Science.gov

Sample records for hepatic tumours effect

  1. Tumour promotion versus tumour suppression in chronic hepatic iron overload.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Steven A; Brown, Kyle E

    2015-06-01

    Although iron-catalysed oxidative damage is presumed to be a major mechanism of injury leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in hemochromatosis, these events have been difficult to recapitulate in an animal model. In this study, we evaluated regulators of hepatocarcinogenesis in a rodent model of chronic iron overload. Sprague-Dawley rats were iron loaded with iron dextran over 6 months. Livers were harvested and analysed for markers of oxidative stress, as well as the following proteins: p53, murine double minute 2, the Shc proteins p66, p52, p46; β-catenin, CHOP, C/EBPα and Yes-associated protein. In this model, iron loading is associated with hepatocyte proliferation, and indices of oxidative damage are mildly increased in tandem with augmented antioxidant defenses. Alterations potentially favouring carcinogenesis included a modest but significant decrease in p53 levels and increases in p52, p46 and β-catenin levels compared with control livers. Countering these factors, the iron-loaded livers demonstrated a significant decrease in CHOP, which has recently been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as a reciprocal increase in C/EBPα and decrease in Yes-associated protein. Our results suggest that chronic iron overload elicits both tumour suppressive as well as tumour-promoting mechanisms in rodent liver. PMID:26059599

  2. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) serum concentrations in dogs with hepatitis and hepatic tumours compared with those with extra-hepatic inflammation and tumours.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Stephan; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Scheulen, Sonja

    2012-10-01

    Cytokines are part of pathogenesis in many diseases. Their measurement could be interesting for diagnostic purposes. One cytokine which participates in different inflammatory and neoplastic diseases is interleukin-6 (IL-6). The aim of this study was to investigate the IL-6 serum concentration in dogs with different liver diseases to show if there is any association between the cytokine serum level and the disease aetiology or the degree of the disease. IL-6 was measured in dogs with acute hepatitis, chronic hepatitis of different degrees and primary and secondary liver tumours. The data were compared with clinically healthy dogs and dogs with extra-hepatic diseases. For measurement, a commercial ELISA Kit (R&D Systems) was used. Compared with clinically healthy dogs and dogs with diabetes mellitus, all dogs with an intra- or extra-hepatic inflammatory or neoplastic disease have increased serum levels of IL-6. Dogs with acute hepatitis have significantly increased IL-6 serum concentrations compared with dogs with chronic hepatitis (P < 0.05). No significant difference between mild and moderate chronic hepatitis exists (P > 0.05). Dogs with secondary liver tumours have significantly increased IL-6 serum concentrations in comparison to dogs with primary liver tumours (P < 0.01), but both groups have comparable IL-6 serum concentration to dogs with extra-hepatic tumours. Measurement of IL-6 serum concentration may help differentiate between acute and chronic hepatitis and between primary and secondary liver tumours. Further information about the aetiology of the liver disease cannot be obtained by measuring IL-6 in the serum. PMID:23049492

  3. Photodynamic therapy using intravenous delta-aminolaevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX sensitisation in experimental hepatic tumours in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Svanberg, K.; Liu, D. L.; Wang, I.; Andersson-Engels, S.; Stenram, U.; Svanberg, S.

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) sensitisation and laser light at 635 nm was investigated in the treatment of experimental hepatic tumours. The model of liver tumours was induced either by local inoculation or by administration of tumour cells through the portal vein in rats. ALA at a dose of 60 mg kg(-1) b.w. was intravenously administered 60 min before PDT. PpIX accumulation in tumour, normal liver and abdominal wall muscle was detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) was used to determine changes in the superficial blood flow in connection with PDT. Histopathological examinations were performed to evaluate the PDT effects on the tumour and the surrounding liver tissue, including pathological features in the microvascular system. The accumulation of PpIX, as monitored by LIF, showed high fluorescence intensities at about 635 nm in both the hepatic tumour tissue and normal liver and low values in the abdominal wall. LDI demonstrated that the blood flow in the treated tumour and its surrounding normal liver tissue decreased immediately after the PDT, indicating an effect on the vascular system. A large number of thrombi in the irradiated tumour were found microscopically 3 h after the PDT. The tumour growth rate showed a marked decrease when evaluated 3 and 6 days after the treatment. These results show that the ALA-PDT is effective in the inhibition of growth of experimental hepatic tumours. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:8932330

  4. Hepatic expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M J; Lau, J Y; Williams, R; Vergani, D

    1994-01-01

    AIM--To determine the hepatic expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. METHODS--Frozen liver biopsy sections from 19 patients with chronic HBV infection were studied, 12 of whom were HBeAg positive and 10 serum HBV DNA positive. Hepatic expression of TNF alpha was determined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS--Only infiltrating mononuclear cells showed immunoreactive staining for TNF alpha (median 2, range 0-3; n = 19) which appeared as diffuse positive staining material in the cytoplasm. Patients with active liver disease, assessed histologically and biochemically, had a higher level of expression, both in the number of TNF alpha positive cells and the proportion of TNF alpha positive infiltrating mononuclear cells. There was no correlation between the expression of TNF alpha and serological parameters of viral infection (HBeAg and HBV DNA status and HBV DNA concentrations). CONCLUSION--Hepatic expression of TNF alpha is increased in chronic HBV infection and is related to the activity of liver disease and not to the level of HBV replication. Images PMID:7876386

  5. Hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy in patients with advanced primary liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Francesca; Fazio, Nicola; Bonomo, Guido; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Vigna, Paolo Della; Radice, Davide; Boselli, Sabrina; Orsi, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Primary liver tumours (PLTs) are currently a major health problem worldwide. The study’s aim was to investigate the feasibility, toxicity, and activity of hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy (HIAC) in patients with advanced PLTs. Methods: We retrospectively analysed 43 patients with advanced unresectable PLT, who were consecutively treated. HIAC with 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and mitomycin-C was administered through a radiologically positioned temporary percutaneous catheter every six weeks until tumour progression or unacceptable toxicity was reached. Results: Partial response was observed in 26% and stable disease in 41% of patients. The median overall survival was 12.3 months. Manageable catheter-related complications occurred in 23% of patients. The grade 3–4 toxicities included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and transaminitis. There were no toxic deaths. Conclusion: The results of this retrospective study show that HIAC is feasible, active, and manageable in patients with PLTs. The treatment could be studied in selected patients with advanced progressive HCC/BTC being treated with or ineligible for sorafenib/cisplatin plus gemcitabine. PMID:23226162

  6. The effects of delays in radiotherapy treatment on tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, R. M.; Beddoe, A. H.; Dale, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    There is often a considerable delay from initial tumour diagnosis to the start of radiotherapy treatment, which may be due to factors such as waiting lists and referral delays. This paper uses widely published models and clinical parameters to calculate the effect of delays in treatment on local tumour control for four different types of tumour - squamous cell carcinoma (head and neck), breast, cervix and prostate. The Poisson model for tumour control probability (TCP), an exponential function for tumour growth and the linear quadratic model of cell kill are used to calculate the change in TCP for delays between diagnosis and treatment of up to 100 days. Typical values of the clinical parameters have been taken from the literature; these include α and β, σα, tumour size at diagnosis, pre-treatment doubling time, delay in onset of accelerated repopulation and doubling time during treatment. It is acknowledged that there are limitations in the reliability of these data for predicting absolute values of tumour control, but models are still useful for predicting how changes in treatment parameters are likely to affect the outcome. It is shown that for fast-growing tumours a delay of 1-2 months can have a significant adverse effect on the outcome, whereas for slow-growing tumours such as Ca prostate a delay of a few months does not significantly reduce the probability of tumour control. These calculations show the importance of ensuring that delays from diagnosis through to treatment are minimized, especially for patients with rapidly proliferating tumours.

  7. Effects of nandrolone decanoate on the toxicity and anti-tumour action of CCNU and FU in murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, M. C.; Double, J. A.; Mughal, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Pre-treatment with the anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate (ND) increases the LD50 of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) and 5-Fluorouracil (FU) in NMRI mice. Administration of ND did not affect the anti-tumour action of CCNU against a transplantable mouse adenocarcinoma of the colon (MAC 13) or the anti-tumour action of FU against MAC 26. In both tumour lines ND had no significant effect on tumour growth. These data suggest that an increase in the anti-tumour selectivity of these agents may be produced by pre-treatment with ND. PMID:7295514

  8. Anti-tumour effect of metformin in canine mammary gland tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Tsuboi, M; Sugano, S; Yoshitake, R; Tanaka, Y; Ong, S M; Saito, T; Matsumoto, K; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2015-08-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in type 2 diabetes. Its pharmacological activity reportedly involves mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors have a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of metastatic canine mammary gland tumour (CMGT) cell lines. It is hypothesised that metformin has selective anti-tumour effects on metastatic CMGT cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of metformin on cell growth, production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in two CMGT clonal cell lines with different metastatic potential. In addition, transcriptome analysis was used to determine cellular processes disrupted by metformin and in vivo anti-tumour effects were examined in a mouse xenograft model. Metformin inhibited CMGT cell growth in vitro, with the metastatic clone (CHMp-5b) displaying greater sensitivity. ATP depletion and ROS elevation were observed to a similar extent in the metastatic and non-metastatic (CHMp-13a) cell lines after metformin exposure. However, subsequent AMPK activation and mTOR pathway inhibition were prominent only in metformin-insensitive non-metastatic cells. Microarray analysis revealed inhibition of cell cycle progression by metformin treatment in CHMp-5b cells, which was further confirmed by Western blotting and cell cycle analysis. Additionally, metformin significantly suppressed tumour growth in xenografted metastatic CMGT cells. In conclusion, metformin exhibited an anti-tumour effect in metastatic CMGT cells through AMPK-independent cell cycle arrest. Its mechanism of action differed in the non-metastatic clone, where AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition were observed. PMID:25981932

  9. Mathematical modelling of the Warburg effect in tumour cords.

    PubMed

    Astanin, Sergey; Preziosi, Luigi

    2009-06-21

    The model proposed here links together two approaches to describe tumours: a continuous medium to describe the movement and the mechanical properties of the tissue, and a population dynamics approach to represent internal genetic inhomogeneity and instability of the tumour. In this way one can build models which cover several stages of tumour progression. In this paper we focus on describing transition from aerobic to purely glycolytic metabolism (the Warburg effect) in tumour cords. From the mathematical point of view this model leads to a free boundary problem where domains in contact are characterized by different sets of equations. Accurate stitching of the solution was possible with a modified ghost fluid method. Growth and death of the cells and uptake of the nutrients are related through ATP production and energy costs of the cellular processes. In the framework of the bi-population model this allowed to keep the number of model parameters relatively small. PMID:19232360

  10. The anti-tumour effects of zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zekri, Jamal; Mansour, Maged; Karim, Syed Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Bone is the most common site for metastasis in patients with solid tumours. Bisphosphonates are an effective treatment for preventing skeletal related events and preserving quality of life in these patients. Zoledronic acid (ZA) is the most potent osteoclast inhibitor and is licensed for the treatment of bone metastases. Clodronate and pamidronate are also licensed for this indication. In addition, ZA has been demonstrated to exhibit antitumour effect. Direct and indirect mechanisms of anti-tumour effect have been postulated and at many times proven. Evidence exists that ZA antitumour effect is mediated through inhibition of tumour cells proliferation, induction of apoptosis, synergistic/additive to inhibitory effect of cytotoxic agents, inhibition of angiogenesis, decrease tumour cells adhesion to bone, decrease tumour cells invasion and migration, disorganization of cell cytoskeleton and activation of specific cellular antitumour immune response. There is also clinical evidence from clinical trials that ZA improved long term survival outcome in cancer patients with and without bone metastases. In this review we highlight the preclinical and clinical studies investigating the antitumour effect of bisphosphonates with particular reference to ZA. PMID:26909294

  11. Influences of Allee effects in the spreading of malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Sewalt, Lotte; Harley, Kristen; van Heijster, Peter; Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2016-04-01

    A recent study by Korolev et al. [Nat. Rev. Cancer, 14:371-379, 2014] evidences that the Allee effect-in its strong form, the requirement of a minimum density for cell growth-is important in the spreading of cancerous tumours. We present one of the first mathematical models of tumour invasion that incorporates the Allee effect. Based on analysis of the existence of travelling wave solutions to this model, we argue that it is an improvement on previous models of its kind. We show that, with the strong Allee effect, the model admits biologically relevant travelling wave solutions, with well-defined edges. Furthermore, we uncover an experimentally observed biphasic relationship between the invasion speed of the tumour and the background extracellular matrix density. PMID:26802481

  12. Anti-tumour immune effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum to CT26 tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingtao; Wang, Chunfeng; Ye, Liping; Yang, Wentao; Huang, Haibin; Meng, Fei; Shi, Shaohua; Ding, Zhuang

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent forms of cancer that shows a high mortality and increasing incidence. There are numerous successful treatment options for CRC, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immunotherapy; however, their side effects and limitations are considerable. Probiotics may be an effective strategy for preventing and inhibiting tumour growth through stimulation of host innate and adaptive immunity. We investigated and compared potential anti-tumour immune responses induced by two isolated Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus plantarum A and Lactobacillus rhamnosus b, by pre-inoculating mice with lactobacilli for 14 days. Subsequently, subcutaneous and orthotopic intestinal tumours were generated in the pre-inoculated mice using CT26 murine adenocarcinoma cells and were assessed for response against the tumour. Our results indicated that oral administration with L. plantarum inhibited CT26 cell growth in BALB/c mice and prolonged the survival time of tumour-bearing mice compared with mice administered L. rhamnosus. L. plantarum produced protective immunity against the challenge with CT26 cells by increasing the effector functions of CD8+ and natural killer (NK) cell infiltration into tumour tissue, up-regulation of IFN-gamma (but not IL-4 or IL-17) production, and promotion of Th1-type CD4+ T differentiation. Consequently, our results suggest that L. plantarum can enhance the anti-tumour immune response and delay tumour formation. PMID:25963256

  13. Effects of childhood body size on breast cancer tumour characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Although a role of childhood body size in postmenopausal breast cancer risk has been established, less is known about its influence on tumour characteristics. Methods We studied the relationships between childhood body size and tumour characteristics in a Swedish population-based case-control study consisting of 2,818 breast cancer cases and 3,111 controls. Our classification of childhood body size was derived from a nine-level somatotype. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, derived from fitting unconditional logistic regression models. Association between somatotype at age 7 and tumour characteristics were evaluated in a case-only analysis where P values for heterogeneity were obtained by performing one degree of freedom trend tests. Results A large somatotype at age 7 was found to be associated with decreased postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Although strongly associated with other risk factors such as age of menarche, adult body mass index and mammographic density, somatotype at age 7 remained a significant protective factor (odds ratio (OR) comparing large to lean somatotype at age 7 = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.58-0.91, P trend = 0.004) after adjustment. The significant protective effect was observed within all subgroups defined by estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, with a stronger effect for ER-negative (0.40, 95% CI = 0.21-0.75, P trend = 0.002), than for ER-positive (0.80, 95% CI = 0.62-1.05, P trend = 0.062), tumours (P heterogeneity = 0.046). Somatotype at age 7 was not associated with tumour size, histology, grade or the presence or absence of metastatic nodes. Conclusions Greater body size at age 7 is associated with a decreased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, and the associated protective effect is stronger for the ER-negative breast cancer subtype than for the ER-positive subtype. PMID:20398298

  14. Hepatic effects of phthalate esters.

    PubMed Central

    Seth, P K

    1982-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a commonly used plasticizer and microchemical environmental pollutant, produces subtle changes in hepatic function as judged by increase in liver weight and morphological and biochemical alterations. It can modify the biological response of drugs and other xenobiotics. Such interactions appear to occur at the pharmacokinetic phase, as DEHP was found to alter the activity of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes and ethanol metabolism. DEHP produced a time- and route-dependent effect on the hepatic cytochrome P-450 contents and activity of aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline hydroxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase and high and low Km aldehyde dehydrogenases when given orally or intraperitoneally. Under in vitro conditions, DEHP produced no effect on the activity of aminopyrine N-demethylase or aniline hydroxylase, while mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and 2-ethylhexanol (2-EH) significantly inhibited their activity at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 15.0 mM. Activity of aminopyrine N-demethylase and aniline hydroxylase was also inhibited by dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) after a single oral administration. In view of the possibility of the human exposure to phthalates and other xenobiotics simultaneously, these observations are of great significance. PMID:6754361

  15. Role of hepatic intra-arterial therapies in metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NET): guidelines from the NET-Liver-Metastases Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Andrew; Bester, Lourens; Salem, Riad; Sharma, Ricky A; Parks, Rowan W; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Liver metastasis from a neuroendocrine tumour (NET) represents a significant clinical entity. A multidisciplinary group of experts was convened to develop state-of-the-art recommendations for its management. Methods Peer-reviewed published reports on intra-arterial therapies for NET hepatic metastases were reviewed and the findings presented to a jury of peers. The therapies reviewed included transarterial embolization (TAE), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radioembolization (RE). Two systems were used to evaluate the level of evidence in each publication: (i) the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) system, and (ii) the GRADE system. Results Eighteen publications were reviewed. These comprised 11 reports on TAE or TACE and seven on RE. Four questions posed to the panel were answered and recommendations offered. Conclusions Studies of moderate quality support the use of TAE, TACE and RE in hepatic metastases of NETs. The quality and strength of the reports available do not allow any modality to be determined as superior in terms of imaging response, symptomatic response or impact on survival. Radioembolization may have advantages over TAE and TACE because it causes fewer side-effects and requires fewer treatments. Based on current European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) Consensus Guidelines, RE can be substituted for TAE or TACE in patients with either liver-only disease or those with limited extrahepatic metastases. PMID:25186181

  16. Reversible phospho-Smad3 signalling between tumour suppression and fibrocarcinogenesis in chronic hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y-R; Yoshida, K; Jin, Q L; Murata, M; Yamaguchi, T; Tsuneyama, K; Moritoki, Y; Niu, J Q; Matsuzaki, K; Lian, Z-X

    2014-04-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, type I receptor (TβRI) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylate Smad3 differentially to create 2 isoforms phosphorylated (p) at the COOH-terminus (C) or at the linker region (L) and regulate hepatocytic fibrocarcinogenesis. This study aimed to compare the differences between how hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affected hepatocytic Smad3 phosphorylated isoforms before and after anti-viral therapy. To clarify the relationship between Smad3 phosphorylation and liver disease progression, we studied 10 random patients in each stage of HBV-related fibrotic liver disease (F1-4) and also 10 patients with HBV-associated HCC. To examine changes in phosphorylated Smad3 signalling before and after anti-HBV therapies, we chose 27 patients with chronic hepatitis B who underwent baseline and follow-up biopsies at 52 weeks from the start of nucleoside analogue treatments (Lamivudine 100 mg daily or Telbivudine 600 mg daily). Fibrosis stage, inflammatory activity and phosphorylated Smad3 positivity in the paired biopsy samples were compared. Hepatocytic pSmad3C signalling shifted to fibrocarcinogenic pSmad3L signalling as the livers progressed from chronic hepatitis B infection to HCC. After nucleoside analogue treatment, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and HBV-DNA levels in 27 patients with HBV-related chronic liver diseases were decreased dramatically. Decrease in HBV-DNA restored pSmad3C signalling in hepatocytes, while eliminating prior fibrocarcinogenic pSmad3L signalling. Oral nucleoside analogue therapies can suppress fibrosis and reduce HCC incidence by successfully reversing phosphorylated Smad3 signalling; even liver disease progressed to cirrhosis in chronic hepatitis B patients. PMID:24372395

  17. Uncaria tomentosa exerts extensive anti-neoplastic effects against the Walker-256 tumour by modulating oxidative stress and not by alkaloid activity.

    PubMed

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida Dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg(-1)) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties. PMID:23408945

  18. Uncaria tomentosa Exerts Extensive Anti-Neoplastic Effects against the Walker-256 Tumour by Modulating Oxidative Stress and Not by Alkaloid Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dreifuss, Arturo Alejandro; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda Leite; Fabossi, Isabella Aviles; Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida dos Reis; Stolf, Aline Maria; Alves de Souza, Carlos Eduardo; Gomes, Liana de Oliveira; Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Teixeira, Simone; Zampronio, Aleksander Roberto; Muscará, Marcelo Nicolás; Stefanello, Maria Elida Alves; Acco, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the anti-neoplastic effects of an Uncaria tomentosa (UT) brute hydroethanolic (BHE) extract with those of two fractions derived from it. These fractions are choroformic (CHCl3) and n-butanolic (BuOH), rich in pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids (POA) and antioxidant substances, respectively. The cancer model was the subcutaneous inoculation of Walker-256 tumour cells in the pelvic limb of male Wistar rat. Subsequently to the inoculation, gavage with BHE extract (50 mg.kg−1) or its fractions (as per the yield of the fractioning process) or vehicle (Control) was performed during 14 days. Baseline values, corresponding to individuals without tumour or treatment with UT, were also included. After treatment, tumour volume and mass, plasma biochemistry, oxidative stress in liver and tumour, TNF-α level in liver and tumour homogenates, and survival rates were analysed. Both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction successfully reduced tumour weight and volume, and modulated anti-oxidant systems. The hepatic TNF-α level indicated a greater effect from the BHE extract as compared to its BuOH fraction. Importantly, both the BHE extract and its BuOH fraction increased the survival time of the tumour-bearing animals. Inversely, the CHCl3 fraction was ineffective. These data represent an in vivo demonstration of the importance of the modulation of oxidative stress as part of the anti-neoplastic activity of UT, as well as constitute evidence of the lack of activity of isolated POAs in the primary tumour of this tumour lineage. These effects are possibly resulting from a synergic combination of substances, most of them with antioxidant properties. PMID:23408945

  19. Hilar Inflammatory Pseudotumour with Hepatic Artery Atheroma- mimicker of Klatskin Tumour.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Archana; Bihari, Chhagan; Gupta, Nalini; Deka, Pranjal; Kumar, Arvind; Negi, Sanjay Singh; Arora, Ankur

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumour of hilar biliary structures is an extremely rare benign lesion that can mimic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Clinical presentation and imaging findings often pose diagnostic difficulties. Main histopathological findings are the presence of myofibroblastic spindle cells, plasma cells, macrophages, and lymphocytes without cellular atypia or atypical mitotic figures. We describe a case of 62 year old male who presented with surgical obstructive jaundice. Imaging revealed a mass lesion involving the biliary confluence with upstream dilatation of biliary tree. Diagnosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma with type III hilar block was made. Intraoperately hilar mass lesion was found which was encasing right hepatic artery with no evidence of metastasis. The patient underwent Right hepatectomy with caudate lobectomy with complete common bile duct (CBD) excision with Roux en Y hepaticojejunostomy. Unexpectedly histopathological examination showed no evidence of malignancy and revealed hilar inflammatory pseudotumour with hepatic artery atherosclerosis. Preoperative imaging, operative management, pathologic diagnosis and literature review are being presented in view of rarity of the case. PMID:25937770

  20. An imaging-based tumour growth and treatment response model: investigating the effect of tumour oxygenation on radiation therapy response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titz, Benjamin; Jeraj, Robert

    2008-09-01

    A multiscale tumour simulation model employing cell-line-specific biological parameters and functional information derived from pre-therapy PET/CT imaging data was developed to investigate effects of different oxygenation levels on the response to radiation therapy. For each tumour voxel, stochastic simulations were performed to model cellular growth and therapeutic response. Model parameters were fitted to published preclinical experiments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Using the obtained parameters, the model was applied to a human HNSCC case to investigate effects of different uniform and non-uniform oxygenation levels and results were compared for treatment efficacy. Simulations of the preclinical studies showed excellent agreement with published data and underlined the model's ability to quantitatively reproduce tumour behaviour within experimental uncertainties. When using a simplified transformation to derive non-uniform oxygenation levels from molecular imaging data, simulations of the clinical case showed heterogeneous tumour response and variability in radioresistance with decreasing oxygen levels. Once clinically validated, this model could be used to transform patient-specific data into voxel-based biological objectives for treatment planning and to investigate biologically optimized dose prescriptions.

  1. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of experimental murine tumours and human tumour xenografts: effects of blood flow modification.

    PubMed Central

    Bremner, J. C.; Counsell, C. J.; Adams, G. E.; Stratford, I. J.; Wood, P. J.; Dunn, J. F.; Radda, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of hydralazine on tumours appears to vary depending on tumour type. Blood flow and radiation sensitivity decrease more in murine tumours than human tumour xenografts. In this study a comparison between various tumour types has been made using in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS) to follow the metabolic responses occurring after clamping or intravenous administration of hydralazine (5 mg kg-1). Large increases in the Pi/total phosphate ratio were found with the murine sarcomas, KHT and RIF-1 implanted into C3H/He mice. However little or no effect was seen for the two human xenografted tumours, HX118 and HT29 implanted in MFI nu/nu/01a mice. An intermediate response was observed for KHT tumours grown in nu/nu mice. All tumours showed a large response to clamping. The anaesthetic Hypnorm/Hypnovel has a great influence on the response of the tumour metabolism to hydralazine appearing to both prolong and increase the changes induced. There is evidence to support the theory that the changes in 31P spectra are related to the oxygen status of the tumours. PMID:1931606

  2. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  3. Effect of anti-glycolytic agents on tumour cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A metabolic change is one of the tumour hallmarks, which has recently attracted a great amount of attention. One of the main metabolic characteristics of tumour cells is a high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in a glycolysis pathway than that in a tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Warburg effect constitutes a fundamental adaptation of tumour cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumour glycolysis may become an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we research the effect of potential anticancer agents on tumour cells in vitro. In our study, we found a high sensitivity of tumour cells to anti-glycolityc drugs. In addition, tumour cells are more resistant to the agents studied in comparison with normal cells. We also observed an atypical cooperative interaction of tumour cells in the median lethal dose of drugs. They formed the specific morphological structure of the surviving cells. This behavior is not natural for the culture of tumour cells. Perhaps this is one of the mechanisms of cells' adaptation to the aggressive environment.

  4. Effect of heterogeneous microvasculature distribution on drug delivery to solid tumour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Wenbo; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2014-11-01

    Most of the computational models of drug transport in vascular tumours assume a uniform distribution of blood vessels through which anti-cancer drugs are delivered. However, it is well known that solid tumours are characterized by dilated microvasculature with non-uniform diameters and irregular branching patterns. In this study, the effect of heterogeneous vasculature on drug transport and uptake is investigated by means of mathematical modelling of the key physical and biochemical processes in drug delivery. An anatomically realistic tumour model accounting for heterogeneous distribution of blood vessels is reconstructed based on magnetic resonance images of a liver tumour. Numerical simulations are performed for different drug delivery modes, including direct continuous infusion and thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery, and the anti-cancer effectiveness is evaluated through changes in tumour cell density based on predicted intracellular concentrations. Comparisons are made between regions of different vascular density, and between the two drug delivery modes. Our numerical results show that both extra- and intra-cellular concentrations in the liver tumour are non-uniform owing to the heterogeneous distribution of tumour vasculature. Drugs accumulate faster in well-vascularized regions, where they are also cleared out more quickly, resulting in less effective tumour cell killing in these regions. Compared with direct continuous infusion, the influence of heterogeneous vasculature on anti-cancer effectiveness is more pronounced for thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery.

  5. Effects of localised tumour hyperthermia on pimonidazole (Ro 03-8799) pharmacokinetics in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, M. I.; Bleehen, N. M.; Workman, P.

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of localised tumour hyperthermia (LTH; 43.5 degrees C x 30 min) on the acute toxicity and pharmacokinetics of the hypoxic cell sensitizer pimonidazole (Ro 03-8799) in mice. There were three treatment groups: unrestrained controls, sham-treated and LTH treated mice. LTH had minimal effects on the acute toxicity (LD50/7d) of pimonidazole with no significant difference between the three treatment groups. Pharmacokinetic studies were carried out at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD; approximately 60% LD50) of 437 micrograms g-1 i.v. in plasma, brain and tumour. Sham tumour treatment consistently increased plasma drug concentrations compared to unrestrained controls but had minimal effects on the elimination t1/2. The AUC0-infinitive was increased by 35% and the plasma clearance decreased by 26%. By contrast, LTH had minimal effects on these parameters compared to sham treatment. Brain pimonidazole concentrations were increased in restrained mice (sham and LTH treatments) compared to unrestrained controls, but average brain/plasma ratios were similar in all three groups at between 400 and 500%. Sham tumour treatment markedly reduced peak tumour pimonidazole concentrations compared to unrestrained controls giving a 29% lower AUC0-180min. Average tumour/plasma ratios were reduced from 236 to 129%. The most important finding was that LTH further reduced pimonidazole tumour concentrations, giving a 31% lower AUC0-180 min compared to sham treated tumours. Tumour/plasma ratios for pimonidazole were reduced by 41%. Plasma exposure to the pimonidazole N-oxide metabolite, Ro 31-0313, was unaltered by LTH. The markedly reduced drug concentrations in heated tumours may be a result of hyperthermia-stimulated bioreductive drug activation. PMID:2736198

  6. Tumour effect on arginine/ornithine metabolic relationship in hypertrophic mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Manteuffel-Cymborowska, M; Chmurzyńska, W; Peska, M; Grzelakowska-Sztabert, B

    1997-03-01

    The presence of a tumour significantly changes nitrogen metabolism, including that of amino acids and polyamines, in host animals. In this study, we examine whether developing tumours affect the metabolic relationship of arginine and ornithine, precursors of polyamines, in the testosterone-induced hypertrophic mouse kidney model. Androgen-induced changes in the activity of enzymes involved with ornithine biosynthesis (arginase), its consumption (ornithine aminotransferase, OAT and ornithine decarboxylase, ODC) and the hypertrophy of host mouse kidney were not affected by the presence of an ascitic tumour (EAC) and only slightly by a mammary carcinoma (MaCa). The HPLC determined renal level of arginine and ornithine showed a striking homeostasis and was disturbed neither by testosterone nor EAC. The effect of MaCa and testosterone on the levels of both amino acids, although significant, was not very pronounced. Developing tumours, especially ascitic, altered the renal activity of OAT and ODC, but not of arginase, in testosterone-untreated mice. All examined tumours, EAC, L 1210 and MaCa actively metabolized arginine and ornithine. the tumour content of arginine which coincided with the activity of arginase, resulted in a marked increase of the ornithine/arginine ratio in tumours, when compared with kidneys. These results indicate that the androgen-induced anabolic response in mouse kidney is preserved, in spite of tumour requirements for essential metabolites. PMID:9062893

  7. The Cost Effectiveness of Hepatitis Immunization for US College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, R. Jake; Saab, Sammy; Meyerhoff, Allen S.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis B immunization is recommended for all American children, and hepatitis A immunization is recommended for children who live in areas with elevated disease rates. Because hepatitis A and B occur most commonly in young adults, the authors examined the cost effectiveness of college-based vaccination. They developed epidemiologic models to…

  8. Systemic anti-tumour effects of local thermally sensitive liposome therapy

    PubMed Central

    Viglianti, Benjamin L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Boruta, R.J.; Park, Ji-Young; Landon, Chelsea; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Guo, Jing; Manzoor, Ashley; Hofmann, Christina L.; Palmer, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There were two primary objectives of this study: (1) to determine whether treatment of a tumour site with systemically administered thermally sensitive liposomes and local hyperthermia (HT) for triggered release would have dual anti-tumour effect on the primary heated tumour as well as an unheated secondary tumour in a distant site, and (2) to determine the ability of non-invasive optical spectroscopy to predict treatment outcome. The optical end points studied included drug levels, metabolic markers flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H), and physiological markers (total haemoglobin (Hb) and Hb oxygen saturation) before and after treatment. Materials and methods Mice were inoculated with SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma in both hind legs. One tumour was selected for local hyperthermia and subsequent systemic treatment. There were four treatment groups: control, DOXIL® (non-thermally sensitive liposomes containing doxorubicin), and two different thermally sensitive liposome formulations containing doxorubicin. Optical spectroscopy was performed prior to therapy, immediately after treatment, and 6, 12, and 24 h post therapy. Results Tumour growth delay was seen with DOXIL and the thermally sensitive liposomes in the tumours that were heated, similar to previous studies. Tumour growth delay was also seen in the opposing tumour in the thermally sensitive liposome-treated groups. Optical spectroscopy demonstrated correlation between growth delay, doxorubicin (DOX) levels, and changes of NAD(P)H from baseline levels. Hb and Hb saturation were not correlated with growth delay. Discussion The study demonstrated that thermally sensitive liposomes affect the primary heated tumour as well as systemic efficacy. Non-invasive optical spectroscopy methods were shown to be useful in predicting efficacy at early time points post-treatment. PMID:25164143

  9. Correlation of adverse effects of cisplatin administration in patients affected by solid tumours: A retrospective evaluation

    PubMed Central

    ASTOLFI, LAURA; GHISELLI, SARA; GUARAN, VALERIA; CHICCA, MILVIA; SIMONI, EDI; OLIVETTO, ELENA; LELLI, GIORGIO; MARTINI, ALESSANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is the most common antineoplastic drug used for the therapy of solid tumours. To date, researchers have focused on the dosage to be administered for each specific tumour, mainly considering the local adverse effects. The aim of this study was to correlate the severity of the adverse effects with: i) the dosage of cisplatin; ii) the specific site of the tumour; iii) the association with other drugs; and iv) the symptoms. We analysed data from 123 patients with 11 different tumour classes undergoing therapy from 2007 to 2008 at St. Anna Hospital (Ferrara, Italy), using the Spearman non-parametric correlation index. Even though significant correlations were found among the variables, the overall results showed that the main factor influencing the severity of the adverse effects was the dosage of cisplatin administered. PMID:23404427

  10. Effects of tumour cells on angiogenesis and vasoconstrictor responses in sponge implants in mice.

    PubMed

    Andrade, S P; Bakhle, Y S; Hart, I; Piper, P J

    1992-11-01

    The effects of tumour cells (Colon 26) on the development and response of new blood vessels to different vasoconstrictors (platelet activating factor; PAF, endothelin-1, angiotensin II, adrenalin and 5-hydroxytryptamine) have been investigated. Sponge implants in mice were used to host tumour cells while washout of 133Xe was employed to assess local blood flow in the implanted sponges. By 14 days after implantation the response of vessels in tumour-bearing implants to the various vasoconstrictors generally was decreased compared to that obtained in control sponge implants or adjacent normal skin. Thus at this time point the t1/2 for 133Xe washout from control sponges treated with adrenalin (0.5 micrograms) was 30 +/- 4 min whereas in tumour-bearing sponges it was 5 +/- 1 min. This decreased sensitivity in tumour vessels was probably not due to a complete lack of contractile elements since actin was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry around blood vessels in both types of implant. The results of the present study have shown that the pharmacological responses of blood vessels in a growing tumour, Colon 26, differed from the responses of vessels of a similar age in non-neoplastic tissue. These results appear to suggest that the different angiogenic stimuli released from tumour tissue may markedly influence pharmacological reactivity of newly formed blood vessels. PMID:1384642

  11. Radiation-Sensitising Effects of Antennapedia Proteins (ANTP)-SmacN7 on Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Li Qing; Wang, Yan; Xu, Chang; Cao, Jia; Wang, Qin; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Fei Yue; Wang, Bing; Katsube, Takanori; Fan, Sai Jun; Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms behind the radiation-sensitising effects of the antennapedia proteins (ANTP)-smacN7 fusion protein on tumour cells. ANTP-SmacN7 fusion proteins were synthesised, and the ability of this fusion protein to penetrate cells was observed. Effects of radiation on the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) were detected by western blotting. The radiation-sensitising effects of ANTP-SmacN7 fusion proteins were observed by a clonogenic assay. The effects of drugs and radiation on tumour cell apoptosis were determined using Annexin V/FITC double staining. Changes in caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-3 were detected by western blot before and after ANTP-SmacN7 inhibition of XIAP. The ANTP-SmacN7 fusion protein could enter and accumulate in cells; in vitro XIAP expression of radiation-induced tumour cells was negatively correlated with tumour radiosensitivity. The ANTP-SmacN7 fusion protein promoted tumour cell apoptosis through the activation of caspase3. ANTP-SmacN7 fusion protein may reduce tumour cell radioresistance by inducing caspase3 activation. PMID:24336110

  12. Divergent effects of flavone acetic acid on established versus developing tumour blood flow.

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, V.; Hart, I. R.

    1991-01-01

    Flavone Acetic Acid (FAA) exerts much of its effect by reducing tumour blood flow. Previous studies on FAA-induced changes in blood flow have used established tumours with a functional microvasculature. Using radioactive Xenon(133Xe) clearance to monitor local blood flow we show that the effects of FAA are dependent on the presence of this functional microvasculature with no evidence that FAA inhibits the actual development of tumour microcirculation. Thus, administration of multiple doses of FAA around the time of tumour cell injection failed to diminish t1/2 values of 133Xe (e.g. t1/2 16 min for FAA vs 14 min for saline controls at 10 days) or to affect tumour volumes (5.55 +/- 0.06 cm3 in FAA-treated animals vs 5.7 +/- 1.3 cm3 in controls at 25 days). In marked contrast a single dose of FAA (200 mg kg-1 body weight) 2 weeks after tumour cell injection dramatically extended t1/2 times (47 min for FAA vs 7 min for controls; P less than 0.001) and significantly reduced tumour burden. This effect is specific for tumour microvasculature and is not directed simply at new vessels since a similar treatment of animals with implanted-sponge-induced granulation tissue had no effect on t1/2 times (6.8 +/- 1.1 min for FAA at 200 mg kg-1 vs 7.2 +/- 1.0 min for saline-treated controls. PMID:1712621

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  14. Induction of DT-diaphorase by 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones in human tumour and normal cells and effect on anti-tumour activity of bioreductive agents.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, G. P.; Leith, M. K.; Wang, X.; Curphey, T. J.; Begleiter, A.

    1998-01-01

    DT-diaphorase is a two-electron-reducing enzyme that is an important activator of bioreductive anti-tumour agents, such as mitomycin C (MMC) and EO9, and is inducible by many compounds, including 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones (D3Ts). We showed previously that D3T selectively increased DT-diaphorase activity in mouse lymphoma cells compared with normal mouse marrow cells, and also increased MMC or EO9 cytotoxic activity in the lymphoma cells with only minor effects in the marrow cells. In this study, we found that D3T significantly increased DT-diaphorase activity in 28 of 38 human tumour cell lines representing ten tissue types with no obvious relationships between the tumour type, or the base level of DT-diaphorase activity, and the ability of D3T to increase the enzyme activity. Induction of DT-diaphorase activity in human tumour cell lines by 12 D3T analogues varied markedly with the D3T structure. D3T also increased DT-diaphorase activity in normal human bone marrow and kidney cells but the increases were small in these cells. In addition, D3T increased the level of enzyme activity in normal human lung cells. Pretreatment of human tumour cells with D3T analogues significantly increased the cytotoxic activity of MMC or EO9 in these cells, and the level of enhancement of anti-tumour activity paralleled the level of DT-diaphorase induction. In contrast, D3T did not effect the toxicity of EO9 in normal kidney cells. These results demonstrate that D3T analogues can increase DT-diaphorase activity in a wide variety of human tumour cells and that this effect can enhance the anti-tumour activity of the bioreductive agents MMC and EO9. PMID:9579829

  15. Comparative effectiveness in hepatic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Page, Andrew J; Cosgrove, David; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of applying comparative effectiveness research (CER) strategies to the management of cancer are important. As the incidence of cancer increases both in the United States and worldwide, accurate analysis of which tests and treatments should be applied in which situations is critical, both in terms of measurable and meaningful clinical outcomes and health care costs. In the last 20 years alone, multiple controversies have arisen in the diagnosis and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors of the liver, making the management of liver malignancies a prime example of CER. Contributing factors to the development of these controversies include improvements in molecular characterization of these diseases and technological advances in surgery and radiology. The relative speed of these advances has outpaced data from clinical trials, in turn making robust data to inform clinical practice lacking. Indeed, many of the current treatment recommendations for the management of liver malignancies are based primarily on retrospective data. We herein review select CER issues concerning select decision-making topics in the management of liver malignancies. PMID:25677025

  16. Investigating the effect of longitudinal micro-CT imaging on tumour growth in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, W. Kyle; Ford, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the impact of longitudinal micro-CT imaging on the growth of B16F1 tumours in C57BL/6 mice. Sixty mice received 2 × 105 B16F1 cells subcutaneously in the hind flank and were divided into control (no scan), 'low-dose' (80 kVp, 70 mA, 8 s, 0.07 Gy), 'medium-dose' (80 kVp, 50 mA, 30 s, 0.18 Gy) and 'high-dose' (80 kVp, 50 mA, 50 s, 0.30 Gy) groups. All imaging was performed on a fast volumetric micro-CT scanner (GE Locus Ultra, London, Canada). Each mouse was imaged on days 4, 8, 12 and 16. After the final imaging session, each tumour was excised, weighed on an electronic balance, imaged to obtain the final tumour volume and processed for histology. Final tumour volume was used to evaluate the impact of longitudinal micro-CT imaging on the tumour growth. An ANOVA indicated no statistically significant difference in tumour volume (p = 0.331, α = β = 0.1) when discriminating against a treatment-sized effect. Histological samples revealed no observable differences in apoptosis or cell proliferation. We conclude that four imaging sessions, using standard protocols, over the course of 16 days did not cause significant changes in final tumour volume for B16F1 tumours in female C57BL/6 mice (ANOVA, α = β = 0.1, p = 0.331).

  17. Arteriolar oxygenation in tumour and subcutaneous arterioles: effects of inspired air oxygen content.

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, M. W.; Ong, E. T.; Rosner, G. L.; Rehmus, S. W.; Shan, S.; Braun, R. D.; Brizel, D. M.; Secomb, T. W.

    1996-01-01

    Carbogen is thought to be more effective than normobaric oxygen in reducing tumour hypoxia because it may reduce hyperoxic vasoconstriction. In this study, tumour and normal arteriolar diameters were measured simultaneously with perivascular pO2 during air breathing followed by either carbogen or 100% oxygen to determine whether the action of carbogen is the result of alterations in feeding vessel diameter. Fischer-344 rats bearing dorsal flap window chambers, with or without implanted R3230AC tumours, were the experimental subjects. Arteriolar diameters were measured using optical techniques and perivascular pO2 was measured using recessed-tip electrodes (3-6 microns tip diameter). Baseline arteriolar pO2 averaged 30-50% of blood gas pO2 (mean = 97 mmHg). Both hyperoxic gases increased blood gas pO2 by 4-to 5-fold, but relative improvements in arteriolar pO2 were < or = 2.5 for all arterioles studied. This means that these normobaric high O2 gases are not very efficient in increasing O2 delivery to tumours. In addition, improvements in tumour arteriolar pO2 were transient for both hyperoxic gases. Oxygen and carbogen caused no change and mild vasodilatory responses in tumour arterioles, respectively. Normal arterioles on the other hand, tended toward vasoconstriction by carbogen breathing. Peri-arteriolar pO2 in tumours increased within the first 5 min of breathing either hyperoxic gas, followed by a decline back toward values seen with air-breathing. These results suggest that temporal changes in tumour oxygenation after exposure to carbogen or O2 may not be due to changes in perfusion. Other factors, such as changes in O2 consumption rate may be involved. PMID:8763889

  18. Quantifying the Effects of Radiation on Tumour Vasculature with High-Frequency Three-Dimensional Power Doppler Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupple, Clinton

    Recent evidence suggests that radiation may have a significant effect on tumour vasculature in addition to damaging tumour cell DNA. It is well established that endothelial cells are among the first cells to respond after administration of ionizing radiation in both normal and tumour tissues. It has also been suggested that microvascular dysfunction may regulate tumour response to radiotherapy at high doses. However, due to limitations in imaging the microcirculation this response is not well characterized. Advances in high-frequency ultrasound and computation methods now make it possible to acquire and analyze 3-D ultrasound data of tumour blood flow in tumour microcirculation. This thesis outlines the work done to test the hypothesis that single dose 8 Gy radiotherapy produces changes in tumour blood vessels which can be quantified using high-frequency power Doppler ultrasound. In addition, the issue of reproducibility of power Doppler measurements and the relationship between histopathology and power Doppler measurements have been examined.

  19. In Silico Analysis of Cell Cycle Synchronisation Effects in Radiotherapy of Tumour Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Harald; Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tumour cells show a varying susceptibility to radiation damage as a function of the current cell cycle phase. While this sensitivity is averaged out in an unperturbed tumour due to unsynchronised cell cycle progression, external stimuli such as radiation or drug doses can induce a resynchronisation of the cell cycle and consequently induce a collective development of radiosensitivity in tumours. Although this effect has been regularly described in experiments it is currently not exploited in clinical practice and thus a large potential for optimisation is missed. We present an agent-based model for three-dimensional tumour spheroid growth which has been combined with an irradiation damage and kinetics model. We predict the dynamic response of the overall tumour radiosensitivity to delivered radiation doses and describe corresponding time windows of increased or decreased radiation sensitivity. The degree of cell cycle resynchronisation in response to radiation delivery was identified as a main determinant of the transient periods of low and high radiosensitivity enhancement. A range of selected clinical fractionation schemes is examined and new triggered schedules are tested which aim to maximise the effect of the radiation-induced sensitivity enhancement. We find that the cell cycle resynchronisation can yield a strong increase in therapy effectiveness, if employed correctly. While the individual timing of sensitive periods will depend on the exact cell and radiation types, enhancement is a universal effect which is present in every tumour and accordingly should be the target of experimental investigation. Experimental observables which can be assessed non-invasively and with high spatio-temporal resolution have to be connected to the radiosensitivity enhancement in order to allow for a possible tumour-specific design of highly efficient treatment schedules based on induced cell cycle synchronisation. PMID:24244120

  20. HIFU and Chemotherapy Synergistic Inhibitory Effect on Dunning AT2 Tumour-Bearing Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Paparel, Philipe; Chesnais, Sabrina; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    Since there is no 100% satisfactory treatment for localized prostate cancer in patients presenting symptoms representing a poor prognosis (stage T3, high Gleason score, PSA level greater than 15 ng/ml, etc.), this study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic and synergistic inhibition effects of using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in combination with chemotherapy (Taxane + Estramustine). Forty-one Dunning AT2 tumour-bearing Copenhagen rats receiving HIFU and/or chemotherapy were divided into four groups: control group; chemotherapy group; HIFU group; and HIFU-chemotherapy combined group. Increase in the tumour volume was observed over 3 weeks and the tumour volume doubling time was evaluated. Growth curves for each group were then plotted and statistically evaluated. HIFU treatment combined with Taxane + Estramusine was found to have a significant synergistic effect; on day 30, the distribution of tumour volume relative to the treatment group was significantly different (p = 0.0007). The control group volumes were significantly greater than those of the chemotherapy-only (p = 0.006) or HIFU-only group (p = 0.006). The greatest difference was observed between the chemotherapy plus HIFU combined group and the control group. Additionally, tumour-doubling times were 7.7 days for the control group, 13.2 days for the HIFU-only group, and 31.2 days for the chemotherapy plus HIFU group. The differences in tumour growth rates between the chemotherapy plus HIFU combined group and a chemotherapy-only + HIFU-only grouping was 3.8% (p = 0.0020). Thus, the combined chemotherapy plus HIFU treatment was clearly more effective in reducing the tumour size than HIFU only or chemotherapy only, which indicates a synergy between the two types of treatment. Our results suggest that this combined therapy could be useful for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

  1. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth. PMID:20491794

  2. Anti-metastatic effects of viral and non-viral mediated Nk4 delivery to tumours.

    PubMed

    Buhles, Alexandra; Collins, Sara A; van Pijkeren, Jan P; Rajendran, Simon; Miles, Michelle; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; O'Hanlon, Deirdre M; Tangney, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The most common cause of death of cancer sufferers is through the occurrence of metastases. The metastatic behaviour of tumour cells is regulated by extracellular growth factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a ligand for the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant expression/activation of the c-Met receptor is closely associated with metastatic progression. Nk4 (also known as Interleukin (IL)32b) is a competitive antagonist of the HGF c-Met system and inhibits c-Met signalling and tumour metastasis. Nk4 has an additional anti-angiogenic activity independent of its HGF-antagonist function. Angiogenesis-inhibitory as well as cancer-specific apoptosis inducing effects make the Nk4 sequence an attractive candidate for gene therapy of cancer. This study investigates the inhibition of tumour metastasis by gene therapy mediated production of Nk4 by the primary tumour. Optimal delivery of anti-cancer genes is vital in order to achieve the highest therapeutic responses. Non-viral plasmid delivery methods have the advantage of safety and ease of production, providing immediate transgene expression, albeit short-lived in most tumours. Sustained presence of anti-angiogenic molecules is preferable with anti-angiogenic therapies, and the long-term expression mediated by Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) might represent a more appropriate delivery in this respect. However, the incubation time required by AAV vectors to reach appropriate gene expression levels hampers efficacy in many fast-growing murine tumour models. Here, we describe murine trials assessing the effects of Nk4 on the spontaneously metastatic Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) model when delivered to primary tumour via plasmid lipofection or AAV2 vector. Intratumoural AAV-Nk4 administration produced the highest therapeutic response with significant reduction in both primary tumour growth and incidence of lung metastases. Plasmid-mediated therapy also significantly reduced metastatic growth, but with moderate

  3. The effect of neutering on the risk of mammary tumours in dogs--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, W; Cardwell, J M; Brodbelt, D C

    2012-06-01

    A commonly-stated advantage of neutering bitches is a significant reduction in the risk of mammary tumours, however the evidence for this has not previously been assessed by systematic review. The objectives of this study were to estimate the magnitude and strength of evidence for any effect of neutering, or age of neutering, on the risk of mammary tumours in bitches. A systematic review was conducted based on Cochrane guidelines. Peer-reviewed analytic journal articles in English were eligible and were assessed for risk of bias by two reviewers independently. Of 11,149 search results, 13 reports in English-language peer-reviewed journals addressed the association between neutering/age at neutering and mammary tumours. Nine were judged to have a high risk of bias. The remaining four were classified as having a moderate risk of bias. One study found an association between neutering and a reduced risk of mammary tumours. Two studies found no evidence of an association. One reported "some protective effect" of neutering on the risk of mammary tumours, but no numbers were presented. Due to the limited evidence available and the risk of bias in the published results, the evidence that neutering reduces the risk of mammary neoplasia, and the evidence that age at neutering has an effect, are judged to be weak and are not a sound basis for firm recommendations. PMID:22647210

  4. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  5. Melatonin potentiates the anti-tumour effect of pravastatin in rat mammary gland carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Orendáš, Peter; Kubatka, Peter; Bojková, Bianka; Kassayová, Monika; Kajo, Karol; Výbohová, Desanka; Kružliak, Peter; Péč, Martin; Adamkov, Marián; Kapinová, Andrea; Adamicová, Katarína; Sadloňová, Vladimíra; Chmelová, Martina; Stollárová, Nadežda

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in the field of cancer research have suggested a possible role for statins in the reduction of risk in certain malignancies. The purpose of these studies was to examine the chemopreventive effects of pravastatin alone and in combination with pineal hormone melatonin in the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis model. Pravastatin was given orally (1 00 mg/kg) and melatonin was added to the water (20 μg/ml). Chemoprevention began seven days prior to carcinogen administration and subsequently continued for 15 weeks until autopsy. At autopsy, mammary tumours were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. Parameters of experimental carcinogenesis, mechanism of action (biomarkers of apoptosis, angiogenesis and proliferation) and side effects after long-term treatment in animals were assessed. Pravastatin alone suppressed tumour frequency by 20.5% and average tumour volume by 15% compared with controls. Combined administration of the drugs decreased tumour frequency by 69% and lengthened tumour latency by nine days compared with control animals. The ration between high and low grade carcinomas was apparently reduced in both treated groups. The analysis of carcinoma cells showed significant expression increase in caspase-3 and caspase-7 after pravastatin treatment; however, combined treatment even more pronounced increase in the expression of both caspases. Regarding VEGFR-2 expression, a small effect in carcinomas of both treated groups was found. In plasma metabolism evaluation, pravastatin alone significantly decreased levels of glucose and triacylglycerols. Our results suggest a mild anti-neoplastic effect of pravastatin in this rat mammary gland carcinoma model. Statins co-administered with other suitable drug (e.g. melatonin) should be further evaluated for tumour-preventive properties. PMID:25270735

  6. TYPE A VIRAL HEPATITIS: EFFECT OF CHLORINE ON INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of (HOCl) treatment on the infectivity of hepatitis A virus (HAV). Prodromal chimpanzee feces, shown to induce hepatitis in marmosets (Saginus sp.), was clarified (JA 20/8K/30 min/5C), the virus precipitated with 7% PEG 6000...

  7. EFFECT OF CHLORINE TREATMENT ON INFECTIVITY OF HEPATITIS A VIRUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the effect of chlorine treatment on the infectivity of hepatitis A virus (HAV). Prodromal chimpanzee feces, shown to induce hepatitis in marmosets (Saguinus sp.), was clarified, and the virus was precipitated with 7% polyethylene glycol 6000, harvested and res...

  8. Effect of Resection of Lung Tumours on the Steroid Abnormalities in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rao, L. G. S.

    1971-01-01

    The urinary excretion of androsterone, aetiocholanolone, total 17-oxosteroids, and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS) was measured in 40 patients with lung cancer three days before resection and again 10-15 days after resection of their lung tumours. There was a significant postoperative increase in the excretion of 17-OHCS but a significant decrease in the excretion of androsterone and aetiocholanolone, resulting in an increase of the preoperative abnormalities in steroid excretion in these patients. Since there was no change in steroid excretion towards normal after resection of the lung tumours, it seems that the steroid abnormalities found in lung cancer are not the effect of the presence of the lung tumours. As the excretions of 17-OHCS and 11-deoxy-17-oxosteroids change in opposite directions after resection, it is suggested that a dissociation of factors that control the excretion of these two groups of steroids takes place as a response to surgical stress in patients with lung cancer. PMID:5130212

  9. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    PubMed

    Whelan, M C; Casey, G; MacConmara, M; Lederer, J A; Soden, D; Collins, J K; Tangney, M; O'Sullivan, G C

    2010-07-01

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development. PMID:20186173

  10. Effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenases in carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatitis model of rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Cai, Haidong; Hou, Min; Fu, Da; Ma, Yushui; Luo, Qiong; Yuan, Xueyu; Lv, Mingli; Zhang, Xiaoping; Cong, Xianling; Lv, Zhongwei

    2012-06-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) converts tryptophan to l-kynurenine, and it is noted as a relevant molecule in promoting tolerance and suppressing adaptive immunity. In this study, to investigate the effects of IDO in carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4) )-induced hepatitis model, the levels of IDO enzymic activities in the mock group, the control group and the 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT)-treated group were confirmed by determination of l-kynurenine concentrations. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels in 1-MT-treated rats after CCl(4) injection significantly increased compared with those in mock and control groups. In CCl(4)-induced hepatitis models, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is critical in the development of liver injury. The mRNA expression and secretion levels of TNF-α in the liver from 1-MT-treated rats were more enhanced compared with those in the mock and the control groups. Moreover, the levels of cytokine and chemokine from mock, control group and 1-MT-treated rats after treated with CCl(4) were analyzed by ELISA, and the level of interleukin-6 was found to increase in 1-MT-treated rats. It was concluded that the deficiency of IDO exacerbated liver injury in CCl(4)-induced hepatitis and its effect may be connected with TNF-α and interleukin-6. PMID:22249930

  11. Immunotherapy augments the effect of 5-azacytidine on HPV16-associated tumours with different MHC class I-expression status

    PubMed Central

    Šímová, J; Polláková, V; Indrová, M; Mikyšková, R; Bieblová, J; Štěpánek, I; Bubeník, J; Reiniš, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic mechanisms have important roles in the tumour escape from immune responses, such as in MHC class I downregulation or altered expression of other components involved in antigen presentation. Chemotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) can thus influence the tumour cell interactions with the immune system and their sensitivity to immunotherapy. Methods: We evaluated the therapeutic effects of the DNMTi 5-azacytidine (5AC) against experimental MHC class I-deficient and -positive tumours. The 5AC therapy was combined with immunotherapy, using a murine model for HPV16-associated tumours. Results: We have demonstrated 5AC additive effects against MHC class I-positive and -deficient tumours when combined with unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or with IL-12-producing cellular vaccine. The efficacy of the combined chemoimmunotherapy against originally MHC class I-deficient tumours was partially dependent on the CD8+-mediated immune responses. Increased cell surface expression of MHC class I cell molecules, associated with upregulation of the antigen-presenting machinery-related genes, as well as of genes encoding selected components of the IFNγ-signalling pathway in tumours explanted from 5AC-treated animals, were observed. Conclusion: Our data suggest that chemotherapy of MHC class I-deficient tumours with 5AC combined with immunotherapy is an attractive setting in the treatment of MHC class I-deficient tumours. PMID:22015556

  12. Effect of chronic phenobarbitone administration on liver tumour formation in the C57BL/10J mouse.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw B; Orton, Terry C; Lake, Brian G

    2009-06-01

    The hepatocarcinogenicity of sodium phenobarbitone (PB) was studied in male and female mice of the low spontaneous liver tumour incidence C57BL/10 J strain. Treatment with 200 and 1000 ppmPB for 1 month increased relative liver weight in both sexes, with 1000 ppmPB also producing a transient increase in replicative DNA synthesis. The treatment of male and female mice with 200 and 1000 ppm (the maximum tolerated dose) PB for 99 weeks resulted in centrilobular hypertrophy and a dose-dependent increase in relative liver weight. Altered hepatic foci were observed in both sexes given 1000 ppm PB. In male mice given 1000 ppm PB significant increases were observed in the incidence of hepatocellular adenoma and carcinoma, to 43% and 10% of the animals examined, respectively. No increase in liver tumours was observed in male mice given 200 ppm PB and in female mice given 200 and 1000 ppm PB. In summary, PB at a dose level which produces liver hypertrophy, a transient stimulation of replicative DNA synthesis and on chronic administration altered hepatic foci, three key events in the established mode of action for PB-induced rodent liver tumour formation, results in a significant increase in liver tumours in male C57BL/10 J mice. PMID:19298838

  13. Canine mammary tumours: protective effect of late ovariectomy and stimulating effect of progestins.

    PubMed

    Misdorp, W

    1988-01-01

    Ovariectomy, even when performed at an advanced age, was found to be to some extent protective against mammary tumour development in dogs. Bitches treated with progestins had a slightly higher risk for mammary tumours (all types, benign and malignant) than controls. Progestin treatment did not increase the risk of mammary cancer. Benign tumours in (treated and untreated) dogs appeared earlier than malignant ones. Progestin treatment resulted in earlier appearance of both benign and malignant tumours than in controls. The ratio solitary/multiple mammary tumours was not significantly different between treated and untreated dogs. PMID:3376408

  14. Comparative effects of thermosensitive doxorubicin-containing liposomes and hyperthermia in human and murine tumours

    PubMed Central

    YARMOLENKO, PAVEL S.; ZHAO, YULIN; LANDON, CHELSEA; SPASOJEVIC, IVAN; YUAN, FAN; NEEDHAM, DAVID; VIGLIANTI, BENJAMIN L.; DEWHIRST, MARK W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In previous reports, laboratory-made lysolecithin-containing thermosensitive liposome encapsulating doxorubicin (LTSL-DOX) showed potent anticancer effects in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma. To further study the spectrum of LTSL-DOX activity, the efficacy of its commercial formulation was re-examined in FaDu and compared in HCT116, PC3, SKOV-3 and 4T07 cancer cell lines. Factors that may influence differences in HT-LTSL-DOX efficacy were also examined. Methods Anticancer effect was measured using standard growth delay methods. We measured doubling time and clonogenic survival after doxorubicin exposure in vitro, and interstitial pH and drug concentrations in vivo. Results In all five tumour types, HT-LTSL-DOX increased median tumour growth time compared with untreated controls ( p < 0.0006) and HT alone ( p < 0.01), and compared with LTSL-DOX alone in FaDu, PC-3 and HCT-116 ( p < 0.0006). HT-LTSL-DOX yielded significantly higher drug concentrations than LTSL-DOX ( p < 0.0001). FaDu was most sensitive ( p < 0.0014) to doxorubicin (IC50 = 90 nM) in vitro, compared to the other cell lines (IC50 = 129–168 nM). Of the parameters tested for correlation with efficacy, only the correlation of in vitro doubling time and in vivo median growth time was significant (Pearson r = 0.98, p = 0.0035). Slower-growing SKOV-3 and PC-3 had the greatest numbers of complete regressions and longest tumour growth delays, which are clinically important parameters. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that variations in anti-tumour effect of HT-LTSL-DOX are primarily related to in vitro doubling time. In the clinic, the rate of tumour progression must be considered in design of treatment regimens involving HT-LTSL-DOX. PMID:20597627

  15. Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study

    PubMed Central

    Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Ćwikła, Jarosław B; Phan, Alexandria T; Raderer, Markus; Sedláčková, Eva; Cadiot, Guillaume; Wolin, Edward M; Capdevila, Jaume; Wall, Lucy; Rindi, Guido; Langley, Alison; Martinez, Séverine; Gomez-Panzani, Edda; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n=101) or placebo (n=103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n=41; placebo, n=47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs. PMID:26743120

  16. Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Ćwikła, Jarosław B; Phan, Alexandria T; Raderer, Markus; Sedláčková, Eva; Cadiot, Guillaume; Wolin, Edward M; Capdevila, Jaume; Wall, Lucy; Rindi, Guido; Langley, Alison; Martinez, Séverine; Gomez-Panzani, Edda; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤ 10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n = 101) or placebo (n = 103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n = 41; placebo, n = 47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs. PMID:26743120

  17. Study on the effect of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne on cellular immune function in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai; Qi, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-tumour effect of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne, and its relationship with the immune function of tumour-bearing organisms. MTT assay was used to observe the effect of different doses of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne on proliferation of lymphocytes in tumour-bearing mice. ELISA assay was also used to detect the levels of IL-2 in mice, and a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to detect the effect of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne on intralymphocytic free calcium ion concentration in tumour-bearing mice. Different doses of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne significantly inhibited the growth of mouse H22 solid tumours, improved the survival time of tumour-bearing mice, increased the proliferation of lymphocytes, elevated the levels of IL-2, and increased the concentration of calcium ions in the lymphocytes. Polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne have certain anti-tumour effect, which is related with the cellular immune function that regulates the body. PMID:24146499

  18. Effect of VEGF receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222548 combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Hess, C; Vuong, V; Hegyi, I; Riesterer, O; Wood, J; Fabbro, D; Glanzmann, C; Bodis, S; Pruschy, M

    2001-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a major target for anti-angiogenesis-based cancer treatment. Here we report the treatment effect of ionizing radiation in combination with the novel orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro and with tumour xenografts in vivo. Combined treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with increasing doses of PTK787/ZK222584 and ionizing radiation abrogated VEGF-dependent proliferation in a dose-dependent way, but inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation was not due to apoptosis induction. In vivo, a combined treatment regimen of PTK787/ZK222584 (4 × 100 mg/kg) during 4 consecutive days in combination with ionizing radiation (4 × 3 Gy) exerted a substantial tumour growth delay for radiation-resistant p53-disfunctional tumour xenografts derived from SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells while each treatment modality alone had only a minimal effect on tumour size and neovascularization. SW480 tumours from animals that received a combined treatment regimen, displayed not only an extended tumour growth delay but also a significant decrease in the number of microvessels in the tumour xenograft. These results support the model of a cooperative antitumoural effect of angiogenesis inhibitor and irradiation and show that the orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 is suitable for combination therapy with irradiation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747347

  19. Investigation of the effect of physical parameters on the design of tumour targeting agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Joanne Lois

    Tumour targeting using radiolabelled antibodies for radioimmunodetection (RAID) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been studied for many years. The main factors that have limited clinical success are low tumour uptake, immunogenicity and poor therapeutic ratios. This thesis has applied current technology to make advances in this area of research. The effect of physical parameters (antibody size, valency, affinity and charge) on the design of tumour targeting agents was studied by constructing divalent (DFM) and trivalent (TFM) forms of the murine anti-CEA antibody A5B7 Fab' by chemical cross-linking. This involves partial reduction of the hinge disulphides to expose thiol (-SH) groups and subsequent reaction with a maleimide cross-linker to form a thioether bond at the hinge region. Previous studies have suggested that the stability of thioether bonds is superior to naturally occurring disulphide bonds present at the hinge region of IgG and F(ab')2. The aim was to compare the functional affinities and in vivo tumour targeting in nude mice bearing human tumour xenografts of DFM and TFM to similar sized parent IgG and F(ab')2. Radiolabelling with 131I and 90Y was also compared with a view to determine which combination would be optimal for RIT. Results clearly demonstrated a significantly faster on-rate of DFM compared to all other antibody forms and estimated dosimetry analysis suggested that DFM would be the most suitable antibody form radiolabelled with 131I for RIT. Both F(ab')2 and DFM showed high kidney uptake levels on labelling with which is unacceptable for RIT. Despite the improved tumour: blood ratios for TFM, the increased estimated dose to normal tissues and lower therapeutic effect in RIT studies suggests that the most promising combination with the radionuclide appears to be IgG. A humanised version of A5B7 hFab' has been constructed previously in order to reduce its immunogenicity in man. The in vivo stability of hDFM proved to be superior to hF(ab')2

  20. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  1. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events. PMID:26787230

  2. Commensal bacteria drive endogenous transformation and tumour stem cell marker expression through a bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingmin; Yang, Yonghong; Huycke, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Commensal bacteria and innate immunity play a major role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). We propose that selected commensals polarise colon macrophages to produce endogenous mutagens that initiate chromosomal instability (CIN), lead to expression of progenitor and tumour stem cell markers, and drive CRC through a bystander effect. Design Primary murine colon epithelial cells were repetitively exposed to Enterococcus faecalis-infected macrophages, or purified trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE)—an endogenous mutagen and spindle poison produced by macrophages. CIN, gene expression, growth as allografts in immunodeficient mice were examined for clones and expression of markers confirmed using interleukin (IL) 10 knockout mice colonised by E. faecalis. Results Primary colon epithelial cells exposed to polarised macrophages or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal developed CIN and were transformed after 10 weekly treatments. In immunodeficient mice, 8 of 25 transformed clones grew as poorly differentiated carcinomas with 3 tumours invading skin and/or muscle. All tumours stained for cytokeratins confirming their epithelial cell origin. Gene expression profiling of clones showed alterations in 3 to 7 cancer driver genes per clone. Clones also strongly expressed stem/progenitor cell markers Ly6A and Ly6E. Although not differentially expressed in clones, murine allografts positively stained for the tumour stem cell marker doublecortin-like kinase 1. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 and Ly6A/E were expressed by epithelial cells in colon biopsies for areas of inflamed and dysplastic tissue from E. faecalis-colonised IL-10 knockout mice. Conclusions These results validate a novel mechanism for CRC that involves endogenous CIN and cellular transformation arising through a microbiome-driven bystander effect. PMID:24906974

  3. Combined effect of clinically relevant doses of emitefur, a new 5-fluorouracil derivative, and radiation in murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Shibamoto, Y.; Murata, R.; Miyauchi, S.; Hirohashi, M.; Takagi, T.; Sasai, K.; Shibata, T.; Oya, N.; Takahashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the combined effect of radiation and clinically relevant doses of emitefur (BOF-A2), a newly developed anti-cancer agent consisting of a masked form of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a potent inhibitor of 5-FU degradation, in two types of murine tumours. In preliminary pharmacokinetic studies, the area under the curve for 5-FU in plasma, after administration of 12.5 mg kg-1 and 25 mg kg-1 emitefur in mice, appeared to be similar to that obtained on the first day and that on the seventh day, respectively, after starting administration of 400-600 mg day-1 in humans. These doses (12.5 and 25 mg kg-1) of emitefur were evaluated either alone or in combination with single (15 Gy), five-fraction (4 Gy each) or ten-fraction (2.8 Gy each) irradiation using a tumour growth delay assay for SCCVII tumours and in combination with four-fraction (5 Gy each) irradiation using an in vivo-in vitro assay for EMT6 tumours. The anti-tumour and radiation-enhancing effects of 12.5 mg kg-1 emitefur were not significant in any except the ten-fraction experiment. On the other hand, multiple doses of 25 mg kg-1 emitefur given either alone or in combination with radiation produced marked effects. The mean tumour growth delay time (the time to double in volume for treated tumours minus that for untreated tumours) was 8.1 days for five administrations of 25 mg kg-1 emitefur. 10.4 days for five fractions of 4 Gy and 22.1 days for five treatments with the combination of the two. Thus, the increase in growth delay afforded by this combination was at least additive. The effect of four fractions of 5 Gy with 25 mg kg-1 emitefur in EMT6 tumours was lower than that of four fractions of 7.5 Gy, but the effect of five fractions of 4 Gy with this dose of emitefur in SCCVII tumours was similar to the effect of five fractions of 6 Gy, and the effect of ten fractions of 2.8 Gy with 25 mg kg-1 emitefur was much higher than that of ten fractions of 4.2 Gy. In conclusion, emitefur given either alone

  4. Surgical implications of tumour immunology.

    PubMed Central

    Somers, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of immune infiltration of tumour deposits and the existence of effective in vitro anti-tumour immune responses would suggest the possibility of therapeutic manipulation against tumour cells. However, clinical immunotherapy has shown little promise as a cancer treatment. Numerous explanations for this inefficacy have been proposed, one of which involves the elaboration of immunosuppressive moieties from tumour cells. The results of studies presented below show that serum from patients with gastrointestinal and other tumours have immunosuppressive influences on normal lymphocytes. The degree of this in vitro inhibition is related to tumour 'bulk' and may reflect a systemic immunosuppressive influence of the tumour. Isolation and culture of lymphocytes from gastrointestinal tumour deposits demonstrated that these immune cells are functionally inert, suggesting the existence of an immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment. The isolation and partial purification of an immunosuppressive moiety from conditioned culture medium of a variety of human tumour cell lines further supports the hypothesis of tumour-mediated immunosuppression. A number of protein tumour cell products have been described with potent immunosuppressive properties. These include transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin-10, and the retroviral envelope protein p15E. The surgical implications of the proposed tumour-host immune relationship includes the hypothesis that clinically apparent disease may not be amenable to immune attack owing to tumour-mediated immune suppression. The use of immunostimulatory strategies as adjuvant perioperative therapy would seem a more effective environment for the activation of antitumour immune responses in the surgical patient. PMID:8678441

  5. [Tumours and liver transplants].

    PubMed

    Mejzlík, Vladimír; Husová, Libuše; Kuman, Milan; Štěpánková, Soňa; Ondrášek, Jiří; Němec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation as a curative treatment method can be used for selected primary liver tumours, in particular for hepatocellular carcinoma and rather rare semi-malignant tumours such as epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, further for infiltration of liver by metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (provided that metastases are only located in the liver and the primary tumour was removed) and for benign tumours (hemangiomas and adenomas) with oppression symptoms and size progression. Cholangiocarcinoma is not indicated for liver transplantation at the CKTCH Brno. In recent years liver transplants for hepatocellular carcinoma have increased and hepatocellular carcinoma has also been more frequently found ex post, in the explanted livers. Liver transplantation is indicated in selected patients with a good chance of long-term survival after liver transplantation (a generally accepted limit is 5 year survival of 50 % after transplantation). By 20 March 2015 there were liver transplants carried out on 38 patients - in 25 of them was hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed before transplantation and in 13 it was found in the liver explants. 5 year survival following transplantation is reached by 53 % of this cohort. 32 % patients suffered from chronic hepatitis C. The longest surviving (32 years) patient at CKTCH Brno had liver transplanted for a big fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma, which points to the prognostic significance of tumour histology: the criterion only considered in some indication schemes for practical reasons. Benign liver tumours (adenomatosis, cystadenoma, hemangioma with oppression symptoms) are rather rare indications and the transplantation results are favourable. 4 patients underwent transplantation for infiltration of liver by carcinoid, tumour recurrence occurred in one. PMID:26375706

  6. 4D radiobiological modelling of the interplay effect in conventionally and hypofractionated lung tumour IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Uzan, J; Baker, C; Nahum, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the impact of the interplay between respiration-induced tumour motion and multileaf collimator leaf movements in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a function of number of fractions, dose rate on population mean tumour control probability () using an in-house developed dose model. Methods: Delivered dose was accumulated in a voxel-by-voxel basis inclusive of tumour motion over the course of treatment. The effect of interplay on dose and was studied for conventionally and hypofractionated treatments using digital imaging and communications in medicine data sets. Moreover, the effect of dose rate on interplay was also studied for single-fraction treatments. Simulations were repeated several times to obtain for each plan. Results: The average variation observed in mean dose to the target volumes were −0.76% ± 0.36% for the 20-fraction treatment and −0.26% ± 0.68% and −1.05% ± 0.98% for the three- and single-fraction treatments, respectively. For the 20-fraction treatment, the drop in was −1.05% ± 0.39%, whereas for the three- and single-fraction treatments, it was −2.80% ± 1.68% and −4.00% ± 2.84%, respectively. By reducing the dose rate from 600 to 300 MU min−1 for the single-fraction treatments, the drop in was reduced by approximately 1.5%. Conclusion: The effect of interplay on is negligible for conventionally fractionated treatments, whereas considerable drop in is observed for the three- and single-fraction treatments. Reduced dose rate could be used in hypofractionated treatments to reduce the interplay effect. Advances in knowledge: A novel in silico dose model is presented to determine the impact of interplay effect in IMRT treatments on . PMID:25251400

  7. Combined effect of levan and cytotoxic agents on the growth of experimental tumours in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Leibovici, J.; Stark, Y.; Wolman, M.

    1983-01-01

    The combined effect of the polysaccharide levan (previously shown to exert a host-dependent as well as direct antitumoural activity) and the cytotoxic agents cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), vincristine (VINC) and 5-fluoro-uracil (SFU) was studied in Lewis lung carcinoma and AKR lymphoma. Combined chemo- and immunotherapy was applied beginning on the day of tumour cell inoculation. Additive effects were obtained with the combined treatments, compared to single treatments, with all the combinations except MTX-levan in Lewis lung carcinoma, where the combined effect was synergistic. The additive effect was obtained with different doses and routes of chemotherapy, whether local or intraperitoneal. A 2 mg dose of CY combined with levan administered at daily doses of 10 mg, resulted in a 100% prevention of Lewis lung carcinoma growth. It is suggested that the levan may have two beneficial effects: it can exert an inhibitory effect on tumour growth and diminish the deleterious effect of cytotoxic agents on the immune system. PMID:6882675

  8. The improving effects on hepatic fibrosis of interferon-γ liposomes targeted to hepatic stellate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinghua; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Feng; Lu, Weiyue; Wang, Jiyao; Guo, Chuanyong

    2012-07-01

    No satisfactory anti-fibrotic therapies have yet been applied clinically. One of the main reasons is the inability to specifically target the responsible cells to produce an available drug concentration and the side-effects. Exploiting the key role of the activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both hepatic fibrogenesis and over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), we constructed targeted sterically stable liposomes (SSLs) modified by a cyclic peptide (pPB) with affinity for the PDGFR-β to deliver interferon (IFN)-γ to HSCs. The pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed satisfactory size distribution. In vitro pPB-SSL could be taken up by activated HSCs. The study of tissue distribution via living-body animal imaging showed that the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ mostly accumulated in the liver until 24 h. Furthermore, the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed more significant remission of hepatic fibrosis. In vivo the histological Ishak stage, the semiquantitative score for collagen in fibrotic liver and the serum levels of collagen type IV-C in fibrotic rats treated with pPB-SSL-IFN-γ were less than those treated with SSL-IFN-γ, IFN-γ and the control group. In vitro pPB-SSL-IFN-γ was also more effective in suppressing activated HSC proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated HSCs. Thus the data suggest that pPB-SSL-IFN-γ might be a more effective anti-fibrotic agent and a new opportunity for clinical therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  9. Antitumour and anti-inflammatory effects of palladium(II) complexes on Ehrlich tumour.

    PubMed

    Quilles, Marcela B; Carli, Camila B A; Ananias, Sandra R; Ferreira, Lucas S; Ribeiro, Livia C A; Maia, Danielle C G; Resende, Flávia A; Moro, Antônio C; Varanda, Eliana A; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Mauro, Antonio E; Carlos, Iracilda Z

    2013-01-01

    Palladium(II) complexes are an important class of cyclopalladated compounds that play a pivotal role in various pharmaceutical applications. Here, we investigated the antitumour, anti-inflammatory, and mutagenic effects of two complexes: [Pd(dmba)(Cl)tu] (1) and [Pd(dmba)(N3)tu] (2) (dmba = N,N-dimethylbenzylamine and tu = thiourea), on Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells and peritoneal exudate cells (PECs) from mice bearing solid Ehrlich tumour. The cytotoxic effects of the complexes on EAT cells and PECs were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-3-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of the complexes on the immune system were assessed based on the production of nitric oxide (NO) (Griess assay) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-12 (IL-12), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) (ELISA). Finally the mutagenic activity was assessed by the Ames test using the Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 98. Cisplatin was used as a standard. The IC50 ranges for the growth inhibition of EAT cells and PECs were found to be (72.8 +/- 3.23) microM and (137.65 +/- 0.22) microM for 1 and (39.7 +/- 0.30) microM and (146.51 +/- 2.67) microM for 2, respectively. The production of NO, IL-12, and TNF-alpha, but not IL-10, was induced by both complexes and cisplatin. The complexes showed no mutagenicity in vitro, unlike cisplatin, which was mutagenic in the strain. These results indicate that the complexes are not mutagenic and have potential immunological and antitumour activities. These properties make them promising alternatives to cisplatin. PMID:24066514

  10. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium immunotherapy for B-cell lymphoma induces broad anti-tumour immunity with therapeutic effect

    PubMed Central

    Grille, Sofía; Moreno, María; Bascuas, Thais; Marqués, Juan M; Muñoz, Natalia; Lens, Daniela; Chabalgoity, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of current immune-chemotherapy for treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a substantial proportion of patients relapse, highlighting the need for new therapeutic modalities. The use of live microorganisms to develop anti-tumoural therapies has evolved since Coley's toxin and is now receiving renewed attention. Salmonella Typhimurium has been shown to be highly effective as an anti-tumour agent in many solid cancer models, but it has not been used in haemato-oncology. Here, we report that intra-tumoural administration of LVR01 (attenuated S. Typhimurium strain with safety profile) elicits local and systemic anti-tumour immunity, resulting in extended survival in a lymphoma model. LVR01 induces intra-tumoural recruitment of neutrophils and activated CD8+ T cells, as well as increasing the natural killer cell activation status. Furthermore, a systemic specific anti-tumour response with a clear T helper type 1 profile was observed. This approach is an alternative therapeutic strategy for lymphoma patients that could be easily moved into clinical trials. PMID:24834964

  11. Effects of He-Ne laser acupuncture-point irradiation on serology hepatitis virus markers in chronic hepatitis B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue-lan; Huang, Bing-chen; Ni, Liu-da

    1993-03-01

    For most of the patients with chronic hepatitis B the immunologic function is deficient. Immunopotentiation and immunoregulation can be used as effective treatments. Laser irradiation can potentiate the cellular immune function of the human body and has good effects on improving clinical symptoms, cutting short the process of diseases, and promoting HBsAg negative change. Thereby we have a randomized opportunity to study the effect of He-Ne laser acupoint irradiation on serological HBV markers (HBVM) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB).

  12. Fluorescence distribution and photodynamic effect of ALA-induced PP IX in the DMH rat colonic tumour model.

    PubMed Central

    Bedwell, J.; MacRobert, A. J.; Phillips, D.; Bown, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) is the first committed step in haem synthesis. In the presence of excess ALA the natural regulatory feedback system is disrupted allowing accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) the last intermediate product before haem, and an effective sensitiser. This method of endogenous photosensitisation of cells has been exploited for photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have studied the fluorescence distribution and biological effect of induced PP IX in normal and tumour tissue in the rat colon. Fluorescence in normal colonic tissue was at a peak of 4 h with a rapid fall off by 6 h. The fluorescence had returned to background levels by 24 h. All normal tissue layers followed the same fluorescence profile but the mucosa showed fluorescent levels six times higher than the submucosa, with muscle barely above background values. At 6 h the ratio of fluorescence levels between normal mucosa and viable tumour was approximately 1:6. At this time laser treatment showed necrosis of normal mucosa and tumour with sparing of normal muscle. There was good correlation between the fluorescence distribution and the biological effect of ALA-induced photosensitisation on exposure to red light. ALA may be superior to conventional sensitisers for tumours that produce haem as the PP IX is synthesised in malignant cells while the other sensitisers mainly localise to the vascular stroma of tumours. There is also a greater concentration difference between the PP IX levels in tumours and in normal mucosa and normal muscle than with the other photosensitisers raising the possibility of more selective necrosis in tumours. Images p820-a Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1616853

  13. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures. PMID:25227763

  14. Edge effects in game-theoretic dynamics of spatially structured tumours.

    PubMed

    Kaznatcheev, Artem; Scott, Jacob G; Basanta, David

    2015-07-01

    Cancer dynamics are an evolutionary game between cellular phenotypes. A typical assumption in this modelling paradigm is that the probability of a given phenotypic strategy interacting with another depends exclusively on the abundance of those strategies without regard for local neighbourhood structure. We address this limitation by using the Ohtsuki-Nowak transform to introduce spatial structure to the go versus grow game. We show that spatial structure can promote the invasive (go) strategy. By considering the change in neighbourhood size at a static boundary--such as a blood vessel, organ capsule or basement membrane--we show an edge effect that allows a tumour without invasive phenotypes in the bulk to have a polyclonal boundary with invasive cells. We present an example of this promotion of invasive (epithelial-mesenchymal transition-positive) cells in a metastatic colony of prostate adenocarcinoma in bone marrow. Our results caution that pathologic analyses that do not distinguish between cells in the bulk and cells at a static edge of a tumour can underestimate the number of invasive cells. Although we concentrate on applications in mathematical oncology, we expect our approach to extend to other evolutionary game models where interaction neighbourhoods change at fixed system boundaries. PMID:26040596

  15. Edge effects in game-theoretic dynamics of spatially structured tumours

    PubMed Central

    Kaznatcheev, Artem; Scott, Jacob G.; Basanta, David

    2015-01-01

    Cancer dynamics are an evolutionary game between cellular phenotypes. A typical assumption in this modelling paradigm is that the probability of a given phenotypic strategy interacting with another depends exclusively on the abundance of those strategies without regard for local neighbourhood structure. We address this limitation by using the Ohtsuki–Nowak transform to introduce spatial structure to the go versus grow game. We show that spatial structure can promote the invasive (go) strategy. By considering the change in neighbourhood size at a static boundary—such as a blood vessel, organ capsule or basement membrane—we show an edge effect that allows a tumour without invasive phenotypes in the bulk to have a polyclonal boundary with invasive cells. We present an example of this promotion of invasive (epithelial–mesenchymal transition-positive) cells in a metastatic colony of prostate adenocarcinoma in bone marrow. Our results caution that pathologic analyses that do not distinguish between cells in the bulk and cells at a static edge of a tumour can underestimate the number of invasive cells. Although we concentrate on applications in mathematical oncology, we expect our approach to extend to other evolutionary game models where interaction neighbourhoods change at fixed system boundaries. PMID:26040596

  16. Effective Management of a pregnancy tumour using a soft tissue diode laser: a case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ambika; Mathur, Vijay Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pregnancy tumours (PTs) are a non-neoplastic, reactive, inflammatory conditional gingival enlargement which occurs in the oral cavity during pregnancy. The lesion most frequently occurs on the gingiva but may also develop on the lip, tongue, oral mucosa and palate. When a large PT develops, it can interfere with mastication, speech, maintenance of oral hygiene and can be aesthetically disfiguring. The treatment of PTs depends upon the size of the lesion; smaller lesions can regress after parturition however large lesions need to be surgically removed. Conventional surgical techniques have the disadvantage of more bleeding from the surgical site and delay in healing of the scar tissue. The diode laser is a relatively new alternative to conventional surgical technique in intra-oral areas with the added advantage of bloodless procedures and rapid healing. Case report: The purpose of the present study is to highlight the management of a PT in a 25-year-old female using a diode laser delivering a painless, bloodless procedure with rapid postoperative healing. Conclusions: Diode laser excision of a persistent pregnancy tumour in a postpartum patient was safe and effective with minimal bleeding, good coagulation, and good wound healing. Among other lasers, the diode laser can therefore be considered for excisional treatment of persistent PTs. PMID:25705084

  17. Quantification of the effect of electrical and thermal parameters on radiofrequency ablation for concentric tumour model of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Muhammad; Ng, E Y K

    2015-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been increasingly used in treating cancer for multitude of situations in various tissue types. To perform the therapy safely and reliably, the effect of critical parameters needs to be known beforehand. Temperature plays an important role in the outcome of the therapy and any uncertainties in temperature assessment can be lethal. This study presents the RFA case of fixed tip temperature where we've analysed the effect of electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and blood perfusion rate of the tumour and surrounding normal tissue on the radiofrequency ablation. Ablation volume was chosen as the characteristic to be optimised and temperature control was achieved via PID controller. The effect of all 6 parameters each having 3 levels was quantified with minimum number of experiments harnessing the fractional factorial characteristic of Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. It was observed that as the blood perfusion increases the ablation volume decreases. Increasing electrical conductivity of the tumour results in increase of ablation volume whereas increase in normal tissue conductivity tends to decrease the ablation volume and vice versa. Likewise, increasing thermal conductivity of the tumour results in enhanced ablation volume whereas an increase in thermal conductivity of the surrounding normal tissue has a debilitating effect on the ablation volume and vice versa. With increase in the size of the tumour (i.e., 2-3cm) the effect of each parameter is not linear. The parameter effect varies with change in size of the tumour that is manifested by the different gradient observed in ablation volume. Most important is the relative insensitivity of ablation volume to blood perfusion rate for smaller tumour size (2cm) that is also in accordance with the previous results presented in literature. These findings will provide initial insight for safe, reliable and improved treatment planning perceptively. PMID:25965014

  18. Photothermal effects induced by laser heating of gold nanorods in suspensions and inoculated tumours during in vivo experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyuk, G S; Ivanov, A V; Polyanskaya, N I; Maksimova, I L; Skaptsov, A A; Chumakov, D S; Khlebtsov, B N; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G

    2012-05-31

    Photothermal effects are studied under laser irradiation of aqueous suspensions of gold nanorods (in vitro experiments) and mice-inoculated Erlich carcinoma after intravenous injection of gold nanorods with the size 40 Multiplication-Sign 10 nm and plasmon resonance at the wavelength 810 nm (in vivo experiment). In 24 hours after the injection the polyethylene-glycol-coated nanoparticles accumulated in the tumour with the concentration three - four times greater than in healthy muscle tissue. At concentrations, attained as a result of passive accumulation of nanoparticles in the tumour (4 {mu}g per 1 g of tumour), the efficiency of the tumour heating was higher than that in aqueous solutions having the same concentration of nanoparticles. Various mechanisms of this effect are discussed including the difference in thermal physical parameters of water and biotissue, the aggregation of nanoparticles in tissues, the influence of multiple scattering in biotissue, and the nonuniform accumulation of particles in the tumour. Using the Monte Carlo method for simulating multiple scattering of light, it is shown that there are such proportions between the biotissue scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient of nanoparticles, at which the fraction of absorbed photons in the tissue is higher than that in a transparent medium containing the same nanoparticles. The conclusion is made that the regime of hyperthermia is less efficient for antineoplastic therapy than the thermal damage due to fast short-time heating of the tissues up to the destruction temperature.

  19. Relative biological effectiveness of light ions in human tumoural cell lines: role of protein p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggio, L.; Cavinato, M.; Cherubini, R.; Conzato, M.; Cucinotta, F.; Favaretto, S.; Gerardi, S.; Lora, S.; Stoppa, P.; Williams, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Protons and alpha particles of high linear energy transfer (LET) have shown an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with respect to X/gamma rays for several cellular and molecular endpoints in different in vitro cell systems. To contribute to understanding the biochemical mechanisms involved in the increased effectiveness of high LET radiation, an extensive study has been designed. The present work reports the preliminary result of this study on two human tumoural cell lines, DLD1 and HCT116, (with different p53 status), which indicate that for these cell lines, p53 does not appear to take a part in the response to radiation induced DNA damage, suggesting an alternative p53-independent pathway and a cell biochemical mechanism dependent on the cell type.

  20. Oncolytic virotherapy for advanced liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ju-Fang; Chen, Pei-Jer; Sze, Daniel Y; Reid, Tony; Bartlett, David; Kirn, David H; Liu, Ta-Chiang

    2009-01-01

    Primary and metastatic neoplasms of the liver account for more than a million deaths per year worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective novel therapies for these cancers are urgently needed. Oncolytic virotherapeutics represent a novel class of pharmacophore that holds promise for the treatment of hepatic neoplasms. Cancer-specific replication is followed by oncolysis, virus spreading and infection of adjacent cancer cells. This process is then repeated. Virotherapeutics target multiple genetic pathways involved in carcino-genesis, and demonstrate activity against apoptosis-resistant tumour cells. This platform can also exploit the advantage of multiple intrinsic anti-cancer therapeutic mechanisms, combining direct viral oncolysis with therapeutic transgene expression. Recent advances in pre-clinical and clinical studies are revealing the potential of this unique therapeutic class, in particular for liver cancers. This review summarizes the available data on applying oncolytic virotherapeutics to hepatic neoplasms to date, and discusses the challenges and future directions for virotherapy. PMID:19175689

  1. Enhanced anti-tumour effects of Vinca alkaloids given separately from cytostatic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, H; Pannert, L; Pfeiffer, S; Wachter, F; Amtmann, E; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose In polychemotherapy protocols, that is for treatment of neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma, Vinca alkaloids and cell cycle-arresting drugs are usually administered on the same day. Here we studied whether this combination enables the optimal antitumour effects of Vinca alkaloids to be manifested. Experimental Approach Vinca alkaloids were tested in a preclinical mouse model in vivo and in vitro in combination with cell cycle-arresting drugs. Signalling pathways were characterized using RNA interference. Key Results In vitro, knockdown of cyclins significantly inhibited vincristine-induced cell death indicating, in accordance with previous findings, Vinca alkaloids require active cell cycling and M-phase transition for induction of cell death. In contrast, anthracyclines, irradiation and dexamethasone arrested the cell cycle and acted like cytostatic drugs. The combination of Vinca alkaloids with cytostatic therapeutics resulted in diminished cell death in 31 of 36 (86%) tumour cell lines. In a preclinical tumour model, anthracyclines significantly inhibited the antitumour effect of Vinca alkaloids in vivo. Antitumour effects of Vinca alkaloids in the presence of cytostatic drugs were restored by caffeine, which maintained active cell cycling, or by knockdown of p53, which prevented drug-induced cell cycle arrest. Therapeutically most important, optimal antitumour effects were obtained in vivo upon separating the application of Vinca alkaloids from cytostatic therapeutics. Conclusion and Implications Clinical trials are required to prove whether Vinca alkaloids act more efficiently in cancer patients if they are applied uncoupled from cytostatic therapies. On a conceptual level, our data suggest the implementation of polychemotherapy protocols based on molecular mechanisms of drug–drug interactions. Linked Article This article is commented on by Solary, pp 1555–1557 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph

  2. Effects of biliary obstruction on hepatic clearance of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.O.; Wilton, P.B.; Barke, R.A.; Gerding, D.N.; Forstrom, L.A.; Shafer, R.B.; Vennes, J.A. )

    1989-08-01

    High surgical mortality in patients with obstructive jaundice and sepsis have been attributed to reticuloendothelial system (RES) depression. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of mechanical biliary obstruction on RES clearance of pathogenic bacteria by comparing the phagocytic index (K) with the directly measured hepatic uptake of indium 111-labeled bacteria injected into the portal vein of normal dogs and dogs with partial (PBO) or complete biliary obstruction (CBO). No significant difference was observed between the K in normal dogs (0.19 +/- 0.08; n = 6) and that in dogs with PBO (0.24 +/- 0.06; n = 5) or CBO (0.21 +/- 0.03; n = 4). There was no significant difference in uptake of radiolabel by the liver among the three groups of dogs. In our model, biliary obstruction had no effect on hepatic RES function and may not represent a significant determinant of mortality in patients with obstructive jaundice.

  3. Inhibitory effect of STAT3 gene combined with CDDP on growth of human Wilms tumour SK-NEP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junrong; Zhang, Nina; Qu, Haijiang; You, Guangxian; Yuan, Junhui; Chen, Caie; Li, Wenyi; Pan, Feng

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) combined with cisplatin (CDDP) on the growth of human Wilms tumour (WT) SK-NEP-1 cell subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice and the possible mechanisms. Human WT SK-NEP-1 cells were subcutaneously transplanted to establish the BALB/c nude mice xenograft model. Mice were randomly divided into five groups: blank control group, adenovirus control group (NC group), STAT3 group, CDDP group and STAT3 plus CDDP group (combination group). Tumour volume and tumour weight were observed during the therapeutic process. The expression levels of STAT3, glucose regulatory protein 78 (GRP78) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis. Compared with the STAT3 group or CDDP group, the tumour weight and volume was significantly reduced in the combination group (P<0.05). No statistical significance was found in NC group compared with the blank control group (P > 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that STAT3, GRP78 and BAX protein levels in the combination group were significantly higher than those in STAT3 group and CDDP group (P<0.05). Exogenous STAT3 and CDDP may synergistically inhibit the xenograft tumour growth through up-regulation of BAX protein via GRP78. PMID:27129294

  4. Paradoxical effects of tumour necrosis factor-α in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard O

    2008-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α therapy is highly effective in rheumatoid arthritis and it is surprising, therefore, that a recent study showed that intraperitoneal administration of recombinant TNFα reduced the severity of adjuvant-induced arthritis and decreased IFNγ expression in cultured draining lymph node cells. Furthermore, in untreated arthritic rats, maximal TNFα expression in draining lymph node cells coincided with spontaneous disease remission, suggesting a role for endogenous TNFα in recovery from arthritis. If confirmed in further studies, these findings suggest that, in addition to its well-established pro-inflammatory properties, TNFα may also play a disease-limiting role in this model of rheumatoid arthritis by suppressing effector T cell responses. PMID:18564403

  5. The effect of the stromal component of breast tumours on prediction of clinical outcome using gene expression microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cleator, Susan J; Powles, Trevor J; Dexter, Tim; Fulford, Laura; Mackay, Alan; Smith, Ian E; Valgeirsson, Haukur; Ashworth, Alan; Dowsett, Mitch

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the cellular composition of biopsies on the error rates of multigene predictors of response of breast tumours to neoadjuvant adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (AC) chemotherapy. Materials and methods Core biopsies were taken from primary breast tumours of 43 patients prior to AC, and subsequent clinical response was recorded. Post-chemotherapy (day 21) samples were available for 16 of these samples. Frozen sections of each core were used to estimate the proportion of invasive cancer and other tissue components at three levels. Transcriptional profiling was performed using a cDNA array containing 4,600 elements. Results Twenty-three (53%) patients demonstrated a 'good' and 20 (47%) a 'poor' clinical response. The percentage invasive tumour in core biopsies collected from these patients varied markedly. Despite this, agglomerative clustering of sample expression profiles showed that almost all biopsies from the same tumour aggregated as nearest neighbours. SAM (significance analysis of microarrays) regression analysis identified 144 genes which distinguished high- and low-percentage invasive tumour biopsies at a false discovery rate of not more than 5%. The misclassification error of prediction of clinical response using microarray data from pre-treatment biopsies (on leave-one-out cross-validation) was 28%. When prediction was performed on subsets of samples which were more homogeneous in their proportions of malignant and stromal cells, the misclassification error was considerably lower (8%–13%, p < 0.05 on permutation). Conclusion The non-tumour content of breast cancer samples has a significant effect on gene expression profiles. Consideration of this factor improves accuracy of response prediction by expression array profiling. Future gene expression array prediction studies should be planned taking this into account. PMID:16790077

  6. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour with Extraosseal Spread: Evaluation of the Effect Carnoy's Solution.

    PubMed

    Levorová, Jitka; Machoň, Vladimír; Grill, Pavel; Hirjak, Dušan; Foltán, René

    2015-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour is relatively rare benign tumour. It is characterized by its fast aggressive growth and high risk of recurrence. Treatment is always surgical: conservative (enucleation, marsupialization) or aggressive (enucleation followed by application of Carnoy's solution, cryotherapy; peripheral ostectomy or en block resection of the jaw). Authors analysed retrospectively 22 patients who fulfilled inclusion criteria, i.e. had odontogenic keratocystic tumour of mandible, wherein antero-posterior dimension was at least 30 mm, and the tumour penetrated into the surrounding soft tissues. All patients underwent tumour enucleation, in 11 patients Carnoy's solution was given into the bone cavity after enucleation. The recurrence rate in the evaluation at least 36 months after surgery was both patient groups the same: 45.4%. PMID:26654803

  7. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Suwantika, Auliya A; Beutels, Philippe; Postma, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A immunization in Indonesia, including an explicit comparison between one-dose and two-dose vaccines. Methods An age-structured cohort model based on a decision tree was developed for the 2012 Indonesia birth cohort. Using the model, we made a comparison on the use of two-dose and one-dose vaccines. The model involved a 70-year time horizon with 1-month cycles for children less than 2 years old and annually thereafter. Monte Carlo simulations were used to examine the economic acceptability and affordability of the hepatitis A vaccination. Results Vaccination would save US$ 3 795 148 and US$ 2 892 920 from the societal perspective, for the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules, respectively, in the context of hepatitis A treatment. It also would save 8917 and 6614 discounted quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs), respectively. With the vaccine price of US$ 3.21 per dose, the implementation of single dose vaccine would yield an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$ 4933 per QALY gained versus no vaccination, whereas the two-dose versus one-dose schedule would cost US$ 14 568 per QALY gained. Considering the 2012 gross-domestic-product (GDP) per capita in Indonesia of US$ 3557, the results indicate that hepatitis A vaccination would be a cost-effective intervention, both for the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules in isolation, but two-dose vaccination would no longer be cost-effective if one-dose vaccination is a feasible option. Vaccination would be 100% affordable at budgets of US$ 71 408 000 and US$ 37 690 000 for the implementation of the two-dose and one-dose vaccine schedules, respectively. Conclusions The implementation of hepatitis A vaccination in Indonesia would be a cost-effective health intervention under the market vaccine price. Given the budget limitations, the use of a one-dose-vaccine schedule would be more realistic to be applied than a two

  8. The effects of shortening lactoferrin derived peptides against tumour cells, bacteria and normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nannan; Strøm, Morten B; Mekonnen, Seble M; Svendsen, John S; Rekdal, Oystein

    2004-01-01

    A number of shortened derivatives of the lactoferrin model peptide L12, PAWRKAFRWAKRMLKKAA, were designed in order to elucidate the structural basis for antitumour activity of lactoferrin derivatives. Three tumour cell lines were included in the study and toxicity determined by measuring lysis of human red blood cells and fibroblasts. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between antitumour activity and net positive charge, in which a net charge close to +7 was essential for a high antitumour activity. In order to increase the antitumour activity of the shortest peptide with a net charge less than +7, the hydrophobicity had to be increased by adding a bulky Trp residue. None of the peptides were haemolytic, but toxicity against fibroblasts was observed. However, modifications of the peptides had a higher effect on reducing fibroblast toxicity than antitumour activity and thereby resulted in peptides displaying an almost 7-fold selectivity for tumour cells compared with fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coil and the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus was also included in order to compare the structural requirements for antitumour activity with those required for a high antimicrobial activity. The results showed that most of the peptides were highly active against both bacterial strains. Less modification by shortening the peptide sequences was tolerated for maintaining a high antitumour activity and selectivity compared with antimicrobial activity. The order of the amino acid residues and thereby the conformation of the peptides was highly essential for antitumour activity, whereas the antimicrobial activity was hardly influenced by changes in this parameter. Thus, in addition to a certain net positive charge and hydrophobicity, the ability to adopt an amphipathic conformation was a more critical structural parameter for antitumour activity than for antimicrobial activity, and implied that a

  9. The anti-tumour efficacy of human recombinant interleukin 2. Correlation between sensitivity of tumours to the cytolytic effect of LAK cells in vitro and their susceptibility to interleukin 2 immunotherapy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Indrová, M

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test what percentage of experimental MC-induced murine sarcomas were sensitive to the local tumour inhibitory effect of IL-2 and whether any correlation existed between the sensitivity of these sarcomas to the immunotherapeutic effect of IL-2 and their susceptibility to the cytolytic effect of IL-2-activated killer cells. It was found that the sensitivity of MC-induced sarcomas to local IL-2 immunotherapy was a general phenomenon. Repeated peri-tumoural injections of RIL-2 inhibited the growth of five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six sarcomas in syngeneic mice. The sixth murine sarcoma (MC12) was found to be resistant to the tumour inhibitory effect of IL-2. Similarly, five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six murine sarcoma cell lines were sensitive to the cytolytic effect of IL-2-activated syngeneic killer spleen cells when examined in vitro, whereas the sixth (MC12) sarcoma cell line was resistant. These results suggest that LAK cells represent the effector cell mechanism responsible for the anti-tumour efficacy of local IL-2 immunotherapy and that in vitro testing of sensitivity to the LAK cell-mediated cytolysis may be used to detect tumours responding to IL-2 immunotherapy in vivo. PMID:3496154

  10. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  11. The potential effect of patulin on mice bearing melanoma cells: an anti-tumour or carcinogenic effect?

    PubMed

    Boussabbeh, Manel; Ben Salem, Intidhar; Rjiba-Touati, Karima; Bouyahya, Chedy; Neffati, Fadwa; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-05-01

    Mycotoxins are bioactive compounds that are noxious to human. Their effects on oncogenesis have been satisfactorily elucidated, and some of mycotoxins have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. Nevertheless, patulin (PAT) is considered by the International Agency of Research on Cancer as 'not carcinogenic to humans'. The present study was designed to understand the effect of this mycotoxin on melanoma cells (B16F10) by measuring cell proliferation and assessing the anti-tumour effect in vivo in Balb/c mice. Our results revealed that intraperitoneally administration of PAT for 20 days significantly induces tumour regression in B16F10 cell-implanted mice. This effect was evidenced by the activation of apoptosis which is supported by the increase in p53 and Bax expressions, the downregulation of the protein levels of Bcl2, and the increase in caspase-3 activity. Moreover, systemic toxicity analysis demonstrated that there is no potential toxicity following PAT treatment unlike untreated melanoma mice which suffer from anaemia, inflammation and liver dysfunction. Remarkably, this is the first published report demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of PAT in vivo models. PMID:26619846

  12. Testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; McGlynn, Katherine A; Okamoto, Keisei; Jewett, Michael A S; Bokemeyer, Carsten

    2016-04-23

    Testicular germ cell tumours are at the crossroads of developmental and neoplastic processes. Their cause has not been fully elucidated but differences in incidences suggest that a combination of genetic and environment factors are involved, with environmental factors predominating early in life. Substantial progress has been made in understanding genetic susceptibility in the past 5 years on the basis of the results of large genome-wide association studies. Testicular germ cell tumours are highly sensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy and hence have among the best outcomes of all tumours. Because the tumours occur mainly in young men, preservation of reproductive function, quality of life after treatment, and late effects are crucial concerns. In this Seminar, we provide an overview of advances in the understanding of the epidemiology, genetics, and biology of testicular germ cell tumours. We also summarise the consensus on how to treat testicular germ cell tumours and focus on a few controversies and improvements in the understanding of late effects of treatment and quality of life for survivors. PMID:26651223

  13. Dual effects of hepatitis C virus Core protein on the transcription of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 gene.

    PubMed

    Kwun, H J; Jang, K L

    2003-07-01

    Transcription of p21 was activated in hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core-expressing HepG2 cells where its upstream p53 was stabilized. However, this effect was not absolutely required for the activation of p21 by Core, as demonstrated in Hep3B cells. In addition, an opposite effect on the transcription of p21 was observed in NIH3T3 and primary hepatocytes, where p53 was not decreased by Core. To explain the p53-independent regulation of p21 by Core, we identified a Core-responsive element between positions -74 and -83 of the p21 promoter, exactly overlapped with a tumour growth factor beta (TGF-beta)/butyrate responsive element. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Core could activate the p21 through the element by stimulating a butyrate pathway, whereas this was inhibited through a TGF-beta pathway. The opposing effects of Core protein on the transcription of p21 might be important in understanding the progression of hepatic disease in HCV-positive patients. PMID:12823590

  14. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity enhances the anti-tumour effects of a Toll-like receptor 7 agonist in an established cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Ando, Tatsuya; Arioka, Yuko; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists have been shown to have anti-tumour activity in basic research and clinical studies. However, TLR agonist monotherapy does not sufficiently eliminate tumours. Activation of the innate immune response by TLR agonists is effective at driving adaptive immunity via interleukin-12 (IL-12) or IL-1, but is counteracted by the simultaneous induction of immunosuppressive cytokines and other molecules, including IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). In the present study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect of the TLR7 agonist, imiquimod (IMQ), in the absence of IDO activity. The administration of IMQ in IDO knockout (KO) mice inoculated with tumour cells significantly suppressed tumour progression compared with that in wild-type (WT) mice, and improved the survival rate. Moreover, injection with IMQ enhanced the tumour antigen-specific T helper type 1 response in IDO-KO mice with tumours. Combination therapy with IMQ and an IDO inhibitor also significantly inhibited tumour growth. Our results indicated that the enhancement of IDO expression with TLR agonists in cancer treatment might impair host anti-tumour immunity while the inhibition of IDO could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of TLR agonists via the increase of T helper type 1 immune response. PMID:25322876

  15. Therapeutic effect of interleukin 12 on mouse haemangiosarcomas is not associated with an increased anti-tumour cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, C.; Rosato, A.; Calderazzo, F.; Quintieri, L.; Fruscella, P.; Wainstok de Calmanovici, R.; Mantovani, A.; Vecchi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.

    1998-01-01

    In syngeneic mice, the H5V polyoma middle-T oncogene-transformed endothelioma cell line induces Kaposi's sarcoma-like cavernous haemangiomas that regress transiently, probably because of an anti-tumour immune response, but eventually grow progressively and kill the host. To evaluate the generation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), spleen cells of tumour-bearing mice were restimulated with irradiated H5V cells in mixed leucocyte-tumour cell cultures. Tumour-specific CTLs were demonstrable only when low numbers of H5V stimulator cells were used (<1 H5V cell per 50 splenocytes). We found that H5V cells secrete immunosuppressive mediators because CTL generation was blocked when H5V cells culture supernatants were added to allogeneic mixed leucocyte cultures. As numerous tumour-derived immunosuppressive mediators may interfere with interleukin 12 (IL-12) production, we tested whether IL-12 treatment of the tumour-bearing mice would augment their immune response and thus suppress tumour growth. Indeed, IL-12 inhibited tumour growth and prevented mortality, but did not increase anti-H5V CTL generation either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, the anti-tumour activity in IL-12-treated mice was abrogated by anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma monoclonal antibody (MAb) co-administration. These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumour effect of IL-12 is principally mediated by IFN-gamma release that in turn blocks H5V cell proliferation and induces the release of factors that suppress angiogenesis. PMID:9484826

  16. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  17. Effect of swine hepatitis E virus on the livers of experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils by swine hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifei; Shi, Ruihan; She, Ruiping; Soomro, Majid Hussain; Mao, Jingjing; Du, Fang; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Can

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be transmitted between rats, pigs, cattle, rabbits, chicken, cats, and deer. Because wild and domestic rodents have anti-HEV antibodies, they are considered potential reservoirs of HEV. In the current study, Mongolian gerbils were experimentally infected with swine hepatitis E virus and the effects of this infection were investigated. After inoculation with HEV, the liver-to-body weight ratio increased at 7 dpi. Mongolian gerbils demonstrated significant increase (p<0.05) in Aspartate Transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and total bilirubin (T-BIL) concentrations in the sera, and HEV IgG was detected at 21 days post-inoculation (dpi). Real-time PCR revealed that the copies of HEV RNA in the liver were detected at 7 dpi, and peaked at 28 dpi at a concentration of 7.73 logs g(-1). Using both light and electron microscopy, hepatic lesions were observed in the HEV inoculated animals. In the experimental group, characteristic viral hepatitis lesions were prominent in the liver. HEV antigen was detected in the liver by immunohistochemistry, and HEV ORF3 antigen was detectable in liver by Western blot. These results clearly demonstrate that viral load of HEV in livers was dynamic, and ultrastructural hepatic injury in HEV infected Mongolian gerbils and anti-HEV IgG positive seroconversion were observed during infection. PMID:26093307

  18. Hepatoprotective effect of trans-Chalcone on experimentally induced hepatic injury in rats: inhibition of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harsimran; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-08-01

    The current study investigated the hepatoprotective effect of trans-Chalcone in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and paracetamol (PCM) induced liver damage in rats. Administration of CCl4 and PCM (1 mL/kg, i.p., 3 days, and 2 g/kg, p.o., single dose, respectively) produced hepatic injury. Ponderal changes (percent change in body mass and relative liver mass) and biochemical parameters (serum ALT, AST, ALP, bilirubin) were estimated. The markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress (TBARS, reduced GSH, nitrite and nitrate), hepatic fibrosis (TGF-β1, collagen content), hepatic inflammation (TNF-α), and histopathological study were evaluated. trans-Chalcone (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was found to be beneficial as demonstrated by significant reversal of liver histology by perceptible reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration with regenerative changes in hepatocytes. Improvement in percent change in body mass and significant reduction in relative liver mass were observed. Marked reduction in serum levels of ALT, AST, ALP, and bilirubin were noted. Decreases in TBARS and nitrites and nitrates and increases in reduced GSH levels were noted. Hepatic fibrosis and inflammation were significantly decreased. The findings indicate a novel hepatoprotective role for trans-Chalcone by improving hepatic injury by possible actions such as anti-oxidant, anti-nitrosative, anti-fibrotic, and anti-inflammatory. Hence, it can be used as promising hepatoprotective agent. PMID:27191034

  19. Effects of a farnesoid X receptor antagonist on hepatic lipid metabolism in primates.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuichiro; Shimada, Mitsuyuki; Miura, Shotaro; Adachi, Ryutaro; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2014-01-15

    We aimed to elucidate the mechanism underlying the anti-dyslipidemic effect of compound-T3, a farnesoid X receptor antagonist, by investigating its effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in non-human primates. We administered lipid-lowering drugs for 7 days to cynomolgus monkeys receiving a high-fat diet, and subsequently measured the levels of lipid parameters in plasma, feces, and hepatic tissue fluids. Compound-T3 (0.3 and 3mg/kg p.o.) significantly decreased the plasma levels of non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein B in a dose-dependent manner. It also decreased the mRNA levels of hepatic small heterodimer partner-1, induced the mRNA expression of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, reduced hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels, increased fecal bile acid excretion, and upregulated the expression of hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. Furthermore, compound-T3 significantly increased plasma HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I levels. The mRNA expression levels of hepatic apolipoprotein A-I tended to increase after compound-T3 treatment. Compound-T3 also induced accumulation of hepatic bile acids and decreased the mRNA expression levels of the hepatic bile acid export pump. The effects of cholestyramine (300mg/kg p.o.) on the plasma and hepatic lipid parameters were similar to those of compound-T3, and it increased fecal bile acid levels without causing accumulation of hepatic bile acids. These findings suggest that LDL receptor-mediated hepatic LDL incorporation due to cholesterol catabolism catalyzed by cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase decreases plasma non-HDL cholesterol levels. Upregulation of hepatic apolipoprotein A-I mRNA expression may partially contribute to the increase in HDL cholesterol levels mediated by compound-T3. PMID:24361308

  20. Tumour-like inflammatory abdominal conditions in children.

    PubMed

    Latawiec-Mazurkiewicz, I; Juszkiewicz, P; Pacanowski, J; Kwas, A; Rybkiewicz, M; Rudnicki, J; Walecka, A; Musiał, S

    2005-02-01

    The presence of a tumour, poor general condition, features of anaemia, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rates and imaging suggesting malignancy were the common features in 4 different tumour-like abdominal conditions that are extremely rare in childhood. These conditions included: extensive retroperitoneal tumour with rib involvement that turned out to be an inflammatory lesion caused by Actinomyces in a 12-year-old girl; multi-loculated tumour of the mesentery/ovary caused by mesenteric lymphadenopathy in the course of a Salmonella enteritidis infection in a 2.5-year-old girl; tumour of the VII - VIII hepatic segments that turned out to be the focus of granuloma in the course of lambliasis in a 5.5-year-old boy with a history of purulent neck lymphadenopathy and a final suspicion of immunocompromise; and a multi-loculated tumour of the small pelvis and inguinal area that turned out to be an abscess of the iliopsoas muscle in a 16-year-old boy. Apart from the imaging, the lesions required cytological examination of the material harvested by fine-needle biopsies (liver tumour) or histopathological investigations (retroperitoneal tumour, mesenteric/ovarian tumour, liver tumour and--on second surgery--the pelvic tumour) and/or bacteriological examination (all cases), serological examination (liver tumour and mesenteric/ovarian tumour), protozoal investigation (liver tumour), and measurement of AFP levels (mesenteric/ovarian tumour). Surgical treatment (retroperitoneal tumour, mesenteric/ovarian tumour and tumour of the small pelvis) and guided antibiotic therapy (all cases including 15 weeks of antibiotics in the first case) allowed complete recovery in 3 patients (actinomycosis, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, abscess of the iliopsoas muscle). Antibiotic and antiprotozoal therapy cured the granulomatous hepatitis; however this patient tended to develop severe right-sided pleural/pulmonary changes (the child was referred for further diagnosis with suspicion of

  1. Effects of thyrotoxicosis and selective hepatic autonomic denervation on hepatic glucose metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Klieverik, Lars P; Sauerwein, Hans P; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Boelen, Anita; Kalsbeek, Andries; Fliers, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Thyrotoxicosis is known to induce a broad range of changes in carbohydrate metabolism. Recent studies have identified the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system as major regulators of hepatic glucose metabolism. The present study aimed to investigate the pathogenesis of altered endogenous glucose production (EGP) in rats with mild thyrotoxicosis. Rats were treated with methimazole in drinking water and l-thyroxine (T(4)) from osmotic minipumps to either reinstate euthyroidism or induce thyrotoxicosis. Euthyroid and thyrotoxic rats underwent either a sham operation, a selective hepatic sympathetic denervation (Sx), or a parasympathetic denervation (Px). After 10 days of T(4) administration, all animals were submitted to a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp combined with stable isotope dilution to measure EGP. Plasma triiodothyronine (T(3)) showed a fourfold increase in thyrotoxic compared with euthyroid animals. EGP was increased by 45% in thyrotoxic compared with euthyroid rats and correlated significantly with plasma T(3). In thyrotoxic rats, hepatic PEPCK mRNA expression was increased 3.5-fold. Relative suppression of EGP during hyperinsulinemia was 34% less in thyrotoxic than in euthyroid rats, indicating hepatic insulin resistance. During thyrotoxicosis, Sx attenuated the increase in EGP, whereas Px resulted in increased plasma insulin with unaltered EGP compared with intact animals, compatible with a further decrease in hepatic insulin sensitivity. We conclude that chronic, mild thyrotoxicosis in rats increases EGP, whereas it decreases hepatic insulin sensitivity. Sympathetic hepatic innervation contributes only to a limited extent to increased EGP during thyrotoxicosis, whereas parasympathetic hepatic innervation may function to restrain EGP in this condition. PMID:18182466

  2. Cardiac and hepatic role of r-AtHSP70: basal effects and protection against ischemic and sepsis conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pasqua, Teresa; Filice, Elisabetta; Mazza, Rosa; Quintieri, Anna Maria; Carmela Cerra, Maria; Iannacone, Rina; Melfi, Donato; Indiveri, Cesare; Gattuso, Alfonsina; Angelone, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), highly conserved in all organisms, act as molecular chaperones activated by several stresses. The HSP70 class of stress-induced proteins is the most studied subtype in cardiovascular and inflammatory disease. Because of the high similarity between plant and mammalian HSP70, the aim of this work was to evaluate whether recombinant HSP70 of plant origin (r-AtHSP70) was able to protect rat cardiac and hepatic function under ischemic and sepsis conditions. We demonstrated for the first time that, in ex vivo isolated and perfused rat heart, exogenous r-AtHSP70 exerted direct negative inotropic and lusitropic effects via Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway, induced post-conditioning cardioprotection via Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase and Survivor Activating Factor Enhancement pathways, and did not cause hepatic damage. In vivo administration of r-AtHSP70 protected both heart and liver against lipopolysaccharide-dependent sepsis, as revealed by the reduced plasma levels of interleukin-1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. These results suggest exogenous r-AtHSP70 as a molecular modulator able to protect myocardial function and to prevent cardiac and liver dysfunctions during inflammatory conditions. PMID:25904190

  3. In silico modelling of a cancer stem cell-targeting agent and its effects on tumour control during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Marcu, David

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC), like most solid tumours, contain a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) that are commonly responsible for treatment failure. Conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling CSCs, thus novel, targeting therapies are needed. A promising agent is ATRA (All-trans-retinoic acid) that was shown to induce CSC differentiation, cell cycle redistribution and CSCs radiosensitisation. To add to the limited data, this work simulated the effects of ATRA on a virtual HNC and evaluated tumour response to radiotherapy. A Monte Carlo technique was employed to grow a HNC consisting of all lineages of cancer cells. The biologically realistic input parameters led to a pre-treatment CSC population of 5.9%. The Linear Quadratic model was employed to simulate radiotherapy. ATRA-induced differentiation, cell arrest and apoptosis were modelled, based on literature data. While the effect of differentiation was marginal, the strongest influence on CSC subpopulation was displayed by ATRA’s cell arrest effect via an exponential behaviour of the dose-response curve. The apoptotic effect induced by ATRA shows linear correlation between the percentage of apoptotic cells and dose required to eradicate CSCs. In conclusion, ATRA is a potent CSC-targeting agent with viable impact on tumour control when combined with radiotherapy. PMID:27573059

  4. In silico modelling of a cancer stem cell-targeting agent and its effects on tumour control during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Loredana G; Marcu, David

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC), like most solid tumours, contain a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) that are commonly responsible for treatment failure. Conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling CSCs, thus novel, targeting therapies are needed. A promising agent is ATRA (All-trans-retinoic acid) that was shown to induce CSC differentiation, cell cycle redistribution and CSCs radiosensitisation. To add to the limited data, this work simulated the effects of ATRA on a virtual HNC and evaluated tumour response to radiotherapy. A Monte Carlo technique was employed to grow a HNC consisting of all lineages of cancer cells. The biologically realistic input parameters led to a pre-treatment CSC population of 5.9%. The Linear Quadratic model was employed to simulate radiotherapy. ATRA-induced differentiation, cell arrest and apoptosis were modelled, based on literature data. While the effect of differentiation was marginal, the strongest influence on CSC subpopulation was displayed by ATRA's cell arrest effect via an exponential behaviour of the dose-response curve. The apoptotic effect induced by ATRA shows linear correlation between the percentage of apoptotic cells and dose required to eradicate CSCs. In conclusion, ATRA is a potent CSC-targeting agent with viable impact on tumour control when combined with radiotherapy. PMID:27573059

  5. Further analysis of the anti-tumour effect in vitro of peritoneal exudate cells from mice treated with Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ghaffar, A; Cullen, R T; Woodruff, M A

    1975-01-01

    Administration of C. parvum to both intact and thymectomized mice resulted in the appearance in the peritoneal exudate of cells which inhibited tumour growth in vitro. This effect was mediated by intact, viable adherent cells, which it seems reasonable to categorize as macrophages, and was contingent on contact between the effector and target cells. No co-operation was observed between lymph node cells from C. parvum treated mice and peritoneal exudate cells from normal mice. PMID:1156505

  6. Microencapsulation of human cells: its effects on growth of normal and tumour cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, S. M.; Hopwood, D.; Newman, E. L.; Cuschieri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth kinetics of established human colorectal tumour cell lines (HT29, HT115 and COLO 320DM) and human diploid fibroblasts (Flow 2002) were studied in conventional culture and in microcapsules formed from alginate-poly(L-lysine)-alginate membranes. The tumour lines grew rapidly in microcapsules but, in the case of the substrate-adherent lines HT29 and HT115, only after a prolonged lag phase. This phase was reduced by serial passage in microcapsules. The anchorage-independent line COLO 320DM showed no lengthening in lag phase. Microencapsulated fibroblasts underwent negligible growth but remained viable. Some evidence for functional differentiation (microvilli, cell-cell junctions) of the tumour line HT115 within the microcapsules was observed. We conclude that the use of microcapsules provides an alternative system with some advantages for the study of human cancer and its metastases in vitro. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2039691

  7. Mediation effect of hepatitis B and C on mortality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Freeman, Joshua R; Yang, Hwai-I; Liu, Jessica; Lee, Mei-Hsuan; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses cause many liver diseases. To move beyond statistical interaction, we aimed to assess the coordinated effect of the two viruses on mortality using mediation analyses. A prospective cohort study of 3837 residents in Taiwan examined participants seropositive for hepatitis B, of which 181 subjects (4.7 %) were co-infected by HCV and 589 died during follow-up. Mediation analyses for cause-specific mortality were performed using Cox proportional hazards model. Follow-up HBV viral load was inversely correlated with baseline HCV viral load (r(2) = -0.074; P < 0.001). For HCV serum viral load increasing from 800 to 404,000 IU/mL (minimum to median) at baseline, the effect of HCV mediated through HBV viral load decreased the all-cause mortality with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.89 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.85, 0.94; P < 0.001), and the effect independent of HBV viral load had an opposite HR of 1.25 (95 % CI 0.98, 1.60; P = 0.08). The protective mediation effects of HCV viral load through HBV DNA level were observed in mortality from causes specific to liver-related diseases and liver cancer, but not in that from non-liver-related diseases. Our findings suggest a suppressive effect of HCV on mortality mediated through decreasing HBV viral load. PMID:26792787

  8. Anti-fibrotic effect of thymoquinone on hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Ghazwani, Mohammed; Zhang, Yifei; Gao, Xiang; Fan, Jie; Li, Jiang; Li, Song

    2014-02-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major cell type involved in the production of extracellular matrix in liver. After liver injury, HSCs undergo transdifferentiation process from quiescent state to activated state, which plays an important role in liver fibrosis. Previous studies have shown that thymoquinone (TQ) might have protective effect against liver fibrosis in animal models; however, the underlying mechanism of action is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine whether TQ has any direct effect on HSCs. Our results showed that pretreatment of mice with TQ has protective effect against CCl4-induced liver injury compared to control group (untreated), which is consistent with previous studies. Moreover, our in vivo study showed that COL1A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by TQ treatment. Similarly, in vitro study confirmed that TQ downregulated COL1A1, COL3A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels in activated rat HSCs and LX2 cells, an immortalized human hepatic stellate cell line. Pretreatment with TQ also inhibited the LPS-induced proinflammatory response in LX2 cells as demonstrated by reduced mRNA expression of IL-6 and MCP-1. Mechanistically, inactivation of NF-κB pathway is likely to play a role in the TQ-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory response in HSCs. Finally, we have shown that TQ inhibited the culture-triggered transdifferentiation of freshly isolated rat HSCs as shown by significant downregulation of mRNA expression of several fibrosis-related genes. In conclusion, our study suggests that TQ has a direct effect on HSCs, which may contribute to its overall antifibrotic effect. PMID:24182989

  9. Anti-tumour activity of oncolytic Western Reserve vaccinia viruses in canine tumour cell lines, xenografts, and fresh tumour biopsies.

    PubMed

    Autio, K; Knuuttila, A; Kipar, A; Ahonen, M; Parviainen, S; Diaconu, I; Kanerva, A; Hakonen, T; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A

    2014-10-10

    Cancer is one of the most common reasons for death in dogs. One promising approach is oncolytic virotherapy. We assessed the oncolytic effect of genetically modified vaccinia viruses in canine cancer cells, in freshly excised tumour biopsies, and in mice harbouring canine tumour xenografts. Tumour transduction efficacy was assessed using virus expressing luciferase or fluorescent marker genes and oncolysis was quantified by a colorimetric cell viability assay. Oncolytic efficacy in vivo was evaluated in a nude mouse xenograft model. Vaccinia virus was shown to infect most tested canine cancer cell lines and primary surgical tumour tissues. Virus infection significantly reduced tumour growth in the xenograft model. Oncolytic vaccinia virus has antitumour effects against canine cancer cells and experimental tumours and is able to replicate in freshly excised patient tumour tissue. Our results suggest that oncolytic vaccinia virus may offer an effective treatment option for otherwise incurable canine tumours. PMID:25302859

  10. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger.

  11. Filamin-A is required to mediate SST2 effects in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Eleonora; Cambiaghi, Valeria; Zerbi, Alessandro; Carnaghi, Carlo; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Peverelli, Erika; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna; Lania, Andrea G

    2016-03-01

    Somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) is the main pharmacological target of somatostatin (SS) analogues widely used in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (P-NETs), this treatment being ineffective in a subset of patients. Since it has been demonstrated that Filamin A (FLNA) is involved in mediating GPCR expression, membrane anchoring and signalling, we investigated the role of this cytoskeleton protein in SST2 expression and signalling, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and cell migration in human P-NETs and in QGP1 cell line. We demonstrated that FLNA silencing was not able to affect SST2 expression in P-NET cells in basal conditions. Conversely, a significant reduction in SST2 expression (-43 ± 21%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) was observed in FLNA silenced QGP1 cells after long term SST2 activation with BIM23120. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of BIM23120 on cyclin D1 expression (-46 ± 18%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), P-ERK1/2 levels (-42 ± 14%; P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), cAMP accumulation (-24 ± 3%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), VEGF expression (-31 ± 5%, P < 0.01 vs untreated cells) and in vitro release (-40 ± 24%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) was completely lost after FLNA silencing. Interestingly, BIM23120 promoted cell adhesion (+86 ± 45%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) and inhibited cell migration (-24 ± 2%, P < 0.00001 vs untreated cells) in P-NETs cells and these effects were abolished in FLNA silenced cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that FLNA plays a crucial role in SST2 expression and signalling, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and cell migration in P-NETs and in QGP1 cell line, suggesting a possible role of FLNA in determining the different responsiveness to SS analogues observed in P-NET patients. PMID:26733502

  12. Expanding the prion concept to cancer biology: dominant-negative effect of aggregates of mutant p53 tumour suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jerson L.; Rangel, Luciana P.; Costa, Danielly C. F.; Cordeiro, Yraima; De Moura Gallo, Claudia V.

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a key protein that participates in cell-cycle control, and its malfunction can lead to cancer. This tumour suppressor protein has three main domains; the N-terminal transactivation domain, the CTD (C-terminal domain) and the core domain (p53C) that constitutes the sequence-specific DBD (DNA-binding region). Most p53 mutations related to cancer development are found in the DBD. Aggregation of p53 into amyloid oligomers and fibrils has been shown. Moreover, amyloid aggregates of both the mutant and WT (wild-type) forms of p53 were detected in tumour tissues. We propose that if p53 aggregation occurred, it would be a crucial aspect of cancer development, as p53 would lose its WT functions in an aggregated state. Mutant p53 can also exert a dominant-negative regulatory effect on WT p53. Herein, we discuss the dominant-negative effect in light of p53 aggregation and the fact that amyloid-like mutant p53 can convert WT p53 into more aggregated species, leading into gain of function in addition to the loss of tumour suppressor function. In summary, the results obtained in the last decade indicate that cancer may have characteristics in common with amyloidogenic and prion diseases. PMID:24003888

  13. Anti-tumour/metastasis effects of the potassium-sparing diuretic amiloride: an orally active anti-cancer drug waiting for its call-of-duty?

    PubMed

    Matthews, Hayden; Ranson, Marie; Kelso, Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Amiloride.HCl is clinically used as an oral potassium-sparing diuretic, but multiple studies in biochemical, cellular and animal models have shown that the drug also possesses anti-tumour and anti-metastasis activities. The additional effects appear to arise through inhibition of two discrete targets: (i) the sodium-hydrogen exchanger 1 (NHE1), a membrane protein responsible for the characteristically low extracellular pH of tumours and (ii) the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), a serine protease mediator of cell migration, invasion and metastasis and well-known marker of poor prognosis in cancer. This mini-review summarises for the first time the reported anti-tumour/metastasis effects of amiloride in experimental models, discusses the putative molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects and concludes by commenting on the pros and cons of trialling amiloride or one of its structural analogues as potential new anti-tumour/metastasis drugs. PMID:21544803

  14. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  15. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  16. Hepatic encephalopathy: effects of liver failure on brain function.

    PubMed

    Felipo, Vicente

    2013-12-01

    Liver failure affects brain function, leading to neurological and psychiatric alterations; such alterations are referred to as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Early diagnosis of minimal HE reveals an unexpectedly high incidence of mild cognitive impairment and psychomotor slowing in patients with liver cirrhosis - conditions that have serious health, social and economic consequences. The mechanisms responsible for the neurological alterations in HE are beginning to emerge. New therapeutic strategies acting on specific targets in the brain (phosphodiesterase 5, type A GABA receptors, cyclooxygenase and mitogen-activated protein kinase p38) have been shown to restore cognitive and motor function in animal models of chronic HE, and NMDA receptor antagonists have been shown to increase survival in acute liver failure. This article reviews the latest studies aimed at understanding how liver failure affects brain function and potential ways to ameliorate these effects. PMID:24149188

  17. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumour Liver Metastases: A New and Effective Modality for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Bogammana, Kashan; Stubbs, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Nonresectable neuroendocrine tumour (NET) liver metastases respond poorly to most widely available and used therapies. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is becoming recognized as a new modality for selectively treating non-resectable liver tumours. This paper presents an experience of 14 patients with non-resectable NET liver metastases treated with SIRT. Methods. Between September 1997 and October 2009 14 patients with extensive NET liver metastases were treated with 2.0 to 3.0 GBq of 90Yttrium microspheres. Repeat SIRT was undertaken in three patients after 16, 27, and 48 months, respectively. Responses were assessed clinically, biochemically, and with serial CT scans. Survival was measured from initial SIRT. Results. Some response was seen in all 14 patients. Carcinoid syndrome improved or resolved in 10/10 instances. 24-hour urinary 5-HIAA or serum chromogranin A levels fell dramatically in 5/7 patients following SIRT. Serial CT scans revealed partial response or stable disease in all 14 patients. Repeat treatment in three patients experiencing progression was associated with a further response. Median survival after SIRT is 25 months with 6 patients being alive (and 3 patients still asymptomatic), at 19, 22, 23, 23, 58, and 60 months. Conclusions. SIRT is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for non-resectable NET liver metastases capable of both alleviating the carcinoid syndrome and achieving significant tumour regression. Repeat treatment is an option and liver resection after downstaging may also become possible. PMID:22164335

  18. Quantifying the effect of respiratory motion on lung tumour dosimetry with the aid of a breathing phantom with deforming lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nioutsikou, Elena; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve

    2006-07-01

    The contribution of organ and tumour motion to the degradation of planned dose distributions during radiotherapy to the breathing lung has been experimentally investigated and quantified. An anthropomorphic, tissue-equivalent breathing phantom with deformable lungs has been built, in which the lung tumour can be driven in any arbitrary 3D trajectory. The trajectory is programmed into a motion controller connected to a high-precision moving platform that is connected to the tumour. The motion controller is connected to the accelerator's dose counter and the speed of motion is scaled to the dose rate. This ensures consistent delivery despite variation in either the dose rate or inter-segment timing. For this study, the phantom was made to breathe by a set of periodic equations representing respiratory motion by an asymmetric, trigonometric function. Several motion amplitudes were selected to be applied in the primary axis of motion. Five three-dimensional, geometrically conformal (3DCRT) fractions with different starting phases (spaced uniformly in the breathing cycle) were delivered to the phantom and compared to a delivery where the phantom was static at the end-expiration position. A set of intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans (IMRT) was subsequently delivered in the same manner. Bigger amplitudes of motion resulted in a higher degree of dose blurring. Severe underdosages were observed when deliberately selecting the PTV wrongly, their extent being correlated with the degree of margin error. IMRT motion-averaged dose distributions exhibited areas of high dose in the gross tumour volume (GTV) which were not present in the static irradiations, arising from booster segments that the optimizer was creating to achieve planning target volume (PTV) homogeneity during the inverse-planning process. 3DCRT, on the other hand, did not demonstrate such effects. It has been concluded that care should be taken to control the delivered fluence when delivering IMRT to the

  19. Huge Perineal Tumour: A Rare Presentation of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour of Rectum.

    PubMed

    Nahar, K; Salahuddin, G M; Islam, M R; Islam, M S; Quddus, M A; Islam, M A; Debnath, B C

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is a relatively rare neoplasm of gastrointestinal tract of which Rectal GIST is uncommon. It produces symptoms of per rectal bleeding or change in bowel habit. Recurrences following curative resection are predominantly intraabdominal, hepatic metastasis occurring at a median 20-25 months following the primary surgery. A 42 years old male presented a huge mass in hypogastrium, the size of which was reduced ofter neoadjuvant therapy for period of 1.5 years. He underwent abdominoperineal resection. He developed recurrences in perineum three times and in thigh at short intervals after primary resection. He also developed liver metastasis. He died two and half years after primary diagnosis. Rectal GIST should be included in differential diagnosis of intraabdominal mass and preoperative diagnosis based on histopathological as well as the immunohistochemical feature of the CD(117) and CD(34). Although complete surgical resection with negative tumour margin is the principal curative procedure for primary and non metastatic tumours, further studies are still needed for the determination of the most effective treatment strategy for patients of rectal GIST. PMID:27277373

  20. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  1. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis B vaccination in adults with diagnosed diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Thomas J; Schillie, Sarah; Wittenborn, John S; Bradley, Christina L; Zhou, Fangjun; Byrd, Kathy; Murphy, Trudy V

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the cost-effectiveness of a hepatitis B vaccination program for unvaccinated adults with diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used a cost-effectiveness simulation model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating adults 20-59 years of age with diagnosed diabetes not previously vaccinated for or infected by hepatitis B virus (HBV). The model estimated acute and chronic HBV infections, complications, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Data sources included surveillance data, epidemiological studies, and vaccine prices. RESULTS With a 10% uptake rate, the intervention will vaccinate 528,047 people and prevent 4,271 acute and 256 chronic hepatitis B infections. Net health care costs will increase by $91.4 million, and 1,218 QALYs will be gained, producing a cost-effectiveness ratio of $75,094 per QALY gained. Results are most sensitive to age, the discount rate, the hepatitis B incidence ratio for people with diabetes, and hepatitis B infection rates. Cost-effectiveness ratios rise with age at vaccination; an alternative intervention that vaccinates adults with diabetes 60 years of age or older had a cost-effectiveness ratio of $2.7 million per QALY. CONCLUSIONS Hepatitis B vaccination for adults with diabetes 20-59 years of age is modestly cost-effective. Vaccinating older adults with diabetes is not cost-effective. The study did not consider hepatitis outbreak investigation costs, and limited information exists on hepatitis progression among older adults with diabetes. Partly based on these results, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recently recommended hepatitis B vaccination for people 20-59 years of age with diagnosed diabetes. PMID:22933435

  2. Protective effects of L-carnosine on CCl4 -induced hepatic injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Alsheblak, Mehyar Mohammad; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; El-Karef, Amro; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M

    2016-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible protective effect of L-carnosine (CAR), an endogenous dipeptide of alanine and histidine, on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic injury. Liver injury was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of CCl4, twice weekly for six weeks. CAR was administered to rats daily, at dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. At the end of six weeks, blood and liver tissue specimens were collected. Results show that CAR treatment attenuated the hepatic morphological changes, necroinflammation and fibrosis induced by CCl4, as indicated by hepatic histopathology scoring. In addition, CAR treatment significantly reduced the CCl4-induced elevation of liver-injury parameters in serum. CAR treatment also combatted oxidative stress; possibly by restoring hepatic nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) levels. Moreover, CAR treatment prevented the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), as indicated by reduced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in the liver, and decreased hepatic inflammation as demonstrated by a reduction in hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and restoration of interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels. In conclusion, CCl4-induced hepatic injury was alleviated by CAR treatment. The results suggest that these beneficial, protective effects are due, at least in part, to its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activities. PMID:27094155

  3. The effect of calcium ions on the glycolytic activity of Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Bygrave, F. L.

    1966-01-01

    1. Added Ca2+ inhibited lactate formation from sugar phosphates by intact Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells. Lactate formation from glucose by these cells was unaffected by added Ca2+. 2. The Ca2+ inhibition of lactate formation by intact cells occurred in the extracellular medium. 3. Intact ascites-tumour cells did not take up Ca2+ in vitro. 4. Glycolysis of sugar phosphates by cell extracts as well as pyruvate formation from 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate was inhibited by Ca2+. 5. It was concluded that Ca2+ inhibited the pyruvate-kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) reaction. Further, Ca2+ inhibition of pyruvate kinase could be correlated with the overall inhibition of glycolysis. 6. Concentrations of Ca2+ usually present in Krebs–Ringer buffers, inhibited glycolysis and pyruvate-kinase activity by approx. 50%. 7. The inhibition of glycolysis by added Ca2+ could be partially reversed by K+ and completely reversed by Mg2+ or by stoicheiometric amounts of EDTA. 8. The hypothesis is advanced that the inability of tumour cells to take up Ca2+ is a factor contributing towards their high rate of glycolysis. PMID:6007855

  4. Effect of dexamethasone on fetal hepatic glutamine-glutamate exchange.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, M; Teng, C; Wilkening, R B; Fennessey, P; Battaglia, F C; Meschia, G

    2000-05-01

    Intravenous infusion of dexamethasone (Dex) in the fetal lamb causes a two- to threefold increase in plasma glutamine and other glucogenic amino acids and a decrease of plasma glutamate to approximately one-third of normal. To explore the underlying mechanisms, hepatic amino acid uptake and conversion of L-[1-(13)C]glutamine to L-[1-(13)C]glutamate and (13)CO(2) were measured in six sheep fetuses before and in the last 2 h of a 26-h Dex infusion. Dex decreased hepatic glutamine and alanine uptakes (P < 0.01) and hepatic glutamate output (P < 0.001). Hepatic outputs of the glutamate (R(Glu,Gln)) and CO(2) formed from plasma glutamine decreased to 21 (P < 0.001) and 53% (P = 0.009) of control, respectively. R(Glu,Gln), expressed as a fraction of both outputs, decreased (P < 0.001) from 0.36 +/- 0.02 to 0.18 +/- 0.04. Hepatic glucose output remained virtually zero throughout the experiment. We conclude that Dex decreases fetal hepatic glutamate output by increasing the routing of glutamate carbon into the citric acid cycle and by decreasing the hepatic uptake of glucogenic amino acids. PMID:10780940

  5. The global effect of follicle-stimulating hormone and tumour necrosis factor α on gene expression in cultured bovine ovarian granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oocytes mature in ovarian follicles surrounded by granulosa cells. During follicle growth, granulosa cells replicate and secrete hormones, particularly steroids close to ovulation. However, most follicles cease growing and undergo atresia or regression instead of ovulating. To investigate the effects of stimulatory (follicle-stimulating hormone; FSH) and inhibitory (tumour necrosis factor alpha; TNFα) factors on the granulosa cell transcriptome, bovine ovaries were obtained from a local abattoir and pools of granulosa cells were cultured in vitro for six days under defined serum-free conditions with treatments present on days 3–6. Initially dose–response experiments (n = 4) were performed to determine the optimal concentrations of FSH (0.33 ng/ml) and TNFα (10 ng/ml) to be used for the microarray experiments. For array experiments cells were cultured under control conditions, with FSH, with TNFα, or with FSH plus TNFα (n = 4 per group) and RNA was harvested for microarray analyses. Results Statistical analysis showed primary clustering of the arrays into two groups, control/FSH and TNFα/TNFα plus FSH. The effect of TNFα on gene expression dominated that of FSH, with substantially more genes differentially regulated, and the pathways and genes regulated by TNFα being similar to those of FSH plus TNFα treatment. TNFα treatment reduced the endocrine activity of granulosa cells with reductions in expression of FST, INHA, INBA and AMH. The top-ranked canonical pathways and GO biological terms for the TNFα treatments included antigen presentation, inflammatory response and other pathways indicative of innate immune function and fibrosis. The two most significant networks also reflect this, containing molecules which are present in the canonical pathways of hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation and transforming growth factor β signalling, and these were up regulated. Upstream regulator analyses also predicted TNF, interferons γ and

  6. Inhibitory effect of oestradiol on activation of rat hepatic stellate cells in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, I; Mizobuchi, Y; Yasuda, M; Shiba, M; Ma, Y; Horie, T; Liu, F; Ito, S

    1999-01-01

    Background—Hepatic stellate cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. 
Aims—To examine the inhibitory effect of oestradiol on stellate cell activation. 
Methods—In vivo, hepatic fibrosis was induced in rats by dimethylnitrosamine or pig serum. In vitro, rat stellate cells were activated by contact with plastic dishes resulting in their transformation into myofibroblast-like cells. 
Results—In the dimethylnitrosamine and pig serum models, treatment with oestradiol at gestation related doses resulted in a dose dependent suppression of hepatic fibrosis with restored content of hepatic retinyl palmitate, reduced collagen content, lower areas of stellate cells which express α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin, and lower procollagen type I and III mRNA levels in the liver. In cultured stellate cells, oestradiol inhibited type I collagen production, α-SMA expression, and cell proliferation. These findings suggest that oestradiol is a potent inhibitor of stellate cell transformation. 
Conclusion—The antifibrogenic role of oestradiol in the liver may contribute to the sex associated differences in the progression from hepatic fibrosis to cirrhosis. 

 Keywords: hepatic stellate cells; hepatic fibrosis; oestradiol; α smooth muscle actin; retinyl palmitate PMID:9862839

  7. Effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on hepatic function in the duck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, J.F.; Dieter, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    1. The indocyanine green dye clearance test for hepatic function was determined in mallard ducks before and during the chronic ingestion (7 months) of representative paraffinic or aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons (PH). 2. No mortality or visible symptoms of toxicity occured in any of the tests. Ingestion of 4000 ppm aromatic PH produced significant increases in liver (25%), plasma clearance of indocyanine green (33%) and hepatic blood flow (30%). 3. Although the aromatics elicited a greater hepatic stress response than the paraffins, the ducks tolerated high concentrations of PH for extended periods.

  8. Hepatitis Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  9. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  10. Transmission Model of Hepatitis B Virus with the Migration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Altaf; Islam, Saeed; Arif, Muhammad; ul Haq, Zahoor

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a globally infectious disease. Mathematical modeling of HBV transmission is an interesting research area. In this paper, we present characteristics of HBV virus transmission in the form of a mathematical model. We analyzed the effect of immigrants in the model to study the effect of immigrants for the host population. We added the following flow parameters: “the transmission between migrated and exposed class” and “the transmission between migrated and acute class.” With these new features, we obtained a compartment model of six differential equations. First, we find the basic threshold quantity Ro and then find the local asymptotic stability of disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. Furthermore, we find the global stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibria. Previous similar publications have not added the kind of information about the numerical results of the model. In our case, from numerical simulation, a detailed discussion of the parameters and their numerical results is presented. We claim that with these assumptions and by adding the migrated class, the model informs policy for governments, to be aware of the immigrants and subject them to tests about the disease status. Immigrants for short visits and students should be subjected to tests to reduce the number of immigrants with disease. PMID:23984318

  11. Ophthalmological side effects of interferon therapy of chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Medhat, Eman; Esmat, Gamal; Hamza, Eman; Abdel Aziz, Amr; Fouad Fathalah, Waleed; Zakaria, Zeinab; Mostafa, Sameh

    2016-01-01

    Background Egypt has one of the highest prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide. Ophthalmological side effects are recognized complications of interferon (IFN) therapy. This study aimed to evaluate IFN-induced ophthalmological manifestations in patients receiving PEGylated interferon (PEG IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) and to assess the effect of IFN duration, response and systemic risk factors on the severity. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 100 patients with chronic HCV who were candidates for PEG-IFN and RBV therapy. All patients were subjected to clinical and ophthalmological examination, laboratory investigations, abdominal ultrasound, colored fundus photography and fundus fluorescein angiography, follow up was made at weeks 12, 24, and 48 of treatment. Results IFN-induced retinopathy had been found in (9/100; 9%), 5 (5/9; 55.5%) of them had bilateral lesions, (3/9; 33.3%) were treatment responders and (6/9; 66.6%) non responders. The time of retinopathy appearance was mainly at W12. Retinopathy was asymptomatic in most of the affected patients (7/9; 77.77%) and reversible, cotton wool spots was the major associated sign. Patients with older age, DM and or HTN, and non-responders to antiviral therapy were associated with more severe retinopathy. Conclusions Retinopathy is not a rare complication of IFN therapy for chronic HCV infection, but fortunately it’s asymptomatic and reversible. Ophthalmological assessment at base-line and at follow up during IFN treatment is very important. PMID:27275462

  12. Imatinib Mesylate Exerts Anti-Proliferative Effects on Osteosarcoma Cells and Inhibits the Tumour Growth in Immunocompetent Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Benjamin; Charrier, Céline; Brion, Régis; Blanchard, Frederic; Redini, Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumour characterized by osteoid production and/or osteolytic lesions of bone. A lack of response to chemotherapeutic treatments shows the importance of exploring new therapeutic methods. Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Novartis Pharma), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was originally developed for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. Several studies revealed that imatinib mesylate inhibits osteoclast differentiation through the M-CSFR pathway and activates osteoblast differentiation through PDGFR pathway, two key cells involved in the vicious cycle controlling the tumour development. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of imatinib mesylate on the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and migration ability of five osteosarcoma cell lines (human: MG-63, HOS; rat: OSRGA; mice: MOS-J, POS-1). Imatinib mesylate was also assessed as a curative and preventive treatment in two syngenic osteosarcoma models: MOS-J (mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic osteosarcoma) and POS-1 (undifferentiated osteosarcoma). Imatinib mesylate exhibited a dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect in all cell lines studied. The drug induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in most cell lines, except for POS-1 and HOS cells that were blocked in the S phase. In addition, imatinib mesylate induced cell death and strongly inhibited osteosarcoma cell migration. In the MOS-J osteosarcoma model, oral administration of imatinib mesylate significantly inhibited the tumour development in both preventive and curative approaches. A phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase array kit revealed that PDGFRα, among 7 other receptors (PDFGFRβ, Axl, RYK, EGFR, EphA2 and 10, IGF1R), appears as one of the main molecular targets for imatinib mesylate. In the light of the present study and the literature, it would be particularly interesting to revisit therapeutic evaluation of imatinib mesylate in osteosarcoma according to the tyrosine-kinase receptor status of patients

  13. Effects of glyphosate on hepatic tissue evaluating melanomacrophages and erythrocytes responses in neotropical anuran Leptodactylus latinasus.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Moreno, Liliana; Tripole, Susana; de Oliveira, Classius; Natale, Guillermo Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) is the most used herbicide worldwide and its effects on anurans are well known. Pollutants can cause physiological and morphological effects. Therefore, this study evaluated the effects of GLY on hepatic melanomacrophages as a response to environmental stressors. Three treatments were exposed to different concentrations of pure GLY (100, 1000, and 10,000 μg g(-1), respectively), and there was also a control group. After the experimental time, liver and blood were analyzed. Melanomacrophages (MMCs) were located between the hepatocyte cordons, close to sinusoids. GLY increased the melanin area in MMCs of Leptodactylus latinasus exposed since lowest concentration until highest concentration. GLY also changed the occurrence of hepatic catabolism pigments into melanomacrophages and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities; therefore, it can interfere with the hepatic metabolism. In conclusion, GLY promotes alterations in the hepatic tissue and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities. Furthermore, MMCs may be useful as morphological responses of GLY effects. PMID:26856864

  14. Simultaneous blockade of programmed death 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) induces synergistic anti-tumour effect in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, S; Sho, M; Yamato, I; Yoshiji, H; Wakatsuki, K; Nishiwada, S; Yagita, H; Nakajima, Y

    2013-01-01

    Recent basic and clinical studies have shown that the programmed death ligand (PD-L)/PD-1 pathway has a significant role in tumour immunity, and its blockade has a therapeutic potential against several human cancers. We hypothesized that anti-angiogeneic treatment might augment the efficacy of PD-1 blockade. To this end, we evaluated combining the blockade of PD-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) in a murine cancer model using Colon-26 adenocarcinoma. Interestingly, simultaneous treatment with anti-PD-1 and anti-VEGFR2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) inhibited tumour growth synergistically in vivo without overt toxicity. Blocking VEGFR2 inhibited tumour neovascularization significantly, as demonstrated by the reduced number of microvessels, while PD-1 blockade had no impact on tumour angiogenesis. PD-1 blockade might promote T cell infiltration into tumours and significantly enhanced local immune activation, as shown by the up-regulation of several proinflammatory cytokine expressions. Importantly, VEGFR2 blockade did not interfere with T cell infiltration and immunological activation induced by PD-1 blockade. In conclusion, simultaneous blockade of PD-1 and VEGFR2 induced a synergistic in-vivo anti-tumour effect, possibly through different mechanisms that might not be mutually exclusive. This unique therapeutic strategy may hold significant promise for future clinical application. PMID:23600839

  15. Dual targeting of Angiopoetin-2 and VEGF potentiates effective vascular normalisation without inducing empty basement membrane sleeves in xenograft tumours

    PubMed Central

    Coutelle, O; Schiffmann, L M; Liwschitz, M; Brunold, M; Goede, V; Hallek, M; Kashkar, H; Hacker, U T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Effective vascular normalisation following vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition is associated with endothelial cell regression leaving empty basement membrane sleeves (BMS). These long-lived BMS permit the rapid regrowth of tumour vasculature upon treatment cessation and promote resistance to VEGF-targeting drugs. Previous attempts at removing BMS have failed. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) is a vascular destabilizing factor that antagonises normalisation. We hypothesised that Ang2 inhibition could permit vascular normalisation at significantly reduced doses of VEGF inhibition, avoiding excessive vessel regression and the formation of empty BMS. Methods: Mice xenografted with human colorectal cancer cells (LS174T) were treated with low (0.5 mg kg−1) or high (5 mg kg−1) doses of the VEGF-targeting antibody bevacizumab with or without an Ang2 blocking peptibody L1-10. Tumour growth, BMS formation and normalisation parameters were examined including vessel density, pericyte coverage, adherence junctions, leakiness, perfusion, hypoxia and proliferation. Results: Dual targeting of VEGF and Ang2 achieved effective normalisation at only one-tenth of the dose required with bevacizumab alone. Pericyte coverage, vascular integrity, adherence junctions and perfusion as prerequisites for improved access of chemotherapy were improved without inducing empty BMS that facilitate rapid vascular regrowth. Conclusions: Dual targeting of VEGF and Ang2 can potentiate the effectiveness of VEGF inhibitors and avoid the formation of empty BMS. PMID:25562438

  16. Comparative Neuroprotective Effects of Dexamethasone and Minocycline during Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gamal, Maha; Abdel Wahab, Zainab; Eshra, Mohamed; Rashed, Laila; Sharawy, Nivin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Encephalopathy and brain edema are serious complications of acute liver injury and may lead to rapid death of patients. The present study was designed to investigate the role of the inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the cytotoxic brain oedema and the neuroprotective effects of both minocycline and dexamethasone. Methods. 48 male albino rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, acute liver injury (ALI) group, minocycline pretreated ALI group, and dexamethasone pretreated ALI group. 24 hours after acute liver injury serum ammonia, liver enzymes, brain levels of heme oxygenase-1 gene, iNOS gene expression, nitrite/nitrate, and cytokines were measured. In addition, the grades of encephalopathy and brain water content were assessed. Results. ALI was associated with significant increases in all measured inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress, iNOS gene expression, and nitrite/nitrate. Both minocycline and dexamethasone significantly modulated the inflammatory changes and the oxidative/nitrosative stress associated with ALI. However, only minocycline but not dexamethasone significantly reduced the cytotoxic brain oedema. Conclusion. Both minocycline and dexamethasone could modulate inflammatory and oxidative changes observed in brain after ALI and could be novel preventative therapy for hepatic encephalopathy episodes. PMID:24693424

  17. Statins and its hepatic effects: Newer data, implications, and changing recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic adverse effects are one of the most commonly known adverse effects reported with statins. Frequently, fear of serious hepatic effects contributes to underutilization of statins as well as unnecessary discontinuation of its use among those indicated. There are changing data on the occurrence of these negative hepatic effects, recommendations on their actual risk, monitoring required, and safety of use in those with preexisting hepatic disorders. Based on reviewed literature, statins appear to be associated with a very low risk of true and serious liver injury. Unprecedented fears regarding hepatic adverse effects of statins among prescribers and patients can deny patients of the significant benefits of these agents. Routine periodic monitoring of liver function does not appear to detect or prevent serious liver injury and hence may not be indicated. But the potential of statins to cause significant and serious hepatic effects should not be overlooked in daily clinical practice. Statin use need not be avoided in patients with preexisting liver dysfunction such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, compensated cirrhosis, and compensated chronic liver disease if its use is clearly indicated. Physician's judgment based on the risk and benefit for an individual patient does matter when a strategy is chosen regarding the use of statins and monitoring patients while on statins. PMID:26957864

  18. Tumour growth inhibition and anti-angiogenic effects using curcumin correspond to combined PDE2 and PDE4 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Abusnina, Abdurazzag; Keravis, Thérèse; Zhou, Qingwei; Justiniano, Hélène; Lobstein, Annelise; Lugnier, Claire

    2015-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a major role in angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial cells. Increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) level inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), which specifically hydrolyse cyclic nucleotides, are critical in the regulation of this signal transduction. We have previously reported that PDE2 and PDE4 up-regulations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are implicated in VEGF-induced angiogenesis and that inhibition of PDE2 and PDE4 activities prevents the development of the in vitro angiogenesis by increasing cAMP level, as well as the in vivo chicken embryo angiogenesis. We have also shown that polyphenols are able to inhibit PDEs. The curcumin having anti-cancer properties, the present study investigated whether PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitors and curcumin could have similar in vivo anti-tumour properties and whether the anti-angiogenic effects of curcumin are mediated by PDEs. Both PDE2/PDE4 inhibitor association and curcumin significantly inhibited in vivo tumour growth in C57BL/6N mice. In vitro, curcumin inhibited basal and VEGF-stimulated HUVEC proliferation and migration and delayed cell cycle progression at G0/G1, similarly to the combination of selective PDE2 and PDE4 inhibitors. cAMP levels in HUVECs were significantly increased by curcumin, similarly to rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and BAY-60-550 (PDE2 inhibitor) association, indicating cAMP-PDE inhibitions. Moreover, curcumin was able to inhibit VEGF-induced cAMP-PDE activity without acting on cGMP-PDE activity and to modulate PDE2 and PDE4 expressions in HUVECs. The present results suggest that curcumin exerts its in vitro anti-angiogenic and in vivo anti-tumour properties through combined PDE2 and PDE4 inhibition. PMID:25230992

  19. Effects of bromocriptine on hepatic cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system.

    PubMed

    Moochhala, S M; Lee, E J; Hu, G T; Koh, O S; Becket, G

    1989-02-01

    We have evaluated the in vitro effects of bromocriptine (Br), on the hepatic cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system of rats pretreated with saline phenobarbitone (PB) and beta-naphthoflavone (BNF). Br inhibited ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in liver microsomes of rats pretreated with saline and PB but not in BNF pretreated animals. Maximum inhibition of EROD activity by Br in the microsomes of saline and PB pretreated rats were 50%-60% of the control. In contrast, a dual effect was observed on aminopyrine N-demethylase activity (APD) by Br in microsomes of saline, PB and BNF pretreated rats. At a low concentration (25 microM), Br inhibited the activity of APD to a similar extent in all pretreatment groups; however, with higher concentrations of Br (50 microM to 300 microM), enhancement of APD activity was observed. Br (300 microM) increased the APD activity to 2-3 times the control level in microsomes of rats pretreated with saline, PB or BNF. Spectral studies revealed a Type II binding of Br to cytochrome P-450 from microsomes of saline and PB pretreated rats. A reverse type I binding was observed for BNF induced microsomes. In addition, Br also enhanced NADPH cytochrome c (P-450) reductase activity to a similar extent in all pretreatment groups. These results suggest that the inhibition of EROD activity may be due to direct binding by Br to certain isozymes of cytochrome P-450 and that the enhancing effect of Br on APD activity may be in part due to the activation of the NADPH cytochrome c reductase component of the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system. PMID:2499727

  20. Inverse agonist of nuclear receptor ERRγ mediates antidiabetic effect through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Gang, Gil-Tae; Ryu, Dongryeol; Koh, Minseob; Kim, Yo-Na; Kim, Su Sung; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Sim, Taebo; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive metabolic disorder with diverse pathological manifestations and is often associated with abnormal regulation of hepatic glucose production. Many nuclear receptors known to control the hepatic gluconeogenic program are potential targets for the treatment of T2DM and its complications. Nevertheless, the therapeutic potential of the estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) in T2DM remains unknown. In this study, we show that the nuclear receptor ERRγ is a major contributor to hyperglycemia under diabetic conditions by controlling hepatic glucose production. Hepatic ERRγ expression induced by fasting and diabetic conditions resulted in elevated levels of gluconeogenic gene expression and blood glucose in wild-type mice. Conversely, ablation of hepatic ERRγ gene expression reduced the expression of gluconeogenic genes and normalized blood glucose levels in mouse models of T2DM: db/db and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. In addition, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study and long-term studies of the antidiabetic effects of GSK5182, the ERRγ-specific inverse agonist, in db/db and DIO mice demonstrated that GSK5182 normalizes hyperglycemia mainly through inhibition of hepatic glucose production. Our findings suggest that the ability of GSK5182 to control hepatic glucose production can be used as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of T2DM. PMID:23775767

  1. Inverse Agonist of Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Mediates Antidiabetic Effect Through Inhibition of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Gang, Gil-Tae; Ryu, Dongryeol; Koh, Minseob; Kim, Yo-Na; Kim, Su Sung; Park, Jinyoung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Sim, Taebo; Lee, In-Kyu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a progressive metabolic disorder with diverse pathological manifestations and is often associated with abnormal regulation of hepatic glucose production. Many nuclear receptors known to control the hepatic gluconeogenic program are potential targets for the treatment of T2DM and its complications. Nevertheless, the therapeutic potential of the estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) in T2DM remains unknown. In this study, we show that the nuclear receptor ERRγ is a major contributor to hyperglycemia under diabetic conditions by controlling hepatic glucose production. Hepatic ERRγ expression induced by fasting and diabetic conditions resulted in elevated levels of gluconeogenic gene expression and blood glucose in wild-type mice. Conversely, ablation of hepatic ERRγ gene expression reduced the expression of gluconeogenic genes and normalized blood glucose levels in mouse models of T2DM: db/db and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. In addition, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study and long-term studies of the antidiabetic effects of GSK5182, the ERRγ-specific inverse agonist, in db/db and DIO mice demonstrated that GSK5182 normalizes hyperglycemia mainly through inhibition of hepatic glucose production. Our findings suggest that the ability of GSK5182 to control hepatic glucose production can be used as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of T2DM. PMID:23775767

  2. [Drug therapy for neuroendocrine tumours].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Miklós

    2013-09-29

    The author aims to review the established medical treatment options of neuroendocrine tumours, which have expanded greatly in recent years and present the most important aspects to be considered in planning patients' management. Medical treatment is usually considered in advanced stages of these tumours, as well as in cases of hormone overproduction. Somatostatin analogues have been known to be effective in alleviating hormone excess syndromes, especially carcinoid syndrome for the past 25 years. There is a convincing evidence that the somatostatin analogue octreotide is useful as an antitumor agent, at least in well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours and probably also in those of pancreatic origin. Interferons may be also used and the indications for their use may be almost the same. Optimal patient selection is mandatory for the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Streptozotocin- and, recently, temozolomide-based chemotherapies should be considered in progressive phases of well differentiated (G1/G2) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. A cisplatin-etoposide combination is the first choice for the treatment of G3 neuroendocrine carcinomas of any origin. Recently, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus and the combined tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib were registered for the treatment of G1/G2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. The most recent drug treatment recommendations and therapeutic algorithms to improve systemic therapy in patients with neuroendocrine tumours are summarized and novel drug candidates with particular potential for future management of these tumours are outlined. PMID:24058101

  3. Protective Effects of Dracocephalum heterophyllum in ConA-Induced Acute Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilan; Lu, Xiaohua; Shi, Qiangqiang; Zou, Junhui

    2016-01-01

    Dracocephalum heterophyllum (DH) is a Chinese herbal medicine used in treating hepatitis. However, the protective effects and pharmacological mechanisms of DH in hepatitis are unknown. In this study, we found that pretreatment with DH extract significantly ameliorated liver injury and suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in Concanavalin A- (ConA-) induced hepatitis (CIH). DH recruited more CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to the liver and suppressed infiltration of macrophages (Kupffer cells) in the liver. The present work explores DH as an effective hepatoprotective medicine to inhibit inflammation and liver injury caused by hepatitis. PMID:27524863

  4. Protective Effects of N-Acetylcysteine in Concanavalin A-Induced Hepatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengfen; Xia, Yujing; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Jing; Yin, Qin; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Junshan; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to study the protective effects and mechanisms of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice. In this study, pretreatment with NAC ameliorated the histopathological changes and suppressed inflammatory cytokines in ConA-induced hepatitis. The expression of IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ was significantly reduced in the NAC-treated groups. NAC activated PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibited the activation of NF-κB. Additionally, NAC reduced autophagosome formation, as assessed by detecting the expression of LC3 and Beclin 1. Our results demonstrate that NAC can alleviate ConA-induced hepatitis by regulating the PI3K/Akt pathway and reducing the late stages of autophagy. Our results described a new pharmaceutical to provide more effective therapies for immune hepatitis. PMID:25821351

  5. Antiproliferative effects of lanreotide autogel in patients with progressive, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a Spanish, multicentre, open-label, single arm phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. Methods This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over ≤92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Results Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Conclusion Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18. PMID:24053191

  6. Synergistic Inhibitory Effects of Hypoxia and Iron Deficiency on Hepatic Glucose Response in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyeyoung; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Robert C; Gao, Yan; Sink, Sandy; Cox, James; McClain, Donald A

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia and iron both regulate metabolism through multiple mechanisms, including hypoxia-inducible transcription factors. The hypoxic effects on glucose disposal and glycolysis are well established, but less is known about the effects of hypoxia and iron deficiency on hepatic gluconeogenesis. We therefore assessed their effects on hepatic glucose production in mice. Weanling C57BL/6 male mice were fed an iron-deficient (4 ppm) or iron-adequate (35 ppm) diet for 14 weeks and were continued in normoxia or exposed to hypoxia (8% O2) for the last 4 weeks of that period. Hypoxic mice became hypoglycemic and displayed impaired hepatic glucose production after a pyruvate challenge, an effect accentuated by an iron-deficient diet. Stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors under hypoxia resulted in most glucose being converted into lactate and not oxidized. Hepatic pyruvate concentrations were lower in hypoxic mice. The decreased hepatic pyruvate levels were not caused by increased utilization but rather were contributed to by decreased metabolism from gluconeogenic amino acids. Pyruvate carboxylase, which catalyzes the first step of gluconeogenesis, was also downregulated by hypoxia with iron deficiency. Hypoxia, and more so hypoxia with iron deficiency, results in hypoglycemia due to decreased levels of hepatic pyruvate and decreased pyruvate utilization for gluconeogenesis. These data highlight the role of iron levels as an important determinant of glucose metabolism in hypoxia. PMID:26993063

  7. Protective effects of sevoflurane in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Yuan, Tong; Zhao, Xin; Lv, Guo-Yue; Liu, Huan-Qiu

    2016-06-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx plays a critical role in the regulation of vascular structure and functions. Previous studies have demonstrated that sevoflurane, a volatile anesthetic, can preserve the endothelial glycocalyx in heart tissues against ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, little is known about the effects of sevoflurane pretreatment on the vascular structure and functions of liver tissues following ischemia-reperfusion injury. To this end, female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 28) were anesthetized either with ketamine (80-120 mg/kg, i.p.) or with one minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) sevoflurane (2% v/v). Following in vivo hepatic ischemia procedure, the liver was isolated and reperfusion was produced. During the period of reperfusion, liver reperfusion samples were collected, and the concentrations of heparan sulfate and syndecan-1 (Syn-1), and the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzymes, were measured. The morphology of hepatocytes and endothelial glycocalyx were then assessed by using the light and electron microscopies, respectively. Ischemia-reperfusion increased the release of HS and Syn-1, and elevated the levels of ALT and AST in a time-dependent manner. However, sevoflurane pretreatment reduced the release of HS and Syn-1and attenuated the levels of ALT and AST, in a time-dependent manner, as compared with ketamine pretreatment. Furthermore, sevoflurane pretreatment decreased the shedding of endothelial glycocalyx and hepatocytes necrosis. Sevoflurane pretreatment preserved the endothelial glycocalyx in the liver tissue against ischemia-reperfusion injury. The effect appears to help protect hepatocytes against ischemia-reperfusion-induced necrosis. PMID:26966142

  8. The effect of diet on tumor necrosis factor stimulation of hepatic lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Soued, M.; Serio, M.K.; Adi, S.; Moser, A.H.; Grunfeld, C. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) on serum lipid levels and hepatic lipid synthesis in animals whose diets and feeding conditions were varied to induce changes in baseline serum lipid levels and/or rates of hepatic lipid synthesis. In animals studied at both the nadir and peak of the diurnal cycle of hepatic lipid synthesis, TNF acutely increases serum triglyceride levels, stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids found in the serum. Similarly, in animals ingesting either high-sucrose or cholesterol-enriched diets, TNF induces the characteristic rapid increase in serum triglyceride levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, and quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. In animals fed a diet high in triglycerides, using either corn oil or lard, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases the quantity of newly synthesized fatty acids in the serum, but serum triglyceride levels do not change. However, TNF inhibits gastric emptying, which results in a marked decrease in fat absorption in TNF-treated animals. It is likely that a decrease in the dietary contribution to serum triglyceride levels during high-triglyceride feeding counterbalances the increased hepatic contribution induced by TNF treatment. In animals fasted before TNF administration there was no acute change in either serum lipid levels, hepatic fatty acid synthesis, or the quantity of labeled fatty acids in the serum. Thus, TNF stimulates hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increases serum triglyceride levels under many diverse dietary conditions, suggesting that there is a strong linkage between the immune system and lipid metabolism that is independent of most dietary manipulations and may be of fundamental importance in the body's response to infection.

  9. Cimicifuga foetida L. plus adefovir effectively inhibits the replication of hepatitis B virus in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    DAI, XIUFANG; YI, XIANFU; SUN, ZEQUN; RUAN, PENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) effect of Cimicifuga foetida L. (C. foetida) in the patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). A total of 60 randomly selected patients with CHB were recruited and divided into groups I and II. The patients in group I received a monotherapy of adefovir (ADV), and the patients in group II received a combination therapy of ADV and C. foetida for >48 weeks. Intrahepatic (IH) HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), serum HBV DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), alanine aminotransferase levels and serum interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) levels were quantified during the test. Following the treatment, a significant reduction of the median IH cccDNA level was identified in group II (P=0.017), but not in group I (P=0.05, and P=0.01 between the 2 groups), and a significant reduction of log10 HBsAg was identified in groups I (P=0.012) and II (P<0.0001, and P=0.20 between the 2 groups). A significant increase of the median serum IFN-γ level was found in group II (P=0.0005), but not in group I (P=0.06, and P=0.004 between the 2 groups), and a significant reduction of the median TGF-β level was identified in groups I (P<0.0001) and II (P<0.0001, and P=0.002 between the 2 groups). A total of 24 patients in group I, and 27 patients in group II achieved a sustained virological response (P=0.0386), and 20 patients in group I and 24 in group II achieved hepatitis B e antigen seroclearance (P=0.0442). In conclusion, C. foetida can effectively inhibit HBV transcription and replication in the patients by stimulating the release of the inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-γ. PMID:27073640

  10. Tumour growth stimulation following partial hepatectomy in mice is associated with increased upregulation of c-Met.

    PubMed

    Harun, Nadia; Costa, Patricia; Christophi, C

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic resection is the preferred option for curative treatment of colorectal liver metastasis (CLM). However, this is associated with significant recurrence rates in both hepatic and extrahepatic sites. The upregulation of growth factors required for liver regeneration after resection is thought to stimulate the growth of micrometastases. The current study describes temporal changes in the expression of hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-Met), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and insulin growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) in an orthotopic mouse model of liver resection and tumour induction. Mice underwent 70% hepatectomy and induction of liver metastases through intrasplenic injection of colorectal cancer cells. Control groups included sham-operated mice and 70% hepatectomy alone. The expression levels of liver and tumour c-Met, EGFR and IGF-IR were quantified by quantitative RT-PCR at different time points. 70% liver resection stimulates tumour growth; increases the expression of c-Met within established tumours and surrounding liver parenchyma; downregulates EGFR expression and increases IGF-IR expression within the liver parenchyma. In conclusion, we demonstrate in our mouse model that major hepatectomy stimulates engraftment and growth of CLM and that this effect is probably due to the upregulation of c-Met as a result of the liver regeneration process. Liver IGF-IR may also contribute to this phenomenon through a paracrine effect on tumour growth. This study provides support for the role of c-Met in the stimulation of tumour growth after resection possibly through the promotion of tumour cell proliferation. PMID:23900501

  11. Correlation of distribution of sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanines with their photodynamic effect in tumour and skin of mice bearing CaD2 mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Q.; Moan, J.

    1995-01-01

    A chemical extraction assay and fluorescence microscopy incorporating a light-sensitive thermoelectrically cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to study the kinetics of uptake, retention and localisation of disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (A1PcS2) and tetrasulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (A1PcS4) at different time intervals after an i.p. injection at a dose of 10 mg kg-1 body weight (b.w.) in tumour and surrounding normal skin and muscle of female C3D2/F1 mice bearing CaD2 mammary carcinoma. Moreover, the photodynamic effect on the tumour and normal skin using sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanines (A1PcS1, A1PcS2, A1pcS4) and Photofrin was compared with respect to dye, dye dose and time interval between dye administration and light exposure. The maximal concentrations of A1PcS2 in the tumour tissue were reached 2-24 h after injection of the dye, while the amounts of A1PcS4 peaked 1-2 h after the dye administration. A1PcS2 was simultaneously localised in the interstitium and in the neoplastic cells of the tumour, whereas A1PcS4 appeared to localise only in the stroma of the tumour. The photodynamic efficiency (light was applied 24 h after dye injection at a dose of 10 mg kg-1 b.w.) of the tumours was found to decrease in the following order: A1PcS2 > A1PcS4 > Photofrin > A1PcS1. Furthermore, photodynamic efficacy was strongly dependent upon dye doses and time intervals between dye administration and light exposure: the higher the dose, the higher the photodynamic efficiency. The most efficient photodynamic therapy (PDT) of the tumour was reached (day 20 tumour-free) when light exposure took place 2 h after injection of A1PcS2 (10 mg kg-1). A dual intratumoral localisation pattern of the dye, as found for A1PcS2, seems desirable to obtain a high photodynamic efficiency. The kinetic patterns of uptake, retention and localisation of A1PcS2 and A1PcS4 are roughly correlated with their photodynamic effect on the tumour and normal skin. Images

  12. Long-Term Effectiveness of Accelerated Hepatitis B Vaccination Schedule in Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dimpy P.; Grimes, Carolyn Z.; Nguyen, Anh T.; Lai, Dejian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We demonstrated the effectiveness of an accelerated hepatitis B vaccination schedule in drug users. Methods. We compared the long-term effectiveness of accelerated (0–1–2 months) and standard (0–1–6 months) hepatitis B vaccination schedules in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and anti-hepatitis B (anti-HBs) antibody loss during 2-year follow-up in 707 drug users (HIV and HBV negative at enrollment and completed 3 vaccine doses) from February 2004 to October 2009. Results. Drug users in the accelerated schedule group had significantly lower HBV infection rates, but had a similar rate of anti-HBs antibody loss compared with the standard schedule group over 2 years of follow-up. No chronic HBV infections were observed. Hepatitis C positivity at enrollment and age younger than 40 years were independent risk factors for HBV infection and antibody loss, respectively. Conclusions. An accelerated vaccination schedule was more preferable than a standard vaccination schedule in preventing HBV infections in drug users. To overcome the disadvantages of a standard vaccination schedule, an accelerated vaccination schedule should be considered in drug users with low adherence. Our study should be repeated in different cohorts to validate our findings and establish the role of an accelerated schedule in hepatitis B vaccination guidelines for drug users. PMID:25880946

  13. Assessment of communication impairment and the effects of resective surgery in solitary, right-sided supratentorial intracranial tumours: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A M; Taylor, R; Whittle, I R

    1998-10-01

    To assess the effects of solitary, right-sided supratentorial intracranial tumours on language and communication function patients were assessed preoperatively using the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) and Boston Naming Test (BNT). The impact of resective tumour surgery was evaluated prospectively by a comparison of test scores obtained at pre- and postoperative assessments. The WAB scores in 33 patients revealed that 21% were by definition dysphasic (i.e. Aphasia Quotient < 93.8) and 35% obtained an abnormal Language Quotient. Performance was particularly variable on the written picture description and word fluency WAB subtests. Using the BNT 21% of 47 patients were anomic. The tumours were evenly distributed throughout the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, but none were in the occipital lobe. Reassessment approximately 6 days after excisional tumour surgery showed that mean scores for the BNT, Aphasia Quotient, and the WAB spontaneous speech and comprehension subtests had improved significantly despite a significant reduction in dexamethasone therapy. This study has demonstrated that right-sided intracranial tumours produce subtle, but specific language deficits of a type more usually associated with left-sided brain dysfunction. The pathophysiological basis of these deficits is unclear, but they are not attributable to either limited education or pre-existing dyslexia. Further studies using a discriminating and comprehensive assessment of language in the right hemisphere are required. PMID:10070445

  14. Effects of Hypothyroidism and Progesterone on Mammary Tumours Induced by 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jabara, Anne G.; Maritz, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Hypothyroidism, alone or combined with progesterone, significantly decreased 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) mammary tumorigenesis relative to controls. However, the decrease was less in the progesterone-treated group, and statistical analysis showed that progesterone enhanced tumorigenesis to the same extent in hypothyroid animals as in the controls. Most tumours in hypothyroid progesterone-treated rats were adenocarcinomata; in the absence of the hormone most tumours were benign. However, the difference between the tumour types in the 2 groups was not statistically significant. The morphological changes observed in the endocrine glands, genital tracts and non-neoplastic mammary tissue, considered in relation to previously reported data, suggest that hypothyroidism reduced the tumour yield mainly by secondarily inhibiting somatotrophin production and secretion, although the effect of decreased food intake could not be excluded completely. The higher tumour yield in the hypothyroid progesterone-treated rats may have been due to higher circulating levels of prolactin in this group compared with those in the hypothyroid group which received no hormone. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4738218

  15. Immunology in the clinic review series; focus on cancer: double trouble for tumours: bi-functional and redirected T cells as effective cancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Marr, L A; Gilham, D E; Campbell, J D M; Fraser, A R

    2012-02-01

    Cancer is one of the most important pathological conditions facing mankind in the 21st century, and is likely to become the most important cause of death as improvements continue in health, diet and life expectancy. The immune response is responsible for controlling nascent cancer through immunosurveillance. If tumours escape this control, they can develop into clinical cancer. Although surgery and chemo- or radiotherapy have improved survival rates significantly, there is a drive to reharness immune responses to treat disease. As T cells are one of the key immune cells in controlling cancer, research is under way to enhance their function and improve tumour targeting. This can be achieved by transduction with tumour-specific T cell receptor (TCR) or chimaeric antigen receptors (CAR) to generate redirected T cells. Virus-specific cells can also be transduced with TCR or CAR to create bi-functional T cells with specificity for both virus and tumour. In this review we outline the development and optimization of redirected and bi-functional T cells, and outline the results from current clinical trials using these cells. From this we discuss the challenges involved in generating effective anti-tumour responses while avoiding concomitant damage to normal tissues and organs. PMID:22235997

  16. Effect of Tenofovir With and Without Interferon on Hepatitis D Virus Replication in HIV–Hepatitis B Virus–Hepatitis D Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Miailhes, Patrick; Brichler, Ségolène; Scholtès, Caroline; Maylin, Sarah; Delaugerre, Constance; Chevallier-Queyron, Phillipe; Gordien, Emmanuel; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Lacombe, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The effect of tenofovir (TDF) alone or in combination with interferon on hepatitis D virus (HDV) replication is poorly characterized in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and HDV. We analyzed triinfected patients undergoing treatment with either TDF alone (n=13) or including interferon (IFN) at some point during TDF therapy (TDF+IFN, n=4). Linear mixed-effect models were used to estimate the mean change from baseline of HDV-RNA and hepatitis surface antigen (HBsAg) levels during treatment. Patients were followed for a median 31.6 (25–75%-tile: 15.0–47.4) months. In the TDF+IFN group, three initiated IFN-based therapy after a median of 21.7 months (range=10.5–24.9) of lamivudine (LAM)+TDF, while the remaining patient had 46.8 months of prior LAM exposure. Significant decreases in HDV-RNA were observed in both groups [TDF alone: –0.380 log10 copies/ml per year (95% CI: −0.557, −0.202) vs. TDF+IFN: −1.325 log10 copies/ml per year (95% CI: −1.931, −0.720)], while the HDV-RNA decline overall was significantly faster in patients with TDF+IFN (p=0.002). Accordingly, two patients achieved HDV-RNA below the limit of quantification (LOQ: <1,000 copies/ml) and one near LOQ (1450 copies/ml), all concomitantly treated with interferon. There were no significant changes in HBsAg levels for either group [TDF alone: −0.008 log10 IU/ml per month (95% CI: −0.019, 0.004), TDF+IFN:−0.011 log10 IU/ml per month (95% CI: −0.037, 0.015)] and no significant difference in slope between treatment groups (p=0.8). Interferon therapy might be more effective after extended previous anti-HBV antiviral exposure among triinfected patients; however, the long-term implications of these findings remain unknown. PMID:23972039

  17. Dairy milk fat augments paclitaxel therapy to suppress tumour metastasis in mice, and protects against the side-effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xueying; Zhang, Jie; Gupta, Rita; Macgibbon, Alastair K H; Kuhn-Sherlock, Barbara; Krissansen, Geoffrey W

    2011-10-01

    Milk fat is a natural product containing essential nutrients as well as fatty acids and other food factors with reported anti-cancer potential. Here bovine milk fat was tested for its ability to inhibit the growth of breast and colon cancers and their metastasis to the lung and liver; either alone or in combination with the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. A diet containing 5% typical anhydrous milk fat (representing ~70% of the total dietary fat component) fed to Balb/c mice delayed the appearance of subcutaneous 4T1 breast and CT26 colon cancer tumours and inhibited their metastasis to the lung and liver, when compared to the control diet containing soybean oil as the only fat component. It augmented the inhibitory effects of paclitaxel on tumour growth and metastasis, and reduced the microvessel density of tumours. It displayed no apparent organ toxicity, but instead was beneficial for well-being of tumour-bearing mice by maintaining gastrocnemius muscle and epididymal adipose tissue that were otherwise depleted by cachexia. The milk fat diet ameliorated gut damage caused by paclitaxel in non-tumour-bearing mice, as evidenced by retention of jejunal morphology, villi length and intestinal γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity, and inhibition of crypt apoptosis. It prevented loss of red and white blood cells due to both cancer-mediated immunosuppression and the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy. The present study warrants the use of milk fat as an adjuvant to inhibit tumour metastasis during cancer chemotherapy, and to spare patients from the debilitating side-effects of cytotoxic drugs. PMID:21739249

  18. An investigation into the effects of temporal resolution on hepatic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in volunteers and in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Andrew B.; Black, Richard T.; Bowden, David J.; Priest, Andrew N.; Graves, Martin J.; Lomas, David J.

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal resolution on the dual-input pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data from normal volunteer livers and from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Eleven volunteers and five patients were examined at 3 T. Two sections, one optimized for the vascular input functions (VIF) and one for the tissue, were imaged within a single heart-beat (HB) using a saturation-recovery fast gradient echo sequence. The data was analysed using a dual-input single-compartment PK model. The VIFs and/or uptake curves were then temporally sub-sampled (at interval ▵t = [2-20] s) before being subject to the same PK analysis. Statistical comparisons of tumour and normal tissue PK parameter values using a 5% significance level gave rise to the same study results when temporally sub-sampling the VIFs to HB < ▵t <4 s. However, sub-sampling to ▵t > 4 s did adversely affect the statistical comparisons. Temporal sub-sampling of just the liver/tumour tissue uptake curves at ▵t ≤ 20 s, whilst using high temporal resolution VIFs, did not substantially affect PK parameter statistical comparisons. In conclusion, there is no practical advantage to be gained from acquiring very high temporal resolution hepatic DCE-MRI data. Instead the high temporal resolution could be usefully traded for increased spatial resolution or SNR.

  19. Photodynamic activity of BAM-SiPc, an unsymmetrical bisamino silicon(IV) phthalocyanine, in tumour-bearing nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, S C H; Lo, P-C; Ng, D K P; Liu, W-K; Fung, K-P; Fong, W-P

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose Ever since the discovery of photodynamic therapy, there has been a continuous search for more potent photosensitizers. Towards that end, we have synthesized a number of novel phthalocyanine derivatives. The unsymmetrical bisamino silicon(IV) phthalocyanine BAM-SiPc is one of the most potent compounds. In in vitro cell culture, it exhibits high phototoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines. Experimental approach In the present investigation, the in vivo effect of BAM-SiPc was studied in the tumour-bearing nude mice model. The biodistribution of BAM-SiPc was followed to evaluate its tumour selectivity and rate of clearance. The tumour volume in the hepatocarcinoma HepG2- and the colorectal adenocarcinoma HT29-bearing nude mice was measured after photodynamic therapy. The level of intrinsic toxicity induced was also investigated. Finally, the metabolism of BAM-SiPc in the ‘normal' WRL68 liver cells and the hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells was compared. Key results The results not only showed significant tumour regression of HepG2 and growth inhibition of HT29 in the tumour-bearing nude mice, but also no apparent hepatic or cardiac injury with the protocol used. Histological analyses showed that apoptosis was induced in the solid tumour. BAM-SiPc could be metabolized by WRL68 liver cells but not by the hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Unfortunately, BAM-SiPc did not show any specific targeting towards the tumour tissue. Conclusions and implications The efficiency of BAM-SiPc in inhibiting tumour growth makes it a good candidate for further evaluation. Enhancement of its uptake in tumour tissue by conjugation with biomolecules is currently under investigation. PMID:18332853

  20. The effects of tramadol on hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mona F.; Gamal, Samar; Shaheen, Mohamed A.; El-Fayoumi, Hassan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Tramadol is a centrally acting synthetic analgesic. It has a cardioprotective effect against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in isolated rat heart. We hypothesized that tramadol may exert a similar protective effect on hepatic I/R injury. Hence, the current investigation was designed to study the possible protective effects of tramadol on experimentally-induced hepatic I/R injury in rats. Materials and Methods: Tramadol was administered 30 min before ischemia following which the rats were subjected to 45 min of ischemia followed by 1 h of reperfusion. Results: Tramadol attenuated hepatic injury induced by I/R as evidenced by the reduction of transaminases, structural changes, and apoptotic cell death. It decreased the level of inflammatory markers such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), TNF-α/interleukin-10 (IL-10) ratio, and nuclear factor-κB gene expression. It also increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10 levels in hepatic tissues. Furthermore, it reduced oxidative stress parameters except manganese superoxide dismutase activity. Conclusion: The results suggest that tramadol has hepatoprotective effects against hepatic I/R injury via anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and antioxidant effects. PMID:27298497

  1. Effects of dietary carbohydrate on hepatic de novo lipogenesis in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.).

    PubMed

    Viegas, Ivan; Jarak, Ivana; Rito, João; Carvalho, Rui A; Metón, Isidoro; Pardal, Miguel A; Baanante, Isabel V; Jones, John G

    2016-07-01

    Farmed seabass have higher adiposity than their wild counterparts and this is often attributed to carbohydrate (CHO) feeding. Whether this reflects a reduction in fat oxidation, increased de novo lipogenesis (DNL), or both, is not known. To study the effects of high CHO diets on hepatic TG biosynthesis, hepatic TG deuterium ((2)H) enrichment was determined following 6 days in (2)H-enriched tank water for fish fed with a no-CHO control diet (CTRL), and diets with digestible starch (DS) and raw starch (RS). Hepatic fractional synthetic rates (FSRs, percent per day(-1)) were calculated for hepatic TG-glyceryl and FA moieties through (2)H NMR analysis. Glyceryl FSRs exceeded FA FSRs in all cases, indicating active cycling. DS fish did not show increased lipogenic potential compared to CTRL. RS fish had lower glyceryl FSRs compared with the other diets and negligible levels of FA FSRs despite similar hepatic TG levels to CTRL. DS-fed fish showed higher activity for enzymes that can provide NADPH for lipogenesis, relative to CTRL in the case of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and relative to RS for both G6PDH and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. This approach indicated that elevated hepatic adiposity from DS feeding was not attributable to increased DNL. PMID:27247346

  2. Effects of aluminum chloride on serum proteins, bilirubin, and hepatic trace elements in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ben; Zhu, Yanzhu; Zhang, Hongling; Liu, Liming; Li, Guojiang; Song, Yongli; Li, Yanfei

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on the hepatic metabolism function and trace elements' distribution. Two hundred healthy male chickens (1 day old) were intraperitoneally administered with AlCl3 (0, 18.31, 27.47, and 36.62 mg kg(-1) day(-1) of Al(3+)) consecutively for 3 days. Then the chickens were allowed to rest for 1 day. The cycle lasted four days. The cycle was repeated 15 times (60 days). The contents of serum total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (TBI), direct bilirubin (DBI), hepatic aluminum (Al), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) were examined. The results showed that the contents of serum TP and ALB and hepatic Fe and Zn decreased and the contents of serum TBI and DBI and hepatic Al and Cu increased in the chickens with AlCl3 This indicates that chronic administration of AlCl3 impairs the hepatic metabolism function and disorders the hepatic trace elements' distribution. PMID:25896954

  3. Antiviral and immunoregulatory effects of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lepiller, Quentin; Soulier, Eric; Li, Qisheng; Lambotin, Mélanie; Barths, Jochen; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Liang, T. Jake; Barth, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    In patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, enhanced activity of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO) has been reported. IDO - a tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme – has been considered as both an innate defence mechanism and an important regulator of the immune response. The molecular mechanism of IDO induction in HCV infection and its role in the antiviral immune response remain unknown. Using primary human hepatocytes, we show that HCV infection stimulates IDO expression. IDO gene induction was transient and coincided with the expression of type I and type III interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in HCV-infected hepatocytes. Overexpression of hepatic IDO prior to HCV infection markedly impaired HCV replication in hepatocytes, suggesting that IDO limits the spread of HCV within the liver. siRNA-mediated IDO knockdown revealed that IDO functions as an IFN-mediated anti-HCV effector. Hepatic IDO was most potently induced by IFN-γ and ongoing HCV replication could significantly upregulate IDO expression. IRF1 and STAT1 regulated hepatic IDO expression. Hepatic IDO expression also had a significant inhibitory effect on CD4+ T cell proliferation. Our data suggest that hepatic IDO plays a dual role during HCV infection by retarding viral replication and also regulating host immune responses. PMID:25792183

  4. Protective effect of pantothenic acid and related compounds against permeabilization of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells by digitonin.

    PubMed

    Slyshenkov, V S; Rakowska, M; Wojtczak, L

    1996-01-01

    Preincubation of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells with millimolar concentrations of pantothenic acid, pantothenol or pantethine, but not with homopantothenic acid, at 22 degrees C or 32 degrees C, but not at 0 degrees C, makes the plasma membrane more resistant to the damaging effect of submillimolar concentrations of digitonin. It is proposed that this increased resistance is due to the increased rate of cholesterol biosynthesis. In fact, incorporation of [14C]acetate into cholesterol is by 45% increased in the cells preincubated with pantothenic acid; this probably reflects elevation of the content of CoA in such cells [Slyshenkov, V.S., Rakowska, M., Moiseenok, A.G. & Wojtczak, L. (1995) Free Radical Biol. Med. 19, 767-772]. PMID:8862188

  5. Borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Tropé, Claes Göran; Kaern, Janne; Davidson, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours account for 10-20% of all epithelial ovarian cancer. Historically, standard primary surgery has included borderline ovarian tumours, omentectomy, peritoneal washing and multiple biopsies. As one-third of borderline ovarian tumours are diagnosed in women under the age of 40 years, fertility-sparing treatment has been more frequently used in the past 10 years. Fertility drugs are well tolerated in women with infertility after fertility-sparing surgery. Careful selection of candidates is necessary. Laparoscopic techniques can be used, but should be reserved for oncologic surgeons. This conservative treatment increases the rate of recurrence, albeit with no effect on survival. The pregnancy rate is nearly 50%, and most are achieved spontaneously. These women should be closely followed up. The question is whether this is acceptable from a gynaecologic oncologic point of view. For this reason, we will discuss recently published studies and gynaecologic oncologic concerns about the mode of fertility-sparing surgery and its consequences. PMID:22321906

  6. Effect of liver regeneration on malignant hepatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ji-Hua; Line, Pål-Dag

    2014-01-01

    Liver regeneration after major surgery may activate occult micrometastases and facilitate tumor growth, leading to liver tumor recurrence. Molecular changes during liver regeneration can provide a microenvironment that stimulates intrahepatic tumor propagation through alterations in cellular signaling pathways, where activation and proliferation of mature hepatocytes, hepatic progenitor cells, non-parenchymal liver cells might favor both liver regeneration and tumor growth. This review highlights recent advances of tumor growth and development in the regenerating liver, possible mechanisms and clinical implications. PMID:25473170

  7. Effect of sulfonylureas on hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, T.B.

    1986-08-01

    In isolated rat livers perfused with oleic acid (0.1 mM), infusion of tolbutamide or glyburide decreased the rate of ketogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was maximal at 2.0 mM and 10 M concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide, respectively. Neither tolbutamide nor glyburide inhibited ketogenesis in livers perfused with octanoate. The inhibition of hepatic ketogenesis by sulfonylureas was independent of perfusate oleic acid concentration. Additionally, in rat livers perfused with oleic acid in the presence of L-(-)-carnitine (10 mM), submaximal concentrations of tolbutamide and glyburide did not inhibit hepatic ketogenesis. Finally, glyburide infusion into livers perfused with (U- $C)oleic acid (0.1 mM) increased the rate of UC label incorporation into hepatic triglycerides by 2.5-fold. These data suggest that both tolbutamide and glyburide inhibit long-chain fatty acid oxidation by inhibition the key regulatory enzyme, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, most probably by competing with L-(-)-carnitine.

  8. Electrochemotherapy on liver tumours in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, L. H.; Orlowski, S.; An, D.; Bindoula, G.; Dzodic, R.; Ardouin, P.; Bognel, C.; Belehradek, J.; Munck, J. N.; Mir, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is a new therapeutic approach combining the effects of a low-permeant cytotoxic drug, bleomycin (BLM), administered i.v. and cell-permeabilizing electric pulses (EPs) locally delivered to tumours. The transient permeabilization of the cell membrane by the EPs allows free access of BLM to its intracellular targets, largely enhancing BLM's cytotoxic effects. ECT efficacy has been proved so far on transplanted subcutaneous murine tumours and on subcutaneous metastases in humans. Here, we present the first study of the effects of ECT on tumours transplanted to livers in rabbits. We used a recently developed EP applicator consisting of an array of parallel and equidistant needles to be inserted in tissues. Effects of EPs alone or of ECT were assessed by histological analysis, tumour growth rates and survival of the treated animals. A transient blood hypoperfusion was seen in the electropulsed areas, with or without BLM, related to EP-dependent vasoconstriction but this had no major effects on cell survival. Long-term effects depended on the presence of BLM at the time of EP delivery. Almost complete tumour necrosis was observed after ECT, resulting from both BLM direct cytotoxic effects on electropermeabilized tumour cells and indirect effects on the tumour vessels. A large reduction in tumour growth rate and significantly longer survival times were scored in comparison with control rabbits. Moreover, ECT of liver tumours was well tolerated and devoid of systemic side-effects. When ECT was associated with a local interleukin 2-based immunotherapy, increased local anti-tumour effectiveness as well as a large decrease in the number of metastases were observed. Thus, ECT could become a novel treatment modality for liver tumours and other solid internal malignancies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9649121

  9. Single-dose infliximab in hepatitis C genotype 1 treatmentnaive patients with high serum levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha does not influence the efficacy of pegylated interferon alpha-2b/ribavirin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Curtis; Shafran, Stephen; Greenbloom, Susan; Enns, Robert; Farley, John; Hilzenrat, Nir; Williams, Kurt; Elkashab, Magdy; Abadir, Nabil; Neuman, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels correlate negatively with hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral response. OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that a single infliximab induction dose would positively influence on-treatment virological response and sustained virological response (SVR). METHODS: The present study was a phase IIIB, randomized, prospective, open-label pilot trial conducted at eight Canadian sites. Treatment-naive HCV genotype 1-infected patients 18 to 65 years of age with high serum TNF-α values (>300 pg/mL) were randomly assigned to receive a single pretreatment induction infliximab infusion (5 mg/kg) seven days before antiviral therapy (arm A) or no pretreatment (arm B). All patients received pegylated interferon α2b (1.5 μg/kg/week) plus weight-based ribavirin (800 mg/day to 1400 mg/day) for up to 48 weeks. RESULTS: Eighty-five patients (arm A [n=41], arm B [n=44]; 70% male) received pegylated interferon α2b. The mean age (48.1 years), race (81% white) and METAVIR fibrosis stage (F0–2 = 79%, F3–4 = 21%) were similar between groups. Infliximab was well tolerated without attributable severe adverse events; 56.5% completed the study (arm A [n=21], arm B [n=27]). Most discontinuations were due to virological failure at weeks 12 (n=20 [23.5%]) and 24 (n=7 [8.2%]) and did not differ according to group. Numerically lower proportions of infliximab recipients achieved rapid virological response (19.5% versus 36.4%), complete early virological response (43.9% versus 59.1%) and SVR (34.1% versus 52.3%). However, between-group differences did not reach statistical significance. No differences in adverse event profile or laboratory measures were noted. CONCLUSION: A single infliximab dose before pegylated-interferon α2b and ribavirin therapy did not result in greater viral decline during the first 12 weeks of HCV therapy or improved SVR. PMID:24212915

  10. Increased serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor in beta thalassaemia: effect of bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meliconi, R; Uguccioni, M; Lalli, E; Nesci, S; Delfini, C; Paradisi, O; Lucarelli, G; Gasbarrini, G; Facchini, A

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: Serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) were determined in beta thalassemic patients before and after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to evaluate whether changes in TNF concentrations after BMT were related to immune mediated complications. METHODS: Serum TNF concentrations were determined by enzyme linked immunoassay (EIA) in paired samples from 71 patients with beta thalassemia before and after BMT. Serial samples from 13 patients were also studied for up to six months after BMT. Forty one normal healthy children matched for sex and age were studied as controls. RESULTS: beta thalassemic patients had high serum TNF concentrations before transplantation compared with controls. These were not related to sex, age, duration of disease, number of blood transfusions, transferrin concentrations or splenectomy. DQw1 positive patients showed significantly lower TNF concentrations than non-DQw1 cases. Patients with severe liver fibrosis had significantly higher TNF concentrations. No correlation was found between TNF values and BMT outcome before transplantation but TNF alpha values fell significantly after BMT. The decrease persisted only in patients with successful engraftment. In serial samples studied for up to six months after BMT, TNF values decreased but in four out of five patients with graft rejection and in all five with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) sharp increases occurred at the time of clinical symptoms. No correlation was found between the degree of GVHD and serum TNF-alpha concentrations nor between TNF-alpha concentrations after BMT and the presence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. CONCLUSIONS: About 50% of beta thalassemic patients have increased serum TNF, and the changes after BMT are related to the occurrence of immune mediate complications. The persistence of low TNF concentrations after successful engraftment may be due to the preparative regimen and the lack of adverse immune reactions. PMID:1740519

  11. A novel technique for hepatic vein reconstruction during hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Surjan, Rodrigo C; Basseres, Tiago; Pajecki, Denis; Puzzo, Daniel B; Makdissi, Fabio F; Machado, Marcel A C; Battilana, Alexandre Gustavo Bellorio

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for malignant liver tumours. Nevertheless, surgical approach to tumours located close to the confluence of the hepatic veins is a challenging issue. Trisectionectomies are considered the first curative option for treatment of these tumours. However, those procedures are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates primarily due to post-operative liver failure. Thus, maximal preservation of functional liver parenchyma should always be attempted. We describe the isolated resection of Segment 8 for the treatment of a tumour involving the right hepatic vein and in contact with the middle hepatic vein and retrohepatic vena cava with immediate reconstruction of the right hepatic vein with a vascular graft. This is the first time this type of reconstruction was performed, and it allowed to preserve all but one of the hepatic segments with normal venous outflow. This innovative technique is a fast and safe method to reconstruct hepatic veins. PMID:27076622

  12. A novel technique for hepatic vein reconstruction during hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Surjan, Rodrigo C.; Basseres, Tiago; Pajecki, Denis; Puzzo, Daniel B.; Makdissi, Fabio F.; Machado, Marcel A.C.; Battilana, Alexandre Gustavo Bellorio

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for malignant liver tumours. Nevertheless, surgical approach to tumours located close to the confluence of the hepatic veins is a challenging issue. Trisectionectomies are considered the first curative option for treatment of these tumours. However, those procedures are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates primarily due to post-operative liver failure. Thus, maximal preservation of functional liver parenchyma should always be attempted. We describe the isolated resection of Segment 8 for the treatment of a tumour involving the right hepatic vein and in contact with the middle hepatic vein and retrohepatic vena cava with immediate reconstruction of the right hepatic vein with a vascular graft. This is the first time this type of reconstruction was performed, and it allowed to preserve all but one of the hepatic segments with normal venous outflow. This innovative technique is a fast and safe method to reconstruct hepatic veins. PMID:27076622

  13. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT) has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT) have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. Materials and methods The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs), IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Results Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Conclusions Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated lung tumours were

  14. Comprehensive insights into microcystin-LR effects on hepatic lipid metabolism using cross-omics technologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongyao; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Bing; Yin, Jinbao; Yu, Yunjiang; Yang, Liuyan

    2016-09-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) can induce hepatic tissue damages and molecular toxicities, but its effects on lipid metabolism remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of MC-LR exposure on mice lipid metabolism and uncovered the underlying mechanism through metabonomic, transcriptomic and metagenomic analyses after administration of mice with MC-LR by gavage for 28 d. Increased liver weight and abdominal fat weight, and evident hepatic lipid vacuoles accumulation were observed in the mice fed with 0.2mg/kg/d MC-LR. Serum nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that MC-LR treatment altered the levels of serum metabolites including triglyceride, unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) and very low density lipoprotein. Digital Gene Expression technology was used to reveal differential expression of hepatic transcriptomes, demonstrating that MC-LR treatment disturbed hepatic UFA biosynthesis and activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathways via Pparγ, Fabp1 and Fabp2 over-expression. Metagenomic analyses of gut microbiota revealed that MC-LR exposure also increased abundant ratio of Firmicutes vs. Bacteroidetes in gut and altered biosynthetic pathways of various microbial metabolic and pro-inflammatory molecules. In conclusion, oral MC-LR exposure can induce hepatic lipid metabolism disorder mediated by UFA biosynthesis and PPAR activation, and gut microbial community shift may play an important role in the metabolic disturbance. PMID:27208774

  15. Effects of intranasal insulin on hepatic fat accumulation and energy metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Gancheva, Sofiya; Koliaki, Chrysi; Bierwagen, Alessandra; Nowotny, Peter; Heni, Martin; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Szendroedi, Julia; Roden, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Studies in rodents suggest that insulin controls hepatic glucose metabolism through brain-liver crosstalk, but human studies using intranasal insulin to mimic central insulin delivery have provided conflicting results. In this randomized controlled crossover trial, we investigated the effects of intranasal insulin on hepatic insulin sensitivity (HIS) and energy metabolism in 10 patients with type 2 diabetes and 10 lean healthy participants (CON). Endogenous glucose production was monitored with [6,6-(2)H2]glucose, hepatocellular lipids (HCLs), ATP, and inorganic phosphate concentrations with (1)H/(31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Intranasal insulin transiently increased serum insulin levels followed by a gradual lowering of blood glucose in CON only. Fasting HIS index was not affected by intranasal insulin in CON and patients. HCLs decreased by 35% in CON only, whereas absolute hepatic ATP concentration increased by 18% after 3 h. A subgroup of CON received intravenous insulin to mimic the changes in serum insulin and blood glucose levels observed after intranasal insulin. This resulted in a 34% increase in HCLs without altering hepatic ATP concentrations. In conclusion, intranasal insulin does not affect HIS but rapidly improves hepatic energy metabolism in healthy humans, which is independent of peripheral insulinemia. These effects are blunted in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25576060

  16. The Effects of Physiological and Environmental Factors on Hepatic Perfusion and First-Pass Metabolism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Marlene Woodruff

    The interaction of three important parameters; hepatic blood flow (Q_{rm H} ), plasma protein binding (f), and hepatic intrinsic clearance (CL_{rm int}) determines the disposition of agents undergoing extensive first-pass metabolism. This collection of studies focuses on the interaction of these parameters in man and the rat in the presence and absence of a given physiological and environmental perturbation. Potential mechanisms implicated in the "Food Effect" phenomenon whereby concomitant food intake increases the bioavailability a basic lipophilic drug are examined. These investigations provide insight as to the physiological response of the liver in the face of nutritional, pharmacological and physiological perturbations. The measurement of hepatic blood flow is a necessary endeavor before and understanding of the hepatic circulation or hepatic clearance concepts can be realized. Preliminary studies were performed to improve our understanding of the factors affecting the interpretation of hepatic blood flow estimates. It has been postulated that this food effect is caused at least in part by a transient increase in Q _{rm H} with its associated decrease in hepatic first-pass metabolism. Posture was manipulated in such a manner as to simulate the hepatic blood flow pattern observed in postprandial subjects. Although transient changes in Q_{rm H } comparable in magnitude and duration to those encountered after food consumption were observed, the AUC _{rm oral} for propanolol was not affected. It is important to assess the free concentration being presented to the organ which is highly extracting the drug. Single macronutrient feedings of glucose and vitamin-free casein to male Sprague-Dawley rats did not produce significant changes in the serum protein binding of a model basic lipophilic drug (quinidine) in systemic or hepatic blood. It has been postulated that food intake may have a greater influence on the bioavailability of metoprolol (a high clearance drug

  17. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination in children, adolescents, and adults.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis A is a major public health problem in the United States and other developed countries, largely because decreased natural immunity allows for increased susceptibility. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of routine vaccination of children, adolescents, and certain high-risk adults against hepatitis A, economic analyses of hepatitis A vaccination were identified through searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and BIOSIS (February, 1992, to December, 2001) for studies, reviews, editorials, and letters from peer-reviewed journals published in English, French, German, Italian, or Spanish. Experts were also contacted. Articles conforming to accepted standards of quality for health-economic studies were used to compile data on vaccination of children, and results were synthesized in a narrative review. This review of economic analyses of vaccine use in several developed countries shows cost-effectiveness comparable with that of other vaccines in children and within accepted boundaries for adolescents and high-risk adults. PMID:12500187

  18. Hepatic glutathione after ethanol administration in rat: effects of cimetidine and omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Battiston, L; Tulissi, P; Moretti, M; Mazzoran, L; Marchi, P; Pussini, E; Pozzato, G

    1995-05-01

    As a fraction of ingested ethanol (EtOH) is metabolized by gastric mucosa, different amounts of alcohol reach the liver, when the same dose is administered by oral or intravenous route. In previous experiments, we demonstrated that the decrease of hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) is less pronounced and is followed by a quicker recovery after oral than after intraperitoneal administration of the same amount of EtOH. Therefore, the time-course of hepatic GSH concentration seems to be an indirect assay of EtOH metabolism by the liver. On the basis of these findings, any condition causing a reduced function of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) should show up as a more severe depletion of hepatic GSH. In the same rat experimental model we determined the effects of cimetidine and omeprazole administration on gastric ADH activity and on the time-course of hepatic GSH after EtOH load. Cimetidine was shown to inhibit gastric ADH with a Ki of 0.167 +/- 0.009 mmol l-1; accordingly, the pretreatment with this drug (20 mg kg-1 b.w. per day for 1 week) determined, after oral EtOH load, a marked reduction of hepatic GSH, likewise after intraperitoneal administration. Omeprazole exerted only a marginal inhibition on gastric ADH and this drug (0.3 mg kg-1 b.w. per day for 1 week) did not modify the time-course of hepatic GSH concentrations after EtOH load. This study indicates that the inhibition of gastric ADH, when associated with EtOH intake, induces depletion of the hepatic GSH concentration and, therefore, possible liver damage. PMID:7479528

  19. The cost-effectiveness of boceprevir for hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Neoh, Chin Fen; Kong, David C M

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly to treat and, has high morbidity and mortality. The addition of new protease inhibitors (i.e., boceprevir, telaprevir), to the standard dual therapy with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin, for the treatment of HCV infection has demonstrated superior efficacy with shorter treatment duration, but at higher drug acquisition costs and incidence of adverse events. Robust economic data are required to inform healthcare decision for the optimal use of these expensive antiviral agents. Accordingly, this review will explore the clinical and economic aspects of boceprevir-based treatment strategies. Important considerations, challenges and gaps for future pharmacoeconomic research in this setting are highlighted. PMID:24708054

  20. Therapeutic effects of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera) in the prevention of diseases via modulation of anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-tumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Arshad H; Aly, Salah M; Ali, Habeeb; Babiker, Ali Y; Srikar, Sauda; khan, Amjad A

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment of various diseases based on synthetic drugs is expensive, alters genetic and metabolic pathways and also shows adverse side effects. Thus, safe and effective approach is needed to prevent the diseases development and progression. In this vista, Natural products are good remedy in the treatment/management of diseases and they are affordable and effective without any adverse effects. Dates are main fruit in the Arabian Peninsula and are considered to be one of the most significant commercial crops and also have been documented in Holy Quran and modern scientific literatures. Earlier studies have shown that constituents of dates act as potent antioxidant, anti-tumour as well as anti-inflammatory, provide a suitable alternative therapy in various diseases cure. In this review, dates fruits has medicinal value are summarized in terms of therapeutic implications in the diseases control through anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and ant-diabetic effect. PMID:24753740

  1. Mediated effect of endotoxin and lead upon hepatic metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttner, R.E.; Ebata, T.; Schumer, W.

    1984-10-01

    A test was made of the possibility that gram-negative bacterial cell wall lipopolysaccharides acted directly on key glucoregulatory enzymes in rat liver cytosol to cause the characteristic hypoglycemia of severe endotoxemia. Fasted male rats were sensitized to endotoxin by the simultaneous intravenous injection of lead acetate. The minimum systemic dosage of endotoxin necessary to perturb the normal pattern of hepatic glycolytic intermediates was determined by serial testing with diminishing dosages of endotoxin. The hepatocyte concentration of endotoxin was then calculated from this minimum dosage by use of literature data on the fraction of endotoxin delivered to liver cells after a systemic intravenous injection of radiochromium labeled lipopolysaccharides. Accepting a molecular weight of 118,000 daltons for the smallest endotoxin monomer capable of evoking a physiologic response, the molar amount of endotoxin present in 1 gram of hepatocytes was readily calculated. The concentration of glucoregulatory enzymes in parenchymal cells was then estimated from other literature sources. It was found that the amount of endotoxin in the hepatocytes was insufficient to combine directly with even 1 per cent of the quantity of a single key glucoregulatory enzyme in liver parenchyma. Since a one to one stoichiometric reaction between endotoxin and enzyme could not occur in the liver cytosol, a direct interaction mechanism between agonist and biocatalyst can be ruled out. It is concluded that bacterial endotoxin must act on hepatic glucoregulation by an indirect mechanism presumably based upon the release and operation of mediators.

  2. Ameliorative effects of pycnogenol on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tai-Hwan; Yang, Young-Su; Lee, Jong-Chan; Moon, Chang-Jong; Kim, Sung-Ho; Jun, Woojin; Park, Seung-Chun; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2007-11-01

    This study evaluated the putative antioxidant activity of Pycnogenol (PYC) against CCl4-induced hepatic oxidative damage in Sprague-Dawley rats. A single oral dose of CCl4 (1.25 mL/kg) produced significantly increased levels of serum aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities. In addition, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, and decreased catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities were observed in the hepatic tissues. However, concomitant administration with PYC (10 or 20 mg/kg) significantly improved CCl4-induced hepatic injury, as evidenced by the decline of serum AST and ALT activities in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, PYC reduced MDA concentration and increased GSH levels and catalase, SOD and GST activities in hepatic tissues, indicating that concomitant administration with PYC efficiently prevent the CCl4-induced oxidative damage in rats. The free radical scavenging assay showed that PYC has a dose-dependent scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals. These results indicate that PYC has an antioxidant effect against CCl4-induced hepatic oxidative damage and is useful as a hepatoprotective agent against various liver diseases induced by oxidative stress. PMID:17886222

  3. Effect of Trichlorfon on Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Crucian Carp Carassius auratus gibelio

    PubMed Central

    Xu, WeiNa; Liu, WenBin; Shao, XianPing; Jiang, GuangZhen; Li, XianngFei

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the toxic effects of the organophosphate pesticide trichlorfon on hepatic lipid accumulation in crucian carp Carassius auratus gibelio. Seventy-five fish were divided into five groups (each group in triplicate), and then exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg/L of trichlorfon and fed with commercial feed for 30 d. At the end of the experiment, plasma and hepatic lipid metabolic biochemical status were analyzed. Triglyceride contents were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in liver but decreased in plasma after 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg/L trichlorfon treatments. Plasma insulin contents were markedly (P < 0.05) increased when trichlorfon concentrations were 0.5, 1.0, and 4.0 mg/L. There were no significant differences in hepatic hormone-sensitive lipase contents between the trichlorfon-treated fish and the controls. Hepatic cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate, very-low-density lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein B100 contents were decreased in the fish when trichlorfon concentration was 2.0 mg/L. Furthermore, electron microscope observations showed rough endoplasmic reticulum dilatation and mitochondrial vacuolization in hepatocytes with trichlorfon exposure. On the basis of morphological and physiological evidence, trichlorfon influenced crucian carp hepatic pathways of lipid metabolism and hepatocellular ultrastructure, which resulted in lipid accumulation in the liver. PMID:22897202

  4. Protective effects of fish oil, allopurinol, and verapamil on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Messiha, Basim Anwar Shehata; Abo-Youssef, Amira M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The major aim of this work was to study the protective effects of fish oil (FO), allopurinol, and verapamil on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced injury in experimental rats. Materials and Methods: Sixty male Wistar albino rats were randomly assigned to six groups of 10 rats each. Group 1 served as a negative control. Group 2 served as hepatic IR control injury. Groups 3, 4, 5, and 6 received N-acetylcysteine (standard), FO, allopurinol, and verapamil, respectively, for 3 consecutive days prior to ischemia. All animals were fasted for 12 h, anesthetized and underwent midline laparotomy. The portal triads were clamped by mini-artery clamp for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 30 min. Blood samples were withdrawn for estimation of serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) activities as well as hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, myeloperoxidase, and total nitrate/nitrite levels, in addition to histopathological examination. Results: Fish oil, allopurinol, and verapamil reduced hepatic IR injury as evidenced by significant reduction in serum ALT and AST enzyme activities. FO and verapamil markedly reduced oxidative stress as compared to control IR injury. Levels of inflammatory biomarkers in liver were also reduced after treatment with FO, allopurinol, or verapamil. In accordance, a marked improvement of histopathological findings was observed with all of the three treatments. Conclusion: The findings of this study prove the benefits of FO, allopurinol, and verapamil on hepatic IR-induced liver injury and are promising for further clinical trials. PMID:26283828

  5. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Light-oxygen effect in cells and its potential applications in tumour therapy (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, S. D.; Ivanov, Andrei V.

    1999-12-01

    The light-oxygen effect (POE) represents damage (and at low optical doses, activation) of cells by photogeneration of molecular singlet oxygen from O2 dissolved in cells, in accordance with the reaction: 3O2+hν→1O2→ biological effect. The phases of evolution of the LOE are similar to the phases, observed in cell experiments, of the photodynamic effect (PDE) the mechanism of which is the basis of the familiar method of photodynamic cancer therapy. The reported proofs of the occurrence of the LOE are in the form of detailed spectra of the biological action of optical radiation on cells recorded in four spectral intervals with the aid of tunable lasers. Allowances are made for the relationships governing a new type of cell excitation, associated with reversible structural transitions in the biomembrane. A demonstration is reported of the same efficiency of cw and pulsed irradiation. An analysis is made of the reasons why the optical doses initiating the PDE and the LOE are comparable. The results are given of the first experimental applications of the LOE in tumour therapy. Identification of the primary photoacceptor (O2) in cell biostimulation and photodestruction provides a scientific basis for the development of low-intensity laser light-oxygen cancer therapy methods.

  6. Anti-tumour effects of antibodies targeting the extracellular cysteine-rich region of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB4.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Sally-Anne; Douglas, Evelyn L; Mertens-Walker, Inga; Lisle, Jessica E; Maharaj, Mohanan S N; Herington, Adrian C

    2015-04-10

    EphB4 is a membrane-bound receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) commonly over-produced by many epithelial cancers but with low to no expression in most normal adult tissues. EphB4 over-production promotes ligand-independent signaling pathways that increase cancer cell viability and stimulate migration and invasion. Several studies have shown that normal ligand-dependent signaling is tumour suppressive and therefore novel therapeutics which block the tumour promoting ligand-independent signaling and/or stimulate tumour suppressive ligand-dependent signaling will find application in the treatment of cancer. An EphB4-specific polyclonal antibody, targeting a region of 200 amino acids in the extracellular portion of EphB4, showed potent in vitro anti-cancer effects measured by an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in anchorage independent growth. Peptide exclusion was used to identify the epitope targeted by this antibody within the cysteine-rich region of the EphB4 protein, a sequence defined as a potential ligand interacting interface. Addition of antibody to cancer cells resulted in phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of the EphB4 protein, suggesting a mechanism that is ligand mimetic and tumour suppressive. A monoclonal antibody which specifically targets this identified extracellular epitope of EphB4 significantly reduced breast cancer xenograft growth in vivo confirming that EphB4 is a useful target for ligand-mimicking antibody-based anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25831049

  7. Anti-tumour effects of antibodies targeting the extracellular cysteine-rich region of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB4

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Sally-Anne; Douglas, Evelyn L.; Mertens-Walker, Inga; Lisle, Jessica E.; Maharaj, Mohanan S.N.; Herington, Adrian C.

    2015-01-01

    EphB4 is a membrane-bound receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) commonly over-produced by many epithelial cancers but with low to no expression in most normal adult tissues. EphB4 over-production promotes ligand-independent signaling pathways that increase cancer cell viability and stimulate migration and invasion. Several studies have shown that normal ligand-dependent signaling is tumour suppressive and therefore novel therapeutics which block the tumour promoting ligand-independent signaling and/or stimulate tumour suppressive ligand-dependent signaling will find application in the treatment of cancer. An EphB4-specific polyclonal antibody, targeting a region of 200 amino acids in the extracellular portion of EphB4, showed potent in vitro anti-cancer effects measured by an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in anchorage independent growth. Peptide exclusion was used to identify the epitope targeted by this antibody within the cysteine-rich region of the EphB4 protein, a sequence defined as a potential ligand interacting interface. Addition of antibody to cancer cells resulted in phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of the EphB4 protein, suggesting a mechanism that is ligand mimetic and tumour suppressive. A monoclonal antibody which specifically targets this identified extracellular epitope of EphB4 significantly reduced breast cancer xenograft growth in vivo confirming that EphB4 is a useful target for ligand-mimicking antibody-based anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25831049

  8. Tumour-specific CD4 T cells eradicate melanoma via indirect recognition of tumour-derived antigen.

    PubMed

    Shklovskaya, Elena; Terry, Alexandra M; Guy, Thomas V; Buckley, Adrian; Bolton, Holly A; Zhu, Erhua; Holst, Jeff; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in tumour immunity has been increasingly recognised, with recent reports describing robust CD4 T cell-dependent tumour control in mice whose immune-regulatory mechanisms have been disturbed by irradiation, chemotherapy, immunomodulatory therapy and/or constitutive immunodeficiency. Tumour control in such models has been attributed in large part to direct Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II-dependent CD4 T cell killing of tumour cells. To test whether CD4 T cells can eradicate tumours without directly killing tumour cells, we developed an animal model in which tumour-derived antigen could be presented to T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD4 T cells by host but not tumour MHC class II molecules. In I-E(+) mice bearing I-E(null) tumours, naive I-E-restricted CD4 T cells proliferated locally in tumour-draining lymph nodes after recognising tumour-derived antigen on migratory dendritic cells. In lymphopaenic but not immunosufficient hosts, CD4 T cells differentiated into polarised T helper type 1 (Th1) cells expressing interferon gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-2 but little IL-17, and cleared established tumours. Tumour clearance was enhanced by higher TCR affinity for tumour antigen-MHC class II and was critically dependent on IFNγ, as demonstrated by early tumour escape in animals treated with an IFNγ blocking antibody. Thus, CD4 T cells and IFNγ can control tumour growth without direct T-cell killing of tumour cells, and without requiring additional adaptive immune cells such as CD8 T cells and B cells. Our results support a role for effective CD4 T cell-dependent tumour immunity against MHC class II-negative tumours. PMID:26837456

  9. Antiproliferative effect of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin in vitro and in human tumour xenografted athymic nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, P. Y.; Bressolle, F.; Pinguet, F.

    1998-01-01

    The anti-tumour activity of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MEBCD), a cyclic oligosaccharide known for its interaction with the plasma membrane, was investigated in vitro and in vivo and compared with that of doxorubicin (DOX) in the human tumour models MCF7 breast carcinoma and A2780 ovarian carcinoma. In vitro proliferation was assessed using the MTT assay. In vivo studies were carried out using xenografted Swiss nude mice injected weekly i.p. with MEBCD at 300 or 800 mg kg(-1) or DOX at 2 mg kg(-1), during 2 months. Under these conditions, MEBCD was active against MCF7 and A2780 cell lines and tumour xenografts. For each tumour model, the tumoral volume of the xenografted mice treated with MEBCD was at least twofold reduced compared with the control group. In the MCF7 model, MEBCD (800 mg kg(-1)) was more active than DOX (2 mg kg(-1)). After 56 days of treatment with MEBCD, no toxicologically meaningful differences were observed in macroscopic and microscopic parameters compared with controls. The accumulation of MEBCD in normal and tumour tissues was also assessed using a chromatographic method. Results indicated that after a single injection of MEBCD, tumour, liver and kidneys accumulated the highest concentrations of MEBCD. These results provided a basis for the potential therapeutic application of MEBCD in cancer therapy. PMID:9820174

  10. Estimation of the effect of increasing UVB exposure on the human immune system and related resistance to infectious diseases and tumours.

    PubMed

    Garssen, J; Norval, M; el-Ghorr, A; Gibbs, N K; Jones, C D; Cerimele, D; De Simone, C; Caffieri, S; Dall'Acqua, F; De Gruijl, F R; Sontag, Y; Van Loveren, H

    1998-03-01

    Exposure to UV light has, besides some beneficial effects (vitamin D production), many harmful effects on human health. UVB irradiation has been shown to suppress both systemic and local immune responses to a variety of antigens, including some microorganisms. However, it is still not known whether such immunomodulating effects may lead to an increase in the number and severity of certain tumours and/or infections in humans. We report herein the data provided by a project that was funded by the European Union (Programme Environment), and that was aimed at the estimation of the risk associated with increased UVB exposure due to ozone depletion regarding the deleterious effects on the immune system and related resistance to tumours and infections in humans. The data, obtained by the different research groups involved, were assembled and used to calculate for the first time a risk assessment for increased environmental exposure to UVB in human subjects. PMID:9595706

  11. Additive Effects of Nicotine and High-Fat Diet on Hepatic Steatosis in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Theodore C.; Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Parveen, Meher; Najjar, Sonia M.; Liu, Yanjun; Mangubat, Michael; Shin, Chang-Sung; Lyzlov, Alexei; Ivey, Rasheed; Shaheen, Magda; French, Samuel W.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease and may contribute to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We hypothesize that in the presence of nicotine, high-fat diet (HFD) causes more severe hepatic steatosis in obese mice. Adult C57BL6 male mice were fed a normal chow diet or HFD and received twice daily injections of nicotine (0.75 mg/kg body weight, ip) or saline for 10 wk. Light microscopic image analysis revealed significantly higher lipid accumulation in livers from mice on HFD plus nicotine (190 ± 19 μm2), compared with mice on HFD alone (28 ± 1.2 μm2). A significant reduction in the percent volume of endoplasmic reticulum (67.8%) and glycogen (49.2%) was also noted in hepatocytes from mice on HFD plus nicotine, compared with mice on HFD alone. The additive effects of nicotine on the severity of HFD-induced hepatic steatosis was associated with significantly greater oxidative stress, increased hepatic triglyceride levels, higher incidence of hepatocellular apoptosis, inactivation (dephosphorylation) of AMP-activated protein kinase, and activation of its downstream target acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase. Treatment with acipimox, an inhibitor of lipolysis, significantly reduced nicotine plus HFD-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. We conclude that: 1) greater oxidative stress coupled with inactivation of AMP-activated protein kinase mediate the additive effects of nicotine and HFD on hepatic steatosis in obese mice and 2) increased lipolysis is an important contributor to hepatic steatosis. We surmise that nicotine exposure is likely to exacerbate the metabolic abnormalities induced by high-fat intake in obese patients. PMID:23093702

  12. OVERVIEW OF AN INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATION ON EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF MODEL HEPATOTOXICANTS ON HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the Effects of Methapyrilene and Clofibrate on Hepatic Gene Expression: A Collaboration Between Laboratories and a Comparison of Platform and Analytical Approaches

    Roger G. Ulrich1, John C. Rockett2, G. Gordon Gibson3 and Syril Pettit4

    1 Rosetta Inpharmat...

  13. Prooxidative effect of copper--metallothionein in the acute cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Suntres, Zacharias E; Lui, Edmund M K

    2006-01-16

    This study was concerned with the role of copper (Cu) and Cu-metallothionein (Cu-MT) in oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced oxidative injury was examined in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells isolated from host mice pretreated with 0, 1 or 2mg of CuSO(4) (ip) 24h earlier. Control Ehrlich cells contained low levels of Cu and Cu treatment produced dose-related increases in cellular Cu and Cu-MT levels and corresponding increases in sensitivity to oxidative toxicity of H(2)O(2) (LC(50), cell blebbing, lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion, and increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)](i)). Hydrogen peroxide treatment also resulted in the oxidation of MT thiolates, reduction in the binding of Cu to MT resulting in translocation of Cu to other subcellular sites. d-penicillamine, a Cu-chelating agent, obliterated the sensitization effect of Cu-pretreatment and reduced the redistribution of MT-bound Cu, suggesting the participation of Cu ions derived from MT in promoting oxidant stress. Additional experiments with desferoxamine and mannitol have revealed the involvement of a Cu-dependent Fenton reaction in the mediation of the prooxidative effect of Cu-MT. These data suggest that cells with high levels of Cu-MT may be particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. PMID:16221516

  14. Brain and spinal tumour.

    PubMed

    Goh, C H; Lu, Y Y; Lau, B L; Oy, J; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2014-12-01

    This study reviewed the epidemiology of brain and spinal tumours in Sarawak from January 2009 till December 2012. The crude incidence of brain tumour in Sarawak was 4.6 per 100,000 population/year with cumulative rate 0.5%. Meningioma was the most common brain tumour (32.3%) and followed by astrocytoma (19.4%). Only brain metastases showed a rising trend and cases were doubled in 4 years. This accounted for 15.4% and lung carcinoma was the commonest primary. Others tumour load were consistent. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and astrocytoma were common in paediatrics (60%). We encountered more primary spinal tumour rather than spinal metastases. Intradural schwannoma was the commonest and frequently located at thoracic level. The current healthcare system in Sarawak enables a more consolidate data collection to reflect accurate brain tumours incidence. This advantage allows subsequent future survival outcome research and benchmarking for healthcare resource planning. PMID:25934956

  15. Ionone Derivatives from the Mycelium of Phellinus linteus and the Inhibitory Effect on Activated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiow-Chyn; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Pan, Tai-Long; Chen, Fu-An; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Three new γ-ionylideneacetic acid derivatives, phellinulins A–C (1–3), were characterized from the mycelium extract of Phellinus linteus. The chemical structures were established based on the spectroscopic analysis. In addition, phellinulin A (1) was subjected to the examination of effects on activated rat hepatic stellate cells and exhibited significant inhibition of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27164091

  16. The increased gastroprotective effect of pioglitazone in cholestatic rats: role of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Moezi, Leila; Janahmadi, Zeinab; Amirghofran, Zahra; Nekooeian, Ali Akbar; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of gastric ulcers is high in cholestatic patients, but the exact mechanism of this increased frequency remains uncertain. It has been shown that pioglitazone accelerates the healing of pre-existing gastric ulcers. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of pioglitazone, on the gastric mucosal lesions in cholestatic rats. Cholestasis was induced by surgical ligation of common bile duct and sham-operated rats served as control. Different groups of sham and cholestatic animals received solvent or pioglitazone (5, 15, 30 mg/kg) for 7 days. On the day eight rats were killed after oral ethanol administration and the area of gastric lesions was measured. The serums of rats were also collected to determine serum levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β and bilirubin. The ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage was significantly more severe in cholestatic rats than sham-operated ones. Pretreatment with pioglitazone dose-dependently attenuated gastric lesions induced by ethanol in both sham and cholestatic rats, but this effect was more prominent in cholestatic ones. The effect of pioglitazone was associated with a significant fall in serum levels of TNF-α in cholestatic rats. L-NAME, a non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, and decreased pioglitazone-induced gastroprotective effect in cholestatic rats, while aminoguanidine, a selective inducible NOS inhibitor, potentiated pioglitazone-induced gastroprotective effect in the cholestatic rats. Chronic treatment with pioglitazone exerts an enhanced gastroprotective effect on the stomach ulcers of cholestatic rats compared to sham rats probably due to constitutive NOS induction and/or inducible NOS inhibition and attenuating release of TNF-α. PMID:24456333

  17. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T—contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

    PubMed Central

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Szomolanyi, P.; Kronnerwetter, C.; Widhalm, G.; Weber, M.; Nemec, S.; Juras, V.; Ladd, M. E.; Prayer, D.; Trattnig, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Methods Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. Results The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8±45.8 vs. 43.9±25.3 [p=0.010], 128.1±53.7 vs. 75.5±32.4 [p=0.004]) and the full dose (129.2±50.9 vs. 66.6±33.1 [p=0.002], 165.4±54.2 vs. 102.6±45.4 [p=0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p=.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Conclusion Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. PMID:25194707

  18. [Protective effects of S-adenosylmethionine against CCl4 - and ethanol-induced experimental hepatic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Gu, J-X; Zou, X-P; Zhuge, Y-Z

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effects of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) on experimental hepatic fibrotic rats induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) and ethanol and the relevant potential mechanisms were explored. Hepatic fibrotic rat models were established with CCl(4) diluted in olive oil being drunk with 10% ethanol in water. SAM was used both for prevention and treatment. Histological evaluation was carried out by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson staining of hepatic samples. Serum biochemical assays showed that alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was increased and albumin (ALB) was decreased by CCl(4) and ethanol, and both effects were suppressed by preventing and treating use of SAM. The model control rats got significantly higher scores in fatty degeneration, lobular inflammation, and hepatocyte ballooning. A significant improvement was observed in the SAM-prevented rats and SAM-treated rats, which was consistent with the change of fibrosis scoring in each group. Smad3 was induced by CCl(4) and ethanol in the model control group, which was significantly down regulated by SAM. SAM reduced both total Smad3 and phospho-Smad3 in vitro. SAM had a protective effect on hepatic fibrosis in rats induced by CCl(4) combined with ethanol and the down-regulation of activity and expression of Smad3 were involved in the potential mechanisms. PMID:27239849

  19. Effect of Liverubin™ on hepatic biochemical profile in patients of alcoholic liver disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Nanda, V; Gupta, V; Sharma, S N; Pasricha, A; Karmakar, A Kumar; Patel, A; Bhatt, V M; Kantroo, B L; Kumar, B; Paul, N K Ketar; Attam, R

    2014-12-01

    Liverubin™ is an available drug in the Indian market that contains silymarin, the major active complex extracted from the medicinal plant milk thistle (Silybum marianum L.). The study retrospectively tracked and analyzed the data of 602 patients, out of which 230 were alcohol induced; 131 with alcohol-induced liver damage (ALD), 13 with liver cirrhosis, and 86 with fatty liver; to assess the effects of water soluble Silymarin (Liverubin™) on important hepatic biochemical parameters. The data was collected from 32 major cities treated by 72 physicians across India who were observed for the specified treatment duration of 11 months. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics. At the end of the treatment the hepatic biochemical profile was appreciably improved: the mean % of change in the levels of important hepatic biochemical parameters was observed as follows: total bilirubin 63.48% (direct bilirubin: 64.96%; indirect bilirubin: 61.63%). The serum SGOT and SGPT changed at a mean % of 65.43 and 69.31 respectively while serum alkaline phosphatase was changed at a mean % rate of 39.81. Liverubin™ proved to be safe & well-tolerated among the studied population and no significant treatment related adverse events were reported during the study. Liverubin™ treatment is found to bring about effective lowering of abnormally elevated hepatic biochemical parameters. Liverubin™, water soluble active Silymarin, in the popularly prescribed doses of 140-mg tid is observed to be a promising safe and effective drug in cases of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26076375

  20. Safe and cost-effective control of post-transplantation recurrence of hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Akinobu; Yagi, Takahito; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    A combination of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NUC) is the current standard of care for controlling hepatitis B recurrence after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). However, long-term HBIG administration is associated with several unresolved issues, including limited availability and extremely high cost, and thus several protocols for treatment with low-dose HBIG combined with NUC or HBIG-free regimens have been developed. This article reviews recent advances in post-OLT hepatitis B virus (HBV) control and future methodological directions. New NUC such as entecavir, tenofovir or lamivudine plus adefovir dipivoxil combinations induce a very low frequency of viral resistance. The withdrawal of HBIG after several months of OLT under new NUC continuation also has permissible effects. Even after HBV reactivation, NUC can usually achieve viral control when viral markers are strictly followed up. Another approach is to induce self-producing anti-HBV antibodies via vaccination with a hepatitis B surface antigen vaccine. However, HBV vaccination is not sufficiently effective in patients to treat liver cirrhosis type B after OLT because immune tolerance to the virus has already continued for several decades. Trials of its safety and cost-effectiveness are required. This review advocates a safe and economical approach to controlling post-OLT HBV recurrence. PMID:24905970

  1. Safe and cost-effective control of post-transplantation recurrence of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Akinobu; Yagi, Takahito; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    A combination of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NUC) is the current standard of care for controlling hepatitis B recurrence after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). However, long-term HBIG administration is associated with several unresolved issues, including limited availability and extremely high cost, and thus several protocols for treatment with low-dose HBIG combined with NUC or HBIG-free regimens have been developed. This article reviews recent advances in post-OLT hepatitis B virus (HBV) control and future methodological directions. New NUC such as entecavir, tenofovir or lamivudine plus adefovir dipivoxil combinations induce a very low frequency of viral resistance. The withdrawal of HBIG after several months of OLT under new NUC continuation also has permissible effects. Even after HBV reactivation, NUC can usually achieve viral control when viral markers are strictly followed up. Another approach is to induce self-producing anti-HBV antibodies via vaccination with a hepatitis B surface antigen vaccine. However, HBV vaccination is not sufficiently effective in patients to treat liver cirrhosis type B after OLT because immune tolerance to the virus has already continued for several decades. Trials of its safety and cost-effectiveness are required. This review advocates a safe and economical approach to controlling post-OLT HBV recurrence. PMID:24905970

  2. Protective Effects of Alisma orientale Extract against Hepatic Steatosis via Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Han, Yu-Ran; Nam, Jeong Soo; Han, Chang Woo; Kim, Byung Joo; Jeong, Han-Sol; Ha, Ki-Tae; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is associated with the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. Alisma orientale Juzepzuk is a traditional medicinal herb for diuretics, diabetes, hepatitis, and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of methanol extract of the tuber of Alisma orientale (MEAO) against ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis in vitro and in vivo. MEAO inhibited the tunicamycin-induced increase in luciferase activity of ER stress-reporter constructs containing ER stress response element and ATF6 response element. MEAO significantly inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress marker expression including GRP78, CHOP, and XBP-1 in tunicamycin-treated Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells and the livers of tunicamycin-injected mice. It also inhibited tunicamycin-induced accumulation of cellular triglyceride. Similar observations were made under physiological ER stress conditions such as in palmitate (PA)-treated HepG2 cells and the livers of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. MEAO repressed hepatic lipogenic gene expression in PA-treated HepG2 cells and the livers of HFD obese mice. Furthermore, MEAO repressed very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) expression and improved ApoB secretion in the livers of tunicamycin-injected mice or HFD obese mice as well as in tunicamycin or PA-treated HepG2 cells. Alismol, a guaiane-type sesquiterpenes in Alisma orientale, inhibited GRP78 expression in tunicamycin-treated HepG2 cells. In conclusion, MEAO attenuates ER stress and prevents hepatic steatosis pathogenesis via inhibition of expression of the hepatic lipogenic genes and VLDLR, and enhancement of ApoB secretion. PMID:26540043

  3. Alleviative effects from boswellic acid on acetaminophen-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lung-Che; Hu, Li-Hong; Yin, Mei-Chin

    2016-06-01

    Protective effects of boswellic acid (BA) against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in Balb/ cA mice were examined. BA, at 0.05 or 0.1%, was supplied for 4 weeks. Acute liver injury was induced by APAP treatment. Results showed that BA intake increased hepatic BA bioavailability. APAP treatment decreased glutathione (GSH) level, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) production; and lowered activity and protein expression of glutathione reductase (GR) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in liver. BA intake at both doses alleviated subsequent APAP-induced oxidative stress by retaining GSH content, decreasing ROS and GSSG formations, reserving activity and expression of GR and HO-1 in liver, and lowering hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 activity and expression. APAP treatment enhanced hepatic levels of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. BA pre-intake diminished APAP-induced release of those inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. APAP upregulated hepatic protein expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, TLR-4, MyD88, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p50, NF-κB p65 and JNK. BA pre-intake at both doses suppressed the expression of NF-κB p65 and p-JNK, and only at 0.1% down-regulated hepatic TLR-3, TLR-4 and MyD88 expression. APAP led to obvious foci of inflammatory cell infiltration in liver, determined by H&E stain. BA intake at both doses attenuated hepatic inflammatory infiltration. These findings support that boswellic acid is a potent hepatoprotective agent. PMID:27161000

  4. Effect of tomato extract supplementation against high-fat diet-induced hepatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Melendez-Martinez, Antonio J; Nascimento, Andre F; Wang, Yan; Liu, Chun; Mao, Yilei; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2013-08-01

    Higher intake of tomatoes or tomato-based products has been associated with lower risk for liver cancer. In this study, we investigated the effects of supplementing tomato extract (TE), which contains mainly lycopene (LY) and less amounts of its precursors, phytoene (PT) and phytofluene (PTF) against high-fat-diet related hepatic inflammation and lipid profiles, and carcinogenesis. Four groups of rats were injected with a hepatic carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and then fed either Lieber-DeCarli control diet (35% fat, CD) or high fat diet (71% fat, HFD) with or without TE supplementation for 6 weeks. Results showed that the supplementation of TE significantly decreased the multiplicity of both inflammatory foci and altered hepatic foci (AHF) expressing placental form glutathione-S transferase (p-GST) in the liver of HFD-fed rats. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that TE supplementation results in a significantly higher accumulation of both PT and PTF than LY in livers of rats. In addition, the TE supplementation led to a decrease of plasma cholesterol levels but an overall increase in hepatic lipids which is associated with changes in the genes on lipid metabolism, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and the sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1). These data suggest that TE supplementation decreases hepatic inflammation and plasma total cholesterol associated with high dietary fat intake. Moreover, TE supplementation results in an accumulation of hepatic PT and PTF as well as increased lipogenesis suggesting further investigation into their biological function(s). PMID:24273751

  5. Protective effect of gastrodin on bile duct ligation-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Li, Naren; Zhen, Yongzhan; Ge, Maoxu; Li, Yi; Yu, Bin; He, Hongwei; Shao, Rong-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Gastrodin has been showed to possess many beneficial physiological functions, including protection against inflammation and oxidation and apoptosis. Studies showed inflammation and oxidation play important roles in producing liver damage and initiating hepatic fibrogenesis. However, it has not been reported whether gastrodin has a protective effect against hepatic fibrosis or not. This is first ever made attempts to test gastrodin against liver fibrosis in bile duct ligation (BDL) rats. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of gastrodin on BDL-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats. BDL rats were divided into two groups, BDL alone group, and BDL-gastrodin group treated with gastrodin (5 mg/ml in drinking water). The effects of gastrodin on BDL-induced hepatic injury and fibrosis in rats were estimated by assessing serum, urine, bile and liver tissue biochemistry followed by liver histopathology (using hematoxylin & eosin and sirius red stain) and hydroxyproline content measurement. The results showed that gastrodin treatment significantly reduced collagen content, bile duct proliferation and parenchymal necrosis after BDL. The serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) decreased with gastrodin treatment by 15.1 and 23.6 percent respectively in comparison to BDL group did not receive gastrodin. Gastrodin also significantly increased the level of serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) by 62.5 percent and down-regulated the elevated urine total bilirubin (TBIL) by 56.5 percent, but had no effect on total bile acid (TBA) in serum, bile and liver tissues. The immunohistochemical assay showed gastrodin remarkably reduced the expressions of CD68 and NF-κB in BDL rats. Hepatic SOD levels, depressed by BDL, were also increased by gastrodin by 8.4 percent. In addition, the increases of hepatic MDA and NO levels in BDL rats were attenuated by gastrodin by 31.3 and 38.7 percent separately. Our results indicate that gastrodin

  6. The evaluation of inhibitive effectiveness of the tumour necrosis factor-α converting enzyme selective inhibitors by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunbin; Yu, Jin; Gu, Jiuling; Huang, Wei

    2011-04-01

    A novel high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method based on the internal standard method was established for assaying the tumour necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) activity and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) activity, and was used to evaluate the inhibitive effectiveness of inhibitors to TACE and MMP-9. In the assay method for TACE and MMP-9, peptides labelled with the ultraviolet group-Dpa were used as substrates. Alanine-Dpa was synthesised and was used as the internal standard for quantitative analysis. After the peptide substrates were hydrolysed by TACE (MMP-9) for 15 min (25 min) at 37 °C, the amount of remaining substrates were determined by reversed-phased HPLC with UV detection at 353 nm. The relative peak area of the substrate was linearly dependent on the substrate concentration. This method was then applied to determine the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) of GM6001 and inhibitor A for both TACE and MMP-9. PMID:21406033

  7. Brown tumour of the jaw

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Preeti P; Gharote, Harshkant P; Thomas, Shaji; R, Guruprasad; Singh, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Brown tumours are classic bony lesions that arise as a result of the effect of parathyroid hormone on bone tissue in some patients with hyperparathyroidism. They are erosive bony lesions caused by rapid osteolysis and peritrabecular fibrosis, resulting in a local destructive phenomenon. Facial skeleton is involved in about 2% of all cases of which the mandible is frequently affected. A 35-year-old female who was diagnosed with osteomalacia and brown tumour in posterior mandible as the sign of secondary hyperparathyroidism secondary to vitamin D deficiency is presented. PMID:22669885

  8. Hepatic haemangiomata: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Larcher, V F; Howard, E R; Mowat, A P

    1981-01-01

    Five cases of hepatic haemangioma are described, and a sixth (previously reported) is reviewed. Clinical features, investigation, and management are described to show the great variability of the complications and prognosis. Five children presented in the first 10 weeks of life with hepatomegaly; 4 developed congestive cardiac failure; 3 had cutaneous haemangiomata. One child presented at age 4 years with hepatomegaly and anaemia, and on investigation had features of chronic disseminated intravascular coagulation. Focal decrease or patchiness in hepatic uptake of technetium-99m colloid, and abnormal intrahepatic circulation was shown in all cases. In 3 children liver biopsy was performed to exclude malignant disease. In one patient there was spontaneous regression of the tumour by age 3 years. In 3 cases hepatic artery ligation was necessary to control congestive cardiac failure which had persisted despite treatment with digoxin, diuretics, and oral corticosteroids, a procedure which was without complications after up to 8 years. One infant with intractable portal hypertension, hepatic vein obstruction, and severe cholestasis died with persisting alimentary haemorrhage and intra-abdominal sepsis. One child aged 4 years showed no immediate response to hepatic artery ligation but the size of her tumour got smaller and the clinical features diminished after irradiation. These tumours cause considerable morbidity and have a high reported mortality. If congestive cardiac failure is not rapidly controlled, hepatic artery ligation should be performed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7469456

  9. Anti‑fibrotic effects of Acremoniumterricola milleretal mycelium on immunological hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; He, Can; Wu, Wang-Yang; Huang, Huan; Li, Wei-Zu; Yin, Yan-Yan

    2014-12-01

    Acremoniumterricola milleretal mycelium (AMM) exerts numerous protective effects on organs, and has been used in Chinese herb prescriptions to treat refractory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AMM on immunological hepatic fibrosis induced by porcine serum (PS) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered 0.5 ml sterile PS by intraperitoneal injections twice a week for 18 weeks. AMM (175, 350 or 700 mg/kg) and colchicine (0.1 mg/kg) were administered intragastrically each day until the rats were sacrificed. PS administration resulted in marked hepatic fibrosis, as assessed by increased oxidative stress and hepatic collagen content, as well as α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA) expression. AMM significantly reduced liver damage and fibrosis. In addition, AMM decreased the elevation in hydroxyproline, hyaluronic acid, laminin and procollagen type III; increased the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase; decreased α‑SMA expression; and eliminated hepatic collagen deposits. Furthermore, AMM inhibited Smad2/3 phosphorylation and Smad7 expression. These results indicate that AMM is able to reduce oxidative stress, inhibit collagen synthesis and block the transforming growth factor‑β/Smad signaling pathway in a dose‑dependent manner. PMID:25270983

  10. Effects of feeding different lipid sources on hepatic histopathology features and growth traits of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tufarelli, Vincenzo; Bozzo, Giancarlo; Perillo, Antonella; Laudadio, Vito

    2015-10-01

    The effects of different dietary lipid sources on growth traits and hepatic histopathology of broiler chickens were investigated. Hubbard strain one-day old chickens (n=120) were kept in pens and were fed one of the three corn-soybean meal-based diets until 49 days of age. The dietary treatments consisted of 2.5% added oil or fat from three sources as follows: SFO diet containing sunflower oil; LRD diet containing lard, and EVOO diet containing extra-virgin olive oil. Dietary oil or fat type improved significantly body weight and gain as well as feed efficiency in birds fed EVOO compared to those fed the other treatments. Based on our findings, after the whole experimental feeding period it was possible to observe relevant injuries to the liver of the chicks fed with lard, whereas the hepatic histopathological changes appeared less marked or absent in the chicks fed vegetable oils from sunflower or olive. Thus, we can conclude that dietary lipid source affected chicks performance and hepatic histopathology especially when chicks fed diet containing animal fats; whereas feeding extra-virgin olive oil supported positively growth traits and did not result in hepatic histopathological effects. PMID:26277050

  11. Hypolipidemic effect of dietary pea proteins: Impact on genes regulating hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Elena; Parolini, Cinzia; Marchesi, Marta; Diani, Erika; Brambilla, Stefano; Sirtori, Cesare R; Chiesa, Giulia

    2010-05-01

    Controversial data on the lipid-lowering effect of dietary pea proteins have been provided and the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely understood. The aim of the study was to evaluate a possible hypolipidemic activity of a pea protein isolate and to determine whether pea proteins could affect the hepatic lipid metabolism through regulation of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid homeostasis. Rats were fed Nath's hypercholesterolemic diets for 28 days, the protein sources being casein or a pea protein isolate from Pisum sativum. After 14 and 28 days of dietary treatment, rats fed pea proteins had markedly lower plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels than rats fed casein (p<0.05). Pea protein-fed rats displayed higher hepatic mRNA levels of LDL receptor versus those fed casein (p<0.05). Hepatic mRNA concentration of genes involved in fatty acids synthesis, such as fatty acid synthase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase, was lower in pea protein-fed rats than in rats fed casein (p<0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates a marked cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering activity of pea proteins in rats. Moreover, pea proteins appear to affect cellular lipid homeostasis by upregulating genes involved in hepatic cholesterol uptake and by downregulating fatty acid synthesis genes. PMID:20077421

  12. Attenuated Effects of Deep-Sea Water on Hepatic Apoptosis in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsai-Ching; Chiu, Chun-Ching; Lin, Hsou-Lin; Kao, Tseng-Wei; Chen, Li-Jeng; Wu, Li-Yi; Huang, Chih-Yang; Tzang, Bor-Show

    2015-06-30

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder and increasing evidences have indicated a connection between DM and hepatic abnormality. Deep-sea water (DSW) has been applied in many fields, especially in medicine; herein, we investigated the influence of DSW on hepatic apoptosis in streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes rats. Our experimental results firstly demonstrated the beneficial effects of 1×DSW, 2×DSW and 3×DSW in alleviating hepatic apoptosis in STZ-induced diabetic rats. We demonstrated that 1×DSW, 2×DSW and 3×DSW significantly suppressed the caspase-3 activity and TUNEL-positive cells in livers of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Significant reductions of both Fas-dependent and mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic molecules were also detected in livers of STZ-induced diabetic rats receiving DSW. Additionally, apoptotic signaling molecules such as phosphorylated IκB-α and NF-κB were significantly reduced in livers of DSW-treated STZ-induced diabetic rats. These findings indicate hepatic protective effects of DSW on DM and suggest DSW as a possible ingredient for health food. PMID:26014125

  13. Spironolactone Effect in Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Pérez, Julio César; Casillas Ramírez, Araní; Torres González, Liliana; Muñoz Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Perales Quintana, Marlene Marisol; Alarcón Galván, Gabriela; Zapata Chavira, Homero; Guzmán de la Garza, Francisco Javier; Cámara Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo; Fernández Garza, Nancy Esthela; Pérez Rodríguez, Edelmiro; Cordero Pérez, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury, often associated with liver surgery, is an unresolved problem in the clinical practice. Spironolactone is an antagonist of aldosterone that has shown benefits over IR injury in several tissues, but its effects in hepatic IR are unknown. Objective. To evaluate the effect of spironolactone on IR-induced damage in liver. Materials and Methods. Total hepatic ischemia was induced in rats for 20 min followed by 60 min of reperfusion. Spironolactone was administered and hepatic injury, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. Results. After IR, increased transaminases levels and widespread acute inflammatory infiltrate, disorganization of hepatic hemorrhage trabeculae, and presence of apoptotic bodies were observed. Administration of SPI reduced biochemical and histological parameters of liver injury. SPI treatment increased IL-6 levels when compared with IR group but did not modify either IL-1β or TNF-α with respect to IR group. Regarding oxidative stress, increased levels of catalase activity were recorded in IR + SPI group in comparison with group without treatment, whereas MDA levels were similar in IR + SPI and IR groups. Conclusions. Spironolactone reduced the liver damage induced by IR, and this was associated with an increase in IL-6 production and catalase activity. PMID:26798418

  14. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  15. Toxicogenomic Evaluation of Long-term Hepatic Effects of TCDD in Immature, Ovariectomized C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boverhof, Darrell R.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Acute exposure to hepatotoxic doses of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro- dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in mice is characterized by differential gene expression that can be phenotypically anchored to elevated levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, increased relative liver weights, hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and hepatocellular necrosis. Unlike most studies that focus on acute exposure effects, this study evaluated the long-term effects of a single oral gavage of 30 μg/kg TCDD at 1, 4, 12, 24, 36, and 72 weeks postdose in ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice. Hepatic TCDD levels were almost completely eliminated by 24 weeks with a calculated half-life of 12 days. Hepatic gene expression analysis identified 395 unique differentially expressed genes between 1 and 12 weeks that decreased to ≤ 8 by 72 weeks, consistent with the minimal hepatic TCDD levels. Hepatic vacuolization, characteristic of short-term exposure, subsided by 4 weeks. Similarly, TCDD-elicited hepatic necrosis and inflammation dissipated by 1 week. Collectively, these results suggest that TCDD-elicited histologic and gene expression responses can be correlated to elevated hepatic TCDD levels, which, once eliminated, elicit minimal hepatic gene expression and histologic alterations. PMID:23864506

  16. The effects of propranolol on hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dunk, A A; Moore, J; Symon, A; Dickie, A; Sinclair, T S; Mowat, N A; Brunt, P W

    1988-04-01

    Beta adrenoreceptor blocking drugs have been used for the prevention of haemorrhage from oesophageal varices. However, it is possible that these agents, by virtue of their effects on hepatic blood flow, may impair liver function and precipitate hepatic encephalopathy. We have therefore studied the effect of the beta blocking drug propranolol on hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Twenty patients were randomly assigned to receive 4 weeks treatment with propranolol or an identical-looking placebo, the former given in a dose sufficient to reduce resting pulse rate by greater than or equal to 25%. Before and after treatment patients were assessed for the severity of liver disease and the presence of encephalopathy. EEG mean cycle frequency and fasting arterial ammonia concentrations were also measured, and in order to detect latent hepatic encephalopathy, each patient underwent a battery of psychometric tests. Patients were blinded as to their treatment, as were those assessing their responses. Neither propranolol nor placebo had any significant effect on the parameters measured. On propranolol median EEG mean cycle frequency fell from 9.08 ct s-1 (range 8.63-11.0 ct s-1) to 8.73 ct s-1 (range 8.27-11.44 ct s-1), and median fasting arterial ammonia concentration fell from 66 mumol litre-1 (range 40-329 mumol litre-1) to 49 mumol litre-1 (range 37-188 mumol litre-1). Psychometric test values, while initially abnormal and suggestive of latent hepatic encephalopathy in the majority of patients, did not change significantly during the study. PMID:2979240

  17. Scintigraphic finding of a silent hepatic haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Borse, Rohan; Mahapatra, G N; Meht, Rajeev; Plumber, Saifee; Dhuri, Sandeep; Ali, Sarfaraz

    2010-10-01

    Hepatic haemangioma is the most common benign tumour of liver. Most of them remain asymptomatic and are detected incidentally. Tc 99m RBC blood pool imaging is highly specific diagnostic modality of choice for hepatic haemangioma as its hypervascular nature may create equivocal result on CT or MRI. The sensitivity and specificity increases using SPECT especially in lesion less than 2 cm. Therefore all patients suspected of having hepatic haemangioma should undergo Tc 99m blood pool imaging. PMID:21510118

  18. How did hepatitis B virus effect the host genome in the last decade?

    PubMed Central

    Ozkal-Baydin, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The principal reason of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma is chronic viral hepatitis all over the world. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has some mutagenic effects on the host genome. HBV may be exhibiting these mutagenic effects through integrating into the host genome, through its viral proteins or through some epigenetic mechanisms related with HBV proteins. This review aims to summarize the molecular mechanisms used by HBV for effecting host genome determined in the last decade. The focus will be on the effects of integration, HBV proteins, especially HBV X protein and epigenetic mechanisms on the host genome. These interactions between HBV and the host genome also forms the underlying mechanisms of the evolution of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25544872

  19. [Cost-effectiveness of chronic hepatitis C treatment in Spain].

    PubMed

    Haj-Ali Saflo, Okba; Hernández Guijo, Jesús Miguel

    2009-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the pharmacologic costs of hepatitis C treatment, considering recommendations on both the duration of therapy and sustained virological response. With this aim, we analyzed relevant scientific articles published in the previous 10 years, considering the most common genotypes present in Spain. In this analysis, we estimated overall costs to be 1,636,524.58-1,761,365.73 euro and 1,794.586.39-1,917,013.73 euro with the use of pegylated interferon (PegIFN)-alpha-2a and PegIFN-alpha-2b, respectively. Sustained virological response was 59.18% and 64.58% respectively, with no significant difference between the two formulations. Finally, we assess the economic costs of the use of high-dose PegIFN-alpha-2a and ribavirin in patients with genotype 1 and treatment resistance (baseline HCV-RNA values > 800.000UI/ml, without early viral response at 12 weeks and weight > 85kg). PMID:19615787

  20. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  1. Tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Head, K. W.; Nielsen, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lung tumours are not common in domestic animals; there has not been the increase in epidermoid carcinomas and anaplastic small-cell carcinomas that has occurred in man this century. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in animals. The biological behaviour of each type of tumour in animals seems to be much the same as in man. The tumours are described histologically, the main categories being: epidermoid carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma, carcinoid tumours, bronchial gland tumours, benign tumours, and sarcomas. ImagesFig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:4371738

  2. The isolating and insulating effects of hepatitis C: a substantive grounded theory.

    PubMed

    McCreaddie, May; Lyons, Imogen; Horsburgh, Dorothy; Miller, Margot; Frew, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C has a global prevalence of 3%, causing chronic infection in 75% of cases, and is currently the main cause of liver transplant in the United Kingdom. This study reviewed patients' and service providers' perspectives on hepatitis C as an enduring condition, using a constructivist grounded theory approach. A constant comparative approach to data collection and analyses incorporating a coding paradigm was applied to semistructured interviews, focus groups, and memos. Sixteen patients and three focus groups of staff (n = 17) were recruited via purposive theoretical sampling (February through August 2008). A negative synergistic relationship between the condition hepatitis C, patients, and service providers that creates isolating and insulating effects for the relevant parties emerged from the data as a middle-range theory. Stigma and contagion create a "real" or perceived sense of isolation for hepatitis C comorbid and itinerant patients, who require the right support at the right time. Healthcare staff adhere to professional demarcation lines to manage potentially untenable patient caseloads. In turn, patients and professionals perceive that a crisis may be required to bring about successful therapeutic intervention. A service that incorporates seamless outreach services and facilitates interdisciplinary working is needed to manage complex patients with this enduring condition. PMID:21301264

  3. Effects of formula composition on hepatic and intestinal drug metabolism during enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Knodell, R G

    1990-01-01

    Significant compositional differences in protein and lipid content are present in currently available enteral nutrition preparations. Since variations in dietary protein and/or lipid have previously been shown to produce alterations in liver and gut drug metabolism, effects of five commonly used enteral nutrition regimens on several drug metabolic parameters were assessed in rats. Study formulations included: 1) Vivonex: low protein -no lipid; 2) High Protein Vivonex: normal protein -no lipid; 3) Vital: normal protein -normal lipid; 4) Sustacal: high protein -high lipid; 5) Isocal: normal protein -high lipid. Hepatic and intestinal microsomes were prepared after a continuous 7-day intragastric infusion of one of the formulations, and measurements of cytochrome P-450 content and assays of drug metabolizing activity were performed. No differences in intestinal microsomal cytochrome P-450 content or meperidine demethylase activity were seen among the various alimentation groups. However, significantly decreased amounts of cytochrome P-450 and reduced meperidine demethylase and pentobarbital hydroxylase activity were present in hepatic microsomes of animals receiving the lipid-poor Vivonex and High Nitrogen Vivonex preparations compared to the other alimentation groups. These data suggest that the composition of enteral nutrition formulations may significantly impact on hepatic function and specifically that the presence of lipid in such preparations may be important for maintaining normal levels of hepatic drug metabolism. PMID:2109111

  4. Transient effects of empty liposomes on hepatic macrophage populations in rats.

    PubMed

    Pervin, Munmun; Golbar, Hossain M; Bondoc, Alexandra; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2016-04-01

    Liposomes have been used as a vehicle for encapsulating chemicals or toxins in toxicological studies. We investigated the transient effects of empty liposomes on hepatic macrophages by applying a single intravenous injection at a dose of 10 ml/kg body weight in 6-week-old male F344 rats. One day after injection, the numbers of hepatic macrophages reacting to CD163, CD68, Iba-1, MHC class II, Gal-3 and CD204 were significantly increased in liposome-treated rats. CD163(+) Kupffer cells and CD68(+) macrophages with increased phagocytic activity in hepatic lobules were most sensitive. The histological architecture of the liver was not changed following liposome injection; however, hepatocytes showed increased proliferating activity, demonstrable with proliferation marker immunostaining and by an increase in gene profiles related to the cell cycle. In the liposome-treated rats, interestingly, AST and ALT values were significantly decreased, and MCP-1, IL-1β and TGF-β1 mRNAs were significantly increased. Collectively, the present study found that hepatic macrophages activated by liposomes can influence liver homeostasis. This information would be useful for background studies on liposomes. PMID:27182120

  5. Hepatoprotective effect of Caesalpinia gilliesii and Cajanus cajan proteins against acetoaminophen overdose-induced hepatic damage.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Maha Z; Aly, Hanan F; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Desoky, M M; Ibrahim, N; Younis, Eman A

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate two proteins derived from the seeds of the plants Cajanus cajan (Leguminosae) and Caesalpinia gilliesii (Leguminosae) for their abilities to ameliorate the toxic effects of chronic doses of acetoaminphen (APAP) through the determination of certain biochemical parameters including liver marker enzymes: alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin. Also, total protein content and hepatic marker enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase were studied. Moreover, liver antioxidants, glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide, and lipid peroxides were determined in this study. Hepatic adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), adenylate energy charge (ATP, adenosine diphosphate, adenosine monophosphate, and inorganic phosphate), and phosphate potential, serum interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and myeloperoxidase were also examined in the present study. On the other hand, histopathological examination of intoxicated and liver treated with both proteins was taken into consideration. The present results show disturbances in all biochemical parameters and hepatic toxicity signs including mild vascular congestion, moderate inflammatory changes with moderate congested sinusoids, moderate nuclear changes (pyknosis), moderate centrilobular necrosis, fatty changes, nuclear pyknosis vascular congestion, and change in fatty centrilobular necrosis liver. Improvement in all biochemical parameters studied was noticed as a result of treatment intoxicated liver with C. gilliesii and C. cajan proteins either paracetamol with or post paracetamol treatment. These results were documented by the amelioration signs in rat's hepatic architecture. Thus, both plant protein extracts can upregulate and counteract the inflammatory process, minimize damage of the liver, delay disease progression, and reduce its complications. PMID:24414985

  6. Transient effects of empty liposomes on hepatic macrophage populations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pervin, Munmun; Golbar, Hossain M.; Bondoc, Alexandra; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes have been used as a vehicle for encapsulating chemicals or toxins in toxicological studies. We investigated the transient effects of empty liposomes on hepatic macrophages by applying a single intravenous injection at a dose of 10 ml/kg body weight in 6-week-old male F344 rats. One day after injection, the numbers of hepatic macrophages reacting to CD163, CD68, Iba-1, MHC class II, Gal-3 and CD204 were significantly increased in liposome-treated rats. CD163+ Kupffer cells and CD68+ macrophages with increased phagocytic activity in hepatic lobules were most sensitive. The histological architecture of the liver was not changed following liposome injection; however, hepatocytes showed increased proliferating activity, demonstrable with proliferation marker immunostaining and by an increase in gene profiles related to the cell cycle. In the liposome-treated rats, interestingly, AST and ALT values were significantly decreased, and MCP-1, IL-1β and TGF-β1 mRNAs were significantly increased. Collectively, the present study found that hepatic macrophages activated by liposomes can influence liver homeostasis. This information would be useful for background studies on liposomes. PMID:27182120

  7. Immunological effects of a 10-μg dose of domestic hepatitis B vaccine in adults*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jing-jing; Dai, Xue-wei; Jiang, Zheng-gang; Shen, Ling-zhi; Chen, Yong-di; Li, Qian; Ren, Wen; Liu, Ying; Yao, Jun; Li, Lan-juan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the immunological effects of three types of domestic 10-μg/dose hepatitis B vaccines in adults compared with a foreign vaccine, and to provide scientific evidence in support of adult hepatitis B vaccination. Methods: Adults from five counties (Deqing, Changxing, Nanxun, Wuxing, Anji) in Huzhou City, Shaoxing County and Tongxiang County, Zhejiang Province, China were selected. Blood samples were taken to assess serum HBsAg, anti-HBs, and anti-HBc using a chemiluminescence immunoassay. Adults, aged 16 to 49 years and who were anti-HBs negative at baseline, received hepatitis B immunizations at 0, 1, and 6 months. Anti-HBs levels were assessed one month after the third and final vaccination. Results: A total of 1 872 adults were immunized and the average positive rate was 89.5%. Four types of hepatitis B vaccine were used, including three from Chinese companies (Shenzhen Kangtai, Dalian High-Tech, and North China Pharmaceutical) and one from a UK company (GlaxoSmithKline). Their seroconversion rates were 81.67%, 95.05%, 89.64%, and 86.81%, respectively. There was a significant difference between the anti-HBs positive conversion rates of the four types (P<0.005) but the seroconversion rates among the different vaccines were not significantly different (χ 2=2.123, P=0.145). The average anti-HBs geometric mean titers (GMTs) of non-immune adults immunized with each of the four vaccines were 177.28, 473.23, 246.13, and 332.20 mIU/ml, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the GMTs between the three types of domestic vaccine and the foreign vaccine (t=−1.575, P=0.116). Conclusions: Domestic recombinant hepatitis B vaccines can achieve immunization effects comparable to those of a foreign vaccine. PMID:23125088

  8. The effects of season and devil facial tumour disease on the reproductive physiology of the male Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Keeley, T; McGreevy, P D; O'Brien, J K

    2012-01-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is the cause of the rapid decline of wild Tasmanian devils. Female devils are seasonal breeders with births peaking during autumn (i.e. March) but the degree of reproductive seasonality in male devils is unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the potential effects of season and DFTD on reproductive function in male devils (n=55). Testicular (1.90±0.23 g) and epididymal (0.90±0.06 g) weights were maximal during autumn and spring (P<0.05), whereas prostate (3.71±0.74 g) and Cowper's gland (0.68±0.22; 0.52±0.21 g) weights peaked during autumn (P<0.001). The motility of spermatozoa from the cauda epididymides extracted post-mortem was similar (P>0.05) across season and disease state (31.5±13.1% total motility). Testicular and epididymal weights were no different between animals displaying late or early-stage DTFD signs or disease-free animals (P>0.1). The accessory sex glands were larger in late-stage DFTD animals than in animals with early-stage disease signs or which were disease-free (P<0.01) but effects of season on this result can't be excluded. Serum testosterone concentrations peaked during summer (0.25±0.18 ng mL(-1)) but values were not different from the preceding and subsequent seasons (P>0.05), nor influenced by disease stage (P>0.1). Seasonal and DFTD-related changes in serum cortisol concentrations were not evident (P>0.1). Male devil reproduction does not appear to be restricted by season nor inhibited by DFTD. PMID:22935161

  9. Systematic pan-cancer analysis of tumour purity

    PubMed Central

    Aran, Dvir; Sirota, Marina; Butte, Atul J.

    2015-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment is the non-cancerous cells present in and around a tumour, including mainly immune cells, but also fibroblasts and cells that comprise supporting blood vessels. These non-cancerous components of the tumour may play an important role in cancer biology. They also have a strong influence on the genomic analysis of tumour samples, and may alter the biological interpretation of results. Here we present a systematic analysis using different measurement modalities of tumour purity in >10,000 samples across 21 cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas. Patients are stratified according to clinical features in an attempt to detect clinical differences driven by purity levels. We demonstrate the confounding effect of tumour purity on correlating and clustering tumours with transcriptomics data. Finally, using a differential expression method that accounts for tumour purity, we find an immunotherapy gene signature in several cancer types that is not detected by traditional differential expression analyses. PMID:26634437

  10. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  11. The potential contribution of tumour-related factors to the development of FOLFOX-induced sinusoidal obstruction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, S M; Mann, D A; Manas, D M; Oakley, F; Mann, J; White, S A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy-associated liver injury (CALI) has been linked to increased morbidity and poorer disease-specific outcomes in patients undergoing resection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of tumour-related factors to the development of FOLFOX-induced liver injury. Methods: We assessed the effect of FOLFOX treatment on the murine liver either in the presence or absence of CRLM to evaluate the contribution of both chemotherapy and tumour death to the development of CALI. Results: In the presence of liver metastases, there was increased hepatic expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (146-fold; P<0.01) and vWF (2.4-fold; P<0.01) transcript as compared with sham-operated controls. In addition, we detected large clusters of megakaryocytes in the spleen of FOLFOX-treated tumour-bearing animals. The livers of FOLFOX-treated animals also showed changes in matrix remodelling genes such as TGFβ (P<0.01), MMP2 (P<0.001), TIMP1 (P<0.001) and Pro-Collagen I (P<0.05) which was exacerbated in the presence of tumour. These genes have previously been demonstrated to have a key role in FOLFOX-induced liver injury. Conclusion: It appears that the toxicity of FOLFOX chemotherapy is enhanced by tumour-related factors. PMID:24113143

  12. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  13. The anti-tumour effects of the prodrugs N-l-leucyl-doxorubicin and vinblastine-isoleucinate in human ovarian cancer xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Boven, E.; Hendriks, H. R.; Erkelens, C. A.; Pinedo, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    N-l-leucyl-doxorubicin and vinblastine-isoleucinate can be considered as relatively non-toxic prodrugs from doxorubicin and vinblastine, respectively. A comparative analysis was carried out of the anti-tumour activity of the four compounds as well as vintriptol in four human ovarian cancer xenografts different in histology, growth rate and chemosensitivity. Injections were given i.v. weekly twice into mice bearing well-established s.c. tumours. At equitoxic doses, the amount of drug administered for N-l-leucyl-doxorubicin and vinblastine-isoleucinate was respectively 3-fold and 2-fold higher than the doses of the parent compound. N-l-leucyl-doxorubicin induced a growth inhibition > 50% in three out of four human ovarian cancer lines. The anti-tumour effects obtained were significantly better (P < 0.01) than in the case of doxorubicin. Vinblastine-isoleucinate studied in two of these lines could induce a growth inhibition of > 50%. This prodrug appeared slightly less effective than vinblastine. Insignificant growth inhibition (< 50%) was obtained by vintriptol. PMID:1457343

  14. Acute changes in liver tumour perfusion measured non-invasively with arterial spin labelling

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S Peter; Ramasawmy, Rajiv; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; Wells, Jack A; Robson, Mathew; Rajkumar, Vineeth; Lythgoe, Mark F; Pedley, R Barbara; Walker-Samuel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive measures of tumour vascular perfusion are desirable, in order to assess response to vascular targeting (or modifying) therapies. In this study, hepatic arterial spin labelling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated to measure acute changes in perfusion of colorectal cancer in the liver, in response to vascular disruption therapy with OXi4503. Methods: SW1222 and LS174T tumours were established in the liver of MF1 nu/nu mice via intrasplenic injection. Perfusion and R2* MRI measurements were acquired with an Agilent 9.4T horizontal bore scanner, before and at 90 min after 40 mg kg−1 OXi4503. Results: A significant decrease in SW1222 tumour perfusion was observed (−43±33%, P<0.005). LS174T tumours had a significantly lower baseline level of perfusion. Intrinsic susceptibility MRI showed a significant increase in R2* in LS174T tumours (28±25%, P<0.05). An association was found between the change in tumour perfusion and the proximity to large vessels, with pre-treatment blood flow predictive of subsequent response. Histological evaluation confirmed the onset of necrosis and evidence of heterogeneous response between tumour deposits. Conclusions: Hepatic ASL-MRI can detect acute response to targeted tumour vascular disruption entirely non-invasively. Hepatic ASL of liver tumours has potential for use in a clinical setting. PMID:27031853

  15. Role of tumour-associated N-glycolylated variant of GM3 ganglioside in cancer progression: effect over CD4 expression on T cells.

    PubMed

    de Leòn, Joel; Fernández, Audry; Mesa, Circe; Clavel, Marilyn; Fernández, Luis E

    2006-04-01

    Gangliosides have diverse biological functions including modulation of immune system response. These molecules are differentially expressed on malignant cells compared with the corresponding normal ones and are involved in cancer progression affecting, in different ways, the host's anti-tumour specific immune responses. Although in humans the N-glycolylated variant of GM3 ganglioside is almost exclusively expressed in tumour tissues, the significance of this glycolipid for malignant cell biology remains obscure, while for NAcGM3 strong immune suppressive effects have been reported. The present work demonstrates, for the first time, the capacity of NGcGM3 ganglioside to down-modulate CD4 expression in murine and human T lymphocytes, especially in non-activated T cells. Thirty and tenfold reductions in CD4 expression were induced by purified NGcGM3 ganglioside in murine and human T lymphocytes, respectively. The CD4 complete recovery in these cells occurred after 48 h of ganglioside removal, due to neo-synthesis. Restored T cells kept similar sensitivity to ganglioside-induced CD4 down-modulation after a new challenge. In addition, a clear association between NGcGM3 insertion in lymphocyte plasma membranes and the CD4 down-modulation effect was documented. Notably, a possible role of this ganglioside in tumour progression, taking advantage of the X63 myeloma model, was also outlined. The relevance of these findings, characterizing NGcGM3 as a possible tumour immunesurveillance inhibitor and supporting the reason for its neo-expression in certain human cancers, is contributing to this unique heterophilic ganglioside validation as target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:16208470

  16. Apical effect of diosmectite on damage to the intestinal barrier induced by basal tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Mahraoui, L; Heyman, M; Plique, O; Droy-Lefaix, M T; Desjeux, J F

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In many digestive diseases the intestinal barrier is weakened by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha). AIM: To investigate the protective effect of apical diosmectite on the intestinal dysfunction induced by the proinflammatory cytokine TNF alpha. METHODS: Filter grown monolayers of the intestinal cell line HT29-19A were incubated for 48 hours in basal medium containing 10 ng/ml TNF alpha and 5 U/ml interferon-gamma (IFN gamma). Next, 1, 10, or 100 mg/ml diosmectite was placed in the apical medium for one hour. Intestinal function was then assessed in Ussing chambers by measuring ionic conductance (G) and apicobasal fluxes of 14C-mannitol (Jman), and intact horseradish peroxidase. In control intestinal monolayers, diosmectite did not significantly modify G, Jman, or intact horseradish peroxidase. RESULTS: After incubation with TNF alpha and IFN gamma, intestinal function altered, as shown by the increases compared with control values for G (22.8 (3.7) v (9.6 (0.5) mS/cm2), Jman (33.8 (7.5) v 7.56 (0.67) micrograms/h x cm2), and intact horseradish peroxidase (1.95 (1.12) v 0.14 (0.04) micrograms/h x cm2). G and Jman were closely correlated, suggesting that the increase in permeability was paracellular. Treatment with diosmectite restored al the variables to control values. CONCLUSIONS: Basal TNF alpha disrupts the intestinal barrier through the tight junctions, and apical diosmectite counteracts this disruption. PMID:9135522

  17. Effects of a cloned cell line with NK activity on bone marrow transplants, tumour development and metastasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John F.; Dennert, Gunther

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells cloned in vitro have been transferred into NK-deficient hosts. These cells have been shown to have a role in the rejection of allogeneic bone marrow grafts, resistance to both radiation-induced thymic leukaemia and challenge with melanoma tumour cells. It appears that NK cells have an important role in immune surveillance.

  18. FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF PRENATAL METHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE: EFFECTS ON RENAL AND HEPATIC RESPONSES TO TROPHIC STIMULI AND ON RENAL EXCRETORY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on the functional development of renal and hepatic response systems was examined in the developing rat. Methylmercury produced an elevation of basal activity of renal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, an enzyme involved in regulation ...

  19. Mode of action analysis for pesticide-induced rodent liver tumours involving activation of the constitutive androstane receptor: relevance to human cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lake, Brian G; Price, Roger J; Osimitz, Thomas G

    2015-06-01

    A number of non-genotoxic chemicals, including some pesticides, have been shown to increase the incidence of liver tumours in rats and/or mice. Frameworks for analysing the modes of action (MOAs) by which chemicals produce liver tumours in rodents and the relevance of such tumour data for human risk assessment have now been established. One common MOA for rodent liver tumour formation by non-genotoxic chemicals involves activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Key and associative events for a CAR-activation MOA include receptor activation, liver hypertrophy, induction of cytochrome P450 enzyme activities, increased replicative DNA synthesis, altered hepatic foci and liver tumours. While some effects of rodent CAR activators can be observed in human liver, a major species difference is that, unlike rodents, CAR activators do not increase replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes. The CAR-activation MOA for rodent liver tumour formation is thus not plausible for humans, and hence such compounds do not pose a hepatocarcinogenic hazard for humans. PMID:25045103

  20. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  1. Protective effect of the roots extract of Platycodon grandiflorum on bile duct ligation-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lim, J-H; Kim, T-W; Song, I-B; Park, S-J; Kim, M-S; Cho, E-S; Jung, J-Y; Son, H-Y; Kim, J-W; Yun, H-I

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of aqueous extract from Platycodon grandiflorum (BC703) on bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats. BDL rats were divided into three groups, which orally received distilled water or BC703 (10 or 50 mg/kg/day) for consecutive 28 days. Antifibrotic effects of BC703 on BDL-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats were estimated by assessing serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBIL), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and hepatic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide (NO). The biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of liver samples stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stain. ALT, AST, TBIL and BUN were elevated in the group treated with BDL alone than in the sham-operated group. These elevations were significantly decreased by BC703 treatment. Hepatic GSH and SOD levels, depressed by BDL, were also increased in the BC703 group. In addition, increases in hepatic MDA and NO levels in the BDL-induced cholestasis were attenuated by BC703 treatment. Furthermore, BC703 treatment significantly reduced the serum level of fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-β1. Histopathological studies further substantiated the protective effect of BC703 on BDL-induced hepatic fibrosis in rat. BC703 may have beneficial effects not only on hepatic fibrosis by cholestasis but also on hepatic fibrosis development in patients with chronic hepatic disease. PMID:23424213

  2. Effect of Tumour Necrosis Factor-Alpha on Estrogen Metabolic Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Marwa; Shouman, Samia; El-Merzebany, Mahmoud; Kilic, Gokhan; Veenstra, Timothy; Saeed, Muhammad; Wagih, Mohamed; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion; Patel, Deepa; Salama, Salama

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a proinflammatory cytokine that has been linked to breast cancer development. Estrogen metabolic pathway is also involved in breast carcinogenesis and DNA adducts formation. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF-α on the estrogen metabolic pathway in MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line. Capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used for analysis of estrogen metabolites and estrogen-DNA adducts levels respectively. Reporter gene assay, Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real time RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to assess the expression of estrogen metabolizing genes and enzymes. TNF-α significantly increased the total EM and decreased the estrone (E1) / 17-β estradiol (E2) ratio. Moreover, it altered the expression of genes and enzymes involved in E2 activation and deactivation pathways e.g. Cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1), Cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1), Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). In addition, there were increased levels of some catechol estrogens e.g. 4-hydroxy-estrone (4-OHE1) and 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) with decreased levels of methylated catechols e.g. 2-methoxy estradiol (2-MeOE2). DNA adducts especially 4-OHE1-[2]-1-N3 Adenine was significantly increased. TNF-α directs the estrogen metabolism into more hormonally active and carcinogenic products in MCF-7. This may implicate a new possible explanation for inflammation associated breast cancer. PMID:22866165

  3. Effects of tumour necrosis factor-α on BrdU incorporation in cultured human enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, J.; Feighery, C.; O'Farrelly, C.; Martin, G.; Weir, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation is a useful method for studying the pattern of DNA synthesis in proliferating cells. The distribution pattern of incorporated BrdU in villus enterocytes of duodenal explants was analysed after exposure to TNFα in organ culture. TNFα caused a consistent, low level uptake of BrdU in the portion of the nucleus close to the nuclear membrane, this pattern was absent from the control cultures. As these epithelial cells are terminally arrested in G0, the BrdU incorporation was thought not to be due to S phase DNA synthesis, but rather a response to the cytotoxic influence of TNFα. Microtitre plate proliferation assays of cell density and DNA synthesis were devised to study the effects of TNFα on confluent monolayers of the human foetal jejunal cell line I407 and the mouse fibrosarcoma cell line L929. Both cell lines showed a similar response to TNFα. Exposure to TNFα alone did not reduce cell numbers but did cause a significant increase in DNA synthesis (p < 0.05). When cycloheximtde was added in tandem with TNFα there was a significant reduction in cell number (p < 0.001) and level of DNA synthesis (p < 0.01) indicative of cell death. The DNA of cells exposed to TNFα and cycloheximide was fragmented when viewed on an electrophoresis gel. The results show that BrdU incorporation might be a good indicator of damage to the DNA of cells after cytotoxic insult. TNFα may be responsible for villus enterocyte damage in enteropathies such as coeliac disease and GVHR of the small bowel. PMID:18475613

  4. [The effect of altan on the functional activity of the liver mitochondria and microsomes from rats with toxic hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Gordienko, A D; Iakovleva, L V

    1999-01-01

    In in vitro experiments althan had no effect on the respiration of intact mitochondria in state 4 according to Chance and produced a high antioxidant effect in fermentative and ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation in intact microsomes isolated from the rat liver. In ethanol-induced toxic hepatitis althan restored the functional activity of mitochondria to the level of that in intact animals and increased microsome hydroxylase activity in CCl4-hepatitis. PMID:10513340

  5. The Laser Treatment of Experimental Malignant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    McGuff, Paul E.; Deterling, Ralph A.; Gottlieb, Leonard S.; Fahimi, H. Dariush; Bushnell, David; Roeber, Fred

    1964-01-01

    Some of the results of experiments performed during the past two years to assess effects of laser energy on experimental malignant tumours are reviewed. Twenty types of malignant tumours (most in the cheek pouch and 11 of human origin) were treated in over 700 Syrian hamsters. Results of laser treatment of malignant melanomas and thyroidal carcinomas are presented. A human patient with malignant melanoma treated by laser energy is described. Investigation of thermal effect revealed that the laser-treated tumour remained warm for about one minute, while the cautery-treated tumour cooled to normal temperature in five seconds. Direct action of laser on superficial tumours is possible; deeper lesions must be exposed surgically. Laser energy has a selective effect on certain malignant tumours, resulting in their progressive regression and ultimate dissolution. All hamsters with implanted malignant melanomas and carcinomas of human origin, after completion of a course of laser treatment, showed no gross or histologic evidence of tumour up to the date of last observation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2aFig. 2bFig. 2cFig. 2dFig. 2eFig. 2fFig. 3Fig. 4aFig. 4bFig. 4cFig. 4dFig. 4eFig. 4fFig. 4gFig. 6 PMID:14229757

  6. The Protective Effect of Resveratrol on Concanavalin-A-Induced Acute Hepatic Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yingqun; Chen, Kan; He, Lei; Xia, Yujing; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Liu, Tong; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Yin, Qin; Zhou, Yuqing; Lu, Jie; Teng, Hongfei; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic Relevance. Resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes, has been reported to modulate the inflammatory process. In this study, we investigated the effects of resveratrol and its mechanism of protection on concanavalin-A- (ConA-) induced liver injury in mice. Materials and Methods. Acute autoimmune hepatitis was induced by ConA (20 mg/kg) in Balb/C mice; mice were treated with resveratrol (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) daily by oral gavage for fourteen days prior to a single intravenous injection of ConA. Eight hours after injection, histologic grading, proinflammatory cytokine levels, and hedgehog pathway activity were determined. Results. After ConA injection, the cytokines IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α were increased, and Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Glioblastoma- (Gli-) 1, and Patched (Ptc) levels significantly increased. Pretreatment with resveratrol ameliorated the pathologic effects of ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis and significantly inhibited IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, Shh, Gli-1, and Ptc. The effects of resveratrol on the hedgehog pathway were studied by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Resveratrol decreased Shh expression, possibly by inhibiting Shh expression in order to reduce Gli-1 and Ptc expression. Conclusion. Resveratrol protects against ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis by decreasing cytokines expression in mice. The decreases seen in Gli-1 and Ptc may correlate with the amelioration of hedgehog pathway activity. PMID:26089871

  7. Protective effect of thymoquinone against lead-induced hepatic toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Aymen; Bel Hadj Salah, Imen; Chaieb, Wafa; Ben Cheikh, Hassen

    2016-06-01

    Lead (Pb) intoxication is a worldwide health problem which frequently affects the liver. This study was carried out to investigate the potential protective effect of thymoquinone (TQ), the major active ingredient of volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds, against Pb-induced liver damage. Adult male rats were randomized into four groups: Control group received no treatment, Pb group was exposed to 2000 ppm Pb acetate in drinking water, Pb-TQ group was cotreated with Pb plus TQ (5 mg/kg/day, per orally), and TQ group receiving only TQ. All treatments were applied for 5 weeks. Results indicated that Pb exposure increased hepatic Pb content, damaged hepatic histological structure (necrotic foci, hepatic strands disorganization, hypertrophied hepatocytes, cytoplasmic vacuolization, cytoplasmic loss, chromatin condensation, mononuclear cell infiltration, congestion, centrilobular swelling), and changed liver function investigated by plasma biochemical parameters (AST, ALT, ALP, γ-GT, LDH). Pb treatment also decreased total antioxidant status level and increased lipid peroxidation in the liver. Supplementation with TQ remarkably improved the Pb-induced adverse effects without significantly reducing the metal accumulation in the liver. In conclusion, our results indicate, for the first time, a protective effect of TQ against Pb-induced hepatotoxicity and suggest that this component might be clinically useful in Pb intoxication. PMID:26971798

  8. Effects of atrazine on hepatic metabolism and endocrine homeostasis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Salaberria, Iurgi Hansen, Bjorn Henrik; Asensio, Vega; Olsvik, Pal A.; Andersen, Rolf A.; Jenssen, Bjorn Munro

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine (ATZ) is one of the most widely used pesticides in the world and is now under scrutiny for its alleged capacity to disrupt the endocrine system. Exhibiting negligible interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER), ATZ's mode of action remains to be elucidated. ATZ may act as an inducer of the enzyme aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens, although other mechanisms should also be taken into consideration such as impairment of hepatic metabolism. Therefore we administered juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) a dose of either 2 or 200 {mu}g ATZ/kg, or of carrier control phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and we measured plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), 17beta-estradiol (E2) and vitellogenin (Vtg) 6 days after exposure. Simultaneously we analyzed hepatic gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A and pi-class glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), and catalase (CAT) activity. Although sex steroid levels showed no significant alterations, we found a dose-dependent increase in Vtg and a concomitant decrease in CYP1A. There was no effect of ATZ on GST-P mRNA levels but GST-P was positively correlated with CYP1A. Also, CYP1A was negatively correlated with liver CAT and E2, and varied with T concentrations in a hormetic manner. The results showed that ATZ can alter hepatic metabolism, induce estrogenic effects and oxidative stress in vivo, and that these effects are linked.

  9. Treatment of spontaneous tumours by temporary local ligation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Frederick M.; Kaplan, Martin M.; Meranze, David R.; Gradess, Morton

    1960-01-01

    Previous work in some human cases and in laboratory animals has indicated that temporary local ligation of spontaneous tumours has a selective destructive effect on these tumours, with only temporary inflammation resulting in normal tissues. In the experiments described in this paper, 49 spontaneous accessible tumours in dogs were treated by this method, with periods of ligation of from 4 to 11 hours. Success, as measured by selective necrosis of tumour tissue as compared with normal tissue, was achieved in 29 out of 41 benign tumours, including lipomas, angiomas, adenomas and mixed mammary tumours. Treatment failures were encountered in two cases each of papillomas and fibromas, six mixed mammary tumours and two testicular tumours. Total necrosis of tumour cells occurred in all eight malignant tumours encountered in this series. The outstanding feature was the specific destruction of tumour tissue by a bodily process without participation of any outside agent. Emphasis was placed on an adequate inflammatory response following temporary anoxia, although a precise definition of this inflammation could not be offered. Post-ligation bacterial multiplication, which may be expected to occur in necrotic tumour tissue, is considered to be a secondary effect rather than a possible primary cause of regression and disappearance of the tumour. If ligation treatment can be shown to be successful for a particular type of tumour, it may be possible to apply it to human patients for the treatment of areas not amenable to surgery. The results reported here warrant new experimental approaches to the study of neoplasms at the cellular level to define more precisely the anoxic and inflammatory processes involved in the selective lethal effect on tumour tissues; and the authors suggest that trials should be undertaken of combinations of chemotherapy or irradiation with ligation to reduce ligation time and extend the possible benefits. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7

  10. Tumour ablation: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours. PMID:19965296