine response in patients undergoing hepatic resection1

    PubMed Central

    Aldrighetti, Luca; Arru, Marcella; Finazzi, Renato; Soldini, Laura; Catena, Marco; Ferla, Gianfranco

    2007-01-01

    Background. Hepatic injury secondary to warm ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) remains an important clinical issue following liver surgery. The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to determine whether steroid administration may reduce liver injury and improve short-term outcome. Patients and methods. Forty-three patients undergoing liver resection were randomized to a steroid group or a control group. Patients in the steroid group received 500 mg of methylprednisolone preoperatively. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate amminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin, anti-thrombin III (AT-III), prothrombin time (PT), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were compared between the two groups. Length of stay and type and number of complications were recorded. Results. Postoperative serum levels of ALT, AST, total bilirubin, and inflammatory cytokines were significantly lower in the steroid group than in controls. The postoperative level of AT-III in the control group was significantly lower than in the steroid group (ANOVA p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications in the control group tended to be significantly higher than that in the steroid group. Conclusion. These results suggest that steroid pretreatment represents a potentially important biologic modifier of I/R injury and may contribute to maintenance of coagulant/anticoagulant homeostasis. PMID:18333219

  8. Intraoperative contrast-enhanced sonographic portography combined with indigo carmine dye injection for anatomic liver resection in hepatocellular carcinoma: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang Shin; Lee, Chang Hee; Park, Pyoung-Jae; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min

    2014-07-01

    We present a method of intraoperative contrast-enhanced sonographic portography combined with indigo carmine dye injection for anatomic liver resection in hepatocellular carcinoma. During surgery, before dye infusion into the feeding portal vein, the targeted portal vein branch was directly punctured, and a microbubble contrast agent was administered under sonographic guidance. Simultaneous enhancement of the resected hepatic parenchyma with a microbubble contrast agent and blue dye improved estimation of the segmental border in the cutting plane and the tumor resection margin during liver surgery. PMID:24958416

  9. MBD2 as a novel marker associated with poor survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatic resection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Na; Lu, Min; Du, Xiao-Juan; Xing, Bao-Cai

    2016-08-01

    Methyl-CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) leads to the silencing of methylated genes in cancer cells and was implicated in the activation of prometastatic genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study aimed to investigate the expression status of MBD2 in HCC and the correlation with surgical outcomes. The correlation between clinical prognostic factors and MBD2 were also evaluated. MBD2 expression was analyzed by western blotting in 20 paired HCC and paratumor liver (PTL) tissues. In addition, immunohistochemistry was performed on the 159 HCC samples following hepatic resection performed between January 2003 and October 2008. The correlation between clinicopathological factors and MBD2 expression was also evaluated by statistical analysis to determine the prognostic value of MBD2 expression in HCC. Postoperative prognostic factors were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Compared with PTL tissues, MBD2 expression was shown to be upregulated in 10 of the 20 HCC tissues (50%) by western blotting. The immunohistochemistry data indicated significant increase of the MBD2 expression level in 81 cases (50.94%) compared with the PTL tissues (0/159, 0%, P<0.001). The upregulated MBD2 expression in HCC tissues was correlated with BCLC stage B, tumor size >5 cm and microscopic vascular invasion. Multivariate analysis revealed that MBD2 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival [HR, 2.089; P=0.001] and disease-free survival (HR, 1.601; P=0.022). In conclusion, MBD2 expression was elevated in HCC tissue, which suggesting MBD2 as a candidate prognostic marker of HCC. PMID:27315121

  10. MBD2 as a novel marker associated with poor survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Na; Lu, Min; Du, Xiao-Juan; Xing, Bao-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) leads to the silencing of methylated genes in cancer cells and was implicated in the activation of prometastatic genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study aimed to investigate the expression status of MBD2 in HCC and the correlation with surgical outcomes. The correlation between clinical prognostic factors and MBD2 were also evaluated. MBD2 expression was analyzed by western blotting in 20 paired HCC and paratumor liver (PTL) tissues. In addition, immunohistochemistry was performed on the 159 HCC samples following hepatic resection performed between January 2003 and October 2008. The correlation between clinicopathological factors and MBD2 expression was also evaluated by statistical analysis to determine the prognostic value of MBD2 expression in HCC. Postoperative prognostic factors were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Compared with PTL tissues, MBD2 expression was shown to be upregulated in 10 of the 20 HCC tissues (50%) by western blotting. The immunohistochemistry data indicated significant increase of the MBD2 expression level in 81 cases (50.94%) compared with the PTL tissues (0/159, 0%, P<0.001). The upregulated MBD2 expression in HCC tissues was correlated with BCLC stage B, tumor size >5 cm and microscopic vascular invasion. Multivariate analysis revealed that MBD2 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival [HR, 2.089; P=0.001] and disease-free survival (HR, 1.601; P=0.022). In conclusion, MBD2 expression was elevated in HCC tissue, which suggesting MBD2 as a candidate prognostic marker of HCC. PMID:27315121

  11. Tie2-Expressing Monocytes Are Associated with Identification and Prognoses of Hepatitis B Virus Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Resection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kang; Sun, Qi-Man; Zhou, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Tie2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) are found in various tumors, involved in forming tumor blood vessels and expressing several important proangiogenic factors. The goals of this study were to evaluate the value of TEMs in diagnosing and predicting the prognosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Flow cytometry was performed to identify and count TEMs in peripheral blood monocytes from HCC patients (n = 84) receiving hepatectomy, HBV cirrhotic patients (n = 21), benign tumors patients (n = 15) and healthy volunteers (n = 23). Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) levels in the plasma were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The distribution of TEMs in tumor tissue was observed by immunofluorescence staining. Then we determined the vascular area as a percentage of tumor area (vascular area/tumor area) by immunohistochemical staining. Finally the prognostic significance of TEMs and other clinicopathologic factors was evaluated. Results Percentage of TEMs in peripheral blood monocytes significantly increased in HCC patients compared with HBV cirrhotic patients and healthy donors (both P< 0.001). However there was no significance in benign liver tumor (P = 0.482). In addition, the percentage of circulating TEMs was positively correlated with plasma Ang-2 concentration (P<0.001, r2 = 0.294) and vascular area/tumor area (P<0.001, r2 = 0.126). Furthermore the percentage of intratumoral TEMs was significantly higher than that of paratumoral TEMs (P<0.001). Increased circulating TEMs was associated with poor overall survival (P = 0.043) and a shorter time to recurrence (P = 0.041). Multivariate Cox analysis also revealed that the percentage of TEMs in peripheral blood was an independent factor for HCC patients’ prognosis. Conclusions TEMs may promote angiogenesis in HCC regarding the angiopoietin/Tie2 signal pathway. Percentage of TEMs in peripheral blood monocytes may be applied as a biomarker for identifying HBV-related HCC

  12. A “reverse direction” technique of single-port left upper pulmonary resection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Sihoe, Alan D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) left upper lobectomy is difficult amongst all the lobes. At the beginning of single-port lobectomies, the upper lobes were believed not to be amenable for single-port approach due to the difficult angulation for staplers. Gonzalez reported the first single-port VATS left upper lobectomy in 2011. Methods We report a new technique of single-port VATS left upper lobectomy with the concept of “reverse direction”. We divide the apical-anterior arterial trunk with upper vein in the last. The procedure sequence is described as follows: posterior artery, lingular artery, bronchus and finally upper vein & apical-anterior arterial trunk. Results This method could overcome the angular limitations frequently encountered in single-port VATS procedures; reduce the risk of injuries to pulmonary artery; broaden the indications of single-port the upper lobe of the left lung (LUL) to include hypoplastic lung fissures. Limitations of this new practice include the enlargement or severe calcifications of hilar and bronchial lymph nodes. Conclusions A “reverse direction” technique of single-port left upper pulmonary resection is feasible and safe. PMID:27621885

  13. Two-micron (thulium) laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique: a new method for BPH treatment.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shu-Jie

    2009-05-01

    Two-micron (thulium) laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique (TmLRP-TT) is a transurethral procedure that uses a thulium laser fiber to dissect whole prostatic lobes off the surgical capsule, similar to peeling a tangerine. We recently reported the primary results. Here we introduce this procedure in detail. A 70-W, 2-microm (thulium) laser was used in continuous-wave mode. We joined the incision by making a transverse cut from the level of the verumontanum to the bladder neck, making the resection sufficiently deep to reach the surgical capsule, and resected the prostate into small pieces, just like peeling a tangerine. As we resected the prostate, the pieces were vaporized, sufficiently small to be evacuated through the resectoscope sheath, and the use of the mechanical tissue morcellator was not required. The excellent hemostasis of the thulium laser ensured the safety of TmLRP-TT. No patient required blood transfusion. Saline irrigation was used intraoperatively, and no case of transurethral resection syndrome was observed. The bladder outlet obstruction had clearly resolved after catheter removal in all cases. We designed the tangerine technique and proved it to be the most suitable procedure for the use of thulium laser in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This procedure, which takes less operative time than standard techniques, is safe and combines efficient cutting and rapid organic vaporization, thereby showing the great superiority of the thulium fiber laser in the treatment of BPH. It has been proven to be as safe and efficient as transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) during the 1-year follow-up. PMID:19398957

  14. [Diagnostic imaging techniques for hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Mollerup, Talie Khadem; Lorentzen, Torben; Møller, Jakob M; Nørgaard, Henrik; Achiam, Michael P

    2015-07-27

    Hepatic metastases (HM) are amongst the most important prognostic factors in patient survival from colorectal cancer. The diagnostic imaging techniques for accurate detection and characterization of colorectal metastases are therefore vital. In a review of the literature, MRI showed the highest sensitivity for detection of HM lesions < 1 cm, but the amount of MR scanners is insufficient. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and computed tomography have similar sensitivity for detection of HM, but each method also have limitation such as operator dependency or enhanced risk of cancer due to ionizing radiation. PMID:26238008

  15. Resection of Giant Hemangioma of the Tongue Utilizing a Miniature Tourniquet Technique.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2016-07-01

    With the progress of multidisciplinary vascular anomaly treatment, the use of radiotherapy, cryotherapy, laser therapy and medical treatments, the corticosteroid, sclerotherapy, and many more, the role of surgery has been refined. Surgical treatment has historically been the mainstay of treatment and will maintain.A miniature tourniquet technique applied to the tongue was successfully utilized in reducing bleeding to a minimum during surgical resection of a massive cavernous hemangioma involving the tongue and lower lip without any postoperative complications.Comprehensions of the neurovascular anatomy of the tongue, vasculature, innervations, and muscles physiological functions are very important for selecting the right surgical approach.A 9-year-old girl presented with giant hemangioma resulting in severe protrusions of the anterior and lateral two-thirds of the tongue with an extensive anterior open bite jaw deformity and oral physiological dysfunctions as speech, mastication, and deglutition. Such a presentation is a unique surgical challenge due to the high risk of bleeding, tongue swelling, and airway compromise.Postsurgical results showed oral physiological function improvement and the elimination of interaction effects on anterior open bite. PMID:27391511

  16. Survival outcomes of hepatic resection compared with transarterial chemoembolization or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Min; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Choi, Wang Yong; Choi, Sei Myong; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kang, Koo Jeong; Kim, Young Hwan; Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Park, Soo Young; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of hepatic resection (HR), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and sorafenib therapy as treatments for HCC with PVTT. Methods: Patients diagnosed as HCC with PVTT between January 2000 and December 2011 who received treatment with sorafenib, HR, or TACE were included. Patients with main PVTT, superior mesenteric vein tumor thrombosis, or Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class C were excluded. The records of 172 patients were analyzed retrospectively. HR, TACE, and sorafenib treatment were performed is 40, 80, and 52 patients respectively. PVTT was classified as either involving the segmental branch (type I) or extending to involve the right or left portal vein (type II). Results: The median survival time was significantly longer in the HR group (19.9 months) than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively; both p<0.001), and did not differ significantly between the latter two groups (p=0.698). Among patients with CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC, the median survival time was longer in the HR group than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (p=0.006). In univariate analyses, the initial treatment method, tumor size, PVTT type, involved lobe, CTP class, and presence of cirrhosis or ascites were correlated with overall survival. The significant prognostic factors for overall survival in Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis were initial treatment method (HR vs. TACE: hazard ratio=1.750, p=0.036; HR vs. sorafenib: hazard ratio=2.262, p=0.006), involved lobe (hazard ratio=1.705, p=0.008), PVTT type (hazard ratio=1.617, p=0.013), and CTP class (hazard ratio=1.712, p=0.012). Conclusions: Compared with TACE or sorafenib, HR may prolong the survival of patients with HCC in cases of CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC. PMID:27044767

  17. Scintigraphic techniques for hepatic imaging. Update for 2000.

    PubMed

    Drane, W E

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear medicine continues to evolve from a generic imaging approach to a collection of imaging techniques that are disease-specific. In-111 octreotide SPECT scan has quickly become the method of choice to image gastrinoma. A number of other agents have a role in other tumor models. FDG imaging of the liver is in its infancy, but has potential to outperform anatomic methods (CT scan, MR imaging), particularly in the detection of colorectal cancer metastases. The imaging of FDG in nuclear medicine involves rapidly evolving technology and has the potential to diffuse to the community level practice. To further face the controversial areas head on, another problem for nuclear medicine's role in hepatic imaging remains its somewhat separate existence from radiology. Frequently, the abdominal imager or the general radiologist is in the best position to recommend a scintigraphic liver study. A broad knowledge of these techniques by all radiologists is essential for their ultimate success. PMID:9520984

  18. Safety of implanting sustained-release 5-fluorouracil into hepatic cross-section and omentum majus after primary liver cancer resection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangtao; Zhang, Junjie; Wang, Chenyu; Yao, Kunhou; Hua, Long; Zhang, Liping; Ren, Xuequn

    2016-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the short-term safety of implanting sustained-release 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) into hepatic cross-section and omentum majus after primary liver cancer resection and its impact on related indexes of liver. Forty patients were selected and divided into an implantation group (n = 20) and a control group (n = 20). On the first day after admission, first week after surgery, and first month after surgery, fasting venous blood was extracted from patients for measuring hematological indexes. The reduction rate of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) on the first week and first month after surgery was calculated, and moreover, drainage volume of the abdominal cavity drainage tube, length of stay after surgery, and wound healing condition were recorded. We found that levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate amino transferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, total bilirubin, albumin, and white blood cells measured on the first week and first month after surgery, length of stay, and wound healing of patients in the two groups had no significant difference (P >0.05). Drainage volume and reduction rate of AFP of two groups were significantly different on the first week and first month after surgery (P <0.05). Implanting sustained-release 5-FU into hepatic cross-section and omentum majus after primary liver cancer resection is proved to be safe as it has little impact on related indexes. PMID:27207445

  19. The Efficacy of Hepatic Resection after Neoadjuvant Transarterial Chemoembolization (TACE) and Radiation Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Greater Than 5 cm in Size

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sae Byeol; Park, Young Nyun; Choi, Jin Sub; Lee, Woo Jung; Seong, Jinsil; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Lee, Jong Tae

    2009-01-01

    In cases of large hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), neoadjuvant treatment such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radiation therapy can be performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of these treatments prior to hepatic resection. Between January 1994 and May 2007, 16 patients with HCC greater than 5 cm in size were treated with TACE and radiation therapy prior to hepatic resection. The clinicopathologic factors were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 16 patients, there were 14 men and two women, and the median age was 52.5 yr. TACE was performed three times in average, and the median radiation dosage was 45 Gy. The median diameter of tumor on specimen was 9.0 cm. The degree of tumor necrosis was more than 90% in 14 patients. The median survival time was 13.3 months. Five patients had survived more than 2 yr and there were two patients who had survived more than 5 yr. Although the prognosis of large HCC treated with neoadjuvant therapy is not satisfactory, some showed long-term survival loger than 5 yr. Further research will be required to examine the survival and disease control effect in a prospective randomized study. PMID:19399265

  20. Surgical resection technique of a fused supernumerary lateral incisor: a clinical report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Widmann, Gerlig; Puelacher, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    This case report presents the surgical and restorative management of a fused supernumerary left lateral incisor. The diagnosis was confirmed using conventional radiographs and CT. The case report discusses the value of CT for evaluation of the root relationships and describes the varied morphology associated with supernumerary incisors, the surgical resection technique, partial pulpotomy, and restoration with composite resin after mechanical exposure of the remaining tooth's pulp. PMID:22782063

  1. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  2. A Novel Surgical Technique for Thyroid Cancer with Intra-Cricotracheal Invasion: Windmill Resection and Tetris Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Keisuke; Uchino, Shinya; Noguchi, Hitoshi; Enomoto, Yukie; Noguchi, Shiro

    2015-12-01

    The most effective treatment for thyroid cancer (TC) invading into the larynx and trachea is a complete surgical resection of the tumor, but currently employed techniques are less than ideal. We report a novel surgical technique, which we named Windmill resection and Tetris reconstruction, for patients with TC invading into the laryngeal lumen. We treated eight cases of TC with invasion into the laryngeal lumen by Windmill resection and Tetris reconstruction. We analyzed complications, clinical data, and pathological findings for all patients. Patients included one man and seven women (mean age 69 ± 10 years). Histopathology of TC indicated papillary cancer in five patients, poorly differentiated cancer in one patient, anaplastic cancer in one patient, and squamous cell carcinoma in one patient. Unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy was confirmed preoperatively by laryngoscope in four patients, and none had bilateral RLN palsy. All patients underwent Windmill resection and Tetris reconstruction along with total thyroidectomy (three patients), subtotal thyroidectomy (three patients), and lobectomy (two patients). Neck dissection was performed in all patients. The average resected length of the larynx and trachea was 29 ± 6 mm. Air leakage at the suture line occurred in three patients; two required further surgery, while the third was closed by insertion of a Penrose drain. Postoperative RLN palsy occurred in five patients. Aspiration was observed in two patients and resolved within 4 weeks. Pneumonia, atelectasis, and pleural effusion occurred in some patients. No other complications, including hemorrhage, wound infection, or airway stenosis, occurred. There was no postoperative mortality and no recurrence at the anastomotic site. Two patients underwent permanent tracheostomy due to permanent bilateral RLN palsy. Two patients, one with anaplastic cancer and the other with poorly differentiated cancer, recurred 13 and 21 months after surgery

  3. Laparoscopic Liver Resections: A Feasibility Study in 30 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cherqui, Daniel; Husson, Emmanuel; Hammoud, Renaud; Malassagne, Benoît; Stéphan, François; Bensaid, Said; Rotman, Nelly; Fagniez, Pierre-Louis

    2000-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic liver resections. Summary Background Data The use of the laparoscopic approach for liver resections has remained limited for technical reasons. Progress in laparoscopic procedures and the development of dedicated technology have made it possible to consider laparoscopic resection in selected patients. Methods A prospective study of laparoscopic liver resections was undertaken in patients with preoperative diagnoses including benign lesion, hepatocellular carcinoma with compensated cirrhosis, and metastasis of noncolorectal origin. Hepatic involvement had to be limited and located in the left or peripheral right segments (segments 2–6), and the tumor had to be 5 cm or smaller. Surgical technique included CO2 pneumoperitoneum and liver transection with a harmonic scalpel, with or without portal triad clamping or hepatic vein control. Portal pedicles and large hepatic veins were stapled. Resected specimens were placed in a bag and removed through a separate incision, without fragmentation. Results From May 1996 to December 1999, 30 of 159 (19%) liver resections were included. There were 18 benign lesions and 12 malignant tumors, including 8 hepatocellular carcinomas in cirrhotic patients. Mean tumor size was 4.25 cm. There were two conversions to laparotomy (6.6%). The resections included 1 left hepatectomy, 8 bisegmentectomies (2 and 3), 9 segmentectomies, and 11 atypical resections. Mean blood loss was 300 mL. Mean surgical time was 214 minutes. There were no deaths. Complications occurred in six patients (20%). Only one cirrhotic patient developed postoperative ascites. No port-site metastases were observed in patients with malignant disease. Conclusion Laparoscopic resections are feasible and safe in selected patients with left-sided and right-peripheral lesions requiring limited resection. Young patients with benign disease clearly benefit from avoiding a major abdominal incision, and cirrhotic

  4. Two-Surgeon Technique for Hepatic Parenchymal Transection of the Noncirrhotic Liver Using Saline-Linked Cautery and Ultrasonic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Aloia, Thomas A.; Zorzi, Daria; Abdalla, Eddie K.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze our experience with saline-linked cautery in hepatic surgery. Summary Background Data: Safe and efficient hepatic parenchymal transection is predicated on the ability to simultaneously address 2 tasks: parenchymal dissection and hemostasis. To date, no single instrument has been designed that addresses both of these tasks. Saline-linked cautery is now widely used in liver surgery and is reported to decrease blood loss during liver transection, but data on its exact benefits are lacking. Methods: From a single institution, prospective liver surgery database, we identified 32 consecutive patients with noncirrhotic livers who underwent resection for primary or metastatic disease using a 2-surgeon technique with saline-linked cautery and ultrasonic dissection (SLC+UD) from December 2002 to January 2004. From the same database, we identified a contemporary and matched set of 32 patients who underwent liver resection with similar indications using ultrasonic dissection alone (UD alone). Operative and anesthetic variables were retrospectively analyzed to identify differences between the 2 groups. Results: The 2 groups were equivalent in terms of age, gender, tumor histology, tumor number, and tumor size. The UD+SLC group had a decreased duration of inflow occlusion (20 minutes versus 30 minutes, P = 0.01), blood loss (150 mL versus 250 mL, P = 0.034), and operative time (187 minutes versus 211 minutes, P = 0.027). Postoperative liver function and complication rates were similar in each group. Conclusions: The 2-surgeon technique for liver parenchymal transection using SLC and UD in noncirrhotic livers is safe and may provide advantages over other techniques. PMID:16041206

  5. Significance of functional hepatic resection rate calculated using 3D CT/99mTc-galactosyl human serum albumin single-photon emission computed tomography fusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruga, Yosuke; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Kamachi, Hirofumi; Shimada, Shingo; Wakayama, Kenji; Orimo, Tatsuya; Kakisaka, Tatsuhiko; Yokoo, Hideki; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of the functional hepatic resection rate (FHRR) calculated using 3D computed tomography (CT)/99mTc-galactosyl-human serum albumin (GSA) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) fusion imaging for surgical decision making. METHODS: We enrolled 57 patients who underwent bi- or trisectionectomy at our institution between October 2013 and March 2015. Of these, 26 patients presented with hepatocellular carcinoma, 12 with hilar cholangiocarcinoma, six with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, four with liver metastasis, and nine with other diseases. All patients preoperatively underwent three-phase dynamic multidetector CT and 99mTc-GSA scintigraphy. We compared the parenchymal hepatic resection rate (PHRR) with the FHRR, which was defined as the resection volume counts per total liver volume counts on 3D CT/99mTc-GSA SPECT fusion images. RESULTS: In total, 50 patients underwent bisectionectomy and seven underwent trisectionectomy. Biliary reconstruction was performed in 15 patients, including hepatopancreatoduodenectomy in two. FHRR and PHRR were 38.6 ± 19.9 and 44.5 ± 16.0, respectively; FHRR was strongly correlated with PHRR. The regression coefficient for FHRR on PHRR was 1.16 (P < 0.0001). The ratio of FHRR to PHRR for patients with preoperative therapies (transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, radiation, radiofrequency ablation, etc.), large tumors with a volume of > 1000 mL, and/or macroscopic vascular invasion was significantly smaller than that for patients without these factors (0.73 ± 0.19 vs 0.82 ± 0.18, P < 0.05). Postoperative hyperbilirubinemia was observed in six patients. Major morbidities (Clavien-Dindo grade ≥ 3) occurred in 17 patients (29.8%). There was no case of surgery-related death. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that FHRR is an important deciding factor for major hepatectomy, because FHRR and PHRR may be discrepant owing to insufficient hepatic inflow and congestion in patients with preoperative

  6. Gross total resection of large cervical intramedullary ependymoma: demonstration of microsurgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Cikla, Ulas; Baggott, Chiristopher; Baskaya, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In adolescents and young adults, ependymomas are the most common intramedullary tumors in the spinal cord.These tumors arise from ependymal cell lining the ventricles and spinal canal. The clinical presentation of intramedullary ependymomas are variable and nonspecific. They usually present with diffuse back or neck pain as a chief complaint. Upper and lower motor neuron deficits, numbness which typically progresses from distal to proximal, are other common symptoms. Gross total resection of ependymomas can achieve long-term tumor control with preservation of function. Here we present a 29-year old man who presented with progressive weakness of the left leg, bowel and bladder incontinence. During surgery, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were used and we achieved gross total resection while preserving the spinal cord. The patient made excellent recovery and all of his preoperative deficitis improved completely. He returned to work on postoperative 2-month. PMID:25269050

  7. [A case of hepatic resection after chemotherapy for metastatic colon cancer of the liver with invasion of the inferior vena cava and hepatic vein].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Hisateru; Tomokuni, Akira; Wada, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shogo; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Hama, Naoki; Kawamoto, Koichi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Umeshita, Koji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with lower abdominal pain. Further examination revealed descending colon cancer and multiple liver metastases (S1, S2, and S5). The largest metastatic lesion in S1 showed massive invasion to the inferior vena cava (IVC) and was considered unresectable. Resection of the primary colon cancer was performed in January 2011, followed by several types of systemic chemotherapy(12 courses of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin [XELOX] + bevacizumab[Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors{RECIST}: PD], 5 courses of folinic acid, fluorouracil, and irinotecan [FOLFIRI] + bevacizumab[RECIST: SD], and 13 courses of FOLFIRI+ panitumumab). After these regimens, the lesions in S1 and S2 substantially decreased in size (RECIST: PR), and the lesion in S5 was no longer visible. The extent of invasion to the IVC significantly reduced, and liver resection(extended left lobectomy)and partial IVC resection were performed in November 2013 without reconstruction of the IVC by using a vascular prosthesis. The patient was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 16, and administration of tegafur-uracil-Leucovorin (UFT/UZEL) was initiated. After 4 months, a recurrent lesion was found in S5, and partial liver resection was performed. In addition, FOLFIRI+panitumumab was reinitiated for the multiple lung metastases. The patient is alive without progression of disease 3 years and 4 months after colectomy. PMID:25731422

  8. Intraoperative anesthetic management of patients undergoing glomus tumor resection using a low-dose isoflurane-fentanyl technique.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W S; Murdoch, J; Leonetti, J

    1994-01-01

    Glomus jugulare and vagale tumors present unique problems to both anesthesiologists and surgeons. The anesthetic plant must be tailored to each patient and provide hemodynamic stability, a consistent intraoperative environment, and rapid awakening after prolonged administration. In this report, we describe our anesthetic method used for paraganglioma resection, which utilizes a combination technique of low-dose isoflurane with a narcotic infusion initiated after bolus administration. Results from the last three patients anesthetized by this "balanced" technique were compared to a similar patient who received isoflurane anesthesia exclusively for a major portion of the surgical procedure. The patients receiving the balanced anesthesia required no hemodynamic support during the procedure and were awakened within 15 to 25 minutes of surgical completion. The patient receiving high-dose isoflurane, however, had a prolonged anesthetic wake-up time and did not follow verbal commands for approximately 12 hours after surgical completion. This patient also required hemodynamic support with a phenylephrine infusion during tumor resection. The balanced technique seems to be superior to a straight inhalational technique. Neurological assessment and intubation times after prolonged surgery were reduced with superb hemodynamic stability throughout. This anesthetic method produces a stable intraoperative environment and provides deep surgical anesthesia during periods when muscle relaxants cannot be utilized. PMID:17170932

  9. Intraoperative Anesthetic Management of Patients Undergoing Glomus Tumor Resection Using a Low-Dose Isoflurane-Fentanyl Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jellish, W.S.; Murdoch, J.; Leonetti, J.

    1994-01-01

    Glomus jugulare and vagale tumors present unique problems to both anesthesiologists and surgeons. The anesthetic plant must be tailored to each patient and provide hemodynamic stability, a consistent intraoperative environment, and rapid awakening after prolonged administration. In this report, we describe our anesthetic method used for paraganglioma resection, which utilizes a combination technique of low-dose isoflurane with a narcotic infusion initiated after bolus administration. Results from the last three patients anesthetized by this “balanced” technique were compared to a similar patient who received isoflurane anesthesia exclusively for a major portion of the surgical procedure. The patients receiving the balanced anesthesia required no hemodynamic support during the procedure and were awakened within 15 to 25 minutes of surgical completion. The patient receiving high-dose isoflurane, however, had a prolonged anesthetic wake-up time and did not follow verbal commands for approximately 12 hours after surgical completion. This patient also required hemodynamic support with a phenylephrine infusion during tumor resection. The balanced technique seems to be superior to a straight inhalational technique. Neurological assessment and intubation times after prolonged surgery were reduced with superb hemodynamic stability throughout. This anesthetic method produces a stable intraoperative environment and provides deep surgical anesthesia during periods when muscle relaxants cannot be utilized. PMID:17170932

  10. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing the Effect of Different Haemostatic Agents for Haemostasis of the Liver after Hepatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Seyyed Sadeghi, Mir Salim; Sanei, Behnam; Hashemzadeh, Shahryar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Operative blood loss is still a great obstacle to liver resection, and various topical hemostatic agents were introduced to reduce it. The aim of the current study is to evaluate effects of 3 different types of these agents. Methods. In this randomized clinical trial, 45 patients undergoing liver resection were assigned to receive TachoSil, Surgicel, and Glubran 2 for controlling bleeding. Intraoperative and postoperative findings were compared between groups. Results. Postoperative bleeding (0 versus 33.3%, P = 0.04) and drainage volume first day after surgery (281.33 ± 103.98 versus 150.00 ± 60.82 mL, P = 0.02) were significantly higher in Surgicel than in TachoSil group. Postoperative complications included bile leak (3 cases in Surgicel, 1 case in TachoSil and Glubran 2), noninfectious collection (2 cases in TachoSil and Surgicel and 1 case in Glubran 2), perihepatic abscess, and massive hematoma around hepatectomy site both in Surgicel group. There was no death during the study period. Conclusion. Due to higher complications in Surgicel group, its application as hemostatic agent after liver resection is not recommended. Better results in TachoSil in comparison to the other two are indicative of its better efficacy and superiority in controlling hemostasis. PMID:24159254

  11. Laparoscopic liver resection for hepatitis B and C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with Child B or C cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Brytska, Nataliya; Shehta, Ahmed; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Cho, Jai Young; Choi, YoungRok

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and oncological outcomes after laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) in patients with hepatitis B and C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with Child B or C cirrhosis. Methods Between January 2004 and December 2013, LLR was performed in 232 patients with HCC. Of these, 141 patients also had pathologically proven cirrhosis. Sixteen patients with hepatitis B and C virus-related HCC with Child B or C cirrhosis were included in the study. Thirteen (81.3%) patients had Child B disease and three (18.8%) patients had Child C disease. Results The median operation time was 215 min, the median estimated blood loss was 350 mL, and the median hospital stay was eight days. Three patients (18.8%) experienced complications after surgery. There was no postoperative mortality or reoperation. The mean follow-up period was 51.6 months. HCC recurred in eight (50%) patients: seven intrahepatic recurrences and one extrahepatic recurrence. The treatments for recurrence were laparoscopic reoperation in one (6.3%) patient, trans-catheter arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) in one (6.3%) patient, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in one (6.3%) patient, and combined TACE and RFA in four (25%) patients. The five-year postoperative overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 84.4% and 41.7%, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates that LLR can be safely used in patients with hepatitis B and C virus-related HCC and Child B or C cirrhosis, with acceptable survival outcomes. PMID:26734621

  12. New technique for feline carbon dioxide laser onychectomy by resection of the redundant epidermis of the ungual crest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, William P.

    2000-05-01

    A new technique for feline carbon dioxide laser onychectomy can further minimize postoperative pain and complications in any age animal. This procedure is accomplished by resection of the redundant epidermis over the ungual crest. Resection of the redundant epidermis allows complete dissection and removal of the claw from a strictly cranio-dorsal approach, thereby minimizing trauma to the surrounding tissues and post- operative complications. The laser setting is preferred at four to six watts continuous power. The epidermis of the ungual crest is resected in a circumferential manner at its most distal edge. This tissue is pushed proximally over the ungual crest. A second circumferential incision is made 3 mm proximal to the first incision. Deeper subcutaneous fascia is also pushed proximally over the ungual crest. An incision of the extensor tendon is made at its insertion on the ungual crest keeping the redundant epidermis proximal to this incision. The incision through the extensor tendon is continued deeper to the synovium of PII and PIII. Gentle traction in a palmar direction will disarticulate the joint space between PII and PIII. Incisions into the lateral and medial collateral ligaments from a cranio-dorsal origin in palmar direction further disarticulate the joint. Care must be exercised to preserve all epidermal tissue lying immediately adjacent to the collateral ligaments. Continual palmar traction will expose the base of PIII and the insertion of the flexor tendon. A dorsal incision is made into the flexor tendon in a palmar direction. Extreme palmar rotation of PIII will allow the dissection of the subcutaneous tissue of the pad from PIII. The redundant epidermal tissue will now cover the majority of the onychectomy site. No sutures or tissue adhesive are advised.

  13. Oxidative and pre-inflammatory stress in wedge resection of pulmonary parenchyma using the radiofrequency ablation technique in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a thermal energy delivery system used for coagulative cellular destruction of small tumors through percutaneous or intraoperative application of its needle electrode to the target area, and for assisting partial resection of liver and kidney. We tried to evaluate the regional oxidative and pre-inflammatory stress of RFA-assisted wedge lung resection, by measuring the MDA and tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α) concentration in the resected lung tissue of a swine model. Method Fourteen white male swines, divided in two groups, the RFA-group and the control group (C-group) underwent a small left thoracotomy and wedge lung resection of the lingula. The wedge resection in the RFA-group was performed using the RFA technique whereas in C-group the simple "cut and sew" method was performed. We measured the malondialdehyde (MDA) and TNF-α concentration in the resected lung tissue of both groups. Results In C-group the MDA mean deviation rate was 113 ± 42.6 whereas in RFA-group the MDA mean deviation rate was significantly higher 353 ± 184 (p = 0.006). A statistically significant increase in TNF-α levels was also observed in the RFA-group (5.25 ± 1.36) compared to C-group (mean ± SD = 8.48 ± 2.82) (p = 0.006). Conclusion Our data indicate that RFA-assisted wedge lung resection in a swine model increases regional MDA and TNF-a factors affecting by this oxidative and pre-inflammatory stress of the procedure. Although RFA-assisted liver resection can be well tolerated in humans, the possible use of this method to the lung has to be further investigated in terms of regional and systemic reactions and the feasibility of performing larger lung resections. PMID:22260184

  14. Biomechanical Analysis of a Novel Acetabulum Reconstruction Technique with Acetabulum Reconstruction Cage and Threaded Rods after Type II Pelvic Resections

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vivek Ajit; Elbahri, Hassan; Shanmugam, Rukmanikanthan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Periacetabular resections with reconstruction has high rates of complications due to the complexity of the reconstruction. We have improvised a novel technique of reconstruction for type II and type II + III pelvic resections with the use of a commercially available acetabulum reconstruction cage (gap II, Stryker) and threaded rods. Objectives. The aim of our study is to determine the biomechanical strength of our reconstruction compared to the traditional cemented total hip replacement (THR) designs in normal acetabulum and establish its mode of failure. Methods. Five sets of hemipelvises were biomechanically tested (Instron® 3848, MA, USA). These constructs were subjected to cyclic loading and load to failure. Results. The reconstructed acetabulum was stiffer and required a higher load to failure compared to the intact pelvis with a standard THR. The mean stiffness of the reconstructed pelvis was 1738.6 ± 200.3 Nmm−1 compared to the intact pelvis, which was 911.4 ± 172.7 Nmm−1 (P value = 0.01). The mean load to failure for the standard acetabular cup construct was 3297.3 ± 117.7 N while that of the reconstructed pelvis with the acetabulum cage and threaded rods was 4863.8 ± 7.0 N. Conclusion. Reconstruction of the pelvis with an acetabular reconstruction cage and threaded rods is a biomechanical viable option. PMID:27340368

  15. Biomechanical Analysis of a Novel Acetabulum Reconstruction Technique with Acetabulum Reconstruction Cage and Threaded Rods after Type II Pelvic Resections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek Ajit; Elbahri, Hassan; Shanmugam, Rukmanikanthan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Periacetabular resections with reconstruction has high rates of complications due to the complexity of the reconstruction. We have improvised a novel technique of reconstruction for type II and type II + III pelvic resections with the use of a commercially available acetabulum reconstruction cage (gap II, Stryker) and threaded rods. Objectives. The aim of our study is to determine the biomechanical strength of our reconstruction compared to the traditional cemented total hip replacement (THR) designs in normal acetabulum and establish its mode of failure. Methods. Five sets of hemipelvises were biomechanically tested (Instron® 3848, MA, USA). These constructs were subjected to cyclic loading and load to failure. Results. The reconstructed acetabulum was stiffer and required a higher load to failure compared to the intact pelvis with a standard THR. The mean stiffness of the reconstructed pelvis was 1738.6 ± 200.3 Nmm(-1) compared to the intact pelvis, which was 911.4 ± 172.7 Nmm(-1) (P value = 0.01). The mean load to failure for the standard acetabular cup construct was 3297.3 ± 117.7 N while that of the reconstructed pelvis with the acetabulum cage and threaded rods was 4863.8 ± 7.0 N. Conclusion. Reconstruction of the pelvis with an acetabular reconstruction cage and threaded rods is a biomechanical viable option. PMID:27340368

  16. Factors Predicting Difficulty of Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer with Total Mesorectal Excision and Double Stapling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiping; Li, Qiken; Fan, Yongtian; Li, Dechuan; Jiang, Lai; Qiu, Pengnian; Tang, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic sphincter-preserving low anterior resection for rectal cancer is a surgery demanding great skill. Immense efforts have been devoted to identifying factors that can predict operative difficulty, but the results are inconsistent. Objective Our study was conducted to screen patients’ factors to build models for predicting the operative difficulty using well controlled data. Method We retrospectively reviewed records of 199 consecutive patients who had rectal cancers 5–8 cm from the anal verge. All underwent laparoscopic sphincter-preserving low anterior resections with total mesorectal excision (TME) and double stapling technique (DST). Data of 155 patients from one surgeon were utilized to build models to predict standardized endpoints (operative time, blood loss) and postoperative morbidity. Data of 44 patients from other surgeons were used to test the predictability of the built models. Results Our results showed prior abdominal surgery, preoperative chemoradiotherapy, tumor distance to anal verge, interspinous distance, and BMI were predictors for the standardized operative times. Gender and tumor maximum diameter were related to the standardized blood loss. Temporary diversion and tumor diameter were predictors for postoperative morbidity. The model constructed for the operative time demonstrated excellent predictability for patients from different surgeons. Conclusions With a well-controlled patient population, we have built a predictable model to estimate operative difficulty. The standardized operative time will make it possible to significantly increase sample size and build more reliable models to predict operative difficulty for clinical use. PMID:26992004

  17. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  18. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage after laparoscopic low anterior resection with double stapling technique anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Kenji; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is one of the most devastating complications after rectal cancer surgery. The double stapling technique has greatly facilitated intestinal reconstruction especially for anastomosis after low anterior resection (LAR). Risk factor analyses for AL after open LAR have been widely reported. However, a few studies have analyzed the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR. Laparoscopic rectal surgery provides an excellent operative field in a narrow pelvic space, and enables total mesorectal excision surgery and preservation of the autonomic nervous system with greater precision. However, rectal transection using a laparoscopic linear stapler is relatively difficult compared with open surgery because of the width and limited performance of the linear stapler. Moreover, laparoscopic LAR exhibits a different postoperative course compared with open LAR, which suggests that the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR may also differ from those after open LAR. In this review, we will discuss the risk factors for AL after laparoscopic LAR. PMID:27433085

  19. Comparing high-resolution microscopy techniques for potential intraoperative use in guiding low-grade glioma resections

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Daphne; Wang, Danni; Wang, Yu “Winston”; Borwege, Sabine; Sanai, Nader; Liu, Jonathan T.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Fluorescence image-guided surgery (FIGS), with contrast provided by 5-ALA-induced-PpIX, has been shown to enable a higher extent of resection of high-grade gliomas. However, conventional FIGS with low-power microscopy lacks the sensitivity to aid in low-grade glioma (LGG) resection because PpIX signal is weak and sparse in such tissues. Intraoperative high-resolution microscopy of PpIX fluorescence has been proposed as a method to guide LGG resection, where sub-cellular resolution allows for the visualization of sparse and punctate mitochondrial PpIX production in tumor cells. Here, we assess the performance of three potentially portable high-resolution microscopy techniques that may be used for the intraoperative imaging of human LGG tissue samples with PpIX contrast: high-resolution fiber-optic microscopy (HRFM), high-resolution wide-field microscopy (WFM), and dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscopy. Materials and Methods Thick unsectioned human LGG tissue samples (n = 7) with ALA-induced-PpIX contrast were imaged using three imaging techniques (HRFM, WFM, DAC). The average signal-to-background ratio (SBR) was then calculated for each imaging modality (5 images per tissue, per modality). Results HRFM provides the ease of use and portability of a flexible fiber bundle, and is simple and inexpensive to build. However, in most cases (6/7), HRFM is not capable of detecting PpIX signal from LGGs due to high autofluorescence, generated by the fiber bundle under laser illumination at 405 nm, which overwhelms the PpIX signal and impedes its visualization. WFM is a camera-based method possessing high lateral resolution but poor axial resolution, resulting in sub-optimal image contrast. Conclusions Consistent successful detection of PpIX signal throughout our human LGG tissue samples (n = 7), with an acceptable image contrast (SBR > 2), was only achieved using DAC microscopy, which offers superior image resolution and contrast that is comparable to

  20. Hemobilia secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: an unusual complication of bile leakage in a patient with a history of a resected IIIb Klatskin tumor.

    PubMed

    Siablis, Dimitrios; Papathanassiou, Zafiria G; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Christeas, Nikolaos; Vagianos, Constantine

    2005-09-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with a 16-year history of a double bilo-enteric anastomosis due to resected hilar cholangiocarcinoma (Type IIIb Klatskin tumor). The patient presented with cholangitis secondary to benign anastomotic stenosis which resulted in a large intrahepatic biloma. In order to restore the patency of the anastomosis and overcome cholangitis, several attempts took place, including endobiliary stenting, balloon-assisted biloplasty and transhepatic billiary drainage. Anastomotic patency was achieved, complicated, however, by persistent upper gastro-intestinal bleeding, presented as hemobilia. A biloma-induced pseudoaneurysm of the left hepatic artery was diagnosed. This had ruptured into the biliary tract, and presented the actual cause of the hemobilia. Selective embolism of the pseudoaneurysm resulted in control of the hemorrhage, and was successfully combined with transhepatic dilatation of the anastomosis and percutaneous drainage of the biloma. The patient was ultimately cured and seems to be in excellent condition, 5 mo after treatment. PMID:16127759

  1. Pre-, peri-, and postoperative oral administration of branched-chain amino acids for primary liver cancer patients for hepatic resection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianyuan; Zhong, Jianhong; Zhang, Hanguang; Zhong, Wenhe; Huang, Zhihong; Jin, Yuanming; Xu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Pre-, peri-, and postoperative oral administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to patients with primary liver cancer (PLC) during hepatic resection (HR) remains controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this practice. Seven literature databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that reported pre-, peri-, and postoperative oral administration of BCAA for PLC patients during HR. Three RCTs were included in a meta-analysis in which risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. The 2 groups showed similar recurrence rates (RR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.36) and similar overall survival (RR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.18). Adverse events related to oral administration of BCAA were more than the control group, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal distension, abdominal pain, and hypertension. However, all adverse reactions disappeared after symptomatic treatment. The available evidence suggests that although pre-, peri-, and postoperative oral BCAA for patients with PLC is safe, it is of questionable clinical value. More RCTs are warranted to explore this question definitively. PMID:24033366

  2. [Assessment of resectability of colorectal liver metastases and extended resection].

    PubMed

    Settmacher, U; Scheuerlein, H; Rauchfuss, F

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with colorectal liver metastases are treated within a multimodal therapy regime whereby liver resection is a key point in the curative treatment concept. The achievement of an R0 situation is of vital importance for long-term survival. Besides general operability and the assessment of comorbidities, resection depends on the quality of liver parenchyma (functional resectability) and the anatomical position of the tumor (oncological resectability). The improvement of operation techniques and perioperative medicine nowadays allow complex surgical procedures for metastasis surgery. This article presents the methods for the assessment of resectability and modern strategies of preoperative conditioning as well as approaches for extended liver resection. PMID:24317339

  3. Current Reconstructive Techniques Following Head and Neck Cancer Resection Using Microvascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Takeharu; Sarukawa, Shunji; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Takeoda, Shoji; Kusaka, Gen; Ichimura, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Various techniques have been developed to reconstruct head and neck defects following surgery to restore function and cosmetics. Free tissue transfer using microvascular anastomosis has transformed surgical outcomes and the quality of life for head and neck cancer patients because this technique has made it possible for surgeons to perform more aggressive ablative surgery, but there is room for improvement to achieve a satisfactory survival rate. Reconstruction using the free tissue transfer technique is closely related to cardiovascular surgery because the anastomosis techniques used by head and neck surgeons are based on those of cardiovascular surgeons; thus, suggestions from cardiovascular surgeons might lead to further development of this field. The aim of this article is to present the recent general concepts of reconstruction procedures and our experiences of reconstructive surgeries of the oral cavity, mandible, maxilla, oropharynx and hypopharynx to help cardiovascular surgeons understand the reconstructions and share knowledge among themselves and with neck surgeons to develop future directions in head and neck reconstruction. PMID:23555452

  4. The Relationship Between Serum Interleukin-6 and the Recurrence of Hepatitis B Virus Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Tao; Wang, Bin; Wang, Shu-yun; Deng, Biao; Qu, Lei; Qi, Xiao-sheng; Wang, Xiao-liang; Deng, Gui-long; Sun, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to assess whether preoperative serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) can predict recurrence of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The association between preoperative IL-6 levels and HCC recurrence following curative hepatectomy in 146 patients with chronic HBV infection was determined. Patients were divided into groups based on the presence or absence of HCC recurrence. Serum IL-6 levels were compared between groups, and the association between serum IL-6 level and greatest tumor dimension was also analyzed. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was used to define the optimal cutoff value for predicting recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. The OS and RFS rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Out of 146 patients, 80 (54.8%) patients were documented as having HCC recurrence during the follow-up period. After adjusting for potential confounders, serum IL-6 levels were significantly associated with HCC recurrence, and a saturation effect existed with serum IL-6 levels up to 3.7 pg/mL. In addition, patients with preoperative serum IL-6 levels over 3.1 pg/mL had lower RFS and OS rates (P < 0.01). There was no significant correlation between preoperative serum IL-6 levels and maximal tumor dimension (r = 0.0003, P = 0.84). Elevated serum levels of IL-6 were significantly associated with an increased risk of HBV-associated HCC recurrence suggesting that preoperative IL-6 serum level is potential biomarker for early prediction of HBV-associated HCC recurrence.

  5. The Influence of Liver Resection on Intrahepatic Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Hannes H; Nißler, Valérie; Croner, Roland S

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of tumor recurrence after resection of metastatic liver lesions remains an unsolved problem. Small tumor cell deposits, which are not detectable by routine clinical imaging, may be stimulated by hepatic regeneration factors after liver resection. It is not entirely clear, however, which factors are crucial for tumor recurrence. The presented mouse model may be useful to explore the mechanisms that play a role in the development of recurrent malignant lesions after liver resection. The model combines the easy-to-perform and reproducible techniques of defined amounts of liver tissue removal and tumor induction (by injection) in mice. The animals were treated with either a single laparotomy, a 30% liver resection, or a 70% liver resection. All animals subsequently received a tumor cell injection into the remaining liver tissue. After two weeks of observation, the livers and tumors were evaluated for size and weight and examined by immunohistochemistry. After a 70% liver resection, the tumor volume and weight were significantly increased compared to a laparotomy alone (p <0.05). In addition, immunohistochemistry (Ki67) showed an increased tumor proliferation rate in the resection group (p <0.05). These findings demonstrate the influence of hepatic regeneration mechanisms on intrahepatic tumor growth. Combined with methods like histological workup or RNA analysis, the described mouse model could serve as foundation for a close examination of different factors involved in tumor growth and metastatic disease recurrence within the liver. A considerable number of variables like the length of postoperative observation, the cell line used for injection or the timing of injection and liver resection offer multiple angles when exploring a specific question in the context of post-hepatectomy metastases. The limitations of this procedure are the authorization to perform the procedure on animals, access to an appropriate animal testing facility and acquisition

  6. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  7. Radical Resection of a Late-Relapsed Testicular Germ Cell Tumour: Hepatectomy, Cavotomy, and Thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ní Leidhin, C.; Redmond, C. E.; Cahalane, A. M.; Heneghan, H. M.; Motyer, R.; Ryan, E. R.; Hoti, E.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 3.2% of patients with testicular germ cell tumours represent with late-relapsing disease. Aggressive surgical resection confers the greatest chance of cure in this patient group. We present the case of a late and extensively relapsed nonseminomatous germ cell tumour with thrombus present along the entire length of the inferior vena cava, as well as in the right hepatic vein. Techniques practised in liver transplantation were used to achieve complete resection of the tumour thrombus. This case illustrates the enhanced potential for tumour resection through a fusion of principles derived from surgical oncology and liver transplantation. PMID:25587480

  8. Radical resection of a late-relapsed testicular germ cell tumour: hepatectomy, cavotomy, and thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Ní Leidhin, C; Redmond, C E; Cahalane, A M; Heneghan, H M; Motyer, R; Ryan, E R; Hoti, E

    2014-01-01

    Up to 3.2% of patients with testicular germ cell tumours represent with late-relapsing disease. Aggressive surgical resection confers the greatest chance of cure in this patient group. We present the case of a late and extensively relapsed nonseminomatous germ cell tumour with thrombus present along the entire length of the inferior vena cava, as well as in the right hepatic vein. Techniques practised in liver transplantation were used to achieve complete resection of the tumour thrombus. This case illustrates the enhanced potential for tumour resection through a fusion of principles derived from surgical oncology and liver transplantation. PMID:25587480

  9. Changes in the types of liver diseases requiring hepatic resection: a single-institution experience of 9016 cases over a 10-year period

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hwui-Dong; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Kwang-Min; Kim, Ki-Hun; Kim, Jin Cheon; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ha, Tae-Yong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims To understand the changing demands for hepatic resection (HR), we collected data regarding HR performed in a tertiary centre over a period of 10 years. Methods We carried out extensive search of institutional databases to identify HR cases performed between January 2005 and December 2014. A study cohort of 9,016 patients were divided into 5 disease categories, namely hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), intrahepatic duct stone disease (IHDS), colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CRLM), and uncommon/rare diseases (URD). Results There were 5,661 (62.8%) HCC cases, followed by 1441 (16.0%) CRLM, 942 (10.5%) ICC, 638 (7.1%) IHDS and 334 (3.7%) URD. The number of annual HR cases gradually increased from 443 in 2005 to 1,260 in 2015. Annual HCC cases also gradually increased, but the annual proportion of HCC cases fluctuated narrowly between 58.3% and 70.2%. Annual CRLM cases increased rapidly, and their proportion increased progressively from 4.7% to 20.5%. Annual ICC cases increased slowly, and their annual proportion fluctuated between 7.2% and 15.6%. Annual IHDS cases decreased slowly, and their annual proportion decreased progressively from 17.2% to 3.4%, while annual URD cases fluctuated, with annual proportions varying between 2.3% and 5.6%. Conclusions Annual cases of HR increased over the last 10 years in a tertiary center probably due to a center-specific centralization effect. The number of CRLM cases increased rapidly; those of HCC and ICC increased gradually, and those of IHDS declined gradually. We believe that these results reflect real changes in the types of liver disease requiring HR. PMID:27212990

  10. Hepatic Resection as a Safe and Effective Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Involving a Single Large Tumor, Multiple Tumors, or Macrovascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jian-Hong; Rodríguez, A. Chapin; Ke, Yang; Wang, Yan-Yan; Wang, Lin; Li, Le-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This systematic review examined whether the available evidence justifies using hepatic resection (HR) during later stages of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which contravenes treatment guidelines but is current practice at many medical centers. Official guidelines and retrospective studies recommend different roles for HR for patients with large/multinodular HCC or with HCC involving macrovascular invasion (MVI). Several databases were systematically searched for studies examining the safety and efficacy of HR for treating HCC involving a single large tumor (>5 cm) or multiple tumors, or for treating HCC involving MVI. We identified 50 studies involving 14 808 patients that investigated the use of HR to treat large/multinodular HCC, and 24 studies with 4389 patients that investigated HR to treat HCC with MVI. Median in-hospital mortality for patients with either type of HCC was significantly lower in Asian studies (2.7%) than in non-Asian studies (7.3%, P < 0.001). Median overall survival (OS) was significantly higher for all Asian patients with large/multinodular HCC than for all non-Asian patients at both 1 year (81% vs 65%, P < 0.001) and 5 years (42% vs 32%, P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained for median disease-free survival at 1 year (61% vs 50%, P < 0.001) and 5 years (26% vs 24%, P < 0.001). However, median OS was similar for Asian and non-Asian patients with HCC involving MVI at 1 year (50% vs 52%, P = 0.45) and 5 years (18% vs 14%, P = 0.94). There was an upward trend in 5-year OS in patients with either type of HCC. HR is reasonably safe and effective at treating large/multinodular HCC and HCC with MVI. The available evidence argues for expanding the indications for HR in official treatment guidelines. PMID:25621684

  11. Modified technique of resection denture prosthesis fabrication for a patient with segmental mandibulectomy--a case report.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P; Hegde, C; Rampal, N; Pawah, Salil; Gupta, A; Shukla, M

    2011-12-01

    The rehabilitation of patients following maxillary & mandibular resection is challenging. A prosthesis supported with dental implants is often the treatment of choice, but implants cannot be used predictably in all clinical situations. A tissue supported post resection denture is usually the most acceptable treatment option left in these situations. This case report describes management of a patient who had undergone segmental mandibulectomy & subsequently rehabilitated with resection denture prosthesis. Conventional treatment planning was modified at various stages of fabrication to improve the quality of the final prosthesis. PMID:22645804

  12. Plantar rotational flap technique for panmetatarsal head resection and transmetatarsal amputation: a revision approach for second metatarsal head transfer ulcers in patients with previous partial first ray amputation.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Reinking, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Transfer ulcers beneath the second metatarsal head are common after diabetes-related partial first ray amputation. Subsequent osteomyelitis of the second ray can further complicate this difficult situation. We present 2 cases depicting our plantar rotational flap technique for revision surgery involving conversion to either panmetatarsal head resection or transmetatarsal amputation (TMA). These cases are presented to demonstrate our indications, procedure selection criteria, flap technique, operative pearls, and staging protocol. The goals of this surgical approach are to excise and close the plantar ulcer beneath the second metatarsal head, remove any infected bone, allow staged surgery if needed, remove all remaining metatarsal heads to decrease the likelihood of repeat transfer ulcers, preserve the toes when practical, avoid excessive shortening of the foot, avoid multiple longitudinal dorsal incisions, and create a functional and cosmetically appealing foot. The flap is equally suited for either panmetatarsal head resection or TMA. The decision to pursue panmetatarsal head resection versus TMA largely depends on the condition of the remaining toes. Involvement of osteomyelitis in the base of the second proximal phalanx, the soft tissue viability of the remaining toes, the presence of a preoperative digital deformity, and the likelihood that saving the lesser toes will be beneficial from a cosmetic or footwear standpoint are factors we consider when deciding between panmetatarsal head resection and TMA. Retrospective chart review identified prompt healing of the flap in both patients. Neither patient experienced recurrent ulcers or required subsequent surgery within the first 12 months postoperatively. PMID:23910736

  13. Modified Cisplatin/Interferon α-2b/Doxorubicin/Fluorouracil (PIAF) chemotherapy in patients with no hepatitis or cirrhosis is associated with improved response rate, resectability and survival of initially unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaseb, Ahmed O.; Shindoh, Junichi; Patt, Yehuda Z.; Roses, Robert E.; Zimmitti, Giuseppe; Lozano, Richard D.; Hassan, Manal M.; Hassabo, Hesham M.; Curley, Steven A.; Aloia, Thomas A.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with response rate, resectability, and survival after cisplatin/interferon α-2b/doxorubicin/5-flurouracil (PIAF) combination therapy in patients with initially unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and Methods The study included two groups of patients treated with conventional high-dose PIAF (n=84) between 1994 and 2003 and those without hepatitis or cirrhosis treated with modified PIAF (n=33) between 2003 and 2012. Tolerance of chemotherapy, best radiographic response, rate of conversion to curative surgery, and overall survival were analyzed and compared between the two groups, and multivariate and logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of response and survival. Results The modified PIAF group had a higher median number of PIAF cycles (4 vs. 2, P = .049), higher objective response rate (36% vs. 15%, P = .013), higher rate of conversion to curative surgery (33% vs. 10%, P = .004), and longer median overall survival (21.3 vs. 10.6 months, P = .002). Multivariate analyses confirmed that positive hepatitis B serology (hazard ratio [HR], 1.68; 95% CI, 1.08 to 2.59) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2 (HR, 1.75; 95% CI 1.04 to 2.93) were associated with worse survival while curative surgical resection after PIAF treatment (HR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.35) was associated with improved survival. Conclusions In patients with initially unresectable HCC, the modified PIAF regimen in patients with no hepatitis or cirrhosis is associated with improved response, resectability, and survival. PMID:23821538

  14. Screening of Danish blood donors for hepatitis B surface antigen using a third generation technique.

    PubMed Central

    Wantzin, P; Nielsen, J O; Tygstrup, N; Soerensen, H; Dybkjaer, E

    1985-01-01

    The profit to be gained by testing Danish blood donors for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) with a third generation technique instead of the currently used immunoelectrophoresis was investigated by additional screening of 48 750 blood units by radioimmunoassay three weeks after donation. Twenty nine units were positive for HBsAg on radioimmunoassay (0.059%). Only six of these were found by immunoelectrophoresis (0.012%). Most of the 23 donors positive on radioimmunoassay and negative on immunoelectrophoresis were healthy carriers of HBsAg (20) or had asymptomatic chronic liver disease (two). One donor had acute hepatitis B. Fifteen of the 23 blood units were transfused. The 15 recipients were monitored biochemically and serologically for up to nine months. One recipient developed fulminant hepatitis B, three developed acute hepatitis B, and one became a healthy carrier of HBsAg. All these patients had received blood from healthy carriers of HBsAg. Two recipients were immunised against HBsAg, and in one patient no seroconversion was observed. The remaining recipients died soon after transfusion or were protected by antibodies to HBsAg that had been present before the transfusion. Testing of Danish blood donors using a third generation technique identified a substantial number of donors positive for HBsAg overlooked by immunoelectrophoresis. Most of these donors were healthy carriers of HBsAg. Blood taken from such carriers is highly infectious when transfused, probably because of the large amount of material transmitted. PMID:3929937

  15. Laparoscopic Low Anterior Resection and Eversion Technique Combined With a Nondog Ear Anastomosis for Mid- and Distal Rectal Neoplasms: A Preliminary and Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Changhua; Liang, Lei; Ying, Mingang; Li, Qingguo; Li, Dawei; Li, Yiwei; Peng, Junjie; Huang, Liyong; Cai, Sanjun; Li, Xinxiang

    2015-12-01

    The transanal eversion and prolapsing technique is a well-established procedure, and can ensure an adequate distal margin for patients with low rectal neoplasms. Potential leakage risks, however, are associated with bilateral dog ear formation, which results from traditional double-stapling anastomosis. The authors determined the feasibility of combining these techniques with a commercial stapling set to achieve a nondog ear (end-to-end) anastomosis for patients with mid- and distal rectal neoplasms. Patients with early-stage (c/ycT1-2N0), mid- to distal rectal neoplasms and good anal sphincter function were included in this study. Laparoscopic low anterior resection was performed with a standard total mesorectal excision technique downward to the pelvic floor as low as possible. The bowel was resected proximal to the lesion with an endoscopic linear stapler. An anvil was inserted extracorporeally into the proximal colon via an extended working pore. The distal rectum coupled with the lesion was prolapsed and everted out of the anus. The neoplasm was resected with a sufficient margin above the dentate line under direct sight. A transrectal anastomosis without dog ears was performed intracorporeally to reconstitute the continuity of the bowel. Eleven cases, 6 male and 5 female patients, were included in this study. The mean operative time was 191 (129-292) minutes. The mean blood loss was 110 (30-300) mL. The median distal margin distance from the lower edge of the lesion to the dentate line was 1.5 (0.5-2.5) cm. All the resection margins were negative. Most patients experienced uneventful postoperative recoveries. No patient had anastomotic leak. Most patients had an acceptable stool frequency after loop ileostomy closure. Our preliminary data demonstrated the safety and feasibility of achieving a sound anastomosis without risking potential anastomotic leakage because of dog ear formation. PMID:26683958

  16. Resection of large epidermoid tumors ventral to the brainstem: techniques to expand the operative corridor across the basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-01-01

    Epidermoid tumors comprise about 1% of all intracranial tumors. They are congenital lesions that arise from paramedian cisterns within the posterior fossa. These tumors present as heterogeneous hyperintense lesions on FLAIR and homogenous hyperintense lesions on DWI. Surgical resection remains the most accepted form of therapy, but epidermoid tumors may recur. These tumors are well exposed through a traditional retrosigmoid approach. The tumor can be removed relatively easily as it is avascular. However, the propensity of this tumor type to fill the small spaces within basal cisterns and attach to cranial nerves may make its complete resection challenging. Tumors resection has to preserve the surrounding arachnoid membranes encasing the cranial nerves. The author presents the case of a 42-year-old woman with a 1-year history of imbalance and nystagmus. An MRI revealed a large right-sided CP angle epidermoid tumor filling the ventral brainstem cistern and extending to the contralateral side, compressing the brainstem. The accompanying video illustrates resection of this mass through an extended (exposing the sigmoid sinus) retrosigmoid approach. The author removed the tumor piecemeal while protecting the cranial nerves. Small pieces of affected arachnoid covering the cranial nerves were not significantly manipulated. To excise the tumor along the contralateral paramedian cistern, the author used the space between the V and VII/VII cranial nerves to expose the space contralateral to the basilar artery and remove additional tumor. This maneuver allowed gross total resection of the tumor without a need to employ a more elaborate skull base approach such as petrosectomy. At 3-month follow-up visit after surgery, the patient's neurological exam returned to normal. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/CzRb-GUvhog . PMID:24380510

  17. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods. PMID:25512768

  18. LICC: L-BLP25 in patients with colorectal carcinoma after curative resection of hepatic metastases--a randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational, double-blinded phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background 15-20% of all patients initially diagnosed with colorectal cancer develop metastatic disease and surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment available. Current 5-year survival following R0-resection of liver metastases is 28-39%, but recurrence eventually occurs in up to 70%. To date, adjuvant chemotherapy has not improved clinical outcomes significantly. The primary objective of the ongoing LICC trial (L-BLP25 In Colorectal Cancer) is to determine whether L-BLP25, an active cancer immunotherapy, extends recurrence-free survival (RFS) time over placebo in colorectal cancer patients following R0/R1 resection of hepatic metastases. L-BLP25 targets MUC1 glycoprotein, which is highly expressed in hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. In a phase IIB trial, L-BLP25 has shown acceptable tolerability and a trend towards longer survival in patients with stage IIIB locoregional NSCLC. Methods/Design This is a multinational, phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a sample size of 159 patients from 20 centers in 3 countries. Patients with stage IV colorectal adenocarcinoma limited to liver metastases are included. Following curative-intent complete resection of the primary tumor and of all synchronous/metachronous metastases, eligible patients are randomized 2:1 to receive either L-BLP25 or placebo. Those allocated to L-BLP25 receive a single dose of 300 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide (CP) 3 days before first L-BLP25 dose, then primary treatment with s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg once weekly for 8 weeks, followed by s.c. L-BLP25 930 μg maintenance doses at 6-week (years 1&2) and 12-week (year 3) intervals unless recurrence occurs. In the control arm, CP is replaced by saline solution and L-BLP25 by placebo. Primary endpoint is the comparison of recurrence-free survival (RFS) time between groups. Secondary endpoints are overall survival (OS) time, safety, tolerability, RFS/OS in MUC-1 positive cancers. Exploratory

  19. Lateral supracerebellar infratentorial approach for microsurgical resection of large midline pineal region tumors: techniques to expand the operative corridor.

    PubMed

    Kulwin, Charles; Matsushima, Ken; Malekpour, Mahdi; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2016-01-01

    Pineal region tumors pose certain challenges in regard to their resection: a deep surgical field, associated critical surrounding neurovascular structures, and narrow operative working corridor due to obstruction by the apex of the culmen. The authors describe a lateral supracerebellar infratentorial approach that was successfully used in the treatment of 10 large (> 3 cm) midline pineal region tumors. The patients were placed in a modified lateral decubitus position. A small lateral suboccipital craniotomy exposed the transverse sinus. Tentorial retraction sutures were used to gently rotate and elevate the transverse sinus to expand the lateral supracerebellar operative corridor. This approach placed only unilateral normal structures at risk and minimized vermian venous sacrifice. The surgeon achieved generous exposure of the caudal midline mesencephalon through a "cross-court" oblique trajectory, while avoiding excessive retraction on the culmen. All patients underwent the lateral approach with no approach-related complication. The final pathological diagnoses were consistent with meningioma in 3 cases, pilocytic astrocytoma in 3 cases, intermediate grade pineal region tumor in 2 cases, and pineoblastoma in 2 cases. The entire extent of these tumors was readily reachable through the lateral supracerebellar route. Gross-total resection was achieved in 8 (80%) of the 10 cases; in 2 cases (20%) near-total resection was performed due to adherence of these tumors to deep diencephalic veins. Large midline pineal region tumors can be removed through a unilateral paramedian suboccipital craniotomy. This approach is simple, may spare some of the midline vermian bridging veins, and may be potentially less invasive and more efficient. PMID:26275000

  20. Embolization of Hepatic Arterial Branches to Simplify Hepatic Blood Flow Before Yttrium 90 Radioembolization: A Useful Technique in the Presence of Challenging Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Karunanithy, Narayan; Gordon, Fabiana; Hodolic, Marina; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Wasan, Harpreet S.; Habib, Nagy; Tait, Nicholas P.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: In the presence of variant hepatic arterial anatomy, obtaining whole-liver coverage with yttrium 90 (Y90) radioembolization may be challenging. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a technique whereby variant hepatic arterial branches are embolized and then Y90 is administered selectively into one remaining hepatic arterial branch results in whole-liver coverage and effective therapy. A retrospective comparison of treatment response was made between a group of patients who underwent this technique before Y90 administration and a group of patients who received standard Y90 administration as a single dose into the proper hepatic artery or in divided doses into the immediate hepatic artery branches. The rest of the workup and treatment were identical in both groups, including routine embolization of potential nonhepatic, nontarget vessels (e.g., the gastroduodenal artery). Methods: A total of 32 patients (mean age 56.9 years, range 39-77 years) treated with Y90 between June 2004 and March 2008 were analyzed. The primary malignancy was colorectal in 29, breast in 2, and cholangiocarcinoma in 1. Group 1 comprised 20 patients who had no alterations to their hepatic arterial supply. Group 2 comprised 12 cases who had undergone prior embolization of hepatic arterial branches before administration of Y90. The response to treatment was assessed by comparing standardized uptake value (SUV) on the pre- and postprocedure fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic studies of representative lesions within the right and left lobes of the liver. Results: In group 1, significant response (P < 0.001) was seen among right lobe lesions but not among left lobe lesions (P = 0.549). In group 2, there was a significant response among both right (P = 0.028) and left (P = 0.014) lobe lesions. No difference was found in the response of right lobe lesions (P = 0.726) between groups 1 and 2; a significantly greater response was found in group 2 compared to group 1 (P

  1. Stereotactic Irradiation of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastasis: A Frameless Linear Accelerator-Based Case Series and Review of the Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Paul J.; Alexander, Brian M.; Hacker, Fred; Marcus, Karen J.; Weiss, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is the standard of care after resection of a brain metastasis. However, concern regarding possible neurocognitive effects and the lack of survival benefit with this approach has led to the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the resection cavity in place of WBRT. We report our initial experience using an image-guided linear accelerator-based frameless stereotactic system and review the technical issues in applying this technique. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the setup accuracy, treatment outcome, and patterns of failure of the first 18 consecutive cases treated at Brigham and Women's Hospital. The target volume was the resection cavity without a margin excluding the surgical track. Results: The median number of brain metastases per patient was 1 (range, 1-3). The median planning target volume was 3.49 mL. The median prescribed dose was 18 Gy (range, 15-18 Gy) with normalization ranging from 68% to 85%. In all cases, 99% of the planning target volume was covered by the prescribed dose. The median conformity index was 1.6 (range, 1.41-1.92). The SRS was delivered with submillimeter accuracy. At a median follow-up of 12.7 months, local control was achieved in 16/18 cavities treated. True local recurrence occurred in 2 patients. No marginal failures occurred. Distant recurrence occurred in 6/17 patients. Median time to any failure was 7.4 months. No Grade 3 or higher toxicity was recorded. A long interval between initial cancer diagnosis and the development of brain metastasis was the only factor that trended toward a significant association with the absence of recurrence (local or distant) (log-rank p = 0.097). Conclusions: Frameless stereotactic irradiation of the resection cavity after surgery for a brain metastasis is a safe and accurate technique that offers durable local control and defers the use of WBRT in select patients. This technique should be tested in larger prospective studies.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Quantitative Diagnosis Technique for Hepatic Fibrosis Using Ultrasonic Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koriyama, Atsushi; Yasuhara, Wataru; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-01

    Since clinical diagnosis using ultrasonic B-mode images depends on the skill of the doctor, the realization of a quantitative diagnosis method using an ultrasound echo signal is highly required. We have been investigating a quantitative diagnosis technique, mainly for hepatic disease. In this paper, we present the basic experimental evaluation results on the accuracy of the proposed quantitative diagnosis technique for hepatic fibrosis by using a simple ultrasonic phantom. As a region of interest crossed on the boundary between two scatterer areas with different densities in a phantom, we can simulate the change of the echo amplitude distribution from normal tissue to fibrotic tissue in liver disease. The probability density function is well approximated by our fibrosis distribution model that is a mixture of normal and fibrotic tissue. The fibrosis parameters of the amplitude distribution model can be estimated relatively well at a mixture rate from 0.2 to 0.6. In the inversion processing, the standard deviation of the estimated fibrosis results at mixture ratios of less than 0.2 and larger than 0.6 are relatively large. Although the probability density is not large at high amplitude, the estimated variance ratio and mixture rate of the model are strongly affected by higher amplitude data.

  3. Hepatic artery injury during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastasis treated by portal vein arterialization

    PubMed Central

    Hokuto, Daisuke; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been applied as a salvage procedure in hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries, including transplantation and liver resection, with revascularization for malignancies. Here we describe the use PVA as a salvage procedure following accidental injury of the hepatic artery to the remnant liver occurred during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). A 60-year-old man with cancer of the sigmoid colon and initially unresectable CRLM received 11 cycles of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (1500 mg/week), after which CRLM was downstaged to resectable. One month after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, a left trisectionectomy and wedge resection of segment 6 were performed. The posterior branch of the right hepatic artery, the only feeding artery to the remnant liver, was injured and totally dissected. Because microsurgical reconstruction of the artery was impossible, PVA was used; PVA is the sole known procedure available when hepatic artery reconstruction is impossible. The patient then suffered portal hypertension, and closure of arterio-portal anastomosis using an interventional technique with angiography was eventually performed on postoperative day 73. Therefore, it is considered that because PVA is associated with severe postoperative portal hypertension, closure of the arterio-portal shunt should be performed as soon as possible on diagnosing portal hypertension. PMID:26197094

  4. Hepatic artery injury during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastasis treated by portal vein arterialization.

    PubMed

    Hokuto, Daisuke; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been applied as a salvage procedure in hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries, including transplantation and liver resection, with revascularization for malignancies. Here we describe the use PVA as a salvage procedure following accidental injury of the hepatic artery to the remnant liver occurred during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). A 60-year-old man with cancer of the sigmoid colon and initially unresectable CRLM received 11 cycles of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (1500mg/week), after which CRLM was downstaged to resectable. One month after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, a left trisectionectomy and wedge resection of segment 6 were performed. The posterior branch of the right hepatic artery, the only feeding artery to the remnant liver, was injured and totally dissected. Because microsurgical reconstruction of the artery was impossible, PVA was used; PVA is the sole known procedure available when hepatic artery reconstruction is impossible. The patient then suffered portal hypertension, and closure of arterio-portal anastomosis using an interventional technique with angiography was eventually performed on postoperative day 73. Therefore, it is considered that because PVA is associated with severe postoperative portal hypertension, closure of the arterio-portal shunt should be performed as soon as possible on diagnosing portal hypertension. PMID:26197094

  5. Novel Technique for Hepatic Fiducial Marker Placement for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarraya, Hajer; Chalayer, Chloé; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Bonodeau, Francois; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mirabel, Xavier; Boulanger, Thomas; Taieb, Sophie; Kramar, Andrew; Lartigau, Eric; Ceugnart, Luc

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report experience with fiducial marker insertion and describe an advantageous, novel technique for fiducial placement in the liver for stereotactic body radiation therapy with respiratory tracking. Methods and Materials: We implanted 1444 fiducials (single: 834; linked: 610) in 328 patients with 424 hepatic lesions. Two methods of implantation were compared: the standard method (631 single fiducials) performed on 153 patients from May 2007 to May 2010, and the cube method (813 fiducials: 610 linked/203 single) applied to 175 patients from April 2010 to March 2013. The standard method involved implanting a single marker at a time. The novel technique entailed implanting 2 pairs of linked markers when possible in a way to occupy the perpendicular edges of a cube containing the tumor inside. Results: Mean duration of the cube method was shorter than the standard method (46 vs 61 minutes; P<.0001). Median numbers of skin and subcapsular entries were significantly smaller with the cube method (2 vs 4, P<.0001, and 2 vs 4, P<.0001, respectively). The rate of overall complications (total, major, and minor) was significantly lower in the cube method group compared with the standard method group (5.7% vs 13.7%; P=.013). Major complications occurred while using single markers only. The success rate was 98.9% for the cube method and 99.3% for the standard method. Conclusions: We propose a new technique of hepatic fiducial implantation that makes use of linked fiducials and involves fewer skin entries and shorter time of implantation. The technique is less complication-prone and is migration-resistant.

  6. Fat graft-assisted internal auditory canal closure after retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma: Technique for prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Azad, Tareq; Mendelson, Zachary S; Wong, Anni; Jyung, Robert W; Liu, James K

    2016-02-01

    The retrosigmoid transmeatal approach remains an important strategy in the surgical management of acoustic neuromas. Gross total resection of acoustic neuromas requires removal of tumor within the cerebellopontine angle as well as tumor involving the internal auditory canal (IAC). Drilling into the petrous bone of the IAC can expose petrous air cells, which can potentially result in a fistulous tract to the nasopharynx manifesting as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. We describe our method of IAC closure using autologous fat graft and assessed the rates of postoperative CSF leakage. We performed a retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients who underwent retrosigmoid transmeatal resection of acoustic neuroma who underwent our method of fat graft-assisted IAC closure. We assessed rates of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, and occurrence of meningitis. Twenty-four patients (10 males, 14 females) with a mean age of 47 years (range 18-84) underwent fat graft-assisted IAC closure. No lumbar drains were used postoperatively. There were no instances of postoperative CSF leak (incisional leak, rhinorrhea, or otorrhea), pseudomeningocele formation, or occurrence of meningitis. There were no graft site complications. Our results demonstrate that autologous fat grafts provide a safe and effective method of IAC defect closure to prevent postoperative CSF leakage after acoustic tumor removal via a retrosigmoid transmeatal approach. The surgical technique and operative nuances are described. PMID:26482457

  7. Kinematic resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Fergal P.

    1995-01-01

    A new geometric formulation is given for the problem of determining position and orientation of a satellite scanner from error-prone ground control point observations in linear pushbroom imagery. The pushbroom satellite resection problem is significantly more complicated than that of the conventional frame camera because of irregular platform motion throughout the image capture period. Enough ephemeris data are typically available to reconstruct satellite trajectory and hence the interior orientation of the pushbroom imagery. The new approach to resection relies on the use of reconstructed scanner interior orientation to determine the relative orientations of a bundle of image rays. The absolute position and orientation which allows this bundle to minimize its distance from a corresponding set of ground control points may then be found. The interior orientation is represented as a kinematic chain of screw motions, implemented as dual-number quaternions. The motor algebra is used in the analysis since it provides a means of line, point, and motion manipulation. Its moment operator provides a metric of distance between the image ray and the ground control point.

  8. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma as a shielding technique after endoscopic mucosal resection in rat and porcine models

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Boix, Jaume; Moreno de Vega, Vicente; Bon, Ignacio; Marín, Ingrid; Bartolí, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The aims were to assess the efficacy of endoscopic application of Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to prevent delayed perforation and to induce mucosal healing after endoscopic resections. Patients and methods: Colonic induced lesions were performed in rats (n = 16) and pigs (n = 4). Animals were randomized to receive onto the lesions saline (control) or PRP. Animals underwent endoscopic follow-up. Thermal injury was assessed with a 1 – 4 scale: (1) mucosal necrosis; (2) submucosal necrosis; (3) muscularis propria necrosis; and (4) serosal necrosis Results: Saline treatment showed 50 % of mortality in rats (P = 0.02). Mean ulcerated area after 48 hours and 7 days was significantly smaller with PRP than with saline (0.27 ± 0.02 cm2 and 0.08 ± 0.01 cm2 vs. 0.56 ± 0.1 cm2 and 0.40 ± 0.06 cm2; P < 0.001). The incidence of thermal injury was significantly lower with PRP (1.25 ± 0.46) than in controls (2.25 ± 0.50); P = 0.006. The porcine model showed a trend toward higher mucosal restoration in animals treated with PRP than with saline at weeks 1 and 2 (Median area in cm2: 0.55 and 0.40 vs. 1.32 and 0.79) Conclusions: Application of PRP to colonic mucosal lesions showed strong healing properties in rat and porcine models. PMID:27540573

  9. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery using a homemade transumbilical port for synchronous colon and hepatic lesions: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuang-Wei; Hsiao, Koung-Hong; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lai, Chieh-Wen

    2013-08-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is an emerging technique and has been utilized in various abdominal surgeries. Herein, we reported a case of synchronous colon and hepatic lesions that underwent right hemicolectomy and wedge resection of the liver by SILS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of synchronous colon and liver resection with SILS using homemade transumbilical port. PMID:23917608

  10. Initial experience of surgical microwave tissue precoagulation in liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic liver.

    PubMed

    Abdelraouf, A; Hamdy, H; El Erian, A M; Elsebae, M; Taha, S; Elshafey, H E; Ismail, S; Hassany, M

    2014-08-01

    Surgical hepatic resection has been considered as the first-line treatment which is most effective and radical treatment for HCC, however, HCC is usually associated with poor liver function owing to chronic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis. Techniques that can eradicate the tumor and also preserve liver function are needed. Moreover, hepatic resection, in the presence of cirrhosis, raises special problem of high risk as hemorrhage and liver failure, thus, good clinical results can only be achieved by minimizing operative blood loss, time of the intervention as well as the hepatic reserve. The tremendous progress in microwave technology has recently attracted considerable attention. This study evaluated the feasibility of this new liver transection technique demonstrating the high performance of this procedure, the accuracy in terms of squeeze effect on veins and portal branch and in terms of reducing the intra operative blood loss, and minimizing the operative time for safe hepatectomy. Twenty-six consecutive patients a first-time diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on top of liver cirrhosis were recruited for the study, from August 2011 to January 2013. All patients were subjected to full clinical examination, laboratory investigations, abdomen ultrasound (U/S), triphasic computed tomographic liver scan (CT) and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in some doubtful cases. Inclusion requirements were presence of resectable disease without vascular invasion or extrahepatic spread at imaging, Child-Pugh class A & B (Score 7) liver cirrhosis, (INR) < 1.6 or platelet count) 60 000/mm3 with no previous treatment. Patients were treated by applying pre-coagulation of the liver transection lines using microwave probe positioned in parallel to the line of resection by open approach after intra-operative U/S assessment for localization of the tumor and line of resection. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia. Mobilization of the liver was not

  11. Precise control of caval and hepatic vessels: Surgical technique to treat level III caval thrombus concomitant to renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Bin; Liu, Ning; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Yiduo; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Chao; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Weidong; Chen, Shuqiu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the surgical techniques, safety, and prevention of complications of nephrectomy and removal of tumour thrombus for treating level III inferior vena cava (IVC) concomitant to renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We did this by precise controlling IVC and hepatic vessels without a vascular bypass. Methods: In this series, we included 5 patients with level III IVC tumour thrombus below the hepatic vein concomitant to RCC. After precisely controlling the IVC and hepatic vessels, we then removed the thrombus en bloc with the renal vein. Blood loss volume, IVC clamping time, hypotension time, resuscitation, cardiocerebrovascular complications, and postoperative organ dysfunction were observed. Results: Surgery was successfully performed without perioperative death. Blood loss volume was 900 to 1500 mL, operation time was 165 to 250 minutes, vascular clamping time was 8 to 12 minutes, and intraoperative hypotension time was 9 to 12 minutes. Serious perioperative complications were not observed. Local recurrence was not observed during the 9 to 24 months of follow-up. One patient exhibited disease-free survival, 3 developed lung or liver metastasis, and 1 died 11 months after surgery. Conclusion: Precise control of IVC and hepatic pedicle vessels, without vascular bypass, is a safe and effective surgical treatment for level III tumor thrombus below the hepatic vein concomitant to RCC. The procedure was conducted without increased risks of intraoperative hypotensive shock, difficult resuscitation, pulmonary embolism, and multiple organ dysfunctions. PMID:26600890

  12. Robotic suture of a large caval injury caused by endo-GIA stapler malfunction during laparoscopic wedge resection of liver segments VII and VIII en-bloc with the right hepatic vein.

    PubMed

    Boggi, Ugo; Moretto, Carlo; Vistoli, Fabio; D'Imporzano, Simone; Mosca, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Primary endo-GIA stapler malfunction occurred during robotic wedge resection of liver segments VII and VIII en-bloc with the right hepatic vein, in an obese woman diagnosed with single liver metastasis from a previous carcinoid tumour. Haemorrhage was soon controlled by clamping the vena cava below the injury using two wristed forceps angled at 90 degrees . With the two instruments locked in the holding position the ensuing operative strategy was discussed between surgeon and anaesthesia teams. Using the third robotic arm the caval injury was repaired laparoscopically with interrupted polypropylene sutures. The patient was transfused with two units of packed red blood cells, recovered uneventfully, and was discharged on post-operative day five. We conclude that even the most advanced technologies can fail and that surgeons should be fully aware of the consequences of these malfunctions and be prepared for repair. From this point of view, the da Vinci surgical system seems to have some advantages over classical laparoscopic methods including the ability to lock the wristed instruments in the holding position, the use of three arms by the same operating surgeon, and the extreme facilitation of intracorporeal suturing and knot-tying in deep and narrow spaces, extremely difficult if not impossible with conventional laparoscopic instruments. PMID:19707931

  13. Visualizing the hepatic vascular architecture using superb microvascular imaging in patients with hepatitis C virus: A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Hidekatsu; Abe, Tamami; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Yudai; Yoshida, Yuichi; Miyasaka, Akio; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Ishida, Hideaki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the hepatic vascular architecture of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) using superb microvascular imaging (SMI) and investigate the use of SMI in the evaluation of liver fibrosis. METHODS: SMI was performed in 100 HCV patients. SMI images were classified into five types according to the vascular pattern, and these patterns were compared with the fibrosis stage. Moreover, the images were analyzed to examine vascularity by integrating the number of SMI signals in the region of interest ROI [number of vascular trees (VT)]. The number of VT, fibrosis stage, serum parameters of liver function, and CD34 expression were investigated. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between SMI distribution pattern and fibrosis stage (P < 0.001). The mean VT values in each of the fibrosis stages were as follows: 26.69 ± 7.08 in F0, 27.72 ± 9.32 in F1, 36.74 ± 9.23 in F2, 37.36 ± 5.32 in F3, and 58.14 ± 14.08 in F4. The VT showed excellent diagnostic ability for F4 [area under the receiver operator characteristic (AUROC): 0.911]. The VT was significantly correlated with the CD34 labeling index (r = 0.617, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: SMI permitted the detailed delineation of the vascular architecture in chronic liver disease. SMI appears to be a reliable tool for noninvasively detecting significant fibrosis or cirrhosis in HCV patients. PMID:27468197

  14. Resection interposition arthroplasty for failed distal ulna resections.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Rubright, James H; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2013-02-01

    The major complications of distal ulna resection, the Darrach procedure, are radioulnar impingement and instability. High failure rates have been reported despite published modifications of the Darrach procedure. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat this difficult problem and to mitigate the symptoms associated with painful convergence and impingement. No technique has demonstrated clinical superiority. Recently, implant arthroplasty of the distal ulna has been endorsed as an option for the management of the symptomatic patient with a failed distal ulna resection. However, there are concerns for implant longevity, especially in young, active adults. Resection interposition arthroplasty relies on interposition of an Achilles tendon allograft between the distal radius and the resected distal ulna. Although this technique does not restore normal mechanics of the distal radioulnar joint, it can prevent painful convergence of the radius on the ulna. Achilles allograft interposition arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective alternative for failed distal ulna resections, especially for young, active patients, in whom an implant or alternative procedure may not be appropriate. PMID:24436784

  15. Postoperative pain relief after hepatic resection in cirrhotic patients: the efficacy of a single small dose of ketamine plus morphine epidurally.

    PubMed

    Taurá, Pilar; Fuster, Josep; Blasi, Anabel; Martinez-Ocon, Julia; Anglada, Teresa; Beltran, Joan; Balust, Jaume; Tercero, Javier; Garcia-Valdecasas, Juan-Carlos

    2003-02-01

    In cirrhotic patients undergoing hepatic surgery, postoperative analgesia remains a challenge. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a single dose of morphine combined with small-dose ketamine given epidurally for postoperative pain relief. One-hundred-four classification "Child A" cirrhotic patients were randomly assigned to two groups: 1) (MKG, n = 54): epidural morphine (3.5-5 mg) plus ketamine (20/30 mg); and 2) epidural morphine (3.5/5 mg) (MG, n = 50). The level of analgesia, side effects, psychomimetic and neurological disorders, additional analgesic needs, and overall quality of the analgesia were recorded. The mean duration of analgesia was longer in the MKG group (27.2 +/- 8 h versus 16.4 +/- 10 h; P < 0.05). In the MKG group, the visual analog scale (VAS) score began to be significantly lower from 14 h at rest and 12 h on coughing until the end of the study. The need for additional analgesia was also smaller in the MKG group (P < 0.05): at 24 h, only 10% of patients in the MKG group needed complementary analgesia, whereas in the MG group it was 100% (P = 0.003). Side effects were similar in both groups. Psychomimetic side effects and neurological disorders were not detected. These results suggest that postoperative analgesia provided by a single dose of epidural morphine with small-dose ketamine is effective in cirrhotic Child's A patients having major upper abdominal surgery. PMID:12538199

  16. CD44 variant 9 is a potential biomarker of tumor initiating cells predicting survival outcome in hepatitis C virus-positive patients with resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kakehashi, Anna; Ishii, Naomi; Sugihara, Eiji; Gi, Min; Saya, Hideyuki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether the expression of CD44 variant 9 (CD44v9) might be a functional marker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells in primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV)(+) patients and provide an indicator of patient survival, as well as associated mechanisms. A total of 90 HCV(+) HCC patients who underwent surgery from 2006 to 2011 were enrolled and monitored for 2-8 years. Expression of CD44v9 was validated immunohistochemically in all HCCs, followed by comparative proteome, survival, and clinicopathological analyses. CD44 variant 8--10 was further evaluated in diethylnitrosamine-induced HCCs of C57Bl/6J mice. Focally localized CD44v(+) cells with a membranous staining pattern were detected in human HCV(+) and mouse HCCs. CD44v9(+) cells of HCCs were predominantly negative for Ki67 and P-p38, indicating decrease of cell proliferation in the CD44v9(+) tumor cell population, likely to be related to suppression of intracellular oxidative stress due to activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling, DNA repair, and inhibition of xenobiotic metabolism. CD44v9 IHC evaluation in 90 HCV(+) HCC cases revealed that positive expression was significantly associated with poor overall and recurrence-free survival, a younger age, poor histological differentiation of HCCs, and high alkaline phosphatase levels compared with patients with negative expression. CD44v9 is concluded to be a potential biomarker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells and a prognostic marker in HCV(+) HCC patients associated with Nrf2-mediated resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:26882440

  17. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  18. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-08-21

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  19. Hepatic Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury and Trauma: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Siempis, Thomas; Theodorakou, Eleni; Tsoulfas, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Context Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a fascinating topic which has drawn a lot of interest in the last several years. Hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury may occur in a variety of clinical situations. These include transplantation, liver resection, trauma, and vascular surgery. Evidence Acquisition The purpose of this review was to outline the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatic I/R injury and present the latest approaches, both surgical and pharmacological, regarding the prevention of it. A comprehensive electronic literature search in MEDLINE/PubMed was performed to identify relative articles published within the last 2 years. Results The basic mechanism of hepatic ischemia – reperfusion injury is one of blood deprivation during ischemia, followed by the return of flow during reperfusion. It involves a complex series of events, such as mitochondrial deenergization, adenosine-5'-triphosphate depletion, alterations of electrolyte homeostasis, as well as Kupffer cell activation, oxidative stress changes and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling. The great number of variable pathways, with several mediators interacting with each other, leads to a high number of candidates for potential therapeutic intervention. As far as surgical approaches are concerned, the modification of existing clamping techniques and the ischemic preconditioning are the most promising techniques till recently. In the search for novel techniques of protecting against hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury, many different strategies have been used in experimental models. The biggest part of this research lies around antioxidant therapy, but other potential solutions have been explored as well. Conclusions The management of hepatic trauma, in spite of the fact that it has become increasingly nonoperative, there still remains the possibility of hepatic resection in the hepatic trauma setting, especially in severe injuries. Hence, clinicians should be familiar with the concept of

  20. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  1. Complications Following Carinal Resections and Sleeve Resections.

    PubMed

    Tapias, Luis F; Ott, Harald C; Mathisen, Douglas J

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary resections with concomitant circumferential airway resection and resection and reconstruction of carina and main stem bronchi remain challenging operations in thoracic surgery. Anastomotic complications range from mucosal sloughing and formation of granulation tissue, anastomotic ischemia promoting scar formation and stricture, to anastomotic breakdown leading to bronchopleural or bronchovascular fistulae or complete dehiscence. Careful attention to patient selection and technical detail results in acceptable morbidity and mortality as well as good long-term survival. In this article, we focus on the technical details of the procedures, how to avoid complications and most importantly how to manage complications when they occur. PMID:26515944

  2. [Treatment of refractory hepatic encephalopathy associated with insertion of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt through new endovascular techniques: a case report].

    PubMed

    Martínez Moreno, Belén; Bellot, Pablo; de España, Francisco; Palazón, José María; Such, José; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Insertion of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is an increasingly used treatment in the management of the complications of portal hypertension. However, one of the complications of this technique is refractory or recurrent hepatic encephalopathy, which poses a difficult clinical problem. We report the case of a patient who underwent TIPS insertion to control bleeding due to esophageal varices. The patient subsequently developed refractory hepatic encephalopathy, requiring reduction of the caliber of the shunt. PMID:21652116

  3. Irreversible Electroporation of Hepatic and Pancreatic Malignancies: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Beicos, Aldo; Venkat, Shree; Songrug, Tanakorn; Poveda, Julio; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica; Poozhikunnath Mohan, Prasoon; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-09-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel therapy that has shown to be a feasible and promising alternative to conventional ablative techniques when treating tumors near vital structures or blood vessels. The clinical efficacy of IRE has been evaluated using established imaging criteria. This study evaluates the histologic and imaging response of hepatic and pancreatic malignancies that were surgically resected after IRE. In total, 12 lesions ablated with IRE were included, including 3 pancreatic carcinomas, 5 primary tumors of the liver, and 4 metastatic tumors of the liver. The rate of complete response to IRE was 25% based on the histologic evaluation of the resected tumors. Although treatment-related vessel wall changes were noted in several cases in histologic findings, there was no evidence of vascular luminal narrowing or obliteration in any of the specimens. The imaging response to IRE before surgical resection usually resulted in underestimation of disease burden when compared with the histologic response seen on the resected specimens. PMID:26365548

  4. Novel technique for full-thickness resection of gastric malignancy: feasibility of nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (news) in porcine models.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takashi; Goto, Osamu; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Hatao, Fumihiko; Wada, Ikuo; Niimi, Keiko; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Fujishiro, Mitsuihiro; Koike, Kazuhiko; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2013-12-01

    Full-thickness resection for gastric malignancy carries a risk of peritoneal dissemination due to opening of the gastric lumen. We evaluated the feasibility and safety a novel method of full-thickness resection without transmural communication, called nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery in ex vivo and in vivo porcine models. Six explanted porcine stomachs and 6 live pigs were used for this study. After marking and submucosal injection around 3 cm simulated lesions, the seromuscular layer was laparoscopically cut and sutured with the lesion inverted to the inside. Consecutively, a mucosubmucosal incision was made endoscopically. Three pigs used for the survival study were monitored for 7 days. All 12 lesions were successfully resected en bloc without perforation. The 3 pigs survived for 1 week without adverse events, and necropsy revealed neither leakage nor abscess formation related to the operation. We demonstrated nonexposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery to be technically feasible and safe in both ex vivo and in vivo porcine studies. PMID:24300935

  5. Limits of Surgical Resection for Bile Duct Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Fabian; Heinrich, Stefan; Lang, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma is the most frequent cholangiocarcinoma and poses difficulties in preoperative evaluation. For its therapy, often major hepatic resections as well as resection and reconstruction of the hepatic artery or the portal vein are necessary. In the last decades, great advances were made in both the surgical procedures and the perioperative anesthetic management. In this article, we describe from our point of view which facts represent the limits for curative (R0) resection in perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods Retrospective data of a 6-year period (2008-2014) was collected in an SPSS 22 database and further analyzed with focus on the surgical approach and the postoperative as well as histological results. Results Out of 96 patients in total we were able to intend a curative resection in 73 patients (76%). In 58/73 (79.5%) resections an R0 situation could be reached (R1 n = 14; R2 n = 1). 23 patients were irresectable because of peritoneal carcinosis (n = 8), broad infiltration of major blood vessels (n = 8), bilateral advanced tumor growth to the intrahepatic bile ducts (n = 3), infiltration of the complete liver hilum (n = 2), infiltration of the gallbladder (n = 1), and liver cirrhosis (n = 1). Patients with a T4 stadium were treated with curative intention twice, and in each case an R1 resection was achieved. Most patients with irresectable tumors can be suspected to have a T4 stadium as well. In a T3 situation (n = 6) we could establish five R0 resections and one R1 resection. Conclusion The limit of surgical resection for bile duct cancer is the advanced tumor stage (T stadium). While in a T3 stadium an R0 resection is possible in most cases, we were not able to perform an R0 resection in a T4 stadium. From our point of view, early T stadium cannot usually be estimated through expanded diagnostics but only through surgical exploration. PMID:26468314

  6. “Curettage and aspiration dissection technique” using PMOD for liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, S. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims. To introduce a special dissection technique named “Curettage and Aspiration Dissection Technique” (CADT) using a versatile instrument called Peng's Multifunction Operative Dissector (PMOD) for liver resection. PMOD is an electrosurgical pencil with an inline suction, bearing four functions: electric cutting, coagulation, aspiration and dissection, The above-mentioned functions can be achieved simultaneously or sequentially during liver resection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this technique and the special electrosurgical device in hepatic surgery. Patients and methods. From June 2005 to December 2006, 70 consecutive patients with segmentectomy or major hepatectomy were performed with this dissection technique by the same surgeon. Peri-operative data and the technical aspect of this device and dissection technique for various types of liver resection were summarised. Results. Forty-nine of 70 cases with various degrees of cirrhosis. Median blood loss were 470 ml (100–2400 ml), the bleeding and mortality within one month postoperatively was zero. There were postoperative complications in 20 patients: bile leak occurred in five cases, nine cases with right pleural effusion and six with ascites. No relative complications with this method were found. Conclusion. The CADT and PMOD can achieve better dissection and hemostasis. It possible is a much more valuable alternative to other devices currently used for liver surgery. PMID:18773106

  7. The Outdoor Rapid Calibration Technique and Realization of Nonmetric Digital Camera Based on the Method of Multi-Image Dlt and Resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Zhang; Jian-jing, Shen; Meng-qing, Sun

    2016-06-01

    For non-metric CCD digital camera features and the needs of Rapid field non-metric cameras calibration, the error sources was detailed analyzed and a mathematical calibration model has been founded. Both detailed multi-image group iterative method for solving DLT coefficient, the elements of interior orientation and distortion parameters of lens and the multi-image resection method for solving the elements of interior orientation, elements of exterior orientation and distortion parameters of lens have been discussed. A standard steel cage (e.g. Figure 1) has been made for real calibrating non-metric cameras outdoor quickly. In order to verify the accuracy, each method mentioned has been used to solve elements of interior orientation and distortion parameters with the same camera (e.g. Figure 2) and the same test images. The results of accuracy show that the maximum X error was 0.2585mm, the maximum Y error was 0.6719mm and the maximum Z error was 0.1319mm by using multi-image DLT algorithm. On the other hand, the maximum X error was 0.1914mm, the maximum Y error was 0.9808mm and the maximum Z error was 0.1453mm by using multi-image resection algorithm. The forward intersection accuracy of the two methods was quite, and the both were less than 1mm. By using multi-image DLT algorithm the planimetric accuracy was less than 0.2585mm and the height accuracy was less than 0.6719mm. On the other hand, by using multi-image resection algorithm the planimetric accuracy was less than 0.1914mm and the height accuracy was less than 0.9808mm. The planimetric accuracy of resection algorithm was the better than DLT algorithm, but the elevation accuracy of DLT algorithm was the better than resection algorithm. In summary both method can be accepted for nonmetric camera calibration. But also the solver accuracy in the inner orientation elements and distortion parameters was not very high has been noted. However for non-metric camera, the true value of inner orientation elements and

  8. New Method of Parent Catheter Advancement in the Balloon Anchor Technique during Balloon-Occluded Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Kei; Tahara, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Suguru; Koyama, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Balloon-occluded transarterial chemoembolization (B-TACE) using a microballoon catheter is a promising method for improvement of lipiodol emulsion accumulation and local control relative to conventional transarterial chemoembolization. This method has been referred to as the balloon anchor technique in previous reports. We report a new technique for successful parent catheter advancement for achievement of stable backup for the selective insertion of a microballoon catheter during B-TACE using the microballoon as an anchor, even in patients with tortuous anatomy of the hepatic and celiac arteries. Deep cannulation of parent catheters was accomplished in all three cases and complications such as vascular injury were not observed in the postprocedure angiograms. PMID:27340582

  9. Atypical as well as anatomical liver resections are feasible by laparoendoscopic single-site surgery☆

    PubMed Central

    Tzanis, Dimitrios; Lainas, Panagiotis; Tranchart, Hadrien; Pourcher, Guillaume; Devaquet, Niaz; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Naveau, Sylvie; Dagher, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Liver surgery was one of the last fields to be conquered by laparoscopy, which has become safe and effective, especially for left lateral sectionectomy (LLS) and limited peripheral resections. However, major hepatectomies remain challenging. Laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery is being employed for an increasing variety of surgical sites and indications. PRESENTATION OF CASE Three patients underwent LESS hepatectomy. A 36-year-old woman had LLS for a 38-mm adenoma, an 85-year-old woman an atypical resection of segment VI for a 12-mm hepatocellular carcinoma and a 41-year-old woman an atypical right anterior resection for a 9 cm symptomatic FNH. Procedures were performed transperitoneally with a single-port device, via a 20-mm or 30-mm incision. Operative times were 110 min for LLS, 100 min for the atypical segment VI resection and 120 min for the atypical right anterior liver resection. Blood loss was less than 50 ml in the first two patients and 150 ml in the third. Postoperative courses were uneventful. The first two patients were discharged on postoperative day 3 and the third on postoperative day 1. DISCUSSION To date, some case reports and series of LESS liver surgery have been published. We performed the reported hepatectomies after a considerable experience in laparoscopic hepatic surgery and after applying the LESS approach to other procedures. Our hepatectomy technique was not modified by the use of the single-port and results were very encouraging. CONCLUSION We believe that in selected patients, both peripheral resections and LLS are feasible by LESS surgery, with good intra-operative and post-operative results. PMID:25108073

  10. Laparoscopic hepatectomy is theoretically better than open hepatectomy: preparing for the 2nd International Consensus Conference on Laparoscopic Liver Resection.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Go; Cherqui, Daniel; Geller, David A; Han, Ho-Seong; Kaneko, Hironori; Buell, Joseph F

    2014-10-01

    Six years have passed since the first International Consensus Conference on Laparoscopic Liver Resection was held. This comparatively new surgical technique has evolved since then and is rapidly being adopted worldwide. We compared the theoretical differences between open and laparoscopic liver resection, using right hepatectomy as an example. We also searched the Cochrane Library using the keyword "laparoscopic liver resection." The papers retrieved through the search were reviewed, categorized, and applied to the clinical questions that will be discussed at the 2nd Consensus Conference. The laparoscopic hepatectomy procedure is more difficult to master than the open hepatectomy procedure because of the movement restrictions imposed upon us when we operate from outside the body cavity. However, good visibility of the operative field around the liver, which is located beneath the costal arch, and the magnifying provide for neat transection of the hepatic parenchyma. Another theoretical advantage is that pneumoperitoneum pressure reduces hemorrhage from the hepatic vein. The literature search turned up 67 papers, 23 of which we excluded, leaving only 44. Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are underway, but their results are yet to be published. Most of the studies (n = 15) concerned short-term results, with some addressing long-term results (n = 7), cost (n = 6), energy devices (n = 4), and so on. Laparoscopic hepatectomy is theoretically superior to open hepatectomy in terms of good visibility of the operative field due to the magnifying effect and reduced hemorrhage from the hepatic vein due to pneumoperitoneum pressure. However, there is as yet no evidence from previous studies to back this up in terms of short-term and long-term results. The 2nd International Consensus Conference on Laparoscopic Liver Resection will arrive at a consensus on the basis of the best available evidence, with video presentations focusing on surgical techniques and the publication

  11. Liver resection for colorectal liver metastases with peri-operative chemotherapy: oncological results of R1 resections

    PubMed Central

    Eveno, Clarisse; Karoui, Mehdi; Gayat, Etienne; Luciani, Alain; Auriault, Marie-Luce; Kluger, Michael D; Baumgaertner, Isabelle; Baranes, Laurence; Laurent, Alexis; Tayar, Claude; Azoulay, Daniel; Cherqui, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background Retrospective analysis of outcomes of R0 (negative margin) versus R1 (positive margin) liver resections for colorectal metastases (CLM) in the context of peri-operative chemotherapy. Methods All CLM resections between 2000 and 2006 were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included: macroscopically incomplete (R2) resections, the use of local treatment modalities, the presence of extra-hepatic disease and no peri-operative chemotherapy. R0/R1 status was based on pathological examination. Results Of 86 eligible patients, 63 (73%) had R0 and 23 (27%) had R1 resections. The two groups were comparable for the number, size of metastases and type of hepatectomy. The R1 group had more bilobar CLM (52% versus 24%, P = 0.018). The median follow-up was 3.1 years. Five-year overall and disease-free survival were 54% and 21% for the R0 group and 49% and 22% for the R1 group (P = 0.55 and P = 0.39, respectively). An intra-hepatic recurrence was more frequent in the R1 group (52% versus 27%, P = 0.02) and occurred more frequently at the surgical margin (22% versus 3%, P = 0.01). Discussion R1 resections were associated with a higher risk of intra-hepatic and surgical margin recurrence but did not negatively impact survival suggesting that in the era of efficient chemotherapy, the risk of an R1 resection should not be considered as a contraindication to surgery. PMID:23458567

  12. Laparoscopic liver resection for malignancy: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalili, Eyas; Berber, Eren

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To review the published literature about laparoscopic liver resection for malignancy. METHODS: A PubMed search was performed for original published studies until June 2013 and original series containing at least 30 patients were reviewed. RESULTS: All forms of hepatic resections have been described ranging from simple wedge resections to extended right or left hepatectomies. The usual approach is pure laparoscopic, but hand-assisted, as well as robotic approaches have been described. Most studies showed comparable results to open resection in terms of operative blood loss, postoperative morbidity and mortality. Many of them showed decreased postoperative pain, shorter hospital stays, and even lower costs. Oncological results including resection margin status and long-term survival were not inferior to open resection. CONCLUSION: In the hands of experienced surgeons, laparoscopic liver resection for malignant lesions is safe and offers some short-term advantages over open resection. Oncologically, similar survival rates have been observed in patients treated with the laparoscopic approach when compared to their open resection counterparts. PMID:25309091

  13. Quantification of Hepatic Vascular and Parenchymal Regeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chichi; Schwen, Lars Ole; Wei, Weiwei; Schenk, Andrea; Zafarnia, Sara; Gremse, Felix; Dahmen, Uta

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver regeneration consists of cellular proliferation leading to parenchymal and vascular growth. This study complements previous studies on cellular proliferation and weight recovery by (1) quantitatively describing parenchymal and vascular regeneration, and (2) determining their relationship. Both together are needed to (3) characterize the underlying growth pattern. Methods Specimens were created by injecting a polymerizing contrast agent in either portal or hepatic vein in normal or regenerating livers after 70% partial hepatectomy. 3D image data were obtained through micro-CT scanning. Parenchymal growth was assessed by determining weight and volume of the regenerating liver. Vascular growth was described by manually determined circumscribed parameters (maximal vessel length and radius of right inferior portal/hepatic vein), automatically determined cumulative parameters (total edge length and total vascular volume), and parameters describing vascular density (total edge length/volume, vascular volume fraction). The growth pattern was explored by comparing the relative increase of these parameters to the increase expected in case of isotropic expansion. Results Liver volume recovery paralleled weight recovery and reached 90% of the original liver volume within 7 days. Comparing radius-related vascular parameters immediately after surgical resection and after virtual resection in-silico revealed a slight increase, possibly reflecting the effect of resection-induced portal hyperperfusion. Comparing length-related parameters between post-operative day 7 and after virtual resection showed similar vascular growth in both vascular systems investigated. In contrast, radius-related parameters increased slightly more in the portal vein. Despite the seemingly homogeneous 3D growth, the observed vascular parameters were not compatible with the hypothesis of isotropic expansion of liver parenchyma and vascular structures. Conclusion We present an approach for

  14. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  15. [Laparoscopic resection of a liver metastasis from segment VII. Case report].

    PubMed

    Dede, Kristóf; Papp, Géza; Salamon, Ferenc; Uhlyarik, Andrea; Bursics, Attila

    2016-05-15

    The technique and clinical results of liver surgery are constantly evolving in recent years, and this development felt most intensely in the field of laparoscopic liver surgery. Based on the results of comparative studies reported to date, laparoscopic surgery is not inferior to open surgery. Although a very small percentage of liver resections are performed with laparoscopic technique, clearly it has a role in oncological surgery. The minor, major, anatomical, or even multi-stage liver resections can be performed with laparoscopy. The previously general recommendation, that lesions in the front segments of the liver are recommended for the minimally invasive technique is currently outdated. The authors present the history of a 70-year-old female, who underwent complex oncosurgical treatment of a locally advanced rectum carcinoma and a pure laparoscopic resection of a solitary hepatic metastasis of segment VII. With this case report the authors want to underline that malignant lesions in the posterior segments of the liver can be removed safely with laparoscopy. PMID:27156527

  16. Comparison of Two Techniques for Radio-frequency Hepatic Tumor Ablation through Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturski, N.; Margenov, S.; Vutov, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We simulate the thermal and electrical processes, involved in the radio-frequency ablation procedure. In this study, we take into account the observed fact, that the electrical conductivity of the hepatic tissue varies during the procedure. With the increase of the tissue temperature to a certain level, a sudden drop of the electrical conductivity is observed. This variation was neglected in some previous studies. The mathematical model consists of two parts—electrical and thermal. The energy from the applied AC voltage is determined first, by solving the Laplace equation to find the potential distribution. After that, the electric field intensity and the current density are directly calculated. Finally, the heat transfer equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution. Heat loss due to blood perfusion is also accounted for. The simulations were performed on the IBM Blue Gene/P massively parallel computer.

  17. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  18. Use of an ulnar head endoprosthesis for treatment of an unstable distal ulnar resection: review of mechanics, indications, and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Berger, Richard A; Cooney, William P

    2005-11-01

    Resection of the distal ulna for post-traumatic arthritis can lead to an unstable forearm joint through loss of the normal articular contact through the distal radioulnar joint and loss of soft tissue constraint. The resulting convergence instability can lead to residual pain, weakness, and loss of function. Restabilization of the forearm joint with implantation of an ulnar head endoprosthesis can re-establish the mechanical continuity of the forearm, reducing pain and improving strength and function. The anatomy, mechanics,rationale, and indications for surgical replacement of the distal ulna are presented. Important tenets of proper ulnar head implant insertion are given to provide a guide for use of the implant. Preliminary results after 2 years of clinical experience are encouraging. PMID:16274870

  19. Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection: The third way for en bloc resection of colonic lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Radaelli, Franco; Spinzi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Background Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection without submucosal injection has been described for removing large flat colorectal lesions. Objective We aim to evaluate the reproducibility of this technique in terms of ease of implementation, safety and efficacy. Methods A prospective observational study of consecutive underwater endoscopic mucosal resection in a community hospital was performed. Results From September 2014 to April 2015, 25 flat or sessile colorectal lesions (median size 22.8 mm, range 10–50 mm; 18 placed in the right colon) were removed in 25 patients. Two of the lesions were adenomatous recurrences on scar of prior resection and one was a recurrence on a surgical anastomosis. The resection was performed en bloc in 76% of the cases. At the pathological examination, 14 lesions (56%) had advanced histology and seven (28%) were sessile serrated adenomas (two with high-grade dysplasia). Complete resection was observed in all the lesions removed en bloc. Intra-procedural bleeding was observed in two cases; both were managed endoscopically and were uneventful. No major adverse events occurred. Conclusion Underwater endoscopic mucosal resection appears to be an easy, safe and effective technique in a community setting. Further studies evaluating the efficacy of the technique (early and late recurrence), as well as comparing it with traditional mucosal resection, are warranted. PMID:27536370

  20. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: Erection problems (impotence) No symptom improvement Passing semen back into your bladder instead of out through ... Whelan JP, Goeree L. Systematic review and meta-analysis of transurethral resection of the prostate versus minimally ...

  1. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  2. Large bowel resection - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100089.htm Large bowel resection - Series To use the sharing features ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The large bowel [large intestine or the colon] is part ...

  3. Endoscopic resection of gastric and esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balmadrid, Bryan; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) techniques have reduced the need for surgery in early esophageal and gastric cancers and thus has lessened morbidity and mortality in these diseases. ESD is a relatively new technique in western countries and requires rigorous training to reproduce the proficiency of Asian countries, such as Korea and Japan, which have very high complete (en bloc) resection rates and low complication rates. EMR plays a valuable role in early esophageal cancers. ESD has shown better en bloc resection rates but it is easier to master and maintain proficiency in EMR; it also requires less procedural time. For early esophageal adenocarcinoma arising from Barrett’s, ESD and EMR techniques are usually combined with other ablative modalities, the most common being radiofrequency ablation because it has the largest dataset to prove its success. The EMR techniques have been used with some success in early gastric cancers but ESD is currently preferred for most of these lesions. ESD has the added advantage of resecting into the submucosa and thus allowing for endoscopic resection of more aggressive (deeper) early gastric cancer. PMID:26510452

  4. Colorectal hepatic metastasis: Evolving therapies

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Makarawo, Tafadzwa

    2014-01-01

    The approach for colorectal hepatic metastasis has advanced tremendously over the past decade. Multidrug chemotherapy regimens have been successfully introduced with improved outcomes. Concurrently, adjunct multimodal therapies have improved survival rates, and increased the number of patients eligible for curative liver resection. Herein, we described major advancements of surgical and oncologic management of such lesions, thereby discussing modern chemotherapeutic regimens, adjunct therapies and surgical aspects of liver resection. PMID:25067997

  5. Ex Vivo Liver Resection and Autotransplantation for End-Stage Alveolar Echinococcosis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Wen, H; Dong, J-H; Zhang, J-H; Duan, W-D; Zhao, J-M; Liang, Y-R; Shao, Y-M; Ji, X-W; Tai, Q-W; Li, T; Gu, H; Tuxun, T; He, Y-B; Huang, J-F

    2016-02-01

    The role of autotransplantation in end-stage hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is unclear. We aimed to present our 15-case experience and propose selection criteria for autotransplantation. All patients were considered to have unresectable hepatic AE by conventional resection due to critical invasion to retrohepatic vena cava, hepatocaval region along with three hepatic veins, and the tertiary portal and arterial branches. All patients successfully underwent ex vivo extended right hepatectomy and autotransplantation without intraoperative mortality. The median autograft weight was 706 g (380-1000 g); operative time was 15.5 hours (11.5-20.5 hours); and anhepatic time was 283.8 minutes (180-435 min). Postoperative hospital stay was 32.3 days (12-60 days). Postoperative complication Clavien-Dindo grade IIIa or higher occurred in three patients including one death that occurred 12 days after the surgery due to acute liver failure. One patient was lost to follow-up after the sixth month. Thirteen patients were followed for a median of 21.6 months with no relapse. This is the largest reported series of patients with end-stage hepatic AE treated with liver autotransplantation. The technique requires neither organ donor nor postoperative immunosuppressant. The early postoperative mortality was low with acceptable morbidity. Preoperative precise assessment and strict patient selection are of utmost importance. PMID:26460900

  6. Image fusion for visualization of hepatic vasculature and tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Jin-Shin; Chen, Shiuh-Yung J.; Sudakoff, Gary S.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Dachman, Abraham H.

    1995-05-01

    We have developed segmentation and simultaneous display techniques to facilitate the visualization of the three-dimensional spatial relationships between organ structures and organ vasculature. We concentrate on the visualization of the liver based on spiral computed tomography images. Surface-based 3-D rendering and maximal intensity projection algorithms are used for data visualization. To extract the liver in the serial of images accurately and efficiently, we have developed a user-friendly interactive program with a deformable-model segmentation. Surface rendering techniques are used to visualize the extracted structures, adjacent contours are aligned and fitted with a Bezier surface to yield a smooth surface. Visualization of the vascular structures, portal and hepatic veins, is achieved by applying a MIP technique to the extracted liver volume. To integrate the extracted structures they are surface-rendered and their MIP images are aligned and a color table is designed for simultaneous display of the combined liver/tumor and vasculature images. By combining the 3-D surface rendering and MIP techniques, portal veins, hepatic veins, and hepatic tumor can be inspected simultaneously and their spatial relationships can be more easily perceived. The proposed technique will be useful for visualization of both hepatic neoplasm and vasculature in surgical planning for tumor resection or living-donor liver transplantation.

  7. Alterations in coagulation following major liver resection.

    PubMed

    Mallett, S V; Sugavanam, A; Krzanicki, D A; Patel, S; Broomhead, R H; Davidson, B R; Riddell, A; Gatt, A; Chowdary, P

    2016-06-01

    The international normalised ratio is frequently raised in patients who have undergone major liver resection, and is assumed to represent a potential bleeding risk. However, these patients have an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, despite conventional coagulation tests indicating hypocoagulability. This prospective, observational study of patients undergoing major hepatic resection analysed the serial changes in coagulation in the early postoperative period. Thrombin generation parameters and viscoelastic tests of coagulation (thromboelastometry) remained within normal ranges throughout the study period. Levels of the procoagulant factors II, V, VII and X initially fell, but V and X returned to or exceeded normal range by postoperative day five. Levels of factor VIII and Von Willebrand factor were significantly elevated from postoperative day one (p < 0.01). Levels of the anticoagulants, protein C and antithrombin remained significantly depressed on postoperative day five (p = 0.01). Overall, the imbalance between pro- and anticoagulant factors suggested a prothrombotic environment in the early postoperative period. PMID:27030945

  8. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord hemangioblastomas account for about 10% of spinal cord tumors. They usually arise from the dorsolateral pia mater and are characterized by their significant vascularity. The principles and techniques of safe resection are different than those employed for the more commonly occurring intramedullary glial tumors (e.g. ependymoma, astrocytoma) and consist of circumferential detachment of the tumor margin from the surrounding normal pia. This video demonstrates the microsurgical techniques of resection of a thoracic spinal cord hemangioblastoma. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/yT5KLi4VyAo. PMID:25175571

  9. Direct Arthroscopic Distal Clavicle Resection

    PubMed Central

    Lervick, Gregory N

    2005-01-01

    Degenerative change involving the acromioclavicular (AC) is frequently seen as part of a normal aging process. Occasionally, this results in a painful clinical condition. Although AC joint symptoms commonly occur in conjunction with other shoulder pathology, they may occur in isolation. Treatment of isolated AC joint osteoarthritis is initially non-surgical. When such treatment fails to provide lasting relief, surgical treatment is warranted. Direct (superior) arthroscopic resection of the distal (lateral) end of the clavicle is a successful method of treating the condition, as well as other isolated conditions of the AC joint. The following article reviews appropriate patient evaluation, surgical indications and technique. PMID:16089089

  10. Minilaparoscopic Colorectal Resections: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Bona, S.; Molteni, M.; Montorsi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal resections have been shown to provide short-term advantages in terms of postoperative pain, general morbidity, recovery, and quality of life. To date, long-term results have been proved to be comparable to open surgery irrefutably only for colon cancer. Recently, new trends keep arising in the direction of minimal invasiveness to reduce surgical trauma after colorectal surgery in order to improve morbidity and cosmetic results. The few reports available in the literature on single-port technique show promising results. Natural orifices endoscopic techniques still have very limited application. We focused our efforts in standardising a minilaparoscopic technique (using 3 to 5 mm instruments) for colorectal resections since it can provide excellent cosmetic results without changing the laparoscopic approach significantly. Thus, there is no need for a new learning curve as minilaparoscopy maintains the principle of instrument triangulation. This determines an undoubted advantage in terms of feasibility and reproducibility of the procedure without increasing operative time. Some preliminary experiences confirm that minilaparoscopic colorectal surgery provides acceptable results, comparable to those reported for laparoscopic surgery with regard to operative time, morbidity, and hospital stay. Randomized controlled studies should be conducted to confirm these early encouraging results. PMID:22548166

  11. Recognition of Intrabiliary Hepatic Metastases From Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Klimstra, David S.; Brown, Karen T.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Kurtz, Robert C.; Jarnagin, William R.; Fong, Yuman

    2000-01-01

    Intrinsic involvement of bile ducts, by metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma growing from within or invading the lumen of bile ducts, is not a well recognized pattern of tumor growth. Clinical, radiographic, operative, and histopathologic aspects of 15 patients with intrabiliary colorectal metastases were described. Fourteen patients were explored for possible hepatic resection. Two had jaundice, two radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect, 10 intraoperative evidence of intrabiliary tumor, and six microscopic evidence of intrabiliariy tumor. Eleven patients underwent hepatic resection. Five of the resected patients developed hepatic recurrence. Four patients were explored for possible repeat resection. One had jaundice, one radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect, all had intraoperative evidence of intrabiliary tumor, and three microscopic evidence of intrabiliary tumor. Three patients underwent repeat hepatic resection. All patients with preoperative jaundice and radiographic evidence of an intrabiliary filling defect were unresectable. Overall, actuarial five-year survival is 33% for those patients resected versus 0% for those not resected. Intraoperative recognition of intrabiliary tumor at exploration for hepatic resection was more common than clinical, radiographic, or histopathologic recognition. More diligent examination of resected liver tissue by the surgeon and pathologist may increase identification of bile duct involvement and aid in achieving adequate tumor clearance. PMID:10977117

  12. Resection of cervical ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Lanzino, Giuseppe; Morales-Valero, Saul F; Krauss, William E; Campero, Mario; Marsh, W Richard

    2014-09-01

    Intramedullary ependymomas are surgically curable tumors. However, their surgical resection poses several challenges. In this intraoperative video we illustrate the main steps for the surgical resection of a cervical intramedullary ependymoma. These critical steps include: adequate exposure of the entire length of the tumor; use of the intraoperative ultrasound; identification of the posterior median sulcus and separation of the posterior columns; Identification of the plane between the spinal cord and the tumor; mobilization and debulking of the tumor and disconnection of the vascular supply (usually from small anterior spinal artery branches). Following these basic steps a complete resection can be safely achieved in many cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/QMYXC_F4O4U. PMID:25175575

  13. Surgical treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsoulfas, Georgios; Pramateftakis, Manousos Georgios; Kanellos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most frequent cancers in Western societies with an incidence of around 700 per million people. About half of the patients develop metastases from the primary tumor and liver is the primary metastatic site. Improved survival rates after hepatectomy for metastatic colorectal cancer have been reported in the last few years and these may be the result of a variety of factors, such as advances in systemic chemotherapy, radiographic imaging techniques that permit more accurate determination of the extent and location of the metastatic burden, local ablation methods, and in surgical techniques of hepatic resection. These have led to a more aggressive approach towards liver metastatic disease, resulting in longer survival. The goal of this paper is to review the role of various forms of surgery in the treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. PMID:21267397

  14. Yttrium-90 hepatic radioembolization: clinical review and current techniques in interventional radiology and personalized dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tong, Aaron K T; Kao, Yung Hsiang; Too, Chow Wei; Chin, Kenneth F W; Ng, David C E; Chow, Pierce K H

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microsphere radioembolization has been establishing itself as a safe and efficacious treatment for both primary and metastatic liver cancers. This extends to both first-line therapies as well as in the salvage setting. In addition, radioembolization appears efficacious for patients with portal vein thrombosis, which is currently a contraindication for surgery, transplantation and transarterial chemoembolization. This article reviews the efficacy and expanding use of (90)Y microsphere radioembolization with an added emphasis on recent advances in personalized dosimetry and interventional radiology techniques. Directions for future research into combination therapies with radioembolization and expansion into sites other than the liver are also explored. PMID:26943239

  15. Reresection of Colorectal Liver Metastasis with Vena Cava Resection

    PubMed Central

    Tardu, Ali; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai; Tolan, Kerem; Ersan, Veysel; Karagul, Servet; Ertuğrul, Ismail; Kirmizi, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    The best known treatment of the colorectal liver metastasis is the complete surgical excision with clean surgical margins. However, liver resections sometimes cannot appear technically feasible due to the high number of metastases in the liver, in cases of recurrent resections or invasion of the tumors to the major vascular structures or neighboring organs. Here, we presented a colorectal recurrent liver metastasis invading the retrohepatic vena cava, right adrenal gland, and right diaphragm. En masse resection of the tumor with caudate hepatectomy combined with vena cava resection and surrounding adrenal and diaphragm resections was accomplished. Caval reconstruction was done by a 5 cm in length cryopreserved vena cava homograft under isolated caval clamping. Postoperative period was uneventful and she was discharged on day 11. As a conclusion, combined liver and vena cava resection for a recurrent colorectal liver metastasis is a feasible procedure even with additional neighboring organ resections. Isolated vena cava occlusion with the preservation of the hepatic blood flow may decrease the risk of liver injury in case of previous chemotherapy for liver metastasis. PMID:27088030

  16. Ex-vivo Resection and Small-Bowel Auto-transplantation for the Treatment of Tumors at the Root of the Mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, S.; Aliakbarian, M.; Kazemi, K.; Shamsaeefar, A. R.; Mehdi, S. H.; Bahreini, A.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tumors involving the root of the mesentery are generally regarded as “unresectable” with conventional surgical techniques. Resection with conventional surgery may end in life-threatening complications in these patients. Ex-vivo resection and auto-transplantation avoids excessive bleeding and prevents ischemic related damage to the small intestine and other organs. Objective: To share our experience of ex-vivo resection of the tumors with involvement of small bowel mesentery followed by small bowel auto-transplantation. Methods: In this study, medical records of all the patients who underwent ex-vivo resection and auto-transplantation at our center were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The most common indication for the procedure in our series was locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Our survival rate was 50% with a mean±SD follow-up of 10.1±9.8 (range: 0–26) months. Causes of early in-hospital mortality were multi-organ failure, sepsis, and cerebrovascular accident. Recurrence of disease was noted in one patient while one patient developed hepatic metastasis after 20 months of surgery. Conclusion: Ex-vivo resection of the tumor and auto-transplantation is the surgical treatment of choice for the locally advanced abdominal tumors involving the root of the mesentery. PMID:25184032

  17. Endoscopic resection of sinonasal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nicolai, Piero; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Malignant tumors of the sinonasal tract are rare, accounting for only 1% of all malignancies. Although they are associated with substantial histological heterogeneity, surgery plays a key role in their management. This review addresses the evolution of current treatments in view of the introduction of endoscopic resection techniques. The absence of facial incisions and osteotomies, decreased hospitalization time, better control of bleeding, improved visualization of tumor borders, and reduced morbidity and mortality rate are the major advantages of endoscopic techniques in comparison to traditional external approaches. The major criticisms focus on oncologic results in view of the short/intermediate follow-up of large series, which have commonly grouped together several histologies that may be associated with different prognoses. Since prospective studies contrasting the results of endoscopic and craniofacial resections are difficult to carry out given the rarity of the disease together with ethical issues, the creation of a large database would favor the analysis of several variables related to the patient, tumor, and treatment on survival performed on a large number of patients. PMID:21243539

  18. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mur, Rafael Esteban

    2014-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (EH) is a severe complication of hepatic cirrhosis that is characterized by multiple neuropsychiatric manifestations. EH is usually triggered by a precipitating factor and occurs in patients with severely impaired hepatic function. Minimal EH is characterized by minor cognitive impairments that are difficult to specify but represent a risk for the patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism of EH is considered to be an increase in blood ammonia with an impairment in the patency of the blood-brainbarrier and its metabolism to glutamine in astrocytes. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroimaging techniques can be complementary. The diagnosis of minimal EH requires specific neurocognitive tests. The clinical evaluation should be directed towards identifying the trigger. Nonabsorbable disaccharides and rifaximin constitute the treatment of choice, along with prophylaxis for new episodes. PMID:25087716

  19. Laryngocele resection by combined external and endoscopic laser approach.

    PubMed

    Ettema, Sandra L; Carothers, Daniel G; Hoffman, Henry T

    2003-04-01

    Options in the management of laryngoceles include observation, endoscopic resection, and resection via an external approach. We introduce a combined endoscopic and external approach that we have employed on several occasions to ensure complete removal of the laryngocele and the saccule from which it originated. A case is presented to help define the technique. PMID:12731632

  20. Tracheal Resection With Carinal Reconstruction for Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Timothy S; Krantz, Seth B; Patterson, G Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for primary malignancies of the trachea. We present here the rare case of a lifelong nonsmoker with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea, requiring tracheal resection and anterior carinal reconstruction. Patient preparation, surgical technique, and considerations to avoid airway anastomotic complications are discussed. PMID:27343542

  1. Management of Type 9 Hepatic Arterial Anatomy at the time of Pancreaticoduodenectomy: Considerations for Preservation and Reconstruction of a Completely Replaced Common Hepatic Artery.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Burkhart, Richard A; Weiss, Matthew J; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Cameron, Andrew M; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-07-01

    Recognition and management of aberrant hepatic arterial anatomy for patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are critical to ensure safe completion of the operation. When the common hepatic artery (CHA) is noted to emanate from the superior mesenteric artery (Michels' type 9 variant), it is vulnerable to injury during the dissection required for PD. While this anatomy does not preclude an operation, care must be taken to avoid injury, often by identifying the CHA throughout its entire course before beginning the dissection of the portal venous structures. The oncologic principle that cautions against resection of a pancreatic cancer when it involves the CHA in its standard position may not universally apply to tumors that focally involve the CHA in the type 9 anatomic variant. In highly selected patients, surgical resection may be entertained as disease biology may be analogous to local involvement of the gastroduodenal artery in a patient with standard anatomy. Here, we review the indications, techniques, and outcomes associated with arterial resection and reconstruction during pancreatectomy among patients with a pancreatic tumor involving a common hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. PMID:27138326

  2. [Elective resection of the spleen--overview of resection technics and description of a new technic based on radiofrequency coagulation and dessication].

    PubMed

    Milićević, M; Bulajić, P; Zuvela, M; Raznatović, Z; Obradović, V; Lekić, N; Palibrk, I; Basarić, D

    2002-01-01

    The authors present a short overview of the development of elective splenic resections. Past and present indications are presented. Contemporary hemostatic technique for elective splenic resection are discussed. An original new technique for transsegmental partial splenic resection using RF generator Radionic Cool Tip(without any aditional hemostatic procedures is presented. This technique is inovative and when use properly it is a practically zero blood loos technique. A patient with transsegmental splenic resection using RF generator is presented. Further clinical application of the technique is necessary. PMID:12587443

  3. Hepatic artery reinforcement after post pancreatectomy haemorrhage caused by pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Merdrignac, Aude; Bergeat, Damien; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Agus, Marina; Boudjema, Karim; Sulpice, Laurent; Meunier, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Post-pancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH) is a major complication occurring in 6-8% of patients after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Arterial bleeding is the most frequent cause. Mortality rate could reach 30% after grade C PPH according to ISGPS classification. Complete interruption of hepatic arterial flow has to be a salvage procedure because of the high risk of intrahepatic abscess following the procedure. We report a technique to perform an artery reinforcement after PPH caused by pancreatitis. A PD according to Whipple's procedure with child's reconstruction was performed in a 68-year-old man. At postoperative day 12, the patient presented a sudden violent abdominal pain with arterial hypotension and tachycardia. Computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast injection was performed. Arterial and venous phases showed a contrast extravasation on the hepatic artery. Origin of PPH was found as an erosion of hepatic artery caused by pancreatic leak. A peritoneal patch was placed around hepatic artery to reinforce damaged arterial wall. The peritoneal patch was harvested from right hypochondrium with a thin preperitoneal fat layer. The patch was sutured around hepatic artery with musculoaponeurotic face placed on the arterial wall. A CT was performed and hepatic artery was permeable with normal caliber in the portion of peritoneal patch reinforcement. The technique described in the present case consists in reinforcing directly arterial wall after occurrence of PPH. The use of a peritoneal patch during pancreatic surgery has first been described to replace a portion of portal vein after venous resection with the peritoneal layer placed on the intraluminal side of the vein. The present case describes a salvage technique to reinforce damaged artery after PPH in context of pancreatic leak. This simple technique could be useful to avoid complex arterial reconstruction and recurrent bleeding in septic context. PMID:27563565

  4. Hepatic artery reinforcement after post pancreatectomy haemorrhage caused by pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Merdrignac, Aude; Bergeat, Damien; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Agus, Marina; Boudjema, Karim; Sulpice, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Post-pancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH) is a major complication occurring in 6–8% of patients after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Arterial bleeding is the most frequent cause. Mortality rate could reach 30% after grade C PPH according to ISGPS classification. Complete interruption of hepatic arterial flow has to be a salvage procedure because of the high risk of intrahepatic abscess following the procedure. We report a technique to perform an artery reinforcement after PPH caused by pancreatitis. A PD according to Whipple’s procedure with child’s reconstruction was performed in a 68-year-old man. At postoperative day 12, the patient presented a sudden violent abdominal pain with arterial hypotension and tachycardia. Computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast injection was performed. Arterial and venous phases showed a contrast extravasation on the hepatic artery. Origin of PPH was found as an erosion of hepatic artery caused by pancreatic leak. A peritoneal patch was placed around hepatic artery to reinforce damaged arterial wall. The peritoneal patch was harvested from right hypochondrium with a thin preperitoneal fat layer. The patch was sutured around hepatic artery with musculoaponeurotic face placed on the arterial wall. A CT was performed and hepatic artery was permeable with normal caliber in the portion of peritoneal patch reinforcement. The technique described in the present case consists in reinforcing directly arterial wall after occurrence of PPH. The use of a peritoneal patch during pancreatic surgery has first been described to replace a portion of portal vein after venous resection with the peritoneal layer placed on the intraluminal side of the vein. The present case describes a salvage technique to reinforce damaged artery after PPH in context of pancreatic leak. This simple technique could be useful to avoid complex arterial reconstruction and recurrent bleeding in septic context. PMID:27563565

  5. Aggressive surgical resection for concomitant liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Jin Hong; Kim, Sung Hoon; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Dae Joon; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Aggressive surgical resection for hepatic metastasis is validated, however, concomitant liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer patients is equivocal. Methods Clinicopathologic data from January 2008 through December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed in 234 patients with colorectal cancer with concomitant liver and lung metastasis. Clinicopathologic factors and survival data were analyzed. Results Of the 234 patients, 129 (55.1%) had synchronous concomitant liver and lung metastasis from colorectal cancer and 36 (15.4%) had metachronous metastasis. Surgical resection was performed in 33 patients (25.6%) with synchronous and 6 (16.7%) with metachronous metastasis. Surgical resection showed better overall survival in both groups (synchronous, p=0.001; metachronous, p=0.028). In the synchronous metastatic group, complete resection of both liver and lung metastatic lesions had better survival outcomes than incomplete resection of two metastatic lesions (p=0.037). The primary site of colorectal cancer and complete resection were significant prognostic factors (p=0.06 and p=0.003, respectively). Conclusions Surgical resection for hepatic and pulmonary metastasis in colorectal cancer can improve complete remission and survival rate in resectable cases. Colorectal cancer with concomitant liver and lung metastasis is not a poor prognostic factor or a contraindication for surgical treatments, hence, an aggressive surgical approach may be recommended in well-selected resectable cases. PMID:27621747

  6. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  7. Arthroscopic resection of wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C; Hoyos, A; Pelaez, J

    2004-12-01

    The arthroscopic resection of synovial cysts of the wrist is a simple technique which is comfortable for the patient. We report on a series of 96 patients with dorsal synovial cysts (75 women, 21 men). All patients had undergone preliminary treatment which had been unsuccessful. We operated on 32 patients with a volar cyst (27 women, five men). All the patients were operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthesia. For the dorsal cysts, after having precisely located the cyst, it is then resected after having inserted a shaver directly through the wall of the cyst starting with the capsule. For the volar cysts the arthroscope was inserted through a 3-4 portal and the shaver was inserted through a 1-2 radiocarpal portal. In all cases, there was no immobilisation and a range of motion was started the same day. For the dorsal cysts, our average follow-up was 34 months (range 12-46 months). There were no complications. We had four recurrences. For the palmar cysts, our average follow-up was 26 months (range 12-39 months). There have been no recurrences to date. PMID:15810100

  8. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  9. Laparoscopic pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Harrell, K N; Kooby, D A

    2015-10-01

    Though initially slow to gain acceptance, the minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection grew during the last decade and pancreatic operations such as the distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic enucleation are frequently performed laparoscopically. More complex operations such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy may also confer benefits with a minimally invasive approach but are less widely utilized. Though most research to date comparing open and laparoscopic pancreatectomy is retrospective, the current data suggest that compared with open, a laparoscopic procedure may afford postoperative benefits such as less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications. Regarding oncologic considerations, despite initial concerns, laparoscopic resection appears to be non-inferior to an open procedure in terms of lymph node retrieval, negative margin rates, and long-term survival. New technologies, such as robotics, are also gaining acceptance. Data show that while the laparoscopic approach incurs higher cost in the operating room, the resulting shorter hospital stay appears to be associated with an equivalent or lower overall cost. The minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection can be safe and appropriate with significant patient benefits and oncologic non-inferiority based on existing data. PMID:26199025

  10. Hepatitis: protecting BMETs & CEs.

    PubMed

    Baker, S A

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis is the primary occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Not until the 1970s were hepatitis viruses isolated and identified as types A and B. In the late 1970s, hepatitis D was discovered as a major cause of fulminant hepatitis. Soon, it was evident that another type was also at work. Because testing was only available for types A and B, the new category was referred to as non-A, non-B. In the 1980s, scientists identified two more viruses from this non-A, non-B group, namely hepatitis E and hepatitis C. These five types of hepatitis have different modes of transmission. The fecal-to-oral route is the mode of transmission for hepatitis types A and E. But, types B and D are bloodborne pathogens. With the advent of a safe vaccine for hepatitis B, this category is declining. To date, hepatitis C appears to have multiple routes of transmission, with half the cases being posttransfusion. In the United States, 85,000 people per year develop chronic hepatitis C, which ultimately leads to severe liver damage. This paper addresses each of the five viruses that have been grouped by routes of transmission, prevention techniques for BMETs and CEs, and statistics of reported cases to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) over the last 20 years. PMID:10139739

  11. ALPPS Procedure for Extended Liver Resections: A Single Centre Experience and a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vivarelli, Marco; Vincenzi, Paolo; Montalti, Roberto; Fava, Giammarco; Tavio, Marcello; Coletta, Martina; Vecchi, Andrea; Nicolini, Daniele; Agostini, Andrea; Ali Ahmed, Emad; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Mocchegiani, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Aim To report a single-centre experience with the novel Associating Liver Partition and Portal vein ligation for Staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) technique and systematically review the related literature. Methods Since January 2013, patients with extended primary or secondary liver tumors whose future liver remnant (FLR) was considered too small to allow hepatic resection were prospectively assessed for the ALPPS procedure. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Library Central. Results Until July 2014 ALPPS was completed in 9 patients whose mean age was 60±8 years. Indications for surgical resection were metastases from colorectal cancer in 3 cases, perihilar cholangiocarcinoma in 3 cases, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma in 2 cases and hepatocellular carcinoma without chronic liver disease in 1 case. The calculated FLR volume was 289±122 mL (21.1±5.5%) before ALPPS-1 and 528±121 mL (32.2±5.7%) before ALLPS-2 (p<0.001). The increase in FLR between the two procedures was 96±47% (range: 24–160%, p<0.001). Additional interventions were performed in 4 cases: 3 patients underwent Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy, and one case underwent wedge resection of a residual tumor in the FLR. The average time between the first and second step of the procedure was 10.8±2.9 days. The average hospital stay was 24.1±13.3 days. There was 1 postoperative death due to hepatic failure in the oldest patient of this series who had a perihilar cholangiocarcinoma and concomitant liver fibrosis; 11 complications occurred in 6 patients, 4 of whom had grade III or above disease. After a mean follow-up of 17.1±8.5 months, the overall survival was 89% at 3–6 and 12 months. The recurrence-free survival was 100%, 87.5% and 75% at 3-6-12 months respectively. The literature search yielded 148 articles, of which 22 articles published between 2012 and 2015 were included in this systematic review. Conclusion The ALPPS technique effectively increased the

  12. Transection Speed and Impact on Perioperative Inflammatory Response – A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Stapler Hepatectomy and CUSA Resection

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Christoph; Klaus, Daniel A.; Tudor, Bianca; Fleischmann, Edith; Wekerle, Thomas; Roth, Georg; Bodingbauer, Martin; Kaczirek, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background Parenchymal transection represents a crucial step during liver surgery and many different techniques have been described so far. Stapler resection is supposed to be faster than CUSA resection. However, whether speed impacts on the inflammatory response in patients undergoing liver resection (LR) remains unclear. Materials and Methods This is a randomized controlled trial including 40 patients undergoing anatomical LR. Primary endpoint was transection speed (cm2/min). Secondary endpoints included the perioperative change of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, overall surgery duration, length of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality. Results Mean transection speed was significantly higher in patients undergoing stapler hepatectomy compared to CUSA resection (CUSA: 1 (0.4) cm2/min vs. Stapler: 10.8 (6.1) cm2/min; p<0.0001). Analyzing the impact of surgery duration on inflammatory response revealed a significant correlation between IL-6 levels measured at the end of surgery and the overall length of surgery (p<0.0001, r = 0.6188). Patients undergoing CUSA LR had significantly higher increase of interleukin-6 (IL-6) after parenchymal transection compared to patients with stapler hepatectomy in the portal and hepatic veins, respectively (p = 0.028; p = 0.044). C-reactive protein levels on the first post-operative day were significantly lower in the stapler cohort (p = 0.010). There was a trend towards a reduced overall surgery time in patients with stapler LR, especially in the subgroup of patients undergoing minor hepatectomies (p = 0.020). Conclusions Liver resection using staplers is fast, safe and suggests a diminished inflammatory response probably due to a decreased parenchymal transection time. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01785212 PMID:26452162

  13. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in children.

    PubMed

    Foley, David S; Sunil, Indira; Debski, Robert; Ignacio, Romeo C; Nagaraj, Hirkati S

    2008-11-01

    Primary carcinoid tumors of the liver are rare, with fewer than 60 cases currently reported in the English literature. We present the evaluation and management of a solid hepatic tumor in a 14-year-old boy. Intraoperative biopsy was indeterminant for malignant potential, and the patient underwent complete resection by left hepatic lobectomy. Final histopathologic evaluation of the mass revealed a carcinoid tumor. Extensive endoscopic and radiologic workup revealed no other primary source. The patient recovered well from surgery and is currently free of disease 32 months after initial resection. Review of the literature suggests that primary hepatic carcinoid tumors are particularly rare in children. As the liver is frequently a site for carcinoid metastasis from the gastrointestinal tract, any patient with a suspected primary hepatic carcinoid tumor must undergo an extensive search for an extrahepatic primary site. These tumors are typically indolent but may metastasize. In addition, medical therapy is of limited benefit in reducing tumor bulk. The mainstay for treatment of primary hepatic carcinoid tumors is surgical resection, and these tumors carry a more favorable prognosis than other primary hepatic malignancies and metastatic carcinoid. Follow-up is long-term, as these tumors can recur many years after initial resection. PMID:18970916

  14. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    moderately increasing the depth of sedation while maintaining spontaneous breathing. Finally, as long as the physiologic impact of awake metastasectomy is definitively elucidated, the authors believe this modality should be used for unilateral procedures, while deserving a staged bilateral approach for bilateral lung metastasectomy. Avoidance of general anesthesia results in a faster recovery with immediate return to many daily life activities, including drinking, eating, and walking, and a reduction in hospital stay and procedure-related costs. If confirmed with future studies, these results could advocate earlier resection of peripheral solitary pulmonary nodules, reducing the risk for delaying a diagnosis of unexpected pulmonary malignancy. Furthermore, potential new frontiers of awake thoracoscopic surgery might include assessment of feasibility and safety of anatomic resections in properly selected instances. Ethical and economical concerns push remorselessly for less frequent and less-invasive surgery. Administrators advocate minimal hospitalization and cost-saving treatments, whereas patients ultimately ask for appropriate health care. Thoracic surgeons of the third millennium must accept the challenge of this dynamic and rapidly evolving scenario without loosing the right root, which probably lays just between well-established conventional surgery techniques and newly available advanced technology tools. Awake thoracic surgery will benefit from evidence-based data that are progressively accumulating. Findings will stimulate experts to continue an active clinical investigation in this unpredictably evolving surgical field, which might ultimately lead to a better understanding of cardiorespiratory physiology and effects of the surgical pneumothorax and thoracic epidural anesthesia on perioperative, respiratory function in awake patients. As the Italian architect Renzo Piano recently stated, "Recovering in the past can be reassuring but the future is the only place

  15. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Éden Sartor; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; Corrêa, Isaac José Felippe; Robles, Laercio; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumors are extremely rare neoplasms derived from hormone-producing neuroendocrine cells. It is difficult to make their diagnosis before biopsy, surgical resection or necropsy. A recent publication described only 94 cases of these tumors. There is no sex predilection and apparently it has no association with cirrhosis or preexisting hepatic disease. The most effective treatment is hepatectomy, and resection is determined by size and location of the lesions. PMID:25628206

  16. Extended resections for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cameron D

    2010-10-01

    Almost all series reporting on the results of resection in thymic tumors indicate that the performance of a complete resection is probably the most important prognostic factor. This issue is not a factor in Masaoka stage I and II tumors that are almost always easily completely resected and have an excellent prognosis. Masaoka stage III tumors that invade the pericardium, lungs, or great vessels have relatively higher incomplete resection rates, significantly higher recurrence rates, and thus a worse prognosis. There are several small reports on the efficacy of resection of the great veins when involved by a thymic malignancy with low morbidity and meaningful long-term survival. Superior vena cava reconstruction is commonly performed by a polytetrafluroethylene, venous, or pericardial graft. These cases can usually be identified preoperatively and, thus, considered for induction therapy. Because these types of cases are almost always of marginal respectability in terms of obtaining a true en bloc resection, there is an increasing enthusiasm for offering induction therapy in an effort to enhance resectability. Preliminary results suggest increased R0 resection rates and improved survival with induction therapy for locally advanced tumors. The optimal induction treatment is unknown. The ultimate extended surgery for advanced thymic tumors is an extrapleural pneumonectomy performed for extensive pleural disease (Masaoka stage IVA). These rarely performed operations are done for IVA disease found at initial presentation and for recurrent disease as a salvage procedure. Again these advanced patients are probably best managed by induction chemotherapy followed by resection. PMID:20859130

  17. Approach to the endoscopic resection of duodenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Jonathan P; Stelow, Edward B; Wang, Andrew Y

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal polyps or lesions are uncommonly found on upper endoscopy. Duodenal lesions can be categorized as subepithelial or mucosally-based, and the type of lesion often dictates the work-up and possible therapeutic options. Subepithelial lesions that can arise in the duodenum include lipomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and carcinoids. Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle aspiration is useful in the characterization and diagnosis of subepithelial lesions. Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors and large or multifocal carcinoids are best managed by surgical resection. Brunner’s gland tumors, solitary Peutz-Jeghers polyps, and non-ampullary and ampullary adenomas are mucosally-based duodenal lesions, which can require removal and are typically amenable to endoscopic resection. Several anatomic characteristics of the duodenum make endoscopic resection of duodenal lesions challenging. However, advanced endoscopic techniques exist that enable the resection of large mucosally-based duodenal lesions. Endoscopic papillectomy is not without risk, but this procedure can effectively resect ampullary adenomas and allows patients to avoid surgery, which typically involves pancreaticoduodenectomy. Endoscopic mucosal resection and its variations (such as cap-assisted, cap-band-assisted, and underwater techniques) enable the safe and effective resection of most duodenal adenomas. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is possible but very difficult to safely perform in the duodenum. PMID:26811610

  18. Primary hepatic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, P; Bhadana, U; Singh, R A K; Ahuja, A

    2015-09-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare, aggressive tumor; composed of spindle or pleomorphic cells that line, or grow into, the lumina of pre-existing vascular spaces like sinusoids and terminal hepatic venules; with only about 200 cases diagnosed annually worldwide but it is the most common primary malignant mesenchymal tumor of the liver in adults and accounts for 2% of all primary hepatic malignancies. HAS occurs in association with known chemical carcinogens, but 75% of the tumors have no known etiology. Patients present with vague symptoms like abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue or an abdominal mass. Hepatic angiosarcoma is usually multicentric and involves both lobes, entire liver may also found to be involved. CD31 is the most reliable marker. These tumors lack specific features on imaging, so, pathological diagnosis is necessary. There are no established treatment guidelines because of low frequency and aggressive nature of tumor, chemotherapy is only palliative, liver resection is indicated for solitary mass and liver transplant is contraindicated. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review all the available literature and to present detailed information and an update on primary hepatic angiosarcoma. PMID:26008857

  19. Prevalence of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Among Patients with Resectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Srinevas K.; Hyder, Omar; Marsh, J. Wallis; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C.; Paul, Andreas; Alexandrescu, Sorin; Marques, Hugo; Pulitano, Carlo; Barroso, Eduardo; Aldrighetti, Luca; Geller, David A.; Sempoux, Christine; Herlea, Vlad; Popescu, Irinel; Anders, Robert; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Gigot, Jean-Francois; Mentha, Giles; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The objective of this report was to determine the prevalence of underlying nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in resectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Methods Demographics, comorbidities, clinicopathologic characteristics, surgical treatments, and outcomes from patients who underwent resection of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma at one of eight hepatobiliary centers between 1991 and 2011 were reviewed. Results Of 181 patients who underwent resection for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, 31 (17.1 %) had underlying nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis were more likely obese (median body mass index, 30.0 vs. 26.0 kg/m2, p<0.001) and had higher rates of diabetes mellitus (38.7 vs. 22.0 %, p=0.05) and the metabolic syndrome (22.6 vs. 10.0 %, p=0.05) compared with those without nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Presence and severity of hepatic steatosis, lobular inflammation, and hepatocyte ballooning were more common among nonalcoholic steatohepatitis patients (all p<0.001). Macrovascular (35.5 vs. 11.3 %, p=0.01) and any vascular (48.4 vs. 26.7 %, p=0.02) tumor invasion were more common among patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. There were no differences in recurrence-free (median, 17.0 versus 19.4 months, p=0.42) or overall (median, 31.5 versus 36.3 months, p=0.97) survival after surgical resection between patients with and without nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Conclusions Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis affects up to 20 % of patients with resectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:23355033

  20. Endoscopically assisted laparoscopic local resection of gastric tumor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive procedures have been applied in treatment of gastric submucosal tumors. Currently, combined laparoscopic - endoscopic rendezvous resection (CLERR) emerges as a new technique which further reduces operative invasiveness. Case presentation A-57-year-old female patient presented with epigastric pain. She was submitted to gastroscopy, which revealed a tumor located at the angle of His. Biopsy specimens demonstrated a leiomyoma. The patient underwent endoscopically assisted laparoscopic resection of the tumor. The operative time was 45 minutes. Diagnosis of leiomyoma was confirmed by the final histopathological examination. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and was discharged on the 2nd postoperative day. Conclusion Combined laparoscopic and endoscopic rendezvous resection appears as a promising alternative minimally invasive technique. It offers easy recognition of the tumor, regardless of location, safe dissection, and full thickness resection with adequate margins as well as less operative time. PMID:24119820

  1. Chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Carin F; Brown, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies with transarterial chemoembolization represents an essential component of interventional oncology. This article discusses patient selection, procedure technique, results, and complications associated with transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:18668189

  2. Thoracoscopic tracheal resection and reconstruction for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wenjie; Zhu, Dezhang; Cheng, Zhaozhong; Zhao, Yandong

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel technique of thoracoscopic circumferential tracheal resection and end-to-end anastomosis. A 60-year-old woman presented with wheezing and progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography scan revealed a mass at the lower trachea, and a nitinol mesh stent was implanted by bronchoscopy. After 2 weeks, a complete thoracoscopic tracheal resection and reconstruction was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. The final pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea. PMID:25555982

  3. Laparoscopic en bloc excision of gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the rectum after neoadjuvant imatinib therapy: anteriorly extended intersphincteric resection combined with partial resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ueki, T; Nagayoshi, K; Manabe, T; Maeyama, R; Yokomizo, A; Yamamoto, H; Oda, Y; Tanaka, M

    2015-04-01

    We herein present a novel technique for laparoscopic en bloc excision involving anteriorly extended intersphincteric resection with partial resection of the posterior lobe of the prostate for large rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The sequence of neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and this less invasive surgery for marginally resectable rectal GISTs has the potential to obviate the need for urinary reconstruction and permanent stomas without jeopardizing the tumor margin status. PMID:25550117

  4. [Acute complications after endoscopic resection of duodenal adenomas].

    PubMed

    König, J; Kaiser, A; Opfermann, P; Manner, H; Pohl, J; Ell, C; May, A D

    2014-02-01

    With the increasing technological development of endoscopy in recent years the diagnosis of and endoscopic therapy for duodenal adenomas has gained in importance. Due to its potentially malignant transformation an effective and safe therapy is necessary. The endoscopic resection has been shown to be safe and effective, even in cases of resection of large duodenal adenomas. Several studies have supported this thesis but are based on relatively small numbers of patients. In our clinic we have performed endoscopic resections of 178 duodenal adenomas over a period of 14 years, including sporadic duodenal adenomas as well as adenomas in familial polyposis syndromes. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to determine the acute complications associated with this technique. The rate of severe complications such as major bleeding or perforations was 9%. Further complications were minor bleeding (15.7%), pain needing treatment with analgesia (6.7%), fever (2.8%) and pancreatitis (0.6%). Summing up our experience with the endoscopic resection of adenomas of the small bowel we also consider the endoscopic resection of duodenal adenomas in most cases as a safe and effective alternative to surgical therapy. Because of the potential complications and their management especially in the resection of large adenomas with a size more than 2 cm, the endoscopic resection should be performed on an inpatient basis in experienced centres. PMID:24526403

  5. Inferior vena cava resection with hepatectomy: challenging but justified

    PubMed Central

    Malde, Deep J; Khan, Aamir; Prasad, K Rajendra; Toogood, Giles J; Lodge, J Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of hepatectomy combined with inferior vena cava (IVC) resection and reconstruction for treatment of invasive liver tumours. Methods From February 1995 to September 2010, 2146 patients underwent liver resections in our hospital's hepatopancreatobiliary unit. Of these, 35 (1.6%) patients underwent hepatectomy with IVC resection. These patients were included in this study. Data were analysed from a prospectively collected database. Results Resections were carried out for colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) (n = 21), hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 6), cholangiocarcinoma (n = 3) and other conditions (n = 5). Resections were carried out with total vascular occlusion in 34 patients and without in one patient. In situ hypothermic perfusion was performed in 13 patients; the ante situm technique was used in three patients, and ex vivo resection was used in six patients. There were four early deaths from multiple organ failure. Postoperative complications occurred in 14 patients, three of whom required re-operation. Median overall survival was 29 months and cumulative 5-year survival was 37.7%. Rates of 1-, 2- and 5-year survival were 75.9%, 58.7% and 19.6%, respectively, in CRLM patients. Conclusions Aggressive surgical management of liver tumours with IVC involvement offers the only hope for cure in selected patients. Resection by specialist teams affords acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:21999594

  6. Surgical treatment of a retroperitoneal benign tumor surrounding important blood vessels by fractionated resection: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WAN, ZHILI; YIN, TIANSHENG; CHEN, HONGWEI; LI, DEWEI

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal tumors are lesions with diverse pathological subtypes that originate from the retroperitoneal space; ~40% of these tumors are benign. Due to such lesions often surrounding and associating with vital abdominal blood vessels, a complete surgical resection is difficult. The current study presents a novel surgical approach, known as fractionation, through which a benign retroperitoneal tumor surrounding important abdominal blood vessels was completely resected. A 21-year-old man was admitted to The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University (Chongqing, China), presenting with a ~7.5×7.2-cm tumor that was located in the retroperitoneal pancreatic head region and the first hepatic hilum. The tumor completely surrounded the celiac axis and the splenic, common hepatic and superior mesenteric arteries, and was closely associated with the abdominal aorta and the portal, splenic, superior mesenteric and left renal veins. A pre-operative computed tomography scan and intraoperative frozen biopsy indicated that the lesion was a benign tumor. A fractionation approach was subsequently adopted, with fractionation of the lesion being performed according to the location of the tumor itself and the direction of the surrounding abdominal blood vessels. In this manner, a complete tumor resection was conducted. Post-operative pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma. The patient was followed up for a year and a half, with no evidence of tumor recurrence. In the present case, a fractionation approach for the complete resection of the retroperitoneal benign tumor achieved a positive outcome and demonstrated the feasibility of the technique. PMID:27123100

  7. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... or past infection, or immunity to hepatitis A Hepatitis B tests: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you have ...

  8. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living ...

  9. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  10. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Giovannini; Lopes, Cesar Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia. Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion, to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding. Only endoscopic resection allows complete histological staging of the cancer, which is critical as it allows stratification and refinement for further treatment. Although other endoscopic techniques, such as ablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen. Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract. PMID:18698673

  11. Hepatitis Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by viruses. They include hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. To diagnose hepatitis, your health care provider will ask you about your medical history and symptoms, do a physical exam, and order blood tests. There are blood tests for each type of ...

  12. Transurethral Resection of Prostate Abscess: Is It Different from Conventional Transurethral Resection for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia?

    PubMed Central

    Sankhwar, Satyanarayan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To present our experience of prostate abscess management by modified transurethral resection (TUR) technique. Methods. Seventeen men with prostate abscess undergoing TUR between 2003 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Details of demography, surgical procedures, complications, and followup were noted. Results. With a mean age of 61.53 ± 8.58 years, all patients had multifocal abscess cavities. Initially, 6 men underwent classical TUR similar to the technique used for benign prostatic enlargement (group 1). Next, 11 men underwent modified TUR (group 2) in which bladder neck and anterior zone were not resected. The abscess cavities resolved completely, and no patient required a second intervention. One patient in group 1 and three in group 2 had postoperative fever requiring parenteral antibiotics (P = 0.916). Three patients in group 1 had transient urinary incontinence, whereas none of the patients in group 2 had this complication (P = 0.055). Four and five men in group 1 and 2 reported retrograde ejaculation, respectively (P = 0.740). Conclusion. The modified technique of prostate resection edges over conventional TURP in the form of reduced morbidity but maintains its high success rate for complete abscess drainage. It alleviates the need for secondary procedures, having an apparent advantage over limited drainage techniques. Use of this technique is emphasized in cases associated with BPH and lack of proper preoperative imaging. PMID:23840969

  13. Microsurgical resection of giant intraventricular meningioma.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K

    2013-01-01

    Intraventricular meningiomas are rare tumors, accounting for approximately 0.5 to 3% of all intracranial meningiomas. The majority arise in the atrium of the lateral ventricle. The surgical management of these tumors remains a considerable challenge because of their deep location and proximity to critical structures. Complete resection, if safely possible, should be the goal of surgery since this results in the best rates of local control. Although various approaches exist to access the lateral ventricular system, selection of the optimal approach should be individualized to the patient based upon the location of the tumor within the ventricle, the tumor size, the origin of the vascular supply to the tumor, and the relationship to neighboring neurovascular structures at risk. In this operative video manuscript, the author demonstrates an illustrative step-by-step technique for microsurgical resection of a giant intraventricular meningioma of the left atrium via a transcortical parieto-occipital approach. The patient illustrated in this video presented with a large recurrent meningioma (> 5 cm) approximately 10 years after the initial resection. The tumor had grown around a pre-existing shunt catheter and resulted in loculated hydrocephalus. A complete resection and shunt revision were both performed at the same sitting. The operative technique and surgical nuances, including the surgical approach, intradural tumor removal, closure, and management of hydrocephalus are illustrated in this video atlas. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/vpdmZ1ccWSM. (http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2013.V1.FOCUS12352) PMID:23282155

  14. 5-aminolevulinic acid guidance during awake craniotomy to maximise extent of safe resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Corns, Robert; Mukherjee, Soumya; Johansen, Anja; Sivakumar, Gnanamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Overall survival for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been consistently shown to improve when the surgeon achieves a gross total resection of the tumour. It has also been demonstrated that surgical adjuncts such as 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence--which delineates malignant tumour tissue--normal brain tissue margin seen using violet-blue excitation under an operating microscope--helps achieve this. We describe the case of a patient with recurrent left frontal GBM encroaching on Broca's area (eloquent brain). Gross total resection of the tumour was achieved by combining two techniques, awake resection to prevent damage to eloquent brain and 5-ALA fluorescence guidance to maximise the extent of tumour resection.This technique led to gross total resection of all T1-enhancing tumour with the avoidance of neurological deficit. The authors recommend this technique in patients when awake surgery can be tolerated and gross total resection is the aim of surgery. PMID:26177997

  15. Isolated hypoxic hepatic perfusion with tumor necrosis factor-alpha, melphalan, and mitomycin C using balloon catheter techniques: a pharmacokinetic study in pigs.

    PubMed Central

    van Ijken, M G; de Bruijn, E A; de Boeck, G; ten Hagen, T L; van der Sijp, J R; Eggermont, A M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate the methodology of isolated hypoxic hepatic perfusion (IHHP) using balloon catheter techniques and to gain insight into the distribution of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), melphalan, and mitomycin C (MMC) through the regional and systemic blood compartments when applying these techniques. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: There is no standard treatment for unresectable liver tumors. Clinical results of isolated limb perfusion with high-dose TNF and melphalan for the treatment of melanoma and sarcoma have been promising, and attempts have been made to extrapolate this success to the isolated liver perfusion setting. The magnitude and toxicity of the surgical procedure, however, have limited clinical applicability. METHODS: Pigs underwent IHHP with TNF, melphalan, and MMC using balloon catheters or served as controls, receiving equivalent dosages of these agents intravenously. After a 20-minute perfusion, a washout procedure was performed for 10 minutes, after which isolation was terminated. Throughout the procedure and afterward, blood samples were obtained from the hepatic and systemic blood compartments and concentrations of perfused agents were determined. RESULTS: During perfusion, locoregional plasma drug concentrations were 20- to 40-fold higher than systemic concentrations. Compared with systemic concentrations after intravenous administration, regional concentrations during IHHP were up to 10-fold higher. Regional MMC and melphalan levels steadily declined during perfusion, indicating rapid uptake by the liver tissue; minimal systemic concentrations indicated virtually no leakage to the systemic blood compartment. During isolation, concentrations of TNF in the perfusate declined only slightly, indicating limited uptake by the liver tissue; no leakage of TNF to the systemic circulation was observed. After termination of isolation, systemic TNF levels showed only a minor transient elevation, indicating that the washout procedure at the end of

  16. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  17. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  18. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  19. Preoperative portal vein embolization in liver cancer: indications, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Favelier, Sylvain; Chevallier, Olivier; Estivalet, Louis; Genson, Pierre-Yves; Pottecher, Pierre; Gehin, Sophie; Krausé, Denis; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative liver failure is a severe complication of major hepatectomies, in particular in patients with a chronic underlying liver disease. Portal vein embolization (PVE) is an approach that is gaining increasing acceptance in the preoperative treatment of selected patients prior to major hepatic resection. Induction of selective hypertrophy of the non-diseased portion of the liver with PVE in patients with either primary or secondary hepatobiliary, malignancy with small estimated future liver remnants (FLR) may result in fewer complications and shorter hospital stays following resection. Additionally, PVE performed in patients initially considered unsuitable for resection due to lack of sufficient remaining normal parenchyma may add to the pool of candidates for surgical treatment. A thorough knowledge of hepatic segmentation and portal venous anatomy is essential before performing PVE. In addition, the indications and contraindications for PVE, the methods for assessing hepatic lobar hypertrophy, the means of determining optimal timing of resection, and the possible complications of PVE need to be fully understood before undertaking the procedure. Technique may vary among operators, but cyanoacrylate glue seems to be the best embolic agent with the highest expected rate of liver regeneration for PVE. The procedure is usually indicated when the remnant liver accounts for less than 25-40% of the total liver volume. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-embolized segments is maximal during the first 2 weeks and persists, although to a lesser extent during approximately 6 weeks. Liver resection is performed 2 to 6 weeks after embolization. The goal of this article is to discuss the rationale, indications, techniques and outcomes of PVE before major hepatectomy. PMID:26682142

  20. Transgastric Synthetic Mesh Migration, 9 Years after Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    You, Jae; Onizuka, Neil; Wong, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Complications of synthetic mesh have been described in various hernia procedures including migration and erosion, but no previous report mentions this complication after liver resection. This case describes a patient who had undergone a left hepatic resection with mesh pledgets sutured along the cut edge of the liver. He remained complication-free until nine years later when he presented with weight loss and early satiety, and endoscopy revealed mesh within the lumen of the stomach. While still attached to the liver, the mesh had eroded into the lumen of the stomach and he ultimately required surgery to remove this. The use of synthetic mesh in hepatectomies and other abdominal procedures may require further consideration by surgeons regarding its relatively unknown tendency for migration and erosion. PMID:24839576

  1. [Combination of in-situ hepatic split and portal ligation in patients with colorectal cancer and metastatic hepatic spread].

    PubMed

    Shchepotin, I B; Kolesnik, O O; Lukashenko, A V; Burlaka, A A; Pryĭmak, V V; Hanich, O V

    2014-11-01

    In up to 50% of patients, suffering colorectal cancer (CRC), a hepatic metastatic affection was revealed, in 20-34% of them the metastases have occurred synchroniously with primary tumor. The main problem in estimation of resectability of metastatic CRC (mCRC) is a possibility to preserve a sufficient volume of the organ parenchyma, because an acute hepatic insufficiency (AHI) constitute one of the main risk factors for occurrence of complications and mortality in early postoperative period after extended hemihepatectomy. The expediency of application in National Cancer Institute of the insitu hepatic split in conjunction with a portal ligation (ISHS-PL), elaborated by surgical group in Regensburg, was studied up. The results of treatment of mCRC, using ISHS-PL--in 3 patients and of a standard two-staged hepatic resection--in 3, were analyzed. Duration of a gap period between the ISHS-PL stages have constituted on average (10 +/- 1) days, and for a standard two-staged hepatic resection--(56 +/- 11.3) days (p = 0.001). The investigation results witness a safety of performance of the ISHS-PL in patients, suffering mCRC. Application of such a surgical tactics have permitted to reduce the risk of an AHI occurrence after performance of the extended hepatic resection in patients, suffering bilobar metastatic hepatic affection. PMID:25675734

  2. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected with the hepatitis B virus, can I breastfeed? • If I am infected with the hepatitis B ... infected with the hepatitis C virus, can I breastfeed? • Glossary What are hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  3. Management of a large mucosal defect after duodenal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal endoscopic resection is the most difficult type of endoscopic treatment in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and is technically challenging because of anatomical specificities. In addition to these technical difficulties, this procedure is associated with a significantly higher rate of complication than endoscopic treatment in other parts of the GI tract. Postoperative delayed perforation and bleeding are hazardous complications, and emergency surgical intervention is sometimes required. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to establish a management protocol for preventing serious complications. For instance, the prophylactic closure of large mucosal defects after endoscopic resection may reduce the risk of hazardous complications. However, the size of mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is relatively large compared with the size after endoscopic mucosal resection, making it impossible to achieve complete closure using only conventional clips. The over-the-scope clip and polyglycolic acid sheets with fibrin gel make it possible to close large mucosal defects after duodenal ESD. In addition to the combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection, endoscopic full-thickness resection holds therapeutic potential for difficult duodenal lesions and may overcome the disadvantages of endoscopic resection in the near future. This review aims to summarize the complications and closure techniques of large mucosal defects and to highlight some directions for management after duodenal endoscopic treatment. PMID:27547003

  4. Microsurgical resection of intramedullary spinal cord ependymoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Ependymomas are the most commonly occurring intramedullary spinal cord tumor in adults. With few exceptions these tumors are histologically benign, although they exhibit some biologic variability with respect to growth rate. While unencapsulated, spinal ependymomas are non-infiltrative and present a clear margin of demarcation from the surrounding spinal cord that serves as an effective dissection plane. This video demonstrates the technique of microsurgical resection of an intramedullary ependymoma through a posterior midline myelotomy. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/lcHhymSvSqU. PMID:25175587

  5. Holmium: YAG laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bukala, B; Denstedt, J D

    1999-04-01

    The holmium laser is a relatively new multipurpose medical laser that recently became available for use in urology. There has been considerable interest in this device, as it seems to combine the cutting properties of the carbon dioxide laser with the coagulating properties of the neodymium:YAG laser, making it particularly appealing for many surgical applications. The last decade has seen enthusiasm for the use of laser energy for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this article, we review the technique of Ho:YAG laser resection of the prostate, including the essential equipment and perioperative patient care. PMID:10360503

  6. Abducens nerve palsy after schwannoma resection.

    PubMed

    Bobbio, Antonio; Hamelin-Canny, Emelyne; Roche, Nicolas; Taillia, Herve; Alifano, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Tumors of the posterior mediastinum are mostly neurogenic and could involve the intervertebral foramen and the medullary canal. We describe the case of a patient who underwent surgery for a nerve sheet tumor originating at the level of the right second neural root. Resection was associated with an incidental dural tear and cerebrospinal fluid leak that was promptly repaired. One week after surgery, horizontal diplopia occurred. A palsy of the left abducens nerve secondary to intracranial hypotension was diagnosed. We present the pathogenic cascade leading to this ocular complication after posterior mediastinal surgery. The surgical techniques to prevent this complication are discussed. PMID:25639411

  7. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... There are different tests for hepatitis A and B. A positive test is ... may mean: You currently have a hepatitis infection. This may ...

  8. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  9. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  10. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ... medical care is an important factor in staying as healthy as possible. The American Liver Foundation is ...

  12. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the hepatitis B virus is also present. Transmission Hepatitis D can be found in the blood, ... other body fluids of people who are infected. Transmission happens when infected body fluid enters another person’s ...

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  14. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  15. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  16. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  17. TOTALLY LAPAROSCOPIC LIVER RESECTION: NEW BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    LACERDA, Croider Franco; BERTULUCCI, Paulo Anderson; de OLIVEIRA, Antônio Talvane Torres

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing number of laparoscopic hepatectomy, there is little published experience. Aim To evaluate the results of a series of hepatectomy completely done with laparoscopic approach. Methods This is a retrospective study of 61 laparoscopic liver resections. Were studied conversion to open technique; mean age; gender, mortality; complications; type of hepatectomy; surgical techniques applied; and simultaneous operations. Results The conversion to open technique was necessary in one case (1.6%). The mean age was 54.7 years (17-84), 34 were men. Three patients (4.9%) had complications. One died postoperatively (mortality 1.6%) and no deaths occurred intraoperatively. The most frequent type was right hepatectomy (37.7%), followed by bisegmentectomy (segments II-III and VI-VII). Were not used hemi-Pringle maneuvers or assisted technic. Six patients (8.1%) underwent simultaneous procedures (hepatectomy and colectomy). Conclusion Laparoscopic hepatectomy is feasible procedure and can be considered the gold standard for various conditions requiring liver resections for both benign to malignant diseases. PMID:25184770

  18. Case report of solitary giant hepatic lymphangioma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwan Hyo

    2016-01-01

    A hepatic lymphangioma is a rare benign neoplasm that is usually associated with systemic lymphangiomatosis. A solitary hepatic lymphangioma is extremely rare. Therefore, we present a rare case of a female patient who underwent right hepatectomy for solitary giant hepatic lymphangioma. A 42-year-old female presented to the emergency department with complaint of severe abdominal pain of the right upper quadrant. Abdominal computed tomography showed an approximately 23×30-cm sized, giant, relatively well-defined, homogenous cystic mass with few septa in the right liver (segments VII and VIII). The preoperative diagnosis was a giant hepatic cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. We performed right hepatectomy. The permanent histopathological report revealed cystic lymphangioma of the liver. Although the prognosis of solitary hepatic lymphangioma after surgical resection is favorable, recurrence has been reported in literature. PMID:27212994

  19. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... suggest medicines to help relieve your symptoms. The hepatitis A vaccine can prevent HAV. Good hygiene can also ...

  20. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  1. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Hepatitis A Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis * A is a virus , or infection, ...

  2. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  3. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  4. Personalized Computational Modeling of Mitral Valve Prolapse: Virtual Leaflet Resection

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Yonghoon; Choi, Ahnryul; McPherson, David D.; Kim, Hyunggun

    2015-01-01

    Posterior leaflet prolapse following chordal elongation or rupture is one of the primary valvular diseases in patients with degenerative mitral valves (MVs). Quadrangular resection followed by ring annuloplasty is a reliable and reproducible surgical repair technique for treatment of posterior leaflet prolapse. Virtual MV repair simulation of leaflet resection in association with patient-specific 3D echocardiographic data can provide quantitative biomechanical and physiologic characteristics of pre- and post-resection MV function. We have developed a solid personalized computational simulation protocol to perform virtual MV repair using standard clinical guidelines of posterior leaflet resection with annuloplasty ring implantation. A virtual MV model was created using 3D echocardiographic data of a patient with posterior chordal rupture and severe mitral regurgitation. A quadrangle-shaped leaflet portion in the prolapsed posterior leaflet was removed, and virtual plication and suturing were performed. An annuloplasty ring of proper size was reconstructed and virtual ring annuloplasty was performed by superimposing the ring and the mitral annulus. Following the quadrangular resection and ring annuloplasty simulations, patient-specific annular motion and physiologic transvalvular pressure gradient were implemented and dynamic finite element simulation of MV function was performed. The pre-resection MV demonstrated a substantial lack of leaflet coaptation which directly correlated with the severe mitral regurgitation. Excessive stress concentration was found along the free marginal edge of the posterior leaflet involving the chordal rupture. Following the virtual resection and ring annuloplasty, the severity of the posterior leaflet prolapse markedly decreased. Excessive stress concentration disappeared over both anterior and posterior leaflets, and complete leaflet coaptation was effectively restored. This novel personalized virtual MV repair strategy has great

  5. Laser-assisted parenchyma-sparing pulmonary resection

    SciTech Connect

    LoCicero, J. III; Frederiksen, J.W.; Hartz, R.S.; Michaelis, L.L. )

    1989-05-01

    The neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser is an excellent tool for removing lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. Local excision of 32 pulmonary lesions in 26 patients was performed with the Nd:YAG laser. Fourteen patients had moderate to severe impairment of pulmonary function: average forced vital capacity = 2.2 +/- 0.3 L and forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 1.3 +/- 0.3 L. Limited thoracotomy was used in the last 23 patients. The resected lesions included 16 primary malignant tumors: nine adenocarcinomas, five squamous carcinomas, and two large cell carcinomas. Eight of these lesions were classified as T1 N0, seven were T2 N0; and one was T1 N2. There were 10 metastatic lesions: three lymphomas, two adenocarcinomas, two leiomyosarcomas, and one case each of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. There were six benign lesions: three granulomas, two hamartomas, and one carcinoid. Twelve lesions were deep seated, could not have been removed by wedge resection or segmentectomy, and would have necessitated lobectomy without this technique. With the laser, the lesion could be precisely excised with minimal loss of lung parenchyma. Mean operating time was 80 +/- 20 minutes; laser resection time was 15 +/- 8 minutes. Resection necessitated 10,000 to 20,000 J. Total blood loss was minimal (less than 100 ml). Chest tubes were always used and remained in place 5 +/- 2 days. The mean hospitalization time was 10 +/- 2 days. Pulmonary function testing, perform 6 weeks to 6 months after discharge, showed no significant difference from preoperative levels. To date, there have been no local recurrences (longest follow-up 2 years). The Nd:YAG laser is an excellent adjunct for pulmonary resection in patients who have marginal pulmonary function or who have deep parenchymal lesions not amenable to wedge resection. The operative technique for laser resection is presented.

  6. Costs of laparoscopic and open liver and pancreatic resection: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Limongelli, Paolo; Vitiello, Chiara; Belli, Andrea; Pai, Madhava; Tolone, Salvatore; del Genio, Gianmattia; Brusciano, Luigi; Docimo, Giovanni; Habib, Nagy; Belli, Giulio; Jiao, Long Richard; Docimo, Ludovico

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study costs of laparoscopic and open liver and pancreatic resections, all the compiled data from available observational studies were systematically reviewed. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane databases to identify all studies published up to 2013 that compared laparoscopic and open liver [laparoscopic hepatic resection (LLR) vs open liver resection (OLR)] and pancreatic [laparoscopic pancreatic resection (LPR) vs open pancreatic resection] resection. The last search was conducted on October 30, 2013. RESULTS: Four studies reported that LLR was associated with lower ward stay cost than OLR (2972 USD vs 5291 USD). The costs related to equipment (3345 USD vs 2207 USD) and theatre (14538 vs 11406) were reported higher for LLR. The total cost was lower in patients managed by LLR (19269 USD) compared to OLR (23419 USD). Four studies reported that LPR was associated with lower ward stay cost than OLR (6755 vs 9826 USD). The costs related to equipment (2496 USD vs 1630 USD) and theatre (5563 vs 4444) were reported higher for LPR. The total cost was lower in the LPR (8825 USD) compared to OLR (13380 USD). CONCLUSION: This systematic review support the economic advantage of laparoscopic over open approach to liver and pancreatic resection. PMID:25516675

  7. Holmium laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, K; Iida, S; Tomiyasu, K; Shimada, A; Suekane, S; Noda, S

    1998-06-01

    A total of 35 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated with the Ho: YAG laser using a new technique termed holmium laser resection of the prostate or HoLRP. The laser energy was applied directly to prostatic tissue exclusively through the use of a standard 550 micron end-firing fiber. A high-powered holmium laser was used and was set at 2.4 J per pulse at 25 pulses per second for an average power of 60 W. The mean preoperative AUA Symptom Score was 24. Postoperatively, the score dropped to 10.9, 8.2, 5.2, and 4.6 at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. The peak urine flow rate improved from 6.3 mL/sec preoperatively to 15.1, 15.3 and 16 mL/sec at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. A foley catheter was removed within 24 hours of completion of the operation in 31 patients (89%), and voiding was improved. The HoLRP technique was bloodless, and the short-term results were satisfactory. Most importantly, the defect produced by HoLRP is identical to that of a conventional transurethral resection. These initial results demonstrate that HoLRP is a useful surgical alternative in the treatment of patients with obstructive BPH. PMID:9658303

  8. Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sözüer, Erdoğan M.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, 226 patients with hydatid disease admitted to the Surgical Department of Erciyes University (Kayseri) and Şişli Etfal Hospital (Istanbul) in Turkey between 1978 and 1990 were reviewed retrospectively. 102 patients (45.1%) were male and 124 (54.9%) female. The most frequent symptom was right upper abdominal pain (66%). The most frequent signs were hepatomegaly (43.8%) and palpable mass (39%). 167 patients (73.9%) were examined with ultrasonography which has a diagnostic value of 94%. Preoperative complications were infection of cyst (7%), intrabiliary rupture (3.5%) and anaphylactic shock (0.4%). Patients were operated on by various techniques; omentoplasty (101), external drainage of residual cavity (64), marsupialization (25), capitonnage (15), introflexion (10), pericystectomy (6), and hepatic resection (5). Main postoperative complications were wound infection (12%) and biliary fistula (2.6%). Total mortality rate was 1.8% in this series. PMID:7880776

  9. Differentiating the impact of anatomic and non-anatomic liver resection on early recurrence in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background For Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with hepatectomy, the extent of the resection margin remains controversial and data available on its effect on early tumor recurrence are very few and contradictory. The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of the type of resection (anatomic versus non-anatomic) on early intra-hepatic HCC recurrence in patients with solitary HCC and preserved liver function. Methods Among 53 patients with similar clinico-pathologic data who underwent curative liver resection for HCC between 2000 and 2006, 28 patients underwent anatomic resection of at least one liver segment and 25 patients underwent limited resection with a margin of at least 1 cm. Results After a close follow-up period of 24 months, no difference was detected in recurrence rates between the anatomic (35.7%) and the non-anatomic (40%) groups in either univariate (p = 0.74) and multivariate (p = 0.65) analysis. Factors contributing to early recurrence were tumor size (p = 0.012) and tumor stage including vascular invasion (p = 0.009). Conclusion The choice of the type of resection for HCC should be based on the maintenance of adequate hepatic reserve. The type of resection (anatomic vs non-anatomic) was found not to be a risk factor for early tumor recurrence. PMID:20497548

  10. Experimental model in cadavera of arthroscopic resection of calcaneonavicular coalition and its first in-vivo application: preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Molano-Bernardino, Carlos; Bernardino, Carlos Molano; Golanó, Pau; Garcia, Maria Angeles; López-Vidriero, Emilio

    2009-11-01

    Open surgical resection of calcaneonavicular coalition is indicated after the failure of conservative treatment. Our objectives are to develop the arthroscopic surgical technique and to check the feasibility of the arthroscopic resection of the calcaneonavicular coalition. We designed and performed endoscopic resection of the calcaneonavicular ligament and part of the anterior process of calcaneus as a simulation of the coalition resection on four cadaver specimens. After this procedure, we successfully performed the first resection in a 12-year-old girl, without any soft tissue interposition. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hindfoot Scale was 55 before surgery, 98 after 10 weeks, and 100 after 2 years without recurrence. PMID:19623084

  11. Management of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)-associated Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy by Shunt Reduction Using the Parallel Technique: Outcomes of a Retrospective Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Cookson, Daniel T. Zaman, Zubayr; Gordon-Smith, James; Ireland, Hamish M.; Hayes, Peter C.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the reproducibility and technical and clinical success of the parallel technique of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) reduction in the management of refractory hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Materials and Methods: A 10-mm-diameter self-expanding stent graft and a 5-6-mm-diameter balloon-expandable stent were placed in parallel inside the existing TIPS in 8 patients via a dual unilateral transjugular approach. Changes in portosystemic pressure gradient and HE grade were used as primary end points. Results: TIPS reduction was technically successful in all patients. Mean {+-} standard deviation portosystemic pressure gradient before and after shunt reduction was 4.9 {+-} 3.6 mmHg (range, 0-12 mmHg) and 10.5 {+-} 3.9 mmHg (range, 6-18 mmHg). Duration of follow-up was 137 {+-} 117.8 days (range, 18-326 days). Clinical improvement of HE occurred in 5 patients (62.5%) with resolution of HE in 4 patients (50%). Single episodes of recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred in 3 patients (37.5%). These were self-limiting in 2 cases and successfully managed in 1 case by correction of coagulopathy and blood transfusion. Two of these patients (25%) died, one each of renal failure and hepatorenal failure. Conclusion: The parallel technique of TIPS reduction is reproducible and has a high technical success rate. A dual unilateral transjugular approach is advantageous when performing this procedure. The parallel technique allows repeat bidirectional TIPS adjustment and may be of significant clinical benefit in the management of refractory HE.

  12. Total Resection of Complex Spinal Cord Lipomas: How, Why, and When to Operate?

    PubMed Central

    PANG, Dachling

    2015-01-01

    This article shows the long-term advantage of total resection of complex spinal cord lipomas over partial resection and over non-surgical treatment for children with asymptomatic lipomas. The classification, embryogenesis, and technique of total resection of complex lipomas are described. The 20-year outcome of 315 patients who had total resection is measured by overall progression-free survival (PFS, Kaplan-Meier), and by subgroup Cox multivariate hazard analysis for the influence of four variables: lipoma type, symptoms, prior surgery, and post-operative cord-sac ratio. These results are compared to 116 patients who underwent partial resection, and to two published series of asymptomatic lipomas followed without surgery. The PFS after total resection for all lipomas is 88.1% over 20 years vs. 34.6% for partial resection at 10.5 years (p < 0.0001). The PFS for total resection of asymptomatic virgin lipomas rose to 98.8% vs. 60% and 67% for non-surgical treatment. Partial resection also compares poorly to non-surgical treatment for asymptomatic lipomas. Multivariate analyses show that a low cord-sac ratio is the only independent variable that predicts good outcome. Pre-operative profiling shows the ideal patient for total resection is a young child with a virgin asymptomatic lipoma, who, with a PFS of 99.2%, is essentially cured. The technique of total resection can be learned by any neurosurgeon. Its long-term protection against symptomatic recurrence is better than partial resection and conservative management. The surgery should be done at diagnosis, except for asymptomatic small infants in whom surgery should be postponed till 6 months to minimize morbidity. PMID:26345666

  13. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for complex mediastinal mass resections

    PubMed Central

    DeMarchi, Lorenzo; Emerson, Dominic A.; Holzner, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has changed the way operative procedures are performed in many specialties. As surgeons have become progressively facile with these techniques, the opportunities to use them have expanded. In thoracic surgery, many surgeons now use minimally invasive techniques to resect small, uncomplicated pathologies of the mediastinum as well as to perform thymectomy for myasthenia gravis. Experience with these techniques has allowed new knowledge to be gained and expansion of the use of these techniques for more complicated mediastinal pathology. This keynote address will outline the instrumentation and techniques that we have adopted over a decade of using these techniques for more complicated mediastinal pathology. PMID:26693146

  14. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  15. Hepatitis Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  16. [Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia].

    PubMed

    Borisch, N

    2014-10-01

    In arthroscopic wrist surgery, the resection of dorsal wrist ganglia has become a well accepted practice. As advantages for the minimally invasive procedure the low complication rate and low postoperative morbidity, less postoperative pain and faster recovery over open techniques are discussed. The possibility to assess accompanying joint pathology is considered as another advantage. The importance of identifying a so-called ganglion cyst stalk seems to have been overstated. Regarding the technique, the main discussion points are the size and localisation of the capsular window and the necessity of additional midcarpal arthroscopy. The possibility and results of treatment of recurrent ganglion cysts are still controversial. Our own experience and that of some authors are positive. Hardly mentioned in the literature is the treatment of occult dorsal wrist ganglia and its results, which is considered as very successful by the authors. PMID:25290273

  17. [Local resection of cancer of the Vater's papilla].

    PubMed

    Søndenaa, K; Andersen, E; Søreide, J A; Tysvaer, A

    1992-09-10

    Tumours of the papilla of Vater are almost always adenocarcinomas and are often less than 2.5 cm in diameter. Lymph node metastases occur in one fourth of the patients with tumours with a diameter of less than 2.5 cm. Whipple's procedure has been the most common operation when attempting radical excision. Local resection has not won acclaim, even though the five year survival rates are often reported to be about the same as for Whipple's procedure. We present a patient who was operated on by local resection, and describe the operative technique. PMID:1412308

  18. Cochlear implantation after resection of an intralabyrinthine schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Christopher A; Kveton, John F

    2014-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare tumors of the distal ends of the cochlear and vestibular nerve. Their presence can be debilitating secondary to symptoms of hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, and imbalance. Currently, treatment to restore hearing in those who have become profoundly deaf is not attempted. Additionally, resection in patients with functioning hearing is rare, as the surgery assures deafness. We report the first case demonstrating the feasibility of resection of an intralabyrinthine schwannoma with immediate cochlear implantation. This technique addresses the patients hearing status by taking into account advancing technology, allowing for an improved quality of life. PMID:24321750

  19. Quantitative measurement of essential and not essential metals in muscular, hepatic and renal tissue of horses by means of PIXE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzan, S.; Buoso, M. C.; Ceccato, D.; De Poli, M.; Giaccone, V.; Moschini, G.; Novelli, E.; Olabanji, S. O.; Passi, P.; Tepedino, V.

    2004-06-01

    Nowadays, the food safety and the related health risks for humans are a major issue. It has become a priority to ensure the health and well-being of the population through the better scientific understanding of the food intake influence. A frequently found harmful feature of human diet is the simultaneous presence in food stuff of both essential and toxic elements. A significant example of this situation is represented by horse meat. The aim of this survey is to evaluate the elemental content of muscular, hepatic and renal tissues of horses bred in different countries of the East of Europe and slaughtered in Italy. The studied population consisted of about 100 individuals; the sampling period, coinciding with the highest market request, was extended from November to March. Freeze dried tissues were pelletized and carbon coated prior to analysis. The samples were analyzed using Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique at the AN2000 van de Graaff accelerator of the INFN-National Laboratories of Legnaro. The accuracy of the results was verified using certified standard reference materials prepared and measured in the same experimental conditions. Results have highlighted the noble nutritional values of horse muscular tissue in terms of iron, zinc and calcium content. Cadmium was staidly identified in horse kidneys, with an average concentration of 257 μg/g on dried matter, while in liver it was sporadically present.

  20. 21 CFR 888.5 - Resurfacing technique.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... techniques, certain joint prostheses require far less bone resection than other devices intended to repair or replace the same joint. The amount of bone resection may or may not affect the safety and effectiveness...

  1. 21 CFR 888.5 - Resurfacing technique.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... techniques, certain joint prostheses require far less bone resection than other devices intended to repair or replace the same joint. The amount of bone resection may or may not affect the safety and effectiveness...

  2. [Chest wall reconstruction after resection of malignant chest wall tumors].

    PubMed

    Ayabe, H; Oka, T; Akamine, S; Takahashi, T; Nagayasu, T

    1998-05-01

    Full-thickness chest wall resection is performed for complete removal of primary and secondary malignant chest wall tumors. Large defects of the chest wall after resection must be repaired to maintain adequate ventilation, to protect important intrathoracic structures, and to preserve cosmetic integrity. Various materials have been utilized over the years to replace the rigid chest wall. At present, Marlex mesh and a composite of Marlex mesh and methylmethacrylate are frequently used to reconstruct rigid chest wall defects. On the other hand, to replace the soft part of the chest wall and cover the rigid materials, pedicled muscle flaps, myocutaneous flaps, or omentum are used. Major pedicled flaps include the pectoralis major, rectus abdominis and latissimus dorsi muscular, and musculocutaneous flaps. Techniques are now available to repair any chest wall site, and to restore chest continuity in patients whose tumors are curatively resected. PMID:9656244

  3. Active contour based segmentation of resected livers in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelmann, Simon; Oyarzun Laura, Cristina; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The majority of state of the art segmentation algorithms are able to give proper results in healthy organs but not in pathological ones. However, many clinical applications require an accurate segmentation of pathological organs. The determination of the target boundaries for radiotherapy or liver volumetry calculations are examples of this. Volumetry measurements are of special interest after tumor resection for follow up of liver regrow. The segmentation of resected livers presents additional challenges that were not addressed by state of the art algorithms. This paper presents a snakes based algorithm specially developed for the segmentation of resected livers. The algorithm is enhanced with a novel dynamic smoothing technique that allows the active contour to propagate with different speeds depending on the intensities visible in its neighborhood. The algorithm is evaluated in 6 clinical CT images as well as 18 artificial datasets generated from additional clinical CT images.

  4. Minimum-incision metatarsal ray resection: an observational case series.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the results of 17 metatarsal ray resections performed through a minimal incision in 13 consecutive patients. Each patient underwent minimum-incision metatarsal ray resection for either definitive treatment or as the index incision and drainage procedure followed by transmetatarsal amputation. There were 10 male and 3 female patients with a mean age of 68.8 +/- 8.5 years (range, 59-83 years). Twelve patients had diabetes mellitus and 7 had critical limb ischemia. There were 11 right feet and 6 left feet involved, and 3 second, 3 third, 3 fourth, and 8 fifth minimum-incision metatarsal ray resections performed. Direct primary-incision closure was performed 7 times (1 with adjacent percutaneous metatarsal osteotomy), delayed primary closure was performed 4 times (1 with external fixation), and conversion to a transmetatarsal amputation was performed 2 times. Fourteen of 17 minimum-incision metatarsal ray resections were deemed successful. Two failures occurred when skin necrosis developed from excessive tension along the incision line requiring conversion to a transmetatarsal amputation, and the other occurred in a patient with unreconstructed critical limb ischemia who underwent multiple repeated incision and drainage procedures and vascular bypass with ultimate healing via secondary intent. When properly performed in patients with adequate vascular inflow, minimum-incision metatarsal ray resection as the definitive procedure or in conjunction with an incision and drainage for unsalvageable toe infection or gangrene represents a safe, simple, useful technique. PMID:20123288

  5. Non-Exposure, Device-Assisted Endoscopic Full-thickness Resection.

    PubMed

    Bauder, Markus; Schmidt, Arthur; Caca, Karel

    2016-04-01

    Recent developments have expanded the frontier of interventional endoscopy toward more extended resections following surgical principles. This article presents two new device-assisted techniques for endoscopic full-thickness resection in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Both methods are nonexposure techniques avoiding exposure of gastrointestinal contents to the peritoneal cavity by a "close first-cut later" principle. The full-thickness resection device is a novel over-the-scope device designed for clip-assisted full-thickness resection of colorectal lesions. Endoscopic full-thickness resection of gastric subepithelial tumors can be performed after placing transmural sutures underneath the tumor with a suturing device originally designed for endoscopic antireflux therapy. PMID:27036899

  6. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  7. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  8. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family ...

  10. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  11. Single port VATS mediastinal tumor resection: Taiwan experience

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Heish, Ming-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background To present the technique of single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic mediastinal tumor resection, which includes limited thymectomy, extended thymectomy, cyst excision and posterior mediastinal tumor excision, and the early results of resection with the use of this technique. Methods Forty patients with mediastinal tumors were treated with single-port thoracoscopic mediastinal resection at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital between April 2014 and September 2015. The surgical intervention was performed through the fourth or fifth intercostal space at the anterior axillary line. A 5 or 10 mm 30 degree video camera and working instruments were employed simultaneously at this incision site throughout the surgery. Results Among the 40 cases included in the final analysis, 10 extended thymectomies, 7 limited thymectomies, nine cyst excisions and 14 tumor excisions were performed successfully without the need for conversion. For the 40 patients who underwent single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), the mean operation time was 97.3±31.2 min and the average blood loss was 29.75±39.77 mL. The average length of the incision wound was 3.22±0.79 cm and the average length of postoperative hospital stay was 3.72±1.63 days. There were no mortalities and mobility was achieved within 30 days postoperatively. Conclusions Our preliminary report suggests that uniportal VATS for mediastinal tumor resection is a promising and safe technique within a short-term period. PMID:27134836

  12. Sessile serrated adenoma: from identification to resection.

    PubMed

    Bordaçahar, Benoît; Barret, Maximilien; Terris, Benoît; Dhooge, Marion; Dreanic, Johann; Prat, Frédéric; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-02-01

    Until the past two decades, almost all colorectal polyps were divided into two main groups: hyperplastic polyps and adenomas. Sessile serrated adenomas presented endoscopic, pathological and molecular profiles distinct from others polyps. Previously under-diagnosed, physicians now identified sessile serrated adenomas. The serrated neoplastic pathway is accounting for up to one-third of all sporadic colorectal cancers and sessile serrated adenomas have been identified as the main precursor lesions in serrated carcinogenesis. By analogy with the adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence, the sessile serrated adenomas-adenocarcinoma sequence, has been identified. The development of endoscopic resection techniques permits the consideration of a non-surgical approach as the first option regardless of the size of the lesion. Sessile serrated adenoma warrants the watchfulness of physicians and requires an optimal quality of the colonoscopy procedure, a thorough evaluation of the lesion, an adequate endoscopic resection and follow-up colonoscopies in accordance with sessile serrated adenomas guidelines. We herein present a review on sessile serrated adenomas focusing on their pathological specificities, epidemiology, treatment modalities and follow-up. PMID:25445408

  13. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Foroulis, Christophoros N; Kleontas, Athanassios D; Tagarakis, George; Nana, Chryssoula; Alexiou, Ioannis; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Tossios, Paschalis; Papadaki, Elena; Kioumis, Ioannis; Baka, Sofia; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Malignant chest wall tumors are rare neoplasms. Resection with wide-free margins is an important prognostic factor, and massive chest wall resection and reconstruction are often necessary. A recent case series of 20 consecutive patients is reported in order to find any possible correlation between tumor histology, extent of resection, type of reconstruction, and adjuvant treatment with short- and long-term outcomes. Methods Twenty patients were submitted to chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant chest wall neoplasms between 2006 and 2014. The mean age (ten males) was 59±4 years. The size and histology of the tumor, the technique of reconstruction, and the short- and long-term follow-up records were noted. Results The median maximum diameter of tumors was 10 cm (5.4–32 cm). Subtotal sternal resection was performed in nine cases, and the resection of multiple ribs was performed in eleven cases. The median area of chest wall defect was 108 cm2 (60–340 cm2). Histology revealed soft tissue, bone, and cartilage sarcomas in 16 cases (80%), most of them chondrosarcomas. The rest of the tumors was metastatic tumors in two cases and localized malignant pleural mesothelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in one case. The chest wall defect was reconstructed by using the “sandwich technique” (propylene mesh/methyl methacrylate/propylene mesh) in nine cases of large anterior defects or by using a 2 mm polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh in nine cases of lateral or posterior defects. Support from a plastic surgeon was necessary to cover the full-thickness chest wall defects in seven cases. Adjuvant oncologic treatment was administered in 13 patients. Local recurrences were observed in five cases where surgical reintervention was finally necessary in two cases. Recurrences were associated with larger tumors, histology of malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and initial incomplete resection or misdiagnosis made by nonthoracic surgeons. Three patients died

  14. Multidisciplinary Approach to Hepatic Metastases of Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Manatakis, Dimitrios K.; Delis, Spiridon G.; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Dervenis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is a rare primary tumor originating from Zimmerman's pericytes, with significant metastatic potential. Hepatic metastatic disease requires an aggressive approach by a multidisciplinary team of dedicated oncology specialists, to prolong survival in selected patients. We report on a patient with recurrent hepatic metastases of grade II intracranial hemangiopericytoma 5 years after initial treatment, managed by a stepwise combination of liver resection, radiofrequency ablation, and transarterial embolization. Although metastatic disease implies hematogenous dissemination, long-term survival after liver resection has been reported and major hepatectomies are justified in patients with adequate local control. Liver resections combined with transarterial embolization are highly recommended, due to hypervascularity of the tumor. PMID:26090247

  15. Surgical trauma and immune functional changes following major lung resection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Calvin S H; Lau, Kelvin K W

    2015-02-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has evolved greatly over the last two decades. VATS major lung resection for early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) has been shown to result in less postoperative pain, less pulmonary dysfunction postoperatively, shorter hospital stay, and better patient tolerance to adjuvant chemotherapy compared with patients who underwent thoracotomy. Several recent studies have even reported improved long-term survival in those who underwent VATS major lung resection for early stage NSCLC when compared with open technique. Interestingly, the immune status and autologous tumor killing ability of lung cancer patients have previously been associated with long-term survival. VATS major lung resection can result in an attenuated postoperative inflammatory response. Furthermore, the minimal invasive approach better preserve patients' postoperative immune function, leading to higher circulating natural killer and T cells numbers, T cell oxidative activity, and levels of immunochemokines such as insulin growth factor binding protein 3 following VATS compared with thoracotomy. Apart from host immunity, the angiogenic environment following surgery may also have a role in determining cancer recurrence and possibly survival. Whether differences in immunological and biochemical mediators contribute significantly towards improved clinical outcomes following VATS major lung resection for lung cancer remains to be further investigated. Future studies will also need to address whether the reduced access trauma from advanced thoracic surgical techniques, such as single-port VATS, can further attenuate the postoperative inflammatory response. PMID:25829712

  16. Anatomical liver resection of segment 4a en bloc with the caudate lobe.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Nicola; Coppola, Alessandro; Ardito, Francesco; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Giuliante, Felice

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical segmentectomy is the complete resection of an area supplied by a segmental portal branch. Among segmentectomies, isolated segmentectomy 4 is a technically demanding procedure because there are two transection planes: on the left side along the umbilical fissure and, on the right side, along the middle hepatic vein. Although there are several reports on anatomic segmentectomies, only few regard the anatomic segmentectomy 4a. We report here the case of a 60-year-old man who underwent anatomical segmentectomy 4a en bloc with the caudate lobe to resect a colorectal liver metastasis located in segment 4a and involving the paracaval portion of the caudate lobe. This type of procedure was planned in order to maximize the postoperative functional hepatic reserve, thereby reducing the risk of postoperative liver failure and ultimately allowing the possibility for future repeat hepatectomy in case of recurrence. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:665-667. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26891129

  17. Pathological evidence of the cause of spontaneous regression in a case of resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Shunichi; Tamura, Akinori; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Fujikawa, Hirotoshi; Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Sugitani, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented for an evaluation after experiencing right hypochondrial pain lasting for two months. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a hepatic tumor in the right liver and extremely mild hepatic steatosis. The imaging findings indicated that the tumor (43 mm in size) was ischemic, and the lesion was surgically resected and examined. The histopathological findings demonstrated 95% necrosis with moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The diagnosis was HCC with spontaneous regression. There was also pathological evidence of thrombus formation in the peripheral arteries and portal veins. In addition, the non-cancerous regions of the liver were diagnosed as exhibiting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The pathological findings obtained after resection of the HCC lesion showed spontaneous regression. PMID:25742889

  18. Tracheal resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Zuin, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tracheal neoplasms are rare diseases, mostly represented by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Symptoms presentation is often misleading and diagnosis may be delayed for months or years, so clinical suspicion plays a fundamental role. Corner stones in the diagnostic pathway are represented by rigid endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) scan, necessary to correctly stage the patients and identify the optimal surgical candidate. When appropriate, surgical resection and reconstruction is still the best opportunity to achieve a long-term survival with a good quality of life, but this kind of surgery is always a very challenging procedure and a wide experience with an in-depth knowledge of every technical detail, from selection of patient, to choice of surgical approach to reconstruction techniques, are needed and recommended. PMID:26981265

  19. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice. PMID:26975959

  20. Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected colorectal cancer metastases: Literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brandi, Giovanni; De Lorenzo, Stefania; Nannini, Margherita; Curti, Stefania; Ottone, Marta; Dall’Olio, Filippo Gustavo; Barbera, Maria Aurelia; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Biasco, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the only option of cure for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the risk of recurrence within 18 mo after metastasectomy is around 75% and the liver is the most frequent site of relapse. The current international guidelines recommend an adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of CRC metastases despite the lower level of evidence (based on the quality of studies in this setting). However, there is still no standard treatment and the effective role of an adjuvant therapy remains controversial. The aim of this review is to report the state-of-art of systemic chemotherapy and regional chemotherapy with hepatic arterial infusion in the management of patients after resection of metastases from CRC, with a literature review and meta-analysis of the relevant randomized controlled trials. PMID:26811604

  1. Multistage resection of esophageal squamous cell cancer of the cardia – successful despite complications

    PubMed Central

    Ptach, Anna; Sadowski, Andrzej; Chruścicka, Iwona; Pęksa, Rafał; Rak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is the treatment of choice for squamous cell esophageal cancer. Complete resection of the esophagus with reconstruction of the digestive tract is performed for tumors located in the chest or cardia. The aim of the report is to present the case of a complete esophageal and gastric resection complicated by colon graft necrosis. The patient was a 45-year-old woman diagnosed with cancer of the cardia infiltrating the distal section of the esophagus and the body and fundus of the stomach. The initial surgical procedure included the opening of three body cavities followed by resection of the thoracic esophagus, stomach, and a portion of the left hepatic lobe. Right colon interposition was performed to restore digestive tract continuity. On the 8th day, a leak was observed in the esophagointestinal anastomosis. Management consisted in two surgical procedures, one of which ended in the removal of the colon patch. The fourth and final procedure was conducted after 10 months. PMID:26702285

  2. Adenoma or atypical hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia: role of preoperative imaging and laparoscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Isidoro; Pulvirenti, Elia; Toro, Adriana; Priolo, Gian Domenico

    2010-06-01

    Differentiation of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and other hypervascular liver lesions, such as hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), is important because of the drastically different therapeutic approach. However, FNH can be well distinguished only if it shows a typical aspect; alternatively, in the case of atypical FNH, imaging findings are not specific enough to provide a secure diagnosis and histologic verification of the lesion is required. In addition, HCA cannot be identified conclusively by any current available imaging technique and it can be at best suspected strongly, and this suspicion may lead to liver resection. Herein we report a case of a patient with an unusual FNH nodule presenting at ultrasonographic scanning as an isoechoic mass arising from hepatic segment 4b; the diagnostic indecision between FNH and HCA was not definitively solved even after computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging and the patient was scheduled for a laparoscopic resection. The pathologic examination diagnosed an atypical FNH nodule. The clinical doubt between FNH and HCA remains a problem affecting the clinicians, and more effort should be made in the direction of a better preoperative differentiation of such different conditions. Surgical resection should not be considered as the failure of the preoperative diagnostic attempt, but as the mainstay for a definitive and sure diagnosis. PMID:20551788

  3. Primary hepatic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Padhan, Rajesh Kumar; Das, Prasenjit; Shalimar

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder confined to the liver without evidence of involvement of spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow or other lymphoid structures. This is in contrast to Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) that often involves the liver as a secondary manifestation. PHL is a rare disease and constitutes 0.016% of all cases of NHL. PHL typically occurs in middle aged men, and usually the chief presenting symptoms are non specific which includes right upper quadrant pain, B symptoms like fever and weight loss and constitutional symptoms. Most frequent physical finding is hepatomegaly which occurs in 75% of patients. Jaundice is rare and present only in less than 5% of patients. Majority of PHL originates from B cells. The blood investigations and imaging findings are nonspecific. Histopathology is essential and confirms the diagnosis. Treatment modalities include combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The prognosis without therapy is grim. The prognosis and management of PHL is different from hepatocellular carcinoma or metastatic disease, hence it is essential to differentiate it from these diseases. The purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis before implementing therapeutic plan for any hepatic space occupying lesion in liver. PMID:26591949

  4. The inferior mesenteric vessels as recipients when performing free tissue transfer for pelvic defects following abdomino-perineal resection. A novel technique and review of intra-peritoneal recipient vessel options for microvascular transfer.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Nicola C; Chan, James K K; Chave, Helen; McGuiness, Caroline N

    2010-12-01

    Successful microvascular transfer of tissue is dependent upon suitable vessels not only of the donor tissue but also at the recipient site. Congenital deformities, previous surgery, infection or irradiation at the recipient site may render vessels less suitable for this purpose. Under such circumstances it becomes desirable to identify suitable recipient vessels remote to the compromised area. In cases where external beam radiotherapy has been delivered, the superficial surface area damaged can be rather extensive precluding the use of even the longest of flap pedicles--a problem potentially addressed by searching for recipient vessels deep to the tissue planes affected. We report one such case where the inferior mesenteric vessels were used as recipient vessels for the microvascular transfer of a free Latissimus Dorsi musculocutaneous flap to reconstruct an extensive perineal defect following abdomino-perineal resection where the vessels would otherwise serve no purpose. Whilst a limited number of intra-peritoneal vessels have previously been reported as recipient vessels for free flap surgery there has not been, to our knowledge, any report of utilising the inferior mesenteric artery (Inf Mes A). Whilst based on a single case report, this article examines the literature describing microvascular transfer of tissue to compromised recipient sites and it reviews previously reported recipient vessel options available when reconstructing the perineum, abdominal wall or trunk with particular emphasis on intra-peritoneal options. PMID:20378437

  5. Differences in Perioperative Outcomes Between Right and Left Hepatic Lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Douaiher, Jeffrey; Dhir, Mashaal; Smith, Lynette; Are, Chandrakanth

    2016-03-01

    The safety of hepatic resection is well documented, but outcome studies comparing right and left hepatic lobectomy are sparse, especially in the context of malignancy. This study analyzes the differences in outcomes between right and left hepatic lobectomy in patients with malignant diagnoses. All patients undergoing right and left hepatic lobectomies for malignancy were extracted from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database (2005-2010). The data was analyzed to determine differences in perioperative mortality and morbidity between the two groups. A total of 1680 patients who underwent right or left hepatic lobectomy for malignant diagnoses were identified. Patients undergoing right hepatic lobectomy had a four-fold increase in perioperative mortality, compared to left lobectomy (p < 0.0001). Mortality in right lobectomy patients increased incrementally with age, with a 12-fold increase in patients > 81 years of age. Patients undergoing right lobectomy also experienced a statistically significant increase in morbidity involving several systems (infectious, pulmonary, cardiac and renal). The results of our study demonstrate that patients undergoing right hepatic lobectomy for malignancy experience a significantly higher incidence of mortality and multi-system morbidity when compared to left lobectomy. This information will be crucial for pre-operative risk-stratification of patients undergoing hepatic resection for malignancy. PMID:27065681

  6. Resection Probability Maps for Quality Assessment of Glioma Surgery without Brain Location Bias

    PubMed Central

    De Witt Hamer, Philip C.; Hendriks, Eef J.; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Barkhof, Frederik; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Duffau, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative brain stimulation mapping reduces permanent postoperative deficits and extends tumor removal in resective surgery for glioma patients. Successful functional mapping is assumed to depend on the surgical team's expertise. In this study, glioma resection results are quantified and compared using a novel approach, so-called resection probability maps (RPM), exemplified by a surgical team comparison, here with long and short experience in mapping. Methods Adult patients with glioma were included by two centers with two and fifteen years of mapping experience. Resective surgery was targeted at non-enhanced MRI extension and was limited by functional boundaries. Neurological outcome was compared. To compare resection results, we applied RPMs to quantify and compare the resection probability throughout the brain at 1 mm resolution. Considerations for spatial dependence and multiple comparisons were taken into account. Results The senior surgical team contributed 56, and the junior team 52 patients. The patient cohorts were comparable in age, preoperative tumor volume, lateralization, and lobe localization. Neurological outcome was similar between teams. The resection probability on the RPMs was very similar, with none (0%) of 703,967 voxels in left-sided tumors being differentially resected, and 124 (0.02%) of 644,153 voxels in right-sided tumors. Conclusion RPMs provide a quantitative volumetric method to compare resection results, which we present as standard for quality assessment of resective glioma surgery because brain location bias is avoided. Stimulation mapping is a robust surgical technique, because the neurological outcome and functional-based resection results using stimulation mapping are independent of surgical experience, supporting wider implementation. PMID:24039922

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as surgical planning tool: a pilot study on middle turbinate resection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Malhotra, Prashant; Rosen, David; Dalton, Pamela; Pribitkin, Edmund A

    2014-01-01

    Controversies exist regarding the resection or preservation of the middle turbinate (MT) during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Any MT resection will perturb nasal airflow and may affect the mucociliary dynamics of the osteomeatal complex. Neither rhinometry nor computed tomography (CT) can adequately quantify nasal airflow pattern changes following surgery. This study explores the feasibility of assessing changes in nasal airflow dynamics following partial MT resection using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. We retrospectively converted the pre- and post-operative CT scans of a patient who underwent isolated partial MT concha bullosa resection into anatomically accurate three-dimensional numerical nasal models. Pre- and post-surgery nasal airflow simulations showed that the partial MT resection resulted in a shift of regional airflow towards the area of MT removal with a resultant decreased airflow velocity, decreased wall shear stress and increased local air pressure. However, the resection did not strongly affect the overall nasal airflow patterns, flow distributions in other areas of the nose, or the odorant uptake rate to the olfactory cleft mucosa. Morever, CFD predicted the patient's failure to perceive an improvement in his unilateral nasal obstruction following surgery. Accordingly, CFD techniques can be used to predict changes in nasal airflow dynamics following partial MT resection. However, the functional implications of this analysis await further clinical studies. Nevertheless, such techniques may potentially provide a quantitative evaluation of surgical effectiveness and may prove useful in preoperatively modeling the effects of surgical interventions. PMID:25312372

  8. [Problems and difficulties in adapting period in infants and children after massive intestinal resection].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Hirai, Y; Sanada, Y; Nakagawa, T; Yoshizawa, Y; Amagai, T; Miyano, T

    1988-09-01

    In the period of intestinal adaptation following massive resection of intestine, patients have several difficulties and problems. This study was done in 17 survivals of 31 infants and children received massive intestinal resection (residual intestine; less than 75 cm) between 1966-1987 to define these problems and difficulties. 1) Postoperative hepatic dysfunction occurred in 11 of the 17 survivals. The relationship between relapsing frequency of hepatic dysfunction and length of remaining ileal segment suggested that the reduced ileal length may be one of the etiologic factors of the hepatic dysfunction. 2) Evaluation of serum bile acid levels suggested that the disturbance of bile acid reabsorption and its rapid turn over might still remain even after catch-up growth of these patients. 3) Abnormal levels of serum minerals (Ca, InP, Mg, Zn and Cu) were observed in 4 cases during TPN, and these abnormalities disappeared by discontinuation of parenteral nutrition and beginning of oral feeding. 4) Serum vitamin levels (Vit.A, Vit.E, 25-OH-D3, and Vit.B12) still remained in abnormal even after the patients reached school age. These results suggested that very long-term nutritional cares, especially in lipid and vitamin nutrition, are necessary for the children with massive intestinal resection. PMID:3226391

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  10. Chest wall resection for extrapulmonary tumor.

    PubMed

    Long, W P; Kline, R; Levine, E A

    1997-09-01

    Despite progress in early detection of breast cancer, a minority of women continue to present with extensive disease which may necessitate chest wall resection. Between 1992 and 1996, 14 patients were treated by surgical resection of the chest wall and reconstruction by the LSU Sections of Surgical Oncology and Plastic Surgery. Indications included resection of primary tumor, resection of recurrent tumor, and resection of radiation therapy induced damage to the chest wall. We report chest wall excision and reconstruction with no operative mortality and minor surgical morbidity in 21% of cases. Local control was achieved in 13 of 14 cases. Additionally we report uniform success in the palliation of ulcerating, painful, or infected chest wall lesions. Approximately 25% of patients treated for breast cancer and followed up for more than 6 months have remained free of disease. Chest wall resection is a useful modality in selected patients with extensive disease. PMID:9316348

  11. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Radiologic Management of Hepatic Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kouri, Brian E; Abrams, Ross A; Al-Refaie, Waddah B; Azad, Nilofer; Farrell, James; Gaba, Ron C; Gervais, Debra A; Gipson, Matthew G; Kolbeck, Kenneth J; Marshalleck, Francis E; Pinchot, Jason W; Small, William; Ray, Charles E; Hohenwalter, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    Management of primary and secondary hepatic malignancy is a complex problem. Achieving optimal care for this challenging population often requires the involvement of multiple medical and surgical disciplines. Because of the wide variety of potential therapies, treatment protocols for various malignancies continue to evolve. Consequently, development of appropriate therapeutic algorithms necessitates consideration of medical options, such as systemic chemotherapy; surgical options, such as resection or transplantation; and loco-regional therapies, such as thermal ablation and transarterial embolization techniques. This article provides a review of treatment strategies for the three most common subtypes of hepatic malignancy treated with loco-regional therapies: hepatocellular carcinoma, neuroendocrine metastases, and colorectal metastases. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26944037

  12. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Change Plan Wallet card for patients to record their alcohol use over a 4-week period as a way to monitor and reduce their drinking behavior. Glossary Definitions of terms commonly used with viral hepatitis and ...

  13. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . 2014;161(1):58-66. PMID 24863637 ... Development Conference Statement: Management of hepatitis B. Ann Intern Med . 2009;150:104-10. PMID: 19124811 www. ...

  14. Vaginoscopic resection of vaginal septum.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Joseph; Al Chami, Ali; Abu Musa, Antoine; Nassar, Anwar H; Kurdi, Ahmad; Ghulmiyyah, Labib

    2012-12-01

    We report the resection of a vaginal septum while preserving the virginity of a 12-year-old girl with Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome (HWWS) having a didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and an ipsilateral renal agenesis with follow-up at 18 months. Successful resection of the vaginal septum with conservation of the hymenal ring and complete drainage of both the hematocolpos and the hematometra were achieved. Cyclic dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain were completely resolved on follow-up visits at 4, 6, and 18 months. Office hysteroscopy performed during the last follow-up visit revealed a patent vaginal vault without evidence of adenosis or recurrence of the vaginal septum. Vaginoscopy is a safe, convenient, and efficient diagnostic and therapeutic modality that can be used in the management of patients with an obstructed hemivagina. It maintains the patient's virginity and it is useful in patients with a restrictive vaginal opening or narrow vaginal canal. Furthermore, the hysteroscopic excision of the vaginal septum offers minimal risk of recurrence of the septal defect. PMID:23315718

  15. Perioperative Therapy for Surgically Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingling; DeFoe, Melissa; Ruzinova, Marianna B; Olsen, Jeffrey R; Wang-Gillam, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    It is estimated that 10% to 20% of patients with pancreatic cancer present with resectable disease. Although surgery offers curative intent, the median survival after curative resection is less than 2 years. To improve clinical outcomes in this patient population, clinical studies have investigated the role of perioperative therapy, including neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment in resectable pancreatic cancer. The role of adjuvant therapy has been well established by large randomized phase III studies, whereas benefit of the neoadjuvant approach remains inconclusive. Here, we review various treatment modalities and their clinical benefits in resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26226906

  16. Hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery for ileocecal resection

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Satoru; Hara, Masayasu; Sato, Mikinori; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2012-01-01

    Although laparoscopic colectomy is commonly performed around the world, an operative wound formed during the surgery is large but not sufficient enough to convert for the majority of open surgery. Thus, a certain sized skin incision is required to remove the resected colon. Here we report the case of a pure laparoscopic ileocecal resection which involves transanal specimen extraction. We present a case characterized by a laterally spreading type of tumor of the cecum. We performed a pure laparoscopic ileocecal resection and the resected specimen was removed transanally using colonoscopy. Intracorporeal functional anastomosis was then performed using a flexible linear stapling device under supporting barbed suture traction. The patient was discharged without complications on postoperative day 4. Laparoscopic colectomy performed with minimal incision could essentially increase the usage of this surgical technique. Although our method is restricted to flat or small lesions, we think it is a feasible and realistic solution for minimization of operative invasion because it involves specimen extraction through a natural orifice. PMID:22408718

  17. Arthroscopic Resection of Wrist Ganglion Arising from the Lunotriquetral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Michael C. K.; Ho, Pak-cheong; Tse, W. L.; Wong, Clara W. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The dorsal wrist ganglion is the most common wrist mass, and previous studies have shown that it arises from the scapholunate interval in the vast majority of cases. Treatment has traditionally been open excision, and more recently arthroscopic resection has been established as an effective and less invasive treatment method. However, application of this technique to ganglia in atypical locations has not been reported, where open excision is the usual practice. This report describes two cases of atypical dorsal wrist ganglia that arose from the lunotriquetral (LT) joint, demonstrated by arthroscopic visualization and wrist arthrogram in one of them. Arthroscopic resection was performed, and the application of this technique to a dorsal wrist ganglion with an atypical origin and location is described. PMID:24436842

  18. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  19. Hepatitis C - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus (HCV). Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis A and hepatitis B . ... Elisofon SA, Jonas MMF. Viral hepatitis in children. In: Boyer TD, Manns MP, Sanyal AJ, eds. Zakim & Boyer's Hepatology: A Textbook of Liver Disease. 6th ed. ...

  20. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis A FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  1. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis D virus ... Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is found only in people who carry the hepatitis B virus. HDV may make liver ... B virus but who never had symptoms. Hepatitis D infects about 15 million people worldwide. It occurs ...

  2. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  3. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  4. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  5. Comprehensive review of post-liver resection surgical complications and a new universal classification and grading system.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masayuki; Mizuguchi, Toru; Harada, Kohei; Ota, Shigenori; Meguro, Makoto; Ueki, Tomomi; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Okita, Kenji; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-10-27

    Liver resection is the gold standard treatment for certain liver tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumors. Some patients with such tumors already have reduced liver function due to chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or chemotherapy-associated steatohepatitis before surgery. Therefore, complications due to poor liver function are inevitable after liver resection. Although the mortality rate of liver resection has been reduced to a few percent in recent case series, its overall morbidity rate is reported to range from 4.1% to 47.7%. The large degree of variation in the post-liver resection morbidity rates reported in previous studies might be due to the lack of consensus regarding the definitions and classification of post-liver resection complications. The Clavien-Dindo (CD) classification of post-operative complications is widely accepted internationally. However, it is hard to apply to some major post-liver resection complications because the consensus definitions and grading systems for post-hepatectomy liver failure and bile leakage established by the International Study Group of Liver Surgery are incompatible with the CD classification. Therefore, a unified classification of post-liver resection complications has to be established to allow comparisons between academic reports. PMID:25349645

  6. Comprehensive review of post-liver resection surgical complications and a new universal classification and grading system

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Masayuki; Mizuguchi, Toru; Harada, Kohei; Ota, Shigenori; Meguro, Makoto; Ueki, Tomomi; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Okita, Kenji; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Liver resection is the gold standard treatment for certain liver tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumors. Some patients with such tumors already have reduced liver function due to chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or chemotherapy-associated steatohepatitis before surgery. Therefore, complications due to poor liver function are inevitable after liver resection. Although the mortality rate of liver resection has been reduced to a few percent in recent case series, its overall morbidity rate is reported to range from 4.1% to 47.7%. The large degree of variation in the post-liver resection morbidity rates reported in previous studies might be due to the lack of consensus regarding the definitions and classification of post-liver resection complications. The Clavien-Dindo (CD) classification of post-operative complications is widely accepted internationally. However, it is hard to apply to some major post-liver resection complications because the consensus definitions and grading systems for post-hepatectomy liver failure and bile leakage established by the International Study Group of Liver Surgery are incompatible with the CD classification. Therefore, a unified classification of post-liver resection complications has to be established to allow comparisons between academic reports. PMID:25349645

  7. Extraperitoneal colostomy in laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection using a laparoscopic retractor.

    PubMed

    Akamoto, Shintaro; Noge, Seiji; Uemura, Jun; Maeda, Norikatsu; Ohshima, Minoru; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Fujiwara, Masao; Yachida, Shinichi; Takama, Takehiro; Hagiike, Masanobu; Okano, Keiichi; Usuki, Hisashi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2013-05-01

    Although extraperitoneal colostomy is often performed to prevent postoperative parastomal hernia formation following an open abdominoperineal resection of lower rectal cancer, it has not been widely employed laparoscopically because of the difficulty associated with the extraperitoneal route. This paper describes a laparoscopic extraperitoneal sigmoid colostomy using the Endo Retract™ Maxi instrument. This surgical technique is easy, and helps to prevent the development of parastomal hernias. PMID:23124709

  8. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... Stomach ache Nausea Diarrhea No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will ...

  9. Collaboration between laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2014-01-01

    Developments in endoscopy and laparoscopy have made monumental changes to the way gastrointestinal diseases are being managed. Many diseases that were traditionally managed by open surgical resection could now be treated by endoscopy alone. However, there are still instances where endoscopic treatment alone is inadequate for disease control and laparoscopic surgery is required. In addition, the collaboration between laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection or other endoscopic resectional techniques represents a new frontier for further research. The present manuscript aims to discuss the complementary role of laparoscopic surgery to endoscopic resection in the traditional context and also its future development. PMID:24188505

  10. Three-Dimensional Echocardiography-based Prediction of Posterior Leaflet Resection

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Yonghoon; Choi, Ahnryul; Laing, Susan T.; McPherson, David D.; Kim, Hyunggun

    2014-01-01

    Clinical long-term outcomes have shown that partial leaflet resection followed by ring annuloplasty is a reliable and reproducible surgical repair technique for treatment of mitral valve (MV) leaflet prolapse. We report a 61-year-old male for three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3D TEE)-based virtual posterior leaflet resection and ring annuloplasty. Severe mitral regurgitation was found and computational evaluation demonstrated substantial leaflet malcoaptation and high stress concentration. Following virtual resection and ring annuloplasty, posterior leaflet prolapse markedly decreased, sufficient leaflet coaptation was restored, and high stress concentration disappeared. Virtual MV repair strategies using 3D TEE have the potential to help optimize MV repair. PMID:25109487

  11. Accuracy of Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy after Liver Transplantation and Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Hanns; Bechstein, Wolf O.; Grünwald, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Biliary complications are the most frequent complications after common liver surgeries. In this study, accuracy of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) and impact of hyperbilirubinemia were evaluated. Methods. Between November 2007 and February 2016, 131 patients underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy after having liver surgery. 39 patients with 42 scans after LTX (n = 13) or hepatic resection (n = 26) were evaluated in the study; 27 were male, with mean age 60 years. The subjects underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled Mebrofenin. The results were compared to ERCP as gold standard performed within one month after HBS. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV. We compared LTX patients to patients with other liver surgeries. Furthermore the influence of hyperbilirubinemia on HBS scans was evaluated. Results. HBS always provided the correct diagnosis in cases of bile leak in the liver-resected group (14/14). Overall diagnostic accuracy was 76% (19/25) in this group and 54% (7/13) in the LTX group. False negative (FN) diagnoses occurred more often among LTX patients (p = 0.011). Hyperbilirubinemia (>5 mg/dL) significantly influenced the excretion function of the liver, prolonging HBS's time-activity-curve (p = 0.001). Conclusions. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy is a reliable tool to detect biliary complications, but reduced accuracy must be considered after LTX. PMID:27563464

  12. Hepatic PEComa: a potential pitfall in the evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hadi Mohammad; Katz, Steven C; Libbey, N Peter; Somasundar, Ponnandai S

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour (PEComa) of the liver is very uncommon and may be overlooked in the clinical and histological differential diagnosis of a liver tumour. We report the case of an incidentally discovered liver mass suspicious for hepatocellular carcinoma, which on biopsy was suggestive of a pseudocyst but after resection was found to be hepatic PEComa with some of the usual characteristics of this neoplasm as well as several less familiar features. We have also reviewed cases of hepatic PEComa from the literature in order to provide insight into recognising possible PEComa preoperatively and assessing its risk of malignancy after diagnosis. PMID:24907216

  13. Anterior Hepatic Transection for Caudate Lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chaib, Eleazar; Ribeiro, Marcelo A F; de Souza, Yngrid Ellyn Dias Maciel; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto C

    2009-01-01

    Resection of the caudate lobe (segment I- dorsal sector, segment IX- right paracaval region, or both) is often technically difficult due to the lobe’s location deep in the hepatic parenchyma and because it is adjacent to the major hepatic vessels (e.g., the left and middle hepatic veins). A literature search was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE for the terms “caudate lobectomy” and “anterior hepatic transection” (AHT) covering 1992 to 2007. AHT was used in 110 caudate lobectomies that are discussed in this review. Isolated caudate lobectomy was performed on 28 (25.4%) patients, with 11 case (11%) associated with hepatectomy, while 1 (0.9%) was associated with anterior segmentectomy. Complete caudate lobectomy was performed on 82 (74.5%) patients. Hepatocellular carcinoma was observed in 106 (96.3%) patients, while 1 (0.9%) had hemangioma and 3 (2.7%) had metastatic caudate tumors. AHT was used in 108 (98.1%) caudate resections, while AHT associated with a right-sided approach was performed in 2 (1.8%) cases. AHT is recommended for tumors located in the paracaval portion of the caudate lobe (segment IX). AHT is usually a safe and potentially curative surgical option. PMID:19936187

  14. An in vivo study of the effect of distal femoral resection on passive knee extension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad K; Chen, Justin A; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2010-10-01

    A previous study showed that 1 mm of distal femoral resection restored knee extension 4.5°. We determined the relationship with a more accurate measurement technique. Twenty-six subjects treated with total knee arthroplasty were studied. Digital photographs of the extended knee with and without 1.5 and 3.0 mm thick augments placed between the femoral component and distal femur were analyzed, and knee extension was measured. One millimeter of distal femoral resection restored 1.8° of extension that is less correction than the previous study reported. Because an attempt to correct a 10° extension deficit by resecting the distal femur could require 5 mm or more of bone removal that moves the joint line too proximal, we recommend exploring other techniques before resecting the femur. PMID:19643566

  15. Predictors of recurrence following resection of intracranial chordomas.

    PubMed

    Choy, Winward; Terterov, Sergei; Kaprealian, Tania B; Trang, Andy; Ung, Nolan; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Lawrance K; Martin, Neil; Selch, Michael; Bergsneider, Marvin; Vinters, Harry V; Yong, William H; Yang, Isaac

    2015-11-01

    Management of intracranial chordomas remains challenging, despite improvements in microsurgical techniques and radiotherapy. Here, we analyzed the prognostic factors associated with improved rates of tumor control in patients with intracranial chordomas, who received either gross (GTR) or subtotal resections (STR). A retrospective review was performed to identify all patients who were undergoing resection of their intracranial chordomas at the Ronald Reagan University of California Los Angeles Medical Center from 1990 to 2011. In total, 57 patients undergoing 81 resections were included. There were 24 females and 33 males with a mean age of 44.6 years, and the mean tumor diameter was 3.36 cm. The extent of resection was not associated with recurrence. For all 81 operations, the 1 and 5 year progression free survival (PFS) was 87.5 and 40.4%, and 88.0 and 33.6% for STR and GTR, respectively (p=0.90). Adjuvant radiotherapy was associated with improved rates of PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.20; p=0.009). Additionally, age >45 years (HR 5.88; p=0.01) and the presence of visual deficits (HR 7.59; p=0.03) were associated with worse rates of tumor control. Tumor size, sex, tumor histology, and recurrent tumors were not predictors of recurrence. Younger age, lack of visual symptoms on presentation and adjuvant radiotherapy were associated with improved rates of tumor control following surgery. However, GTR and STR produced comparable rates of tumor control. The surgical management of intracranial chordomas should take a conservative approach, with the aim of maximal but safe cytoreductive resection with adjuvant radiation therapy, and a major focus on quality of life. PMID:26209919

  16. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  17. Advances in the Surgical Management of Resectable and Borderline Resectable Pancreas Cancer.

    PubMed

    Helmink, Beth A; Snyder, Rebecca A; Idrees, Kamran; Merchant, Nipun B; Parikh, Alexander A

    2016-04-01

    Successful surgical resection offers the only chance for cure in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, pancreatic resection is feasible in less than 20% of the patients. In this review, the current state of surgical management of pancreatic cancer is discussed. The definition of resectability based on cross-sectional imaging and the technical aspects of surgery, including vascular resection and/or reconstruction, management of aberrant vascular anatomy and extent of lymphadenectomy, are appraised. Furthermore, common pancreatic resection-specific postoperative complications and their management are reviewed. PMID:27013365

  18. Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Chawla, Sumit; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following acute infection, 20% of people eliminate the virus over weeks or months and are often asymptomatic. The remaining 80% of people will develop chronic disease, of which approximately 20% will eventually develop liver cirrhosis and 1–5% will develop liver cancer. About 150 million people are chronically infected with HCV, and more than 350 000 people die every year from hepatitis C related liver diseases. The economic cost of hepatitis C is significant both to the individual and to the society. In the United States the average lifetime cost of the disease was estimated at $33 407 USD with the cost of a liver transplant approximately $200 000 USD. PEG-IFN and ribavirin treatment is also expensive and, at an average cost of approximately GB £7000 in the UK for a treatment course, is unaffordable in developing countries. Hepatitis C, not only brings down the quality of the life of individuals but also affect progress of the nation by adding financial burden. If we prevent the disease from occurring or find a perfect cure of the disease, in form of a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine, it will be a boon to not only to the individual but to the nation as a whole. PMID:24165512

  19. Transsphincteric tumor resection in case of a pararectal solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Troja, Achim; El-Sourani, Nader; Antolovic, Dalibor; Raab, Hans Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Transsphincteric resection of rectal tumors was first described about 120 years ago. Nowadays, this approach faded into obscurity due to standardized guidelines and practice in surgical oncology including lymphadenectomy, mesorectal excision and radical dissection of veins. However, transsphincteric resection seems reasonable in some cases, especially if an abdominal approach can be avoided. In the following, we will present and describe the technique of the transsphincteric approach with its variations in rectal surgery in the case of a rare pararectal tumor. PMID:26773876

  20. Perspectives of holmium laser resection of the prostate: cutting effects with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenauer, Rolf H.; Droege, Gerit; Brinkmann, Ralf; Neuss, Malte; Gafumbegete, Evariste; Jocham, Dieter

    1998-07-01

    Laser prostatectomy shows an improvement in peak urinary flow rates, in post-void residual urine volumes and also a symptomatic improvement when compared to the transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P). Time to achieve symptomatic improvement is delayed with many established laser procedures compared to standard resection. However, this disadvantage can be solved with a new resection technique using a pulsed holmium laser. Nevertheless, this advanced technique shows a few problems in a first clinical trial. Besides this clinical study, in vitro experiments were carried out in order to determine the optimal irradiation parameters with respect to resection rate, incision/ablation quality and handling. Prostate tissue of radical prostatectomies and chicken breast as model were irradiated with a pulsed holmium-laser in vitro with different laser parameters using a bare fiber in contact to tissue. The incision quality (depths and coagulation/vaporization effects) was analyzed with regard to pulse energy (speed of incision, angle of incision) and fiber diameter. Fast flash photography was performed to analyze thermo-mechanical side-effects. Fast flash photography reveals cavitation bubble up to 7 mm length in water and dissections in tissue. The ablation rate increases proportional to the laser pulse energy. The Holmium Laser Resection of the Prostate (HOLRP) in humans with available instrumentation right now shows equieffective results compared to the transurethral resection, no need for transfusion, no transurethral resection syndrome, short time for catheterization. Further technical approvement may significantly improve holmium laser prostate resection. We present a new application system for the laser resection.

  1. Pure Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Malignant Liver Tumor: Anatomic Resection Versus Nonanatomic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Xi; Xiu, Dian-Rong; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Jiang, Bin; Ma, Zhao-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been considered to be safe and feasible. However, few studies focused on the comparison between the anatomic and nonanatomic LLR. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the perioperative factors and outcomes of the anatomic and nonanatomic LLR, especially the area of liver parenchymal transection and blood loss per unit area. Methods: In this study, surgical and oncological data of patients underwent pure LLR procedures for malignant liver tumor were prospectively collected. Blood loss per unit area of liver parenchymal transection was measured and considered as an important parameter. All procedures were conducted by a single surgeon. Results: During nearly 5 years, 84 patients with malignant liver tumor received a pure LLR procedure were included. Among them, 34 patients received anatomic LLR and 50 received nonanatomic LLR, respectively. Patients of the two groups were similar in terms of demographic features and tumor characteristics, despite the tumor size was significantly larger in the anatomic LLR group than that in the nonanatomic LLR group (4.77 ± 2.57 vs. 2.87 ± 2.10 cm, P = 0.001). Patients who underwent anatomic resection had longer operation time (364.09 ± 131.22 vs. 252.00 ± 135.21 min, P < 0.001) but less blood loss per unit area (7.85 ± 7.17 vs. 14.17 ± 10.43 ml/cm2, P = 0.018). Nonanatomic LLR was associated with more blood loss when the area of parenchymal transection was equal to the anatomic LLR. No mortality occurred during the hospital stay and 30 days after the operation. Moreover, there was no difference in the incidence of postoperative complications. The disease-free and overall survival rates showed no significant differences between the anatomic LLR and nonanatomic LLR groups. Conclusions: Both anatomic and nonanatomic pure LLR are safe and feasible. Measuring the area of parenchymal transection is a simple and effective method to estimate the outcomes of the liver

  2. Intradermal Hepatitis B Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ruddock, David G.S.; Dickson, Annie

    1992-01-01

    Intramuscular administration of hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is safe and efficacious, but its cost has limited its availability. In this pilot study, 49 of 56 participants who received 2 μg of intradermal (ID) HB vaccine (one tenth the intramuscular dose) at the beginning of administration, at 1 month, and at 6 months developed protective levels of antibody to HB surface antigen. Although questions remain, the cost savings of this technique make it worth considering. PMID:21229118

  3. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  4. Contemporary management and classification of hepatic leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Mazin O; Roberts, Keith J; Merchant, William; Lodge, J Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic leiomyosarcomas are rare soft-tissue tumours. The majority of lesions previously considered as leiomyosarcomas have been identified as gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). Consequently, understanding of the role of liver resection for true leiomyosarcoma is limited, a fact that is exacerbated by the increasing recognition of leiomyosarcoma subtypes. This study presents data on the outcomes of liver resection for leiomyosarcoma and suggests an algorithm for its pathological assessment and treatment. Methods Patients were identified from a prospectively collected departmental database. All tumours were negative for c-kit expression. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify the presence of oestrogen or progesterone receptor (OR/PR) expression or Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and patients were stratified according to this profile. Results Eight patients (of whom seven were female) underwent a total of 11 liver resections over a 12-year period. One patient had a primary hepatic leiomyosarcoma. Of those with metastatic leiomyosarcomas, the primary tumours were located in the mesentery, gynaecological organs and retroperitoneum in four, two and one patient, respectively. Both leiomyosarcomas of gynaecological origin stained positive for OR/PR expression. One patient had previously undergone renal transplantation; this leiomyosarcoma was associated with EBV expression. Median survival was 56 months (range: 22–132 months) and eight, six and four patients remained alive at 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively. Conclusions Hepatic resection for leiomyosarcoma is associated with encouraging rates of 5-year overall and disease-free survival. The worse outcome that had been expected based on data derived from historical cohorts (partly comprising subjects with GIST) was not observed. An algorithm for pathological classification and treatment is suggested. PMID:25418451

  5. Management of excluded segmental bile duct leakage following liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Honoré, Charles; Vibert, Eric; Hoti, Emir; Azoulay, Daniel; Adam, René; Castaing, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Background: Postoperative bile leak secondary to a fistula is a known complication of hepatic surgery. Four different biliary fistula sub-types have been described: type A refers to minor leakage from the bile duct stump; type B to major leakage caused by insufficient closure of the bile duct stump; type C to major leakage caused by injury to the bile duct, and type D (the rarest) to the division and exclusion of a bile duct. This complication results from functional liver parenchyma in which bile drainage is excluded from the main duct. Methods: A retrospective review of the database for 163 patients diagnosed with post-hepatic surgery bile leak from April 1992 to June 2007 was performed. Results: Three patients were found to have type D biliary fistula, with durations of 3–21 months. The bile leak developed after a right hepatectomy in two patients and a right hepatectomy extending to segment IV in one patient. All three patients were rescheduled for surgical exploration, following failure of medical treatment. The procedure consisted of repeat resection of the independent liver parenchyma containing the fistula. One patient developed a postoperative leak from a hepaticojejunal anastomosis (treated conservatively) and the other two patients had an uneventful recovery. No recurrence of bile leak was encountered during their follow-up. Conclusions: Our experience indicates that conservative treatment is deceptive and not efficacious. For this condition, surgical intervention is the treatment of choice because it is very effective and is associated with a low morbidity. PMID:19718366

  6. One case of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma amenable to resection after radioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Servajean, Cecilia; Gilabert, Marine; Piana, Gilles; Monges, Geneviève; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Brenot, Isabelle; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old man who was diagnosed with a large unresectable cholangiocarcinoma associated with 2 satellite nodules and without clear margins with the right hepatic vein. Despite 4 cycles of GEMOX (stopped due to a hypertransaminasemia believed to be due to gemcitabine) and 4 cycles of FOLFIRINOX, the tumor remained stable and continued to be considered unresectable. Radioembolization (resin microspheres, SIRS-spheres®) targeting the left liver (474 MBq) and segment IV (440 MBq) was performed. This injection was very well tolerated, and 4 more cycles of FOLFIRINOX were given while waiting for radioembolization efficacy. On computed tomography scan, a partial response was observed; the tumor was far less hypervascularized, and a margin was observed between the tumor and the right hepatic vein. A left hepatectomy enlarged to segment VIII was performed. On pathological exam, most of the tumor was acellular, with dense fibrosis around visible microspheres. Viable cells were observed only at a distance from beads. Radioembolization can be useful in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma, allowing in some cases a secondary resection. PMID:24803830

  7. Laparo-endoscopic transgastric resection of gastric submucosal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Geylor; Savides, Thomas J.; Sicklick, Jason K.; Abbas Fehmi, Syed M.; Coker, Alisa M.; Green, Shannon; Broderick, Ryan; Nino, Diego F.; Harnsberger, Cristina R.; Berducci, Martin A.; Sandler, Bryan J.; Talamini, Mark A.; Jacobsen, Garth R.; Horgan, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic and endoluminal surgical techniques have evolved and allowed improvements in the methods for treating benign and malignant gastrointestinal diseases. To date, only case reports have been reported on the application of a laparo-endoscopic approach for resecting gastric submucosal tumors (SMT). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and oncologic outcomes of a laparo-endoscopic transgastric approach to resect tumors that would traditionally require either a laparoscopic or open surgical approach. Herein, we present the largest single institution series utilizing this technique for the resection of gastric SMT in North America. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected patient database. Patients who presented for evaluation of gastric SMT were offered this surgical procedure and informed consents were obtained for participation in the study. Results Fourteen patients were included in this study between August/2010 and January/2013. Eight (8) patients (57.1 %) were female and the median age was 56 years (range 29–78). Of the 14 cases, 8 patients (57.1 %) underwent laparo-endoscopic resection of SMTs with transgastric extraction, 5 patients (35.7 %) had conversions to traditional laparoscopic surgery, and 1 patient (7.2 %) was abandoned intraoperatively. The median operative time for this cohort was 80 min (range 35–167). Ten patients (71.4 %) had GISTs, 3 (21.4 %) had leiomyomas, and 1 (7.1 %) had schwannoma. There were no intraoperative complications. Two patients had postoperative staple line bleeding that required repeat endoscopy. The median hospital stay was 1 day (range 1–6) and there were no postoperative mortalities. At 12-month follow-up visit, only one GIST patient (10 %) had tumor recurrence. Conclusion Our experience suggests that this surgical approach is safe and efficient in the resection of gastric SMT with transgastric extraction. This study found no intraoperative

  8. Heterotopic auxiliary rat liver transplantation with flow-regulated portal vein arterialization in acute hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.(1-3) The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.(4) In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.(5-6) We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor's portal vein was carried out via the recipient's right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient's aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. (7) In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft's weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  9. Heterotopic Auxiliary Rat Liver Transplantation With Flow-regulated Portal Vein Arterialization in Acute Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.1-3 The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.4 In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.5-6 We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor’s portal vein was carried out via the recipient’s right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient’s aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. 7 In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft’s weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  10. Outcomes following resection of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Parissa; Jibara, Ghalib; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Franssen, Bernardo; Labow, Daniel M; Schwartz, Myron E; Thung, Swan N; Sarpel, Umut

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this analysis was to examine prognostic features and outcomes in patients undergoing resection for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Methods A retrospective chart review was performed in all patients who underwent R0 or R1 resection for primary ICC between 1995 and 2011. Clinical data were abstracted and statistical analyses were conducted in the standard fashion. Results A total of 82 patients underwent curative hepatectomy for primary ICC; 51 patients in this cohort developed recurrence. The median follow-up of survivors was 27 months (range: 1–116 months). Recurrences were intrahepatic (65%), associated with multiple tumours (54%) and occurred during the first 2 years after hepatectomy (86%). The main factor associated with recurrence after resection was the presence of satellite lesions. Overall 5-year disease-free survival after primary resection was 16%. Factors associated with poor survival were transfusion and perineural invasion. Treatment of recurrence was undertaken in 89% of patients and repeat surgical resection was performed in 15 patients. The 3-year survival rate after recurrence was 25%. Prolonged survival after recurrence was associated with a solitary tumour recurrence. Conclusions Despite curative resection of ICC, recurrence can be expected to occur in 79% of patients at 5 years. Predictors of survival and recurrence after resection vary in the literature. In patients with recurrence, selection of the optimal treatment remains challenging. PMID:25395176

  11. Impact of multiple liver resections prior to salvage liver transplantation on survival in patients with recurrent HCC

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Qijun; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhiwei; Xiang, Jie; Zhou, Lin; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Salvage liver transplantation (SLT) is a controversial technique that has been reported to be acceptable for the management of patients with recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after primary hepatic resection (HR). However, whether the number of times liver resection is performed has an impact on survival after SLT has not yet been reported. Design Retrospective study. Setting The level of care is primary and the study was carried out at only 1 centre. Participants The study included 59 patients who underwent SLT for HCC from September 2001 to December 2012. 51 patients underwent HR only once before SLT, while the remaining 8 patients underwent HR more than once before SLT (HR=2 [7], HR=3, [1]). Primary and secondary outcome measures In this study, the 1-year, 3-year and 5-year overall and tumour-free survival outcomes between the 2 groups were compared. Results There were no significant differences between patients who underwent HR once and those who underwent HR more than once with respect to overall or tumour-free survival after receiving SLT. The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year overall survival rates for patients who underwent HR once were 72.9%, 35.3% and 35.5% vs 50%, 50% and 50%, respectively (p=0.986), while the 1-year, 3-year and 5-year tumour-free survival rates for those who underwent HR more than once were 66.3%, 55.3% and 44.4% vs 40%, 40% and 40%, respectively (p=0.790). Conclusions There was no significant difference in the survival rate of patients who underwent HR once before SLT and those who underwent HR more than once. This suggests that SLT is a reasonable choice for patients who suffer from recurrent HCC after HR. Trial registration number This is a retrospective study and no registry or number is required. PMID:26353871

  12. Laparoscopic liver resection: Experience based guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirola; Fonseca, Gilton Marques; Araújo, Raphael Leonardo Cunha; Jeismann, Vagner Birk; Perini, Marcos Vinícius; Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Cecconello, Ivan; Herman, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been progressively developed along the past two decades. Despite initial skepticism, improved operative results made laparoscopic approach incorporated to surgical practice and operations increased in frequency and complexity. Evidence supporting LLR comes from case-series, comparative studies and meta-analysis. Despite lack of level 1 evidence, the body of literature is stronger and existing data confirms the safety, feasibility and benefits of laparoscopic approach when compared to open resection. Indications for LLR do not differ from those for open surgery. They include benign and malignant (both primary and metastatic) tumors and living donor liver harvesting. Currently, resection of lesions located on anterolateral segments and left lateral sectionectomy are performed systematically by laparoscopy in hepatobiliary specialized centers. Resection of lesions located on posterosuperior segments (1, 4a, 7, 8) and major liver resections were shown to be feasible but remain technically demanding procedures, which should be reserved to experienced surgeons. Hand-assisted and laparoscopy-assisted procedures appeared to increase the indications of minimally invasive liver surgery and are useful strategies applied to difficult and major resections. LLR proved to be safe for malignant lesions and offers some short-term advantages over open resection. Oncological results including resection margin status and long-term survival were not inferior to open resection. At present, surgical community expects high quality studies to base the already perceived better outcomes achieved by laparoscopy in major centers’ practice. Continuous surgical training, as well as new technologies should augment the application of laparoscopic liver surgery. Future applicability of new technologies such as robot assistance and image-guided surgery is still under investigation. PMID:26843910

  13. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low-grade fever Nausea and vomiting Pale or clay-colored stools Yellow skin (jaundice) ... The virus does not remain in the body after the infection is gone. Most people with hepatitis A recover within 3 months. Nearly all people get better within 6 months. There ...

  14. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will closely monitor and manage any side effects that may occur, as high doses of prednisone are often prescribed to treat autoimmune hepatitis. Immune system suppressors. Medications that suppress the immune system prevent the body from making autoantibodies and block the immune reaction ...

  15. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advisory Board Sponsors Sponsorship Opporunities Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician ... Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There ...

  16. Presacral schwannoma: laparoscopic resection, a viable option.

    PubMed

    Jatal, Sudhir; Pai, Vishwas D; Rakhi, Bharat; Saklani, Avanish P

    2016-05-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumours arising from Schwann cells. Presacral schwannomas are rare with only case report and short case series being reported in literature. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice for these rare tumours. Approach to surgical resection depends on the type of the tumour. Type 3 tumours have conventionally been treated with open intra or extra peritoneal approach. With improvement in the laparoscopic surgical skills, more and more complex surgical procedures have been attempted via this approach. We are presenting a case of presacral schwannoma in an overweight lady treated by laparoscopic resection. PMID:27275489

  17. Presacral schwannoma: laparoscopic resection, a viable option

    PubMed Central

    Jatal, Sudhir; Pai, Vishwas D.; Rakhi, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumours arising from Schwann cells. Presacral schwannomas are rare with only case report and short case series being reported in literature. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice for these rare tumours. Approach to surgical resection depends on the type of the tumour. Type 3 tumours have conventionally been treated with open intra or extra peritoneal approach. With improvement in the laparoscopic surgical skills, more and more complex surgical procedures have been attempted via this approach. We are presenting a case of presacral schwannoma in an overweight lady treated by laparoscopic resection. PMID:27275489

  18. Oncoprotein stability after tumour resection.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, G.; Gullick, W.; Sikora, K.

    1990-01-01

    The means by which oncogenes and their products activate malignant transformation are currently under intense investigation. However, published papers on experiments using human tumour material do not always report in detail their methods of collection or storage of the specimens. In order to assess the stability of oncogene encoded proteins following collection or storage of human tumour biopsies, we have examined the rate of decay of the c-myc, neu and EGF-receptor proteins. Solid tumours, containing amplified copies of each oncogene, were established in nude mice and the stability of the oncogene protein in portions of each tumour, left in phosphate buffered saline at room temperature for varying time intervals, was examined by immunoblotting. Intact EGF-receptor and neu oncoproteins were present even after 24 h under these conditions while the c-myc protein was apparently rapidly degraded after 20 min. These data demonstrate that oncogene products decay at different rates after tumour resection and that collection of human biopsies should take this into account in order to provide the basis for consistent measurements of protein expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2139576

  19. Resection of meningiomas with implantable microwave coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.P.; Xie, Q.L.; Liu, J.M.; Yue, Z.J.; Cai, K.H.

    1996-05-01

    Implantable microwave coagulation was used to perform resection on 62 patients that had intracranial meningiomas. When 20--60 W microwave power was applied for 15 s, the temperature at the center of the tumor tissue was 43--63 C; 30 mm from the center, the temperature was under 40 C. Histological changes in the center of the tumor showed coagulative necrosis, diminished nuclei, and obliterated blood vessels. The changes at 10--20 mm from the center of the tumor showed coagulative necrosis and degeneration and, 30--50 mm from the center of the tumor, showed normal cell morphology after microwave coagulation. The thermal field in brain tumor has an effective diameter of about 40 mm. No side effects on the normal brain tissues were observed. The amount of blood loss during the operation was minimal while the meningioma was coagulated, especially when the meningioma was located at the skull base or in the parasagittal or cerebral convexity region. After microwave coagulation, the entire tumor could easily be removed. Among the 62 surgically treated cases, gross total tumor excision was 85%. No postoperative complications occurred after microwave coagulation, and there was no operative mortality in the series. The authors believe that this new technique has the advantage of simplicity, less blood loss, and smooth postoperative procedures. Hemostatic effects during the operation are satisfactory, and blood transfusion can be reduced by 50--60%.

  20. Uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic sleeve lobectomy and other complex resections

    PubMed Central

    Fieira, Eva; Delgado, Maria; de la Torre, Mercedes; Mendez, Lucia; Fernandez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to the recent improvements in thoracoscopy, a great deal of complex lung resections can be performed without performing thoracotomies. During the last years, experience gained through video-assisted thoracoscopic techniques, enhancement of the surgical instruments and improvement of high definition cameras have been the greatest advances. The huge number of surgical videos posting on specialized websites, live surgery events and experimental courses has contributed to the rapid learning of minimally invasive surgery during the last years. Nowadays, complex resections, such as post chemo-radiotherapy resections, lobectomies with chest wall resection, bronchial and vascular sleeves are being performed by thoracoscopic approach in experienced centers. Additionally, surgery has evolved regarding the thoracoscopic surgical approach, allowing us to perform these difficult procedures by means of a small single incision, with excellent postoperative results. PMID:25379210

  1. Preserving the superior rectal artery in laparoscopic [correction of laparoscopis] anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, D; Bergamaschi, R

    2002-01-01

    Anterior resection for the treatment of full thickness rectal prolapse has been around for over four decades. 1 However, its use has been limited due to fear of anastomotic leakage and related morbidity. It has been shown that high anterior resection is preferable to its low counterpart as the latter increases complication rates. 2 Although sparing the inferior mesenteric artery in sigmoid resection for diverticular disease has been shown to decrease leak rates in a randomized setting, 3 vascular division is current practice. We shall challenged this current practice of dividing the mesorectum in anterior resection for complete rectal prolapse developing a technique that allows the preservation of the superior rectal artery. PMID:12587465

  2. Cardiac Autotransplantation for Surgical Resection of a Primary Malignant Left Ventricular Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Michael J.; Walkes, Jon-Cecil M.; DeFelice, Clement A.; Wojciechowski, Zbigniew

    2006-01-01

    Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare. In such tumors, surgical resection is sometimes considered necessary to correct obstruction of flow caused by the tumor and to accomplish complete resection. The anatomic difficulties associated with large, primary, intracavitary left-sided sarcomas have led us to use cardiac explantation, ex vivo tumor resection, and cardiac autotransplantation to meet the anatomic challenges of left atrial tumors. We report the case of a patient who had a large, primary, intracavitary, left ventricular sarcoma that was successfully removed by cardiac explantation and ex vivo reconstruction with use of the cardiac autotransplantation technique. This is the 1st report describing the use of cardiac autotransplantation to surgically resect an intracavitary left ventricular malignancy. PMID:17215979

  3. Uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic sleeve lobectomy and other complex resections.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Fieira, Eva; Delgado, Maria; de la Torre, Mercedes; Mendez, Lucia; Fernandez, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    Thanks to the recent improvements in thoracoscopy, a great deal of complex lung resections can be performed without performing thoracotomies. During the last years, experience gained through video-assisted thoracoscopic techniques, enhancement of the surgical instruments and improvement of high definition cameras have been the greatest advances. The huge number of surgical videos posting on specialized websites, live surgery events and experimental courses has contributed to the rapid learning of minimally invasive surgery during the last years. Nowadays, complex resections, such as post chemo-radiotherapy resections, lobectomies with chest wall resection, bronchial and vascular sleeves are being performed by thoracoscopic approach in experienced centers. Additionally, surgery has evolved regarding the thoracoscopic surgical approach, allowing us to perform these difficult procedures by means of a small single incision, with excellent postoperative results. PMID:25379210

  4. Use of the harmonic scalpel for soft palate resection in dogs: a series of three cases.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, J

    2011-12-01

    Soft palate resection is performed to resect a redundant or diseased soft palate, often associated with brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS). Resection has been associated with numerous complications, including coughing, bleeding, pharyngeal oedema, respiratory obstruction and death. Traditionally, the surgery is performed by sharp dissection and suturing, but other reported techniques include the use of an electrothermal sealing device or a laser. Operative time for sharp dissection is approximately 12 min, but is shortened to around 5 min when using a laser, as the haemostatic properties of the instrument negates the need for post-resection oversewing. The successful use of a harmonic scalpel to resect redundant soft palates in three dogs is described. The resected soft palates were not oversewn and the surgical time was comparable with that for laser surgery. The first dog had a minor bleed 6 h postoperatively, possibly associated with suboptimal placement of the harmonic scalpel cutting jaws. The following two patients had no postoperative complications. The harmonic scalpel laparoscopic handpiece allowed excellent visualisation of the surgical field and rapid performance of the procedure. All three patients had markedly improved postoperative respiratory function. Cleaning and resterilisation permitted multiple reuse of the handpiece, making it cost-competitive with other surgical techniques. PMID:22103952

  5. What has changed after the Morioka consensus conference 2014 on laparoscopic liver resection?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The 2nd International Consensus Conference on Laparoscopic Liver Resection (ICCLLR) was held 4th–6th October, 2014, in Morioka, Japan. The level of evidence appears to be low in the field of laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) to create strong recommendations. Therefore, an independent jury-based consensus model was applied to better define the current role of LLR and to develop internationally accepted recommendations. The three-day conference was very intense with full of insightful discussions on assessment of LLR and its future directions. The jury drew the statements based on the presentations and documents prepared by the expert. LLR is theoretically superior to open liver resection (OLR) because the laparoscope allows better exposure with a magnified view, and the pneumoperitoneum pressure reduces hepatic vein bleeding from the cut surface. During the ICCLLR, we shared these theoretical advantages in LLR and the conceptual change of liver resection. After the ICCLLR, a couple of important studies have been published to prove this theoretical superiority of LLR over OLR in short-term outcomes without deteriorating long-term outcomes. Another new concept was proposed at the ICCLLR: parenchyma sparing (limited) anatomical resection. Review of the literature supports anatomical resection with parenchyma sparing strategy for LLR irrespective of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM). Just after the ICCLLR, sensational news of clustered mortality after LLR was reported in the Japanese media and they impacted on daily practice of LLR in Japan. The most important message from the ICCLLR is to protect patients from this new surgical procedure. The ICCLLR recommended three actions for the protection of patients: (I) prospective reporting registry for transparency; (II) a difficulty scoring system to select patients; (III) creation of a formal structure of education. The online prospective registry system including items to calculate the

  6. Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization Tailored to Prepare the Liver for Complex Resections: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, T. de Robinson, J. M.; Deschamps, F.; Rao, P.; Teriitheau, C.; Goere, D.; Elias, D.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) tailored to prepare the liver for complex and extended resections. During the past 5 years, 12 PVEs were performed in noncirrhotic patients with liver metastases from colon cancer (n = 10), choroidal melanoma (n = 1), and leiomyosarcoma (n = 1) to prepare complex anatomical liver resections in patients with small future remnant livers. These liver resections planned to preserve only segment IV in four patients, segments IV, V, and VIII in four patients, segments II, III, VI, and VII in three patients, and segments V and VI in one patient. PVE was performed under general anesthesia with a flow-guided injection of a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol using a 5-Fr catheter. All portal branches feeding the liver segments to be resected were successfully embolized with cyanoacrylate except one, which was occluded with coils due to the risk of reflux with cyanoacrylate. After a mean of 32 days, CT volumetry revealed a mean hypertrophy of the unembolized liver of 47 {+-} 25% (range, 21-88%). Liver resections could be performed in 10 patients but were canceled in 2, due to the occurrence of a new hepatic tumor in one and an insufficiently increased volume in the other. Among the 10 patients who underwent the liver resection, 1 died of postoperative sepsis, 3 died 3 to 32 months after surgery, including 1 death unrelated to cancer, and 6 were alive after 6 to 36 months after surgery. In conclusion, in this preliminary report, PVE appears to be feasible and able to induce hypertrophy of the future remnant liver before a complex and extended hepatectomy. Further evaluation is needed in a larger cohort.

  7. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  8. Liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gallinger, S.; Biagi, J.J.; Fletcher, G.G.; Nhan, C.; Ruo, L.; McLeod, R.S.

    2013-01-01

    Questions Should surgery be considered for colorectal cancer (crc) patients who have liver metastases plus (a) pulmonary metastases, (b) portal nodal disease, or (c) other extrahepatic metastases (ehms)? What is the role of chemotherapy in the surgical management of crc with liver metastases in (a) patients with resectable disease in the liver, or (b) patients with initially unresectable disease in the liver that is downsized with chemotherapy (“conversion”)? What is the role of liver resection when one or more crc liver metastases have radiographic complete response (rcr) after chemotherapy? Perspectives Advances in chemotherapy have improved survival in crc patients with liver metastases. The 5-year survival with chemotherapy alone is typically less than 1%, although two recent studies with folfox or folfoxiri (or both) reported rates of 5%–10%. However, liver resection is the treatment that is most effective in achieving long-term survival and offering the possibility of a cure in stage iv crc patients with liver metastases. This guideline deals with the role of chemotherapy with surgery, and the role of surgery when there are liver metastases plus ehms. Because only a proportion of patients with crc metastatic disease are considered for liver resection, and because management of this patient population is complex, multidisciplinary management is required. Methodology Recommendations in the present guideline were formulated based on a prepublication version of a recent systematic review on this topic. The draft methodology experts, and external review by clinical practitioners. Feedback was incorporated into the final version of the guideline. Practice Guideline These recommendations apply to patients with liver metastases from crc who have had or will have a complete (R0) resection of the primary cancer and who are being considered for resection of the liver, or liver plus specific and limited ehms, with curative intent. 1(a). Patients with liver and lung

  9. Simultaneous Transventricular-Orbitocranial Resection of Large Suprasellar Craniopharyngioma as Inspired by Jackson's Maneuver from 1863

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Walter C; Syed, Hasan R; Ryan, Joshua E; Anaizi, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Traditional skull base techniques utilizing the microscope have allowed surgeons improved safe access to deep-seated lesions. More recent technical advances with the endoscope have allowed improved visibility and access to these previously difficult-to-reach regions. Most current literature emphasizes one technique over the other. We present a unique hybrid-type approach that tackles this not-infrequent surgical dilemma. This hybrid-type surgery resulted in a new technique that is a confluence of both open microsurgery and skull base corridors with an endoscope. Furthermore, a combined ventriculoscope approach adds extended assistance with resection. We detail the utility of this technique. A patient presented with a large suprasellar lesion that was suspicious for a craniopharyngioma. Given improved survival with extent of resection, the goal of surgical intervention was maximal safe resection. The location of the tumor would have involved certain morbidity with deliberate residual if a skull base approach or endoscope-based approach was employed independently. As a result, the patient underwent a hybrid-type operation using a multi-corridor split-surgical team approach for the resection of her tumor. The patient underwent hybrid surgery via a combined open microsurgical craniotomy, endoscopic resection, and a ventriculoscope-assisted approach. The ventriculoscope access allowed for resection of the intraventricular portion of the tumor and guided the extent of resection from the microsurgical corridor. Additionally, from a separate craniotomy, the suprasellar component was resected using both standard skull base and endoscope-assisted techniques. The patient tolerated the procedure well without additional morbidity provided from the multi-corridor hybrid technique. The hybrid surgery resulted in a new multi-modality, split-surgical team approach providing maximal visualization with minimal added morbidity to resect a lesion difficult to access

  10. The effect of wide resection during radical prostatectomy on surgical margins

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Luke T.; Stokl, Andrew; Cnossen, Sonya; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Morash, Chris; Cagiannos, Ilias; Breau, Rodney H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The impact of nerve-sparing on positive surgical margins during radical prostatectomy (RP) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of positive surgical margins with a wide resection compared to a nerve-sparing technique. Methods: A consecutive, single-surgeon patient cohort treated between August 2010 and November 2014 was reviewed. A standardized surgical approach of lobe-specific nerve-spare or wide resection was performed. Lobe-specific margin status and tumour stage were obtained from pathology reports. Univariable and multivariable associations between nerve management technique and lobe-specific positive surgical margin were determined. Results: Of 388 prostate lobes, wide resection was performed in 105 (27%) and nerve-sparing in 283 (73%). In 273 lobes without extra-prostatic extension (EPE), 0 of 52 (0%) had a positive margin when wide resection was performed compared to 20 of 221 (9%) if nerve-sparing was performed (p=0.02). In 115 lobes with EPE, 11 of 53 (21%) had a positive margin if wide resection was performed compared to 28 of 62 (45%) if nerve-sparing was performed (p=0.006). In multivariable analysis, the risk of a positive margin was decreased among patients who received wide resection as compared to nerve-spare (RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.26–0.71; p=0.001). Conclusions: Surgical techniques to reduce positive surgical margins have become increasingly important as more patients with high-risk cancer are selecting surgery. The risk of a positive margin was greatly reduced using a standardized wide resection technique compared to nerve-sparing. PMID:26977200

  11. Long-term outcome of laparoscopic resection for stage IV colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Shigeki; Harada, Masayoshi; Gagner, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is recommended as an initial stage IV colorectal cancer therapy. A 57-year-old male with sigmoid colon cancer and two hepatic metastases underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with lymph adenectomy. He was orally administered postoperative Tagafur/Uracil/leucovorin therapy for 10 months. However, because of regrowth of the liver metastasis he was administered leucovorin/bolus and infusional 5-fluorouracil/irinotecan therapy for 10 months followed by extended left lobectomy of the liver and the above mentioned chemotherapy was continued for 6 months. He was diagnosed with S6 and S6/7 hepatic recurrent tumor, which were resected 14 months after the second and another 14 months after the third surgery, respectively. Forty-two months following complete response after the fourth surgery, S6 hepatic recurrent tumor was resected. Six months after the fifth surgery, he developed multiple liver metastases. He was treated successfully using leucovorin/bolus and infusional 5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin and bevacizumab. He is alive 9 years and 3 months after initial surgery. PMID:25699358

  12. The use of water-jet dissection in open and laparoscopic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Duessel, A. P.; Wurzbacher, S.

    2008-01-01

    Background. We intend to give an overview of our experiences with the implementation of a new dissection technique in open and laparoscopic surgery. Methods. Our database comprises a total of 950 patients who underwent liver resection. Three hundred and fifty of them were performed exceptionally with the water-jet dissector. Forty-one laparoscopic partial liver resections were accomplished. Results. Using the water-jet dissection technique it was possible to reduce the blood loss, the Pringle- and resection time in comparison to CUSA® and blunt dissection. In the last five years we could reduce the Pringle-rate from 48 to 6% and the last 110 liver resections were performed without any Pringle's manoeuvre. At the same time, the transfusion-rate decreased from 1.86 to 0.46 EC/patient. In oncological resections, the used dissection technique had no influence on long-time survival. Conclusions. The water-jet dissection technique is fast, feasible, oncologically safe and can be used in open and in laparoscopic liver surgery. PMID:18773110

  13. Cricotracheal resection for laryngeal invasion by thyroid carcinoma: our experience.

    PubMed

    Morisod, Benoît; Monnier, Philippe; Simon, Christian; Sandu, Kishore

    2014-08-01

    Invasion of the laryngeal framework by thyroid carcinoma requires specific surgical techniques and carries a higher rate of complications that deserve to be highlighted. We reviewed our data from 1995 to 2012 and found six patients with laryngotracheal invasion by thyroid carcinoma. All underwent total thyroidectomy and single-stage cricotracheal resection, plus anterolateral neck dissection. Three had airway obstruction that necessitated prior endoscopic debulking. None of the patients needed a tracheotomy. There were four cases of papillary carcinoma, and two cases of undifferentiated carcinoma. One patient died of complications of the procedure (anastomotic dehiscence and tracheo-innominate artery fistula). Another died 2 months after the procedure from local recurrence and aspiration pneumonia. One case presented recurrence at 15 months, which was managed by re-excision and adjuvant radiotherapy; after 26 months of follow-up, he has no evidence of locoregional recurrence. The three other patients are alive without evidence of disease at 6, 18 and 41 months, respectively. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion by thyroid carcinoma is an effective procedure, but carries significant risks of complications. This could be attributed to the devascularisation of the tracheal wall due to the simultaneous neck dissection, sacrifice of the strap muscles or of a patch of oesophageal muscle layer. We advocate a sternocleidomastoid flap to cover the anastomosis. Cricotracheal resection for subglottic invasion can be curative with good functional outcomes, even for the advanced stages of thyroid cancer. Endoscopic debulking of the airway prior to the procedure avoids tracheotomy. PMID:24129693

  14. Optic Radiation Tractography and Vision in Anterior Temporal Lobe Resection

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Gavin P; Daga, Pankaj; Stretton, Jason; Modat, Marc; Symms, Mark R; McEvoy, Andrew W; Ourselin, Sebastien; Duncan, John S

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anterior temporal lobe resection (ATLR) is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy but may result in a contralateral superior visual field deficit (VFD) that precludes driving in the seizure-free patient. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography can delineate the optic radiation preoperatively and stratify risk. It would be advantageous to incorporate display of tracts into interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to guide surgery. Methods We studied 20 patients undergoing ATLR. Structural MRI scans, DTI, and visual fields were acquired before and 3 to 12 months following surgery. Tractography of the optic radiation was performed on preoperative images and propagated onto postoperative images. The anteroposterior extent of the damage to Meyer's loop was determined, and visual loss was quantified using Goldmann perimetry. Results Twelve patients (60%) suffered a VFD (10–92% of upper quadrant; median, 39%). Image registration took <3 minutes and predicted that Meyer's loop was 4.4 to 18.7mm anterior to the resection margin in these patients, but 0.0 to 17.6mm behind the resection margin in the 8 patients without VFD. The extent of damage to Meyer's loop significantly correlated with the degree of VFD and explained 65% of the variance in this measure. Interpretation The optic radiation can be accurately delineated by tractography and propagated onto postoperative images. The technique is fast enough to propagate accurate preoperative tractography onto intraoperative scans acquired during neurosurgery, with the potential to reduce the risk of VFD. ANN NEUROL 2012; PMID:22451201

  15. Cavernostomy x Resection for Pulmonary Aspergilloma: A 32-Year History

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The most adequate surgical technique for the treatment of pulmonary aspergilloma is still controversial. This study compared two groups of patients submitted to cavernostomy and pulmonary parenchyma resection. Methods Cases of pulmonary aspergilloma operated upon between 1979 and 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Group 1 consisted of patients submitted to cavernostomy and group 2 of patients submitted to pulmonary parenchyma resection. The following variables were compared between groups: gender, age, number of hospitalizations, pre- and postoperative length of hospital stay, time of follow-up, location and type of aspergilloma, preoperative symptoms, underlying disease, type of fungus, preoperative pulmonary function, postoperative complications, patient progression, and associated diseases. Results A total of 208 patients with pulmonary aspergilloma were studied (111 in group 1 and 97 in group 2). Group 1 was older than group 2. The number of hospitalizations, length of hospital stay and time of follow-up were higher in group 1. Hemoptysis was the most frequent preoperative symptom in group 1. Preoperative respiratory malfunction was more severe in group 1. Hemorrhagic complications and recurrence were more frequent in group 1 and infectious complications and residual pleural space were more common in group 2. Postoperative dyspnea was more frequent in group 2. Patient progression was similar in the two groups. No difference in the other factors was observed between groups. Conclusions Older patients with severe preoperative respiratory malfunction and peripheral pulmonary aspergilloma should be submitted to cavernostomy. The remaining patients can be treated by pulmonary resection. PMID:21974978

  16. Microscopic Posterior Transdural Resection of Cervical Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasushi; Manabe, Hideki; Sumida, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Takahiko

    2015-12-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are noninflammatory masses formed posterior to the odontoid process. Because of their anatomy, the optimal surgical approach for resecting pseudotumors is controversial. Conventionally, 3 approaches are used: the anterior transoral approach, the lateral approach, and the posterior extradural approach; however, each approach has its limitations. The posterior extradural approach is the most common; however, it remains challenging due to severe epidural veins. Although regression of pseudotumors after fusion surgery has been reported, direct decompression and a pathologic diagnosis are ideal when the pseudotumor is large. We therefore developed a new microscopic surgical technique; transdural resection. After C1 laminectomy, the dorsal and ventral dura was incised while preserving the arachnoid. Removal of the pseudotumor was performed and both of the dura were repaired. The patient's clinical symptoms subsequently improved and the pathologic findings showed degenerative fibrocartilaginous tissue. In addition, no neurological deterioration, central spinal fluid leakage, or arachnoiditis was observed. Currently, the usefulness of the transdural approach has been reported for cervical and thoracic disk herniation. According to our results, the transdural approach is recommended for resection of retro-odontoid pseudotumors because it enables direct decompression of the spinal cord and a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26544168

  17. Microscopic Posterior Transdural Resection of Cervical Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumors

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Hideki; Sumida, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are noninflammatory masses formed posterior to the odontoid process. Because of their anatomy, the optimal surgical approach for resecting pseudotumors is controversial. Conventionally, 3 approaches are used: the anterior transoral approach, the lateral approach, and the posterior extradural approach; however, each approach has its limitations. The posterior extradural approach is the most common; however, it remains challenging due to severe epidural veins. Although regression of pseudotumors after fusion surgery has been reported, direct decompression and a pathologic diagnosis are ideal when the pseudotumor is large. We therefore developed a new microscopic surgical technique; transdural resection. After C1 laminectomy, the dorsal and ventral dura was incised while preserving the arachnoid. Removal of the pseudotumor was performed and both of the dura were repaired. The patient’s clinical symptoms subsequently improved and the pathologic findings showed degenerative fibrocartilaginous tissue. In addition, no neurological deterioration, central spinal fluid leakage, or arachnoiditis was observed. Currently, the usefulness of the transdural approach has been reported for cervical and thoracic disk herniation. According to our results, the transdural approach is recommended for resection of retro-odontoid pseudotumors because it enables direct decompression of the spinal cord and a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26544168

  18. Management of resectable colorectal lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Moorcraft, Sing Yu; Ladas, George; Bowcock, Anne; Chau, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Lung metastases occur in 10-20 % of patients with colorectal cancer. The biology of colorectal lung metastases is poorly understood, however lung metastases are more common in patients with rectal cancer and in patients with RAS mutations. Although the majority of patients have extrapulmonary disease, a small proportion of patients with lung metastases are suitable for lung metastasectomy and surgical resection has become a standard of care, based on data from retrospective series demonstrating a 5-year overall survival of 40-68 %. However, there remains uncertainty regarding the optimal management approach for these patients due to the lack of evidence from randomized controlled trials and current practice varies between institutions. For example, the role for neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy is not yet defined and there are no randomized trials comparing surgery with alternative treatment options such as radiofrequency ablation and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Further research is needed to improve the selection of patients for surgery, but favourable prognostic factors include a normal pre-operative CEA, solitary metastasis, complete resection and a long disease-free interval. There is also evidence that patients with resectable liver and lung metastases may benefit from resection of both sites of disease, and that re-resection may be of benefit in selected patients who relapse with resectable lung metastases. This article summarizes the biology of colorectal lung metastases and discusses the management of patients with lung metastases. PMID:26659389

  19. Liver resection for intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Peng-Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ji-Tong; Xu, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system is regarded as the gold standard staging system for HCC, classifying HCC as early, intermediate, or advanced. For intermediate HCC, trans-catheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is recommended as the optimal strategy by the BCLC guideline. This review investigates whether liver resection is better than TACE for intermediate HCC. Based on published studies, we compare the survival benefits and complications of liver resection and TACE for intermediate HCC. We also compare the survival benefits of liver resection in early and intermediate HCC. We find that liver resection can achieve better or at least comparable survival outcomes compared with TACE for intermediate HCC; however, we do not observe a significant difference between liver resection and TACE in terms of safety and morbidity. We conclude that liver resection may improve the short- and long-term survival of carefully selected intermediate HCC patients, and the procedure may be safely performed in the management of intermediate HCC. PMID:27190577

  20. Indocyanine green as an adjunct for resection of insular gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Abhidha; Rangarajan, Vithal; Kaswa, Amol; Jain, Sonal; Goel, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Many controversies exist regarding the extent of resection for insular gliomas and the timing of resection. Several techniques and adjuncts are used to maximize safety during resection of these tumors. We describe the use of indocyanine green (ICG) to identify the branches of the middle cerebral artery and discuss its utility to increase safety for resection for insular gliomas. Materials and Methods: Five patients with insular gliomas were surgically treated by the authors from June 2013 to June 2014. The patients presented with complaints of either a headache or recurring episodes of convulsions. All the patients were operated with the aid of neuronavigation and tractography. The long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery course through the insula and pass onward to supply the corona radiata. It is essential to preserve these vessels to prevent postoperative neurological deficits. ICG (Aurogreen) was used to identify and preserve the long perforating arteries of the middle cerebral artery. Results: ICG dye correctly identified the long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery and easily distinguished these vessels from the short perforating branches. All the branches of the middle cerebral artery that coursed through the tumor and had an onward course were preserved in all the patients. Only one patient developed a transient right sided hemiparesis that had improved at follow-up. Conclusions: Surgery for insular gliomas is challenging due to its location adjacent to eloquent areas, important white fiber tracts and the course of the middle cerebral artery within it. ICG is useful to identify and preserve the long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery that course through the tumor and traverse onward to supply the corona radiata. PMID:27366256

  1. Improving Outcomes with Surgical Resection and Other Ablative Therapies in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rahul; O'Reilly, Derek; Sherlock, David

    2011-01-01

    With rising incidence and emergence of effective treatment options, the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex multidisciplinary process. There is still little consensus and uniformity about clinicopathological staging systems. Resection and liver transplantation have been the cornerstone of curative surgical treatments with recent emergence of ablative techniques. Improvements in diagnostics, surgical techniques, and postoperative care have lead to dramatically improved results over the years. The most appropriate treatment plan has to be individualised and depends on a variety of patient and tumour-related factors. Very small HCCs discovered on surveillance have the best outcomes. Patients with advanced cirrhosis and tumours within Milan criteria should be offered transplantation. Resection is best for small solitary tumours with preserved liver function. Ablative techniques are suitable for low volume tumours in patients unfit for either resection or transplantation. The role of downstaging and bridging therapy is not clearly established. PMID:21994867

  2. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of liver cirrhosis and is an important therapeutic challenge, with a social and economic issue. If, now, the pathophysiology is not totally understood (main role of ammonia, but a better understanding of cerebral mechanisms), the clinical presentation is well-known. Some treatments are useful (disaccharides, treatment of the trigger) but their efficiency is limited. Nevertheless, the emergence of new treatments, such as non-absorbable antibiotics (rifaximin essentially), is an interesting therapeutic tool. PMID:26597584

  3. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  4. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... have the virus and do not practice good hygiene. Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis B ... where diapers are changed to ensure that proper hygiene is followed. If your child gets hepatitis A, ...

  5. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  6. Preventing hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  7. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  8. Complete Surgical Resection of a Leiomyosarcoma Arising from the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Hirofumi; Minamimura, Keisuke; Endo, Yuhei; Irie, Shoichi; Hirata, Toru; Kobayashi, Takashi; Mafune, Ken-ichi; Mori, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital with chief complaint of right hypochondoralgia. Abdominal ultrasound showed a retroperitoneal tumor in the suprarenal region of the right kidney. Computed tomography revealed an enhanced lobular tumor with irregular, circumscribed, and indistinct border. Ultrasound-guided biopsy was performed. The tumor consisted of spindle-shaped cells with a giant nucleus and multinuclear cells. The diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma by immunohistochemical staining. The patient underwent surgery accessed by a right eighth intercostal thoracoabdominal incision. The tumor was completely resected, accompanied by removal of the posterosuperior segment of the right hepatic lobe, right adrenal gland, and a portion of the inferior vena cava (IVC). The histopathologic diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma arising from the IVC. We present a rare case of a successfully managed leiomyosarcoma of the IVC. This case suggests the importance of curative surgical resection of the tumor due to low efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy for leiomyosarcoma. PMID:26167180

  9. Resection of giant liver hemangioma in a pregnant woman with coagulopathy: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Yasuhiko; Hazama, Ryoichi; Nishimoto, Masashi; Tanimura, Kenji; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Morizane, Mayumi; Nakabayashi, Koji; Fukumoto, Takumi; Ku, Yonson; Yamada, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    Background Hemangioma is a common benign tumor in the liver and usually asymptomatic. Scanty evidence concerning treatment modality of symptomatic hemangioma during pregnancy exists. Case A 35 year-old woman with giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma developed consumption coagulopathy due to the enlarged tumor, and underwent danaparoid therapy from 5 weeks of gestation (GW). Magnetic resonance image revealed giant hemangioma with 20 cm in diameter in the right lobe of the liver. A surgical operation of liver resection was successfully performed at 16 GW. Thereafter, the coagulopathy disappeared. She delivered a healthy male infant at 36 GW. Conclusion This is the first case report of surgical resection therapy for giant liver hemangioma during pregnancy. PMID:22905301

  10. A Glasgow Tipple—transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion prior to Whipple resection

    PubMed Central

    Jabbar, Salman A.A.; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Morris, Andrew J.; Oien, Karin A.; Duthie, Fraser; McKay, Colin J.; Carter, Christopher R.; Dickson, Euan J.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal surgery performed in patients with significant liver disease and portal hypertension is associated with high mortality rates, with even poorer outcomes associated with complex pancreaticobiliary operations. We report on a patient requiring portal decompression via transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) prior to a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The 49-year-old patient presented with pain, jaundice and weight loss. At ERCP an edematous ampulla was biopsied, revealing high-grade dysplasia within a distal bile duct adenoma. Liver biopsy was performed to investigate portal hypertension, confirming congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). A TIPS was performed to enable a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Prophylactic TIPS can be performed for preoperative portal decompression for patients requiring pancreatic resection. A potentially curative resection was performed when abdominal surgery was initially thought impossible. Notably, CHF has been associated with the development of cholangiocarcinoma in only four previous instances, with this case being only the second reported distal bile duct cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:27177892

  11. Use of an Autologous Liver Round Ligament Flap Zeros Postoperative Bile Leak after Curative Resection of Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Da-Xin; Tan, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Feng; Xu, Jin; Cui, Dong-Xu; Dai, Xian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative bile leak is a major surgical morbidity after curative resection with hepaticojejunostomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma, especially in Bismuth-Corlette types III and IV. This retrospective study assessed the effectiveness and safety of an autologous hepatic round ligament flap (AHRLF) for reducing bile leak after hilar hepaticojejunostomy. Methods Nine type III and IV hilar cholangiocarcinoma patients were consecutively hospitalized for elective perihilar partial hepatectomy with hilar hepaticojejunostomy using an AHRLF between October 2009 and September 2013. The AHRLF was harvested to reinforce the perihilar hepaticojejunostomy. Main outcome measures included operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, morbidity, bile leak, R0 resection rate, and overall survival. Results All patients underwent uneventful R0 resection with hilar hepaticojejunostomy. No patient experienced postoperative bile leak. Conclusions The AHRLF was associated with lack of bile leak after curative perihilar hepatectomy with hepaticojejunostomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma, without compromising oncologic safety, and is recommended in selected patients. PMID:25938440

  12. Transurethral resection syndrome in elderly patients: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) involves the risk of transurethral resection (TUR) syndrome owing to hyponatremia. Irrigation fluid type, duration of operation, and weight of resected mass have been evaluated as risk factors for TUR syndrome. The purpose of the present study was to identify risk factors related to TUR syndrome in the elderly. Methods After obtaining approval from the Institutional Review Board, data on all elderly males (aged 70 years and older) who underwent TURP under regional anesthesia over a 6-year period at our institution were retrospectively reviewed. TUR syndrome was defined as evidence of a central nervous system disturbance such as nausea, vomiting, restlessness, confusion, or even coma with a circulatory abnormality both intra- and post-operatively. Patients were divided into two groups, positive and negative, for the occurrence of the syndrome. Data such as previous medical history, preoperative and postoperative serum data, weight of resected mass, duration of operation, irrigation fluid drainage technique, anesthetic technique, operative infusion and transfusion volume, and neurological symptoms were collected. Only observational variables with p < 0.05 on univariate analyses were included in the multivariate logistic regression model to ascertain their independent effects on TUR syndrome. Results Of the 98 patients studied, 23 had TUR syndrome (23.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 14.9–32.0%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that volume of plasma substitute ≥ 500 ml (odds ratio [OR] 14.7, 95% CI 2.9–74.5), continuous irrigation through a suprapubic cystostomy (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.3–16.7), and weight of resected mass > 45 g (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.2–14.7) were associated with significantly increased risks for TUR syndrome (Hosmer-Lemeshow test, p = 0.94, accuracy 84.7%). Conclusions These results suggest that the use of a plasma substitute and continuous irrigation through a

  13. Sparing Sphincters and Laparoscopic Resection Improve Survival by Optimizing the Circumferential Resection Margin in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Metin; Bayraktar, Adem; Sivirikoz, Emre; Yegen, Gülcin; Karip, Bora; Saglam, Esra; Bulut, Mehmet Türker; Balik, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of rectal cancer treatment is to minimize the local recurrence rate and extend the disease-free survival period and survival. For this aim, obtainment of negative circumferential radial margin (CRM) plays an important role. This study evaluated predictive factors for positive CRM status and its effect on patient survival in mid- and distal rectal tumors. Patients who underwent curative resection for rectal cancer were included. The main factors were demographic data, tumor location, surgical technique, neoadjuvant therapy, tumor diameter, tumor depth, lymph node metastasis, mesorectal integrity, CRM, the rate of local recurrence, distant metastasis, and overall and disease-free survival. Statistical analyses were performed by using the Chi-squared test, Fisher exact test, Student t test, Mann–Whitney U test and the Mantel–Cox log-rank sum test. A total of 420 patients were included, 232 (55%) of whom were male. We observed no significant differences in patient characteristics or surgical treatment between the patients who had positive CRM and who had negative CRM, but a higher positive CRM rate was observed in patients undergone abdominoperineal resection (APR) (P < 0.001). Advanced T-stage (P < 0.001), lymph node invasion (P = 0.001) and incomplete mesorectum (P = 0.007) were encountered significantly more often in patients with positive CRM status. Logistic regression analysis revealed that APR (P < 0.001) and open resection (P = 0.046) were independent predictors of positive CRM status. Moreover, positive CRM was associated with decreased 5-year overall and disease-free survival (P = 0.002 and P = 0.004, respectively). This large single-institution series demonstrated that APR and open resection were independent predictive factors for positive CRM status in rectal cancer. Positive CRM independently decreased the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates. PMID:26844498

  14. Laparoscopic liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients: single center experience of 90 cases

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Roberto; Vennarecci, Giovanni; Lepiane, Pasquale; Colasanti, Marco; Felli, Emanuele; de Werra, Edoardo; Colace, Lidia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Montalbano, Marzia; Visco, Ubaldo; Maritti, Michela; Antonini, Mario; Santoro, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with or without underlying liver disease can be treated by surgical resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, morbidity and mortality of a laparoscopic approach in cirrhotic patients with HCC. Methods From 2004 to September 2014, 90 patients underwent a laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) for HCC. Data were collected in a prospectively maintained database since 2001. Preoperative patient evaluation was based on a multidisciplinary team meeting assessment. Results Median age was 63 years; 67 (74.4%) patients were male. Median body mass index (BMI) was 26.7. Underlying liver disease was known in 68 patients: in 46 patients’ hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related, in 15 patients to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related, in 5 patients alcohol-related. Child-Pugh Score was of grade A in 85 patients and of grade B in 5 patients; 63 patients had a Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) <10 and 27 patients MELD >10. A total of 18 left lateral sectionectomies, 1 left hepatectomy and 71 wedge resections or segmentectomies were performed. Conversion to laparotomy was necessary in 7 (7.7%) patients (five cases for bleeding and two cases for oncological reasons). In 90 patients, 98 HCC nodules were resected: 79 patients had one nodule, 8 patients had two nodules and 1 patient had three nodules. HCC nodules medium diameter was 29 mm (range, 4-100 mm) with median value of 25 mm. Tumor margins distance was 16 mm (range, 0-35 mm) with a median of 5 mm. Seventy nodules were located within the anterior sectors and 28 nodules within the posterior sectors. Conclusions LLR for HCC can be performed with acceptable morbidity in patients with underlying liver disease. The use of laparoscopic surgery in cirrhotic patients may be proposed as the first-line treatment for HCC or as bridge treatment before liver transplantation. PMID:26605279

  15. CT during hepatic arteriography and portography: an illustrative review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Hyun Jin; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2002-01-01

    The combination of computed tomography (CT) during arterial portography (CTAP) and CT during hepatic arteriography (CTHA) has been used for evaluation of hepatic neoplasms before partial hepatic resection. Focal hepatic lesions that can be demonstrated with CTAP and CTHA include regenerative nodules, dysplastic nodules, dysplastic nodules with malignant foci, hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, hemangioma, and metastases. CTAP is considered the most sensitive modality for detection of small hepatic lesions, particularly small hepatic tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic tumors. CTHA can demonstrate not only hypervascular tumors but also hypovascular tumors and can help differentiate malignant from benign lesions. However, various types of nontumorous hemodynamic changes are frequently encountered at CTAP or CTHA and appear as focal lesions that mimic true hepatic lesions. Such hemodynamic changes include several types of arterioportal shunts, liver cirrhosis, Budd-Chiari syndrome, inflammatory changes, pseudolesions due to an aberrant blood supply, and laminar flow in the portal vein. Familiarity with the CTAP and CTHA appearances of various hepatic lesions and nontumorous hemodynamic changes allows the radiologist to improve the diagnostic accuracy. PMID:12235334

  16. Development of a standardized laparoscopic caecum resection model to simulate laparoscopic appendectomy in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) has become one of the most common surgical procedures to date. To improve and standardize this technique further, cost-effective and reliable animal models are needed. Methods In a pilot study, 30 Wistar rats underwent laparoscopic caecum resection (as rats do not have an appendix vermiformis), to optimize the instrumental and surgical parameters. A subsequent test study was performed in another 30 rats to compare three different techniques for caecum resection and bowel closure. Results Bipolar coagulation led to an insufficiency of caecal stump closure in all operated rats (Group 1, n = 10). Endoloop ligation followed by bipolar coagulation and resection (Group 2, n = 10) or resection with a LigaSure™ device (Group 3, n = 10) resulted in sufficient caecal stump closure. Conclusions We developed a LA model enabling us to compare three different caecum resection techniques in rats. In conclusion, only endoloop closure followed by bipolar coagulation proved to be a secure and cost-effective surgical approach. PMID:24934381

  17. Feasibility of laparoscopic liver resection for giant hemangioma of greater than 6 cm in diameter

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Sung

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Liver hemangioma, the most common benign liver tumor, can be safely managed by clinical observation. However, surgical treatment should be considered in a subset of patients with giant hemangioma with abdominal symptoms. We reviewed the feasibility of total laparoscopic liver resection for giant hemangioma of >6 cm in diameter. Methods Nine consecutive patients who underwent total laparoscopic liver resection for giant hemangioma between August 2008 to December 2012 were included in this study. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for demographic data, laboratory findings, and perioperative results. Results The median age of patients was 36 yrs (range, 31-63). Eight females and 1 male were included in the study. The median size of hemangioma was 11 cm in diameter (range, 6-18) and 5 patients had a hemangioma >10 cm. Indications for surgical treatments were abdominal symptoms in 4 patients, increased size in 5 patients, and uncertain diagnosis in 1 patient. The median operation time was 522 minutes for right hepatectomy, 220 minutes for left lateral sectionectomy, and 90 minutes for wedge resection. The median estimated blood loss was 400 ml (range, 50-900). There was no postoperative morbidity, including Clanvien-Dindo grade I. Conclusions The resection of giant hemangioma demands meticulous surgical technique due to high vascularity and the concomitant risk of intraoperative hemorrhage. Laparoscopic liver resection is feasible with minimal operative complication. Therefore, laparoscopic liver resection can be considered as an option for surgical treatment for giant hemangioma. PMID:26155263

  18. Rectovaginal fistula: a new approach by stapled transanal rectal resection.

    PubMed

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Scilletta, Beniamino; Tomaselli, Tiziana Grazia; Zarbo, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Many surgical procedures have been developed to repair rectovaginal fistulas even if no "procedure of choice" is reported. The authors report a case of relatively uncommon, complex, medium-high post-obstetric rectovaginal fistula without sphincteral lesions and treated with a novel tailored technique. Our innovative surgical management consisted of preparing the neck of the fistula inside the vagina and folding it into the rectum so as to enclose the fistula within two semicontinuous sutures (stapled transanal rectal resection); no fecal diversion was performed. Postoperative follow-up at 9 months showed no recurrence of the fistula. PMID:17899300

  19. Pure bronchoplastic resections of the bronchus without pulmonary resection for endobronchial carcinoid tumours†

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Kai; Karenovics, Wolfram; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Jordan, Simon; Dusmet, Michael

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumours are relatively uncommon primary lung neoplasms. A small proportion of these lesions are predominantly endobronchial and do not extend beyond the bronchial wall. Endoscopic resection can be performed, but carries around a one in three risk of local recurrence and, therefore, mandates long-term surveillance. An alternative is complete surgical resection via bronchoplastic resection. We present our experience of surgical resection in patients with endobronchial carcinoids. METHODS From 2000 to 2010, 13 patients (age 45 ± 16 years, 10 males) underwent pure bronchoplastic resection, including systematic nodal dissection, for endobronchial carcinoid tumours, without the resection of lung parenchyma. RESULTS There was no significant operative morbidity or mortality. This is a retrospective review of a consecutive case series. The last follow-up for all patients was obtained in 2011. The mean maximum tumour size was 18 ± 8 mm. No lymph node invasion was observed. The median follow-up was 6.3 ± 3.3 years, with no regional recurrence. In 1 case, a tumourlet was identified at 5 years in the contralateral airway and viewed as a metachronous new lesion. CONCLUSIONS Bronchial sleeve resection is a safe procedure for suitably located endobronchial carcinoid tumours. Endoscopic resection should be reserved for patients who decline, or are unfit, for surgery. PMID:23628650

  20. Recurrence after thymoma resection according to the extent of the resection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete resection of the thymus is considered appropriate for a thymoma resection because any remaining thymic tissue can lead to local recurrence. However, there are few studies concerning the extent of thymus resection. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether recurrence following thymoma resection correlated to the extent of resection. Methods Between 1986 and 2011, a total of 491 patients underwent resection of thymic epithelial tumors with curative intent. Of those, we excluded patients with an undetermined World Health Organization (WHO) histologic type, patients with type C thymoma, and patients who underwent incomplete resection (n = 21). The remaining 342 patients were reviewed retrospectively and compared recurrence according to the extent of resection. Results Extended thymectomy was performed in 239 patients (69.9%) and limited thymectomy was performed 103 patients (30.1%). In the extended thymectomy group, 29 recurrences occurred, and in the limited thymectomy group, 10 recurrences occurred. Comparing rates of freedom from recurrence between two groups, there was no significant statistical difference in total recurrence (p =0.472) or local recurrence (p =0.798). After matching patients by stage and tumor size, there was no significant difference in freedom from recurrence between the two groups (p = 0.162). Additionally, after adjusting for histologic type and MG, there was also no significant difference (p = 0.125) between groups. Conclusions No difference in the rate of recurrence was observed in patients following limited thymectomy compared with extended thymectomy. PMID:24646138

  1. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, viral hepatitis, and liver cancer make liver disease one of the 10 leading ... disease are decreasing, those for viral hepatitis and liver cancer are on the rise, both in the U.S. ...

  2. Resection of Late Pulmonary Metastases from Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Is Surgery an Option?

    PubMed

    Brieau, Bertrand; Barret, Maximilien; Rouquette, Alexandre; Dréanic, Johann; Brezault, Catherine; Regnard, Jean François; Coriat, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Patients with recurrences from pancreas adenocarcinoma have a poor survival rate despite new chemotherapy treatment options. Recurrences are mainly hepatic metastases or peritoneal dissemination and surgical treatment is not recommended. Late and single metachronous pulmonary recurrences are uncommon and may mimic primary lung carcinoma. We report two patients with late and unique pulmonary metastasis from pancreatic cancer. These two patients underwent surgical resection; three and five years later, they did not experience recurrences. Cases called for a surgical approach in late and unique pulmonary metastases from pancreatic cancer, and paved the way for a prolonged chemotherapy free period. PMID:26461032

  3. Laparoscopic Colorectal Resection in Octogenarian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Minghao; Qin, Huabo; Luo, Qianxin; He, Xiaosheng; Lan, Ping; Lian, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The population older than 80 years has been increasing. A significant proportion of colorectal diseases that require colorectal resection occur in very elderly patients. However, the benefits of laparoscopy remain controversial in octogenarians. A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational study was performed to compare clinical outcomes between laparoscopic versus open colorectal resection in octogenarians. The PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases from the years 1990 to 2015 were searched for studies that compare surgical outcomes between laparoscopic and open colorectal resection in octogenarians (≥80 years old). Seven eligible studies including 528 laparoscopic and 484 open colorectal resections were identified. Laparoscopic approach was associated with lower rate of mortality (odds ratio [OR] 0.48, P = 0.03), overall complications (OR 0.54, P < 0.001), and prolonged ileus (OR 0.56, P = 0.009), quicker bowel function return (standardized mean difference [SMD] −0.50, P < 0.001), and shorter length of hospital stay (SMD −0.47, P = 0.007). No differences were found in anastomotic leak (OR 1.16, P = 0.72), respiratory complication (OR 0.60, P = 0.07), and reoperation (OR 0.85, P = 0.69). Laparoscopic colorectal resection is as safe as open approach, and the short-term outcomes appear to be more favorable in octogenarians. PMID:26496302

  4. A new Simplified Method of Selective Exposure of Hepatic Pedicles for Controlled Hepatectomies

    PubMed Central

    Karagiulian, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Our experience of 90 hepatectomies (HE) and examinations of 64 cadaver livers resulted in the elaboration of a simplified technique for the exposure of hepatic pedicles (HP) and the rapid selective ligation without significant normothermal ischemia of the retained parts of the liver. The method comprises 4 consecutive steps: 1) a superficial T-shaped incision of Glisson's capsule at the site of HP projection on the liver's inferior surface, 2) introduction of the surgeon's forefinger into the liver parenchyma, controlled by clamping the hepatoduodenal ligament, the fingertip finding a tubular structure well distinguished by its smooth elastic surface from the friable parenchyma and bending the finger to hook the pedicle, 3) drawing the hooked pedicle downwards through the slit in the capsule and temporarily clamping it, while releasing the hepatoduodenal ligament so as to restore blood supply to the retained parts of the liver, 4) checking for correct ligature position on the HP before its final ligation by matching the actual ischemic area with the intended line of resection and moving the clamp proximally or distally along the exposed pedicle for the release or clamping of lateral branches as necessary. Whereupon resection can be performed by any of the known methods. This method has been used in 8 major HE, allowing to reduce intraoperative blood loss from 2200±247 ml to 1000±225 ml and reducing general liver ischemia from 10 minutes and more to 2–3 minutes. PMID:2487059

  5. Endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer: Current and original devices

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2009-01-01

    Compared with endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is easier to perform and requires less time for treatment. However, EMR has been replaced by ESD, because achieving en bloc resection of specimens > 20 mm in diameter is difficult with EMR. The technique of ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precise histological diagnosis and can also reduce the rate of recurrence, but has a high level of technical difficulty, and is consequently associated with a high rate of complications, a need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. To overcome disadvantages in both EMR and ESD, various advances have been made in submucosal injections, knives, other accessories, and in electrocoagulation systems. PMID:21160647

  6. Early experiences with magnetic rings in resection of the distal colon.

    PubMed

    Jansen, A; Keeman, J N; Davies, G A; Klopper, P J

    1980-01-01

    We have developed an anastomosis technique for resection of the distal colon based on the principle of submucosal layer apposition. The anastomosis apparatus consists of two rings of Ertalyte (polyester-polyethyleneterephtalate) containing two magnetic rings of polymer bonded rare earth cobalt. For low anastomoses we developed a magnetic ring holder, protecting cap and hexagonal connecting rod. The working principle is based on progressive compression leading to necrosis of the intermediate mucosal and submucosal layers by increasing magnetic force while bowel healing takes place. After 7 to 17 days the magnets cut through and are propelled by peristalis out of the anastomotic region. From our initial series of five patients we performed three sigmoid resections and two low anterior resections. There were no postoperative complications. Sigmoidoscopic and radiological investigations two weeks postoperatively, showed no evidence of leakage or anastomotic narrowing. The technique and the special advantages of the apparatus are discussed. PMID:7366876

  7. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teach you how to perform coughing and deep breathing techniques. You should do these every 3 to 4 hours. Tell you how to care for yourself after your procedure. You may need to wear tight stockings and use a breathing device to keep your lungs clear. You may ...

  8. Current role of portal vein embolization/hepatic artery chemoembolization.

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Norihiro; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2004-04-01

    This article has reviewed indications, methods, and results of PVE and TACE for hepatobiliary tumors. PVE is applied mainly to increase the safety of major hepatic resection in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma, HCC, or metastatic liver tumors. Hepatic arterial embolization causes selective ischemia of the liver tumor and enhances the cytotoxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent administered concomitantly. A survival benefit of TACE in patients with unresectable or recurrent HCC has been demonstrated. The significance of preoperative TACE is still controversial. TACE is routinely performed before PVE in HCC patients. PMID:15062666

  9. Management of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lal, Alysandra; Christians, Kathleen; Evans, Douglas B

    2010-04-01

    Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is an emerging stage of disease defined by computed tomogrpahy criteria, patient (Katz type B), or disease characteristics (Katz type C). These patients are particularly well suited to a surgery-last strategy with induction therapy consisting of chemotherapy (gemcitabine alone or in combination) followed by chemoradiation. With appropriate selection and preoperative planning, many patients with borderline resectable disease derive clinical benefit from multimodality therapy. The use of a standardized system for the staging of localized pancreatic cancer avoids indecision and allows for the optimal treatment of all patients guided by the extent of their disease. In this article, 2 case reports are presented, and the term borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is discussed. The advantages of neoadjuvant therapy and surgery are also discussed. PMID:20159519

  10. Hepatic artery aneurysm developing after Billroth's operation.

    PubMed

    Fatic, Nikola; Music, Davor; Zornic, Nenad; Radojevic, Nemanja

    2014-05-01

    In this report we review the unusual case of a patient with a common hepatic artery aneurysm presenting 30 years after a Billroth's II resection. A 65-year-old man with epigastric pain and 10 kg of weight loss in the previous 6 months was referred to our clinic. Computed tomography revealed the presence of an aneurysm of the common hepatic artery (HAA) of 35 mm. This HAA was surgically excluded by aneurysmectomy and prosthetic bypass. Intraoperatively we observed extensive peritoneal adhesions and connective tissue formation in the region of the hepatoduodenal and hepatogastric ligaments, and the outer wall of the HAA was tightly affixed to the root of the transverse mesocolon by connective adhesions. Retraction of the adhesions slowly brought about a continued stretching and thinning of the arterial wall likely caused the HAA. PMID:24184460

  11. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, John W.; Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Pappas, Theodore N.; Clary, Bryan M.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Bendell, Johanna C.; Morse, Michael A.; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is a rare malignancy. Despite radical resection, survival remains poor, with high rates of local and distant failure. To clarify the role of radiotherapy with chemotherapy, we performed a retrospective analysis of resected patients who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 patients (13 with proximal and 32 with distal disease) underwent resection plus radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy). All but 1 patient received concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 30 months for all patients and 40 months for survivors. Results: Of the 45 patients, 33 underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, and 12 were treated neoadjuvantly. The 5-year actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 33%, 37%, 42%, and 78%, respectively. The median survival was 34 months. No patient died perioperatively. Patient age {<=}60 years and perineural involvement adversely affected survival on univariate analysis. Patients undergoing R0 resection had a significantly improved rate of local control but no survival advantage. Despite having more advanced disease at presentation, patients treated neoadjuvantly had a longer survival (5-year survival 53% vs. 23%, p = 0.16) and similar rates of Grade 2-3 surgical morbidity (16% vs. 33%, p = 0.24) compared with those treated in the postoperative setting. Conclusion: These study results suggest a possible local control benefit from chemoradiotherapy combined with surgery in patients with advanced, resected biliary cancer. Furthermore, our results suggest that a treatment strategy that includes preoperative chemoradiotherapy might result in improved tumor resectability with similar surgical morbidity compared with patients treated postoperatively, as well as potentially improved survival outcomes. Distant failure remains a significant failure pattern, suggesting the need for more effective systemic

  12. Protect Yourself from Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop yellowish eyes and skin. All the hepatitis viruses can cause acute, or short-term, hepatitis. Some can also cause chronic hepatitis, in which the infection lasts a long time, sometimes for your whole life. Chronic hepatitis can eventually lead to scarring of ...

  13. Hepatic osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Angelo; Verardo, Alberto; Di Pascoli, Marco; Giannini, Sandro; Bolognesi, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    Metabolic disturbances of bone are frequent in patients with chronic liver disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with advanced chronic liver disease is reported between 12% and 55%; it is higher in primary biliary cirrhosis. All patients with advanced liver disease should be screened for osteoporosis with a densitometry, especially if the etiology is cholestatic and in the presence of other risk factors. Clinical relevance of hepatic osteodystrophy increases after liver transplantation. After liver transplant, a rapid loss of bone mineral density can be detected in the first 6 months, followed by stabilization and slight improvement of the values. At the time of transplantation, bone density values are very important prognostic factors. Therapy of hepatic osteodystrophy is based primarily on the control of risk factors: cessation of tobacco and alcohol assumption, reduction of caffeine ingestion, exercise, supplementation of calcium and vitamin D, limitation of drugs such as loop diuretics, corticosteroids, cholestyramine. Bisphosphonates have been proposed for the therapy of osteoporosis in patients with liver disease, particularly after liver transplantation. The possible side effects of oral administration of bisphosphonates, such as the occurrence of esophageal ulcerations, are of particular concern in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension, due to the risk of gastrointestinal hemorrhage from ruptured esophageal varices, although this risk is probably overestimated. PMID:25568651

  14. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  15. Laparoscopic Resection of Unruptured Rudimentary Horn Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepti; Usha, M G; Gaikwad, Ramesh; Sudha, S

    2011-01-01

    A non-communicating rudimentary horn is an uncommon site for ectopic pregnancy. Rudimentary horn pregnancy (RHP) is a rare entity but associated with grave clinical consequences. Majority of these cases if not detected timely end up in uterine rupture and present as an obstetrical emergency. We present this case of a 32-year-old, third gravida with a 12 weeks live gestation in the right rudimentary horn, which was successfully managed with laparoscopic resection. Early diagnosis is the key stone in the management of such cases. Laparoscopic resection is a safe and viable option in the surgical management of unruptured RHP. PMID:26085754

  16. Further considerations on hepatic lesion discrimination using diffusion MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyin; Zhang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    With great interest, we read the article "Differential diagnosis between hepatic metastases and benign focal lesions using DWI with parallel acquisition technique: a meta-analysis" (by Wei CG et al.). This article suggests that diffusion-weighted imaging was useful for differentiation between hepatic metastases and benign focal lesions. The result is encouraging. We would like to contribute regarding the value of DWI with parallel acquisition technique in the differentiation of metastases and benign hepatic lesions. PMID:26472720

  17. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Colorectal Metastasis through Stoma Site at Time of Reversal of Diversion Ileostomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Røsok, Bård I.; Edwin, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques for liver tumors are gaining increased acceptance as an alternative to traditional resections by laparotomy. In this article we describe a laparoscopic liver resection of a metastatic lesion in a patient primarily operated for colorectal cancer. The resection was conducted as a single port procedure through the stoma aperture at time of reversal of the diversion ileostomy. Sigle incision liver resections may be less traumatic than conventional laparoscopy and could be applied in selected patients with both benign and malignant liver tumors. PMID:22091359

  18. [Tubular rectum and colon resection. A new operative method for the removal of large adenomas and low-risk carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Gall, F P

    1982-08-01

    A new operative method for the removal of large sessile tubular or villous adenomas and small early carcinomas of the low risk type by a "tubular" colonic or rectal resection is described. The term "tubular" applies to a short segmental resection of the colon or rectum with complete preservation of the mesocolon or mesorectum and the marginal or superior hemorrhoidal artery. This tubular resection has been used by us since 1981 in 11 patients (7 adenomas, 3 adenocarcinomas and one carcinoid). There was no suture line leakage. No lethality and so far no recurrence. The advantages of this new operative technique over conventional methods are discussed in detail. PMID:7128268

  19. Synchronous giant hepatic adenoma in siblings-A case report and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Shi, Xuetao; Zhao, Lei

    2016-07-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred to our department for a hepatic mass. She denied history of hepatitis or alcohol consumption and regular oral contraceptive use, except for the emergency contraceptive pill taken once a decade ago. Hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C antibody were negative, α-fetoprotein was within normal limit. CT scan revealed an enormous mass measuring 26.0×16 5×13 0 cm that almost totally replaced the right hepatic lobe. The neoplasm was completely resected and pathologically diagnosed as hepatic adenoma. Literature review indicates this is the largest hepatic adenoma reported so far. At the same time, clinical examination also revealed a hepatic mass in the patient's 42-year-old brother, which was pathologically confirmed as hepatic adenoma, too. He denied history of anabolic steroid use. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the subtypes of both tumors as the inflammatory hepatic adenoma. Literature review indicates this is the first report of synchronous hepatic adenomas in siblings. PMID:27096392

  20. Utility of the Gyrus open forceps in hepatic parenchymal transection

    PubMed Central

    Porembka, Matthew R; Doyle, M B Majella; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Simon, Peter O; Strasberg, Steven M; Linehan, David C; Hawkins, William G

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate if the Gyrus open forceps is a safe and efficient tool for hepatic parenchymal transection. Background: Blood loss during hepatic transection remains a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality associated with liver surgery. Various electrosurgical devices have been engineered to reduce blood loss. The Gyrus open forceps is a bipolar cautery device which has recently been introduced into hepatic surgery. Methods: We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of all liver resections performed from November 2005 through November 2007. Patients undergoing resection of at least two liver segments where the Gyrus was the primary method of transection were included. Patient charts were reviewed; clinicopathological data were collected. Results: Of the 215 open liver resections performed during the study period, 47 patients met the inclusion criteria. Mean patient age was 61 years; 34% were female. The majority required resection for malignant disease (94%); frequent indications included colorectal metastasis (66%), hepatocellular carcinoma (6%) and cholangiocarcinoma (4%). Right hemihepatectomy (49%), left hemihepatectomy (13%) and right trisectionectomy (13%) were the most frequently performed procedures. A total of 26 patients (55%) underwent a major ancillary procedure concurrently. There were no operative mortalities. Median operative time was 220 min (range 97–398 min). Inflow occlusion was required in nine patients (19%) for a median time of 12 min (range 3–30 min). Median total estimated blood loss was 400 ml (range 10–2000 ml) and 10 patients (21%) required perioperative transfusion. All patients had macroscopically negative margins. Median length of stay was 8 days. Two patients (4%) had clinically significant bile leak. The 30-day postoperative mortality was zero. Conclusions: Use of the Gyrus open forceps appears to be a safe and efficient manner of hepatic parenchymal transection which allows

  1. Endoscopic resection of a talocalcaneal coalition using a posteromedial approach.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Koji; Kumai, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2014-02-01

    Resection is a standard surgical procedure for a talocalcaneal coalition (TCC). A posterior approach is the representative technique for hindfoot endoscopy, and there is only 1 report of endoscopic resection of TCC using this approach. Disadvantages of the posterior approach for TCC are as follows: (1) the indication is limited to posterior-facet coalition, (2) the flexor hallucis longus can be an obstacle in approaching the coalition, (3) the acute insertion angle between the endoscope and instrument reduces operability, and (4) a position change and additional skin incision are essential for conversion to an open procedure. In contrast, a posteromedial approach for TCC with established portals at the entrance and exit of the flexor retinaculum is a useful technique because (1) the indication is allow to middle- and posterior-facet coalitions, (2) increased perfusion pressure allows the creation of sufficient working space, (3) operating the instrument only at the coalition site decreases the risk of tendon injury and neurovascular damage, (4) the obtuse insertion angle between the endoscope and instrument improves operability, and (5) a position change and additional skin incision are unnecessary for conversion to an open procedure. PMID:24749021

  2. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-04-25

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  3. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  4. Risk factors for non-curative resection of early gastric neoplasms with endoscopic submucosal dissection: Analysis of 1,123 lesions

    PubMed Central

    TOYOKAWA, TATSUYA; INABA, TOMOKI; OMOTE, SHIZUMA; OKAMOTO, AKIKO; MIYASAKA, RIKA; WATANABE, KAZUO; IZUMIKAWA, KOICHI; FUJITA, ISAO; HORII, JOICHIRO; ISHIKAWA, SHIGENAO; MORIKAWA, TAMIYA; MURAKAMI, TAKAKO; TOMODA, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Although the frequency of residual disease and recurrence following endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has markedly decreased, a few cases of residual disease and recurrence following ESD are still observed. The aims of the present study were to clarify the causes of non-curative resection and to investigate the risk factors. A total of 1,123 early gastric neoplasm lesions treated by ESD were investigated. Non-curative resection was defined as histological positivity of the resected margins, vascular invasion or failure of en bloc resection. Cases of non-curative resection were classified as being caused by one of three reasons: Inadequate technique, pre-procedural misdiagnosis or problems in the histological diagnosis. Following classification, the cases of non-curative and curative resection were compared based on a range of patient characteristics: Procedure time, and size, type and location of the lesions. The frequency of non-curative resection was 16% (182 lesions). Non-curative resection occurred due to inadequate technique in 59 cases, pre-procedural misdiagnosis in 88 cases and problems in the histological diagnosis in 35 cases. Multivariate analysis revealed that a large lesion size, long procedure time and inexperienced endoscopist were associated with a significantly higher risk of non-curative resection due to an inadequate technique. Furthermore, it was found that lesions located in the upper area of the stomach and cancer with submucosal invasion were associated with a significantly higher risk of non-curative resection due to pre-procedural misdiagnosis. In conclusion, the present study has shown that the major reasons for non-curative resection are an inadequate technique and pre-procedural misdiagnosis. The risk factors for these problems have been clarified. PMID:25780411

  5. Hepatic Cryotherapy and Subsequent Hepatic Arterial Chemotherapy for Colorectal Metastases to the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Majeed H.; Booth, Michael W. C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an experience of thirty consecutive patients with hepatic colorectal metastases who were treated with hepatic cryotherapy and subsequent hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy using 5FU. Patients with colorectal metastases confined to the liver but not suitable for resection, and with liver involvement of less than 50% were offered the treatment. Prospective documentation of all patients was undertaken with data being recorded on a computerised database. Patients had a median of 6 (2–15) lesions with sizes ranging from 1–12 cm. There was no 30 day mortality. Postoperative complications developed in 8 patients but were followed by full recovery in all instances. Side effects from chemotherapy occured in 23% of cycles. Twenty seven patients have died. Median survival from the time of cryotherapy was 18.2 months (7–34), or 23months (9–44) from diagnosis of liver lesions. Hepatic cryotherapy with subsequent arterial chemotherapy is safe and well tolerated. The results suggest survival of patients with colorectal hepatic metastases can be improved by the use of this modality of treatment. PMID:9893239

  6. Radioembolization of hepatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors are a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity. This remains a challenging and key task for every oncologist despite significant advances that have been made with selective targeted systemic agents and in technology advances with radiotherapy delivery. Radioembolization (RE) is a technique of permanently implanting microspheres containing Yttrium-90 (90Y), a beta-emitting isotope with a treatment range of 2 mm, into hepatic tumors. This form of brachytherapy utilizes the unique dual vascular anatomy of the liver to preferentially deliver radioactive particles via the hepatic artery to tumor, sparing normal liver parenchyma. The main treatment inclusion criteria are patients with solid tumors, compensated liver functions, life expectancy of at least three months, and ECOG performance status 0-2. Benefit of RE has been proven in patients that have low-to-moderate extrahepatic disease burden, prior liver radiotherapy, heavy prior chemotherapy and biologic agent exposure, and history of hepatic surgery or ablation. Most of the clinical evidence is reported in metastatic colorectal, and neuroendocrine tumors (NET), and primary hepatocellular cancer. A growing body of data supports the use of RE in hepatic metastatic breast cancer, intrahepatic cholangiocarinoma, and many other metastatic tumor types. Side effects are typically mild constitutional and GI issues limited to the first 7-14 days post treatment, with only 6% grade 3 toxicity reported in large series. Potentially serious or fatal radiation induced liver disease is extremely rare, reported in only 1% or fewer in major series of both metastatic and primary tumors treated with RE. Currently, high priority prospective clinical trials are testing RE combined with chemotherapy in first line therapy for colorectal hepatic metastases, and combined with sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Fortunately, this beneficial and now widely available therapy is

  7. Radioembolization of hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors are a leading cause of cancer mortality and morbidity. This remains a challenging and key task for every oncologist despite significant advances that have been made with selective targeted systemic agents and in technology advances with radiotherapy delivery. Radioembolization (RE) is a technique of permanently implanting microspheres containing Yttrium-90 ((90)Y), a beta-emitting isotope with a treatment range of 2 mm, into hepatic tumors. This form of brachytherapy utilizes the unique dual vascular anatomy of the liver to preferentially deliver radioactive particles via the hepatic artery to tumor, sparing normal liver parenchyma. The main treatment inclusion criteria are patients with solid tumors, compensated liver functions, life expectancy of at least three months, and ECOG performance status 0-2. Benefit of RE has been proven in patients that have low-to-moderate extrahepatic disease burden, prior liver radiotherapy, heavy prior chemotherapy and biologic agent exposure, and history of hepatic surgery or ablation. Most of the clinical evidence is reported in metastatic colorectal, and neuroendocrine tumors (NET), and primary hepatocellular cancer. A growing body of data supports the use of RE in hepatic metastatic breast cancer, intrahepatic cholangiocarinoma, and many other metastatic tumor types. Side effects are typically mild constitutional and GI issues limited to the first 7-14 days post treatment, with only 6% grade 3 toxicity reported in large series. Potentially serious or fatal radiation induced liver disease is extremely rare, reported in only 1% or fewer in major series of both metastatic and primary tumors treated with RE. Currently, high priority prospective clinical trials are testing RE combined with chemotherapy in first line therapy for colorectal hepatic metastases, and combined with sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Fortunately, this beneficial and now widely available therapy

  8. The role of chemoradiation for patients with resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Russo, Suzanne; Monjazeb, Arta; Blackstock, A William

    2012-04-01

    Conflicting data and substantial controversy exist regarding optimal adjuvant treatment for those patients with resectable or potentially resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Despite improvements in short-term surgical outcomes, the use of newer chemotherapeutic agents, development of targeted agents and more precise delivery of radiation, the 5-year survival rates for early-stage patients remains less than 25%. This article critically reviews the existing data for various adjuvant treatment approaches for patients with surgically resectable pancreatic cancer. Our review confirms that despite several randomized clinical trials, the optimal adjuvant treatment approach for these patients remains unclear. PMID:22500684

  9. Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sözüer, Erdoğan M.

    1992-01-01

    In this report two hundred and twenty six patients with hydatid disease were admitted to the Surgical Department of Erciyes University (Kayseri) and Şişli Etfal Hospital (Istanbul) between 1978 and 1990 and reviewed retrospectively. One hundred and two patients (45.1%) were male and 124 (54.9%) female. In the patients with hydatid cysts the most frequent symptom was right upper abdominal pain (66%). The most frequent signs were hepatomegaly (43.8%) and palpable mass (39%). One hundred and sixty seven patients (73.9%) were examined with ultrasonography which has a diagnostic value of 94%. Preoperative complications were infection of cyst (7%), intrabiliary rupture (3.5%) and anaphylactic shock (0.4%). All patients were operated on by using various surgical techniques; omentoplasty (101), external drainage of residual cavity (64), marsupialization (25), capitonnage (15), introflexion (10), pericystectomy (6), and hepatic resection (5). The main postoperative complications were wound infection (12%) and biliary fistula (2.6%). The total mortality rate was 1.8% in this series. PMID:1467317

  10. Hepatic arterial embolization in patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Liver metastases occur in 46-93% of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs). Presence and extension of liver metastases are considered important prognostic factors, as they may significantly impair the patient’s quality of life, because of either tumor bulk or hormonal hypersecretion. Therapies for NEN liver metastases include surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and biotherapy. Surgery is the gold standard for curative therapy, but in most of NEN patients with liver metastases, when surgery can not be applied, minimally invasive therapeutic approaches are adopted. They include trans-arterial embolization (TAE), trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE), radiofrequency thermal ablation and new emerging techniques. TAE is based on selective infusion of particles in the branch of the hepatic artery supplying the tumor lesions. The goal of TAE is to occlude tumor blood vessels resulting in ischemia and necrosis. Many reports have shown that TAE can reduce tumor size and hormone output, resulting in palliation of symptoms without the use of cytotoxic drugs, resulting in better tolerability. This review will focus on TAE performance and safety in NEN patients with liver metastases. PMID:24887262

  11. Clinical results of sublobar resection versus lobectomy or more extensive resection for lung cancer patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Seok; Sim, Hee Je; Lee, Geun Dong; Hwang, Su Kyung; Choi, Sehoon; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Kim, Yong-Hee; Park, Seung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are at a high risk of requiring lung resection. The optimal surgical strategy for these patients remains unclear. This study aimed to compare the clinical results of a sublobar resection versus a lobectomy or more extensive resection for lung cancer in patients with IPF. Methods From January 1995 to December 2012, 80 patients with simultaneous non-small cell lung cancer and IPF were treated surgically at Asan Medical Center. Predictors of recurrence-free survival and overall survival were evaluated in the series. Results Lobectomy or more extensive resection of the lung (lobar resection group) was performed in 65 patients and sublobar resection (sublobar resection group) was carried out in 15 patients. The sublobar resection group showed fewer in-hospital mortalities than the lobar resection group (6.7% vs. 15.4%; P=0.68). For late mortality after lung resection, cancer-related deaths were not significantly different in incidence between the two groups (55.6% vs. 30.6%; P=0.18). Recurrence-free survival after lung resection was significantly greater in the lobar than in the sublobar resection group (P=0.01). However, overall survival after lung resection was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.05). Sublobar resection was not a significant predictive factor for overall survival (hazard ratio =0.50; 95% CI: 0.21–1.15; P=0.10). Conclusions Although not statistically significant, a sublobar resection results in less in-hospital mortality than a lobar resection for lung cancer patients with IPF. There is no significant difference in overall survival compared with lobar resection. A sublobar resection may be another therapeutic option for lung cancer patients with IPF. PMID:27162674

  12. Resection planning for robotic acoustic neuroma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBrayer, Kepra L.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic neuroma surgery is a procedure in which a benign mass is removed from the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC). Currently this surgical procedure requires manual drilling of the temporal bone followed by exposure and removal of the acoustic neuroma. This procedure is physically and mentally taxing to the surgeon. Our group is working to develop an Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Robot (ANSR) to perform the initial drilling procedure. Planning the ANSR's drilling region using pre-operative CT requires expertise and around 35 minutes' time. We propose an approach for automatically producing a resection plan for the ANSR that would avoid damage to sensitive ear structures and require minimal editing by the surgeon. We first compute an atlas-based segmentation of the mastoid section of the temporal bone, refine it based on the position of anatomical landmarks, and apply a safety margin to the result to produce the automatic resection plan. In experiments with CTs from 9 subjects, our automated process resulted in a resection plan that was verified to be safe in every case. Approximately 2 minutes were required in each case for the surgeon to verify and edit the plan to permit functional access to the IAC. We measured a mean Dice coefficient of 0.99 and surface error of 0.08 mm between the final and automatically proposed plans. These preliminary results indicate that our approach is a viable method for resection planning for the ANSR and drastically reduces the surgeon's planning effort.

  13. Radical Carinal Resection for a Glomic Tumor.

    PubMed

    Bellier, Jocelyn; Sage, Edouard; Gonin, François; Longchampt, Elisabeth; Chapelier, Alain

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with increasing dyspnea secondary to a tumor arising from the carina. After desobstruction by bronchoscopy, the pathologic analysis revealed a glomic tumor. Carinal resection and reconstruction were performed with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and the long-term result was excellent. PMID:27449451

  14. Laparoscopic resection of splenic flexure tumors.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Massimo; Spoletini, Domenico; Castaldi, Fabio; Giovannini, Cristiano; Passaro, Umberto

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a single institution experience in laparoscopic treatment of splenic flexure tumors (SFT) is reported. Low incidence of these tumors and complexity of the procedure make the laparoscopic resection not diffuse and not well standardized. Since 2004, in a specific database, we prospectively record clinicopathological features and outcome of all patients submitted to laparoscopic colorectal resection. From January 2004 to October 2015, out of 567 cases of minimally invasive colorectal procedures, we performed 20 laparoscopic resection of SFT, 11 with extracorporeal anastomosis and 9 totally laparoscopic. Twelve patients had an advanced disease. Conversion rate was null. The mean operative time was 105' (range 70'-135'). Comparing extracorporeal and intracorporeal anastomoses, we did not find any significant difference in mean duration of surgery. Mean distal margin was 9.4 ± 3.1 cm (mean ± DS), mean proximal margin 8.9 ± 2.7 cm. The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 17.8 ± 5.6. Evaluating surgical short-term and oncological mid-term outcomes, laparoscopic resection of splenic flexure for tumors, even if challenging, resulted technically feasible and oncologically safe and it seems to be advisable. PMID:27040272

  15. Single-incision laparoscopic resection of small bowel tumours: Making it easier for patient and surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Terry P.; Aho, Johnathon M.; Bingener, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with small bowel tumours frequently require surgical intervention. Minimally invasive techniques require advanced skills and may not be offered to many patients. We present a laparoscopic single-incision technique that is minimally invasive without requiring intracorporeal anastomosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cases of all patients with laparoscopic small bowel resections performed by one surgeon from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed. A single-port technique was introduced after it became available at our institution in 2009. Before that, conventional laparoscopy (LAP) was performed with extension of the periumbilical incision to allow externalisation of the bowel. RESULTS: Totally, 10 patients were identified who underwent laparoscopic resection of small bowel tumours: 9 in the small bowel and 1 in the terminal ileum near the cecum. Three tumours were resected before 2009 using LAP, and 7 were resected using the single-port technique. Median length of stay was 3 days, median follow-up was 16.5 months, and no patients had a recurrence. Operative time, post-operative complications, hospital length of stay, and narcotic utilisation were similar between the single-port and traditional laparoscopic groups. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic removal of small bowel tumours with a small, periumbilical trocar incision is both effective and feasible without advanced technical skill. PMID:27279394

  16. IDENTIFICATION, ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INFECTIOUS HEPATITIS (HEPATITIS A) AGENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research program has the overall objective of combining the techniques of electron microscopy, ultracentrifugation, column chromatography, tissue culture and serology to identify, isolate and characterize the etiologic agent of infectious hepatitis, to propagate it in cell cu...

  17. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  18. Can immediate second resection be an alternative to standardized second transurethral resection of bladder tumors?

    PubMed

    Doğantekin, Engin; Girgin, Cengiz; Görgel, Sacit Nuri; Soylemez, Haluk; Dinçel, Çetin

    2016-03-01

    This study analyzed the impact of an immediate second transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) protocol on residual tumor status at the initial TURBT session and the recurrence rate in the primary resection area. We prospectively evaluated and randomized 47 consecutive patients who underwent TURBT sessions for bladder cancer. In accordance with the inclusion criteria, of the 47 consecutive patients, 19 (Group I) underwent immediate second resection of the tumor bed after complete TUR and 28 (Group II) did not. After standard TURBT, Group I underwent a second cystoscopy and resection of the bed of the tumor or an ignored tumor, which was performed by a different urologist. After 4-6 weeks, delayed second TURB was performed, and all pathological results were evaluated. Tumors were detected in two patients during the immediate second resection. Of these, one was a misdiagnosed tumor, whereas the other was diagnosed at the bed of the tumor by pathological examination. Tumors were detected in nine patients at the delayed second TURB, of which only one was part of Group I, while the others were part of Group II (p = 0.04). The results of this study demonstrated that residual tumors may remain after initial TURB, either in the tumor bed or in a different location within the bladder. Although this was a pilot study enrolling only a small number of patients, our initial results supported the assertion that immediate second resection can be an alternative to standard second TURBT. PMID:27106005

  19. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  20. Hepatitis B Blood Tests: FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working on ... people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See More ...

  1. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  2. Laparoscopic Resection of Adrenal Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Vitagliano, Gonzalo; Villeta, Matias; Arellano, Leonardo; Santis, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Background: Teratoma is a germ-cell tumor that commonly affects the gonads. Its components originate in the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. Extragonadal occurrence is rare. Teratomas confined to the adrenal gland are exceptional; only 3 cases have been reported in the English-language literature. We report 2 cases of mature teratomas of the adrenal gland that were laparoscopically excised. Methods: Two patients (ages 8 and 61 years) were diagnosed with adrenal teratoma at our institution. Radiological examination showed a solid 8-cm adrenal lesion in both cases. Hormonal assessment was normal. Both patients underwent laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy. Results: Surgical time was 120 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively. One patient was discharged on postoperative day 2, and the other remained hospitalized until day 10. The latter patient required percutaneous drainage of a retroperitoneal collection. Both tumors were identified as mature cystic teratomas. No evidence was present of recurring disease in either patient. Conclusions: Adrenal teratoma is rare. Laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy is a feasible, effective technique that enables excellent oncologic results. To our knowledge, this is the first report of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pure adrenal teratoma. PMID:17575773

  3. Principles of Quality Controlled Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection with Appropriate Dissection Level and High Quality Resected Specimen

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Eisei; Man-i, Mariko; East, James E.; Azuma, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has enabled en bloc resection of early stage gastrointestinal tumors with negligible risk of lymph node metastasis, regardless of tumor size, location, and shape. However, ESD is a relatively difficult technique compared with conventional endoscopic mucosal resection, requiring a longer procedure time and potentially causing more complications. For safe and reproducible procedure of ESD, the appropriate dissection of the ramified vascular network in the level of middle submucosal layer is required to reach the avascular stratum just above the muscle layer. The horizontal approach to maintain the appropriate depth for dissection beneath the vascular network enables treatment of difficult cases with large vessels and severe fibrosis. The most important aspect of ESD is the precise evaluation of curability. This approach can also secure the quality of the resected specimen with enough depth of the submucosal layer. PMID:23251883

  4. Surgical Guides (Patient-Specific Instruments) for Pediatric Tibial Bone Sarcoma Resection and Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bellanova, Laura; Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2013-01-01

    To achieve local control of malignant pediatric bone tumors and to provide satisfactory oncological results, adequate resection margins are mandatory. The local recurrence rate is directly related to inappropriate excision margins. The present study describes a method for decreasing the resection margin width and ensuring that the margins are adequate. This method was developed in the tibia, which is a common site for the most frequent primary bone sarcomas in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) were used for preoperative planning to define the cutting planes for the tumors: each tumor was segmented on MRI, and the volume of the tumor was coregistered with CT. After preoperative planning, a surgical guide (patient-specific instrument) that was fitted to a unique position on the tibia was manufactured by rapid prototyping. A second instrument was manufactured to adjust the bone allograft to fit the resection gap accurately. Pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens showed tumor-free resection margins in all four cases. The technologies described in this paper may improve the surgical accuracy and patient safety in surgical oncology. In addition, these techniques may decrease operating time and allow for reconstruction with a well-matched allograft to obtain stable osteosynthesis. PMID:23533326

  5. Perioperative treatment options in resectable pancreatic cancer - how to improve long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Marianne; Bahra, Marcus; Denecke, Timm; Travis, Sue; Pelzer, Uwe; Riess, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    Surgery remains the only chance of cure for pancreatic cancer, but only 15%-25% of patients present with resectable disease at the time of primary diagnosis. Important goals in clinical research must therefore be to allow early detection with suitable diagnostic procedures, to further broaden operation techniques and to determine the most effective perioperative treatment of either chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. More extensive operations involving extended pancreatectomy, portal vein resection and pancreatic resection in resectable pancreatic cancer with limited liver metastasis, performed in specialized centers seem to be the surgical procedures with a possible impact on survival. After many years of stagnation in pharmacological clinical research on advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) - since the approval of gemcitabine in 1997 - more effective cytotoxic substances (nab-paclitaxel) and combinations (FOLFIRINOX) are now available for perioperative treatment. Additionally, therapies with a broader mechanism of action are emerging (stroma depletion, immunotherapy, anti-inflammation), raising hopes for more effective adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment concepts, especially in the context of “borderline resectability”. Only multidisciplinary approaches including radiology, surgery, medical and radiation oncology as the backbones of the treatment of potentially resectable PDAC may be able to further improve the rate of cure in the future. PMID:26989460

  6. Short-term morbidity in transdiaphragmatic cardiophrenic lymph node resection for advanced stage gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    LaFargue, C J; Sawyer, B T; Bristow, R E

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is commonly diagnosed at an advanced stage, with disease involving the upper abdomen. The finding of enlarged cardiophrenic lymph nodes (CPLNs) on pre-operative imaging often indicates the presence of malignant spread to the mediastinum. Surgical resection of CPLN through a transdiaphragmatic approach can help to achieve cytoreduction to no gross residual. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients who underwent transdiaphragmatic cardiophrenic lymph node resection from 8/1/11 through 2/1/15. All relevant pre-, intra-, and post-operative characteristics and findings were recorded. A brief description of the surgical technique is included for reference. Eleven patients were identified who had undergone transdiaphragmatic resection of cardiophrenic lymph nodes. Malignancy was identified in 18/21 (86%) of total lymph nodes submitted. The median number of post-operative days was 7. The overall post-operative morbidity associated with CPLN resection was low, with the most common finding being a small pleural effusion present on chest x-ray between POD# 3-5 (55%). Transdiaphragmatic CPLN resection is a feasible procedure with relatively minor short-term post-operative morbidities that can be used to achieve cytoreduction to no gross residual disease. PMID:27354998

  7. Sorafenib after resection improves the outcome of BCLC stage C hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang; Hou, Yu; Cai, Xiao-Bei; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether sorafenib use after resection impacts tumor relapse and survival in Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage C hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: This retrospective study enrolled 36 male BCLC stage C HCC patients with portal vein thrombus and Child-Pugh class A liver function. Twenty-four patients received only surgical resection (SR), and 12 patients received oral sorafenib within 30 d after surgery. The primary outcomes were time to progression (TTP) (the time from surgical resection until HCC recurrence or extrahepatic metastases) and overall survival (OS). The secondary outcome was the rate of postoperative recurrence or metastasis. TTP and OS were analyzed using Kaplan Meier curves. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups in the serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, copies of hepatitis B virus-DNA, preoperative laboratory results, degree of hepatic fibrosis, types of portal vein tumor thrombus, number of satellite lesions, tumor diameter, pathological results, volume of blood loss, volume of blood transfusion, or surgery time (all P > 0.05). Patients in the SR + sorafenib group had a significantly longer TTP (29 mo vs 22 mo, P = 0.041) and a significantly longer median OS (37 mo vs 30 mo, P = 0.01) compared to patients in the SR group. The SR group had 18 cases (75%) of recurrence/metastasis while the SR + sorafenib group had six cases (50%) of recurrence/metastasis. A total of 19 patients died after surgery (five in the SR + sorafenib group and 14 in the SR group). The most common sorafenib-related adverse events were skin reactions, diarrhea, and hypertension, all of which were resolved with treatment. CONCLUSION: Sorafenib after SR was well-tolerated. Patients who received sorafenib after SR had better outcomes compared to patients who received only SR. PMID:27099447

  8. Hepatitis C testing: interpretation, implications, and counseling.

    PubMed

    Becherer, P R; Bacon, B

    1993-01-01

    New molecular biology techniques recently identified hepatitis C virus (HCV) as the major cause of non-A, non-B hepatitis. Serologic assays for HCV specific antibodies are a significant advance, but they require cautious interpretation due to problems with the tests' sensitivity and specificity. Patients with suspected HCV infection should be thoroughly evaluated to verify the presence of infection, to exclude other forms of chronic liver disease, and to determine the extent of liver damage prior to considering treatment. PMID:8421452

  9. Comparison between thulium laser resection of prostate and transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate or transurethral resection of prostate.

    PubMed

    DeCao, Hong; Wang, Jia; Huang, Yu; LiangLiu, Ren; JunLei, Hao; Gao, Liang; Tang, Zhuang; YingHu, Chun; Li, Xiang; JiuYuan, Hong; Dong, Qiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged and elderly men. In the present study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) with either transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (TUPKP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A literature search was performed, eventually, 14 studies involving 1587 patients were included. Forest plots were produced by using Revman 5.2.0 software. Our meta-analysis showed that operation time, decrease in hemoglobin level, length of hospital stay, catheterization time, and development of urethral stricture significantly differed, whereas the transitory urge incontinence rate, urinary tract infection rate, and recatheterization rate did not significantly differ between TMLRP and either TURP or TUPKP. The blood transfusion rate was significantly different between TMLRP and TURP, but not between TMLRP and TUPKP. In addition, the retrograde ejaculation rate between TMLRP and TURP did not significantly differ. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of postoperative follow-up, the maximum flow rate, post-void residual, quality of life, and International Prostate Symptom Score did not significantly differ among the procedures. Thus, the findings of this study indicate that TMLRP may be a safe and feasible alternative. PMID:26444930

  10. Comparison between thulium laser resection of prostate and transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate or transurethral resection of prostate

    PubMed Central

    DeCao, Hong; Wang, Jia; Huang, Yu; LiangLiu, Ren; JunLei, Hao; Gao, Liang; Tang, Zhuang; YingHu, Chun; Li, Xiang; JiuYuan, Hong; Dong, Qiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged and elderly men. In the present study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) with either transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (TUPKP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A literature search was performed, eventually, 14 studies involving 1587 patients were included. Forest plots were produced by using Revman 5.2.0 software. Our meta-analysis showed that operation time, decrease in hemoglobin level, length of hospital stay, catheterization time, and development of urethral stricture significantly differed, whereas the transitory urge incontinence rate, urinary tract infection rate, and recatheterization rate did not significantly differ between TMLRP and either TURP or TUPKP. The blood transfusion rate was significantly different between TMLRP and TURP, but not between TMLRP and TUPKP. In addition, the retrograde ejaculation rate between TMLRP and TURP did not significantly differ. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of postoperative follow-up, the maximum flow rate, post-void residual, quality of life, and International Prostate Symptom Score did not significantly differ among the procedures. Thus, the findings of this study indicate that TMLRP may be a safe and feasible alternative. PMID:26444930

  11. Fluorescence-Guided Resection of Malignant Glioma with 5-ALA

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Sadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are extremely difficult to treat with no specific curative treatment. On the other hand, photodynamic medicine represents a promising technique for neurosurgeons in the treatment of malignant glioma. The resection rate of malignant glioma has increased from 40% to 80% owing to 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic diagnosis (ALA-PDD). Furthermore, ALA is very useful because it has no serious complications. Based on previous research, it is apparent that protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulates abundantly in malignant glioma tissues after ALA administration. Moreover, it is evident that the mechanism underlying PpIX accumulation in malignant glioma tissues involves an abnormality in porphyrin-heme metabolism, specifically decreased ferrochelatase enzyme activity. During resection surgery, the macroscopic fluorescence of PpIX to the naked eye is more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging, and the alert real time spectrum of PpIX is the most sensitive method. In the future, chemotherapy with new anticancer agents, immunotherapy, and new methods of radiotherapy and gene therapy will be developed; however, ALA will play a key role in malignant glioma treatment before the development of these new treatments. In this paper, we provide an overview and present the results of our clinical research on ALA-PDD. PMID:27429612

  12. Fluorescence-Guided Resection of Malignant Glioma with 5-ALA.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sadahiro; Kaneko, Sadao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are extremely difficult to treat with no specific curative treatment. On the other hand, photodynamic medicine represents a promising technique for neurosurgeons in the treatment of malignant glioma. The resection rate of malignant glioma has increased from 40% to 80% owing to 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic diagnosis (ALA-PDD). Furthermore, ALA is very useful because it has no serious complications. Based on previous research, it is apparent that protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulates abundantly in malignant glioma tissues after ALA administration. Moreover, it is evident that the mechanism underlying PpIX accumulation in malignant glioma tissues involves an abnormality in porphyrin-heme metabolism, specifically decreased ferrochelatase enzyme activity. During resection surgery, the macroscopic fluorescence of PpIX to the naked eye is more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging, and the alert real time spectrum of PpIX is the most sensitive method. In the future, chemotherapy with new anticancer agents, immunotherapy, and new methods of radiotherapy and gene therapy will be developed; however, ALA will play a key role in malignant glioma treatment before the development of these new treatments. In this paper, we provide an overview and present the results of our clinical research on ALA-PDD. PMID:27429612

  13. A projective surgical navigation system for cancer resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Qi; Shao, Pengfei; Wang, Dong; Ye, Jian; Zhang, Zeshu; Wang, Xinrui; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging technique can provide precise and real-time information about tumor location during a cancer resection surgery. However, many intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are based on wearable devices or stand-alone displays, leading to distraction of the surgeons and suboptimal outcome. To overcome these limitations, we design a projective fluorescence imaging system for surgical navigation. The system consists of a LED excitation light source, a monochromatic CCD camera, a host computer, a mini projector and a CMOS camera. A software program is written by C++ to call OpenCV functions for calibrating and correcting fluorescence images captured by the CCD camera upon excitation illumination of the LED source. The images are projected back to the surgical field by the mini projector. Imaging performance of this projective navigation system is characterized in a tumor simulating phantom. Image-guided surgical resection is demonstrated in an ex-vivo chicken tissue model. In all the experiments, the projected images by the projector match well with the locations of fluorescence emission. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed projective navigation system can be a powerful tool for pre-operative surgical planning, intraoperative surgical guidance, and postoperative assessment of surgical outcome. We have integrated the optoelectronic elements into a compact and miniaturized system in preparation for further clinical validation.

  14. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  15. Hepatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S.; Langer, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses are potentially lethal diseases if early diagnosis and treatment are not instituted. They are prevalent all over the globe and pyogenic abscesses are predominant over amoebic. With better control of intra abdominal and systemic infections by a spectrum of antibiotics, aetiology of pyogenic abscesses are secondary to interventions and diseases in the biliary tree to a large extent today. The common organisms isolated are the Gram negative group. Amoebic abscesses continue to plague some regions of the world where hygiene and sanitation are questionable. Over the years, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis have evolved remarkably. Imaging modalities like ultrasonography and CT scan have become the cornerstone of diagnosis. The absence of ionizing radiation makes MRI an attractive alternative in patients who require multiple follow up scans. Serological testing in amoebic abscesses has become more reliable. Though antibiotics have remained the principal modality of management, percutaneous drainage of abscesses have vastly improved the chances of cure and bring down the morbidity drastically in pyogenic abscesses. Amoebic abscesses respond well to medical treatment with nitroimidazoles, and minimally invasive surgical drainage is an option in cases where open surgery is indicated. PMID:24532886

  16. [Arthroscopic distal ulna resection after post traumatic ulno carpal abutment].

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C; Pagnotta, A

    2006-11-01

    Ulno carpal abutments secondary to the sequels of a fracture of the radius are often due to the inversion of the distal radio ulnar index by shortening relative to the radius. This positive ulnar variance eventually leads to an abutment between the head of the ulnar and the proximal articular face of the lunate with alteration of the cartilaginous carpal surfaces. The wrist arthroscopy makes diagnosis and treatment possible in a less invasive way. The patients are operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthetic using a pneumatic tourniquet. The arthroscope is positioned using the 3-4 radio carpal opening permitting exploration of the joint. The surgical treatment is performed by arthroscopy using a burr and going in through the 6R radio carpal opening. In this way we use the technique of partial resection of the distal ulna. We have a series of 62 patients who have benefited from the technique of partial resection of the ulnar head by arthroscopy. There were 30 men and 32 women. The average age was 66 years old (between 45 and 82). Our average follow-up is 32 months (between 12 and 60 months). Recovery of mobility was immediate in all cases with persistent pain in the radio ulnar joint in 8 cases. Arthroscopic treatment of ulno carpal abutment has proved itself effective and innocuous. It should nevertheless be reserved for operations on small sized inversions of the distal radio ulnar index (less than 5 mm). In the event of larger ulnar variances we prefer ulnar shortening osteotomy. The other techniques will be restricted to cases where the distal radio ulnar joint has been impaired. PMID:17361890

  17. [Arthroscopic distal ulna resection after post traumatic ulno carpal abutment.

    PubMed

    Mathoulin, C; Pagnotta, A

    2006-11-01

    Ulno carpal abutments secondary to the sequels of a fracture of the radius are often due to the inversion of the distal radio ulnar index by shortening relative to the radius. This positive ulnar variance eventually leads to an abutment between the head of the ulnar and the proximal articular face of the lunate with alteration of the cartilaginous carpal surfaces. The wrist arthroscopy makes diagnosis and treatment possible in a less invasive way. The patients are operated on as outpatients under local regional anaesthetic using a pneumatic tourniquet. The arthroscope is positioned using the 3-4 radio carpal opening permitting exploration of the joint. The surgical treatment is performed by arthroscopy using a burr and going in through the 6R radio carpal opening. In this way we use the technique of partial resection of the distal ulna. We have a series of 62 patients who have benefited from the technique of partial resection of the ulnar head by arthroscopy. There were 30 men and 32 women. The average age was 66 years old (between 45 and 82). Our average follow-up is 32 months (between 12 and 60 months). Recovery of mobility was immediate in all cases with persistent pain in the radio ulnar joint in 8 cases. Arthroscopic treatment of ulno carpal abutment has proved itself effective and innocuous. It should nevertheless be reserved for operations on small sized inversions of the distal radio ulnar index (less than 5 mm). In the event of larger ulnar variances we prefer ulnar shortening osteotomy. The other techniques will be restricted to cases where the distal radio ulnar joint has been impaired. PMID:17349395

  18. Acute Shingles after Resection of Thoracic Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Muesse, Jason L.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Harris, Richard L.; Kim, Min P.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes zoster is relatively uncommon after surgery in immunocompetent patients. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of herpes zoster after the resection of a thoracic schwannoma. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman in whom acute shingles developed after the video-assisted thoracic surgical resection of a posterior mediastinal schwannoma adjacent to the 4th thoracic vertebral body. The patient recovered after receiving timely antiviral therapy. Rash and pain are common in patients who have wound infections and contact dermatitis after surgery, so the possible reactivation of varicella virus might not be prominent in the surgeon's mind. This case serves as a reminder that viral infections such as shingles should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative erythema and pain. PMID:22740749

  19. Resection arthroplasty for comminuted olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Compton, R; Bucknell, A

    1989-02-01

    Five cases of comminuted olecranon fractures treated by resection of the proximal fragments are reviewed. The patients' average age was 56 years and all were radiographically osteopenic. The triceps was advanced and attached to the distal olecranon with the elbow flexed at 90 degrees. A standard postoperative regimen was used with immobilization for three weeks in plaster at 45 to 60 degrees of flexion followed by progression to cautious active range of motion exercises. Follow-up of from 18 to 54 months shows an average active range of motion of 10 degrees flexion to 120 degrees flexion. There were no complaints or clinical evidence of instability and minimal degenerative changes were seen on radiography. We conclude that resection arthroplasty of comminuted olecranon fractures yields excellent clinical and functional results in elderly patients. PMID:2927958

  20. Endoscopic Resection of the Bicipitoradial Bursa.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit; Pan, Xiao Hua

    2016-03-01

    The bicipitoradial bursa lies at the insertion of the biceps tendon on the radial tuberosity. It is an unusual site for chronic bursitis. It can be treated conservatively with aspiration and steroid injection. Surgical excision of the bursa is indicated in case of infection cause, failed conservative treatment with recurrence of the enlarged bursa and pain after aspiration, the presence of nerve compression with neurological impairment, mechanical limitation to flexion and extension of the elbow or biceps tendon degeneration, and/or functional impairment. Open resection through the anterior approach requires extensive dissection to expose the radial tuberosity and the radial neck, which increases the risk of neurovascular injury. Endoscopic resection is possible through distal biceps tendoscopy and endoscopy around the radial neck. It is technically demanding and should be reserved to the experienced elbow arthroscopist. PMID:26752772

  1. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  2. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePlus

    ... partner – it's your best friend. Welcome. The Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) is a 501 (c) 3 non- ... and cures is your participation in the Hepatitis Foundation International Registry. Whether you are affected, a caregiver, ...

  3. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... hepatitis A. Children can get hepatitis A at day care center from other children or from child care ... treatment with immunoglobulin therapy. If your child attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the ...

  4. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  5. Medial over-resection of the tibia in total knee arthroplasty for varus deformity using computer navigation.

    PubMed

    Krackow, Kenneth A; Raju, Sivashanmugam; Puttaswamy, Mohan K

    2015-05-01

    We are reporting a series of 35 cases in which downsizing, lateralizing of the tibial baseplate and resection of the uncovered medial plateau bone releases the medial collateral ligament and tightens the lateral collateral ligament. Result in excellent ligamentous balance and correction to neutral mechanical axis. The mean follow up was 32.8 months (11-95 months) and the average pre-operative varus was 9.47° (3.5-15°) with the average post-operative alignment was 0.65° varus. We obtained a mean correction of 0.45° for every mm (millimeter) of bone resected. We did not have any varus collapse or instability. Medial Over-resection could be employed as a technique in the management of varus OA knee with 2mm of resection giving about 10 correction of deformity. PMID:25575730

  6. Use of Amiodarone after Major Lung Resection

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Mark F.; D’Amico, Thomas A.; Onaitis, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We evaluated the association of respiratory complications and amiodarone use in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) after major lung resection. METHODS Outcomes of patients who had postoperative AF treated with or without amiodarone after lobectomy, bilobectomy, or pneumonectomy at a single institution between 2003 and 2010 were evaluated using multivariable logistic modeling. RESULTS Of 1412 patients who underwent lobectomy, bilobectomy, or pneumonectomy, AF occurred in 232 (16%). AF developed after a respiratory complication in 31 patients, who were excluded from subsequent analysis. The remaining 201 patients that had AF without an antecedent respiratory complication had similar mortality (3.0% [6/201] versus 2.5% [30 /1180], p=0.6) and respiratory morbidity (10% [20/201] versus 9% [101/1180], p=0.5) but longer hospital stays (5 [4,7] versus 4 days [3,6], p<0.0001) compared to the 1180 patients that did not have AF. Amiodarone was used in 101 (50%) of these 201 patients, including 5 patients who had a pneumonectomy. Age, pulmonary function, and operative resection were similar between the patients treated with/without amiodarone. Amiodarone use was not associated with a significant difference in the incidence of subsequent respiratory complications [12% (12/101 amiodarone patients) versus 8% (8/100 non-amiodarone patients), p=0.5)]. CONCLUSIONS AF that occurs without an antecedent respiratory complication in patients after major lung resection results in longer hospital stay but not increased mortality or respiratory morbidity. Using amiodarone to treat atrial fibrillation after major lung resection is not associated with an increased incidence of respiratory complications. PMID:25106684

  7. Sexual dysfunction following proctocolectomy and abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yeager, E S; Van Heerden, J A

    1980-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction after rectal excision was studied in 45 male patients who were less than 50 years of age. Of 25 patients having had proctocolectomy, one (4%) was impotent, while three (15%) of 20 patients having had abdominoperineal resection were impotent. Two patients in the abdominoperineal group reported no ejaculation with normal potency and sensation of orgasm. The age of the patient and the extent of dissection seemed to be the two main factors concerned with sexual dysfunction after rectal excision. PMID:7362286

  8. [Trans-sphincteric resection of the rectum].

    PubMed

    Kopecký, J; Kovárová, A; Kopecká, P; Klus, I

    1997-01-01

    On the base of long time watching of 16 patients treated by transsphincteric resection of the rectum authors believe that this operation has even nowadays still its justification among operations preserving continention. They have dominant position namely in indications for benign disease, where only a small part of patients require a more extent performance. On the contrary, at rectum carcinoma the operating performance is highly elective. PMID:10103148

  9. Echocardiographic assessment of mitral valve morphology and performance after triangular resection of the prolapsing posterior leaflet for degenerative myxomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Bruno; Gregorini, Renato; De Remigis, Franco; Petrella, Licia; Villani, Carmine; Di Pietrantonio, Fabrizio; Pavicevic, Srdan; Mazzola, Alessandro

    2009-08-01

    The gold standard for the surgical treatment of prolapse of the posterior leaflet of the mitral valve (MV) for degenerative myxomatous disease has been represented by the quadrangular resection of the leaflet, according to the Carpentier technique. Since 2006 we performed a triangular resection of the prolapsing leaflet in 20 patients with myxomatous mitral regurgitation (MR). Seventeen patients (85%) underwent the triangular resection of P2; one patient (5%) had a triple scallops triangular resection (P1, P2, P3) and two (10%) a double scallops (P2, P3) resection. In this study, we report the immediate and mid-term clinical and echocardiographic results of a cohort of 20 patients, who underwent this technique. Thirty-day mortality was 0. Acute renal failure occurred in three patients (15%) and they resolved with conservative management. One patient (5%) required re-exploration for bleeding. At the mean follow-up of 13.1+/-4.2 months survival was 95%; one patient died of lymphoma during the follow-up time. All the cases were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I. Nineteen survivors underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) (5), or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) (13), performed by two skilled cardiologists. All patients showed no or trivial MV regurgitation. We believe that triangular resection of posterior MV leaflet (PMVL) provides excellent mid-term results providing the surgeon with a reliable and reproducible surgical option for myxomatous degenerative MV regurgitation. PMID:19414490

  10. Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection: indications and results.

    PubMed

    Scala, Dario; Niglio, Antonello; Pace, Ugo; Ruffolo, Fulvio; Rega, Daniela; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Surgical treatment of distal rectal cancer has long been based only on abdominoperineal excision, resulting in a permanent stoma and not always offering a definitive local control. Sphincter saving surgery has emerged in the last 20 years and can be offered also to patients with low lying tumours, provided that the external sphincter is not involved by the disease. An intersphincteric resection (ISR) is based on the resection of the rectum with a distal dissection proceeding into the space between the internal and the external anal sphincter. Originally described as an open procedure, it has also been developed with the laparoscopic approach, and also this technically demanding procedure is inscribed among those offered to the patient by a minimally invasive surgery. Indications have to be strict and patient selection is crucial to obtain both oncological and functional optimal results. The level of distal dissection and the extent of internal sphincter resected are chosen according to the distal margin of the tumour and is based on MRI findings: accurate imaging is therefore mandatory to better define the surgical approach. We here present our actual indications for ISR, results in terms of operative time, median hospital stay for ISR in our experience and review the updated literature. PMID:27022927

  11. Laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiayu; Zhou, Yucheng; Mou, Yiping; Xia, Tao; Xu, Xiaowu; Jin, Weiwei; Zhang, Renchao; Lu, Chao; Chen, Ronggao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasms (SPNs) of the pancreas are uncommon neoplasms and are potentially malignant. Complete resection is advised due to rare recurrence and metastasis. Duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) is indicated for SPNs located in the pancreatic head and is only performed using the open approach. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports describing laparoscopic DPPHR (LDPPHR) for SPNs. Methods: Herein, we report a case of 41-year-old female presented with a 1-week history of epigastric abdominal discomfort, and founded an SPN of the pancreatic head by abdominal computed tomography/magnetic resonance, who was treated by radical LDPPHR without complications, such as pancreatic fistula and bile leakage. Histological examination of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of SPN. Results: The patient was discharged 1 week after surgery following an uneventful postoperative period. She was followed up 3 months without readmission and local recurrence according to abdominal ultrasound. Conclusion: LDPPHR is a safe, feasible, and effective surgical procedure for SPNs. PMID:27512859

  12. Speaking without Broca's area after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Monique; Gatignol, Peggy; Leroy, Marianne; Duffau, Hugues

    2009-08-01

    We present the case of a right-handed patient who received surgical treatment for a left frontal WHO grade II glioma invading the left inferior and middle frontal gyri, the head of the caudate nucleus, the anterior limb of the internal capsule and the anterior insula, in direct contact also with the anterior-superior part of the lentiform nucleus. The tumor resection was guided by direct electrical stimulation on brain areas, while the patient was awake. Adding a narrative production task to the neuropsychological assessment, we compared pre-, peri- and post-surgical language skills in order to analyze the effects of the tumor infiltration and the consequences of the left IFG resection, an area known to be involved in various language and cognitive processes. We showed that the tumor infiltration and its resection did not lead to the severe impairments predicted by the localization models assigning a significant role in language processing to the left frontal lobe, notably Broca's area. We showed that slow tumor evolution - the patient had been symptom-free for a long time - enabled compensatory mechanisms to process most language functions endangered by the tumor infiltration. However, a subtle fragility was observed in two language devices, i.e., reported speech and relative clauses, related to minor working memory deficits. This case study of a patient speaking without Broca's area illustrates the efficiency of brain plasticity, and shows the necessity to broaden pre-, peri-, post-surgery language and cognitive assessments. PMID:19274574

  13. Unique MRI findings for differentiation of an early stage of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takanori; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Yabuki, Hidehiko; Ito, Akira

    2015-01-01

    CT scan and ultrasonography images revealed two small uniformly low-density and hypoechoic lesions in the liver, respectively, 7 years after curative resection of rectal cancer, in a 74-year-old man. The area of the liver including the two lesions was segmentally resected. Two lesions were histopathologically confirmed as early but active stage alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by accidental ingestion of eggs of the fox tapeworm, Echinococcus multilocularis. This case is very unique and rare, since early stage hepatic AE cases have only accidentally been confirmed from cases in which malignant hepatic tumours were suspected, and because two independent AE lesions were detected. Abdominal MRI showed two isointense tumour lesions with small areas of high-signal intensity in their centres on T2-weighted images. MRI findings appear to reflect the macroscopic view and microscopic findings of early stage AE with active cyst in the centre of each hepatic lesion well. PMID:25697300

  14. Favorable perioperative outcomes after resection of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant stereotactic radiation and chemotherapy compared with upfront pancreatectomy for resectable cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, Eric A.; Strom, Tobin J.; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Frakes, Jessica M.; Springett, Gregory M.; Hodul, Pamela J.; Malafa, Mokenge P.; Chuong, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are utilized to increase margin negative (R0) resection rates in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) or locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients. Concerns persist that these neoadjuvant therapies may worsen perioperative morbidities and mortality. Methods Upfront resection patients (n=241) underwent resection without neoadjuvant treatment for resectable disease. They were compared to BRPC or LAPC patients (n=61) who underwent resection after chemotherapy and 5 fraction SBRT. Group comparisons were performed by Mann-Whitney U or Fisher’s exact test. Overall Survival (OS) was estimated by Kaplan-Meier and compared by log-rank methods. Results In the neoadjuvant therapy group, there was significantly higher T classification, N classification, and vascular resection/repair rate. Surgical positive margin rate was lower after neoadjuvant therapy (3.3% vs. 16.2%, P=0.006). Post-operative morbidities (39.3% vs. 31.1%, P=0.226) and 90-day mortality (2% vs. 4%, P=0.693) were similar between the groups. Median OS was 33.5 months in the neoadjuvant therapy group compared to 23.1 months in upfront resection patients who received adjuvant treatment (P=0.057). Conclusions Patients with BRPC or LAPC and sufficient response to neoadjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and SBRT have similar or improved peri-operative and long-term survival outcomes compared to upfront resection patients. PMID:27563444

  15. Training methods and models for colonoscopic insertion, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naohisa; Fernandopulle, Nilesh; Inada, Yutaka; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2014-09-01

    Colonoscopic examination is considered an effective examination for the detection of colorectal cancers. Additionally, early colorectal cancers can be resected using endoscopic techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection. However, those examinations and treatments need special techniques. Various training methods are practiced to acquire such endoscopic techniques throughout the world. In clinical cases, magnetic positioning devices help endoscopic insertion by less experienced endoscopists. There is a physical model made by polyvinyl chloride and a virtual simulator for training of colonoscopic insertion. Various techniques including a method to apply pressure to the abdomen and consideration for patient's pain can be trained using these models. In view of extensive training of endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection, animal models are useful and actually used. Live animal models of minipig, which entails blood flow, are ideal and used frequently, but are cumbersome to prepare. On the other hand, ex vivo animal models using intestine of porcine and bovine are convenient for preparation and less expensive. Unique ex vivo animal models with blood flow have been developed recently and techniques for hemostasis can be practiced. With respect to a method of training for colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection, a stepwise system has been adopted throughout the world. Thus, first they observe the expert's technique, then practice training of animal models, and finally, they perform clinical rectal cases. The system is useful for a safe and definite procedure. In this review, we reveal various training methods for colonoscopic examinations and treatments. PMID:25102984

  16. Robot-assisted segmental resection for intralobar pulmonary sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Konecna, J.; Karenovics, W.; Veronesi, G.; Triponez, F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation found most frequently as intralobar sequestration in the left lower lobe. Complete surgical resection is considered the treatment of choice. Presentation We present the case of a 29- year-old woman with intralobar pulmonary sequestration (ILS) diagnosed on chest CT. The sequestration was located in the left lower basal segments (segments 9 and 10) and was treated successfully by robot-assisted segmental resection without complication. Discussion Recently, robot- assisted thoracoscopic lobar resections started to be performed for ILS. The sublobar, segmental resection are reserved mainly for the resection of pulmonary nodules. We report a first case of robot-assisted anatomical segmental resection for ILS. Conclusion We highlight the role of robotic technology offering three-dimensional view and excellent dexterity enhancing the surgical performance and getting the surgical procedure more precise and safer. This could be useful especially in case of challenging sublobar resections. PMID:27061483

  17. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  18. Treating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Karmen

    2014-10-01

    (1) New treatments for hepatitis C are curing more people than before. (2) Baby boomers make up an estimated 75 percent of all cases of hepatitis C. (3) Medicare and some insurance plans cover screening for hepatitis C as a preventive service without a copayment. PMID:25514812

  19. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  20. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A Text Size ... Prevented? How Is It Treated? What Is It? Hepatitis (pronounced: hep-uh-TIE-tiss) is a disease ...

  1. Hepatic adenoma and focal nodular hyperplasia: differential diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Herman, P; Pugliese, V; Machado, M A; Montagnini, A L; Salem, M Z; Bacchella, T; D'Albuquerque, L A; Saad, W A; Machado, M C; Pinotti, H W

    2000-03-01

    The diagnosis of benign hepatic tumors as hepatic adenoma (HA) and focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) remains a challenge for clinicians and surgeons. The importance of differentiating between these lesions is based on the fact that HA must be surgically resected and FNH can be only observed. A series of 23 female patients with benign liver tumors (13 FNH, 10 HA) were evaluated, and a radiologic diagnostic algorithm was employed with the aim of establishing preoperative criteria for the differential diagnosis. All patients were submitted to surgical biopsy or hepatic resection to confirm the diagnosis. Based only on clinical and laboratory data, distinction was not possible. According to the investigative algorithm, the diagnosis was correct in 82.6% of the cases; but even with the development of imaging methods, which were used in combination, the differentiation was not possible in four patients. For FNH cases scintigraphy presented a sensitivity of 38.4% and specificity of 100%, whereas for HA the sensitivity reached 60% and specificity 85.7%. Magnetic resonance imaging, employed when scintigraphic findings were not typical, presented sensitivities of 71.4% and 80% and specificities of 100% and 100% for FNH and HA, respectively. Preoperative diagnosis of FNH was possible in 10 of 13 (76.9%) patients and was confirmed by histology in all of them. In one case, FNH was misdiagnosed as HA. The diagnosis of HA was possible in 9 of 10 (90%) adenoma cases. Surgical biopsy remains the best method for the differential diagnosis between HA and FNH and must be performed in all doubtful cases. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for all patients with adenoma and can be performed safely. With the evolution of imaging methods it seems that the preoperative diagnosis of FNH may be considered reliable, thereby avoiding unnecessary surgical resection. PMID:10658075

  2. Cluster Hepaticojejunostomy Is a Useful Technique Enabling Secure Reconstruction of Severely Damaged Hilar Bile Ducts.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Hwang, Shin; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Myeong-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Goo; Kwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Gi-Young

    2015-08-01

    Secure reconstruction of multiple hepatic ducts severely damaged by tumor invasion or iatrogenic injury is very difficult. If percutaneous or endoscopic biliary stenting fails, one or more percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tubes must be maintained in place for the rest of the patient's life. To cope with such difficult situations, we present a surgical technique termed cluster hepaticojejunostomy (HJ), which can be coupled with palliative bile duct resection. The cluster HJ technique consisted of applying multiple internal biliary stents and a single wide porto-enterostomy to surrounding connective tissues. We present a preliminary study with six patients. Five perihilar cholangiocarcinoma patients undergoing palliative bile duct resection received this procedure. Follow-up PTBD tubogram and hepatobiliary scintigraphy were performed at 1-2 weeks after surgery, after which the PTBD tubes were removed. No patient showed surgical complications, and the 6-month patency rate of clustered HJ was 80%. Another patient with laparoscopic cholecystectomy-associated major bile duct injury showed no biliary complications in the 5-year period following this procedure. Based on the results of this study, the cluster HJ technique may be a useful surgical method enabling the secure reconstruction of severely damaged hilar bile ducts. PMID:25956723

  3. The role of intraoperative MRI in resective epilepsy surgery for peri-eloquent cortex cortical dysplasias and heterotopias in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sacino, Matthew F; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Murnick, Jonathan; Keating, Robert F; Gaillard, William D; Oluigbo, Chima O

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated that an important factor in seizure freedom following surgery for lesional epilepsy in the peri-eloquent cortex is completeness of resection. However, aggressive resection of epileptic tissue localized to this region must be balanced with the competing objective of retaining postoperative neurological functioning. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) as a complement to existing epilepsy protocol techniques and to compare rates of seizure freedom and neurological deficit in pediatric patients undergoing resection of perieloquent lesions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of pediatric patients who underwent resection of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) or heterotopia localized to eloquent cortex regions at the Children's National Health System between March 2005 and August 2015. Patients were grouped into two categories depending on whether they underwent conventional resection (n = 18) or iMRI-assisted resection (n = 11). Patient records were reviewed for factors including demographics, length of hospitalization, postoperative seizure freedom, postoperative neurological deficit, and need for reoperation. Postsurgical seizure outcome was assessed at the last postoperative follow-up evaluation using the Engel Epilepsy Surgery Outcome Scale. RESULTS At the time of the last postoperative follow-up examination, 9 (82%) of the 11 patients in the iMRI resection group were seizure free (Engel Class I), compared with 7 (39%) of the 18 patients in the control resection group (p = 0.05). Ten (91%) of the 11 patients in the iMRI cohort achieved gross-total resection (GTR), compared with 8 (44%) of 18 patients in the conventional resection cohort (p = 0.02). One patient in the iMRI-assisted resection group underwent successful reoperation at a later date for residual dysplasia, compared with 7 patients in the conventional resection cohort (with 2/7 achieving

  4. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Transclival Resection of a Petroclival Meningioma: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Walter C; Anaizi, Amjad; DeKlotz, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach has been widely described for its use to resect clivus chordomas, but there have only been isolated reports of its use for petroclival meningiomas. These tumors are most often resected utilizing open transpetrosal approaches, but these operations, difficult even in the hands of dedicated skull base surgeons, are particularly challenging if the meningiomas are medially-situated and positioned mainly behind the clivus. For this subset of petroclival meningiomas, a transclival approach may be preferable. We report a meningioma resected via an endoscopic endonasal transclival technique. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented originally for medical attention because of diplopia related to an abducens palsy on the left. A workup at that time revealed a meningioma contained entirely in the left cavernous sinus, and this was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. His symptoms resolved and his meningioma was stable on MRI for several years after treatment. The patient was then lost to follow-up until 13 years after radiosurgery when he experienced intermittent diplopia again. At this point, workup revealed a large petroclival meningioma compressing the brainstem. He underwent a successful endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of this tumor. A demonstration of the step-by-step surgical technique, discussion of the nuances of the operation, and a comparison with the open transpetrosal approaches are included in our report. PMID:27433420

  5. Transoral resection of supraglottic tumours using microelectrodes (54 cases).

    PubMed

    Basterra, Jorge; Esteban, Francisco; Reboll, Rosa; Menoyo, Alicia; Zapater, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    We present the oncological and functional results of surgical transoral resection of supraglottic laryngeal carcinomas using microelectrodes. This prospective multicentre trial was conducted from 2005 to 2009. It included 54 patients (23 T1, 14 T2, and 17 T3) with supraglottic cancer, with a follow-up of 2 years. Outcome measurements were: tracheostomy, hospital stay, nasogastric feeding and recurrences. Four patients required permanent tracheostomies. The mean hospital stay was 8.1 days. Temporary nasogastric feeding was necessary in 13 patients. Postoperative complications included two incidences of haemorrhage requiring surgical intervention and one pneumonia. Four patients out of eight with T3 tumours had regional recurrence; in these cases salvage surgery was performed: two cases by the transoral approach and six total laryngectomies. Clinical results were similar to those obtained with CO2 laser therapy. We list other advantages of the technique and include a literature review. PMID:24695940

  6. Endoscopic Resection of a Large Colonic Lipoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Girolamo; Pisello, Franco; Arnone, Enrico; Sciuto, Antonio; Modica, Giuseppe; Sciumè, Carmelo

    2010-01-01

    Colonic lipomas are uncommon, benign, submucosal adipose tumors that are usually asymptomatic. Large lipomas can cause symptoms such as constipation, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding and intussusception. We report the case of a 60-year-old man with a history of lower abdominal pain and pseudoobstructive symptoms. Colonoscopy revealed a large polypoid sessile lesion in the sigma. We used a standardized technique of polypectomy, preceded by submucosal injection of dilute 5 ml polygelin with epinephrine 1:10,000 solution, to fully resect large colonic lipomas. The lipoma size was 3.5 cm. No bleeding or perforation developed. Histology showed the polyp to be a submucosul lipoma. On follow-up, there was no residual lesion. Colonic lipomas larger than 2 cm can be safely and efficaciously removed using electrosurgical snare polypectomy technique. The technique of submucosal injection before resection and using an electrocautery snare appears to be safe and reduces the risk of perforation reported in the literature. PMID:21103220

  7. Efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic resections of colorectal neoplasia: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Passera, Roberto; Migliore, Marco; Cirocchi, Roberto; Galloro, Giuseppe; Manta, Raffaele; Morino, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic local resections for colorectal lesions not suitable for endoscopic resection. Summary background data The combined laparo-endoscopic approach has been proposed for large colorectal lesions unsuitable for endoscopic resection, in order to reduce morbidity of common laparoscopic resection. However, data on the efficacy and safety of laparo-endoscopic local resections are still controversial. Methods An Embase search of papers published during the period 1985–2014 was performed. Published studies that evaluated laparo-endoscopic resections for colorectal lesions were assessed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations by two authors. Forest plots on primary (per-lesion rate of further surgery, including surgery for complications and surgery for oncologic radical treatment) and secondary outcomes were produced based on fixed and random effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Risk for within-study bias was ascertained with QUADAS (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies) system. Results A total of 11 studies provided data on 707 lesions treated with a combined laparo-endoscopic approach. A variety of techniques were reported. The overall per-lesion rate of further surgery was 9.5%, while per-lesion rate of further surgery for oncologic treatment was 7.9%, per-lesion rate of further surgery for complications treatment was 3.5%, incidence of adenocarcinoma was 10.5%, incidence of overall complications was 7.9%, incidence of conversion to open surgery 4.3% and incidence of recurrence was 5.4%. Conclusions Despite laparo-endoscopic approach ensures limited invasiveness, it is affected by a consistent rate of complications and oncologic inadequacy that often requires further surgical treatment. PMID:26668744

  8. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  9. [Estimation of risk areas for hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Braga, Ricardo Cerqueira Campos; Valencia, Luís Iván Ortiz; Medronho, Roberto de Andrade; Escosteguy, Claudia Caminha

    2008-08-01

    This study estimated hepatitis A risk areas in a region of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. A cross-sectional study consisting of a hepatitis A serological survey and a household survey were conducted in 19 census tracts. Of these, 11 tracts were selected and 1,298 children from one to ten years of age were included in the study. Geostatistical techniques allowed modeling the spatial continuity of hepatitis A, non-use of filtered drinking water, time since installation of running water, and number of water taps per household and their spatial estimation through ordinary and indicator kriging. Adjusted models for the outcome and socioeconomic variables were isotropic; risk maps were constructed; cross-validation of the four models was satisfactory. Spatial estimation using the kriging method detected areas with increased risk of hepatitis A, independently of the urban administrative area in which the census tracts were located. PMID:18709215

  10. Arthroscopic resection of the dorsal ganglia of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Bienz, T; Raphael, J S

    1999-08-01

    Arthroscopic ganglion resection provides a means by which dorsal wrist ganglia may be safely resected while avoiding the requisite scar accompanying open resection. Use of the arthroscope provides a much more complete examination of the wrist, allowing assessment of the cause of the ganglion as well as associated intra-articular problems. In a previous pilot study, 50% of patients demonstrated visible intra-articular abnormalities, including SL ligament laxity and perforations, TFCC tears, or chondral degeneration at the radial and triquetral-hamate joints. Use of the shaver within the joint allows the surgeon to directly address the ganglion's site of capsular origin, ensuring that the "one-way valve" mechanism is resected. The authors' initial experience was that the recurrence rate after arthroscopic resection was equal to or lower than after open resection. There is now some suggestion that resection of only the ganglion stalk, without removal of the sac, is feasible, but may yield slightly higher recurrence rates than formal open resection of the sac and stalk. This may be attributed to cases in which the capsular attachment to the SL ligament is debrided without identification and removal of a true stalk. The recurrence rate of a ganglion that has previously recurred also appears to be higher than that of primary resection. The authors look forward to publishing their completed results of an on-going follow-up study comparing open, arthroscopic, and recurrent ganglion resections. PMID:10451818

  11. Improved Results of Liver Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma on Cirrhosis Give the Procedure Added Value

    PubMed Central

    Grazi, Gian Luca; Ercolani, Giorgio; Pierangeli, Filippo; Del Gaudio, Massimo; Cescon, Matteo; Cavallari, Antonino; Mazziotti, Alighieri

    2001-01-01

    Objective To review a single-center experience to update the performance indexes of liver resection (LR). Summary Background Data Several therapies have been proposed in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on cirrhosis, although LR was the first to be widely applied. Methods Of 408 patients with cirrhosis admitted for HCC in the period 1983 to 1998, 264 had a LR. Patient selection, surgical technique, 30-day deaths, long-term survival, recurrence rate, and recurrence treatment were reviewed after stratifying patients according to the year of surgery. Mean follow-up was 34.5 ± 29.1 months. Results The number of Child A patients who underwent surgery after the discovery of the tumor at routine evaluation increased significantly from 64.5% to 87.9% during the study period. Procedures carried out without blood transfusions increased from 31.4% to 76.9%. The overall operative death rate was 4.9%. Actuarial survival rates were 63.1% and 41.1% after 3 and 5 years, respectively; actuarial tumor-free survival rates were 49.3% and 27.9% at the same intervals. After 1992, surgical deaths decreased from 9.3% to 1.3%. Actuarial survival rates increased from 52.9% and 32.3% to 71.7% and 49.4% after 3 and 5 years, respectively. There was no difference in the actuarial recurrence rate between the two periods, but the chance to treat recurrence increased over time from 22.4% to 53.7% with a concomitant, significant improvement in survival. Conclusions LR represents a well-established therapy for HCC on cirrhosis. It remains one of the fundamentals in the multidisciplinary approach to this tumor and should be considered as the first option for patients with preserved hepatic function and limited disease. Today, LR should offer a surgical death rate of less than 1.5%, a 5-year survival rate of approximately 50%, and a 5-year tumor-free survival rate of 28% when performed in specialized centers. PMID:11420485

  12. THE USE OF 18F-FLUORODEOXYGLUCOSE POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY TO ASSESS CLINICAL OUTCOMES OF PATIENTS WITH BORDERLINE RESECTABLE PANCREATIC CANCER.

    PubMed

    Durmus, A; Yilmaz, A; Malya, F; Ozturk, G; Bektasoglu, H; Ertugrul, G; Karyagar, S; Karatepe, O

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of 18FDG PET on preoperative staging and clinical management of pancreatic cancer. Between December 2011 and February 2015, 28 consecutive patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer were evaluated with both 18FDG PET scans and conventional preoperative imaging studies. Medical records of all patients were noted prospectively. 18FDG PET findings were compared with conventional imaging studies and over-staging or down-staging rates with changes in clinical management were evaluated. The correlation of 18FDG PET with conventional imaging studies was evaluated with a kappa agreement coefficient. A number of 22 (78.5%) patients had pancreatic head cancer and 6 (21.4%) patients had pancreatic body and tail cancers. Based on 18FDG PET, additional lesions were found in 4 (14.28%) of the patients which were lung and peritoneal lesions as metastasis. No hepatic metastasis or supraclavicular lymph node involvement was confirmed in patients. Routine use of 18FDG PET for preoperative staging has not an effect on cancer management in 96.8% of our patients. In conclusion, 18FDG PET has additional value over conventional radiologic techniques for monitoring the treatment response in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients. It is feasible to predict early metastasis and patient outcome early (after one course of IC) during therapy. PMID:27249430

  13. Endoscopic resection of colorectal granular cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Take, Iri; Shi, Qiang; Qi, Zhi-Peng; Cai, Shi-Lun; Yao, Li-Qing; Zhou, Ping-Hong; Zhong, Yun-Shi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of endoscopic resection for the treatment of colorectal granular cell tumors (GCTs). METHODS: This was a retrospective study performed at a single institution. From January 2008 to April 2015, we examined a total of 11 lesions in 11 patients who were treated by an endoscopic procedure for colorectal GCTs in the Endoscopy Center, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Either endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed by three surgeons with expertise in endoscopic treatment. The pre- and post-operative condition and follow-up of these patients were evaluated by colonoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). RESULTS: Of these 11 lesions, 2 were located in the cecum, 3 were in the ileocecal junction, 5 were in the ascending colon, and 1 was in the rectum. The median maximum diameter of the tumors was 0.81 cm (range 0.4-1.2 cm). The en bloc rate was 100%, and the complete resection rate was 90.9% (10/11). Post-operative pathology in one patient showed a tumor at the cauterization margin. However, during ESD, this lesion was removed en bloc, and no tumor tissue was seen in the wound. No perforations or delayed perforations were observed and emergency surgery was not required for complications. All patients were followed up to May 2015, and none had recurrence, metastasis, or complaints of discomfort. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic treatment performed by endoscopists with sufficient experience appears to be feasible and effective for colorectal GCTs. PMID:26730166

  14. Combined portal vein resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Chen, Jie; Xie, Zhi-Bo; Ma, Liang; Liu, Jun-Jie; Zhu, Shao-Liang; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Li, Le-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgery is the only curative therapy for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA). Combined portal vein resection (PVR) could achieve negative resection margins in HCCA patients with portal vein invasion. This systematic review aimed to analysis the efficiency of combined PVR for HCCA. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, and clinical trial registries were searched through April 2015. Risk ratios (RRs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: The analysis included 21 retrospective studies, altogether involving 2403 patients (patients with PVR, n=637; patients without PVR, n=1766). Patients with PVR were likely to have more advanced HCCA (lymphatic invasion: RR=1.14, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.28; perineural invasion: RR=1.31, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.63) and suffered less curative resections (RR=0.89, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.99). Postoperative morbidity was similar between patients with or without PVR (RR=1.06, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.02). Patients with PVR suffered higher mortality rate (RR=1.52, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.18), and worse 5-year survival rate (RR=0.67, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.91). Conclusion: Combined PVR for HCCA patients would not increase postoperative morbidity rate. However, ascribed to PVR group concluded more advanced HCCA patients; patients with PVR had increased postoperative mortality rate and worse survival rate. The results still need further high quality trails for validation. PMID:26885035

  15. Transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Feng; Li, Weiwu; Lu, Honghai; Liu, Sikuan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Binghui

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the efficacy and safety of transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour (TURD-Bt). Methods: In total, 56 patients with bladder tumour were treated by TURD-Bt. The results in these patients were compared with 32 patients treated by current transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TUR-Bt). Patients with or without disease progressive factors were respectively compared between the 2 groups. The factors included recurrent tumour, multiple tumours, tumour ≥3 cm in diameter, clinical stage T2, histological grade 3, adenocarcinoma, and ureteral obstruction or hydronephrosis. Results: Follow-up time was 48.55 ± 23.74 months in TURD-Bt group and 56.28 ± 17.61 months in the TUR-Bt group (p > 0.05). In patients without progressive factors, no tumour recurrence was found and overall survival was 14 (100%) in the TURD-Bt group; 3 (37.50%) patients had recurrence and overall survival was 5 (62.5%) in the TUR-Bt group. In patients with progressive factors, 8 (19.05%) patients had tumour recurrence, overall survival was 32 (76.19%) and cancer death was 3 (7.14%) in TURD-Bt group; 18 (75.00%) patients had tumour recurrence (p < 0.05), overall survival was 12 (50.00%) (p < 0.01) and cancer death was 8 (33.33%) (p < 0.05) in TUR-Bt group. No significant complication was found in TURD-Bt group. Conclusion: This study suggests that complete resection and degeneration of bladder tumour can be expected by TURD-Bt. The surgical procedure is safe and efficacious, and could be predictable and controllable before and during surgery. We would conclude that for bladder cancers without lymph node metastasis and distal metastasis, TURD-Bt could be performed to replace radical TUR-Bt and preserve the bladder. PMID:24475002

  16. Anatomical prognostic factors after abdominal perineal resection

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, B.J.; Green, M.R.; Lindstrom, E.R.; Butcher, H.R. Jr.

    1981-04-01

    The natural history of 153 patients with rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma treated by abdominal perineal resection was retrospectively studied with emphasis on survival, clinical signs and symptoms of recurrence distantly and in the pelvis. We analyzed diagnostic factors that might predict tumor stage preoperatively and anatomical factors of the tumor itself that might predict behaviour of the lesion. Age, sex, tumor size, and distance from the anal verge were not useful in predicting stage. Constriction of the lesion tended to occur with high stage, but was not a reliable predictor. The grade or differentiation of the biopsy (when noted) did not correlate with either the grade of the resected specimen or the stage. The highest grade of the resected specimen was quite predictive of subsequent outcome. Seventy-three percent of the poorly differentiated tumors were Stage C or D, though a lower grade specimen did not rule out high stage. The Astler-Coller stage was reliable in predicting the likelihood of survival, pelvic recurrence, and distant metastases. In Stage C patients, the number of positive lymph node metastases strongly affected prognosis: if only one node was positive, survival was intermediate between Stages B and C; if more than seven nodes were positive, no patient survived. Of the evaluable cases, 48% survived clinically free of disease five or more years; 43% failed (died of the rectosigmoid tumor); 22% developed pelvic recurrence (6% pelvis only, 16% pelvis plus distant metastases). Fifty-two percent of the patients failing had tumor in the pelvis. Seven of the 56 failures (13%) occurred at or after five years; six of these seven failed locally, usually with metastases. Patients under age 40 or over age 80 and the same results as the group in general. Sixteen percent of the entire group had major complications, 52% minor. There were eight postoperative deaths (5%); 18 patients (12%) required reoperation.

  17. Bursal synovial chondromatosis formation following osteochondroma resection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Gebhardt, Mark G; Wu, Jim S

    2014-07-01

    Osteochondroma is a common tumor of the bone and can be complicated by adventitial bursa formation and malignant transformation of the cartilaginous cap. Synovial chondromatosis formation within these bursae is extremely rare and can be confused with malignant transformation of the osteochondroma cap to a chondrosarcoma. We describe a case of extra-articular synovial chondromatosis formation several years following osteochondroma resection. Cartilage nodule formation within the bursal synovial lining and proliferation of cartilage debris shed from the cartilaginous cap during surgery or biopsy are potential etiologies of this rare complication of osteochondromas. PMID:24453028

  18. COMPLETE RESECTION OF A PRIMARY CARDIAC RHABDOMYOSARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Judy E.; Schwartz, Gary P.; Judson, Preston L.; Seibel, John E.; Trumbull, Horace R.

    1979-01-01

    A case of primary cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma in a 23-year-old white man was managed by complete excision and combination chemotherapy. The pathologic features of the tumor are described. Based on a review of the English literature, the natural history of this tumor is discussed and a plan of therapy is proposed, which consists of (1) resection of the tumor if feasible, (2) chemotherapy with Actinomycin D, vincristine sulfate, and cyclophosphamide, and (3) cardiac radiation for residual unresected or locally recurrent tumor. Images PMID:15216294

  19. Surgical Resection of a Giant Coronary Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mehall, John R; Verlare, Jordan L

    2015-06-01

    Coronary aneurysms are quite uncommon, and those qualifying as giant aneurysms are even more so. Currently, no standardized treatment protocol exists. We report the case of a 46-year-old man presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of acute myocardial infarction who was found to have a giant coronary aneurysm. The patient was initially evaluated with a computed tomography angiogram, which revealed a 9-cm aneurysm of the left circumflex coronary artery. Surgical resection of the aneurysm, ligation of the proximal circumflex artery, and bypass using the left internal mammary artery to vascularize the proximal circumflex artery was performed. PMID:26046882

  20. Alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Damgaard Sandahl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute inflammatory syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis is strongly dependent on disease severity, as assessed by clinical scoring systems. Reliable epidemiological data as well as knowledge of the clinical course of AH are essential for planning and resource allocation within the health care system. Likewise, individual evaluation of risk is desirable in the clinical handling of patients with AH as it can guide treatment, improve patient information, and serve as strata in clinical trials. The present PhD thesis is based on three studies using a cohort of nearly 2000 patients diagnosed with AH in Denmark from 1999 to 2008 as a cohort, in a population-based study design. The aims of this thesis were as follows. (1) To describe the incidence and short- and long-term mortality, of AH in Denmark (Study I). (2) To validate and compare the ability of the currently available prognostic scores to predict mortality in AH (Study II). (3) To investigate the short- and long-term causes of death of patients with AH (Study III). During the study decade, the annual incidence rate in the Danish population rose from 37 to 46 per 106 for men and from 24 to 34 per 106 for women. Both short- and long-term mortality rose for men and women, and the increase in short-term mortality was attributable to increasing patient age and prevalence of cirrhosis. Our evaluation of the most commonly used prognostic scores for predicting the mortality of patients with AH showed that all scores performed similarly, with Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristics curves giving values between 0.74 and 0.78 for 28-day mortality assessed on admission. Our study on causes of death showed that in the short-term (< 84 days after diagnosis), patients with AH were likely to die from liver-related events and infections. In the long-term (≥ 84 days after diagnosis), those who developed cirrhosis mainly died from liver-related causes, and