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Sample records for hereditary sensory neuropathy

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE On this page: Description Genetic changes ... November 2012 What is hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA On this page: Description Genetic changes ... definitions Reviewed March 2015 What is hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA? Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is ...

  3. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin tumours like amelanotic melanoma. Management of HSN I follows the guidelines given for diabetic foot care (removal of pressure to the ulcer and eradication of infection, followed by the use of specific protective footwear) and starts with early and accurate counselling of patients about risk factors for developing foot ulcerations. The disorder is slowly progressive and does not influence life expectancy but is often severely disabling after a long duration of the disease. PMID:18348718

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (often shortened to HSAN2 ) On this ... 2011 What is HSAN2? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSAN2) is a condition that primarily ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (often shortened to HSAN5 ) On this ... 2011 What is HSAN5? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (HSAN5) is a condition that primarily ...

  6. [Clinical practice of hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN)].

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of neuropathies, the main category becomes Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT), also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN), distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), and hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy (HSAN). At least 80 genes have been associated with CMT, HMN or HSAN, a precise molecular diagnosis is often needed to make a clinical diagnosis accurately, enable genetic counseling of the patient and understanding of their molecular mechanisms. To identify the mutation in each patient, using a high-throughput NGS, we established a diagnostic procedure involving screening of disease causing genes in CMT, HMN or HSAN. PMID:25672680

  7. Hereditary Neuropathies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Hereditary Neuropathies Information Page Synonym(s): Neuropathy - Hereditary Table of Contents ( ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Hereditary Neuropathies? Hereditary neuropathies are a group of inherited disorders ...

  8. Painless Ulcers and Fissures of Toes: Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy, Not Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN) are rare genetically determined neuropathies. They often manifest as painless injuries in children. We present HSN in a 5-year-old boy who presented with recurrent fissuring and ulceration involving both great toes.

  9. Natural history and biomarkers in hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Vera; Oaklander, Anne louise; David, William S; Johnson, Elise A; Pan, Jessica; Novak, Peter; Brown, Robert H; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is most commonly caused by missense mutations in SPTLC1. In this study we mapped symptom progression and compared the utility of outcomes. Methods: We administered retrospective surveys of symptoms and analyzed results of nerve conduction, autonomic function testing (AFT), and PGP9.5-immunolabeled skin biopsies. Results: The first symptoms were universally sensory and occurred at a median age of 20 years (range 14–54 years). The onset of weakness, ulcers, pain, and balance problems followed sequentially. Skin biopsies revealed universally absent epidermal innervation at the distal leg with relative preservation in the thigh. Neurite density was highly correlated with total Charcot-Marie-Tooth Examination Score (CMTES; r2?=??0.8) and median motor amplitude (r2?=??0.75). Conclusions: These results confirm sensory loss as the initial symptom of HSAN1 and suggest that skin biopsy may be the most promising biomarker for future clinical trials. Muscle Nerve, 2015 Muscle Nerve 51: 489–495, 2015 PMID:25042817

  10. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  11. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  12. An hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait.

    PubMed Central

    Jestico, J V; Urry, P A; Efphimiou, J

    1985-01-01

    Five members of a single family presented with neuropathic deformities and ulceration of the feet developing in the first and second decades of life, and progressed slowly over many years. In this form of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy, there was minimal tendon reflex impairment, cutaneous sensory impairment was restricted to the feet, and there was no autonomic dysfunction. The only neurophysiological abnormality was that of reduced or absent sural nerve sensory action potentials. Sural nerve biopsies taken from two affected family members showed changes of a chronic neuropathy with loss of myelinated fibres, particularly affecting those of small diameter. Unmyelinated fibres were present in normal numbers. This condition differed from other forms of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy having an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance. Images PMID:3866836

  13. Autosomal recessive inheritance of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with optic atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, R M; Riordan-Eva, P; Wood, N W

    1997-01-01

    Three siblings are reported with childhood onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) and adult onset optic atrophy. Electrophysiological studies showed an axonal neuropathy and dysfunction of the retinal ganglion cells or optic nerve. The presumed mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive. This is the second family in which autosomal recessive inheritance of HMSN and optic atrophy (HMSN type VI) has been described, and the first in which electrophysiological studies have been reported. PMID:9120454

  14. [Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II A: early neurological and skeletal findings].

    PubMed

    Esmer, C; Díaz Zambrano, S; Santos Díaz, M A; González Huerta, L M; Cuevas Covarrubias, S A; Bravo Oro, A

    2014-04-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are genetic disorders characterized by the loss of sensation including pain, tactile and temperature. Its clinical and molecular features vary widely; the symptoms may begin from birth or be noticed in the first or second decade, with different types of complications of trauma to the extremities such as ulcers, mutilations and acral amputations. They are classified into six groups from I to VI, determined by the abnormality in eleven genes leading to phenotypic variations in the age of onset and the presence or absence of dysautonomia signs. With the exception of type I, all are autosomal recessive. The type II of these neuropathies is characterized by insensitivity to pain, heat and proprioception. We describe three members of a Mexican family with WNK1 gene mutation that caused hereditary neuropathy IIA. PMID:23831200

  15. Talectomy for Equinovarus Deformity in Family Members with Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy Type I

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Hristo

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of severe rigid neurogenic clubfoot deformities still remains a challenging problem in modern paediatric orthopaedics. In those cases, in spite of being a palliative procedure, talectomy has been advocated for the correction of the deformity thus providing a stable plantigrade foot which allows pain-free walking with standard footwear. Herein, we present the results after talectomy in two patients (brother and sister) affected by a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I, with rigid severe pes equinovarus deformities. PMID:25610681

  16. Atypical hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV with neither mental retardation nor pain insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chae Lim; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Byoung Joon; Lee, Jong-Hyuck; Sung, Ki-Sun; Kim, Jong-Won; Park, Youn-Soo

    2013-12-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe mental retardation and self-mutilation-related complications. Recently, we investigated a 16-year-old Korean boy with normal intelligence. He had preserved pain sensation but was suspected of having hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV because of the recurrent bone fractures and painless joint destruction in the absence of any predisposing medical conditions. Genetic analysis of the NTRK1 gene revealed compound heterozygous mutations including c.851-33T>A and c.2303C>T (p.Pro768Leu) in the NTRK1 gene. The p.Pro768Leu mutation has been identified in 2 Japanese patients with a mild phenotype. Therefore, although it is rare, hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV should be considered in patients with recurrent bone fractures and painless joint destruction who do not have any predisposing conditions even when they do not have typical clinical features such as mental retardation or pain insensitivity. PMID:23112235

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... controls involuntary body functions such as heart rate, digestion, and breathing. The signs and symptoms of HSAN2 ... nervous system ; autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; bud ; cell ; congenital ; digestion ; digestive ; esophagus ; gastroesophageal reflux ; gene ; hereditary ; inherited ; injury ; ...

  18. Facial nerve dysfunction in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I and III.

    PubMed

    Glocker, F X; Rösler, K M; Linden, D; Heinen, F; Hess, C W; Lücking, C H

    1999-09-01

    Facial nerve function was studied in 19 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSN I) and 2 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSN III, Déjérine-Sottas), and compared to that in 24 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The facial nerve was stimulated electrically at the stylomastoid fossa, and magnetically in its proximal intracanalicular segment. Additionally, the face-associated motor cortex was stimulated magnetically. The facial nerve motor neurography was abnormal in 17 of 19 HMSN I patients and in both HMSN III patients, revealing moderate to marked conduction slowing in both the extracranial and intracranial nerve segments, along with variable reductions of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes. The facial nerve conduction slowing paralleled that of limb nerves, but was not associated with clinical dysfunction of facial muscles, because none of the HMSN I patients had facial palsy. Conduction slowing was most severe in the HMSN III patients, but only slight facial weakness was present. In GBS, conduction slowing was less marked, but facial weakness exceeded that in HMSN patients in all cases. We conclude that involvement of the facial nerve is common in HMSN I and HMSN III. It affects the intra- and extracranial part of the facial nerve and is mostly subclinical. PMID:10454715

  19. Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy II, a rare disease in a large Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Arain, Fazal Manzoor; Chand, Prem

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy II (HSAN II) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by severe loss of pain, temperature and touch sensation. Injuries in these patients can progress to necrosis and shedding of digits and limbs. Here we report two cases of HSAN II belonging to a Pakistani family. Individual 1, a forty five year old man, had complete loss of pain sensation since birth. Self-mutilation and complication of injuries resulted in the shedding of all the digits and right foot and surgical amputation of left leg. Individual 2, a five year old girl,had delay in healing of wounds and self-mutilation. Examination showed a complete lack of pain sensation throughout her body and hyporeflexia. As the genetic cause of HSAN II is unknown, identification of more patients will allow further research on this disease and possibly develop a cure. PMID:26440849

  20. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V: Report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Kalaskar, Ritesh; Kalaskar, Ashita

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type V is a rare inherited disease caused by a mutation in the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 1 gene located on chromosome 1 (1q21-q22). It is characterized by pain insensitivity, partial anhydrosis without mental retardation and unimpaired touch and pressure sensitivity. Self-mutilation injury involving the teeth, lips, tongue, ears, eyes, nose, and fingers are invariable feature of this disorder. The purpose of this paper was to discuss the diagnosis and oral management of 18-month-old girl with HSAN type V, having typical oral manifestation of bitten tongue and auto-extraction of primary teeth. Modified bite guard was given to the patient to prevent further self-mutilating injuries to the tongue. PMID:25684922

  1. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V: Report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Kalaskar, Ritesh; Kalaskar, Ashita

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type V is a rare inherited disease caused by a mutation in the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 1 gene located on chromosome 1 (1q21-q22). It is characterized by pain insensitivity, partial anhydrosis without mental retardation and unimpaired touch and pressure sensitivity. Self-mutilation injury involving the teeth, lips, tongue, ears, eyes, nose, and fingers are invariable feature of this disorder. The purpose of this paper was to discuss the diagnosis and oral management of 18-month-old girl with HSAN type V, having typical oral manifestation of bitten tongue and auto-extraction of primary teeth. Modified bite guard was given to the patient to prevent further self-mutilating injuries to the tongue. PMID:25684922

  2. Misclassification and linkage of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2B

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, J.M.; Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    Recently Kwon et al. published in the Journal their work describing linkage of a single large family with an inherited axonal neuropathy to chromosome 3, which they suggest is a second locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 2 and subsequently named {open_quotes}CMT2B.{close_quotes} We think that the diagnostic classification of this family as CMT2 is incorrect, since the subjects have a severe sensory neuropathy that fits within the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type 1 classification of Dyck (1993). Abnormal sensory findings in CMT2 separate it from distal spinal muscular atrophy but are a minor component of clinical symptoms in most CMT patients, as CMT is primarily a motor neuropathy. When Kwon et al. state that {open_quotes}all [patients] had characteristic findings in their physical examinations, including... evidence of foot sores that were slow to heal, or amputated limbs related to the poorly healing foot ulcers,{close_quotes} it suggests that a different diagnosis is more appropriate. In our experience collecting data on >950 individuals in >60 CMT1, CMT2, CMTX and CMT4 families, we have not seen foot ulcers, osteomyelitis, or amputations. Ulcerations leading to osteomyelitis and amputations are usually associated with severe sensory neuropathies. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Tazir, Meriem; Hamadouche, Tarik; Nouioua, Sonia; Mathis, Stephane; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases are the most common degenerative disorders of the peripheral nervous system. However, the frequency of the different subtypes varies within distinct populations. Although more than seventy clinical and genetic forms are known to date, more than 80% of CMT patients in Western countries have genetic abnormalities associated with PMP22, MPZ, MFN2 and GJB1. Given the considerable genetic heterogeneity of CMT, we emphasize the interest of both clinical and pathological specific features such that focused genetic testing could be performed. In this regard, peripheral nerve lesions in GDAP1 mutations (AR CMT1A), such as mitochondrial abnormalities, have been newly demonstrated. Otherwise, while demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT used to be classified as CMT4 (A, B, C …), we propose a simplified classification such as AR CMT1 (A, B, C …), and AR CMT2 for axonal forms. Also, we stress that next generation sequencing techniques, now considered to be the most efficient methods of genetic testing in CMT, will be helpful in molecular diagnosis and research of new genes involved. Finally, while no effective therapy is known to date, ongoing new therapeutic trials such as PXT3003 (a low dose combination of the three already approved drugs baclofen, naltrexone, and D-sorbitol) give hopes for potential curative treatment. PMID:25454638

  4. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies: Understanding molecular pathogenesis could lead to future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Shy, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies, like many other degenerative disorders, have been challenging to treat. At this point, there is little specific therapy for the inherited neuropathies other than genetic counseling as well as symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation. In the past, ascorbic acid, progesterone antagonists, and subcutaneous neurotrophin-3 (NT3) injections have demonstrated improvement in animal models of CMT 1A, the most common inherited neuropathy, but have failed to translate any effect in humans. Given the difficulty in treatment, it is important to understand the molecular pathogenesis of hereditary neuropathies in order to strategize potential future therapies. The hereditary neuropathies are in an era of molecular insight and over the past 20 years, more than 78 subtypes of Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) have been identified and extensively studied to understand the biological pathways in greater detail. Next generation molecular sequencing has also improved the diagnosis as well as the understanding of CMT. A greater understanding of the molecular pathways will help pave the way to future therapeutics of CMT. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25108281

  5. Disturbances in affective touch in hereditary sensory & autonomic neuropathy type III

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Vaughan G.; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Löken, Line; Axelrod, Felicia B.; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (HSAN III, Riley–Day syndrome, Familial Dysautomia) is characterised by elevated thermal thresholds and an indifference to pain. Using microelectrode recordings we recently showed that these patients possess no functional stretch-sensitive mechanoreceptors in their muscles (muscle spindles), a feature that may explain their lack of stretch reflexes and ataxic gait, yet patients have apparently normal low-threshold cutaneous mechanoreceptors. The density of C-fibres in the skin is markedly reduced in patients with HSAN III, but it is not known whether the C-tactile afferents, a distinct type of low-threshold C fibre present in hairy skin that is sensitive to gentle stroking and has been implicated in the coding of pleasant touch are specifically affected in HSAN III patients. We addressed the relationship between C-tactile afferent function and pleasant touch perception in 15 patients with HSAN III and 15 age-matched control subjects. A soft make-up brush was used to apply stroking stimuli to the forearm and lateral aspect of the leg at five velocities: 0.3, 1, 3, 10 and 30 cm/s. As demonstrated previously, the control subjects rated the slowest and highest velocities as less pleasant than those applied at 1–10 cm/s, which fits with the optimal velocities for exciting C-tactile afferents. Conversely, for the patients, ratings of pleasantness did not fit the profile for C-tactile afferents. Patients either rated the higher velocities as more pleasant than the slow velocities, with the slowest velocities being rated unpleasant, or rated all velocities equally pleasant. We interpret this to reflect absent or reduced C-tactile afferent density in the skin of patients with HSAN III, who are likely using tactile cues (i.e. myelinated afferents) to rate pleasantness of stroking or are attributing pleasantness to this type of stimulus irrespective of velocity. PMID:24726998

  6. Genetic aspects of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (types I and II)

    PubMed Central

    Harding, A E; Thomas, P K

    1980-01-01

    The genetic features of a series of 227 patients with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) have been analysed. The series comprised 119 index cases from 110 families in which 108 affected relatives were identified. The cases were classified as having type I or type II HMSN on the basis of nerve conduction studies. Inheritance in the type I cases was autosomal dominant in 139 (45 families) and autosomal recessive in eight (four families) with 26 single cases. For the type II cases, 35 (17 families) were autosomal dominant and three (two families) autosomal recessive with 16 single cases. A significant excess of males was present in the combined single and recessive type I cases and in the type I index cases. No X linked pedigrees were identified. The correlation coefficients for motor nerve conduction velocity between the index cases and their relatives suggested further genetic heterogeneity in the type I cases. Parent-offspring and sib-sib correlation coefficients for age of onset in the dominantly inherited type I cases were less than 0·5. There was therefore no strong suggestion of genetic heterogeneity in terms of age of onset. The severity of muscle weakness did not differ between the dominantly inherited type I and type II cases. In both types males had higher weakness scores than females, but there was no difference for either type in relation to the sex of the affected parent. Segration analysis suggested that approximately 70% of the single generation type I cases were of autosomal recessive inheritance, whereas only about 25% of the single generation type II cases were recessive. Biological fitness was reduced in type II HMSN, which would support a higher proportion of new dominant mutations among the single cases of this type than in type I. Despite the excess of males in the type I single case/recessive category, a contribution of cases with X linked recessive inheritance is improbable. Single cases of HMSN, especially the type II form in view of its later onset, are likely to be unrecognised clinically and will be classified as `cryptogenic' neuropathy. As in many affected subjects the degree of disability is minimal, a careful scrutiny of the relatives is merited in such instances. PMID:7218272

  7. The Variant p.(Arg183Trp) in SPTLC2 Causes Late-Onset Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Suriyanarayanan, Saranya; Auranen, Mari; Toppila, Jussi; Paetau, Anders; Shcherbii, Maria; Palin, Eino; Wei, Yu; Lohioja, Tarja; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Schön, Ulrike; Abicht, Angela; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Tyynismaa, Henna; Walter, Maggie C; Hornemann, Thorsten; Ylikallio, Emil

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 1 (HSAN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder that can be caused by variants in SPTLC1 or SPTLC2, encoding subunits of serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase. Disease variants alter the enzyme's substrate specificity and lead to accumulation of neurotoxic 1-deoxysphingolipids. We describe two families with autosomal dominant HSAN1C caused by a new variant in SPTLC2, c.547C>T, p.(Arg183Trp). The variant changed a conserved amino acid and was not found in public variant databases. All patients had a relatively mild progressive distal sensory impairment, with onset after age 50. Small fibers were affected early, leading to abnormalities on quantitative sensory testing. Sural biopsy revealed a severe chronic axonal neuropathy with subtotal loss of myelinated axons, relatively preserved number of non-myelinated fibers and no signs for regeneration. Skin biopsy with PGP9.5 labeling showed lack of intraepidermal nerve endings early in the disease. Motor manifestations developed later in the disease course, but there was no evidence of autonomic involvement. Patients had elevated serum 1-deoxysphingolipids, and the variant protein produced elevated amounts of 1-deoxysphingolipids in vitro, which proved the pathogenicity of the variant. Our results expand the genetic spectrum of HSAN1C and provide further detail about the clinical characteristics. Sequencing of SPTLC2 should be considered in all patients presenting with mild late-onset sensory-predominant small or large fiber neuropathy. PMID:26573920

  8. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Hilo, Wasseem; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Modi, Naftali; Briscoe, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Lebers hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute severe visual loss in both eyes, which usually manifests in young adulthood. The disease has maternal inheritance due to mitochondrial DNA mutation. The final diagnosis is genetic. There is still no proven treatment, but there is significant progress in developments on the genetics of the disease to reach gene therapy. In this article we review the latest literature relevant to this disease. PMID:24167936

  9. Molecular basis of hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chance, P F

    2001-05-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B) and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0 or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy, also of undetermined cause. Forms of CMT2 map to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A), chromosome 3p (CMT2B), chromosome 7p (CMT2D), and to chromosome 8p21 (CMT2E). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset, demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene and shares considerable clinical and pathologic features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication/deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosomes 8q, 10q, and 11q. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal dominant disorder causing painful, recurrent brachial plexopathies and maps to chromosome 17q25. PMID:11345007

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Leber hereditary optic neuropathy On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... Reviewed December 2013 What is Leber hereditary optic neuropathy? Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited ...

  11. KIF1A, an Axonal Transporter of Synaptic Vesicles, Is Mutated in Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathy Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Ramalingam, Siriram; Lavastre, Valérie; Shekarabi, Masoud; Holbert, Sébastien; Lafontaine, Julie; Srour, Myriam; Merner, Nancy; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Gaudet, Rébecca; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Baets, Jonathan; Houlden, Henry; Brais, Bernard; Nicholson, Garth A.; Van Esch, Hilde; Nafissi, Shahriar; De Jonghe, Peter; Reilly, Mary M.; Timmerman, Vincent; Dion, Patrick A.; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSANII) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by peripheral nerve degeneration resulting in a severe distal sensory loss. Although mutations in FAM134B and the HSN2 exon of WNK1 were associated with HSANII, the etiology of a substantial number of cases remains unexplained. In addition, the functions of WNK1/HSN2 and FAM134B and their role in the peripheral nervous system remain poorly understood. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that KIF1A, an axonal transporter of synaptic vesicles, interacts with the domain encoded by the HSN2 exon. In parallel to this screen, we performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping in a consanguineous Afghan family affected by HSANII and identified a unique region of homozygosity located on chromosome 2q37.3 and spanning the KIF1A gene locus. Sequencing of KIF1A in this family revealed a truncating mutation segregating with the disease phenotype. Subsequent sequencing of KIF1A in a series of 112 unrelated patients with features belonging to the clinical spectrum of ulcero-mutilating sensory neuropathies revealed truncating mutations in three additional families, thus indicating that mutations in KIF1A are a rare cause of HSANII. Similarly to WNK1 mutations, pathogenic mutations in KIF1A were almost exclusively restricted to an alternatively spliced exon. This study provides additional insights into the molecular pathogenesis of HSANII and highlights the potential biological relevance of alternative splicing in the peripheral sensory nervous system. PMID:21820098

  12. Identification of dietary alanine toxicity and trafficking dysfunction in a Drosophila model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Matthew C. W.; West, Ryan J. H.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Sweeney, Sean T.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is characterized by a loss of distal peripheral sensory and motorneuronal function, neuropathic pain and tissue necrosis. The most common cause of HSAN1 is due to dominant mutations in serine palmitoyl-transferase subunit 1 (SPT1). SPT catalyses the condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in sphingolipid biogenesis. Identified mutations in SPT1 are known to both reduce sphingolipid synthesis and generate catalytic promiscuity, incorporating alanine or glycine into the precursor sphingolipid to generate a deoxysphingoid base (DSB). Why either loss of function in SPT1, or generation of DSBs should generate deficits in distal sensory function remains unclear. To address these questions, we generated a Drosophila model of HSAN1. Expression of dSpt1 bearing a disease-related mutation induced morphological deficits in synapse growth at the larval neuromuscular junction consistent with a dominant-negative action. Expression of mutant dSpt1 globally was found to be mildly toxic, but was completely toxic when the diet was supplemented with alanine, when DSBs were observed in abundance. Expression of mutant dSpt1 in sensory neurons generated developmental deficits in dendritic arborization with concomitant sensory deficits. A membrane trafficking defect was observed in soma of sensory neurons expressing mutant dSpt1, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi block. We found that we could rescue sensory function in neurons expressing mutant dSpt1 by co-expressing an effector of ER–Golgi function, Rab1 suggesting compromised ER function in HSAN1 affected dendritic neurons. Our Drosophila model identifies a novel strategy to explore the pathological mechanisms of HSAN1. PMID:26395456

  13. Identification of dietary alanine toxicity and trafficking dysfunction in a Drosophila model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Matthew C W; West, Ryan J H; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Sweeney, Sean T

    2015-12-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is characterized by a loss of distal peripheral sensory and motorneuronal function, neuropathic pain and tissue necrosis. The most common cause of HSAN1 is due to dominant mutations in serine palmitoyl-transferase subunit 1 (SPT1). SPT catalyses the condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in sphingolipid biogenesis. Identified mutations in SPT1 are known to both reduce sphingolipid synthesis and generate catalytic promiscuity, incorporating alanine or glycine into the precursor sphingolipid to generate a deoxysphingoid base (DSB). Why either loss of function in SPT1, or generation of DSBs should generate deficits in distal sensory function remains unclear. To address these questions, we generated a Drosophila model of HSAN1. Expression of dSpt1 bearing a disease-related mutation induced morphological deficits in synapse growth at the larval neuromuscular junction consistent with a dominant-negative action. Expression of mutant dSpt1 globally was found to be mildly toxic, but was completely toxic when the diet was supplemented with alanine, when DSBs were observed in abundance. Expression of mutant dSpt1 in sensory neurons generated developmental deficits in dendritic arborization with concomitant sensory deficits. A membrane trafficking defect was observed in soma of sensory neurons expressing mutant dSpt1, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi block. We found that we could rescue sensory function in neurons expressing mutant dSpt1 by co-expressing an effector of ER-Golgi function, Rab1 suggesting compromised ER function in HSAN1 affected dendritic neurons. Our Drosophila model identifies a novel strategy to explore the pathological mechanisms of HSAN1. PMID:26395456

  14. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy.

    PubMed

    Paprocka, Justyna; Kajor, Maciej; Jamroz, Ewa; Jezela-Stanek, Aleksandra; Seeman, Pavel; Marszał, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disease with sensory and motor nerve palsies usually precipitated by trivial trauma or compression. In the majority of cases HNPP is caused by deletion of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22) on chromosome 17p11.2. The authors present a family case with genetically proven HNPP. PMID:17183456

  15. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Man, P Y W; Turnbull, D M; Chinnery, P F

    2002-03-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial genetic disease that preferentially causes blindness in young adult males, affecting about 1 in 25 000 of the British population. It is characterised by bilateral subacute loss of central vision owing to focal degeneration of the retinal ganglion cell layer and optic nerve. Over 95% of LHON cases are primarily the result of one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations, G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C, which all involve genes encoding complex I subunits of the respiratory chain. An intriguing feature of LHON is that only approximately 50% of males and approximately 10% of females who harbour a pathogenic mtDNA mutation actually develop the optic neuropathy. This marked incomplete penetrance and gender bias imply that additional mitochondrial and/or nuclear genetic factors must be modulating the phenotypic expression of LHON. It is also likely that environmental factors contribute to the onset of visual failure. However, these secondary precipitating factors remain poorly defined at present. In this review, we describe the natural history of this optic nerve disorder and highlight issues relating to clinical diagnosis, management, and genetic counselling. We also discuss the findings of recently published studies and the light they shed on the complex aetiology and pathophysiology of LHON. PMID:11897814

  16. Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy Type 1 Is Caused by the Accumulation of Two Neurotoxic Sphingolipids*?

    PubMed Central

    Penno, Anke; Reilly, Mary M.; Houlden, Henry; Laurá, Matilde; Rentsch, Katharina; Niederkofler, Vera; Stoeckli, Esther T.; Nicholson, Garth; Eichler, Florian; Brown, Robert H.; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    HSAN1 is an inherited neuropathy found to be associated with several missense mutations in the SPTLC1 subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). SPT catalyzes the condensation of serine and palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in the de novo synthesis of sphingolipids. Here we show that the HSAN1 mutations induce a shift in the substrate specificity of SPT, which leads to the formation of the two atypical deoxy-sphingoid bases (DSBs) 1-deoxy-sphinganine and 1-deoxymethyl-sphinganine. Both metabolites lack the C1 hydroxyl group of sphinganine and can therefore neither be converted to complex sphingolipids nor degraded. Consequently, they accumulate in the cell, as demonstrated in HEK293 cells overexpressing mutant SPTLC1 and lymphoblasts of HSAN1 patients. Elevated DSB levels were also found in the plasma of HSAN1 patients and confirmed in three groups of HSAN1 patients with different SPTLC1mutations. The DSBs show pronounced neurotoxic effects on neurite formation in cultured sensory neurons. The neurotoxicity co-occurs with a disturbed neurofilament structure in neurites when cultured in the presence of DSBs. Based on these observations, we conclude that HSAN1 is caused by a gain of function mutation, which results in the formation of two atypical and neurotoxic sphingolipid metabolites. PMID:20097765

  17. The TRK-Fused Gene Is Mutated in Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy with Proximal Dominant Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Sako, Wataru; Yoshida, Mari; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Tanabe, Osamu; Goto, Jun; Takahashi, Yuji; Date, Hidetoshi; Mitsui, Jun; Ahsan, Budrul; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Iwata, Atsushi; Yoshino, Hiide; Izumi, Yuishin; Fujita, Koji; Maeda, Kouji; Goto, Satoshi; Koizumi, Hidetaka; Morigaki, Ryoma; Ikemura, Masako; Yamauchi, Naoko; Murayama, Shigeo; Nicholson, Garth A.; Ito, Hidefumi; Sobue, Gen; Nakagawa, Masanori; Kaji, Ryuji; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with proximal dominant involvement (HMSN-P) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by widespread fasciculations, proximal-predominant muscle weakness, and atrophy followed by distal sensory involvement. To date, large families affected by HMSN-P have been reported from two different regions in Japan. Linkage and haplotype analyses of two previously reported families and two new families with the use of high-density SNP arrays further defined the minimum candidate region of 3.3 Mb in chromosomal region 3q12. Exome sequencing showed an identical c.854C>T (p.Pro285Leu) mutation in the TRK-fused gene (TFG) in the four families. Detailed haplotype analysis suggested two independent origins of the mutation. Pathological studies of an autopsied patient revealed TFG- and ubiquitin-immunopositive cytoplasmic inclusions in the spinal and cortical motor neurons. Fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus, a frequent finding in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, was also observed in the motor neurons with inclusion bodies. Moreover, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43)-positive cytoplasmic inclusions were also demonstrated. In cultured cells expressing mutant TFG, cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 was demonstrated. These findings indicate that formation of TFG-containing cytoplasmic inclusions and concomitant mislocalization of TDP-43 underlie motor neuron degeneration in HMSN-P. Pathological overlap of proteinopathies involving TFG and TDP-43 highlights a new pathway leading to motor neuron degeneration. PMID:22883144

  18. Treatment of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Newman, Nancy J

    2012-10-01

    The hereditary optic neuropathies are inherited disorders in which optic nerve dysfunction is a prominent feature in the phenotypic expression of disease. Optic neuropathy may be primarily an isolated finding, such as in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy, or part of a multisystem disorder. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the hereditary optic neuropathies involve mitochondrial dysfunction owing to mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that encodes proteins essential to mitochondrial function. Effective treatments are limited, and current management includes therapies directed at enhancing mitochondrial function and preventing oxidative damage, as well as genetic counselling, and supportive and symptomatic measures. New therapies, including gene therapy, are emerging via animal models and human clinical trials. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, in particular, provides a unique model for testing promising treatments owing to its characteristic sequential bilateral involvement and the accessibility of target tissue within the eye. Lessons learned from treatment of the hereditary optic neuropathies may have therapeutic implications for other disorders of presumed mitochondrial dysfunction. In this Review, the natural history of the common inherited optic neuropathies, the presumed pathogenesis of several of these disorders, and the literature to date regarding potential therapies are summarized. PMID:22945544

  19. A mutation in an alternative untranslated exon of hexokinase 1 associated with Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy – Russe (HMSNR)

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Janina; Chandler, David; King, Rosalind; Wanders, Ronald JA; Angelicheva, Dora; Tournev, Ivailo; McNamara, Elyshia; Kwa, Marcel; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Kaneva, Radka; Baas, Frank; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy – Russe (HMSNR) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder, identified in the Gypsy population. Our previous studies mapped the gene to 10q22-q23 and refined the gene region to ?70?kb. Here we report the comprehensive sequencing analysis and fine mapping of this region, reducing it to ?26?kb of fully characterised sequence spanning the upstream exons of Hexokinase 1 (HK1). We identified two sequence variants in complete linkage disequilibrium, a G>C in a novel alternative untranslated exon (AltT2) and a G>A in the adjacent intron, segregating with the disease in affected families and present in the heterozygote state in only 5/790 population controls. Sequence conservation of the AltT2 exon in 16 species with invariable preservation of the G allele at the mutated site, strongly favour the exonic change as the pathogenic mutation. Analysis of the Hk1 upstream region in mouse mRNA from testis and neural tissues showed an abundance of AltT2-containing transcripts generated by extensive, developmentally regulated alternative splicing. Expression is very low compared with ubiquitous Hk1 and all transcripts skip exon1, which encodes the protein domain responsible for binding to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and regulation of energy production and apoptosis. Hexokinase activity measurement and immunohistochemistry of the peripheral nerve showed no difference between patients and controls. The mutational mechanism and functional effects remain unknown and could involve disrupted translational regulation leading to increased anti-apoptotic activity (suggested by the profuse regenerative activity in affected nerves), or impairment of an unknown HK1 function in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). PMID:19536174

  20. Transgenic expression of neuronal dystonin isoform 2 partially rescues the disease phenotype of the dystonia musculorum mouse model of hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy VI

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Andrew; Sato, Tadasu; De Repentigny, Yves; Gibeault, Sabrina; Bhanot, Kunal; O'Meara, Ryan W.; Lynch-Godrei, Anisha; Kornfeld, Samantha F.; Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    A newly identified lethal form of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), designated HSAN-VI, is caused by a homozygous mutation in the bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (BPAG1)/dystonin gene (DST). The HSAN-VI mutation impacts all major neuronal BPAG1/dystonin protein isoforms: dystonin-a1, -a2 and -a3. Homozygous mutations in the murine Dst gene cause a severe sensory neuropathy termed dystonia musculorum (dt). Phenotypically, dt mice are similar to HSAN-VI patients, manifesting progressive limb contractures, dystonia, dysautonomia and early postnatal death. To obtain a better molecular understanding of disease pathogenesis in HSAN-VI patients and the dt disorder, we generated transgenic mice expressing a myc-tagged dystonin-a2 protein under the regulation of the neuronal prion protein promoter on the dtTg4/Tg4 background, which is devoid of endogenous dystonin-a1 and -a2, but does express dystonin-a3. Restoring dystonin-a2 expression in the nervous system, particularly within sensory neurons, prevented the disorganization of organelle membranes and microtubule networks, attenuated the degeneration of sensory neuron subtypes and ameliorated the phenotype and increased life span in these mice. Despite these improvements, complete rescue was not observed likely because of inadequate expression of the transgene. Taken together, this study provides needed insight into the molecular basis of the dt disorder and other peripheral neuropathies including HSAN-VI. PMID:24381311

  1. Aberrant signature methylome by DNMT1 hot spot mutation in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 1E.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhifu; Wu, Yanhong; Ordog, Tamas; Baheti, Saurabh; Nie, Jinfu; Duan, Xiaohui; Hojo, Kaori; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Dyck, Peter J; Klein, Christopher J

    2014-08-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is essential for DNA methylation, gene regulation and chromatin stability. We previously discovered DNMT1 mutations cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1E; OMIM 614116). HSAN1E is the first adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by a defect in a methyltransferase gene. HSAN1E patients appear clinically normal until young adulthood, then begin developing the characteristic symptoms involving central and peripheral nervous systems. Some HSAN1E patients also develop narcolepsy and it has recently been suggested that HSAN1E is allelic to autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, with narcolepsy (ADCA-DN; OMIM 604121), which is also caused by mutations in DNMT1. A hotspot mutation Y495C within the targeting sequence domain of DNMT1 has been identified among HSAN1E patients. The mutant DNMT1 protein shows premature degradation and reduced DNA methyltransferase activity. Herein, we investigate genome-wide DNA methylation at single-base resolution through whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of germline DNA in 3 pairs of HSAN1E patients and their gender- and age-matched siblings. Over 1 billion 75-bp single-end reads were generated for each sample. In the 3 affected siblings, overall methylation loss was consistently found in all chromosomes with X and 18 being most affected. Paired sample analysis identified 564,218 differentially methylated CpG sites (DMCs; P<0.05), of which 300?134 were intergenic and 264?084 genic CpGs. Hypomethylation was predominant in both genic and intergenic regions, including promoters, exons, most CpG islands, L1, L2, Alu, and satellite repeats and simple repeat sequences. In some CpG islands, hypermethylated CpGs outnumbered hypomethylated CpGs. In 201 imprinted genes, there were more DMCs than in non-imprinted genes and most were hypomethylated. Differentially methylated region (DMR) analysis identified 5649 hypomethylated and 1872 hypermethylated regions. Importantly, pathway analysis revealed 1693 genes associated with the identified DMRs were highly associated in diverse neurological disorders and NAD+/NADH metabolism pathways is implicated in the pathogenesis. Our results provide novel insights into the epigenetic mechanism of neurodegeneration arising from a hotspot DNMT1 mutation and reveal pathways potentially important in a broad category of neurological and psychological disorders. PMID:25033457

  2. Aberrant signature methylome by DNMT1 hot spot mutation in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 1E

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhifu; Wu, Yanhong; Ordog, Tamas; Baheti, Saurabh; Nie, Jinfu; Duan, Xiaohui; Hojo, Kaori; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Dyck, Peter J; Klein, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is essential for DNA methylation, gene regulation and chromatin stability. We previously discovered DNMT1 mutations cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1E; OMIM 614116). HSAN1E is the first adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by a defect in a methyltransferase gene. HSAN1E patients appear clinically normal until young adulthood, then begin developing the characteristic symptoms involving central and peripheral nervous systems. Some HSAN1E patients also develop narcolepsy and it has recently been suggested that HSAN1E is allelic to autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, with narcolepsy (ADCA-DN; OMIM 604121), which is also caused by mutations in DNMT1. A hotspot mutation Y495C within the targeting sequence domain of DNMT1 has been identified among HSAN1E patients. The mutant DNMT1 protein shows premature degradation and reduced DNA methyltransferase activity. Herein, we investigate genome-wide DNA methylation at single-base resolution through whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of germline DNA in 3 pairs of HSAN1E patients and their gender- and age-matched siblings. Over 1 billion 75-bp single-end reads were generated for each sample. In the 3 affected siblings, overall methylation loss was consistently found in all chromosomes with X and 18 being most affected. Paired sample analysis identified 564,218 differentially methylated CpG sites (DMCs; P < 0.05), of which 300?134 were intergenic and 264?084 genic CpGs. Hypomethylation was predominant in both genic and intergenic regions, including promoters, exons, most CpG islands, L1, L2, Alu, and satellite repeats and simple repeat sequences. In some CpG islands, hypermethylated CpGs outnumbered hypomethylated CpGs. In 201 imprinted genes, there were more DMCs than in non-imprinted genes and most were hypomethylated. Differentially methylated region (DMR) analysis identified 5649 hypomethylated and 1872 hypermethylated regions. Importantly, pathway analysis revealed 1693 genes associated with the identified DMRs were highly associated in diverse neurological disorders and NAD+/NADH metabolism pathways is implicated in the pathogenesis. Our results provide novel insights into the epigenetic mechanism of neurodegeneration arising from a hotspot DNMT1 mutation and reveal pathways potentially important in a broad category of neurological and psychological disorders. PMID:25033457

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies On this page: Description Genetic changes ... April 2007 What is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies? Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed August 2009 What is distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II? Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies On this page: ... Glossary definitions Reviewed April 2007 What is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies? Hereditary neuropathy with ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed August 2009 What is distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V? Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V ...

  7. X-Linked Hereditary Motor Sensory Neuropathy Type 1 (CMTX1) in a Three-Generation Gelao Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiao Mei; Tian, Mao Qiang; Li, Juan; Peng, Long Ying; Yu, Xiao Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we describe a three-generation family (the Gelao nationality, a minority ethnic group from Guizhou Province in the southwest China) with one affected member with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy X type 1 (CMTX1) in each generation. The three affected members carrying the R164W mutation in the Cx32 gene had different clinical symptoms. The proband, a 13-year-old boy presented recurrent episodes of transient central nervous system symptoms and concomitant transient diffuse white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. His grandfather had the peripheral neurological presentations with later onset in the fourth decade, characterized by slowly progressive weakness of the distal muscles, atrophy, and foot deformities. But no sensory loss was observed. The proband's 38-year-old mother denied any neurological symptoms. The examination was normal except for pes cavus and diminished deep tendon reflexes in her lower limbs bilaterally. Genetic sequencing revealed the proband and his grandfather had a hemizygous mutation (p.164R?>?W) of CJB1 gene, and his mother had R164W heterozygous mutation. Our three cases denied symptoms of sensory disturbances, the sensory examination including touch, pin prick, and temperature sensation showed no obvious abnormalities. Thus, further investigation is needed to improve our understanding of the Cx32 protein function in the nervous system. PMID:26479765

  8. Oral l-serine supplementation reduces production of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids in mice and humans with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Kevin; Penno, Anke; Schmidt, Brian P.; Lee, Ho-Joon; Frosch, Matthew P.; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Brown, Robert H.; Hornemann, Thorsten; Eichler, Florian S.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) causes sensory loss that predominantly affects the lower limbs, often preceded by hyperpathia and spontaneous shooting or lancinating pain. It is caused by several missense mutations in the genes encoding 2 of the 3 subunits of the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). The mutant forms of the enzyme show a shift from their canonical substrate l-serine to the alternative substrate l-alanine. This shift leads to increased formation of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids (dSLs). Our initial analysis showed that in HEK cells transfected with SPTLC1 mutants, dSL generation was modulated in vitro in the presence of various amino acids. We therefore examined whether in vivo specific amino acid substrate supplementation influenced dSL levels and disease severity in HSAN1. In mice bearing a transgene expressing the C133W SPTLC1 mutant linked to HSAN1, a 10% l-serine–enriched diet reduced dSL levels. l-serine supplementation also improved measures of motor and sensory performance as well as measures of male fertility. In contrast, a 10% l-alanine–enriched diet increased dSL levels and led to severe peripheral neuropathy. In a pilot study with 14 HSAN1 patients, l-serine supplementation similarly reduced dSL levels. These observations support the hypothesis that an altered substrate selectivity of the mutant SPT is key to the pathophysiology of HSAN1 and raise the prospect of l-serine supplementation as a first treatment option for this disorder. PMID:22045570

  9. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyoung Won; Kuntz, Nancy L

    2015-11-01

    Investigators from 4 pediatric hospitals in Canada analyzed the clinical presentation and electrophysiological data of 12 children with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), caused by PMP22 gene deletion. PMID:26933540

  10. [A family of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type 1B showing a marked difference of neurological disability score among affected family members].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, A; Yamamoto, T; Kikuchi, K

    1999-06-01

    The proband was a 22-year-old man with a complaint of progressive weakness in his lower limbs. His clinical diagnosis of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) type 1 was made based on the neurological findings and the results of peripheral nerve conduction studies and of histological studies of the sural nerve obtained on biopsy. The molecular genetic studies revealed arginine-to-histidine substitution at amino acid 98 of the Po protein in the proband. Therefore, the final diagnosis of HMSN type 1B was made. The same mutation was found in his mother and his two sisters. The neurological disability score of the proband was 69. It was 24 for his affected mother. The scores were 16 and 20 for the two affected sisters. The reason why the proband showed the highest score was considered to be the presence of the marked muscle weakness in the lower limbs found only in the proband. Therefore, it was concluded that the neurological disability score differs greatly among the affected members even with the same genetic abnormality in the same generation of the same family with HMSN type 1B. The affected family member with a low neurological disability score may be clinically undiagnosed. PMID:10434362

  11. Carriers of Recessive WNK1/HSN2 Mutations for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathy Type 2 (HSAN2) Are More Sensitive to Thermal Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Loggia, Marco L.; Bushnell, M. Catherine; Tétreault, Martine; Thiffault, Isabelle; Bhérer, Claude; Mohammed, Nazma K.; Kuchinad, Anil A.; Laferrière, Audrey; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Loisel, Lina; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Brais, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSAN2) is a rare recessive genetic disorder characterized by severe sensory loss affecting the tactile, thermal and nociceptive modalities. Although heterozygous carriers of nonsense mutations in the HSN2 gene, called with-no-lysine(K)-1 (WNK1), do not develop the disease, historical and experimental evidence suggests that these individuals might perceive somatosensory stimuli differently from others. Using the method-of-limits, we assessed the thresholds for warmth detection, cool detection, heat pain and cold pain in 25 mutation carriers and 35 controls. In group analyses, carriers displayed significantly lower warmth (p <0.001) and cool (p < 0.05) difference thresholds, and also tended to report cold pain at higher temperatures (p = 0.095), than controls. Similarly, matched-pair analyses showed that carriers are significantly more sensitive to warm stimuli (p < 0.01) and cold pain stimuli (p < 0.05), and tend to be more sensitive to cool stimuli (p = 0.11). Furthermore, the differences between the warmth detection thresholds of the carriers and those of gender- and sex-matched wild types significantly increased with age (r = 0.76, p = 0.02), and in carriers cool detection thresholds did not increase with age (r = 0.27, p = 0.24) as expected and observed in controls (r = 0.34, p = 0.05). This study demonstrates that the carriers of a recessive mutation for HSAN2 display greater sensitivity to innocuous thermal stimuli, as well as for cold pain, suggesting a possible environmental adaptive advantage of the heterozygous state. PMID:19228968

  12. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  13. Medical Management of Hereditary Optic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  14. [Molecular mechanisms of hereditary neuropathy: genotype-phenotype correlation].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masanori; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are classified into several subtypes according to clinical, electrophysiologic and pathologic findings. Recent genetic studies have revealed their phenotypic and genetic diversities. In the primary peripheral demyelinating neuropathies(CMT1), at least 9 genes have been associated with the disorders; altered dosage of peripheral myelin protein 22(PMP22) or point mutation of PMP22, the gap junction protein 1(GJB1), the myelin protein zero gene(MPZ), the early growth response gene 2(EGR2), the myotubularin-related protein 2 gene(MTMR2), the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), the L-periaxin gene(PRX), SRY-related HMG-BOX gene 10(SOX10) and the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 gene(GDAP1). In the primary peripheral axonal neuropathies(CMT2), at least 8 genes have been associated with these disorders; the neurofilament light chain gene(NEFL), the kinesin 1B gene(KIF1B), the gigaxonin gene(GAN1), Lamin A/C(LMNA) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1(TDP1). In addition, some mutations in GJB1, MPZ and GDAP1 also present with clinical and electrophysiologic findings of CMT2. Mutation of NEFL or KIF1B cause dominantly inherited axonal neuropathies, whereas mutation of GJB1 or MPZ can present as genocopies of dominant axonal neuropathies. In addition to the above diseases, we have reported a new type of NMSNP(MIM # *604484) characterized by proximal dominant neurogenic atrophy, obvious sensory nerve involvement and the gene locus on 3q13. Here, we summarize the genetic bases of hereditary neuropathies and attempt to highlight significant genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:12884740

  15. Neuropathic pain in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Na Young; Shin, Youn Ho; Jung, Junyang

    2013-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that neuropathic pain is an occasional symptom of CMT referred by CMT patients. However, neuropathic pain is not considered a significant symptom in CMT patient and no researchers have studied profoundly the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain in CMT. Here, we highlight the relationship between CMT disease and neuropathic pain via previous several studies. PMID:24278891

  16. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mackey, D A; Buttery, R G

    1992-08-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) presents with sudden onset of visual loss mainly in young adult males. LHON is not uncommon in Australia, accounting for 2% of invalid blind pensions. We have identified 20 unrelated families carrying mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with LHON and 135 of 291 individuals with documented LHON are currently alive in Australia. The mean age of onset of visual loss for males was 26 years and for females 27 years, with a range from six to 65 years. The mean risk of visual loss was 20% for males and 4% for females. There are over 1750 male and female carriers living in Australia who have not yet lost vision; 600 carriers are under 24 years of age. The expected number of new cases of blindness from LHON is three to four per year. PMID:1449769

  17. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  18. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  19. Evidence for sensory neuropathy and pharmacologic management.

    PubMed

    Greene, Scott M; Simpson, C Blake

    2010-02-01

    Recent literature points to postviral sensory neuropathy as a possible cause for refractory chronic cough. Vagal neuropathy may affect the sensory branches, inducing chronic cough or laryngospasm. Although the clinical presentation is fairly well described, there is little in the way of diagnostic criteria to establish this diagnosis. This article highlights the clinical picture of this disease and the efficacy, side-effect profiles of the currently used pharmacological interventions. PMID:20172257

  20. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies: clinical forms, genetics, and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Warner, L E; Garcia, C A; Lupski, J R

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary peripheral neuropathies, among the most common genetic disorders in humans, are a complex, clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that produce progressive deterioration of the peripheral nerves. This group of disorders includes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Our understanding of these disorders has progressed from the description of the clinical phenotypes and delineation of the electrophysiologic and pathologic features to the identification of disease genes and elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:10073277

  1. [Designation criteria for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Makoto; Mimura, Osamu; Wakakura, Masato; Inatani, Masaru; Nakazawa, Toru; Shiraga, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Designation criteria for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have been established by a working group for retino-choroidal and optic atrophy funded by the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) of Japan in collaboration with the Japanese Neuro-ophthalmology Society. The criteria are composed of three major symptoms and three ancillary test findings. According to the number and the combination of these symptoms and findings, subjects are classified into definite, probable, and possible LHON cases and asymptomatic carriers. The major symptoms include bilateral involvement with a time-lag, a papillomacular bundle atrophy, both characteristic optic disc findings at the acute phase. In the ancillary testings, mitochondrial DNA mutations specific for LHON are detailed with a table listing the mutation loci being attached. To enhance readers' understanding of description of the major symptoms and ancillary test findings, explanatory remarks on 11 parameters are supplemented. The establishment of the criteria facilitates epidemiological survey of LHON by MHLW and contributes to improvement of welfare for patients with LHON in Japan. PMID:26062390

  2. Goiter and Laryngeal Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Abdul Latif; Jabour, Jad; Azar, Sami T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Examining the prevalence of laryngeal sensory neuropathy (LSN) in goiter patients versus a control group. Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Methods. 33 Goiter patients were enrolled versus 25 age-matched controls. TSH levels, size of thyroid gland, and presence or absence of thyroid nodules were reported. Subjects were asked about the presence or absence of any of the following symptoms: cough, globus pharyngeus, and/or throat clearing that persistented for more than 6 weeks. The presence of one or more of these symptoms for at least six weeks in the absence of LPRD, allergy, asthma, ACE inhibitor intake, and psychogenic disorder was defined as LSN. Results. For goitrous patients mean age (years) was (41.73 ± 9.47) versus (37.44 ± 10.89) for controls. 82% goitrous patients had known nodules and 27% carried a simultaneous diagnosis of hypothyroidism. Among those with documented size (61%), mean total thyroid volume was 26.996 ± 14.852 cm3, with a range from 9.430 to 67.022 cm3. The overall prevalence of LSN among goitrous patients was 42% versus 12% among controls (P = 0.0187). There was no correlation between LSN, size of thyroid gland, and TSH level. Conclusion. The prevalence of LSN in goitrous patients is significantly higher than that in a nongoitrous population. PMID:23818901

  3. Foot pad skin biopsy in mouse models of hereditary neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dacci, Patrizia; Dina, Giorgia; Cerri, Federica; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Lauria, Giuseppe; Feltri, Maria Laura; Bolino, Alessandra; Comi, Giancarlo; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Quattrini, Angelo

    2010-12-01

    Numerous transgenic and knockout mouse models of human hereditary neuropathies have become available over the past decade. We describe a simple, reproducible, and safe biopsy of mouse skin for histopathological evaluation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in models of hereditary neuropathies. We compared the diagnostic outcome between sciatic nerve and dermal nerves found in skin biopsy (SB) from the hind foot. A total of five animal models of different Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies, and one model of congenital muscular dystrophy associated neuropathy were examined. In wild type mice, dermal nerve fibers were readily identified by immunohistochemistry, light, and electron microscopy and they appeared similar to myelinated fibers in sciatic nerve. In mutant mice, SB manifested myelin abnormalities similar to those observed in sciatic nerves, including hypomyelination, onion bulbs, myelin outfolding, redundant loops, and tomacula. In many strains, however, SB showed additional abnormalities--fiber loss, dense neurofilament packing with lower phosphorylation status, and axonal degeneration-undetected in sciatic nerve, possibly because SB samples distal nerves. SB, a reliable technique to investigate peripheral neuropathies in human beings, is also useful to investigate animal models of hereditary neuropathies. Our data indicate that SB may reveal distal axonal pathology in mouse models and permits sequential follow-up of the neuropathy in an individual mouse, thereby reducing the number of mice necessary to document pathology of the PNS. PMID:20878767

  4. Foot Pad Skin Biopsy in Mouse Models of Hereditary Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dacci, Patrizia; Dina, Giorgia; Cerri, Federica; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Lauria, Giuseppe; Feltri, Maria Laura; Bolino, Alessandra; Comi, Giancarlo; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Quattrini, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Numerous transgenic and knockout mouse models of human hereditary neuropathies have become available over the past decade. We describe a simple, reproducible, and safe biopsy of mouse skin for histopathological evaluation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in models of hereditary neuropathies. We compared the diagnostic outcome between sciatic nerve and dermal nerves found in skin biopsy (SB) from the hind foot. A total of five animal models of different Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies, and one model of congenital muscular dystrophy associated neuropathy were examined. In wild type mice, dermal nerve fibers were readily identified by immunohistochemistry, light, and electron microscopy and they appeared similar to myelinated fibers in sciatic nerve. In mutant mice, SB manifested myelin abnormalities similar to those observed in sciatic nerves, including hypomyelination, onion bulbs, myelin outfolding, redundant loops, and tomacula. In many strains, however, SB showed additional abnormalities—fiber loss, dense neurofilament packing with lower phosphorylation status, and axonal degeneration—undetected in sciatic nerve, possibly because SB samples distal nerves. SB, a reliable technique to investigate peripheral neuropathies in human beings, is also useful to investigate animal models of hereditary neuropathies. Our data indicate that SB may reveal distal axonal pathology in mouse models and permits sequential follow-up of the neuropathy in an individual mouse, thereby reducing the number of mice necessary to document pathology of the PNS. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20878767

  5. Genetic spectrum of hereditary neuropathies with onset in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Baets, Jonathan; Deconinck, Tine; De Vriendt, Els; Zimoń, Magdalena; Yperzeele, Laetitia; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Peeters, Kristien; Spiegel, Ronen; Parman, Yesim; Ceulemans, Berten; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Pou-Serradell, Adolf; Bernert, Günther; Dinopoulos, Argirios; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Sallinen, Satu-Leena; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Pauly, Fernand; Van den Bergh, Peter; Bilir, Birdal; Battaloglu, Esra; Madrid, Ricardo E; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Kochanski, Andrzej; Topaloglu, Haluk; Miller, Geoffrey; Jordanova, Albena; Timmerman, Vincent; De Jonghe, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Early onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies are rare disorders encompassing congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy with disease onset in the direct post-natal period and Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy starting in infancy. The clinical spectrum, however, reaches beyond the boundaries of these two historically defined disease entities. De novo dominant mutations in PMP22, MPZ and EGR2 are known to be a typical cause of very early onset hereditary neuropathies. In addition, mutations in several other dominant and recessive genes for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease may lead to similar phenotypes. To estimate mutation frequencies and to gain detailed insights into the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of early onset hereditary neuropathies, we selected a heterogeneous cohort of 77 unrelated patients who presented with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy within the first year of life. The majority of these patients were isolated in their family. We performed systematic mutation screening by means of direct sequencing of the coding regions of 11 genes: MFN2, PMP22, MPZ, EGR2, GDAP1, NEFL, FGD4, MTMR2, PRX, SBF2 and SH3TC2. In addition, screening for the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A duplication on chromosome 17p11.2-12 was performed. In 35 patients (45%), mutations were identified. Mutations in MPZ, PMP22 and EGR2 were found most frequently in patients presenting with early hypotonia and breathing difficulties. The recessive genes FGD4, PRX, MTMR2, SBF2, SH3TC2 and GDAP1 were mutated in patients presenting with early foot deformities and variable delay in motor milestones after an uneventful neonatal period. Several patients displaying congenital foot deformities but an otherwise normal early development carried the Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A duplication. This study clearly illustrates the genetic heterogeneity underlying hereditary neuropathies with infantile onset. PMID:21840889

  6. Genetic spectrum of hereditary neuropathies with onset in the first year of life

    PubMed Central

    Baets, Jonathan; Deconinck, Tine; De Vriendt, Els; Zimoń, Magdalena; Yperzeele, Laetitia; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Peeters, Kristien; Spiegel, Ronen; Parman, Yesim; Ceulemans, Berten; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Pou-Serradell, Adolf; Bernert, Günther; Dinopoulos, Argirios; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Sallinen, Satu-Leena; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Pauly, Fernand; Van den Bergh, Peter; Bilir, Birdal; Battaloglu, Esra; Madrid, Ricardo E.; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Kochanski, Andrzej; Topaloglu, Haluk; Miller, Geoffrey; Jordanova, Albena; Timmerman, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Early onset hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies are rare disorders encompassing congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy with disease onset in the direct post-natal period and Dejerine–Sottas neuropathy starting in infancy. The clinical spectrum, however, reaches beyond the boundaries of these two historically defined disease entities. De novo dominant mutations in PMP22, MPZ and EGR2 are known to be a typical cause of very early onset hereditary neuropathies. In addition, mutations in several other dominant and recessive genes for Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease may lead to similar phenotypes. To estimate mutation frequencies and to gain detailed insights into the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of early onset hereditary neuropathies, we selected a heterogeneous cohort of 77 unrelated patients who presented with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy within the first year of life. The majority of these patients were isolated in their family. We performed systematic mutation screening by means of direct sequencing of the coding regions of 11 genes: MFN2, PMP22, MPZ, EGR2, GDAP1, NEFL, FGD4, MTMR2, PRX, SBF2 and SH3TC2. In addition, screening for the Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 1A duplication on chromosome 17p11.2-12 was performed. In 35 patients (45%), mutations were identified. Mutations in MPZ, PMP22 and EGR2 were found most frequently in patients presenting with early hypotonia and breathing difficulties. The recessive genes FGD4, PRX, MTMR2, SBF2, SH3TC2 and GDAP1 were mutated in patients presenting with early foot deformities and variable delay in motor milestones after an uneventful neonatal period. Several patients displaying congenital foot deformities but an otherwise normal early development carried the Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 1A duplication. This study clearly illustrates the genetic heterogeneity underlying hereditary neuropathies with infantile onset. PMID:21840889

  7. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  8. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  9. Small Heat Shock Proteins and Distal Hereditary Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Nefedova, V V; Muranova, L K; Sudnitsyna, M V; Ryzhavskaya, A S; Gusev, N B

    2015-12-01

    Classification of small heat shock proteins (sHsp) is presented and processes regulated by sHsp are described. Symptoms of hereditary distal neuropathy are described and the genes whose mutations are associated with development of this congenital disease are listed. The literature data and our own results concerning physicochemical properties of HspB1 mutants associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. Mutations of HspB1, associated with hereditary motor neuron disease, can be accompanied by change of the size of HspB1 oligomers, by decreased stability under unfavorable conditions, by changes in the interaction with protein partners, and as a rule by decrease of chaperone-like activity. The largest part of these mutations is accompanied by change of oligomer stability (that can be either increased or decreased) or by change of intermonomer interaction inside an oligomer. Data on point mutation of HspB3 associated with axonal neuropathy are presented. Data concerning point mutations of Lys141 of HspB8 and those associated with hereditary neuropathy and different forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. It is supposed that point mutations of sHsp associated with distal neuropathies lead either to loss of function (for instance, decrease of chaperone-like activity) or to gain of harmful functions (for instance, increase of interaction with certain protein partners). PMID:26878578

  10. [A family of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I with a mutation (Arg98-->His) in myelin Po--report on a second Japanese family].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, A; Kashiwada, E; Hashimoto, T; Yamamoto, T; Murai, Y; Ohashi, H; Ikegami, T; Hayasaka, K; Sudo, K; Yamamori, S

    1996-03-01

    A 46-year-old housewife had complaints of insidiously progressive muscle weakness and paresthesia in the distal lower limbs. On neurological examination, a slight to moderate degree of muscle weakness with slight atrophy was observed in the bilateral intrinsic hand muscles. A severe degree of muscle weakness with moderate atrophy was observed in tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Muscle stretch reflexes were decreased in the upper limbs and absent in the lower limbs, without pathologic reflexes. She had a steppage gait. Vibratory sensation was slightly decreased in the hands and moderately decreased in the feet. Touch, pain and temperature sensations were also moderately decreased only in the feet. On laboratory examination, glycosuria (5.6g/dl) was noted. Fasting blood sugar was 226mg/dl with an elevated hemoglobin A1C level (12.7%). The right median motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities were 14.8 and 20.3 m/sec, respectively, with a markedly prolonged distal latency. No muscle action potential was obtained from stimulation of the right tibial nerve. Also, no nerve action potential was elicited from stimulation of the right sural nerve. A fascicular biopsy of the right sural nerve revealed the presence of both demyelinated and remyelinated axons, and an onion-bulb formation with a marked decrease in the density of the myelinated fibers. Based on the neurological examination and nerve conduction studies of the family members, a younger sister, younger brother and an elder daughter of the proband were found to be affected by demyelinating polyneuropathy. Diabetes mellitus was not found among the family members with laboratory evidences of demyelinating polyneuropathy. Based on the family history, an uncle on the mother's side of the proband, the proband's grandmother and a younger daughter of a proband's brother were considered to be affected. The uncle and grandmother had diabetes mellitus. Therefore, we concluded that this family had HMSN type I with autosomal dominant inheritance. In the studies on fluorescence in situ hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism of the genomic DNA of the proband, a DNA duplication in the 17p11.2-12 region was not observed. However, the direct sequencing analysis of DNA fragments from genomic DNA encoding the Po gene of the proband revealed a substitution of histidine for arginine at the codon 98 in the extramembranous domain of Po. She was heterozygous for the mutant allele and normal allele. Alterations in the tertiary structure of the extramembranous domain of Po may result in an impairment of the peripheral myelin compaction. This is the second Japanese family with the same mutation (Arg98-->His) of myelin Po as reported previously by us, and this type of case is rare in the literature. Therefore, the mutation at the codon 98 may play a critical role in the development of the myelin abnormality in HMSN type IB. PMID:8851708

  11. Phenotype HNPP (Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies) Induced by Medical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Mark; Ly, Amy; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The phenotype HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies) is caused by heterozygous deletion of the PMP22 gene. HNPP is clinically characterized by asymmetric focal sensory loss and muscle weakness. Reports of HNPP have been rare. In this article, we report the case of an asymptomatic woman with the HNPP mutation. After undergoing total knee arthroplasty, she developed a footdrop with prolonged recovery. We concluded (a) that the HNPP mutation may carry a high risk for certain surgical procedures not expected to cause neurologic deficits in normal patients and (b) that humans with the HNPP mutation can be asymptomatic. Lack of symptoms can contribute to underrecognition of the disease. PMID:26761923

  12. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    van Paassen, Barbara W; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Verhamme, Camiel; Baas, Frank; de Visser, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  13. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  14. Late-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy mimicking Susac's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zoccolella, Stefano; Petruzzella, Vittoria; Prascina, Francesco; Artuso, Lucia; Pacillo, Francesca; Dell'Aglio, Rosa; Avolio, Carlo; Delle Noci, Nicola; Attimonelli, Marcella; Specchio, Luigi Maria

    2010-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by bilateral painless optic atrophy and blindness. It usually occurs in young men in association with three major mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). We report a patient with a history of alcohol abuse who developed at age 63 years visual impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, and memory dysfunction, suggestive of Susac's syndrome. The patient carried the heteroplasmic mt. 11778G>A mutation on the T2e mtDNA haplogroup. It remains unclear if chronic alcohol abuse combined with the mitochondrial genetic background prompted an aged-related neurodegeneration or deferred the onset of the LHON disease. PMID:20632027

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  16. Pre-excitation syndrome in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nikoskelainen, E K; Savontaus, M L; Huoponen, K; Antila, K; Hartiala, J

    1994-09-24

    Pre-excitation syndrome is common in families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). 24 Finnish families with LHON were screened for the 11778 and the 3460 mitochondrial DNA mutations. 5 of 30 individuals with LHON and the 11778 mutation had the Wolff-Parkinson-White pre-excitation syndrome. None of 10 with the 3460 mutation or of 11 with "other" mutations had this syndrome. Overall, 5 of 51 LHON patients and 9 of 112 symptom-free maternal relatives had Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (9%). In paternal relatives, the frequency was 1.6%. Mitochondrial DNA causal for LHON may contribute to pre-excitation syndrome. PMID:7916404

  17. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: the first publication (1947).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J

    2003-04-01

    The first report of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was published in Dutch in 1947. The present paper makes it accessible in the English language. de Jong described two families, but only the cases from the first family may be considered to have had HNPP. Five persons from three generations had recurring peripheral neuropathies. de Jong hypothesized a hereditary disposition for the occurrence of neuropathies, but suggested a relationship with low vitamin B(1) levels. PMID:12682341

  18. Genetic evaluation of inherited motor/sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chance, Phillip F

    2004-01-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), chromosome 16 (CMT1C) and chromosome 10 (CMT1D). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-p12. In rare patients it may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (Po or MPZ) gene. Mutations in the SIMPLE gene cause CMT1C, and CMT1D is the result of mutations in the early response 2 (ERG2 or Krox-20) gene. An X-linked form of CMT1 (CMT1X) maps to Xq13 and is associated with mutations in the connexin32 (Cx32) gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy that maps to chromosome 1p35-p36 (CMT2A), chromosome 3q13-q22 (CMT2B), chromosome 7p14 (CMT2D), chromosome 8p21 (CMT2E), chromosome 1q22-q23 (CMT2F) or chromosome 3q13 (CMT2G). Two X-linked forms of CMT2 have been reported (CMT2XA and CMT2XB), but the genes remain unidentified. An area that has recently expanded is the identification of autosomal recessive forms of CMT type 1 and 2. Of the eight recessive forms of CMT1 that have been identified to date, only two have been fully characterized at the molecular level (CMT1 AR B 1 and CMT1 AR D). Point mutations were found in the myotubularin-related protein-2 (MTM2) gene for CMT1 AR B1. CMT1 AR D is the result of point mutations in the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene, PO gene, EGR2 gene or the PRX gene (for the recessive form). It shares considerable clinical and pathological features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-p12 that results in reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication/deletion syndromes that originate from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosome 8q, 10q and 11q. PMID:16106622

  19. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy: a recurrent and bilateral foot drop case report.

    PubMed

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Macedo, Liliana; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Rodrigues, Maria Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, "sausage-like" swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis. PMID:24251057

  20. A rare genetic disorder in the differential diagnosis of the entrapment neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Koc, Filiz; Güzel, Rengin; Benlidayi, Ilke Coskun; Yerdelen, Deniz; Güzel, Irfan; Sarica, Yakup

    2006-04-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant, slowly progressive neuromuscular disorder, which is characterized by recurrent acute peripheral nerve palsies. Electrophysiological studies show decreased motor and sensory conduction velocities in both clinically affected and unaffected nerves. Focal thickening of myelin sheath with sausage-like formation, also called tomacula, is seen in nerve biopsies. In genetic studies, 1.5-Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2 is detected in approximately 85% of HNPP cases and point mutations are determined in some cases. We describe a 26-year-old man who had a 6-month history of paresthesia in the little fingers of his hands. He was diagnosed with HNPP by neurologic examination, and electrophysiological and histopathologic studies. Studies in his mother and one brother also showed entrapment neuropathy. However, no deletions or point mutations were determined in this family. Other genetic defects apart from the known ones might be present in this disease. The most frequent entrapment syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, is also seen in this disease, so physicians dealing with musculoskeletal problems should be alert about this subject. Awareness of HNPP may help avoid unnecessary operative interventions. PMID:16601541

  1. Clinical and neurophysiological features of the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy due to the 17p11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline Pinheiro Martins de; Pereira, Raquel Campos; Onofre, Patrícia Toscano; Marques, Vanessa Daccach; Andrade, Gilberto Brown de; Barreira, Amilton Antunes; Marques Junior, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autossomal dominant disorder manifesting recurrent mononeuropathies. Objective Evaluate its clinical and nerve conduction studies (NCS) characteristics, searching for diagnostic particularities. Method We reviewed the neurological manifestations of 39 and the NCS of 33 patients. Results Family history was absent in 16/39 (41%). The onset complaints were weakness in 24, pain in 6, sensory deficit in 5 and paresthesias in 4. Pain was seen in 3 other patients. The following neuropathy patterns were found: multiple mononeuropathy (26), mononeuropathy (7), chronic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (4), chronic sensory polyneuropathy (1) and unilateral brachial plexopathy (1). NCS showed a sensorimotor neuropathy with focal conduction slowing in 31, two had mononeuropathy and another brachial plexopathy. Conclusion HNPP presentation is variable and may include pain. The most frequent pattern is of an asymmetrical sensory and motor neuropathy with focal slowing at specific topographies on NCS. PMID:26982985

  2. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Marc J; Feinberg, Joseph; DiCarlo, Edward F; Birchansky, Sherri B; Wolfe, Scott W

    2007-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an uncommon diagnosis that should be considered in patients with multiple compressive neuropathies. We present the case of a woman who presented with bilateral hand numbness and weakness. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, bilateral ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, left peroneal neuropathy at the fibular head, and a primarily demyelinating generalized sensorimotor neuropathy. Subsequent genetic testing identified a deletion at chromosome 17p11.2 to confirm the diagnosis of HNPP. Treatment of this largely self-limiting disease is controversial, and this patient suffered minimal disability with treatment including splinting and surgical releases. PMID:18751796

  3. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Presenting as an Acute Brachial Plexopathy: A Lover's Palsy.

    PubMed

    Wedderburn, Sarah; Pateria, Puraskar; Panegyres, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    It is generally regarded that patients with hereditary neuropathy to pressure palsies, due to a deletion in the PMP22 gene, show recurrent pressure palsy and generalised peripheral neuropathy (pes cavus and hammer toes sometimes develop). Brachial plexopathy is rarely identified as a first presentation of hereditary neuropathy to pressure palsies. We describe a young man who developed a painless flail upper limb with a clinical diagnosis of a brachial plexopathy after his partner slept on his arm - a PMP22 deletion was found. His father, who had a symmetrical polyneuropathy without recurrent mononeuropathies, shared the PMP22 deletion. PMID:25685136

  4. Pes cavus and hereditary neuropathies: when a relationship should be suspected

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, S.; Ricci, G.; Caldarazzo Ienco, E.; Carlesi, C.; Volpi, L.; Siciliano, G.

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary peripheral neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Foot deformities, including the common pes cavus, but also hammer toes and twisting of the ankle, are frequently present in patients with hereditary peripheral neuropathy, and often represent one of the first signs of the disease. Pes cavus in hereditary peripheral neuropathies is caused by imbalance between the intrinsic muscles of the foot and the muscles of the leg. Accurate clinical evaluation in patients with pes cavus is necessary to exclude or confirm the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies should be suspected in those cases with bilateral foot deformities, in the presence of family history for pes cavus and/or gait impairment, and in the presence of neurological symptoms or signs, such as distal muscle hypotrophy of limbs. Herein, we review the hereditary peripheral neuropathies in which pes cavus plays a key role as a “spy sign,” discussing the clinical and molecular features of these disorders to highlight the importance of pes cavus as a helpful clinical sign in these rare diseases. PMID:20963465

  5. Genotype-phenotype correlations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    To?ska, Katarzyna; Kodro?, Agata; Bartnik, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), acute or subacute vision loss due to retinal ganglion cell death which in the long run leads to optic nerve atrophy is one of the most widely studied maternally inherited diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Although three common mutations, 11778G>A, 14484T>C or 3460G>A are responsible for over 90% of cases and affect genes encoding complex I subunits of the respiratory chain, their influence on bioenergetic properties of the cell is marginal and cannot fully explain the pathology of the disease. The following chain of events was proposed, based on biochemical and anatomical properties of retinal ganglion cells whose axons form the optic nerve: mitochondrial DNA mutations increase reactive oxygen species production in these sensitive cells, leading to caspase-independent apoptosis. As LHON is characterized by low penetrance and sex bias (men are affected about 5 times more frequently than women) the participation of the other factors-genetic and environmental-beside mtDNA mutations was studied. Mitochondrial haplogroups and smoking are some of the factors involved in the complex etiology of this disease. PMID:20211598

  6. Novel therapeutic approaches for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shilpa

    2013-03-01

    Many human childhood mitochondrial disorders result from abnormal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and altered bioenergetics. These abnormalities span most of the mtDNA, demonstrating that there are no "unique" positions on the mitochondrial genome that when deleted or mutated produce a disease phenotype. This diversity implies that the relationship between mitochondrial genotype and clinical phenotype is very complex. The origins of clinical phenotypes are thus unclear, fundamentally difficult-to-treat, and are usually clinically devastating. Current treatment is largely supportive and the disorders progress relentlessly causing significant morbidity and mortality. Vitamin supplements and pharmacological agents have been used in isolated cases and clinical trials, but the efficacy of these interventions is unclear. In spite of recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases, a cure remains elusive. An optimal cure would be gene therapy, which involves introducing the missing gene(s) into the mitochondria to complement the defect. Our recent research results indicate the feasibility of an innovative protein-transduction ("protofection") technology, consisting of a recombinant mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) that avidly binds mtDNA and permits efficient targeting into mitochondria in situ and in vivo. Thus, the development of gene therapy for treating mitochondrial disease offers promise, because it may circumvent the clinical abnormalities and the current inability to treat individual disorders in affected individuals. This review aims to focus on current treatment options and future therapeutics in mitochondrial disease treatment with a special emphasis on Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. PMID:23545042

  7. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy - phenotype, genetics, therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Gallenmüller, C; Klopstock, T

    2014-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a rare genetic disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells leading to a persistent severe bilateral loss of visual acuity within weeks or months. Males are much more likely to be affected than females, disease onset in most cases takes place between age 15 and 35 years. The disease is caused by point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. The penetrance of the disease is incomplete, i.e., not all mutation carriers develop clinical symptoms. The phenotype is relatively uniform, but age at onset, severity and prognosis may vary even within the same family. Environmental and endocrine factors, optic disc anatomy as well as mitochondrial and nuclear genetic factors are discussed to influence penetrance as well as interindividual and intrafamilial variability. However, only cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption have been shown to trigger disease onset. The disease is characterised by a central visual field defect, impaired colour vision and fundoscopically a peripapillary microangiopathy in the acute phase. Most patients end up after some months with a severe visual loss below 0.1 and in most cases there is no significant improvement of visual acuity in the course. In rare cases patients experience a mostly partial visual recovery which depends on the type of mutation. For confirmation of the diagnosis a detailed ophthalmological examination with fundoscopy, family history and genetic analysis of the mitochondrial DNA is needed. To date, there is no proven causal therapy, but at early disease stages treatment with idebenone can be tried. PMID:24658858

  8. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies in childhood: Case series and literature update.

    PubMed

    Chrestian, Nicolas; McMillan, Hugh; Poulin, Chantal; Campbell, Craig; Vajsar, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) is a rare condition in childhood with a diverse range of clinical presentations. We analyzed the clinical presentation and electrophysiological data of 12 children with a confirmed PMP22 gene deletion and reviewed the published reports of HNPP in children and compared our data with the reports from the literature review. Peroneal palsy was the most common presentation (42%) followed by brachial plexus palsy in 25% of our cases. Nerve conduction studies were always suggestive of the diagnosis demonstrating 3 major patterns: multifocal demyelination at the area of entrapment, generalized sensory-motor polyneuropathy and a combination of the two first patterns in a vast majority (60%). Surprisingly, there was bilateral or unilateral electrophysiological entrapment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel in all our patients. The clinical presentation of HNPP in childhood is heterogeneous and electrophysiological findings are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Any unexplained mononeuropathy or multifocal neuropathy should lead to PMP22 gene testing to look for the deletion. Early diagnosis is important in order to facilitate appropriate genetic counseling and also for the appropriate care for these patients. PMID:26189194

  9. Vesiculobullous dermatomyositis with sensory motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Erhan; Baykara, Sule Nergiz; Ozekinci, Selver; Aytekin, Sema

    2013-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented with muscle weakness in both legs for a duration of 2 months. Physical examination revealed periorbital edema and erythema, erythema on the neck and chest, erythematous papules on the proximal-distal interphalangeal and metocarpophalangeal joints, crusted plaque lesions on the thighs and around the knees, and bullous and ulcerated lesions in the antecubital and popliteal fossae (Figure 1A and 1B). Some bullous lesions were intact and some were ulcerated. There was severe edema especially in the upper extremities. He had a history of 15-kg weight loss for 4 months. Laboratory findings were remarkable for a white blood cell count of 16.0 K/UL (4.60-10.20 K/UL), a C-reactive protein of 6.93 mg/dL (0-0.5 mg/dL), an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 50 mm/h (8-15 mm/h), an aspartate aminotransferase level of 213 U/L (10-40 U/L), a lactate dehydrogenase of 447 U/L (< 225 U/L), and a creatine kinase level of 1733 U/L (29-200 U/L). Results from antinuclear antibody at 1:320 titers and anti-smooth muscle antibody were positive. Results from anti-SS A/SS B antibodies, anti Jo-1 antibody, U1-snRNP antibody, and anti-ds DNA antibody tests were negative. A skin biopsy specimen obtained from the right antecubital fossa showed minimal orthokeratosis and subepidermal detachments. There was marked edema in the dermis and lymphocyte infiltration around the skin appendages (Figure 2). Direct immunofluorescence studies demonstrated scattered staining for C3 and IgM at the basal membrane zone. Results for IgG, IgA, and fibrin staining were negative. Muscle biopsy from left deltoid muscle was performed and some muscle fibers were demonstrated to be atrophied. There was remarkable difference between muscle fiber diameters. With Masson staining, there was increased connective tissue and no inflammation. Electromyography (EMG) showed a myogenic pattern. Nerve conduction studies showed tibial, median, ulnar, peroneal motor neuropathy, and median, ulnar, and sural sensory neuropathy. Based on these findings, diagnosis of vesiculo-bullous dermatomyositis (DM) was made. Further investigation of esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy revealed ulcerated lesions on antrum and corpus and these were assessed as Helicobacter pylori-negative atrophic chronic gastritis. No pathologic findings were described on chest, abdomen, and pelvic tomography. Levels of tumor markers were within normal ranges. Overall, no sign of malignancy was detected. Methyl prednisolone treatment of 1 mg/kg/d was started; however, new bullous lesions erupted while the original lesions were healing. PMID:23930362

  10. Severe sensory neuropathy in patients with adult-onset multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoxia; Hong, Daojun; Zhang, Wei; Li, Wurong; Shi, Xin; Zhao, Danhua; Yang, Xu; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2016-02-01

    Multiple Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of fatty acid oxidation. Most patients with late-onset MADD are clinically characterized by lipid storage myopathy with dramatic responsiveness to riboflavin treatment. Abnormalities of peripheral neuropathy have rarely been reported in patients with late-onset MADD. We describe six patients who presented with proximal limb weakness and loss of sensation in the distal limbs. Muscle biopsy revealed typical myopathological patterns of lipid storage myopathy and blood acylcarnitine profiles showed a combined elevation of multiple acylcarnitines supporting the diagnosis of MADD. However, nerve conduction investigations and sural nerve biopsies in these patients indicated severe axonal sensory neuropathy. Causative ETFDH gene mutations were found in all six cases. No other causative gene mutations were identified in mitochondrial DNA and genes associated with hereditary neuropathies through next-generation-sequencing panel. Late-onset patients with ETFDH mutations can present with proximal muscle weakness and distal sensory neuropathy, which might be a new phenotypic variation, but the precise underlying pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. PMID:26821934

  11. A novel locus for a hereditary recurrent neuropathy on chromosome 21q21.

    PubMed

    Calpena, E; Martínez-Rubio, D; Arpa, J; García-Peñas, J J; Montaner, D; Dopazo, J; Palau, F; Espinós, C

    2014-08-01

    Hereditary recurrent neuropathies are uncommon. Disorders with a known molecular basis falling within this group include hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) due to the deletion of the PMP22 gene or to mutations in this same gene, and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA) caused by mutations in the SEPT9 gene. We report a three-generation family presenting a hereditary recurrent neuropathy without pathological changes in either PMP22 or SEPT9 genes. We performed a genome-wide mapping, which yielded a locus of 12.4 Mb on chromosome 21q21. The constructed haplotype fully segregated with the disease and we found significant evidence of linkage. After mutational screening of genes located within this locus, encoding for proteins and microRNAs, as well as analysis of large deletions/insertions, we identified 71 benign polymorphisms. Our findings suggest a novel genetic locus for a recurrent hereditary neuropathy of which the molecular defect remains elusive. Our results further underscore the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of this group of neuropathies. PMID:24878226

  12. Novel use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S W; Ko, C H; Yau, S K; Mak, Chloe; Yuen, Y F; Lee, C Y

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of a young Chinese male presenting with sequential, painless, bilateral visual loss in Hong Kong. He was diagnosed to have Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with genetic workup showing G11778A mutation with over 80% heteroplasmy. He was started on idebenone treatment 11 months after onset of the binocular disease. To our best knowledge, this is the first case of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy treated with idebenone in Hong Kong. The recent evidence of the diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease is reviewed. PMID:25307075

  13. Congenital talipes equinovarus associated with hereditary congenital common peroneal nerve neuropathy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Matar, Hosam E; Garg, Neeraj K

    2016-03-01

    We present a unique case of a congenital hereditary common peroneal nerve neuropathy with congenital idiopathic congenital talipes equinovarus that had been treated with the Ponseti method with satisfactory outcome at 5-year follow-up, along with a literature review. PMID:26588839

  14. Antiretroviral therapy-associated acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Capers, Kimberly N; Turnacioglu, Sinan; Leshner, Robert T; Crawford, John R

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has been reported in HIV-infected patients in association with the immune reconstitution syndrome whose symptoms can be mimicked by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. We report a case of a 17-year-old, HIV-infected patient on HAART with a normal CD4 count and undetectable viral load, presenting with acute lower extremity weakness associated with lactatemia. Electromyography/nerve conduction studies revealed absent sensory potentials and decreased compound muscle action potentials, consistent with a diagnosis of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. Lactatemia resolved following cessation of HAART; however, neurological deficits minimally improved over several months in spite of immune modulatory therapy. This case highlights the potential association between HAART, mitochondrial toxicity and acute axonal neuropathies in HIV-infected patients, distinct from the immune reconstitution syndrome. PMID:21327178

  15. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of BSCL2 Mutations in a Taiwanese Cohort with Hereditary Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Lin, Chou-Ching; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Huang, Yen-Hua; Liao, Yi-Chu; Huang, Han-Wei; Lin, Kon-Ping; Soong, Bing-Wen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Background A small group of patients with inherited neuropathy that has been shown to be caused by mutations in the BSCL2 gene. However, little information is available about the role of BSCL2 mutations in inherited neuropathies in Taiwan. Methodology and Principal Findings Utilizing targeted sequencing, 76 patients with molecularly unassigned Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2) and 8 with distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN), who were selected from 348 unrelated patients with inherited neuropathies, were screened for mutations in the coding regions of BSCL2. Two heterozygous BSCL2 mutations, p.S90L and p.R96H, were identified, of which the p.R96H mutation is novel. The p.S90L was identified in a pedigree with CMT2 while the p.R96H was identified in a patient with apparently sporadic dHMN. In vitro studies demonstrated that the p.R96H mutation results in a remarkably low seipin expression and reduced cell viability. Conclusion BSCL2 mutations account for a small number of patients with inherited neuropathies in Taiwan. The p.R96H mutation is associated with dHMN. This study expands the molecular spectrum of BSCL2 mutations and also emphasizes the pathogenic role of BSCL2 mutations in molecularly unassigned hereditary neuropathies. PMID:26815532

  16. An Analysis of the Symptomatic Domains Most Relevant to Charcot Marie Tooth Neuropathy (CMT) Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT); Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy; Nerve Compression Syndromes; Tooth Diseases; Congenital Abnormalities; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in distal axons contribute to HIV sensory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Helmar C.; Chen, Weiran; Borzan, Jasenka; Mankowski, Joseph; Höke, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Objective Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage has been associated with aging and abnormal oxidative metabolism. We hypothesized that in human immunodeficiency virus associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN), damaged mtDNA accumulates in distal nerve segments and that a spatial pattern of mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the distal degeneration of sensory nerve fibers. Methods We measured levels of common deletion mutations in mtDNA and expression levels of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes of matched proximal and distal nerve specimens from patients with and without HIV-SN. In mitochondria isolated from peripheral nerves of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected macaques, a model of HIV-SN, we measured mitochondrial function and generation of reactive oxygen species. Results We identified increased levels of mtDNA common deletion mutation in post-mortem sural nerves of patients with HIV-SN as compared to uninfected patients or HIV patients without sensory neuropathy. Furthermore, we found that common deletion mutation in mtDNA was more prevalent in distal sural nerves compared to dorsal root ganglia. In a primate model of HIV-SN, freshly isolated mitochondria from sural nerves of macaques infected with a neurovirulent strain of SIV showed impaired mitochondrial function compared to mitochondria from proximal nerve segments. Interpretation Our findings suggest that mtDNA damage accumulates in distal mitochondria of long axons, especially in patients with HIV-SN, and that this may lead to reduced mitochondrial function in distal nerves relative to proximal segments. Although our findings are based on HIV-SN, if confirmed in other neuropathies, these observations could explain the length-dependent nature of most axonal peripheral neuropathies. PMID:21280080

  18. A novel point mutation in PMP22 gene in an Italian family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Muglia, Maria; Patitucci, Alessandra; Rizzi, Romana; Ungaro, Carmine; Conforti, Francesca Luisa; Gabriele, Anna Lia; Magariello, Angela; Mazzei, Rosalucia; Motti, Luisa; Sabadini, Rossella; Sprovieri, Teresa; Marcello, Norina; Quattrone, Aldo

    2007-12-15

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by recurrent sensory or motor dysfunction. In 85% of HNPP cases the genetic defect is a 1.4 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, encompassing the PMP22 gene. Point mutations in the PMP22 gene responsible for HNPP phenotypes are rare. We investigated a 17-years-old girl who led to our detecting a novel mutation in PMP22 gene. The mutation was also detected in her father and corresponded to a deletion of one tymidine at position 11 in exon2 (c.11delT). This novel mutation creates a shift on the reading frame starting at codon 4 and leads to the introduction of a premature stop at codon 6. PMID:17707409

  19. Successful chemotherapy in a male patient with malignant lymphoma and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Zanssen, Stefanie; Buse, Gerhard

    2003-04-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a bilateral subacute optic neuropathy caused by hereditary missense mutations of the mitochondrial genome. Primary mutations are located at nucleotide positions 11778, 3460, and 14484 in genes encoding subunits of complex I of the respiratory chain. It has been suggested that degenerative changes in the optic nerve might be mediated by apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients affected with LHON might show altered sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs. Here we report the case of a LHON patient carrying the 11778 mutation who required chemotherapy for malignant lymphoma. Using in vitro assays, we found that the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not show altered vulnerability to cytotoxic drugs. The patient was treated with combination chemotherapy and consolidating radiotherapy, leading to complete remission without inappropriately severe acute or chronic side effects. These data indicate that the 11778 mutation does not change cellular response to cytotoxic drugs in a clinically apparent manner. PMID:12666138

  20. Disruption in the autophagic process underlies the sensory neuropathy in dystonia musculorum mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, Andrew; De Repentigny, Yves; Lynch-Godrei, Anisha; Gibeault, Sabrina; Eid, Walaa; Kuo, Daniel; Zha, Xiaohui; Kothary, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    A homozygous mutation in the DST (dystonin) gene causes a newly identified lethal form of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in humans (HSAN-VI). DST loss of function similarly leads to sensory neuron degeneration and severe ataxia in dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt)) mice. DST is involved in maintaining cytoskeletal integrity and intracellular transport. As autophagy is highly reliant upon stable microtubules and motor proteins, we assessed the influence of DST loss of function on autophagy using the Dst(dt-Tg4) mouse model. Electron microscopy (EM) revealed an accumulation of autophagosomes in sensory neurons from these mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the autophagic flux was impaired. Levels of LC3-II, a marker of autophagosomes, were elevated. Consequently, Dst(dt-Tg4) sensory neurons displayed impaired protein turnover of autophagosome substrate SQTSM1/p62 and of polyubiquitinated proteins. Interestingly, in a previously described Dst(dt-Tg4) mouse model that is partially rescued by neuronal specific expression of the DST-A2 isoform, autophagosomes, autolysosomes, and damaged organelles were reduced when compared to Dst(dt-Tg4) mutant mice. LC3-II, SQTSM1, polyubiquitinated proteins and autophagic flux were also restored to wild-type levels in the rescued mice. Finally, a significant decrease in DNAIC1 (dynein, axonemal, intermediate chain 1; the mouse ortholog of human DNAI1), a member of the DMC (dynein/dynactin motor complex), was noted in Dst(dt-Tg4) dorsal root ganglia and sensory neurons. Thus, DST-A2 loss of function perturbs late stages of autophagy, and dysfunctional autophagy at least partially underlies Dst(dt) pathogenesis. We therefore conclude that the DST-A2 isoform normally facilitates autophagy within sensory neurons to maintain cellular homeostasis. PMID:26043942

  1. Efficient mitochondrial biogenesis drives incomplete penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Iommarini, Luisa; Giordano, Luca; Maresca, Alessandra; Pisano, Annalinda; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Caporali, Leonardo; Liguori, Rocco; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracasso, Flavio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; D'Adamo, Pio; Hudson, Gavin; Pyle, Angela; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Chinnery, Patrick F; Zeviani, Massimo; Salomao, Solange R; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Ventura, Dora Fix; Moraes, Milton; Moraes Filho, Milton; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Federico; De Negri, Annamaria; Sadun, Alfredo A; Tancredi, Andrea; Mancini, Massimiliano; d'Amati, Giulia; Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited blinding disease caused as a result of homoplasmic point mutations in complex I subunit genes of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by incomplete penetrance, as only some mutation carriers become affected. Thus, the mitochondrial DNA mutation is necessary but not sufficient to cause optic neuropathy. Environmental triggers and genetic modifying factors have been considered to explain its variable penetrance. We measured the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass indicators in blood cells from affected and carrier individuals, screening three large pedigrees and 39 independently collected smaller families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, as well as muscle biopsies and cells isolated by laser capturing from post-mortem specimens of retina and optic nerves, the latter being the disease targets. We show that unaffected mutation carriers have a significantly higher mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass compared with their affected relatives and control individuals. Comparative studies of fibroblasts from affected, carriers and controls, under different paradigms of metabolic demand, show that carriers display the highest capacity for activating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore we postulate that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis in carriers may overcome some of the pathogenic effect of mitochondrial DNA mutations. Screening of a few selected genetic variants in candidate genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis failed to reveal any significant association. Our study provides a valuable mechanism to explain variability of penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and clues for high throughput genetic screening to identify the nuclear modifying gene(s), opening an avenue to develop predictive genetic tests on disease risk and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24369379

  2. Identification of two novel KIF5A mutations in hereditary spastic paraplegia associated with mild peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    López, Eva; Casasnovas, Carlos; Giménez, Javier; Santamaría, Raúl; Terrazas, Jesús M; Volpini, Víctor

    2015-11-15

    Spastic paraplegia type 10 (SPG10) is a rare form of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) due to mutations in KIF5A, a gene encoding the neuronal kinesin heavy-chain involved in axonal transport. KIF5A mutations have been associated with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from pure HSP to isolated peripheral nerve involvement or complicated HSP phenotypes. Most KIF5A mutations are clustered in the motor domain of the protein that is necessary for microtubule interaction. Here we describe two Spanish families with an adult onset complicated AD-HSP in which neurological studies revealed a mild sensory neuropathy. Intention tremor was also present in both families. Molecular genetic analysis identified two novel mutations c.773 C>T and c.833 C>T in the KIF5A gene resulting in the P258L and P278L substitutions respectively. Both were located in the highly conserved kinesin motor domain of the protein which has previously been identified as a hot spot for KIF5A mutations. This study adds to the evidence associating the known occurrence of mild peripheral neuropathy in the adult onset SPG10 type of AD-HSP. PMID:26403765

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in DNA methylation, which is the addition of methyl groups, consisting of one carbon atom and three ... DNA molecules. In particular, the enzyme helps add methyl groups to DNA building blocks (nucleotides) called cytosines. ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the ability to feel pain, heat, and cold. Deep pain perception, the feeling of pain from injuries ... with HSAN5. Because of the inability to feel deep pain, affected individuals suffer repeated severe injuries such ...

  5. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Hong, Bo Young; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young; Kim, Juwon; Lee, Kyung-A

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

  6. Partial Gene Deletions of PMP22 Causing Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Sang Guk; Yang, Jin-Young

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal neuropathy that is commonly caused by a reciprocal 1.5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2, at the site of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Other patients with similar phenotypes have been shown to harbor point mutations or small deletions, although there is some clinical variation across these patients. In this report, we describe a case of HNPP with copy number changes in exon or promoter regions of PMP22. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe analysis revealed an exon 1b deletion in the patient, who had been diagnosed with HNPP in the first decade of life using molecular analysis. PMID:25506001

  7. Mouse mtDNA mutant model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun Shi; Sharpley, Mark S; Fan, Weiwei; Waymire, Katrina G; Sadun, Alfredo A; Carelli, Valerio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Baciu, Peter; Sung, Eric; McManus, Meagan J; Pan, Billy X; Gil, Daniel W; Macgregor, Grant R; Wallace, Douglas C

    2012-12-01

    An animal model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was produced by introducing the human optic atrophy mtDNA ND6 P25L mutation into the mouse. Mice with this mutation exhibited reduction in retinal function by elecroretinogram (ERG), age-related decline in central smaller caliber optic nerve fibers with sparing of larger peripheral fibers, neuronal accumulation of abnormal mitochondria, axonal swelling, and demyelination. Mitochondrial analysis revealed partial complex I and respiration defects and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas synaptosome analysis revealed decreased complex I activity and increased ROS but no diminution of ATP production. Thus, LHON pathophysiology may result from oxidative stress. PMID:23129651

  8. Mouse mtDNA mutant model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun Shi; Sharpley, Mark S.; Fan, Weiwei; Waymire, Katrina G.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Baciu, Peter; Sung, Eric; McManus, Meagan J.; Pan, Billy X.; Gil, Daniel W.; MacGregor, Grant R.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    An animal model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was produced by introducing the human optic atrophy mtDNA ND6 P25L mutation into the mouse. Mice with this mutation exhibited reduction in retinal function by elecroretinogram (ERG), age-related decline in central smaller caliber optic nerve fibers with sparing of larger peripheral fibers, neuronal accumulation of abnormal mitochondria, axonal swelling, and demyelination. Mitochondrial analysis revealed partial complex I and respiration defects and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas synaptosome analysis revealed decreased complex I activity and increased ROS but no diminution of ATP production. Thus, LHON pathophysiology may result from oxidative stress. PMID:23129651

  9. DNA analysis in Finnish patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed Central

    Silander, K; Halonen, P; Sara, R; Kalimo, H; Falck, B; Savontaus, M L

    1994-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a dominantly inherited disorder that presents as recurrent mononeuropathies precipitated by apparently trivial traumas. The presence of a deletion in 17p11.2 was analysed in 13 Finnish families with HNPP. The deletion was found in all patients who were neurologically and neurophysiologically confirmed to have HNPP. In the problematic cases the detection of the gene defect is the method of choice in the diagnosis of HNPP. Analysis of DNA can also be used to detect clinically unaffected family members. Images PMID:7931393

  10. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1),"…

  11. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1),"…

  12. Autosomal dominant optic atrophy with asymptomatic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, R M; Bird, A C; Harding, A E

    1996-01-01

    The association between hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) and optic atrophy has been termed HMSN type VI. The autosomal dominant inheritance of this syndrome is reported. Three generations were affected with optic atrophy, which differed in some respects from classic dominant optic atrophy, and an asymptomatic, mainly sensory, neuropathy. PMID:8708653

  13. Single-cell analysis of intercellular heteroplasmy of mtDNA in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Sharpe, H.; Brown, N.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have investigated the distribution of mutant mtDNA molecules in single cells from a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a maternally inherited disease that is characterized by a sudden-onset bilateral loss of central vision, which typically occurs in early adulthood. More than 50% of all LHON patients carry an mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 11778. This nucleotide change converts a highly conserved arginine residue to histidine at codon 340 in the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4) gene of mtDNA. In the present study, the authors used PCR amplification of mtDNA from lymphocytes to investigate mtDNA heteroplasmy at the single-cell level in a LHON patient. They found that most cells were either homoplasmic normal or homoplasmic mutant at nucleotide position 11778. Some (16%) cells contained both mutant and normal mtDNA.

  14. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy presenting with hand drop in a young child.

    PubMed

    Sobreira, Inês; Sousa, Cátia; Raposo, Ana; Soares, M Rita; Soudo, Ana; Dias, Ana Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) results from the deletion of the PMP22 gene in chromosome 17p11.2. Clinically, it presents with painless pressure palsies, typically in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life, being a rare entity in childhood. We present the case study of a six-year-old male child who presented with left hand drop that he kept for over four weeks. Electrophysiological studies suggested HNPP and genetic studies confirmed it. With this paper, we pretend to create awareness to this entity as a diagnosis to be considered in a child with painless monoparesis and to emphasize the importance of electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis. PMID:22953141

  16. High incidence of pre-excitation syndrome in Japanese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Y; Kigasawa, K; Hasegawa, H; Tani, M; Oguchi, Y

    1996-12-01

    Cardiac conduction abnormalities have been reported in families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The pre-excitation syndrome Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome or Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome, is reportedly common in Finns with LHON, being seen in 14 (9%) of the 163 individuals with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. While this syndrome is thought to be rare in other ethnic groups with LHON, the present study of 35 Japanese LHON families confirmed that it is also relatively common among Japanese families, being seen in 5 (8%) of the 63 individuals with mtDNA mutations. It remains to be determined whether the high incidence of the pre-excitation syndrome in Finnish and Japanese LHON families is due to a particular genetic composition of ethnic groups such as in Finland and in Japan, or only to a reporting bias. PMID:9147893

  17. Strength-duration curve: a measure for assessing sensory deficit in peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Friedli, W G; Meyer, M

    1984-01-01

    By using an isolated constant current stimulator producing true square-wave pulses, sensory strength-duration curves were obtained at various sites by percutaneous electrical stimulation. Strength-duration curves derived from normal groups were compared to those of patients with peripheral neuropathy. Stimulus strength at sensory threshold was shown to be a reproducible measure of sensory deficit, increasing parallel to the degree of axonal failure found by conventional methods. This may be useful as a complementary method in assessing peripheral neuropathy. PMID:6323634

  18. Structure and stability of internodal myelin in mouse models of hereditary neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Avila, Robin L; Inouye, Hideyo; Baek, Rena C; Yin, Xinghua; Trapp, Bruce D; Feltri, M Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2005-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathies often result in abnormalities in the structure of internodal myelin, including changes in period and membrane packing, as observed by electron microscopy (EM). Mutations in the gene that encodes the major adhesive structural protein of internodal myelin in the peripheral nervous system of humans and mice--P0 glycoprotein--correlate with these defects. The mechanisms by which P0 mutations interfere with myelin packing and stability are not well understood and cannot be provided by EM studies that give static and qualitative information on fixed material. To gain insights into the pathogenesis of mutant P0, we used x-ray diffraction, which can detect more subtle and dynamic changes in native myelin, to investigate myelin structure in sciatic nerves from murine models of hereditary neuropathies. We used mice with disruption of one or both copies of the P0 gene (models of Charcot-Marie-Tooth-like neuropathy [CMT1B] or Dejerine-Sottas-like neuropathy) and mice with a CMT1B resulting from a transgene encoding P0 with an amino terminal myc-tag. To directly test the structural role of P0, we also examined a mouse that expresses P0 instead of proteolipid protein in central nervous system myelin. To link our findings on unfixed nerves with EM results, we analyzed x-ray patterns from unembedded, aldehyde-fixed nerves and from plastic-embedded nerves. From the x-ray patterns recorded from whole nerves, we assessed the amount of myelin and its quality (i.e. relative thickness and regularity). Among sciatic nerves having different levels of P0, we found that unfixed nerves and, to a lesser extent, fixed but unembedded nerves gave diffraction patterns of sufficient quality to distinguish periods, sometimes differing by a few Angstroms. Certain packing abnormalities were preserved qualitatively by aldehyde fixation, and the relative amount and structural integrity of myelin among nerves could be distinguished. Measurements from the same nerve over time showed that the amount of P0 affected myelin's stability against swelling, thus directly supporting the hypothesis that packing defects underlie instability in "live" or intact myelin. Our findings demonstrate that diffraction can provide a quantitative basis for understanding, at a molecular level, the membrane packing defects that occur in internodal myelin in demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:16254492

  19. Axonal degeneration in peripheral nerves in a case of Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mnatsakanyan, Lilit; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Carelli, Valerio; Wang, Michelle Y.; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genetic disorder characterized by profound bilateral loss of central vision due to selective loss of retinal ganglion cells. Most patients with LHON do not have complaints related to the peripheral nervous system. We investigated possible qualitative and quantitative histological changes in the peripheral nerve of a patient with LHON as compared to normal controls. Methods Brachial plexus specimens were obtained at necropsy from an LHON patient carrying the 3460/ND1 mtDNA mutation and age-matched controls without known history of neurological disease. The nerves were evaluated by light microscopy coupled to a digital camera based morphometric analysis and electron microscopy. Results Extensive axonal degeneration of the large heavily myelinated fibers was found in the brachial plexus from the LHON patient. In LHON nerve fascicles we counted over ten times as many degenerated profiles as found in control nerve fascicles. Conclusion Microscopic examination of the brachial plexus in this LHON patient clearly demonstrated a significant pattern of neurodegeneration. Our study suggests that peripheral neuropathy may be a subclinical feature associated with LHON. PMID:21139512

  20. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies in a Turkish patient (HNPP): a rare cause of entrapment neuropathies in young adults.

    PubMed

    Celik, Yahya; Kilinçer, Cumhur; Hamamcioğlu, M Kemal; Balci, Kemal; Birgili, Bariş; Cobanoğlu, Sebahattin; Utku, Ufuk

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant nerve disease usually caused by 1,5 Mb deletion on chromosome 17p11.2.2-p12, the region where the PMP-22 gene is located. The patients with HNPP usually have relapsing and remitting entrapment neuropathies due to compression. We present a 14-year-old male who had acute onset, right-sided ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow. He had electrophysiological findings of bilateral ulnar nerve entrapments (more severe at the right side) at the elbow and bilateral median nerve entrapment at the wrist. Genetic tests of the patient demonstrated deletions in the 17p11.2 region. The patient underwent decompressive surgery for ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow and completely recovered two months after the event. Although HNPP is extremely rare, it should be taken into consideration in young adults with entrapment neuropathies. PMID:18382985

  1. Arnold's nerve cough reflex: evidence for chronic cough as a sensory vagal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicole M; Gibson, Peter G; Birring, Surinder S

    2014-10-01

    Arnold's nerve ear-cough reflex is recognised to occur uncommonly in patients with chronic cough. In these patients, mechanical stimulation of the external auditory meatus can activate the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold's nerve) and evoke reflex cough. This is an example of hypersensitivity of vagal afferent nerves, and there is now an increasing recognition that many cases of refractory or idiopathic cough may be due to a sensory neuropathy of the vagus nerve. We present two cases where the cause of refractory chronic cough was due to sensory neuropathy associated with ear-cough reflex hypersensitivity. In both cases, the cough as well as the Arnold's nerve reflex hypersensitivity were successfully treated with gabapentin, a treatment that has previously been shown to be effective in the treatment of cough due to sensory laryngeal neuropathy (SLN). PMID:25383210

  2. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge regarding pathogenesis, diagnosis and management continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. PMID:23642723

  3. High frequency of mutations at position 11778 in mitochondrial ND4 gene in Japanese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Y; Hiida, Y; Oguchi, Y; Kudoh, J; Shimizu, N

    1993-08-01

    We have investigated the presence of a point mutation at position 11778 in the ND4 gene of mitochondrial DNA in 17 Japanese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and have identified the mutation in 14 (82.4%) of the 17 families. The prevalence of this mutation appears to be much higher in Japanese patients with LHON than in patients of other ethnic origins, such as Finnish, Dutch, German, and English families. PMID:8103501

  4. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, D.D.; Oost, B.A. van; Went, L.N.; Bruyn, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA mutations previously reported in LHON were not present. Sequence analysis of the protein-coding mitochondrial genes revealed two previously unreported mtDNA mutations. A heteroplasmic A{yields}G transition at nucleotide position 11696 in the ND4 gene resulted in the substitution of an isoleucine for valine at amino acid position 312. A second mutation, a homoplasmic T{yields}A transition at nucleotide position 14596 in the ND6 gene, resulted in the substitution of a methionine for the isoleucine at amino acid residue 26. Biochemical analysis of a muscle biopsy revealed a severe complex I deficiency, providing a link between these unique mtDNA mutations and this rare, complex phenotype including Leber optic neuropathy. 80 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Diagnostic challenges in movement disorders: Sensory Ataxia Neuropathy Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lovan, Alyson; Haq, Ihtsham ul; Balakrishnan, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    A woman in her early 60s presented to our Movement Disorders Centre with a 5-year history of progressive peripheral neuropathy, gait instability with falls, blurred vision, cognitive impairment and tremors. The patient was found to have profound sensory ataxia, chronic ophthalmoplegia, dementia with significant deficits in registration and construction and bilateral resting tremor of the hands. Investigations revealed an unremarkable MRI of the brain, negative cerebrospinal fluid studies, and unremarkable chemistries. Nerve conduction studies found a severe sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Genetic testing revealed a compound heterozygous mutation in the POLG1 gene consistent with the diagnosis of Sensory Ataxia Neuropathy Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) syndrome. PMID:23997076

  6. A locus for axonal motor-sensory neuropathy with deafness and mental retardation maps to Xq24-q26

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, J.M.; Nouri, N.; Keats, B.J.B.

    1995-09-20

    DNA markers on the X chromosome were used to map the locus for an unusual form of X-linked recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with associated deafness and mental retardation in a three-generation family that was originally reported by Towchock et al. This family included seven affected males, three obligate carrier females, and four unaffected males. The patients were severely affected within the first few years of life with distal weakness, muscle atrophy, sensory loss, areflexia, pes cavus, and hammer toes. Five of the seven affected males showed associated deafness, and three of these five individuals also presented with mental retardation or social development delay. Motor nerve conduction velocitites in affected males were normal to mildly delayed, and sensory conduction was markedly abnormal. Heterozygous females were asymptomatic. Close linkage to the Xg blood group locus (Xp22) and the PGK locus (Xq13) was previously excluded in this family, while weak linkage of the disease gene to DXYS1 (Xq21.3) was suggested. Our current linkage studies and haplotype analysis of 19 microsatellite markers on the long arm of the X chromosome demonstrate that DXS425 (Xq24) and HPRT (Xq26.1) are flanking markers and that the disease gene is closely linked to the markers DSX1122, DXS994, DXS737, DXS100, DXS1206, and DXS1047. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. A locus for axonal motor-sensory neuropathy with deafness and mental retardation maps to Xq26-q27

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, J.M.; Nouri, N.; Keats, B.J.B.

    1994-09-01

    Twenty-two DNA markers spanning the X chromosome have been analyzed for linkage to the locus causing an unusual form of X-linked recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy in a Pennsylvania family of Italian ancestry. This 3 generation family which was originally reported by Cowchock includes 7 affected males, 3 obligate carrier females, and 4 unaffected males. Males are severely affected at birth or within the first few years of life with areflexia, slowly progressive axonal atrophy, and absence of large myelinated fibers, and they all develop pes cavus and hammer toes. Five of the 7 affected males show associated deafness and 3 of these 5 individuals also presented with mental retardation or social developmental delay. Motor nerve conduction velocities in affected males are normal to mildly delayed and sensory conduction velocities are markedly abnormal. Heterozygous females are asymptomatic. Close linkage to the Xg blood group locus (Xp22) was previously excluded in this family while weak linkage of the disease gene to DXYS1 (Xq13-q21) was suggested. The current study excludes the short arm and the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Haplotype analysis of markers on the long arm demonstrates that HPRT is a proximal flanking marker and that the disease gene is closely linked to the marker DXS984. Further microsatellite markers are being studied in order to refine the region of the distal long arm of the X chromosome containing the gene causing the motor-sensory neuropathy in this family. This is the first such gene assigned to the distal region of Xq.

  8. Dynein mutations associated with hereditary motor neuropathies impair mitochondrial morphology and function with age

    PubMed Central

    Eschbach, Judith; Sinniger, Jérome; Bouitbir, Jamal; Fergani, Anissa; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard; Rene, Frédérique; Larmet, Yves; Baloh, Robert H.; Harms, Matthew B.; Shy, Michael E.; Messadeq, Nadia; Weydt, Patrick; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Ludolph, Albert C.; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the tail domain of dynein heavy chain (DYNC1H1) cause two closely related human motor neuropathies, dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED) and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, and lead to sensory neuropathy and striatal atrophy in mutant mice. Dynein is the molecular motor carrying mitochondria retrogradely on microtubules, yet the consequences of dynein mutations on mitochondrial physiology have not been explored. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts bearing heterozygous or homozygous point mutation in the tail domain of dynein, similar to human mutations, show profoundly abnormal mitochondrial morphology associated with loss of mitofusin 1. Furthermore, heterozygous dynein mutant mice display mitochondrial dysfunction in multiple tissues and mitochondria progressively increase in size and invade sarcomeres in muscles. As a likely consequence of systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, dynein mutant mice develop hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia and progress to glucose intolerance with age. Last, similar defects in mitochondrial morphology and mitofusin levels are observed in fibroblasts from patients with SMA-LED. Our results show that dynein function is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and function with ageing and suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to dyneindependent neurological diseases, such as SMA-LED. PMID:23742762

  9. Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block with sensory fibre involvement in a diabetic patient. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fila, Micha?; Szadkowska, Iwona; Hasiec, Tomasz; Bogucki, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block (MMNcb) is a relatively rare disease characterized clinically by asymmetric limb weakness with spared sensation and electrophysiologically by persistent focal motor conduction block. We present the case of a 40-year-old male patient with six-year history of progressive, asymmetric weakness of upper and lower extremities without sensory symptoms. Electroneurography revealed definite or probable motor conduction block in several nerves. However, features of axonal lesion of sensory fibres were also found. Laboratory studies were unremarkable apart from an abnormal glucose tolerance test, and type 2 diabetes was diagnosed. In the presented case the differential diagnosis should take into consideration MMNcb with coexisting diabetic sensory polyneuropathy and multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM). PMID:18651334

  10. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies Masked by Previous Gunshots and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gencik, Martin; Finsterer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Although hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) presents with a distinct phenotype on history, clinical exam, and nerve conduction studies, it may be masked if diagnostic work-up suggests other causes. Case Report. In a 37-year-old male with pseudoradicular lumbar pain, neurological exam revealed sore neck muscles, peripheral facial nerve palsy, right anacusis and left hypoacusis, hemihypesthesia of the right face, mild distal quadriparesis, diffuse wasting, and generally reduced tendon reflexes. He had a history of skull fracture due to a gunshot behind the right ear and tuberculosis for which he had received adequate treatment for 3 years; MRI revealed a disc prolapse at C6/7 and Th11/12. Nerve conduction studies were indicative of demyelinating polyneuropathy with conduction blocks. Despite elevated antinuclear antibodies and elevated CSF-protein, HNPP was diagnosed genetically after having excluded vasculitis, CIDP, radiculopathy, and the side effects of antituberculous treatment. Conclusions. HNPP may manifest with mild, painless, distal quadriparesis. The diagnosis of HNPP may be blurred by a history of tuberculosis, tuberculostatic treatment, hepatitis, and the presence of elevated CSF-protein. PMID:26640726

  11. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND1 T3394C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Min; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; Guan, Minqiang; Zhao, Fuxing; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; Tong, Yi; The First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350005 ; Yang, Li; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; and others

    2009-06-05

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of four Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T3394C (Y30H) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved tyrosine at position 30 of ND1, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups D4b and M9a. The occurrence of T3394C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in these four Chinese pedigrees carrying the T3394C mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T3394C mutation.

  12. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND6 T14502C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fuxin; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; Guan, Minqiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Liang, Ming; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; Liu, Qi; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yongmei; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; Yang, Li; Tong, Yi; The First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350005 ; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Qu, Jia; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; and others

    2009-11-20

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age of onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T14502C (I58V) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved isoleucine at position 58 of ND6, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups M10a, F1a1, and H2. The occurrence of T14502C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Here, mtDNA variants I187T in the ND1, A122V in CO1, S99A in the A6, and V254I in CO3 exhibited an evolutionary conservation, indicating a potential modifying role in the development of visual impairment associated with T14502C mutation in those families. Furthermore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic manifestation of the LHON-associated T14502C mutation in these Chinese families.

  13. [Molecular diagnosis of hereditary neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease].

    PubMed

    Pouget, J

    2004-02-01

    During the last decade, molecular biology has demonstrated the extraordinary heterogeneity of genetic abnormalities in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The main phenotypes are either of the demyelinating or axonal type, transmitted with dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance. X-linked CMT is less rare than it was initially described and is often misdiagnosed as autosomal dominant type. Linked phenotypes are Dejerine-Sottas disease, congenital hypomyelinization and hereditary neuropathy with susceptibility to pressure palsies. Each phenotype can be due to different genotypes and concerned genes are numerous. Conversely, each genotype can express different phenotypes. Molecular diagnostic strategy of CMT is mainly baised on three elements: - phenotypic expertise which is based on the analysis of the inheritance mode and on electrophysiological data, which are peculiar in CMTX - knowledge of respective occurrence of the different genotypes and phenotypes which is increasing - technical feasibility of molecular biology methods which is important to consider, even though progress are fastly coming. According to these considerations, a strategy is proposed for molecular diagnosis of CMT. PMID:15034475

  14. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: the relationship to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Rovira, Alex; Ciccarelli, Olga; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Filippi, Massimo; Frederiksen, Jette L; Giorgio, Antonio; Küker, Wilhelm; Lukas, Carsten; Rocca, Maria A; De Stefano, Nicola; Toosy, Ahmed; Yousry, Tarek; Palace, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction. Objective The primary aim was to define MRI features of LMS and LHON, and to assess the proportions of individuals displaying features typical of MS. Secondarily, we investigated the effect of gender on the risk of developing white matter lesions in the context of LHON. Methods A blinded standardised review of conventional brain MRIs of 30 patients with MS, 31 patients with LHON and 11 patients with LMS was conducted by three independent experts in the field. MS-like MRI features were assessed. Results All patients with LMS and 26% of patients with LHON had white matter lesions. Of these, all patients with LMS and 25% with LHON were found to have an MRI appearance typical of MS. Female patients with LHON had a significantly greater risk of having white matter lesions consistent with MS compared with male patients (relative risk 8.3). Conclusions A blinded review of conventional brain MRIs shows that patients with LMS have a scan appearance indistinguishable from MS. Mitochondrial dysfunction could be a common pathophysiological pathway in the formation of white matter lesions. There appears to be a strong female influence on the radiological appearance as well as clinical development of MS in patients with LHON. PMID:25053773

  15. The Epidemiology of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy in the North East of England

    PubMed Central

    Man, P. Y. W.; Griffiths, P. G.; Brown, D. T.; Howell, N.; Turnbull, D. M.; Chinnery, P. F.

    2003-01-01

    We performed the first population-based clinical and molecular genetic study of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in a population of 2,173,800 individuals in the North East of England. We identified 16 genealogically unrelated families who harbor one of the three primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations that cause LHON. Two of these families were found to be linked genetically to a common maternal founder. A de novo mtDNA mutation (G3460A) was identified in one family. The minimum point prevalence of visual failure due to LHON within this population was 3.22 per 100,000 (95% CI 2.47–3.97 per 100,000), and the minimum point prevalence for mtDNA LHON mutations was 11.82 per 100,000 (95% CI 10.38–13.27 per 100,000). These results indicate that LHON is not rare but has a population prevalence similar to autosomally inherited neurological disorders. The majority of individuals harbored only mutant mtDNA (homoplasmy), but heteroplasmy was detected in ?12% of individuals. Overall, however, ?33% of families with LHON had at least one heteroplasmic individual. The high incidence of heteroplasmy in pedigrees with LHON raises the possibility that a closely related maternal relative of an index case may not harbor the mtDNA mutation, highlighting the importance of molecular genetic testing for each maternal family member seeking advice about their risks of visual failure. PMID:12518276

  16. Pitfalls in the molecular genetic diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, D.R. ); Neufeld, M.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Pathogenetic mutations in mtDNA are found in the majority of patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and molecular genetic techniques to detect them are important for diagnosis. A false-positive molecular genetic error has adverse consequences for the diagnosis of this maternally inherited disease. The authors found a number of mtDNA polymorphisms that occur adjacent to known LHON-associated mutations and that confound their molecular genetic detection. These transition mutations occur at mtDNA nt 11779 (SfaNI site loss, 11778 mutation), nt 3459 (BsaHI site loss, 3460 mutation), nt 15258 (AccI site loss, 15257 mutation), nt 14485 (mismatch primer Sau3AI site loss, 14484 mutation), and nt 13707 (BstNI site loss, 13708 mutation). Molecular genetic detection of the most common pathogenetic mtDNA mutations in LHON, using a single restriction enzyme, may be confounded by adjacent polymorphisms that occur with a false-positive rate of 2%-7%. 19 refs.

  17. A Female Patient with Down Syndrome and Low-Penetrance Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Frousiakis, Starleen E.; Pouw, Andrew E.; Karanjia, Rustum; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old female with a history of Down syndrome (DS) who was referred to our neuro-ophthalmology clinic for evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The patient's family history was significant for a known G11778A mutation in a maternal relative, consistent with LHON. The patient was also positive for the G11778A mutation; however, the genotype demonstrated low penetrance in the pedigree, with only 1 out of 10 adult male offspring showing signs or symptoms of the disease. Mitochondrial mutations implicated in LHON have been shown to impair complex I of the electron transport chain and thereby reducing the effective generation of adenosine triphosphate and increasing the production of toxic reactive oxygen species. Although the partial or complete triplicate of chromosome 21 constitutes the etiology of DS, some of the pleiotropic phenotypes of the syndrome have been attributed to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Given the low penetrance of the mutation and the patient's sex, this case illustrates the possibility that the mitochondrial mutation demonstrated increased penetrance due to pre-existing mitochondrial dysfunction related to DS. PMID:25566062

  18. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-Jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-Kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-Qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-Wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  19. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy-Gene Therapy: From Benchtop to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Guy, John

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disorder caused by point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Most cases are due to mutations in genes encoding subunits of the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase that is Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC). These mutations are located at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, or 14484 in the mitochondrial genome. The disease is characterized by apoplectic, bilateral, and severe visual loss. While the mutated mtDNA impairs generation of ATP by all mitochondria, there is only a selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and degeneration of optic nerve axons. Thus, blindness is typically permanent. Half of the men and 10% of females who harbor the pathogenic mtDNA mutation actually develop the phenotype. This incomplete penetrance and gender bias is not fully understood. Additional mitochondrial and/or nuclear genetic factors may modulate the phenotypic expression of LHON. In a population-based study, the mtDNA background of haplogroup J was associated with an inverse relationship of low-ATP generation and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Effective therapy for LHON has been elusive. In this paper, we describe the findings of pertinent published studies and discuss the controversies of potential strategies to ameliorate the disease. PMID:21253496

  20. White Matter Changes in Two Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees: 12-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Jan?i?, Jasna; Dejanovi?, Ivana; Radovanovi?, Saša; Ostoji?, Jelena; Kozi?, Duško; ?uri?-Jovi?i?, Milica; Samardži?, Janko; ?etkovi?, Mila; Kosti?, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting two Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pedigrees with abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) findings but without neurological manifestation associated with LHON. The study included 14 LHON patients and 41 asymptomatic family members from 12 genealogically unrelated families. MRI showed white matter involvement and H-MRS exhibited metabolic anomalies within 12 LHON families. Main outcome measures were abnormal MRI and H-MRS findings in two pedigrees. MRI of the proband of the first pedigree showed a single demyelinating lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere, while the proband of the second family displayed multiple supratentorial and infratentorial lesions, compatible with the demyelinating process, and both the absolute choline (Cho) concentration and Cho/creatinine ratio were increased. MRI and H-MRS profiles of both affected and unaffected mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers suggest more widespread central nervous involvement in LHON. Although even after 12 years our patients did not develop neurological symptoms, MRI could still be used to detect possible changes during the disease progression. PMID:26540208

  1. A Female Patient with Down Syndrome and Low-Penetrance Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Frousiakis, Starleen E; Pouw, Andrew E; Karanjia, Rustum; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2014-09-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old female with a history of Down syndrome (DS) who was referred to our neuro-ophthalmology clinic for evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The patient's family history was significant for a known G11778A mutation in a maternal relative, consistent with LHON. The patient was also positive for the G11778A mutation; however, the genotype demonstrated low penetrance in the pedigree, with only 1 out of 10 adult male offspring showing signs or symptoms of the disease. Mitochondrial mutations implicated in LHON have been shown to impair complex I of the electron transport chain and thereby reducing the effective generation of adenosine triphosphate and increasing the production of toxic reactive oxygen species. Although the partial or complete triplicate of chromosome 21 constitutes the etiology of DS, some of the pleiotropic phenotypes of the syndrome have been attributed to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Given the low penetrance of the mutation and the patient's sex, this case illustrates the possibility that the mitochondrial mutation demonstrated increased penetrance due to pre-existing mitochondrial dysfunction related to DS. PMID:25566062

  2. A quantitative sensory analysis of peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer and its exacerbation by oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R; Simone, Donald A; Wang, Xin S; Cleeland, Charles S; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially platins and taxanes, is a widespread problem among cancer survivors that is likely to continue to expand in the future. However, little work to date has focused on understanding this challenge. The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight into the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared with those from 47 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function before any therapy compared with healthy volunteers, and they became more pronounced in patients who received chemotherapy. Sensory modalities that involved large A? myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers were most affected by chemotherapy, whereas sensory modalities conveyed by thinly myelinated A? fibers were less sensitive to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were tested again 6 to 12 months after chemotherapy presented with the most numbness and pain and also the most pronounced sensory deficits. Our results illuminate a mechanistic connection between the pattern of effects on sensory function and the nerve fiber types that appear to be most vulnerable to chemotherapy-induced toxicity, with implications for how to focus future work to ameloirate risks of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25183707

  3. Safety and effects of the vector for the Leber hereditary optic neuropathy gene therapy clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Yu, Hong; Chou, Tsung-Han; Feuer, William J; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Tse, David; Hauswirth, William W; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Neuringer, Martha; Renner, Lauren; Guy, John

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE We developed a novel strategy for treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) caused by a mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit IV (ND4) mitochondrial gene. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the safety and effects of the gene therapy vector to be used in a proposed gene therapy clinical trial. DESIGN AND SETTING In a series of laboratory experiments, we modified the mitochondrial ND4 subunit of complex I in the nuclear genetic code for import into mitochondria. The protein was targeted into the organelle by agency of a targeting sequence (allotopic expression). The gene was packaged into adeno-associated viral vectors and then vitreally injected into rodent, nonhuman primate, and ex vivo human eyes that underwent testing for expression and integration by immunohistochemical analysis and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. During serial follow-up, the animal eyes underwent fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal or pattern electroretinography. We tested for rescue of visual loss in rodent eyes also injected with a mutant G11778A ND4 homologue responsible for most cases of LHON. EXPOSURE Ocular infection with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors containing a wild-type allotopic human ND4 gene. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Expression of human ND4 and rescue of optic neuropathy induced by mutant human ND4. RESULTS We found human ND4 expressed in almost all mouse retinal ganglion cells by 1 week after injection and ND4 integrated into the mouse complex I. In rodent eyes also injected with a mutant allotopic ND4, wild-type allotopic ND4 prevented defective adenosine triphosphate synthesis, suppressed visual loss, reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and prevented demise of axons in the optic nerve. Injection of ND4 in the ex vivo human eye resulted in expression in most retinal ganglion cells. Primates undergoing vitreal injection with the ND4 test article and followed up for 3 months had no serious adverse reactions. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Expression of our allotopic ND4 vector in the ex vivo human eye, safety of the test article, rescue of the LHON mouse model, and the severe irreversible loss of visual function in LHON support clinical testing with mutated G11778A mitochondrial DNA in our patients. PMID:24457989

  4. Safety and Effects of the Vector for the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Gene Therapy Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Yu, Hong; Chou, Tsung-Han; Feuer, William J.; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Tse, David; Hauswirth, William W.; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Neuringer, Martha; Renner, Lauren; Guy, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE We developed a novel strategy for treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) caused by a mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit IV (ND4) mitochondrial gene. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the safety and effects of the gene therapy vector to be used in a proposed gene therapy clinical trial. DESIGN AND SETTING In a series of laboratory experiments, we modified the mitochondrial ND4 subunit of complex I in the nuclear genetic code for import into mitochondria. The protein was targeted into the organelle by agency of a targeting sequence (allotopic expression). The gene was packaged into adeno-associated viral vectors and then vitreally injected into rodent, nonhuman primate, and ex vivo human eyes that underwent testing for expression and integration by immunohistochemical analysis and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. During serial follow-up, the animal eyes underwent fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal or pattern electroretinography. We tested for rescue of visual loss in rodent eyes also injected with a mutant G11778A ND4 homologue responsible for most cases of LHON. EXPOSURE Ocular infection with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors containing a wild-type allotopic human ND4 gene. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Expression of human ND4 and rescue of optic neuropathy induced by mutant human ND4. RESULTS We found human ND4 expressed in almost all mouse retinal ganglion cells by 1 week after injection and ND4 integrated into the mouse complex I. In rodent eyes also injected with a mutant allotopic ND4, wild-type allotopic ND4 prevented defective adenosine triphosphate synthesis, suppressed visual loss, reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and prevented demise of axons in the optic nerve. Injection of ND4 in the ex vivo human eye resulted in expression in most retinal ganglion cells. Primates undergoing vitreal injection with the ND4 test article and followed up for 3 months had no serious adverse reactions. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Expression of our allotopic ND4 vector in the ex vivo human eye, safety of the test article, rescue of the LHON mouse model, and the severe irreversible loss of visual function in LHON support clinical testing with mutated G11778A mitochondrial DNA in our patients. PMID:24457989

  5. Targeting estrogen receptor ? as preventive therapeutic strategy for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Annalinda; Preziuso, Carmela; Iommarini, Luisa; Perli, Elena; Grazioli, Paola; Campese, Antonio F; Maresca, Alessandra; Montopoli, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio; Ghelli, Anna; Giordano, Carla

    2015-12-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited blinding disease characterized by degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and consequent optic nerve atrophy. Peculiar features of LHON are incomplete penetrance and gender bias, with a marked male prevalence. Based on the different hormonal metabolism between genders, we proposed that estrogens play a protective role in females and showed that these hormones ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in LHON through the estrogen receptors (ERs). We also showed that ER? localize to the mitochondria of RGCs. Thus, targeting ER? may become a therapeutic strategy for LHON specifically aimed at avoiding or delaying the onset of disease in mutation carriers. Here, we tested the effects of ER? targeting on LHON mitochondrial defective metabolism by treating LHON cybrid cells carrying the m.11778G>A mutation with a combination of natural estrogen-like compounds that bind ER? with high selectivity. We demonstrated that these molecules improve cell viability by reducing apoptosis, inducing mitochondrial biogenesis and strongly reducing the levels of reactive oxygen species in LHON cells. These effects were abolished in cells with ER? knockdown by silencing receptor expression or by using specific receptor antagonists. Our observations support the hypothesis that estrogen-like molecules may be useful in LHON prophylactic therapy. This is particularly important for lifelong disease prevention in unaffected LHON mutation carriers. Current strategies attempting to combat degeneration of RGCs during the acute phase of LHON have not been very effective. Implementing a different and preemptive approach with a low risk profile may be very helpful. PMID:26410888

  6. Retinal Ganglion Cell Dysfunction in Asymptomatic G11778A: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Guy, John; Feuer, William J.; Porciatti, Vittorio; Schiffman, Joyce; Abukhalil, Fawzi; Vandenbroucke, Ruth; Rosa, Potyra R.; Lam, Byron L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To report the serial evaluation of asymptomatic eyes of subjects with mutated G11778A mitochondrial DNA. Methods. Forty-five asymptomatic G11778A Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) carriers and two patients with the mutation who developed unilateral visual loss underwent testing that included visual acuity, automated visual field, pattern electroretinogram (PERG), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography every 6 months between September 2008 and March 2012. Results. Visual acuity, visual fields, and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness remained stable within the normal range. Mean PERG amplitudes of carriers dropped progressively by ?40% from baseline to 36 months. In addition, comparisons with the fellow eyes of patients with unilateral optic neuritis revealed a 3.4 ETDRS (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study) letter loss in the LHON carriers. A single carrier developed visual loss, with PERG amplitudes dropping by half. In one of two LHON cases who presented with unilateral visual loss, visual acuity in the asymptomatic eye was ?20/40 at baseline. The PERG amplitude of this eye was reduced to ?30% of normal. Six months later, his visual acuity had dropped to ?20/500. A second patient who was ?20/20 and had a visual field defect in the asymptomatic eye at baseline remained at this level for the 18 months of follow-up. His PERG amplitudes were similar to those of asymptomatic carriers, with 0.78 ?V at baseline that did not decline with follow-up. Conclusions. Declines of the PERG amplitude suggest subclinical retinal ganglion cell dysfunction in asymptomatic G11778A subjects, which is progressive. PMID:24398093

  7. Point mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in a Latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Baumane, Kristine; Zalite, Solveiga; Ranka, Renate; Zole, Egija; Pole, Ilva; Sepetiene, Svetlana; Laganovska, Guna; Baumanis, Viesturs; Pliss, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in patients suspected of having this mitochondrial disorder in a Latvian population. Additional aims were to determine the heteroplasmy status of all non-synonymous polymorphisms identified in the current study and to identify the mitochondrial haplogroups of the studied participants because these factors may contribute to the manifestation of LHON. Methods Twelve patients, including patients in two families, were enrolled in the current study. LHON was suspected based on the findings of ophthalmologic examinations. In clinically affected individuals, the presence of all previously reported LHON-associated mutations was assessed with sequencing analysis. Additionally, the SURVEYOR endonuclease assay was used to detect heteroplasmy. The mitochondrial haplogroups were identified with restriction analysis and the sequencing of hypervariable segment 1. Results In one family (mother and son), there was one primary LHON-associated mutation, G11778A. In addition, one rare previously reported LHON-associated polymorphism, A13637G, was detected in two unrelated patients. A non-synonymous polymorphism at T6253C was found in one individual. This mutation was reported in the background of the 3460 mutation among LHON patients in a Chinese population. No non-synonymous point mutations in mitochondrial DNA were found in five of the study participants. Conclusions Molecular analysis of 12 patients with suspected LHON confirmed the diagnosis in four patients and allowed the use of appropriate prophylactic measures and treatment. Further investigations and additional studies of different populations are necessary to confirm the role of the non-synonymous polymorphisms A13637G and T6253C in the manifestation of LHON and the associations of these polymorphisms with mitochondrial haplogroups and heteroplasmy. PMID:24319328

  8. Polygenic Inheritance of Paclitaxel-Induced Sensory Peripheral Neuropathy Driven by Axon Outgrowth Gene Sets in CALGB 40101 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Aparna; Mefford, Joel; Stahl, Eli A.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Baldwin, R. Michael; Owzar, Kouros; Li, Megan; Winer, Eric P.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; McLeod, Howard L.; Ratain, Mark J.; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Plenge, Robert M.; Witte, John S.; Kroetz, Deanna L.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common dose-limiting toxicity for patients treated with paclitaxel. For most individuals there are no known risk factors that predispose patients to the adverse event, and pathogenesis for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy is unknown. Determining whether there is a heritable component to paclitaxel induced peripheral neuropathy would be valuable in guiding clinical decisions and may provide insight into treatment of and mechanisms for the toxicity. Using genotype and patient information from the paclitaxel arm of CALGB 40101 (Alliance), a phase III clinical trial evaluating adjuvant therapies for breast cancer in women, we estimated the variance in maximum grade and dose at first instance of sensory peripheral neuropathy. Our results suggest that paclitaxel-induced neuropathy has a heritable component, driven in part by genes involved in axon outgrowth. Disruption of axon outgrowth may be one of the mechanisms by which paclitaxel treatment results in sensory peripheral neuropathy in susceptible patients. PMID:24513692

  9. A “Fille du Roy” Introduced the T14484C Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Mutation in French Canadians

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, Anne-Marie; Jomphe, Michèle; Houde, Louis; Vézina, Hélène; Tremblay, Marc; Desjardins, Bertrand; Labuda, Damian; St-Hilaire, Marc; Macmillan, Carol; Shoubridge, Eric A.; Brais, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    The predominance of the T14484C mutation in French Canadians with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is due to a founder effect. By use of genealogical reconstructions of maternal lineages, a woman married in Quebec City in 1669 is identified as the shared female ancestor for 11 of 13 affected individuals, who were previously not known to be related. These individuals carry identical mitochondrial haplogroups. The current geographic distribution of French Canadian cases overlaps with that of the founder’s female descendants in 1800. This is the first example of genealogical reconstruction to identify the introduction of a mitochondrial mutation by a woman in a founder population. PMID:15954041

  10. Is Leber hereditary optic neuropathy treatable? Encouraging results with idebenone in both prospective and retrospective trials and an illustrative case.

    PubMed

    Sabet-Peyman, Esfandiar J; Khaderi, Khizer R; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2012-03-01

    A 31-year-old woman developed subacute bilateral visual loss over a 2-week period. Two months later, the diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) 11778/ND4 was established and the patient was treated with 900 mg of idebenone daily. Over the ensuing 9 months, visual acuity improved from 20/200 to 20/25 in each eye with near-total resolution in visual field abnormalities. Our case report is in agreement with 2 large published series of patients with LHON treated with idebenone, raising hope for treatment of this visually devastating mitochondrial disorder. PMID:22269948

  11. Early infantile sensory-motor neuropathy with late onset respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Blaschek, Astrid; Gläser, Dieter; Kuhn, Marius; Schroeder, Andreas Sebastian; Wimmer, Cornelius; Heimkes, Bernd; Schön, Carola; Müller-Felber, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Children with spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress (SMARD1) usually present within their first year of life, with respiratory failure due to diaphragmatic paralysis and progressive distal limb weakness. We present a child with a confirmed compound heterozygous IGHMBP2 mutation c.[676G>T];[2083A>T] in whom severe sensory-motor neuropathy preceded diaphragmatic paralysis by almost 3years. Autonomic system involvement with neurogenic bladder and urine retention were found at 3years. In summary, our patient highlights the broad spectrum of phenotypes observed in SMARD1. Currently, no prediction of phenotype according to genotype is possible, suggesting that yet unknown factors cause the observed phenotypic variation. Even in the absence of obvious diaphragmatic weakness, SMARD1 should be considered in severe infantile onset neuropathies. High throughput techniques, such as next generation sequencing, will possibly offer a useful approach in the heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies. PMID:24342282

  12. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Nair, Pradeep P.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG). EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block) and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG). Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them. PMID:19893645

  13. Clinical characterization and mitochondrial DNA sequence variations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Kaur, Punit; Kumar, Manoj; Saxena, Rohit; Sharma, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited disorder, results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). MtDNA is highly polymorphic in nature with very high mutation rate, 10–17 fold higher as compared to nuclear genome. Identification of new mtDNA sequence variations is necessary to establish a clean link with human disease. Thus this study was aimed to assess or evaluate LHON patients for novel mtDNA sequence variations. Materials and Methods Twenty LHON patients were selected from the neuro-ophthalmology clinic of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. DNA was isolated from whole blood samples. The entire coding region of the mitochondrial genome was amplified by PCR in 20 patients and 20 controls. For structural analysis (molecular modeling and simulation) the MODELER 9.2 program in Discovery Studio (DS 2.0) was used. Results MtDNA sequencing revealed a total of 47 nucleotide variations in the 20 LHON patients and 29 variations in 20 controls. Of 47 changes in patients 21.2% (10/47) were nonsynonymous and the remaining 78.72% (37/47) were synonymous. Five nonsynonymous changes, including primary LHON mutations (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [ND1]:p.A52T, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [ND6]:p.M64V, adenosine triphosphate [ATP] synthase subunit a (F-ATPase protein 6) [ATPase6]:p.M181T, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [ND4]:p.R340H, and cytochrome B [CYB]:p.F181L), were found to be pathogenic. A greater number of changes were present in complex I (53.19%; 25/47), followed by complex III (19.14%; 9/47), then complex IV (19.14%; 9/47), then complex V (8.5%; 4/47). Nonsynonymous variations may impair respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathways, which results in low ATP production and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Oxidative stress is the underlying etiology in various diseases and also plays a crucial role in LHON. Conclusions This study describes the role of mtDNA sequence variations in LHON patients. Primary LHON mutations of mtDNA are main variants leading to LHON, but mutations in other mitochondrial genes may also play an important role in pathogenesis of LHON as indicated in the present study. Certain alleles in certain haplogroups have protective or deleterious roles and hence there is a need to analyze a large number of cases for correlating phenotype and disease severity with mutation and mtDNA haplogroups. PMID:23170061

  14. Trial End Points and Natural History in Patients With G11778A Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Byron L.; Feuer, William J.; Schiffman, Joyce C.; Porciatti, Vittorio; Vandenbroucke, Ruth; Rosa, Potyra R.; Gregori, Giovanni; Guy, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Establishing the natural history of G11778A Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is important to determine the optimal end points to assess the safety and efficacy of a planned gene therapy trial. OBJECTIVE To use the results of the present natural history study of patients with G11778A LHON to plan a gene therapy clinical trial that will use allotopic expression by delivering a normal nuclear-encoded ND4 gene into the nuclei of retinal ganglion cells via an adeno-associated virus vector injected into the vitreous. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective observational study initiated in 2008 was conducted in primary and referral institutional practice settings. Participants included 44 individuals with G11778A LHON, recruited between September 2008 and March 2012, who were evaluated every 6 months and returned for 1 or more follow-up visits (6–36 months) as of August 2012. EXPOSURES Complete neuro-ophthalmic examination and main measures. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Visual acuity, automated visual field testing, pattern electroretinogram, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. RESULTS Clinical measures were stable during the follow-up period, and visual acuity was as good as or better than the other visual factors used for monitoring patients. Based on a criterion of 15 or more letters from the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart, 13 eyes of 8 patients (18%) improved, but 24 months after the onset of symptoms, any further improvements were to no better than 20/100. Acuity recovery occurred in some patients despite continued marked retinal nerve fiber layer thinning indistinguishable from that in patients who did not recover visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Spontaneous improvement of visual acuity in patients with G11778A LHON is not common and is partial and limited when it occurs, so improvements in vision with adeno-associated virus–mediated gene therapy of a synthetic wild-type ND4 subunit gene should be possible to detect with a reasonable sample size. Visual acuity appears to be the most suitable primary end point for the planned clinical trial. PMID:24525545

  15. Immunotherapy Prospects for Painful Small-fiber Sensory Neuropathies and Ganglionopathies.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2016-01-01

    The best-known peripheral neuropathies are those affecting the large, myelinated motor and sensory fibers. These have well-established immunological causes and therapies. Far less is known about the somatic and autonomic "small fibers"; the unmyelinated C-fibers, thinly myelinated A-deltas, and postganglionic sympathetics. The small fibers sense pain and itch, innervate internal organs and tissues, and modulate the inflammatory and immune responses. Symptoms of small-fiber neuropathy include chronic pain and itch, sensory impairment, edema, and skin color, temperature, and sweating changes. Small-fiber polyneuropathy (SFPN) also causes cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and urological symptoms, the neurologic origin of which often remains unrecognized. Routine electrodiagnostic study does not detect SFPN, so skin biopsies immunolabeled to reveal axons are recommended for diagnostic confirmation. Preliminary evidence suggests that dysimmunity causes some cases of small-fiber neuropathy. Several autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren and celiac, are associated with painful small-fiber ganglionopathy and distal axonopathy, and some patients with "idiopathic" SFPN have evidence of organ-specific dysimmunity, including serological markers. Dysimmune SFPN first came into focus in children and teenagers as they lack other risk factors, for example diabetes or toxic exposures. In them, the rudimentary evidence suggests humoral rather than cellular mechanisms and complement consumption. Preliminary evidence supports efficacy of corticosteroids and immunoglobulins in carefully selected children and adult patients. This paper reviews the evidence of immune causality and the limited data regarding immunotherapy for small-fiber-predominant ganglionitis, regional neuropathy (complex regional pain syndrome), and distal SFPN. These demonstrate the need to develop case definitions and outcome metrics to improve diagnosis, enable prospective trials, and dissect the mechanisms of small-fiber neuropathy. PMID:26526686

  16. The modified ultrasound pattern sum score mUPSS as additional diagnostic tool for genetically distinct hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Alexander; Rasenack, Maria; Athanasopoulou, Ioanna M; Dammeier, Nele Maria; Lipski, Christina; Wolking, Stefan; Vittore, Debora; Décard, Bernhard F; Axer, Hubertus

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the nerve ultrasound characteristics in genetically distinct inherited neuropathies, the value of the modified ultrasound pattern sum score (mUPSS) to differentiate between the subtypes and the correlation of ultrasound with nerve conduction studies (NCS), disease duration and severity. All patients underwent a standardized neurological examination, ultrasound, and NCS. In addition, genetic testing was performed. Consequently, mUPSS was applied, which is a sum-score of cross-sectional areas (CSA) at predefined anatomical points in different nerves. 31 patients were included (10xCharcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT)1a, 3xCMT1b, 3xCMTX, 9xCMT2, 6xHNPP [Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies]). Generalized, homogeneous nerve enlargement and significantly increased UPS scores emphasized the diagnosis of demyelinating neuropathy, particularly CMT1a and CMT1b. The amount of enlargement did not depend on disease duration, symptom severity, height and weight. In CMTX the nerves were enlarged, as well, however, only in the roots and lower limbs, most prominent in men. In CMT2 no significant enlargement was detectable. In HNPP the CSA values were increased at entrapped sites, and not elsewhere. However, a distinction from CMT1, which also showed enlarged CSA values at entrapment sites, was only possible by calculating the entrapment ratios and entrapment score. The mUPSS allowed distinction between CMT1a (increased UPS scores, entrapment ratios <1.0) and HNPP (low UPS scores, entrapment ratios >1.4), while CMT1b and CMTX showed intermediate UPS types and entrapment ratios <1.0. Although based on few cases, ultrasound revealed consistent and homogeneous nerve alteration in certain inherited neuropathies. The modified UPSS is a quantitative tool, which may provide useful information for diagnosis, differentiation and follow-up evaluation in addition to NCS and molecular testing. PMID:26559821

  17. Impaired sensory nerve function and axon morphology in mice with diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lennertz, Richard C.; Medler, Karen A.; Bain, James L.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes is the most prevalent metabolic disorder in the United States, and between 50% and 70% of diabetic patients suffer from diabetes-induced neuropathy. Yet our current knowledge of the functional changes in sensory nerves and their distal terminals caused by diabetes is limited. Here, we set out to investigate the functional and morphological consequences of diabetes on specific subtypes of cutaneous sensory nerves in mice. Diabetes was induced in C57Bl/6 mice by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. After 6–8 wk, mice were characterized for behavioral sensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli followed by analysis of sensory function using teased nerve fiber recordings and histological assessment of nerve fiber morphology. Diabetes produced severe functional impairment of C-fibers and rapidly adapting A?-fibers, leading to behavioral hyposensitivity to both mechanical and heat stimuli. Electron microscopy images showed that diabetic nerves have axoplasm with more concentrated organelles and frequent axon-myelin separations compared with control nerves. These changes were restricted to the distal nerve segments nearing their innervation territory. Furthermore, the relative proportion of A?-fibers was reduced in diabetic skin-nerve preparations compared with nondiabetic control mice. These data identify significant deficits in sensory nerve terminal function that are associated with distal fiber loss, morphological damage, and behavioral hyposensitivity in diabetic C57Bl/6 mice. These findings suggest that diabetes damages sensory nerves, leading to functional deficits in sensory signaling that underlie the loss of tactile acuity and pain sensation associated with insensate diabetic neuropathy. PMID:21653724

  18. Axon Transport and Neuropathy: Relevant Perspectives on the Etiopathogenesis of Familial Dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are highly prevalent and are most often associated with chronic disease, side effects from chemotherapy, or toxic-metabolic abnormalities. Neuropathies are less commonly caused by genetic mutations, but studies of the normal function of mutated proteins have identified particular vulnerabilities that often implicate mitochondrial dynamics and axon transport mechanisms. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies are a group of phenotypically related diseases caused by monogenic mutations that primarily affect sympathetic and sensory neurons. Here, I review evidence to indicate that many genetic neuropathies are caused by abnormalities in axon transport. Moreover, in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. There may be specific convergence on gene mutations that disrupt nerve growth factor signaling, upon which sympathetic and sensory neurons critically depend. PMID:26724390

  19. The relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory function in entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Bland, Jeremy D P; Bhat, Manzoor A; Bennett, David L H

    2014-12-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the impact of entrapment neuropathy on target innervation and the relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory symptoms and signs. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy; the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on the morphology of small unmyelinated as well as myelinated sensory axons and relate such changes to somatosensory function and clinical symptoms. Thirty patients with a clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome [17 females, mean age (standard deviation) 56.4 (15.3)] and 26 age and gender matched healthy volunteers [18 females, mean age (standard deviation) 51.0 (17.3)] participated in the study. Small and large fibre function was examined with quantitative sensory testing in the median nerve territory of the hand. Vibration and mechanical detection thresholds were significantly elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (P<0.007) confirming large fibre dysfunction and patients also presented with increased thermal detection thresholds (P<0.0001) indicative of C and Aδ-fibre dysfunction. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were comparable between groups (P>0.13). A skin biopsy was taken from a median nerve innervated area of the proximal phalanx of the index finger. Immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 and myelin basic protein was used to evaluate morphological features of unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fibre density showed a striking loss in patients (P<0.0001) confirming a significant compromise of small fibres. The extent of Meissner corpuscles and dermal nerve bundles were comparable between groups (P>0.07). However, patients displayed a significant increase in the percentage of elongated nodes (P<0.0001), with altered architecture of voltage-gated sodium channel distribution. Whereas neither neurophysiology nor quantitative sensory testing correlated with patients' symptoms or function deficits, the presence of elongated nodes was inversely correlated with a number of functional and symptom related scores (P<0.023). Our findings suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome does not exclusively affect large fibres but is associated with loss of function in modalities mediated by both unmyelinated and myelinated sensory axons. We also document for the first time that entrapment neuropathies lead to a clear reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, which was independent of electrodiagnostic test severity. The presence of elongated nodes in the target tissue further suggests that entrapment neuropathies affect nodal structure/myelin well beyond the focal compression site. Interestingly, nodal lengthening may be an adaptive phenomenon as it inversely correlates with symptom severity. PMID:25348629

  20. Neuromyelitis optica (Devic's syndrome): no association with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations found in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Cock, H; Mandler, R; Ahmed, W; Schapira, A H

    1997-01-01

    Devic's neuromyelitis optica is a rare syndrome characterised by the combination of acute or subacute optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, in some cases considered to be a variant of multiple sclerosis. Mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have been identified in some patients with multiple sclerosis in whom optic neuritis is a prominent early feature. Using restriction enzyme digestion of mtDNA products amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, the primary LHON mtDNA mutations at positions 3460 bp, 11,778 bp, and 14,484 bp have been excluded in four women with Devic's neuromyelitis optica. A mutation at 4160 bp associated in some LHON families with more widespread neurological disease was also not detected. It is concluded that the primary mtDNA mutations currently associated with LHON are not responsible for the prominence of optic nerve disease in Devic's neuromyelitis optica. PMID:9010406

  1. Gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy as the first candidate for a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Augustin, Sébastien; Ellouze, Sami; Sahel, José-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cannot be ignored anymore in most medical disciplines; indeed their minimum estimated prevalence is superior to 1 in 5000 births. Despite the progress made in the last 25 years on the identification of gene mutations causing mitochondrial pathologies, only slow progress was made towards their effective treatments. Ocular involvement is a frequent feature in mitochondrial diseases and corresponds to severe and irreversible visual handicap due to retinal neuron loss and optic atrophy. Interestingly, three clinical trials for Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 mutations are ongoing since 2007. Overall, the feasibility and safety of ocular Adeno-Associated Virus delivery in adult and younger patients and consistent visual function improvements have been demonstrated. The success of gene-replacement therapy for RPE65 opens the way for the development of similar approaches for a broad range of eye disorders, including those with mitochondrial etiology such as Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). PMID:24702846

  2. Long-term evaluation of Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy-like symptoms in rotenone administered rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Laura; Philip, Ann L.; Martinez, Juan C.; Guttierez, Juan C.; Marella, Mathieu; Patki, Gaurav; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao; Thomas, Biju B.

    2015-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons that lead to the loss of central vision. This study is aimed at evaluating the LHON symptoms in rats administered with rotenone microspheres into the superior colliculus (SC). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) analysis showed substantial loss of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in rotenone injected rats. Optokinetic testing in rotenone treated rats showed decrease in head-tracking response. Electrophysiological mapping of the SC surface demonstrated attenuation of visually evoked responses; however no changes were observed in the ERG data. The progressive pattern of disease manifestation in rotenone administered rats demonstrated several similarities with human disease symptoms. These rats with LHON-like symptoms can serves as a model for future investigators to design and implement reliable tests to assess the beneficial effects of therapeutic interventions for LHON disease. PMID:25481764

  3. Evidence for Detrimental Cross Interactions between Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Here we have collected evidence suggesting that chronic changes in the NO homeostasis and the rise of reactive oxygen species bioavailability can contribute to cell dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. We report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), derived from a female LHON patient with bilateral reduced vision and carrying the pathogenic mutation 11778/ND4, display increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), as revealed by flow cytometry, fluorometric measurements of nitrite/nitrate, and 3-nitrotyrosine immunodetection. Moreover, viability assays with the tetrazolium dye MTT showed that lymphoblasts from the same patient are more sensitive to prolonged NO exposure, leading to cell death. Taken together these findings suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress cooperatively play an important role in driving LHON pathology when excess NO remains available over time in the cell environment. PMID:26881022

  4. Features of mtDNA mutation patterns in European pedigrees and sporadic cases with leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Obermaier-Kusser, B.; Schubring, S.; Paprotta, A.; Meitinger, T.; Jaksch, M.; Gerbitz, K.D.; Lorenz, B.; Zerres, K.; Meire, F.; Cochaux, P.

    1994-11-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is maternally transmitted and is characterized by bilateral loss of central vision in young adults as a result of optic nerve degeneration. Fifteen transition mutations located in different genes for the mitochondrially encoded subunits of respiratory chain complexes have been associated thus far with the disease. Genetic studies have led to the classification of the pathogenic significance of these different mutations. However, more research is required to determine the causality of the mutations and the penetrance of the disease. The present study compares studies of populations of different ethnic origins, namely European LHON pedigrees and sporadic cases, in order to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms involved. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and isolated left ventricular abnormal trabeculation as a manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J; Stöllberger, C; Kopsa, W; Jaksch, M

    2001-04-01

    Myocardial thickening and isolated left ventricular abnormal trabeculation (ILVAT) have not been described in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) before. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, myocardial thickening and ILVAT were found by electrocardiogram, echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a 48-year-old man with bilateral, severely reduced visual acuity since age 24 years, palpitations since age 43 years and lower limb muscle cramps since age 47 years. Because ILVAT is frequently associated with respiratory chain disorders, neurological investigations were initiated, revealing the primary LHON mutation G3460A in lymphocytic mitochondrial DNA. On the basis of the clinical and genetic data, LHON was diagnosed in the index patient, but also in the patient's brother who showed ILVAT as well. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, myocardial thickening and ILVAT may be rare manifestations of LHON. PMID:11329546

  6. Medical marijuana for HIV-associated sensory neuropathy: legal and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Larriviere, Daniel G

    2014-10-01

    The number of states legalizing medical marijuana is increasing. Medical marijuana is possibly effective therapy for HIV-associated sensory neuropathy. Despite legalization at the state level, however, the current and contradictory federal drug enforcement policy creates the risk that physicians who recommend medical marijuana to their patients will lose their ability to prescribe medications. The federal-state tension has legal and ethical implications for neurologists who receive a request for medical marijuana from their patients since neurologists must strive to both relieve suffering and obey relevant laws. Recommendation of medical marijuana by neurologists to their patients is ethically permissible but is not ethically mandatory. PMID:25299291

  7. Amplitude of sensory nerve action potential in early stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy: an analysis of 500 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunqian; Li, Jintao; Wang, Tingjuan; Wang, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is important for the successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we recruited 500 diabetic patients from the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University in China from June 2008 to September 2013: 221 cases showed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (symptomatic group) and 279 cases had no symptoms of peripheral impairment (asymptomatic group). One hundred healthy control subjects were also recruited. Nerve conduction studies revealed that distal motor latency was longer, sensory nerve conduction velocity was slower, and sensory nerve action potential and amplitude of compound muscle action potential were significantly lower in the median, ulnar, posterior tibial and common peroneal nerve in the diabetic groups compared with control subjects. Moreover, the alterations were more obvious in patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Of the 500 diabetic patients, neural conduction abnormalities were detected in 358 cases (71.6%), among which impairment of the common peroneal nerve was most prominent. Sensory nerve abnormality was more obvious than motor nerve abnormality in the diabetic groups. The amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was the most sensitive measure of peripheral neuropathy. Our results reveal that varying degrees of nerve conduction changes are present in the early, asymptomatic stage of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25221597

  8. Mutations in HINT1 are one of the most frequent causes of hereditary neuropathy among Czech patients and neuromyotonia is rather an underdiagnosed symptom.

    PubMed

    Laššuthová, P; Brožková, D Šafka; Krůtová, M; Neupauerová, J; Haberlová, J; Mazanec, R; Dvořáčková, N; Goldenberg, Z; Seeman, P

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the HINT1 gene were recently discovered as being the major cause of autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia. This combination was clinically recognized and described previously in a few reports but is generally unknown. We aimed to establish the importance of HINT1 mutations as the cause of hereditary neuropathy and particularly hereditary motor neuropathy/axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (HMN/CMT2) among Czech patients. Overall, mutations in the HINT1 gene seem to be a surprisingly frequent cause of inherited neuropathy in our group of patients. Biallelic pathogenic mutations were found in 21 patients from 19 families. The prevalent mutation in the Czech population is the p.R37P (95% of pathogenic alleles). Clinically, all patients with biallelic mutations presented with early onset of symptoms at the end of the first decade. Foot/toe extension weakness to plegia was present in almost all patients. Neuromyotonia was present in all but two patients. However, it had been properly recognized in only three patients prior to molecular genetic diagnosis. HINT1 mutations seem to be one of the most frequent causes of inherited neuropathy and are probably the most frequent cause of HMN in Czech patients. We suggest all HMN/CMT2 patients be tested for the presence of the prevalent mutation, the p.R37P. PMID:25342199

  9. The Influence of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy on Local Postural Muscle and Central Sensory Feedback Balance Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control) and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing). DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2) and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2) with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, P<0.01), which suggests a compromised local-control balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, P<0.02), which suggests an adaptation mechanism to reduce the overall body sway in DPN patients. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between central-control rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, P<0.05) and the history of diabetes (rPearson = 0.58-071, P<0.05). Results suggest that in the lack of sensory feedback cueing, DPN participants were highly unstable compared to controls. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation mechanism using sensory feedback depends on the level of neuropathy and the history of diabetes. PMID:26258497

  10. A patient with PMP22-related hereditary neuropathy and DBH-gene-related dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Chiaro, Giacomo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Contin, Manuela; Scaglione, Cesa; Barletta, Giorgio; Cecere, Annagrazia; Garagnani, Paolo; Tieri, Paolo; Ferrarini, Alberto; Piras, Silvia; Franceschi, Claudio; Delledonne, Massimo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent focal neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a relatively frequent autosomal-dominant demyelinating neuropathy linked to peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene deletions. The combination of PMP22 gene mutations with other genetic variants is known to cause a more severe phenotype than expected. We present the case of a patient with severe orthostatic hypotension since 12 years of age, who inherited a PMP22 gene deletion from his father. Genetic double trouble was suspected because of selective sympathetic autonomic disturbances. Through exome-sequencing analysis, we identified two novel mutations in the dopamine beta hydroxylase gene. Moreover, with interactome analysis, we excluded a further influence on the origin of the disease by variants in other genes. This case increases the number of unique patients presenting with dopamine-?-hydroxylase deficiency and of cases with genetically proven double trouble. Finding the right, complete diagnosis is crucial to obtain adequate medical care and appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:26410747

  11. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G.; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Kearns, Lisa S.; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Trounce, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function. PMID:26496696

  12. A variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy characterized by recovery of vision and by an unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, D. ); Howell, N. )

    1992-12-01

    The Tas2 and Vic2 Australian families are affected with a variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The risk of developing the optic neuropathy shows strict maternal inheritance, and the opthalmological changes in affected family members are characteristic of LHON. However, in contrast to the common form of the disease, members of these two families show a high frequency of vision recovery. To ascertain the mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in these families, both (a) the nucleotide sequences of the seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory-chain complex I and (b) the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were determined for representatives of both families. Neither family carries any of the previously identified primary mitochondrial LHON mutations: ND4/11778, ND1/3460, or ND1/4160. Instead, both LHON families carry multiple nucleotide changes in the mitochondrial complex I genes, which produce conservative amino acid changes. From the available sequence data, it is inferred that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families are phylogenetically related to each other and to a cluster of LHON families in which mutations in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene have been hypothesized to play a primary etiological role. However, sequencing analysis establishes that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families do not carry these cytochrome b mutations. There are two hypotheses to account for the unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in the Tas2 and Vic2 LHON families. One possibility is that there is a primary LHON mutation within the mitochondrial genome but that it is at a site that was not included in the sequencing analyses. Alternatively, the disease in these families may result from the cumulative effects of multiple secondary LHON mutations that have less severe phenotypic consequences. 29 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Dominantly inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2003-07-01

    Since 1886, the year that Charcot and Marie and Tooth described a genetic "peroneal muscular atrophy syndrome," electrophysiological and histological studies of the peripheral nervous system have greatly aided the characterization of this syndrome, which falls among the hereditary sensory-motor neuropathies. Two principal forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease have been distinguished: CMT 1, corresponding to a demyelinating type, and CMT 2, corresponding to an axonal type. The modes of transmission of these types are variable, recessive or dominant, autosomal, or X-linked. Our discussion here is confined to the dominant forms. In recent years, advances in molecular biology have greatly modified the approach to CMT disease and related neuropathies (such as hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies). With increased knowledge of responsible gene mutations and several other loci identified by linkage studies, our understanding of the pathophysiology of these neuropathies is increasing; however, with greater understanding, the classification of these disorders is becoming more complex. In this review we present and discuss the currently characterized subtypes, with emphasis on their known histological aspects. While nerve biopsy has lost its diagnostic importance in certain forms of the disease, such as CMT 1A, CMT 1B, and X-linked CMT (CMT X), it remains important for better characterizing the lesions of CMT 2 and forms of genetic peroneal atrophy in which DNA study is unrevealing. PMID:12901697

  14. Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun

    2014-11-15

    A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged. PMID:25175852

  15. Haplogroup Effects and Recombination of Mitochondrial DNA: Novel Clues from the Analysis of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Carelli, Valerio; Achilli, Alessandro; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Rengo, Chiara; Semino, Ornella; Pala, Maria; Olivieri, Anna; Mattiazzi, Marina; Pallotti, Francesco; Carrara, Franco; Zeviani, Massimo; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Carducci, Carla; Valle, Giorgio; Simionati, Barbara; Mendieta, Luana; Salomao, Solange; Belfort, Rubens; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Torroni, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 87 index cases with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) sequentially diagnosed in Italy, including an extremely large Brazilian family of Italian maternal ancestry, was evaluated in detail. Only seven pairs and three triplets of identical haplotypes were observed, attesting that the large majority of the LHON mutations were due to independent mutational events. Assignment of the mutational events into haplogroups confirmed that J1 and J2 play a role in LHON expression but narrowed the association to the subclades J1c and J2b, thus suggesting that two specific combinations of amino acid changes in the cytochrome b are the cause of the mtDNA background effect and that this may occur at the level of the supercomplex formed by respiratory-chain complexes I and III. The families with identical haplotypes were genealogically reinvestigated, which led to the reconnection into extended pedigrees of three pairs of families, including the Brazilian family with its Italian counterpart. The sequencing of entire mtDNA samples from the reconnected families confirmed the genealogical reconstruction but showed that the Brazilian family was heteroplasmic at two control-region positions. The survey of the two sites in 12 of the Brazilian subjects revealed triplasmy in most cases, but there was no evidence of the tetraplasmy that would be expected in the case of mtDNA recombination. PMID:16532388

  16. Intravitreal delivery of AAV-NDI1 provides functional benefit in a murine model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chadderton, Naomi; Palfi, Arpad; Millington-Ward, Sophia; Gobbo, Oliverio; Overlack, Nora; Carrigan, Matthew; O'Reilly, Mary; Campbell, Matthew; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Wolfrum, Uwe; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Farrar, G Jane

    2013-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited form of visual dysfunction caused by mutations in several genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex (complex I). Development of gene therapies for LHON has been impeded by genetic heterogeneity and the need to deliver therapies to the mitochondria of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the cells primarily affected in LHON. The therapy under development entails intraocular injection of a nuclear yeast gene NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (NDI1) that encodes a single subunit complex I equivalent and as such is mutation independent. NDI1 is imported into mitochondria due to an endogenous mitochondrial localisation signal. Intravitreal injection represents a clinically relevant route of delivery to RGCs not previously used for NDI1. In this study, recombinant adenoassociated virus (AAV) serotype 2 expressing NDI1 (AAV-NDI1) was shown to protect RGCs in a rotenone-induced murine model of LHON. AAV-NDI1 significantly reduced RGC death by 1.5-fold and optic nerve atrophy by 1.4-fold. This led to a significant preservation of retinal function as assessed by manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and optokinetic responses. Intraocular injection of AAV-NDI1 overcomes many barriers previously associated with developing therapies for LHON and holds great therapeutic promise for a mitochondrial disorder for which there are no effective therapies. PMID:22669418

  17. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND6 T14484C mutation in three Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yanhong; Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Qian Yaping; Zhou Jian; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-08-18

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with maternally transmitted Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. In the affected matrilineal relatives, the loss of central vision is bilateral, the fellow eye becoming affected either simultaneously (45%) or sequentially (55%). The penetrances of vision loss in these pedigrees were 27%, 50%, and 60%, respectively. The age-at-onset of vision loss in these families was 14, 19, and 24 years, respectively. Furthermore, the ratios between affected male and female matrilineal relatives were 1:1, 1:1.2, and 1:2, respectively. Mutational analysis of mitochondrial DNA revealed the presence of homoplasmic ND6 T14484C mutation, which has been associated with LHON. The incomplete penetrance and phenotypic variability implicate the involvement of nuclear modifier gene(s), environmental factor(s) or mitochondrial haplotype(s) in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T14484C mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  18. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND4 G11696A mutation in five Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangtian |; Wei Qiping; Yang Li; Tong Yi |; Zhao Fuxin; Lu Chunjie; Qian Yaping; Sun Yanghong; Lu Fan; Qu Jia |. E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin ||. E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-02-03

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical ND4 G11696A mutation associated with LHON. Indeed, this mutation is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families. In fact, the occurrence of the G11696A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Furthermore, the N405D in the ND5 and G5820A in the tRNA{sup Cys}, showing high evolutional conservation, may contribute to the phenotypic expression of G11696A mutation in the WZ10 pedigree. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in other four Chinese pedigrees carrying the G11696A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated G11696A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  19. Pupil responses derived from outer and inner retinal photoreception are normal in patients with hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Aki; Collomb, Sylvie; Léon, Lorette; Münch, Mirjam

    2014-03-01

    We compared the pupil responses originating from outer versus inner retinal photoreception between patients with isolated hereditary optic neuropathy (HON, n = 8) and healthy controls (n = 8). Three different testing protocols were used. For the first two protocols, a response function of the maximal pupil contraction versus stimulus light intensity was generated and the intensity at which half of the maximal pupil contraction, the half-max intensity, was determined. For the third protocol, the pupil size after light offset, the re-dilation rate and re-dilation amplitude were calculated to assess the post-light stimulus response. Patients with HON had bilateral, symmetric optic atrophy and significant reduction of visual acuity and visual field compared to controls. There were no significant mean differences in the response curve and pupil response parameters that reflect mainly rod, cone or melanopsin activity between patients and controls. In patients, there was a significant correlation between the half-max intensity of the red light sequence and visual field loss. In conclusion, pupil responses derived from outer or inner retinal photoreception in HON patients having mild-to moderate visual dysfunction are not quantitatively different from age-matched controls. However, an association between the degree of visual field loss and the half-max intensity of the cone response suggests that more advanced stages of disease may lead to impaired pupil light reflexes. PMID:24275502

  20. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  1. Intravitreal delivery of AAV-NDI1 provides functional benefit in a murine model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chadderton, Naomi; Palfi, Arpad; Millington-Ward, Sophia; Gobbo, Oliverio; Overlack, Nora; Carrigan, Matthew; O'Reilly, Mary; Campbell, Matthew; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Wolfrum, Uwe; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Jane Farrar, G

    2013-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited form of visual dysfunction caused by mutations in several genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex (complex I). Development of gene therapies for LHON has been impeded by genetic heterogeneity and the need to deliver therapies to the mitochondria of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the cells primarily affected in LHON. The therapy under development entails intraocular injection of a nuclear yeast gene NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (NDI1) that encodes a single subunit complex I equivalent and as such is mutation independent. NDI1 is imported into mitochondria due to an endogenous mitochondrial localisation signal. Intravitreal injection represents a clinically relevant route of delivery to RGCs not previously used for NDI1. In this study, recombinant adenoassociated virus (AAV) serotype 2 expressing NDI1 (AAV-NDI1) was shown to protect RGCs in a rotenone-induced murine model of LHON. AAV-NDI1 significantly reduced RGC death by 1.5-fold and optic nerve atrophy by 1.4-fold. This led to a significant preservation of retinal function as assessed by manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and optokinetic responses. Intraocular injection of AAV-NDI1 overcomes many barriers previously associated with developing therapies for LHON and holds great therapeutic promise for a mitochondrial disorder for which there are no effective therapies. PMID:22669418

  2. Idebenone protects against retinal damage and loss of vision in a mouse model of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Fabrice D; Erb, Michael; Anklin, Corinne; Robay, Dimitri; Pernet, Vincent; Gueven, Nuri

    2012-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited disease caused by mutations in complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The disease is characterized by loss of central vision due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dysfunction and optic nerve atrophy. Despite progress towards a better understanding of the disease, no therapeutic treatment is currently approved for this devastating disease. Idebenone, a short-chain benzoquinone, has shown promising evidence of efficacy in protecting vision loss and in accelerating recovery of visual acuity in patients with LHON. It was therefore of interest to study suitable LHON models in vitro and in vivo to identify anatomical correlates for this protective activity. At nanomolar concentrations, idebenone protected the rodent RGC cell line RGC-5 against complex I dysfunction in vitro. Consistent with the reported dosing and observed effects in LHON patients, we describe that in mice, idebenone penetrated into the eye at concentrations equivalent to those which protected RGC-5 cells from complex I dysfunction in vitro. Consequently, we next investigated the protective effect of idebenone in a mouse model of LHON, whereby mitochondrial complex I dysfunction was caused by exposure to rotenone. In this model, idebenone protected against the loss of retinal ganglion cells, reduction in retinal thickness and gliosis. Furthermore, consistent with this protection of retinal integrity, idebenone restored the functional loss of vision in this disease model. These results support the pharmacological activity of idebenone and indicate that idebenone holds potential as an effective treatment for vision loss in LHON patients. PMID:23028832

  3. Assessment of Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing as a Tool for the Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and Hereditary Motor Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Vincenzo; García-García, Francisco; Sancho, Paula; Tello, Cristina; García-Romero, Mar; Villarreal, Liliana; Alberti, Antonia; Sivera, Rafael; Dopazo, Joaquín; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Márquez-Infante, Celedonio; Casasnovas, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is characterized by broad genetic heterogeneity with >50 known disease-associated genes. Mutations in some of these genes can cause a pure motor form of hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetics of which are poorly characterized. We designed a panel comprising 56 genes associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease/hereditary motor neuropathy. We validated this diagnostic tool by first testing 11 patients with pathological mutations. A cohort of 33 affected subjects was selected for this study. The DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation was detected in two cases; novel changes and/or variants with low frequency (<1%) were found in 12 cases. There were no candidate variants in 18 cases, and amplification failed for one sample. The DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation was also detected in three additional families. On haplotype analysis, all of the patients from these five families shared the same haplotype; therefore, the DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation may be a founder event. Our gene panel allowed us to perform a very rapid and cost-effective screening of genes involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease/hereditary motor neuropathy. Our diagnostic strategy was robust in terms of both coverage and read depth for all of the genes and patient samples. These findings demonstrate the difficulty in achieving a definitive molecular diagnosis because of the complexity of interpreting new variants and the genetic heterogeneity that is associated with these neuropathies. PMID:26752306

  4. Nerve conduction abnormalities and neuromyotonia in genetically engineered mouse models of human hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Zielasek, J; Toyka, K V

    1999-09-14

    We performed electrophysiological studies in myelin protein mutant mice in order to characterize nerve conduction changes. We performed neurographic studies on the facial and sciatic nerves and needle electromyography (EMG). Mice homozygously deficient for the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (Pmp22-/-) exhibited increased motor latencies, reduced nerve conduction velocities, and polyphasia of the M-response, which are the typical electrophysiological signs of dysmyelination. PMP22 +/- mice developed only mild conduction slowing at an old age and a mild reduction of the M-amplitude, which indicates mild axonal dysfunction. Mice overexpressing Pmp22 developed severe electrophysiological signs of dysmyelination. In myelin protein zero-deficient mice (P0 -/-), we found alterations similar to those found in Pmp22 -/- mice, whereas P0 +/- mice developed mildly increased sciatic nerve F-wave latencies only late in life, which indicates only mild dysmyelination. Connexin 32-deficient mice showed electrophysiological evidence of mild axonal damage. By EMG, we found the clinical and electrophysiological signs of neuromyotonia, that is, continuous spontaneous motor unit discharges, often in rhythmic patterns (myokymia), in P0 -/-, Pmp22 -/-, Trembler, Trembler-J, and Pmp22-overexpressing mice. This indicates abnormal impulse generation in these dysmyelinated nerves. In summary, our studies demonstrate nerve conduction changes in mice with myelin protein gene defects that are similar to those found in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorders. In addition, we identified new mouse models of hereditary neuromyotonia. PMID:10586256

  5. Inherited peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Keller, M P; Chance, P F

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary disorders of the peripheral nerves constitute a group of frequently encountered neurological diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is genetically heterogeneous and characterized by demyelination with moderately to severely reduced nerve conduction velocities, absent muscle stretch reflexes and onion bulb formation. Genetic loci for CMT1 map to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), and another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1 B result from point mutations in the myelin protein zero (Po or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1 C is unknown. Mutations in the early growth response 2 gene (EGR2) are also associated with demyelinating neuropathy. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosome 8q, 10q, and 11q. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is characterized by normal or mildly reduced nerve conduction velocity with decreased amplitude and axonal loss without hypertrophic features. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1 p36 (CMT2A), another to chromosome 3p (CMT2B) and another to 7p (CMT2D). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the Po gene and shares considerable clinical and pathological features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication/deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. PMID:10716658

  6. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways.

    PubMed

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that modulate LHON penetrance must take into account also the exposure to environmental triggers such as tobacco smoke. PMID:26673666

  7. Clustering of Caucasian Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients containing the 11778 or 14484 mutations on an mtDNA lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Sun, F.; Wallace, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a type of blindness caused by mtDNA mutations. Three LHON mtDNA mutations at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, and 14484 are specific for LHON and account for 90% of worldwide cases and are thus designated as {open_quotes}primary{close_quotes} LHON mutations. Fifteen other {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} LHON mtDNA mutations have been identified, but their pathogenicity is unclear. mtDNA haplotype and phylogenetic analysis of the primary LHON mutations in North American Caucasian patients and controls has shown that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, which are distributed throughout the European-derived (Caucasian) mtDNA phylogeny, patients containing the 14484 mutation tended to be associated with European mtDNA haplotype J. To investigate this apparent clustering, we performed {chi}{sup 2}-based statistical analyses to compare the distribution of LHON patients on the Caucasian phylogenetic tree. Our results indicate that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, the 14484 mutation was not distributed on the phylogeny in proportion to the frequencies of the major Caucasian mtDNA haplogroups found in North America. The 14484 mutation was next shown to occur on the haplogroup J background more frequently that expected, consistent with the observation that {approximately}75% of worldwide 14484-positive LHON patients occur in association with haplogroup J. The 11778 mutation also exhibited a moderate clustering on haplogroup J. These observations were supported by statistical analysis using all available mutation frequencies reported in the literature. This paper thus illustrates the potential importance of genetic background in certain mtDNA-based diseases, speculates on a pathogenic role for a subset of LHON secondary mutations and their interaction with primary mutations, and provides support for a polygenic model for LHON expression in some cases. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. DTI Study of Cerebral Normal-Appearing White Matter in Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Song, Chun-Li; Huang, Liang; Song, Qing-Wei; Liang, Zhan-Hua; Wei, Qiang; Hu, Jia-Ni; Miao, Yan-Wei; Wu, Bing; Xie, Lizhi

    2015-10-01

    The majority of previous studies on hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) were focused on peripheral nerves, whereas cerebral alterations in HNPP have been less attended to. In this work, Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to detect the changes in WM, especially in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in HNPP patients for its sensitivity in probing the microstructure of WM, the sensitive metric was searched for probing cerebral alterations and the regional distribution of cerebral abnormalities was identified. Twelve HNPP patients and 12 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent the conventional MRI, DTI scan, and electrophysiological examination. The conventional MRI images were first analyzed to identify abnormal intense regions and the NAWM regions. NAWM refers to the white matter regions that do not include the lesions on conventional MRI. The apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the NAWM were then measured and compared between patient and control groups. The sensitivity and specificity of 3 methods and the cerebral regional distribution of MR signal abnormalities were further analyzed. Hyperintense foci were observed on T2 weighted image and fluid attenuated inversion recovery images in 6 patients. Compared to the controls, FA values of the patients were significantly lower in bilateral frontal, orbitofrontal, and temporal NAWMs; whereas the electrophysiological examination results of patients and controls exhibited no statistically significant difference. The sensitivity of FA value was higher than that of electrophysiological examination and conventional MRI. The majority of abnormal signals on conventional MRI images and abnormal FA values were located in the frontal and temporal lobes. The results of our study show cerebral WM changes in HNPP patients. FA value in DTI has been shown to be sensitive to the cerebral microstructural changes in HNPP. The frontal lobe is the predilection site that is most involved in HNPP. PMID:26512614

  9. Longitudinal study of a heteroplasmic 3460 Leber hereditary optic neuropathy family by multiplexed primer-extension analysis and nucleotide sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.S.; Fahy, E.; Bodis-Wollner, I.

    1996-02-01

    Nucleotide-sequencing and multiplexed primer-extension assays have been used to quantitate the mutant-allele frequency in 14 maternal relatives, spanning three generations, from a family that is heteroplasmic for the primary Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutation at nucleotide 3460 of the mitochondrial genome. There was excellent agreement between the values that were obtained with the two different methods. The longitudinal study shows that the mutant-allele frequency was constant within individual family members over a sampling period of 3.5 years. Second, although there was an overall increase in the mutant-allele frequency in successive generations, segregation in the direction of the mutant allele was not invariant, and there was one instance in which there was a significant decrease in the frequency from parent to offspring. From these two sets of results, and from previous studies of heteroplasmic LHON families, we conclude that there is no evidence for a marked selective pressure that determines the replication, segregation, or transmission of primary LHON mutations to white blood cells and platelets. Instead, the mtDNA molecules are most likely to replicate and segregate under conditions of random drift at the cellular level. Finally, the pattern of transmission in this maternal lineage is compatible with a developmental bottleneck model in which the number of mitochondrial units of segregation in the female germ line is relatively small in relation to the number of mtDNA molecules within a cell. However, this is not an invariant pattern for humans, and simple models of mitochondrial gene transmission are inappropriate at the present time. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Mutational analysis of Greek patients with suspected hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP): a 15-year experience.

    PubMed

    Karadima, Georgia; Koutsis, Georgios; Raftopoulou, Maria; Karletidi, Karolina-Maria; Zambelis, Thomas; Karandreas, Nikolaos; Panas, Marios

    2015-06-01

    There has been limited information from population studies regarding the overall frequency of the common 1.5-Mb 17p11.2 deletion and even scarcer data regarding the overall frequency of PMP22 micromutations in patients with a clinical suspicion of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). We have analysed 100 consecutive Greek patients referred for HNPP genetic testing over a 15-year period to our Neurogenetics Unit in Athens, a reference centre for all regions of Greece. All patients were screened for the 1.5-Mb deletion and a selected subgroup of deletion-negative patients for PMP22 micromutations. Mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients were compared for various clinical parameters. In total, 54 mutation-positive patients were identified. In index cases, the deletion frequency was 47.8%, and the PMP22 micromutation frequency was 2.2%. Within mutation-positive patients, the common deletion represented 95.7% and PMP22 micromutations 4.3% of cases. Two previously reported PMP22 micromutations (c.364_365delCC and c.79-2A>G) were detected. HNPP index cases had a 2.8-1 male-to-female ratio, similar to mutation-negative patients. A typical phenotype (recurrent or isolated palsies) was present in 82.4% of symptomatic HNPP cases, significantly higher than mutation-negative patients. Sensitivity of proposed electrophysiological diagnostic criteria for HNPP was calculated at 95.7% and specificity at 80.5%. In conclusion, the common HNPP deletion accounts for ∼50% and PMP22 micromutations for ∼2% of cases in a large consecutive cohort of patients with suspected HNPP. The mutational and phenotypic spectrum of HNPP is similar in the Greek population compared with other populations. Proposed electrophysiological diagnostic criteria perform satisfactorily in everyday clinical practice. PMID:26110377

  11. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that modulate LHON penetrance must take into account also the exposure to environmental triggers such as tobacco smoke. PMID:26673666

  12. c-Jun activation in Schwann cells protects against loss of sensory axons in inherited neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hantke, Janina; Carty, Lucy; Wagstaff, Laura J; Turmaine, Mark; Wilton, Daniel K; Quintes, Susanne; Koltzenburg, Martin; Baas, Frank; Mirsky, Rhona; Jessen, Kristján R

    2014-11-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is the most frequent inherited peripheral neuropathy. It is generally due to heterozygous inheritance of a partial chromosomal duplication resulting in over-expression of PMP22. A key feature of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is secondary death of axons. Prevention of axonal loss is therefore an important target of clinical intervention. We have previously identified a signalling mechanism that promotes axon survival and prevents neuron death in mechanically injured peripheral nerves. This work suggested that Schwann cells respond to injury by activating/enhancing trophic support for axons through a mechanism that depends on upregulation of the transcription factor c-Jun in Schwann cells, resulting in the sparing of axons that would otherwise die. As c-Jun orchestrates Schwann cell support for distressed neurons after mechanical injury, we have now asked: do Schwann cells also activate a c-Jun dependent neuron-supportive programme in inherited demyelinating disease? We tested this by using the C3 mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. In line with our previous findings in humans with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A, we found that Schwann cell c-Jun was elevated in (uninjured) nerves of C3 mice. We determined the impact of this c-Jun activation by comparing C3 mice with double mutant mice, namely C3 mice in which c-Jun had been conditionally inactivated in Schwann cells (C3/Schwann cell-c-Jun(-/-) mice), using sensory-motor tests and electrophysiological measurements, and by counting axons in proximal and distal nerves. The results indicate that c-Jun elevation in the Schwann cells of C3 nerves serves to prevent loss of myelinated sensory axons, particularly in distal nerves, improve behavioural symptoms, and preserve F-wave persistence. This suggests that Schwann cells have two contrasting functions in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: on the one hand they are the genetic source of the disease, on the other, they respond to it by mounting a c-Jun-dependent response that significantly reduces its impact. Because axonal death is a central feature of much nerve pathology it will be important to establish whether an axon-supportive Schwann cell response also takes place in other conditions. Amplification of this axon-supportive mechanism constitutes a novel target for clinical intervention that might be useful in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and other neuropathies that involve axon loss. PMID:25216747

  13. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tudor J C; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W; Williams, Amanda C de C; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L H; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K; Rice, Andrew S C

    2014-09-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n=28), of whom 75% (n=21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN. PMID:24973717

  14. Neuromyotonia, myocloni, sensory neuropathy and cerebellar symptoms in a patient with antibodies to neuronal nucleoproteins (anti-Hu-antibodies).

    PubMed

    Toepfer, M; Schroeder, M; Unger, J W; Lochmüller, H; Pongratz, D; Müller-Felber, W

    1999-09-01

    A middle-aged patient presented with subacute muscular stiffness, myocloni of both extremity and facial muscles, gait ataxia and symmetrical distal painful paraesthesias. Electrophysiologically, neuromyotonia was confirmed. High titer anti-Hu antibodies were detected, but no other paraneoplastic antibodies were found. Small-cell lung cancer was diagnosed. Under chemotherapy tumor remission was achieved and, except for minor sensory deficits, neurological symptoms disappeared. This report shows that paraneoplastic syndromes associated with antibodies to neuronal nucleoproteins (anti-Hu antibodies) may be associated with a syndrome including neuromyotonia, sensory neuropathy, cerebellar symptoms and myocloni. PMID:10536910

  15. Bilateral Neuropathy of Primary Sensory Neurons by the Chronic Compression of Multiple Unilateral DRGs

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ya-Bin; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Ying; Song, Kai; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Fan-Cheng; Yang, Yu-Jie; He, Yang-Song; Kuang, Fang; You, Si-Wei; You, Hao-Jun; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To mimic multilevel nerve root compression and intervertebral foramina stenosis in human, we established a new animal model of the chronic compression of unilateral multiple lumbar DRGs (mCCD) in the rat. A higher occurrence of signs of spontaneous pain behaviors, such as wet-dog shaking and spontaneous hind paw shrinking behaviors, was firstly observed from day 1 onward. In the meantime, the unilateral mCCD rat exhibited significant bilateral hind paw mechanical and cold allodynia and hyperalgesia, as well as a thermal preference to 30°C plate between 30 and 35°C. The expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral all-sized DRG neurons after the mCCD. And the expression of CGRP was significantly increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral large- and medium-sized DRG neurons. ATF3 and CGRP expressions correlated to evoked pain hypersensitivities such as mechanical and cold allodynia on postoperative day 1. The results suggested that bilateral neuropathy of primary sensory neurons might contribute to bilateral hypersensitivity in the mCCD rat. PMID:26819761

  16. Pan-American mDNA haplogroups in Chilean patients with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Pablo; Fernández, Verónica; Slabaugh, Mark; Seleme, Nicolás; Reyes, Nury; Gallardo, Patricia; Herrera, Luisa; Peña, Luis; Pezo, Patricio; Moraga, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The clinical impact of mDNA mutations on the development of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) may be modulated by mitochondrial haplogroups, which vary across populations. The aim of this research was to determine the clinical spectrum and molecular characteristics, including the haplogroup, of 15 South American families with LHON. Methods This study was a prospective, observational study conducted between March 2006 and August 2012. All patients were referred to the Clinical Hospital of the University of Chile, where the clinical study was conducted. Molecular studies were conducted at the Biomedical Sciences Institute (ICBM) of the University of Chile. Fifteen index cases were identified with molecular analysis after initial neuroophthalmic examination at different centers throughout Chile. Clinical features of patients with LHON and maternal relatives of the 15 families (75 individuals: 26 affected and 49 healthy carriers) were evaluated. The primary mDNA mutations (m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, or m.14484T>C) were determined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in all individuals. Mitochondrial haplogroups were determined with direct sequencing of two hypervariable regions (HV1 and HV2) and compared with reference sequences. Results The m.11778G>A mutation was found in 59 subjects (78.7%), the m.14484T>C mutation was found in 12 subjects (16.0%), and the m.3460G>A mutation was found in four (5.3%) subjects. The average age of onset of symptoms in affected subjects was 22.2 years old (range 3 to 53 years); 21 (80.7%) were male, and five (19.3%) were female. Twelve families (80%) had Amerindian haplogroups: One family had the A2 haplogroup, four families had the B2i2 haplogroup, six families had the C1b haplogroup, and one family had the D1g haplogroup. Conclusions In this limited sample size, the Amerindian haplogroup A2 was associated with delayed onset of disease in this population. Patients with haplogroup C retained better vision than the patients with other haplogroups in this population. Disease in subjects with haplogroup D appeared to be underrepresented compared to the population at large. PMID:24672219

  17. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression and macrophage responses in genetically proven Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Stoll, G; Gabreëls-Festen, A A; Jander, S; Müller, H W; Hanemann, C O

    1998-11-01

    This study examined major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression and macrophage infiltration in sural nerve biopsies from patients with genetically proven Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) 1A and 1B and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) by immunocytochemistry. In both young and older patients with duplication of the PMP22 gene, MHC class II expression was consistently up-regulated and not closely related to the extent of macrophage infiltration. On the other hand, MHC class II expression was more variable in CMT1A and CMT1B caused by point mutations and in HNPP. The extent of nerve pathology as assessed by teased fiber preparations or electron microscopy was not predictive for the degree of MHC class II expression in CMT1/HNPP. We conclude that MHC class II up-regulation is a common feature in hereditary neuropathies. As shown for the animal model of globoid cell dystrophy, it is conceivable that increased expression of MHC class II molecules in CMT1 and HNPP accelerates nerve pathology. PMID:9771665

  18. AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Susan C.; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, or clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This chapter reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. PMID:23239211

  19. Evidence against an X-linked locus close to DXS7 determining visual loss susceptibility in British and Italian families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.G.; Davis, M.B.; Lashwood, A.; Brockington, M.; Harding, A.E. ); Toscano, A. )

    1992-10-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is associated with mutations of mtDNA, but two features of LHON pedigrees are not explicable solely on the basis of mitochondrial inheritance. There is a large excess of affected males, and not all males at risk develop the disease. These observations could be explained by the existence of an X-linked visual loss susceptibility gene. This hypothesis was supported by linkage studies in Finland, placing the susceptibility locus at DXS7, with a maximum lod score of 2.48 at a recombination fraction of 0. Linkage studies in 1 Italian and 12 British families with LHON, analyzed either together or separately depending on the associated mtDNA mutation, have excluded the presence of such a locus from an interval of about 30 cM around DXS7 in these kindreds, with a total lod score of -26.51 at a recombination fraction of 0. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Detection of the mtDNA 14484 mutation on an African-specific haplotype: Implications about its role in causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Torroni, A.; Petrozzi, M.; Terracina, M.

    1996-07-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease whose primary clinical manifestation is acute or subacute bilateral loss of central vision leading to central scotoma and blindness. To date, LHON has been associated with 18 mtDNA missense mutations, even though, for many of these mutations, it remains unclear whether they cause the disease, contribute to the pathology, or are nonpathogenic mtDNA polymorphisms. On the basis of numerous criteria, which include the specificity for LHON, the frequency in the general population, and the penetrance within affected pedigrees, the detection of associated defects in the respiratory chain, mutations at three nucleotide positions (nps), 11778 (G{r_arrow}A), 3460 (G{r_arrow}A), and 14484 (T{r_arrow}C) have been classified as high-risk and primary LHON mutations. Overall, these three mutations encompass {ge}90% of the LHON cases. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Heat Shock Protein 70 Is Necessary to Improve Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Reverse Diabetic Sensory Neuropathy following KU-32 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiacheng; Farmer, Kevin L.; Pan, Pan; Urban, Michael J.; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired neuronal mitochondrial bioenergetics contributes to the pathophysiologic progression of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and may be a focal point for disease management. We have demonstrated that modulating heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 with the small-molecule drug KU-32 ameliorates psychosensory, electrophysiologic, morphologic, and bioenergetic deficits of DPN in animal models of type 1 diabetes. The current study used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes to determine the relationship of changes in sensory neuron mitochondrial bioenergetics to the onset of and recovery from DPN. The onset of DPN showed a tight temporal correlation with a decrease in mitochondrial bioenergetics in a genetic model of type 2 diabetes. In contrast, sensory hypoalgesia developed 10 weeks before the occurrence of significant declines in sensory neuron mitochondrial bioenergetics in the type 1 model. KU-32 therapy improved mitochondrial bioenergetics in both the type 1 and type 2 models, and this tightly correlated with a decrease in DPN. Mechanistically, improved mitochondrial function following KU-32 therapy required Hsp70, since the drug was ineffective in diabetic Hsp70 knockout mice. Our data indicate that changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics may rapidly contribute to nerve dysfunction in type 2 diabetes, but not type 1 diabetes, and that modulating Hsp70 offers an effective approach toward correcting sensory neuron bioenergetic deficits and DPN in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24263156

  2. Simultaneous occurrence of the 11778 (ND4) and the 9438 (COX III) mtDNA mutations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Molecular, biochemical, and clinical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, R.J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Zwart, R.

    1995-10-01

    Three mtDNA point mutations at nucleotide position (np) 3460, at np 11778 and at np 14484, are thought to be of primary importance in the pathogenesis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute central vision loss. These mutations are present in genes coding for subunits of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the respiratory chain, occur exclusively in LHON maternal pedigrees, and have never been reported to occur together. Johns and Neufeld postulated that an mtDNA mutation at np 9438, in the gene coding for one of the subunits (COX III) of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), was also of primary importance. Johns and Neufeld (1993) found this mutation, which changed a conserved glycine to a serine, in 5 unrelated LHON probands who did not carry one of the presently known primary mutations, but they did not find it in 400 controls. However, the role of this sequence variant has been questioned in the Journal when it has been found to occur in apparently healthy African and Cuban individuals. Subsequently, Johns et al. described this mutation in two Cuban individuals presenting with optic and peripheral neuropathy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Cardiac Involvement in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z; AlMahameed, Soufian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is the least recognized and understood complication of peripheral neuropathy. However, because of its potential adverse effects including sudden death, CAN is one of the most important forms of autonomic neuropathies. CAN presents with different clinical manifestations including postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, fluctuation of blood pressure and heart rate, arrhythmia, and increased risk of myocardial infarction. In this article, the prevalence, clinical presentations, and management of cardiac involvement in certain peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy, human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy, hereditary neuropathies, and amyloid neuropathy are examined in detail. PMID:26905912

  4. Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial of Amitriptyline for Analgesia in Painful HIV-Associated Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dinat, Natalya; Marinda, Edmore; Moch, Shirra; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Kamerman, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study at a single center in South Africa, to ascertain whether amitriptyline is an effective analgesic for painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy of moderate to severe intensity in: i) antiretroviral drug naive individuals, and ii) antiretroviral drug users. 124 HIV-infected participants (antiretroviral drug naive = 62, antiretroviral drug users = 62) who met the study criteria for painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy were randomized to once-daily oral amitriptyline (titrated to a median: interquartile range of 50: 25-50 mg) or placebo for six weeks, followed by a three-week washout period and subsequent treatment crossover. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline in worst pain intensity of the feet (measured by participant self-report using an 11-point numerical pain rating scale) after six weeks of treatment. 122 of 124 participants completed all study visits and were included in the analysis of the primary outcome. In the antiretroviral drug-naive group (n = 61) there was no significant difference in the mean change in pain score from baseline after six weeks of treatment with placebo or amitriptyline [amitriptyline: 2.8 (SD 3.3) vs. placebo: 2.8 (3.4)]. Similarly, there was no significant difference in the change in pain score after six weeks of treatment with placebo or amitriptyline in the antiretroviral drug-user group (n = 61) [amitriptyline: 2.7 (3.3) vs. placebo: 2.1 (2.8)]. Controlling for period effects and treatment order effects did not alter the outcome of the analyses. Nor did analyzing the intention-to-treat cohort (missing data interpolated using baseline observation carried forward) alter the outcome of the analyses. In summary, amitriptyline, at the doses used here, was no more effective than an inactive placebo at reducing pain intensity in individuals with painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy of moderate to severe intensity, irrespective of whether they were on antiretroviral therapy or not. Trial Registration ISRCTN 54452526 PMID:25974287

  5. A 1.5-Mb deletion in 17p11.2-p12 is frequently observed in Italian families with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, D.; Pandolfo, M. |; Pareyson, D.; Sghirlanzoni, A.; Di Donato, S.; Roa, B.B.; Abbas, N.E.; Lupski, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent mononeuropathies. A 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-p12 has been associated with HNPP. Duplication of the same 1.5-Mb region is known to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1A), a more severe peripheral neuropathy characterized by symmetrically slowed nerve conduction velocity (NCV). The CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion appear to be the reciprocal products of a recombination event involving a repeat element (CMT1A-REP) that flanks the 1.5-Mb region involved in the duplication/deletion. Patients from nine unrelated Italian families who were diagnosed with HNPP on the basis of clinical, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations were analyzed by molecular methods for DNA deletion on chromosome 17p. In all nine families, Southern analysis using a CMT1A-REP probe detected a reduced hybridization signal of a 6.0-kb EcoRI fragment mapping within the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating deletion of one copy of CMT1A-REP in these HNPP patients. Families were also typed with a polymorphic (CA){sub n} repeat and with RFLPs corresponding to loci D17S122, D17S125, and D17S61, which all map within the deleted region. Lack of allelic transmission from affected parent to affected offspring was observed in four informative families, providing an independent indication for deletion. Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of SacII-digested genomic DNA detected junction fragments specific to the 1.5-Mb HNPP deletion in seven of nine Italian families included in this study. These findings suggest that a 1.5-Mb deletion on 17p11.2-p12 is the most common mutation associated with HNPP. 51 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Very low penetrance of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in five Han Chinese families carrying the ND1 G3460A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yi; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhao, Fuxin; Mao, Yijian; Wei, Qi-ping; Yang, Li; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2009-01-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Han Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Strikingly, there were very low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families, ranging from 4.2% to 22.2%, with an average of 10.2%. In particular, only 7 (4 males/3 females) of 106 matrilineal relatives in these families exhibited the variable severity and age-at-onset in visual dysfunction. The age-at-onset for visual impairment in matrilineal relatives in these families, varied from 20 to 25 years, with an average of 21.8 years old. Molecular analysis of mitochondrial genomes identified the homoplasmic ND1 G3460A mutation and distinct sets of variants, belonging to the Asian haplogroups B5b, C4a1, D5, F1, and R9, respectively. This suggests that the G3640A mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mtDNA in China. However, there was the absence of known secondary LHON-associated mtDNA mutations in these Chinese families. Very low penetrance of visual loss in these five Chinese pedigrees strongly indicated that the G3640A mutation was itself insufficient to develop the optic neuropathy. The absence of secondary LHON mtDNA mutations suggest that these mtDNA haplogroup-specific variants may not play an important role in the phenotypic expression of the G3640A mutation in those Chinese families with low penetrance of vision loss. However, nuclear modifier genes, epigenetic and environmental factors appear to be modifier factors for the phenotypic manifestation of the G3640A mutation in these Chinese families. PMID:20053576

  7. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy caused by the homoplasmic ND1 m.3635G>A mutation in nine Han Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Minglian; Xie, Shipeng; Gao, Min; Zhang, Sai; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Jinping; Ji, Yanchun; Wei, Qi-Ping; Tong, Yi; Guan, Min-Xin

    2014-09-01

    In this report, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-associated mitochondrial m.3635G>A (p.S110N, ND1) mutation. A mutational screening of ND1 gene in a cohort of 1070 Han Chinese subjects LHON identified the m.3635G>A mutation in nine Chinese families with suggestively maternally transmitted LHON. Thirty-eight (22 males/16 females) of 162 matrilineal relatives in these families exhibited the variable severity and age-at-onset of optic neuropathy. Molecular analysis of their mitochondrial genomes identified the homoplasmic m.3635G>A mutation and distinct sets of polymorphisms belonging to the Asian haplogroups G2a1, R11a, D4, R11a, M7b2, G1a, F1a1, B4, and N9a3, respectively. Using cybrids constructed by transferring mitochondria from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from one Chinese family into mtDNA-less (?(0)) cells, we showed ~27% decrease in the activity of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in mutant cybrids carrying the m.3635G>A mutation, compared with control cybrids. The respiratory deficiency caused by the m.3635G>A mutation results in decreased efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. These mitochondrial dysfunctions caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species in the mutant cybrids. The data provide the direct evidence for the m.3635G>A mutation leading to LHON. Our findings may provide new insights into the understanding of pathophysiology of LHON. PMID:25194554

  8. Mutation analysis of PMP22 in Slovak patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Resko, Peter; Radvansky, Jan; Odnogova, Zuzana; Baldovic, Marian; Minarik, Gabriel; Polakova, Helena; Palffy, Roland; Kadasi, Ludevit

    2011-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related peripheral neuropathies are the most commonly inherited neurological disorders in humans, characterized by clinical and genetic heterogeneity. The most prevalent clinical entities belonging to this group of disorders are CMT type 1A (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). CMT1A and HNPP are predominantly caused by a 1.5 Mb duplication and deletion in the chromosomal region 17p11.2, respectively, and less frequently by other mutations in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Despite being relatively common diseases, they haven't been previously studied in the Slovak population. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the spectrum and frequency of PMP22 mutations in the Slovak population by screening 119 families with CMT and 2 families with HNPP for causative mutations in this gene. The copy number determination of PMP22 resulted in the detection of CMT1A duplication in 40 families and the detection of HNPP deletion in 7 families, 6 of which were originally diagnosed as CMT. Consequent mutation screening of families without duplication or deletion using dHPLC and sequencing identified 6 single base changes (3 unpublished to date), from which only c.327C>A (Cys109X) present in one family was provably causative. These results confirm the leading role of PMP22 mutation analysis in the differential diagnosis of CMT and show that the spectrum and frequency of PMP22 mutations in the Slovak population is comparable to that seen in the global population. PMID:22131320

  9. [Sjogren's syndrome-associated neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Koike, Haruki; Sobue, Gen

    2013-11-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by xerophthalmia and xerostomia; it is associated with widespread systemic visceral involvement. A wide variety of neurological complications are characteristic features of Sjogren's syndrome, of which peripheral neuropathy is a major neurological manifestation. Based on the predominant neuropathic symptoms, patients can be considered to have several forms of neuropathies, including sensory ataxic neuropathy, painful sensory neuropathy without sensory ataxia, multiple mononeuropathy, multiple cranial neuropathy, trigeminal neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and radiculoneuropathy. Acute or subacute onset is observed more frequently in multiple mononeuropathy and multiple cranial neuropathies, whereas disease progression is usually chronic in other forms of neuropathies. Sensory symptoms without substantial motor involvement are observed predominantly in sensory ataxic, painful sensory, trigeminal, and autonomic neuropathies. In contrast, motor impairment is apparent in multiple mononeuropathy, multiple cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuropathy. Autonomic symptoms such as abnormal pupils and orthostatic hypotension are particularly noted in patients with sensory ataxic, painful, trigeminal, and autonomic neuropathies. Sural nerve biopsy specimens reveal predominantly large fiber loss in sensory ataxic neuropathy and predominantly small fiber loss in painful sensory neuropathy. Vasculitis is observed most frequently in multiple mononeuropathy. The autopsy findings of patients with sensory ataxic and painful neuropathies demonstrate neuronal loss in the dorsal root ganglia and sympathetic ganglia with CD8-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Differential therapeutic responses to corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin can be seen among the various neuropathic forms. In conclusion, the clinicopathological features of neuropathies associated with Sjogren's syndrome are highly variable. The neuropathy classification is important from a therapeutic point of view. PMID:24200611

  10. Mice with a mutation in the dynein heavy chain 1 gene display sensory neuropathy but lack motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Luc; Fergani, Anissa; Braunstein, Kerstin E; Eschbach, Judith; Holl, Nathalie; Rene, Frédérique; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Zoerner, Björn; Schwalenstocker, Birgit; Ludolph, Albert C; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In neurons, cytoplasmic dynein functions as a molecular motor responsible for retrograde axonal transport. An impairment of axonal transport is thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most frequent motor neuron disease in the elderly. In this regard, previous studies described two heterozygous mouse strains bearing missense point mutations in the dynein heavy chain 1 gene that were reported to display late-onset progressive motor neuron degeneration. Here we show, however, that one of these mutant strains, the so-called Cra mice does not suffer from motor neuron loss, even in aged animals. Consistently, we did not observe electrophysiological or biochemical signs of muscle denervation, indicative of motor neuron disease. The "hindlimb clasping" phenotype of Cra mice could rather be due to the prominent degeneration of sensory neurons associated with a loss of muscle spindles. Altogether, these findings show that dynein heavy chain mutation triggers sensory neuropathy rather than motor neuron disease. PMID:18952079

  11. Inherited neuropathies: from gene to disease.

    PubMed

    Keller, M P; Chance, P F

    1999-04-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B) and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0 or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy, also of undetermined cause. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A), another to chromosome 3p (CMT2B) and another to 7p (CMT2D). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene and shares considerable clinical and pathological features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication/deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosome 8q, 10q and 11q. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal dominant disorder causing painful, recurrent brachial plexopathies and maps to chromosome 17q25. PMID:10219749

  12. Retinal Microcirculation in Type 1 Diabetic Patients With and Without Peripheral Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Forst, Thomas; Weber, Matthias M; Mitry, Michael; Müller, Lena; Forst, Senait; Tanis, Mukkadar; Pfützner, Andreas; Michelson, Georg

    2014-02-21

    In patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), early retinal microvascular alterations can be observed even before the clinical diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. This study aimed to investigate morphological and functional changes in retinal microvascular blood flow in type 1 diabetic patients with and without peripheral neuropathy (PNP) as compared to nondiabetic controls. Retinal microvascular blood flow (RBF) was assessed using scanning laser Doppler flowmetry (Heidelberg Retina Flowmeter, Heidelberg Engineering, Germany) before and after stimulation with flicker light. PNP was assessed using the neuropathy disability score (NDS) and by the evaluation of the vibration perception threshold (VPT). A total of 41 subjects were recruited for study participation and were stratified to 3 different groups according to their metabolic and neurological status: 14 nondiabetic subjects without PNP, 14 diabetic patients without PNP, and 13 diabetic patients with PNP. All subjects were free from diabetic retinopathy as assessed by fundoscopy. In diabetic patients with PNP, baseline and stimulated RBF was higher compared with diabetic patients without PNP and the nondiabetic control group. No difference with regard to RBF could be observed between the nondiabetic control subjects and patients with type 1 DM without PNP. No difference in the arterial WLR could be observed between the 3 groups. A linear correlation was found for VPT and RBF (r = .38, P < .001) and for NDS and RBF (r = .44, P < .0001). In our study population of patients with type 1 diabetes, PNP was associated with functional but not morphological changes in RBF. PMID:24876588

  13. Two families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy carrying G11778A and T14502C mutations with haplogroup H2a2a1 in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chen; Wei, Tanwei; Hu, Bo; Peng, Chunyan; Qiu, Xueping; Wei, Li; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial haplogroup has been reported to affect the clinical expression of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The present study aimed to investigate the interaction between mutations and the haplogroup of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in families. Two unrelated families with LHON were enrolled in the study, and clinical, genetic and molecular characterizations were determined in the affected and unaffected family members. Polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing was performed using 24 pairs of overlapping primers for whole mtDNA to screen for mutations and haplogroup. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to evaluate the pathogenic effect of these mtDNA mutations and the haplogroup. The G11778A mutation was identified in the two families. In addition, the members of family 2 exhibited the T14502C mutation and those in family 1 exhibited the T3394C and T14502C mutations, which were regarded as secondary mutations. The penetrance of visual loss in families 1 and 2 were 30.8 and 33.3%, respectively. In addition, the two families were found to be in the H2a2a1 haplogroup. In this limited sample size, it was demonstrated that the H2a2a1 haplogroup had a possible protective effect against LHON. Additional modifying factors, including environmental factors, lifestyle, estrogen levels and nuclear genes may also be important in LHON. PMID:25936877

  14. Cell therapy using retinal progenitor cells shows therapeutic effect in a chemically-induced rotenone mouse model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mansergh, Fiona C; Chadderton, Naomi; Kenna, Paul F; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Farrar, G Jane

    2014-11-01

    Primary mitochondrial disorders occur at a prevalence of one in 10?000; ?50% of these demonstrate ocular pathology. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common primary mitochondrial disorder. LHON results from retinal ganglion cell pathology, which leads to optic nerve degeneration and blindness. Over 95% of cases result from one of the three common mutations in mitochondrial genes MTND1, MTND4 and MTND6, which encode elements of the complex I respiratory chain. Various therapies for LHON are in development, for example, intravitreal injection of adeno-associated virus carrying either the yeast NDI1 gene or a specific subunit of mammalian Complex I have shown visual improvement in animal models. Given the course of LHON, it is likely that in many cases prompt administration may be necessary before widespread cell death. An alternative approach for therapy may be the use of stem cells to protect visual function; this has been evaluated by us in a rotenone-induced model of LHON. Freshly dissected embryonic retinal cells do not integrate into the ganglion cell layer (GCL), unlike similarly obtained photoreceptor precursors. However, cultured retinal progenitor cells can integrate in close proximity to the GCL, and act to preserve retinal function as assessed by manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, optokinetic responses and ganglion cell counts. Cell therapies for LHON therefore represent a promising therapeutic approach, and may be of particular utility in treating more advanced disease. PMID:24569607

  15. Cell therapy using retinal progenitor cells shows therapeutic effect in a chemically-induced rotenone mouse model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mansergh, Fiona C; Chadderton, Naomi; Kenna, Paul F; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Farrar, G Jane

    2014-01-01

    Primary mitochondrial disorders occur at a prevalence of one in 10?000; ?50% of these demonstrate ocular pathology. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common primary mitochondrial disorder. LHON results from retinal ganglion cell pathology, which leads to optic nerve degeneration and blindness. Over 95% of cases result from one of the three common mutations in mitochondrial genes MTND1, MTND4 and MTND6, which encode elements of the complex I respiratory chain. Various therapies for LHON are in development, for example, intravitreal injection of adeno-associated virus carrying either the yeast NDI1 gene or a specific subunit of mammalian Complex I have shown visual improvement in animal models. Given the course of LHON, it is likely that in many cases prompt administration may be necessary before widespread cell death. An alternative approach for therapy may be the use of stem cells to protect visual function; this has been evaluated by us in a rotenone-induced model of LHON. Freshly dissected embryonic retinal cells do not integrate into the ganglion cell layer (GCL), unlike similarly obtained photoreceptor precursors. However, cultured retinal progenitor cells can integrate in close proximity to the GCL, and act to preserve retinal function as assessed by manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, optokinetic responses and ganglion cell counts. Cell therapies for LHON therefore represent a promising therapeutic approach, and may be of particular utility in treating more advanced disease. PMID:24569607

  16. Exclusion of 5 functional candidate genes for distal hereditary motor neuropathy type II (distal HMN II) linked to 12q24.3.

    PubMed

    Irobi, J; Nelis, E; Meuleman, J; Venken, K; De Jonghe, P; Van Broeckhoven, C; Timmerman, V

    2001-11-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (distal HMNs) are characterised by degeneration of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord resulting in muscle weakness and atrophy. Distal HMN type II is genetically linked to chromosome 12q24.3 and located within a 13 cM region flanked by markers D12S86 and D12S340. We previously excluded the human phospholipase A2 group 1B gene (PLA2G1B) as the disease causing gene. Here, we report the mutation analysis of five other candidate genes localised within the distal HMN II region: the cytoskeletal proteins paxillin (PXN) and restin (RSN); the acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein, large P0 subunit (RPLP0); a nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NME2B); and the beta 3 subunit of the voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNB3). DNA sequencing of the coding regions was performed but no disease causing mutations could be identified, hence excluding these five genes for distal HMN type II. PMID:11851982

  17. Mitochondrial tRNA(Thr) 15891C>G mutation was not associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Han Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaochang; Yu, Jinfang; Xia, Bohou; Zhuo, Guangchao

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were the most important causes of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). To date, approximately 25 LHON-associated mtDNA mutations have been identified in various ethnic populations. Three primary mutations, the 3460G?>?A, 11778G?>?A and 14484T?>?C, in genes encoding the subunits of respiratory chain complex I, were the most common LHON-associated mtDNA mutations. Moreover, secondary mutations in mt-tRNA genes have been reported increasingly to be associated with LHON, simply due to the high mutation rates of mt-tRNAs. There is a lack of functional analysis and a poor genetic evaluation of a certain mt-tRNA mutation, which failed to meet the classic pathogenicity scoring system. As a result, how to classify a pathogenic mutation in mt-tRNA gene became important for both geneticist and clinician to diagnosis the LHON or the suspicious of LHON. In this study, we reassessed the role of a point mutation in mt-tRNA(Thr) gene which had been reported to be a mutation associated with LHON, the pathogenicity of this mutation has been discussed in this context. PMID:25186221

  18. X-inactivation patterns in female Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients do not support a strong X-linked determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Carelli, V.; Cortelli, P.

    1996-02-02

    Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) accounts for about 3% of the cases of blindness in young adult males. The underlying mitochondrial pathogenesis of LHON has been well studied, with specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations of structural genes described and well characterized. However, enigmatic aspects of the disease are not explained by mutation data, such as the higher proportion of affected males, the later onset of the disease in females, and the presence of unaffected individuals with a high proportion of mutant mtDNA. A hypothesis which has been put forward to explain the unusual disease expression is a dual model of mtDNA and X-linked nuclear gene inheritance. If a nuclear X-linked modifier gene influences the expression of the mitochondrial-linked mutant gene then the affected females should be either homozygous for the nuclear determinant, or if heterozygous, lyonization should favor the mutant X. In order to determine if an X-linked gene predisposes to LHON phenotype we studied X-inactivation patterns in 35 females with known mtDNA mutations from 10 LHON pedigrees. Our results do not support a strong X-linked determinant in LHON cause: 2 of the 10 (20%) manifesting carriers showed skewing of X-inactivation, as did 3 of the 25 (12%) nonmanifesting carriers. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangdong Bu; Rotter, J.I. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1991-09-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, the authors show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, they have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11{plus minus}0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.l08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus.

  20. Novel therapeutic strategy to prevent chemotherapy-induced persistent sensory neuropathy by TRPA1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Materazzi, Serena; Fusi, Camilla; Altomare, Alessandra; Aldini, Giancarlo; Lodovici, Maura; Patacchini, Riccardo; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Nassini, Romina

    2013-05-15

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a severe and painful adverse reaction of cancer treatment in patients that is little understood or treated. Cytotoxic drugs that cause CIPN exert their effects by increasing oxidative stress, which activates the ion channel TRPA1 expressed by nociceptors. In this study, we evaluated whether TRPA1 acted as a critical mediator of CIPN by bortezomib or oxaliplatin in a mouse model system. Bortezomib evoked a prolonged mechanical, cold, and selective chemical hypersensitivity (the latter against the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate). This CIPN hypersensitivity phenotype that was stably established by bortezomib could be transiently reverted by systemic or local treatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. A similar effect was produced by the oxidative stress scavenger ?-lipoic acid. Notably, the CIPN phenotype was abolished completely in mice that were genetically deficient in TRPA1, highlighting its essential role. Administration of bortezomib or oxaliplatin, which also elicits TRPA1-dependent hypersensitivity, produced a rapid, transient increase in plasma of carboxy-methyl-lysine, a by-product of oxidative stress. Short-term systemic treatment with either HC-030031 or ?-lipoic acid could completely prevent hypersensitivity if administered before the cytotoxic drug. Our findings highlight a key role for early activation/sensitization of TRPA1 by oxidative stress by-products in producing CIPN. Furthermore, they suggest prevention strategies for CIPN in patients through the use of early, short-term treatments with TRPA1 antagonists. PMID:23477783

  1. Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy in Golden Retriever Dogs Is Caused by a Deletion in the Mitochondrial tRNATyr Gene

    PubMed Central

    Baranowska, Izabella; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin; Nennesmo, Inger; Holmqvist, Erik; Heidrich, Nadja; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Andersson, Göran; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.; Hedhammar, Åke; Wibom, Rolf; Andersson, Leif

    2009-01-01

    Sensory ataxic neuropathy (SAN) is a recently identified neurological disorder in golden retrievers. Pedigree analysis revealed that all affected dogs belong to one maternal lineage, and a statistical analysis showed that the disorder has a mitochondrial origin. A one base pair deletion in the mitochondrial tRNATyr gene was identified at position 5304 in affected dogs after re-sequencing the complete mitochondrial genome of seven individuals. The deletion was not found among dogs representing 18 different breeds or in six wolves, ruling out this as a common polymorphism. The mutation could be traced back to a common ancestor of all affected dogs that lived in the 1970s. We used a quantitative oligonucleotide ligation assay to establish the degree of heteroplasmy in blood and tissue samples from affected dogs and controls. Affected dogs and their first to fourth degree relatives had 0–11% wild-type (wt) sequence, while more distant relatives ranged between 5% and 60% wt sequence and all unrelated golden retrievers had 100% wt sequence. Northern blot analysis showed that tRNATyr had a 10-fold lower steady-state level in affected dogs compared with controls. Four out of five affected dogs showed decreases in mitochondrial ATP production rates and respiratory chain enzyme activities together with morphological alterations in muscle tissue, resembling the changes reported in human mitochondrial pathology. Altogether, these results provide conclusive evidence that the deletion in the mitochondrial tRNATyr gene is the causative mutation for SAN. PMID:19492087

  2. A Simple Oligonucleotide Biochip Capable of Rapidly Detecting Known Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Chinese Patients with Leber’S Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei-Dong; Chen, Gang; Cao, Hui-Min; Jin, Qing-Hui; Liao, Rong-Feng; He, Xiang-Cheng; Chen, Da-Ben; Huang, Shu-Ren; Zhao, Hui; Lv, Yong-Mei; Tang, Hua-Yang; Tang, Xian-Fa; Wang, Yong-Qing; Sun, Song; Zhao, Jian-Long; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease. Clinically, no efficient assay protocols have been available. In this study, we aimed to develop an oligonucleotide biochip specialized for detection of known base substitution mutations in mitochondrial DNA causing LHON and to investigate frequencies of LHON relevant variants in Anhui region of China. Thirty-two pairs of oligonucleotide probes matched with the mutations potentially linked to LHON were covalently immobilized. Cy5-lablled targets were amplified from blood DNA samples by a multiplex PCR method. Two kinds of primary mutations 11778 G > A and 14484 T > C from six confirmed LHON patients were interrogated to validate this biochip format. Further, fourteen Chinese LHON pedigrees and twenty-five unrelated healthy individuals were investigated by the LHON biochip, direct sequencing and pyrosequencing, respectively. The biochip was found to be able efficiently to discriminate homoplasmic and heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations in LHON. Biochip analysis revealed that twelve of eighteen LHON symptomatic cases from the 14 Chinese pedigree harbored the mutations either 11778G > A, 14484T > C or 3460G > A, respectively, accounting for 66.7%. The mutation 11778G > A in these patients was homoplasmic and prevalent (55.5%, 10 of 18 cases). The mutations 3460G > A and 3394T > C were found to co-exist in one LHON case. The mutation 13708G > A appeared in one LHON pedigree. Smaller amount of sampling and reaction volume, easier target preparation, fast and high-throughput were the main advantages of the biochip over direct DNA sequencing and pyrosequencing. Our findings suggested that primary mutations of 11778G > A, 14484T > C or 3460G > A are main variants of mtDNA gene leading to LHON in China. The biochip would easily be implemented in clinical diagnosis. PMID:21694444

  3. Fifteen novel mutations in the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, 2, 3, 4, 4L, 5 and 6 genes from Iranian patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Zahra; Didari, Elmira; Arastehkani, Ahoura; Ghodsinejad, Vadieh; Aryani, Omid; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2013-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an optic nerve dysfunction resulting from mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is transmitted in a maternal pattern of inheritance. It is caused by three primary point mutations: G11778A, G3460A and T14484C; in the mitochondrial genome. These mutations are sufficient to induce the disease, accounting for the majority of LHON cases, and affect genes that encode for the different subunits of mitochondrial complexes I and III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Other mutations are secondary mutations associated with the primary mutations. The purpose of this study was to determine MT-ND variations in Iranian patients with LHON. In order to determine the prevalence and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in the LHON patients, their DNA was studied using PCR and DNA sequencing analysis. Sequencing of MT-ND genes from 35 LHON patients revealed a total of 44 nucleotide variations, in which fifteen novel variations-A14020G, A13663G, C10399T, C4932A, C3893G, C10557A, C12012A, C13934T, G4596A, T12851A, T4539A, T4941A, T13255A, T14353C and del A 4513-were observed in 27 LHON patients. However, eight patients showed no variation in the ND genes. These mutations contribute to the current database of mtDNA polymorphisms in LHON patients and may facilitate the definition of disease-related mutations in human mtDNA. This research may help to understand the disease mechanism and open up new diagnostic opportunities for LHON. PMID:24158608

  4. Amplitudes of Pain-Related Evoked Potentials Are Useful to Detect Small Fiber Involvement in Painful Mixed Fiber Neuropathies in Addition to Quantitative Sensory Testing – An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels; Kahn, Ann-Kathrin; Zeller, Daniel; Katsarava, Zaza; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of pain-related evoked potentials (PREP) elicited by electrical stimulation for the identification of small fiber involvement in patients with mixed fiber neuropathy (MFN). Eleven MFN patients with clinical signs of large fiber impairment and neuropathic pain and ten healthy controls underwent clinical and electrophysiological evaluation. Small fiber function, electrical conductivity and morphology were examined by quantitative sensory testing (QST), PREP, and skin punch biopsy. MFN was diagnosed following clinical and electrophysiological examination (chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy: n?=?6; vasculitic neuropathy: n?=?3; chronic axonal ­neuropathy: n?=?2). The majority of patients with MFN characterized their pain by descriptors that mainly represent C-fiber-mediated pain. In QST, patients displayed elevated cold, warm, mechanical, and vibration detection thresholds and cold pain thresholds indicative of MFN. PREP amplitudes in patients correlated with cold (p?

  5. Correlation between denervation activity and compound muscle action potential amplitude in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy I and II.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, G P; Panousopoulou, A; Karandreas, N; Piperos, P; Lygidakis, C; Papageorgiou, C

    1998-09-01

    Studying the electrophysiological characteristics of the various types of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is important in the understanding of its pathophysiology. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency of fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves (FP/PWs) in HMSN I and II and, since they are indices of denervation, to elucidate whether they are correlated with the amplitude of compound muscle action potentials (CMAP). We reviewed the electrophysiological findings of 47 patients who have been studied in our hospital and found to suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth polyneuropathy. FP/PW were graded according to a 4-grade scale and the 38 m/sec criterion for motor conduction velocity (MCV) was used for distinction between HMSN I and II subgroups. Seventy percent of HMSN II patients and 81% of HMSN I patients showed fibrillation potentials in the upper or lower limbs. There was no difference in the frequency of FP/PW appearance between the two groups. In the HMSN II group the FP/PW grade correlated with CMAP amplitude in the upper limbs. In both groups there was no correlation between FP/PW grade and MCV. Our findings might indicate that in HMSN I there is a considerable axonal destruction that occurs concurrently with myelin loss. PMID:9783119

  6. The background of mitochondrial DNA haplogroup J increases the sensitivity of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy cells to 2,5-hexanedione toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ghelli, Anna; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Zanna, Claudia; Vidoni, Sara; Mattioli, Stefano; Barbieri, Anna; Iommarini, Luisa; Pala, Maria; Achilli, Alessandro; Torroni, Antonio; Rugolo, Michela; Carelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited blinding disease due to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in complex I subunit genes, whose incomplete penetrance has been attributed to both genetic and environmental factors. Indeed, the mtDNA background defined as haplogroup J is known to increase the penetrance of the 11778/ND4 and 14484/ND6 mutations. Recently it was also documented that the professional exposure to n-hexane might act as an exogenous trigger for LHON. Therefore, we here investigate the effect of the n-hexane neurotoxic metabolite 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD) on cell viability and mitochondrial function of different cell models (cybrids and fibroblasts) carrying the LHON mutations on different mtDNA haplogroups. The viability of control and LHON cybrids and fibroblasts, whose mtDNAs were completely sequenced, was assessed using the MTT assay. Mitochondrial ATP synthesis rate driven by complex I substrates was determined with the luciferine/luciferase method. Incubation with 2,5-HD caused the maximal loss of viability in control and LHON cells. The toxic effect of this compound was similar in control cells irrespective of the mtDNA background. On the contrary, sensitivity to 2,5-HD induced cell death was greatly increased in LHON cells carrying the 11778/ND4 or the 14484/ND6 mutation on haplogroup J, whereas the 11778/ND4 mutation in association with haplogroups U and H significantly improved cell survival. The 11778/ND4 mutation on haplogroup U was also more resistant to inhibition of complex I dependent ATP synthesis by 2,5-HD. In conclusion, this study shows that mtDNA haplogroups modulate the response of LHON cells to 2,5-HD. In particular, haplogroup J makes cells more sensitive to its toxic effect. This is the first evidence that an mtDNA background plays a role by interacting with an environmental factor and that 2,5-HD may be a risk element for visual loss in LHON. This proof of principle has broad implications for other neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:19936068

  7. Trial end points and natural history in patients with G11778A Leber hereditary optic neuropathy : preparation for gene therapy clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lam, Byron L; Feuer, William J; Schiffman, Joyce C; Porciatti, Vittorio; Vandenbroucke, Ruth; Rosa, Potyra R; Gregori, Giovanni; Guy, John

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Establishing the natural history of G11778A Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is important to determine the optimal end points to assess the safety and efficacy of a planned gene therapy trial. OBJECTIVE To use the results of the present natural history study of patients with G11778A LHON to plan a gene therapy clinical trial that will use allotopic expression by delivering a normal nuclear-encoded ND4 gene into the nuclei of retinal ganglion cells via an adeno-associated virus vector injected into the vitreous. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective observational study initiated in 2008 was conducted in primary and referral institutional practice settings. Participants included 44 individuals with G11778A LHON, recruited between September 2008 and March 2012, who were evaluated every 6 months and returned for 1 or more follow-up visits (6-36 months) as of August 2012. EXPOSURES Complete neuro-ophthalmic examination and main measures. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Visual acuity, automated visual field testing, pattern electroretinogram, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. RESULTS Clinical measures were stable during the follow-up period, and visual acuity was as good as or better than the other visual factors used for monitoring patients. Based on a criterion of 15 or more letters from the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart, 13 eyes of 8 patients (18%) improved, but 24 months after the onset of symptoms, any further improvements were to no better than 20/100. Acuity recovery occurred in some patients despite continued marked retinal nerve fiber layer thinning indistinguishable from that in patients who did not recover visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Spontaneous improvement of visual acuity in patients with G11778A LHON is not common and is partial and limited when it occurs, so improvements in vision with adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy of a synthetic wild-type ND4 subunit gene should be possible to detect with a reasonable sample size. Visual acuity appears to be the most suitable primary end point for the planned clinical trial. PMID:24525545

  8. A pilot study of a plantar sensory evaluation system for early screening of diabetic neuropathy in a weight-bearing position.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Chikai, Manabu; Takahashi, Noriyo; Ohnishi, Tadasuke; Doi, Kohki; Nunokawa, Kiyohiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop smart equipment to quantify plantar tactile sensibility for the early diagnosis and tracking of peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes mellitus. In this paper, we offer a new testing system that is composed of a plantar tactile stimulation platform with a small moving contactor to stretch the skin tangentially, a response switch for each tactile stimulus, a motor control box, and a personal computer (PC) for psychophysical data processing. This quantitative sensory testing system has detailed measurements available and is easy to use compared with the conventional testing devices, such as von Frey monofilaments, pin-prick testing devices, and current perception threshold testers. When using our testing system in a weight-bearing position, we observed that the plantar tactile thresholds for the tangential stretching stimulus on the plantar surface of the foot ranged from approximately 10 um to 30 um for healthy subjects. However, the threshold for a subject with diabetes was nearly three times higher than that for healthy subjects. The significant difference between these values suggests that the plantar sensory evaluation system using the lateral skin stretch stimulation can be used for early diagnosis, for the accurate staging of diabetic neuropathy, and for evaluating its progression noninvasively in a clinic and at home. PMID:25570747

  9. Diabetic Neuropathy Enhances Voltage–Activated Ca2+ Channel Activity and Its Control by M4 Muscarinic Receptors in Primary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xue-Hong; Byun, Hee Sun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Painful neuropathy is one of the most serious complications of diabetes and remains difficult to treat. The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonists have a profound analgesic effect on painful diabetic neuropathy. Here we determined changes in T-type and high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (HVACCs) and their regulation by mAChRs in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy. The HVACC currents in large neurons, T-type currents in medium and large neurons, the percentage of small DRG neurons with T-type currents, and the Cav3.2 mRNA level were significantly increased in diabetic rats compared with those in control rats. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly inhibited HVACCs in a greater proportion of DRG neurons with and without T-type currents in diabetic than control rats. In contrast, oxotremorine-M had no effect on HVACCs in small and large neurons with T-type currents and in most medium neurons with T-type currents from control rats. The M2 and M4 antagonist himbacine abolished the effect of oxotremorine-M on HVACCs in both groups. The selective M4 antagonist muscarinic toxin-3 caused a greater attenuation of the effect of oxotremorine-M on HVACCs in small and medium DRG neurons in diabetic than control rats. Additionally, the mRNA and protein levels of M4, but not M2, in the DRG were significantly greater in diabetic than control rats. Our findings suggest that diabetic neuropathy potentiates the activity of T-type and HVACCs in primary sensory neurons. M4 mAChRs are upregulated in DRG neurons and probably account for increased muscarinic analgesic effects in diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:21883220

  10. The neuropathies of vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael P; Arnold, William David; Kissel, John T

    2013-05-01

    Vasculitic neuropathy can occur as an isolated entity (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) but more commonly evolves in the setting of primary systemic vasculitides or secondary vasculitides related to infections, drugs, or connective tissue disorders. Vasculitic neuropathies are usually but not always painful and tend to produce sensory motor or sensory symptoms. Patients with purely motor or small-fiber dysfunction are unlikely to have vasculitis. Deficits are typically multifocal or asymmetric, but distal symmetric polyneuropathy occurs uncommonly. Evaluation requires laboratory tests, electrodiagnostic studies, and nerve or nerve/muscle biopsy. This article reviews classification, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of peripheral nerve vasculitis. PMID:23642724

  11. Intrathecal administration of IGF-I by AAVrh10 improves sensory and motor deficits in a mouse model of diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Homs, Judit; Pagès, Gemma; Ariza, Lorena; Casas, Caty; Chillón, Miguel; Navarro, Xavier; Bosch, Assumpció

    2014-01-01

    Different adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes efficiently transduce neurons from central and peripheral nervous systems through various administration routes. Direct administration of the vectors to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) could be an efficient and safe strategy. Here, we show that lumbar puncture of a nonhuman AAV leads to wide and stable distribution of the vector along the spinal cord in adult mice. AAVrh10 efficiently and specifically infects neurons, both in dorsal root ganglia (60% total sensory neurons) and in the spinal cord (up to one-third of ?-motor neurons). As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the efficacy of AAVrh10 in a mouse model of diabetic neuropathy, in which intrathecal delivery of the vector coding for insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) favored the release of the therapeutic protein into the CSF through its expression by sensory and motor neurons. IGF-I–treated diabetic animals showed increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression, activation of Akt/PI3K pathway, and stimulated nerve regeneration and myelination in injured limbs. Moreover, we achieved restoration of nerve conduction velocities in both sensory and motor nerves by AAVrh10, whereas we reached only sensory nerve improvement with AAV1. Our results indicate that intrathecal injection of AAVrh10 is a promising tool to design gene therapy approaches for sensorimotor diseases. PMID:26015946

  12. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sames, Lori; Moore, Allison; Arnold, Renee; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN) is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL) assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN) could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF), The Neuropathy Association (TNA) and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies, we can envision treatment options for these rare diseases in the near future. PMID:24860645

  13. Auditory Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Auditory Neuropathy On this page: What is auditory neuropathy? What ... can I get additional information? What is auditory neuropathy? Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder in which ...

  14. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  15. Overlap phenotype between CMT1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies caused by the novel small in-frame deletion c.407_418del12 in PMP22 gene.

    PubMed

    Vill, Katharina; Kuhn, Marius; Gläser, Dieter; Müller-Felber, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    We report monozygotic twins, who presented with a clinical picture of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1) with bilateral foot drop, pes cavus, thoracic kyphosis, and scoliosis. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) showed up in one of them. Neurography showed demyelinating neuropathy, typical for CMT1, and transient conduction block in the ulnar nerve correlating with clinical ulnar palsy due to minor mechanical stress in only one of them. Genetic analysis revealed novel small de novo deletion c.407_418del12 in the PMP22 gene. Our patient shows the rarely reported combination of CMT1A and HNPP, caused by an in-frame deletion in the PMP22 gene. HNPP is in the majority of cases correlated with heterozygous deletion of the whole PMP22 gene or other mutations leading to functional haploinsufficiency. The cases give further evidence that pathogenesis of HNPP is not completely understood and can obviously result from existence of a defective protein, too. The intrafamiliar phenotypic variability, even in monozygotic twins, confirms the well-known fact that factors apart from genetics contribute to the clinical course. PMID:25265422

  16. Anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with acute motor sensory neuropathy resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takeo; Wakida, Kenji; Kimura, Akio; Inuzuka, Takashi; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2015-12-23

    A 69-year-old man experienced general malaise, weight loss, amnesia, gait disturbance, and restlessness a month prior to admission. Brain MRI showed high intensity areas in the bilateral medial temporal lobes and insular cortices on FLAIR images, and therefore, he was diagnosed with limbic encephalitis. After admission, quadriplegia and respiratory failure progressed rapidly, and he needed ventilatory management. A nerve conduction study revealed low compound muscle action potential amplitude with loss of sensory nerve action potential, which indicated axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We administered intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, but he did not recover. Although no tumor was found on CT, his serum was positive for anti-Hu antibody; therefore, we diagnosed him with paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. An FDG-PET study showed accumulation at lesions on two hilar lymph nodes. Small cell lung carcinoma was detected by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Although paraneoplastic acute sensorimotor neuropathy with respiratory failure resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome is rare, identification of antibodies and servey of tumors aids accurate diagnosis. PMID:26511029

  17. A New Regulatory Mechanism for Kv7.2 Protein During Neuropathy: Enhanced Transport from the Soma to Axonal Terminals of Injured Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Elsa; Roza, Carolina; Jackson, Nieka; López-García, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Kv7.2 channel expression has been reported to decrease in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following the induction of a peripheral neuropathy while other experiments show that Kv7.2 accumulates in peripheral neuromas. The mechanisms underlying these novel expression patterns are poorly understood. Here we use immunofluorescence methods to analyze Kv7.2 protein expression changes in sensory neurons following peripheral axotomy and the potential role of axonal transport. Results indicate that DRG neurons express Kv7.2 in ~16% of neurons and that this number decreases by about 65% after axotomy. Damaged neurons were identified in DRG by application of the tracer Fluoro-ruby at the site of injury during surgery. Reduction of Kv7.2 expression was particularly strong in damaged neurons although some loss was also found in putative uninjured neurons. In parallel to the decrease in the soma of axotomized sensory neurons, Kv7.2 accumulated at neuromatose fiber endings. Blockade of axonal transport with either vinblastine (VLB) or colchicine (COL) abolished Kv7.2 redistribution in neuropathic animals. Channel distribution rearrangements did not occur following induction of inflammation in the hind paw. Behavioral tests indicate that protein rearrangements within sensory afferents are essential to the development of allodynia under neuropathic conditions. These results suggest that axotomy enhances axonal transport in injured sensory neurons, leading to a decrease of somatic expression of Kv7.2 protein and a concomitant accumulation in damaged fiber endings. Localized changes in channel expression patterns under pathological conditions may create novel opportunities for Kv7.2 channel openers to act as analgesics. PMID:26696829

  18. Japanese neuropathy patients with peripheral myelin protein-22 gene aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Lebo, R.V.; Li, L.Y.; Flandermeyer, R.R.

    1994-09-01

    Peripheral myelin protein (PMP-22) gene aneuploidy results in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A) and the Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) in Japanese patients as well as Caucasian Americans. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, results when expression of one of at least seven genes is defective. CMT1A, about half of all CMT mutations, is usually associated with a duplication spanning the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene on distal chromosome band 17p11.2. Autosomal dominant HNPP (hereditary pressure and sensory neuropathy, HPSN) results from a deletion of the CMT1A gene region. Multicolor in situ hybridization with PMP-22 gene region probe characterized HNPP deletion reliably and detected all different size duplications reported previously. In summary, 72% of 28 Japanese CMT1 (HMSNI) patients tested had the CMT1A duplication, while none of the CMT2 (HMSNII) or CMT3 (HMSNIII) patients had a duplication. Three cases of HNPP were identified by deletion of the CMT1A gene region on chromosome 17p. HNPP and CMT1A have been reported to result simultaneously from the same unequal recombination event. The lower frequency of HNPP compared to CMT1A suggests that HNPP patients have a lower reproductive fitness than CMT1A patients. This result, along with a CMT1A duplication found in an Asian Indian family, demonstrates the broad geographic distribution and high frequency of PMP-22 gene aneuploidy.

  19. Are electrophysiological criteria useful in distinguishing childhood demyelinating neuropathies?

    PubMed

    Potulska-Chromik, Anna; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Aragon-Gawinska, Karolina; Kabzinska, Dagmara; Seroka, Andrzej; Lipowska, Marta; Kaminska, Anna M; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Childhood chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) needs to be differentiated from hereditary neuropathy. We aimed to validate existing CIDP nerve conduction study (NCS) criteria in a group of children with demyelinating neuropathies of chronic or subacute onset. Retrospective analysis of clinical and NCS results in 18 children with CIDP, 7 with hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsy (HNPP), and 24 with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1a (CMT1a). AAN and EFNS electrodiagnostic CIDP criteria were fulfilled in 17 of 18 CIDP, 3 of 7 HNPP, and 23 of 24 CMT1a patients. A distal compound muscle action potential (dCMAP) of >9 ms was observed in 14 of 18 CIDP patients but not in any patients with HNPP. Abnormal median/normal sural SNAP (AMNS) and a 10 m/s difference between conduction velocities (CV) of two corresponding nerves were not observed in any CMT1a patients. NCS in CMT1a, HNPP, and CIDP reflect demyelination. dCMAP duration, sensory AMNS, and a 10 m/s CV difference parameter are most useful in the differential diagnosis of pediatric CIDP. PMID:26663344

  20. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk of ...

  1. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  2. [Metabolic and nutritional neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Lagueny, A

    2000-04-01

    The two main causes of metabolic neuropathies are successively diabetes and chronic renal insufficiency. Diabetic neuropathies include both diffuse polyneuropathies and focal neuropathies. Sensori(motor) polyneuropathy is the most frequent form and different therapeutic trials have been initiated on the ground of the vascular and metabolic factors implicated in its pathogenesis. Autonomic neuropathy is the major cause of morbidity and mortality. In patients with chronic renal failure, the polyneuropathy is improved by renal transplantation. The carpal tunnel syndrome is frequent in hemodialysis patients, and surgery gives the opportunity to look for beta-2-microglobulin amyloid deposits. Among the less frequent causes of peripheral neuropathies in which metabolic factors have been considered, we review hypoglycemia, chronic respiratory insufficiency due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic liver diseases, and the polyneuropathy occurring in the critically ill patients with nutritional or metabolic failures. In chronic excessive drinkers peripheral neuropathy is classically associated with thiamine deficiency, but the direct effect of alcohol itself has been discussed. Various vitaminic deficiencies have been responsible for the development of peripheral neuropathies. The clinical forms often associate peripheral neuropathy with myelopathy, and serum vitamin E concentrations should be measured in patients with spinocerebellar disorders. Usually nutritional deficiencies need multivitamins supplementation. PMID:10853552

  3. A 1.5 Mb submicroscopic deletion in 17p11.2-p12 is frequently observed in Italian families with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, D.; Roa, B.B.; Abbas, N.E.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent mononeuropathies that was recently associated with a 1.5 Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-p12. Duplication of the same region is known to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), a more severe peripheral neuropathy characterized by symmetrically slowed nerve conduction velocity. The CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion are reciprocal recombination products involving a repeat element (CMT1A-REP) which flanks the 1.5 Mb region involved in the duplication/deletion. Patients from 9 unrelated HNPP Italian families were clinically, electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Families were typed with a polymorphic (CA){sub n} repeat and with RFLPs corresponding to loci D17S122, D17S125 and D17S61, which all map within the deleted region. Lack of allelic transmission from affected parent to affected offspring was observed in four informative families, suggesting the presence of deletion. Southern blot analysis of EcoRI digested genomic DNA from HNPP patients and control subjects was performed using a probe mapping within the CMT1A-REP elements. A reduced hybridization signal of a 6.0 kb EcoRI fragment, mapping within the distal CMT1A-REP, was observed in all HNPP patients suggesting the loss of one copy of this fragment in the HNPP-deleted chromosome. PFGE analysis of SacII digested genomic DNA from selected HNPP subjects showed the presence of a junction fragment which has previously been found in association with the 1.5 Mb HNPP deletion. Evidence for deletion could be demonstrated in all 9 families suggesting that the 17p11.2-p12 deletion is commonly associated with HNPP.

  4. Screening of the 17p11.2--p12 region in a large cohort of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease or hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Kabzinska, D; Pierscinska, J; Kochanski, A

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decade, numerous methods have been applied to detect the most common mutation in patients affected with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, i.e. submicroscopic duplication in the 17p11.2--p12 region. In 1993, another neuropathy - known as hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) - has been shown to be caused by a 17p11.2--p12 deletion. Historically, Southern blot analysis was the first approach to identify CMT1A duplication or HNPP deletion. This time- and labor-consuming method requires prior selection of DNA samples. In fact, only CMT patients affected with the demyelinating form of CMT1 have been screened for CMT1A duplication. After the 17p11.2--p12 duplication was identified in the CMT1 families, subsequent studies revealed additional axonal features in the patients harboring the 17p11.2--p12 duplication. Thus it seems reasonable to test all patients affected with CMT for the presence of the 17p11.2--p12 duplication. To evaluate the utility of real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism PCR (RFLP-PCR), we screened a large group of 179 families with the diagnosis of CMT/HNPP for the presence of the 17p11.2--p12 duplication/deletion. Due to a high frequency of CMT1A duplication in familial cases of CMT, we propose (in contrast to the previous studies) to perform Q-PCR analysis in all patients diagnosed with CMT. PMID:19638685

  5. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Burning sensation or freezing pain Sharp, jabbing or electric-like pain Extreme sensitivity to touch Difficulty sleeping ... damaged. There are three types of peripheral nerves: motor, sensory and autonomic. Some neuropathies affect all three ...

  6. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  7. The coexistence of mitochondrial ND6 T14484C and 12S rRNA A1555G mutations in a Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Yang Li; Sun Yanhong; Zhou Jian; Li Guang; Jiang, Robert; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2007-06-15

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of one three-generation Han Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss. Four of 14 matrilineal relatives exhibited the moderate central vision loss at the average age of 12.5 years. Of these, one subject exhibited both LHON and mild hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in the pedigree showed the presence of homoplasmic LHON-associated ND6 T14484C mutation, deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1555 mutation and 47 other variants belonging to Eastern Asian haplogroup H2. None of other mitochondrial variants was evolutionarily conserved and functional significance. Therefore, the coexistence of the A1555G mutation and T14484C mutations in this Chinese family indicate that the A1555G mutation may play a synergistic role in the phenotypic manifestation of LHON associated ND6 T14484C mutation. However, the incomplete penetrance of vision and hearing loss suggests the involvement of nuclear modifier genes and environmental factors in the phenotypic expression of these mtDNA mutations.

  8. Sensory neuron subpopulation-specific dysregulation of intracellular calcium in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Gold, M S

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the prediction that the unique manifestation of chemotherapeutic-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) would be reflected in a specific pattern of changes in the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in subpopulations of cutaneous neurons. To test this prediction, we characterized the pattern of changes in mechanical nociceptive threshold associated with paclitaxel administration (2mg/kg, iv, every other day for four days), as well as the impact of target of innervation and paclitaxel treatment on the regulation of [Ca(2+)]i in subpopulations of putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons. Neurons innervating the glabrous and hairy skin of the hindpaw as well as the thigh were identified with retrograde tracers, and fura-2 was used to assess changes in [Ca(2+)]i. Paclitaxel was associated with a persistent decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold in response to stimuli applied to the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but not the hairy skin of the hindpaw or the thigh. However, in both putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, resting [Ca(2+)]i was significantly lower in neurons innervating the thigh after treatment. The magnitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transient was also lower in putative non-nociceptive thigh neurons. More interestingly, while paclitaxel had no detectable influence on either resting or depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative non-nociceptive neurons, in putative nociceptive neurons there was a subpopulation-specific decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient that was largely restricted to neurons innervating the glabrous skin. These results suggest that peripheral nerve length alone, does not account for the selective distribution of CIPN symptoms. Rather, they suggest the symptoms of CIPN reflect an interaction between the toxic actions of the therapeutic and unique properties of the neurons deleteriously impacted. PMID:25982563

  9. Neuropathy in Human and Mice with PMP22 null

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario Andre; Katona, Istvan; Zhang, Xuebao; Roper, Helen P.; Carr, Louise; Macdonald, Fiona; Brueton, Louise; Blake, Julian; Suter, Ueli; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Haploinsufficiency of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). However, the biological functions of PMP22 in humans are largely unexplored due to the absence of patients with PMP22 null mutations. Design, Setting and Participants We have evaluated a 7-year-old boy with PMP22 null. Findings were compared with those from nerves of Pmp22 null mice. Results Motor and sensory deficits in the proband were non-length dependent. Weakness was found in cranial muscles, but not in the limbs. Large fiber sensory modalities were profoundly abnormal, which started prior to the maturation of myelin. This is in line with the temporal pattern of PMP22 expression predominantly in cranial motor neurons and DRG during embryonic development, becoming undetectable in adulthood. Moreover, there were conspicuous maturation defects of myelinating Schwann cells that were more significant in motor nerve fibers than in sensory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that PMP22 is important for the normal function of neurons that express PMP22 during early development, such as cranial motor neurons and spinal sensory neurons. Moreover, PMP22 deficiency differentially affects myelination between motor and sensory nerves, which may have contributed to the unique clinical phenotype in the patient with absence of PMP22. PMID:21670407

  10. Profiling the Mitochondrial Proteome of Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) in Thailand: Down-Regulation of Bioenergetics and Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control Pathways in Fibroblasts with the 11778G>A Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Aung Win; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Kaewsutthi, Supannee; Katanyoo, Wanphen; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Peerapittayamongkol, Chayanon; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Lertrit, Patcharee

    2014-01-01

    Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is one of the commonest mitochondrial diseases. It causes total blindness, and predominantly affects young males. For the disease to develop, it is necessary for an individual to carry one of the primary mtDNA mutations 11778G>A, 14484T>C or 3460G>A. However these mutations are not sufficient to cause disease, and they do not explain the characteristic features of LHON such as the higher prevalence in males, incomplete penetrance, and relatively later age of onset. In order to explore the roles of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in development of LHON, we applied a proteomic approach to samples from affected and unaffected individuals from 3 pedigrees and from 5 unrelated controls. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by MS/MS analysis in the mitochondrial lysate identified 17 proteins which were differentially expressed between LHON cases and unrelated controls, and 24 proteins which were differentially expressed between unaffected relatives and unrelated controls. The proteomic data were successfully validated by western blot analysis of 3 selected proteins. All of the proteins identified in the study were mitochondrial proteins and most of them were down regulated in 11778G>A mutant fibroblasts. These proteins included: subunits of OXPHOS enzyme complexes, proteins involved in intermediary metabolic processes, nucleoid related proteins, chaperones, cristae remodelling proteins and an anti-oxidant enzyme. The protein profiles of both the affected and unaffected 11778G>A carriers shared many features which differed from those of unrelated control group, revealing similar proteomic responses to 11778G>A mutation in both affected and unaffected individuals. Differentially expressed proteins revealed two broad groups: a cluster of bioenergetic pathway proteins and a cluster involved in protein quality control system. Defects in these systems are likely to impede the function of retinal ganglion cells, and may lead to the development of LHON in synergy with the primary mtDNA mutation. PMID:25215595

  11. Autonomic neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and pupils. Autonomic neuropathy may be seen with: Alcohol abuse Diabetes (diabetic neuropathy) Disorders involving scarring of ... dizziness when standing High blood pressure Shortness of breath with activity or exercise Bladder symptoms may include: ...

  12. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  13. Auditory Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about the potential benefits of hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other technologies for people with auditory neuropathy. ... some children and adults with auditory neuropathy. Cochlear implants (electronic devices that compensate for damaged or nonworking ...

  14. Neurotrophins and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, D R; Fernyhough, P; Diemel, L T

    1996-03-29

    The most common form of peripheral neuropathy is that associated with diabetes mellitus. In rodent models of diabetes there are expression deficits in nerve growth factor (NGF) and in its high-affinity receptor, trkA, leading to decreased retrograde axonal transport of NGF and decreased support of NGF-dependent sensory neurons, with reduced expression of their neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Treatment of diabetic rats with intensive insulin normalized these deficits and treatment with exogenous NGF caused dose-related increases, giving levels of NGF and neuropeptides which were greater than those of controls. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) mRNA was also deficient in leg muscle from diabetic rats and administration of recombinant NT-3 to diabetic rats increased the conduction velocity of sensory nerves without affecting motor conduction velocity. These findings implicate deficient neurotrophic support in diabetic neuropathy and suggest that its correction should be a paramount therapeutic target. PMID:8730785

  15. Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Pierre R; Chardon, Jodi Warman; Massie, Rami

    2015-09-20

    Peripheral nervous system axons and myelin have unique potential protein, proteolipid, and ganglioside antigenic determinants. Despite the existence of a blood-nerve barrier, both humoral and cellular immunity can be directed against peripheral axons and myelin. Molecular mimicry may be triggered at the systemic level, as was best demonstrated in the case of bacterial oligosaccharides. The classification of immune neuropathy has been expanded to take into account specific syndromes that share unique clinical, electrophysiological, prognostic and serological features. Guillain-Barré syndrome encompasses a classical syndrome of acute demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and many variants: axonal motor and sensory, axonal motor, Miller-Fisher, autonomic, and sensory. Similarly, chronic immune neuropathy is composed of classic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants characterized as multifocal (motor or sensorimotor), sensory, distal symmetric, and syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Among putative biomarkers, myelin associated glycoprotein and several anti-ganglioside autoantibodies have shown statistically significant associations with specific neuropathic syndromes. Currently, the strongest biomarker associations are those linking Miller-Fisher syndrome with anti-GQ1b, multifocal motor neuropathy with anti-GM1, and distal acquired symmetric neuropathy with anti-MAG antibodies. Many other autoantibody associations have been proposed, but presently lack sufficient specificity and sensitivity to qualify as biomarkers. This field of research has contributed to the antigenic characterization of motor and sensory functional systems, as well as helping to define immune neuropathic syndromes with widely different clinical presentation, prognosis and response to therapy. Serologic biomarkers are likely to become even more relevant with the advent of new targeted forms of immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25748038

  16. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Jiro; Kamiya, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic criteria of diabetic neuropathy that can be easily used at bedsides and have international consensus have not been established. The most important therapeutic strategy is to maintain strict glycemic control. In addition, treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor that is innovated from the viewpoint of the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy would be useful for preventing the progression of diabetic neuropathy. For painful diabetic neuropathy, pregabalin and duloxetine effectively relieve the pain, and contribute to the improvement of the quality of life. PMID:26666151

  17. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eyes worsens with a severe loss of sharpness (visual acuity) and color vision. This condition mainly affects ... death of cells in the nerve that relays visual information from the eyes to the brain (the ...

  19. Hereditary angioedema

    MedlinePLUS

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare but serious problem with the immune system. The problem is passed down through families. ... Angioedema is swelling that is similar to hives , but the swelling is under the skin instead of ...

  20. Advances in understanding drug-induced neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda C; Russell, James W

    2006-01-01

    Many commonly used medications have neurotoxic adverse effects; the most common of these is peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathy can be a dose-limiting adverse effect for many medications used in life-threatening conditions, such as malignancy and HIV-related disease. Epidemiological evidence supports previous case reports of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (or 'statins') causing an axonal sensorimotor neuropathy or a purely small-fibre neuropathy in some patients. The neuropathy improves when the medication is withdrawn. Despite the association between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors and neuropathy, the risk is low compared with the significant vascular protective benefits. Oxaliplatin, a new platinum chemotherapy agent designed to have fewer adverse effects than other such agents, has been shown to cause a transient initial dysaesthesia in addition to an axonal polyneuropathy. Thalidomide, an old therapy currently being utilised for new therapeutic indications (e.g. treatment of haematological malignancies), is associated with a painful, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy that does not improve on withdrawal of the drug. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are important components of highly active antiretroviral therapy, but are associated with a sensory neuropathy that is likely to be due to a direct effect of these drugs on mitochondrial DNA replication. New research demonstrates that lactate levels may help discriminate between neuropathy caused by nucleoside analogues and HIV-induced neuropathy. Understanding the mechanism of drug-induced neuropathy has led to advances in preventing this disabling condition. PMID:16454532

  1. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype–phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive results. PMID:25802885

  2. [Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Oya, Yasushi

    2013-11-01

    The typical clinical manifestation of vasculitic peripheral neuropathy is sensory-dominant multiple mononeuropathy, although it can progress to distal-dominant sensorimotor polyneuropathy. It is painful in most cases. Peripheral nerves may be the most prone to produce symptoms of the vasculitis. Nerve conduction studies show reduced amplitude of M wave or sensory nerve action potential, which depends on the degree of injury of a nerve examined. Wallerian degeneration can cause pseudo-conduction block in the acute stage and temporal dispersion in the chronic stage. However, a definite diagnosis requires histological confirmation. Combined biopsy of the sural nerve and the peroneus brevis muscle can be performed by a single incision. Skin biopsy can also be performed. To increase the diagnostic yield, biopsy specimens are prepared in different manners to observe as many cross sections as possible: frozen unfixed, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded, and glutaraldehyde-fixed epon embedded specimens, as well as teased fiber preparation of a nerve. Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy usually results from small-vessel vasculitis. There are still controversies regarding the classification of vasculitides. Differential diagnosis of vasculitis includes infection and lymphoma. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of neuropathy result in the impairment of ADL and QOL. Recovery from axonal degeneration usually takes time and is not always possible. Treatment includes corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and intravenous immunoglobulin administration; however, the intensity of treatment depends on the disease activity of vasculitis. PMID:24200608

  3. Hereditary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition, which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis, progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age. The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis express one of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesised that one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causes pancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site so preventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas and prolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families with these two mutations have been identified in many countries and there are also other rarer mutations, which have also been linked to hereditary pancreatitis. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the same way as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlier age. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed for many years, particularly if they present with non-specific symptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always be considered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitis with a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients with the 2 common mutations are compared, those with the R122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger age and are more likely to require surgical intervention than those with N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between 50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests may become important. PMID:12508340

  4. Hereditary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charnley, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition, which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis, progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age. The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis express one of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesised that one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causes pancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site so preventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas and prolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families with these two mutations have been identified in many countries and there are also other rarer mutations, which have also been linked to hereditary pancreatitis. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the same way as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlier age. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed for many years, particularly if they present with non-specific symptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always be considered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitis with a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients with the 2 common mutations are compared, those with the R122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger age and are more likely to require surgical intervention than those with N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40% lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between 50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests may become important. PMID:12508340

  5. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  6. Disulfiram neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C P; Ashby, P; Bilbao, J M

    1980-01-01

    Disulfiram (Antabuse) can produce neuropathy in daily doses of less than the usually recommended 500 mg. The four recent cases reported in this paper emphasize the need for greater recognition of this condition. Nerve biopsies showed axonal degeneration. The neuropathy is difficult to distinguish from that associated with ethanol abuse. Disulfiram neuropathy occurs after a variable latent period (mean 5 to 6 months) and progresses steadily. Slow improvement may occur when the drug's use is stopped; often there is complete recovery eventually. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6266628

  7. Hereditary Hyperlipoproteinemias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nora, James J.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Evidence and research indicate that the majority of cases of coronary artery disease represent familial disorders which are best explained by a polygenic hereditary predisposition interacting with emotional triggers such as diet and stress. Early identification is judged necessary. (Authors/JA)

  8. Peripheral neuropathy and statins.

    PubMed

    2007-12-01

    (1) Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs extensively used in cardiovascular prevention. Their most well-known adverse effect is muscle damage, including rhabdomyolysis. (2) Several cases of peripheral polyneuropathy attributed to a statin have been published or reported by pharmacovigilance centres. (3) They included sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy with signs of sensory impairment, and a decrease or sometimes a suppression of osteotendinous reflexes. Some patients also had a marked reduction in muscle strength in the affected limb(s). Renal failure and diabetes appear to increase the risk of this adverse effect. (4) Epidemiological studies and clinical trials have shown that this adverse effect is rare, affecting only about one patient in 10 000 treated for one year. (5) After ruling out other possible causes of peripheral neuropathy, statin withdrawal often leads to clinical improvement. PMID:18092417

  9. Which lower limb frontal plane sensory and motor functions predict gait speed and efficiency on uneven surfaces in older persons with diabetic neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Allet, L.; Kim, H.; Ashton-Miller, J.A.; Richardson, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify which frontal plane lower limb sensorimotor functions predict gait speed and efficiency (step-width-to-step-length ratio) on an uneven surface. Design Cross sectional, observational study. Setting Biomechanics research laboratory. Participants Thirty-three subjects (14; 42.4% female and 21; 63.6% with diabetic distal symmetric peripheral neuropathy), with a spectrum of lower limb sensorimotor function ranging from normal to marked diabetic neuropathy. Methods Independent variables included ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds, and normalized measures of maximum voluntary strength and maximum rate of torque development (RTD) of hip abduction/adduction and ankle inversion/eversion. Kinematic data were obtained using an optoelectronic system as subjects walked over an uneven 10m surface. Main Outcome Measures Dependent variables included gait speed and efficiency (determined by step-width-to-step-length ratio) on an uneven surface. Results Hip adduction RTD, ankle inversion RTD, and hip abduction maximal strength predicted XY% of gait speed, with the first predicting the majority (45%). Ankle inversion RTD was the only significant predictor of gait efficiency, accounting for 46% of its variability. Age predicted neither gait speed nor efficiency. Conclusions The rapid generation of strength in the frontal plane at the hip and ankle is responsible for the successful negotiation of irregular surfaces in older persons. Age demonstrated no independent influence. Training regimens in older persons should include maneuvers that develop strength rapidly in hip adductors and ankle invertors if navigation of uneven surfaces is a functional goal. PMID:22796383

  10. Diabetic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Izenberg, Aaron; Perkins, Bruce A; Bril, Vera

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common condition and diabetics are prone to develop a spectrum of neuropathic complications ranging from symmetric and diffuse to asymmetric and focal neuropathies that may be associated with significant morbidity. Diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common of these complications, occurring in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as in those with prediabetes and glucose intolerance. In this review, the authors discuss the wide variety of neuropathies that can present in the context of diabetes, including the clinical manifestations, diagnostic features, and approach to management. PMID:26502765

  11. Tyr78Phe Transthyretin Mutation with Predominant Motor Neuropathy as the Initial Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Riboldi, Giulietta; Del Bo, Roberto; Ranieri, Michela; Magri, Francesca; Sciacco, Monica; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Corti, Stefania; Comi, Giacomo P.

    2011-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis, the most frequent form of hereditary amyloidosis, is caused by dominant mutations in the TTR gene. More than 100 mutations have been identified. Clinical manifestations of TTR amyloidosis are usually induced by extracellular amyloid deposition in several organs. The major neurological manifestation is motor-sensory neuropathy associated with dysautonomic impairment. Here, we describe a 63-year-old man who came to our institution due to a suspected motor neuron disease. During a 4-year follow-up period, he underwent extensive clinical examination, electromyographic studies, sural nerve biopsy and TTR gene analysis by direct sequencing. Despite the predominant motor involvement, the detailed clinical examination also showed some mild sensory and dysautonomic signs. In addition, his clinical and family history included multiorgan disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, as well as conditions with cardiac, renal, eye, and hepatic involvement. The sural nerve biopsy disclosed amyloid deposition, and the sequence analysis of the TTR gene detected a heterozygous Tyr78Phe substitution. The TTR gene variant found in our patient had only been described once so far, in a French man of Italian origin presenting with late-onset peripheral neuropathy and bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The predominant motor involvement presented by our patient is an uncommon occurrence and demonstrates the clinical heterogeneity of TTR amyloidosis. PMID:21490715

  12. Generalized pruritus preceding paraneoplastic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hébant, Benjamin; Miret, Nicolas; Berthelot, Lucile; Jaafar, Mohamad; Maltête, David; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2016-04-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are a group of rare disorders involving non-metastatic systemic effects accompanying malignancies, and occur remotely from the tumor itself. Chronic pruritus lasting more than 6weeks can be from paraneoplastic origin. A 65-year-old woman was admitted for generalized pruritus lasting for 1month, despite treatment with prednisolone, levocetirizine and hydroxyzine. General examination was normal. Biological data and gastroscopy were normal. One month later, the patient was readmitted for worsening of her pruritus and walking impairment, revealing a severe sensory neuropathy. Blood anti-Hu antibodies returned positive at a level of 400 (normal <100). Bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsies revealed small-cell lung carcinoma. To our knowledge, the association of generalized pruritus and paraneoplastic neuropathy has been rarely reported. Our observation raises the question of a pathophysiological continuum between pruritus and neuropathy in a paraneoplastic context. PMID:26633089

  13. The Spectrum of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Jennifer A.; Dyck, P. James B.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with many different neuropathic syndromes, ranging from a mild sensory disturbance as can be seen in a diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy, to the debilitating pain and weakness of a diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy. The etiology of these syndromes has been extensively studied, and may vary among metabolic, compressive, and immunological bases for the different disorders, as well as mechanisms yet to be discovered. Many of these disorders of nerve appear to be separate conditions with different underlying mechanisms, and some are directly caused by diabetes mellitus, whereas others are associated with it but not caused by hyperglycemia. We discuss a number of the more common disorders of nerve found with diabetes mellitus. We discuss the symmetrical neuropathies, particularly generalized diabetic polyneuropathy, and then the focal or asymmetrical types of diabetes-associated neuropathy. PMID:18194747

  14. Enhanced Excitability of Primary Sensory Neurons and Altered Gene Expression of Neuronal Ion Channels in Dorsal Root Ganglion in Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy after paclitaxel treatment is not well understood. Given the poor penetration of paclitaxel into central nervous system, peripheral nervous system is most at risk. Methods Intrinsic membrane properties of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were studied by intracellular recordings. Multiple-gene real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction array was used to investigate gene expression of DRG neuronal ion channels. Results Paclitaxel increased the incidence of spontaneous activity from 4.8% to 27.1% in large and from 0% to 33.3% in medium-sized neurons. Paclitaxel decreased the rheobase (nA) from 1.6 ± 0.1 to 0.8 ± 0.1 in large, from 1.5 ± 0.2 to 0.6 ± 0.1 in medium-sized, and from 1.6 ± 0.2 to 1.0 ± 0.1 in small neurons. After paclitaxel, other characteristics of membrane properties in each group remained the same except that A? neurons showed shorter action potential fall time (ms) (1.0 ± 0.2, n = 10 vs. 1.8 ± 0.3, n = 9, paclitaxel vs. vehicle). Meanwhile, real-time polymerase chain reaction array revealed an alteration in expression of some neuronal ion channel genes including upregulation of HCN1 (fold change 1.76 ± 0.06) and Nav1.7 (1.26 ± 0.02) and downregulation of Kir channels (Kir1.1, 0.73 ± 0.05, Kir3.4, 0.66 ± 0.06) in paclitaxel-treated animals. Conclusions The increased neuronal excitability and the changes in gene expression of some neuronal ion channels in DRG may provide insight into the molecular and cellular basis of paclitaxel neuropathy, which may lead to novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24534904

  15. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    PubMed

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-05-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Sural nerve biopsy in a severe case showed giant axonal swellings due to accumulation of 10nm neurofilaments, myelin sheath attenuation and widening of nodal gaps. The development of neuropathy bore no direct relationship to the duration of exposure, hence factors such as individual susceptibility may be important. Optic neuropathy and CNS involvement were uncommon and autonomic neuropathy was not encountered. PMID:8505647

  16. Animal models of HIV peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models in the study of HIV and AIDS has advanced our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of infection. Of the multitude of HIV disease manifestations, peripheral neuropathy remains one of the most common long-term side effects. Several of the most important causes of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients include direct association with HIV infection with or without antiretroviral medication and infection with opportunistic agents. Because the pathogeneses of these diseases are difficult to study in human patients, animal models have allowed for significant advancement in the understanding of the role of viral infection and the immune system in disease genesis. This review focuses on rodent, rabbit, feline and rhesus models used to study HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, focusing specifically on sensory neuropathy and antiretroviral-associated neuropathies. PMID:25214880

  17. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy. PMID:25744683

  18. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Argov, Z; Mastaglia, F L

    1979-01-01

    Review of the various drugs in current clinical use showed that over 50 of them may cause a purely sensory or mixed sensorimotor neuropathy. These include antimicrobials, such as isoniazid, ethambutol, ethionamide, nitrofurantoin, and metronidazole; antineoplastic agents, particularly vinca alkaloids; cardiovascular drugs, such as perhexiline and hydrallazine; hypnotics and psychotropics, notable methaqualone; antirheumatics, such as gold, indomethacin, and chloroquine; anticonvulsants, particularly phenytoin; and other drugs, including disulfiram, calcium carbimide, and dapsone. Patients receiving drug treatment who complain of paraesthesie, pain, muscle cramps, or other abnormal sensations and those without symptoms who are receiving drugs that are known or suspected to be neurotoxic should undergo neurological examination and studies of motor and sensory nerve conduction. This will allow the incidence of drug-induced peripheral neuropathy to be determined more precisely. PMID:219931

  19. Mutation in NDUFA13/GRIM19 leads to early onset hypotonia, dyskinesia and sensorial deficiencies, and mitochondrial complex I instability.

    PubMed

    Angebault, Claire; Charif, Majida; Guegen, Naig; Piro-Megy, Camille; Mousson de Camaret, Benedicte; Procaccio, Vincent; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Hebrard, Maxime; Manes, Gael; Leboucq, Nicolas; Rivier, François; Hamel, Christian P; Lenaers, Guy; Roubertie, Agathe

    2015-07-15

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiencies are causing debilitating neurological diseases, among which, the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy and Leigh Syndrome are the most frequent. Here, we describe the first germinal pathogenic mutation in the NDUFA13/GRIM19 gene encoding a CI subunit, in two sisters with early onset hypotonia, dyskinesia and sensorial deficiencies, including a severe optic neuropathy. Biochemical analysis revealed a drastic decrease in CI enzymatic activity in patient muscle biopsies, and reduction of CI-driven respiration in fibroblasts, while the activities of complex II, III and IV were hardly affected. Western blots disclosed that the abundances of NDUFA13 protein, CI holoenzyme and super complexes were drastically reduced in mitochondrial fractions, a situation that was reproduced by silencing NDUFA13 in control cells. Thus, we established here a correlation between the first mutation yet identified in the NDUFA13 gene, which induces CI instability and a severe but slowly evolving clinical presentation affecting the central nervous system. PMID:25901006

  20. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  1. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multifocal Motor Neuropathy? Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder ...

  2. Recombination hot spot in 3.2-kb region of the Charcot-Marie Tooth type 1A repeat sequences: New tools for molecular diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, J.; LeGuern, E.; Gouider, R.; Tardieu, S.; Abbas, N.

    1996-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are autosomal dominant neuropathies, associated, respectively, with duplications and deletions of the same 1.5-Mb region on 17p11.2-p12. These two rearrangements are the reciprocal products of an unequal meiotic crossover between the two chromosome 17 homologues, caused by the misalignment of the CMT1A repeat sequences (CMT1A-REPs), the homologous sequences flanking the 1.5-Mb CMT1A/HNPP monomer unit. In order to map recombination breakpoints within the CMT1A-REPs, a 12.9-kb restriction map was constructed from cloned EcoRI fragments of the proximal and distal CMT1A-REPs. Only 3 of the 17 tested restriction sites were present in the proximal CMT1A-REP but absent in the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating a high degree of homology between these sequences. The rearrangements were mapped in four regions of the CMT1A-REPs by analysis of 76 CMT1A index cases and 38 HNPP patients, who were unrelated. A hot spot of crossover breakpoints located in a 3.2-kb region accounted for three-quarters of the rearrangements, detected after EcoRI/SacI digestion, by the presence of 3.2-kb and 7.8-kb junction fragments in CMT1A and HNPP patients, respectively. These junction fragments, which can be detected on classical Southern blots, permit molecular diagnosis. Other rearrangements can also be detected by gene dosage on the same Southern blots. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sun; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes. PMID:26090078

  4. Recurrent Episodes of Stroke-Like Symptoms in a Patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy X Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Said, Sarita; Sabat, Shyamsunder; Wicklund, Matthew; Stahl, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), also known as hereditary motor sensory neuropathy, is a heterogeneous group of disorders best known for causing inherited forms of peripheral neuropathy. The X-linked form, CMTX1, is caused by mutations in the gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene, expressed both by peripheral Schwann cells and central oligodendrocytes. Central manifestations are known but are rare, and there are few case reports of leukoencephalopathy with transient or persistent neurological deficits in patients with this CMT subtype. Here, we report the case of a man with multiple male and female family members affected by neuropathy who carries a pathologic mutation in GJB1. He has experienced three transient episodes with variable neurological deficits over the course of 7 years with corresponding changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This case illustrates CMT1X as a rare cause of transient neurological deficit and demonstrates the evolution of associated reversible abnormalities on MRI over time. To the best of our knowledge, this report provides the longest period of serial imaging in a single patient with this condition in the English language literature. PMID:26955336

  5. The evolutionarily conserved transcription factor PRDM12 controls sensory neuron development and pain perception.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Vanja; Cole, Tiffany; Van Campenhout, Claude; Khoung, Thang M; Leung, Calvin; Vermeiren, Simon; Novatchkova, Maria; Wenzel, Daniel; Cikes, Domagoj; Polyansky, Anton A; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Meixner, Arabella; Bellefroid, Eric J; Neely, G Gregory; Penninger, Josef M

    2015-01-01

    PR homology domain-containing member 12 (PRDM12) belongs to a family of conserved transcription factors implicated in cell fate decisions. Here we show that PRDM12 is a key regulator of sensory neuronal specification in Xenopus. Modeling of human PRDM12 mutations that cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) revealed remarkable conservation of the mutated residues in evolution. Expression of wild-type human PRDM12 in Xenopus induced the expression of sensory neuronal markers, which was reduced using various human PRDM12 mutants. In Drosophila, we identified Hamlet as the functional PRDM12 homolog that controls nociceptive behavior in sensory neurons. Furthermore, expression analysis of human patient fibroblasts with PRDM12 mutations uncovered possible downstream target genes. Knockdown of several of these target genes including thyrotropin-releasing hormone degrading enzyme (TRHDE) in Drosophila sensory neurons resulted in altered cellular morphology and impaired nociception. These data show that PRDM12 and its functional fly homolog Hamlet are evolutionary conserved master regulators of sensory neuronal specification and play a critical role in pain perception. Our data also uncover novel pathways in multiple species that regulate evolutionary conserved nociception. PMID:25891934

  6. [Painful ischemic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Lang, P M

    2015-02-01

    Chronic ischemia in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) represents a common medical problem. Neuropathic changes and pain caused by chronic ischemia are often found in the lower extremities of these patients. Pain in patients with chronic critical limb ischemia fulfill the criteria of neuropathic pain. Diagnostic tools besides medical history and examination are questionnaires, quantitative sensory testing (QST) and measuring intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) when indicated. A pharmacological approach with non-opioids and opioids as well as antidepressive and anticonvulsive drugs (according to the recommendations for the therapy of neuropathic pain) seems to be indicated for treating painful ischemic neuropathy. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) provides the best evidence for invasive procedures in treating chronic ischemic pain. PMID:25620734

  7. Dejerine-Sottas disease and hereditary demyelinating polyneuropathy of infancy.

    PubMed

    Plante-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gérard

    2002-11-01

    Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD) was originally described as a hypertrophic polyneuropathy characterized by onset in infancy or early childhood in patients born to unaffected parents. The clinical features included distal sensory changes with ataxia; pes cavus, at times with kyphoscoliosis; motor deficit and atrophy predominating in the distal lower limbs and progressing toward the proximal limbs following a length-dependent pattern; palpable nerve hypertrophy; and Argyll-Robertson pupils. The morphological hallmark was the extensive nerve and root hypertrophy associated with demyelination-remyelination of surviving, originally myelinated axons and profuse Schwann-cell proliferation forming onion bulbs. Wide variations in clinical manifestations of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies of early onset in children born to unaffected parents have now been reported, with only some of the characteristics required in the original study, and at least seven genes encoding the myelin proteins P0, PMP22, the transcriptional factor EGR2, and others have been implicated. Thus, DSD is now a component of the hereditary demyelinating polyneuropathies of infancy that also include subsets of the recently individualized CMT4 neuropathies. The presumed recessive transmission of patients with DSD should be confirmed by molecular genetic analysis, which is still negative in a significant proportion of patients. The nerve biopsy can be useful in patients in whom genealogical or DNA abnormalities in favor of a genetic disorder are missing, because in a few patients with a progressive or relapsing course the diagnosis of early-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy must be considered. PMID:12402282

  8. Rheumatoid neuropathy: a histological and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R. O.; Bruckner, F. E.; Chamberlain, M. Anne

    1970-01-01

    Peripheral nerves in five patients with rheumatoid neuropathy were examined electrophysiologically and by sural nerve biopsy. There was close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease and the degree of nerve damage found histologically and by EMG. Group 1 patients with a mild distal sensory neuropathy showed varying degrees of axonal degeneration in the large myelinated fibres and some segmental demyelination. Group 2 patients with a severe, rapidly progressive sensori-motor neuropathy had extensive loss of myelinated fibres. In one case all the large fibres had degenerated. The second case had lost both large and small myelinated fibres together with many of the non-myelinated axons. The major nerve damage in both groups appeared to be axonal degeneration but some segmental demyelination was detected. Occlusive vascular disease in the vasa nervorum was considered to be the major cause of the nerve damage. Images PMID:4320255

  9. [Painful neuropathies and small fiber involvement].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, J-P

    2014-12-01

    It is customary to consider that a purely sensory and painful neuropathy accompanied by normal electroneuromyographic examination may be or must be a small fiber neuropathy. This leads to perform specific tests, such as measuring the intra-epidermal nerve fiber density on skin biopsy or neurophysiological tests, such as evoked potentials to noxious stimuli (laser) or quantification of thermal sensory thresholds. However, these tests are only sensitive to the loss of small fibers (A-delta and C), which does not reflect the mechanisms responsible for peripheral neuropathic pain. Selective loss of small sensory fibers inherently generates a sensory deficit that does not necessarily present a painful character. Also, assigning the cause of a painful neuropathy to a small fiber neuropathy has no pathophysiological sense, although there are indirect links between these two conditions. In fact, it is not possible to explain univocally peripheral neuropathic pain, which reflects complex and diverse mechanisms, involving different types of nerve fibers. In this context, the clinical and laboratory approach must be improved to better understand the underlying mechanisms. It is imperative to interpret the data provided by laboratory tests and to correlate these data to the clinical signs and symptoms presented by the patients. Thus, one must go beyond many a priori and misinterpretations that unfortunately exist in this area at present and are not based on any solid pathophysiological basis. PMID:25459125

  10. Peripheral neuropathy and indomethacin.

    PubMed Central

    Eade, O E; Acheson, E D; Cuthbert, M F; Hawkes, C H

    1975-01-01

    A patient with seronegative inflammatory polyarthritis developed a predominantly motorperipheral neuropathy associated with the use of indomethacin. Three other cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with indomethacin treatment have been reported to the Committee on Safety of Medicines. In all cases the neuropathy regressed when indomethacinwas stopped. Peripheral neuropathy should be recognized as a rare complication of indomethacin therapy and considered in the differential diagnosis of a neuropathy accompanyingrheumatoid arthritis. PMID:165855

  11. [Phenotypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome and Differential Diagnosis Focused in Inflammatory Neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy, is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome of the peripheral nervous system with a rather homologous clinical phenotype (slowly progressive distal weakness and muscle atrophy, skeletal deformities, and areflexia in each limb). CMT1 is the autosomal-dominant demyelinating form, and CMT1A (mostly PMP22 duplication) is the most frequent subtype, followed by CMTX1, HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies), CMT1B, or CMT2. As CMT is characterized by slowly progressive motor and sensory disturbances in each limb, it could be misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) occasionally. Some points can distinguish demyelinating CMT from CIDP. CMT1 patients do not show the conduction block that is frequent in CIDP. In addition, ultrasonographic findings are useful because CMT1 suggests diffuse enlargement of peripheral nerves, whereas CIDP is characterized by asymmetrical or focal enlargement of peripheral nerves. Some CMT1 cases show favorable responses to immunomodulating therapeutics such as corticosteroids, IVIg, and plasma exchange. Such CIDP-like CMT1 (especially CMT1B or CMT2A) shows moderate to high levels of cerebrospinal fluid protein and infiltrated inflammatory macrophages. PMID:26764297

  12. Differential diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and related neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, D

    2004-06-01

    The diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related neuropathies (e. g. Déjèrine-Sottas disease; hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies) appears to be easy. However, the incredible advances in molecular genetics have greatly complicated the classification of these disorders, and the proper diagnosis of the CMT subtype may be important for correct genetic counselling and prognosis. Moreover, these diseases may be confused with potentially treatable acquired and inherited neuropathies, such as dysimmune neuropathies, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and Refsum's disease. A number of clinical, laboratory, electrophysiological, morphological and neuroradiological features that may help in the diagnostic process are reviewed in the present paper. DNA investigations are fundamental but need to be properly addressed. Currently, great interest is focused on the role of the immune system in hereditary neuropathies, and surprising findings are coming from research on animal models. PMID:15221625

  13. Hereditary Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Renal Carcinoma Request Permissions Print to PDF Hereditary Papillary Renal Carcinoma Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 12/2015 What is hereditary papillary renal carcinoma? Hereditary papillary renal carcinoma (HPRC) is a hereditary ...

  14. Quality assessment of online patient education resources for peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hansberry, David R; Suresh, Ragha; Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2013-03-01

    Given its practicality, the internet is a primary resource for patients afflicted with diseases like peripheral neuropathy. Therefore, it is important that the readily available online resources on peripheral neuropathy are tailored to the general public, particularly concerning readability. Patient education resources were downloaded from the US National Library of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Neuropathy.org, GBS/CIDP Foundation International, Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association, Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy, and Neuropathy Action Foundation websites. All patient education material related to peripheral neuropathy was evaluated for its level of readability using the Flesch Reading Ease (FRE) and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level. The FRE scores averaged 43.4 with only the US National Library of Medicine scoring above 60 (76.5). The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level scores averaged 11.0. All scores were above a seventh-grade level except the US National Library of Medicine, which had a score of a fifth-grade reading level. Most Americans may not fully benefit from patient education resources concerning peripheral neuropathy education on many of the websites. Only the US National Library of Medicine, which is written at a fifth-grade level, is likely to benefit the average American. PMID:23521643

  15. Inherited Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    With a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people, inherited peripheral nerve diseases, collectively called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), are among the most common inherited neurologic disorders. Patients with CMT typically present with chronic muscle weakness and atrophy in limbs, sensory loss in the feet and hands, and foot deformities. Clinical similarities between patients often require genetic testing to achieve a precise diagnosis. In this article, the author reviews the clinical and pathologic features of CMT, and demonstrates how electrodiagnostic and genetic tools are used to assist in the diagnosis and symptomatic management of the diseases. Several cases are presented to illustrate the diagnostic processes. PMID:23117945

  16. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hereditary peroneal nerve dysfunction; Neuropathy - peroneal (hereditary); Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy ... Nerves that stimulate movement (called the motor nerves) are most ... and most severely. Symptoms usually begin between mid-childhood ...

  17. Fetal akinesia in metatropic dysplasia: The combined phenotype of chondrodysplasia and neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Unger, Sheila; Lausch, Ekkehart; Stanzial, Franco; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Stefanova, Irina; Di Stefano, Cristina Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Nilius, Bernd; Zabel, Bernhard; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Dominant mutations in the receptor calcium channel gene TRPV4 have been associated with a family of skeletal dysplasias (metatropic dysplasia, pseudo-Morquio type 2, spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type, brachyolmia, and familial digital arthropathy) as well as with dominantly inherited neuropathies (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy 2C, scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy, and congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy). While there is phenotypic overlap between the various members of each group, the two groups were considered to be totally separate with the former being strictly a structural skeletal condition and the latter group being confined to the peripheral nervous system. We report here on fetal akinesia as the presenting feature of severe metatropic dysplasia, suggesting that certain TRPV4 mutations can cause both a skeletal and a neuropathic phenotype. Three cases were detected on prenatal ultrasound because of absent movements in the second trimester. Case 4 presented with multiple joint contractures and absent limb movements at birth and was diagnosed with "fetal akinesia syndrome". Post-interruption and post-natal X-rays showed typical features of metatropic dysplasia in all four. Sequencing of the TRPV4 gene confirmed the presence of de novo heterozygous mutations predicting G78W (Case 1), T740I (Cases 2 and 3), and K276E (Case 4). Although some degree of restriction of movements is not uncommon in fetuses with skeletal dysplasia, akinesia as leading sign is unusual and suggests that certain TRPV4 mutations produce both chondrodysplasia and a peripheral neuropathy resulting in a severe "overlap" phenotype. PMID:21964829

  18. Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Harati, Y; Butler, I J

    1985-01-01

    Two patients with congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy are reported with details of sural nerve pathology. The resemblance of this condition to the hypomyelinating neuropathy of Trembler mice is discussed and the pertinent medical literature reviewed. Images PMID:4087003

  19. Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Can Help Contact Us The Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy works to educate the public and healthcare professionals, ... of-the-art treatment for patients with peripheral neuropathy, and will be the catalyst for advancing innovative ...

  20. ALCOHOL-RELATED PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: NUTRITIONAL, TOXIC, OR BOTH?

    PubMed Central

    MELLION, MICHELLE; GILCHRIST, JAMES M.; DE LA MONTE, SUZANNE

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-related peripheral neuropathy (ALN) is a potentially debilitating complication of alcoholism that results in sensory, motor, and autonomic dysfunction. Unfortunately, ALN is rarely discussed as a specific disease entity in textbooks because it is widely assumed to primarily reflect consequences of nutritional deficiency. This hypothesis is largely based on observations first made over eight decades ago when it was demonstrated that thiamine deficiency (beriberi) neuropathy was clinically similar to ALN. In recent studies, failure of thiamine treatment to reverse ALN, together with new information demonstrating clinical and electrophysiological distinctions between ALN and nutritional deficiency neuropathies, suggests that alcohol itself may significantly predispose and enhance development of neuropathy in the appropriate clinical setting. We reviewed the evidence on both sides and conclude that ALN should be regarded as a toxic rather than nutritional neuropathy. PMID:21321947

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary angioedema

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary angioedema On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... Glossary definitions Reviewed April 2009 What is hereditary angioedema? Hereditary angioedema is a disorder characterized by recurrent ...

  2. Peripheral nerve involvement in hereditary cerebellar and multisystem degenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Berciano, José; García, Antonio; Infante, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias (HA) encompass an increasing number of degenerative disorders characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia usually accompanied by extracerebellar semeiology including peripheral nerve involvement. Classically, HA were classified according to their pathological hallmark comprising three main forms: (1) spinal form predominantly with degeneration of spinocerebellar tracts, posterior columns, and pyramidal tracts (Friedreich's ataxia, FA); (2) olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA); and (3) cortical cerebellar atrophy (CCA). In the 1980s Harding proposed a clinico-genetic classification based upon age of onset, modality of transmission, and clinical semeiology. The main categories in this classification were as follows: (1) early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA) with age of onset below 25 years and usually with autosomal recessive (AR) transmission (this group encompasses FA and syndromes different from FA); (2) autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) with adult onset and with either cerebellar-plus syndrome or pure cerebellar semeiology; and (3) idiopathic late onset onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA). With the advent of molecular genetics, the nosology of HA has been in a state of constant flux. At present EOCA comprises at least 17 genotypes (designated with the acronym of ARCA derived from AR cerebellar ataxia), whereas under the umbrella of ADCA 30 genotypes have been reported. In this chapter we will review peripheral nerve involvement in classical pathological entities (OPCA and CCA), ARCA, ADCA, and ILOCA paying special attention to the most prevalent syndromes in each category. As a general rule, nerve involvement is relatively common in any form of ataxia except ILOCA, the most common pattern being either sensory or sensorimotor neuronopathy with a dying-back process. An exception to this rule is AR spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay where nerve conduction studies show the characteristic pattern of intermediate neuropathy implying that sacsin mutation causes both axonal and Schwann cell dysfunction. PMID:23931821

  3. Drug-induced neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Manji, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Although drug-induced neuropathies account for only 2-4% of referrals, their identification is important. Numerically, chemotherapy and antiretroviral drugs are the most important worldwide. Research is currently focused on elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and the earliest presymptomatic changes using neurophysiological and pharmacogenetic techniques in order to avoid the drug or make dosage changes before irreversible damage occurs. Chemoprotectants against chemotherapy-induced neuropathy are also an active area of research. This chapter focuses on the pathophysiology of drug-induced neuropathies in general, followed by detailed reviews of neuropathy due to; newer compounds such as TNF (tumor necrosis factor) ? antagonists and antibiotics such as linezolid; chemotherapeutic agents, old and new, where significant progress has been made; antiretroviral drugs; and amiodarone, which is unusual in that it causes a demyelinating neuropathy. The controversial issue of statin-induced neuropathy is also reviewed. PMID:23931812

  4. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  5. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. It has been estimated that ten percent of pancreatic cancers are hereditary. Many of these occur as part of rare medical syndromes. These include: Familial breast cancer gene(BRCA2) ...

  6. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  7. Genetic determination of motor neuron disease and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vrebalov Cindro, Pavle; Vrebalov Cindro, Veselin

    2015-03-01

    Following the completion of the Human Genome Project, a lot of progress has been made in understanding the genetic basis of motor neuron diseases (MNDs) and neuropathies. Spinal Muscular Atrophies (SMA) are caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene localized on Chromosome 5q11. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) has been found to have at least 18 different types, many of them associated to different genetic loci (e.g. SOD1, ALS2, SETX, FUS, VAPB, ANG, TARDBP and others), but many of the forms have still not been associated with a particular gene. Sensomotoric hereditary neuropathies (Charcot-Marie-Tooth) are a large heterogeneous group of various hereditary neuropathies, which have also been associated with a wide spectrum of genetic mutations, such as PMP22, LITAF, EGR2, P0 protein, KIF1B, MFN2, RAB7 and others. It is also apparent that more genes are being implicated, mutations discovered, and phenotypes recognised and broadened. Therefore, a lot of continuing, additional research effort will be required in the coming years to illuminate pathogenic mechanisms that underlie motor neuron diseases and neuropathies and that could lead to new and improved treatments. PMID:26040103

  8. Hereditary ataxias and paraplegias in Cantabria, Spain. An epidemiological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Polo, J M; Calleja, J; Combarros, O; Berciano, J

    1991-04-01

    A clinical, genetic and epidemiological study of hereditary ataxias and paraplegias was conducted within a defined area (Cantabria) in Northern Spain from 1974 to 1986. The series comprised 48 index cases and 65 affected relatives. On prevalence day, 103 patients were alive, giving a prevalence of 20.2 cases per 100,000. There were 24 patients (18 families) with Friedreich's ataxia (FA), 12 (6 families) with early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA) differing from FA, 6 (3 families) with dominantly transmitted late onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA), 11 with 'idiopathic' LOCA, 49 (9 families) with 'pure' hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and 1 patient with congenital cerebellar ataxia. The prevalence found here is comparable with the highest figures described in previous surveys. This may in part be due to the great number of secondary cases in our series. A high frequency of parental consanguinity occurred in FA patients, 'pseudodominant' inheritance being observed in 1 family. The clinical features were those of classical FA except for later onset and slower course in 1 family, and retained tendon reflexes in the lower limbs in 2 cases. Such data indicate the need for modification of the essential criteria for the disease. EOCA included 4 patients with normoreflexic ataxia and 1 patient with ataxia and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone deficiency. In addition, there were 7 patients from 2 unrelated families with a homogeneous syndrome characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance, cerebellar ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa and sensory neuropathy. This syndrome is therefore a well defined nosological entity to be added to the list of autosomal recessive mendelian phenotypes. The clinical picture of patients with LOCA was either a 'pure' cerebellar or a 'cerebellar-plus' syndrome. Genetic subgroups of 'pure' HSP were autosomal dominant type I in 5 families and type II in 2, and autosomal recessive in 2 families. PMID:2043954

  9. Early Electrophysiological Abnormalities and Clinical Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyllienmark, Lars; Alstrand, Nils; Jonsson, Björn; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Cooray, Gerald; Wahlberg-Topp, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to elucidate whether subclinical nerve dysfunction as reflected by neurophysiological testing predicts the development of clinical neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine patients were studied twice with neurophysiological measurements at baseline and at follow-up. At baseline, patients were 15.5 ± 3.22 years (range 7–22 years) of age, and duration of diabetes was 6.8 ± 3.3 years. At follow-up, patients were 20–35 years of age, and disease duration was 20 ± 5.3 years (range 10–31 years). RESULTS At baseline, patients showed modestly reduced nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes compared with healthy subjects, but all were free of clinical neuropathy. At follow-up, clinical neuropathy was present in nine (15%) patients. These patients had a more pronounced reduction in peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV), median MCV, and sural sensory nerve action potential at baseline (P < 0.010–0.003). In simple logistic regression analyses, the predictor with the strongest association with clinical neuropathy was baseline HbA1c (R2 = 48%, odds ratio 7.9, P < 0.002) followed by peroneal MCV at baseline (R2 = 38%, odds ratio 0.6, P < 0.006). With the use of a stepwise forward analysis that included all predictors, first baseline HbA1c and then only peroneal MCV at baseline entered significantly (R2 = 61%). Neuropathy impairment assessment showed a stronger correlation with baseline HbA1c (? = 0.40, P < 0.002) than with follow-up HbA1c (? = 0.034, P < 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Early defects in nerve conduction velocity predict the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the strongest predictor was HbA1c during the first years of the disease. PMID:23723354

  10. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms. PMID:26602549

  11. Amiodarone induced optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagra, P K; Foroozan, R; Savino, P J; Castillo, I; Sergott, R C

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To determine the clinical features of amiodarone induced optic neuropathy, which may help distinguish it from non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy. Methods: Retrospective observational case series of patients diagnosed with amiodarone induced optic neuropathy at the neuro-ophthalmology service from March 1998 to February 2001. Amiodarone was discontinued after discussion with the patient's cardiologist. Visual acuity, colour vision, automated perimetry, and funduscopy were performed on initial and follow up examinations. Results: Three patients with amiodarone induced optic neuropathy presented with mildly decreased vision, visual field defects, and bilateral optic disc swelling. Upon discontinuing the medication, visual function and optic disc swelling slowly improved in all three patients. Conclusion: Amiodarone induced optic neuropathy can present with visual dysfunction, and is typically a bilateral process. Upon discontinuation of amiodarone, slow resolution of optic disc swelling occurs and visual function improves in some patients. PMID:12642303

  12. [Hereditary optic neuropathies: from clinical signs to diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Meunier, I; Lenaers, G; Hamel, C; Defoort-Dhellemmes, S

    2013-12-01

    Inherited optic atrophy must be considered when working up any optic nerve involvement and any systemic disease with signs of optic atrophy, even with a negative family history. There are two classical forms: dominant optic atrophy, characterized by insidious, bilateral, slowly progressive visual loss and temporal disc pallor, and Leber's optic atrophy, characterized by acute loss of central vision followed by the same event in the fellow eye within a few weeks to months, with disc hyperemia in the acute phase. Family history is critical for diagnosis. In the absence of family history, the clinician must rule out an identifiable acquired cause, i.e. toxic, inflammatory, perinatal injury, traumatic or tumoral, with orbital and brain imaging (MRI). Recessive optic atrophies are more rare and more severe and occur as part of multisystemic disorders, particularly Wolfram syndrome (diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, and hearing loss). Effective treatments are limited; alcohol and smoking should be avoided. A cyclosporine trial (taken immediately upon visual loss in the first eye) is in progress in Leber's optic atrophy to prevent involvement of the fellow eye. PMID:24161764

  13. [Past, present, and future in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Y

    2001-12-01

    Leber's disease is a disease of optic atrophy first reported by Theodor Leber in 1871. Since then, 130 years have passed. Recently, several new findings about the pathology, causes, and heredity of this disease have been made. In 1988 Wallace and others reported a new mutation of 11778 base pairs of mtDNA of patients with Leber's disease. Since then, the study of this disease has progressed remarkably. In this review clinical studies on Leber's disease which were carried out in our department from 1990 are summarized. 1. Genetic diagnosis and clinics Two hundred and twenty-four cases were examined, including patients at our hospital, for the 8 years between 1990 and 1998. Among them, 72 cases were diagnosed as Leber's disease. There were 3 cases (4%) of 3460 mutations, 63 cases(83%) of 11778 mutations, and 6 cases(8%) of 14484 mutations as primary mutations. The reasons for performing the genetic diagnosis were mostly the need for a definite diagnosis of Leber's disease and research on the genesis of optic nerve atrophy of unknown origin. Concerning the secondary mutations, it was confirmed that these mutations were polymorphic as seen in European and American patients. There is a problem of heteroplasmy about the mtDNA mutation. We developed a simple and exact method to evaluate heteroplasmy by using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). In a study of peripheral blood samples in one family, Leber's disease does not appear under conditions of less than 60% mtDNA mutation. As for the three kinds of mutation in Leber's disease, cases of recovery of a visual acuity of 0.3 and above were only 7% in 11778 mutations, but 38% in 3460 mutations and 50% in 14484 mutations. It is assumed that visual prognosis depends on the kind of mutation. 2. Characteristics of visual evoked potential(VEP) In pattern VEP in the acute stage, latency was not delayed very much, but the amplitude was low. On the other hand, in the acute stage of optic neuritis, the latency was very much delayed and the amplitude was diminished. Therefore, I deduced that not only demyelination of the optic nerve fibers but also papilla-macula bundle defects may play an important role. In flash VEP, only the amplitude was low, but latency was normal. 3. Image analysis of the optic nerve In high resolution T2-weighted fast spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging(MRI), the image of the optic nerve can be clearly demonstrated within a short operation time. In MRI in the acute stage of Leber's disease, the image of the optic nerve appeared almost normal. But in the course of time, patients with Leber's disease showed markedly high signals in the optic nerve on the T2-weighted fast spin-echo MRI, and in the atrophic stage the image of the optic nerve showed thinning. The results in this study support the hypothesis that a primary lesion in Leber's disease may be intraocular. 4. Possibility of therapy at the present time The effectiveness of using idebenone combined with vitamin B2, vitamin C, and isopropyl unoprostone(Rescula) for recovery of the circulation of the optic nerve head for patients in the acute stage was compared with untreated patients. In patients with visual acuity of 0.3 and more, there was no statistical difference between the two groups. The recovery interval up to 0.3 was significantly shorter in the treated group than in the untreated group. I suggest that this kind of treatment may aid spontaneous recovery. Among 15 cases of Leber's disease which occurred in the patients teens, at least one eye in 8 cases(53%) recovered to 0.3 or more. Among the 8 recovered cases, 5 cases were from the treated group. On the other hand, 6 cases were treated and 5 cases recovered visual acuity. It is said that the patients developing the disease at younger ages have a tendency toward visual recovery. Pharmacological treatment can aid recovery. 5. Visual function after the recovery of visual acuity The recovery of visual acuity in Leber's disease has the characteristics of fenestrated central scotoma. The visual acuity can be recovere

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the hand brought on by exposure to cold temperatures are often the initial symptom. The characteristic features ... reduce the activity of glycyl-tRNA synthetase. A reduction in the activity of this enzyme may impair ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... involved in activities such as cell movement (motility), stabilizing the cell's structural framework (the cytoskeleton), folding and stabilizing newly produced proteins, and repairing damaged proteins. Heat ...

  16. [Hereditary prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Wolski, Zbigniew; Drewa, Tomasz; Olszewska-S?onina, Dorota; Cussenot, Olivier

    2004-06-01

    About 10% of the prostate cancer cases were recognized as familial or hereditary. Till now gene/genes responsible for hereditary prostate cancer are not identified. Hereditary prostate cancer case concerning 3 brothers in family of 6 siblings from first marriage and a grandson from second marriage was presented. Two brothers were treated radical prostatectomy because of confined disease. The third brother with spreading disease died after androgen blockade management. We did not find any linkage between chosen markers of PCaP region (Predisposing for Prostate Cancer) and prostate cancer occurrence in this family. PMID:15510898

  17. Loss of function mutations in HARS cause a spectrum of inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Safka Brozkova, Dana; Deconinck, Tine; Griffin, Laurie Beth; Ferbert, Andreas; Haberlova, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Lassuthova, Petra; Roth, Christian; Pilunthanakul, Thanita; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Janecke, Andreas R; Zavadakova, Petra; Chrast, Roman; Rivolta, Carlo; Zuchner, Stephan; Antonellis, Anthony; Beg, Asim A; De Jonghe, Peter; Senderek, Jan; Seeman, Pavel; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by distal muscle weakness and sensory loss. Mutations in genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been implicated in peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that these tRNA charging enzymes are uniquely important for the peripheral nerve. Recently, a mutation in histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) was identified in a single patient with a late-onset, sensory-predominant peripheral neuropathy; however, the genetic evidence was lacking, making the significance of the finding unclear. Here, we present clinical, genetic, and functional data that implicate HARS mutations in inherited peripheral neuropathies. The associated phenotypic spectrum is broad and encompasses axonal and demyelinating motor and sensory neuropathies, including four young patients presenting with pure motor axonal neuropathy. Genome-wide linkage studies in combination with whole-exome and conventional sequencing revealed four distinct and previously unreported heterozygous HARS mutations segregating with autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy in four unrelated families (p.Thr132Ile, p.Pro134His, p.Asp175Glu and p.Asp364Tyr). All mutations cause a loss of function in yeast complementation assays, and p.Asp364Tyr is dominantly neurotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. This study demonstrates the role of HARS mutations in peripheral neuropathy and expands the genetic and clinical spectrum of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-related human disease. PMID:26072516

  18. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Hereditary Spastic ... Funding | News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | ...

  19. Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, N. C.

    1971-01-01

    Case studies of two siblings suffering from a gum disorder in which enlargement of the gingival mucosa is caused by a fibrosis. The disorder in the two children was felt to be an hereditary recessive trait. (CD)

  20. Hereditary Hemochromatosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... buildup can be prevented. Doctors usually diagnose iron overload with these blood tests: serum ferritin : measures the ... disease. previous continue Treatment Doctors treat the iron overload from hereditary hemochromatosis by regularly drawing blood to ...

  1. Sarcomas in hereditary retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Children diagnosed with the hereditary form of retinoblastoma (Rb), a rare eye cancer caused by a germline mutation in the RB1 tumor suppressor gene, have excellent survival, but face an increased risk of bone and soft tissue sarcomas. This predisposition to sarcomas has been attributed to genetic susceptibility due to inactivation of the RB1 gene as well as past radiotherapy for Rb. The majority of bone and soft tissue sarcomas among hereditary Rb survivors occur in the head, within the radiation field, but they also occur outside the radiation field. Sarcomas account for almost half of the second primary cancers in hereditary Rb survivors, but they are very rare following non-hereditary Rb. Sarcomas among hereditary Rb survivors arise at ages similar to the pattern of occurrence in the general population. There has been a trend over the past two decades to replace radiotherapy with chemotherapy and other focal therapies (laser or cryosurgery), and most recently, chemosurgery in order to reduce the incidence of sarcomas and other second cancers in Rb survivors. Given the excellent survival of most Rb patients treated in the past, it is important for survivors, their families and health care providers to be aware of the heightened risk for sarcomas in hereditary patients. PMID:23036192

  2. Sarcomas in hereditary retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Schonfeld, Sara J; Tucker, Margaret A

    2012-01-01

    Children diagnosed with the hereditary form of retinoblastoma (Rb), a rare eye cancer caused by a germline mutation in the RB1 tumor suppressor gene, have excellent survival, but face an increased risk of bone and soft tissue sarcomas. This predisposition to sarcomas has been attributed to genetic susceptibility due to inactivation of the RB1 gene as well as past radiotherapy for Rb. The majority of bone and soft tissue sarcomas among hereditary Rb survivors occur in the head, within the radiation field, but they also occur outside the radiation field. Sarcomas account for almost half of the second primary cancers in hereditary Rb survivors, but they are very rare following non-hereditary Rb. Sarcomas among hereditary Rb survivors arise at ages similar to the pattern of occurrence in the general population. There has been a trend over the past two decades to replace radiotherapy with chemotherapy and other focal therapies (laser or cryosurgery), and most recently, chemosurgery in order to reduce the incidence of sarcomas and other second cancers in Rb survivors. Given the excellent survival of most Rb patients treated in the past, it is important for survivors, their families and health care providers to be aware of the heightened risk for sarcomas in hereditary patients. PMID:23036192

  3. Hereditary ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonio; Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Rizzo, Sergio; Bazan, Viviana; Di Fede, Gaetana

    2009-01-01

    At least 10% of ovarian tumors are hereditary and associated with highly penetrant, autosomal, dominant genetic predisposition. Three clinical manifestations of hereditary ovarian cancer have been identified: site-specific ovarian cancer, hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndromes. BRCA germline mutations account for more than 90% of all hereditary epithelial ovarian tumors whereas most of the remaining 10% are caused by MLH1 and MSH2 mutations, which are susceptibility genes of HNPCC. Genetic testing is available for each of the three hereditary syndromes above mentioned. The recommendations for OC surveillance in high-risk women having a strong family history or BRCA mutation carriers include transvaginal pelvic ultrasound with color Doppler and serum CA125 every 6 months. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy appears to be effective to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA mutation carriers. Hysterosalpingo-oophorectomy should be considered in HNPCC women who undergo surgery for colorectal carcinoma. PMID:18656380

  4. Correlation of epidermal nerve fiber density with pain-related evoked potentials in HIV neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Mark; Katsarava, Zaza; Esser, Stefan; Sommer, Claudia; He, Lan; Selter, Laura; Yoon, Min-Suk; Kaube, Holger; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Maschke, Matthias

    2008-08-15

    HIV associated sensory neuropathy is a common neurological disorder with reported prevalence of 53%. When only small fibers are involved, the diagnosis of neuropathy remains difficult since standard nerve conduction studies generally are unremarkable. We assessed a method to identify small-fiber neuropathy using electrically evoked pain-related potentials and correlated the electrophysiological results with intraepidermal nerve fiber density in patients with HIV associated sensory neuropathy. Nineteen HIV positive patients were investigated for clinically diagnosed peripheral neuropathy with Neuropathy Symptoms Score (NSS)3 and Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS)5. Nine healthy HIV negative control subjects were recruited. We performed standard nerve conduction testing, electrically evoked pain-related potentials and skin biopsy in all participants. Pain-related evoked potentials revealed abnormalities in all HIV positive neuropathy patients, while standard nerve conduction testing was abnormal in eight patients only. Pain-related evoked potential latencies and amplitudes strongly correlated with intraepidermal nerve fiber density. The method of pain-related evoked potential conduction appears to be a sensitive, fast, non-invasive technique for the detection of small-fiber neuropathy and may prove to become a valuable diagnostic asset. PMID:18096318

  5. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Martini, R

    1997-10-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  6. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MARTINI, RUDOLF

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  7. Distally pronounced infantile spinal muscular atrophy with severe axonal and demyelinating neuropathy associated with the S230L mutation of SMN1.

    PubMed

    Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Barisi?, Nina; Eggermann, Katja; Ortiz Brüchle, Nadina; Gr?an, Petra; Zerres, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Two Croatian siblings with atypical clinical findings in the presence of SMN1 gene mutations are reported. The girl presented with delayed motor development and weakness in hands and feet in her first year of life. She never stood or walked and developed scoliosis and joint contractures during childhood. Her hands and feet were non-functional when last seen at age 14 years. Her 4-year-old brother was more severely affected and had a clinical picture resembling infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 1. He also showed unusual distally pronounced weakness and facial weakness. Both patients had no sensory deficits but gave evidence of a mixed axonal and demyelinating neuropathy with pronounced slowing in the distal nerve segments. Unexpectedly, both siblings showed a compound heterozygous SMN1 mutation (heterozygous deletion and missense mutation c.689C?>?T; p.S230L), thus confirming infantile SMA. In addition, next generation sequencing of 52 genes for hereditary neuropathies revealed a heterozygous missense mutation c.505T?>?C; p.Y169H in the SH3TC2 gene that was transmitted by the healthy father. Our observations widen the phenotypic consequences of SMN1 gene mutations and support the notion to look for additional genetic factors which may modify the clinical picture in atypical cases. PMID:26794302

  8. Alteration of foot temperature in diabetic neuropathy: is it another piece of puzzle?

    PubMed

    Naicker, A S; Roohi, S A; Lee, C S; Chan, W H; Tay, L S; Din, X J; Eow, L H

    2006-02-01

    Poor glycaemic control and the duration of diabetes mellitus are known to accelerate development and progression of neuropathy. Diabetic co-morbidities: hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, have been postulated to associate with development of neuropathy. A diabetic foot with low temperature and frequent exposure to low temperature environment has recently been hypothesized to be at higher risk to develop early neuropathy. This cross-sectional study is undertaken to identify risk factors for diabetic neuropathy and the association between foot temperature and development of diabetic neuropathy by using simple clinical examination in the outpatient setting. From April 18, to April 30, 2005, universal sampling method was used to select 134 diabetic patients (type 1 or type 2 for >1 year) with peripheral neuropathy. Excluded are those with chronic alcoholism, drug-induced neuropathy, dietary history of vitamin B deficiency and family history of porphyria and hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy. The patient's duration of diabetes, glycaemic control status and the presence of co-morbids: hypertension and hyperlipidemia, were recorded. The temperature of the foot was measured by using thermo buddy. Of 134 patients representing Malaysian ethnic distribution with an equal number of males and females, 20.1% were in the age group of 61 to 65 years and, 85.1% and 67.9% belonged to lower socioeconomic and educational groups respectively. Associations between diabetic neuropathy and glycaemic control (p = 0.018) and duration of diabetes (p < 0.05) were significant. However, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and low foot temperature were not significantly associated with development of diabetic neuropathy. Poor glycaemic control is significantly associated with diabetic neuropathy. Foot temperature alteration is merely an effect of autonomic neuropathy with a cold foot is attributed to co-existing peripheral arterial disease. PMID:17042221

  9. Diabetic neuropathy in the gut: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Azpiroz, Fernando; Malagelada, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    The activity of the digestive tract is usually regulated to match its content: physiological stimuli in the gut induce modulatory reflexes that control digestive function so that digestion is normally not perceived. However, under certain circumstances, digestive stimuli may activate sensory afferents and give rise to conscious sensations. Both reflex and sensory signals are modulated by a balance of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. Patients with diabetes may develop a neuropathy affecting the control of gastric and/or intestinal motor function and the sensory innervation as well. During fasting the stomach is contracted and relaxes to accommodate a meal. After ingestion the stomach progressively recontracts and this contraction gently produces gastric emptying. Impairment of excitatory pathways affects the contraction of the stomach, which may result in delayed gastric emptying and vomiting of retained food. Conversely, alteration of the inhibitory neural pathways results in impaired relaxation of the stomach in response to a meal; in this case increased wall tension may produce early satiation, fullness and nausea. Diabetic neuropathy may distort the control of intestinal motility, which can lead to diverse symptoms such as diarrhoea, constipation, intestinal distension and abdominal pain. Neuropathy in diabetes may also affect the sensory nerves of the gut, and depending on which pathways are involved, perception may be increased or reduced. In summary, in patients with diabetic neuropathy, disorders of gut motor function are associated with sensory abnormalities, and the combination of impaired pathways determines the clinical consequences. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Diagnosis and treatment of autonomic diabetic neuropathy in the gut' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by another mini-review on a topic from this symposium (by Hans Törnblom, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3829-9 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Péter Kempler (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3826-y ). PMID:26643877

  10. Occupational Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, Marcello; Becker, Charles E.; Aminoff, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    Neither clinical nor laboratory evaluation can distinguish occupational neuropathies from neuropathies due to other causes. A worker may suffer either from mechanical injury of individual nerves or from a toxic polyneuropathy that is usually axonal in type. A thorough occupational and environmental history and the recognition of clusters of cases are important in determining the diagnosis. Electrophysiologic studies are helpful in detecting neuropathies in patients who have been occupationally exposed to neurotoxins but have no symptoms. Prevention of occupational neuropathies depends on clinical vigilance, industrial hygiene surveys, biologic monitoring and periodic examination of workers exposed to neurotoxic chemicals. The development of more sophisticated methods of prevention and early detection of peripheral nerve involvement depend on understanding the mechanisms of action of toxins and the pathophysiology of the lesions they cause. PMID:6299013

  11. Permanent Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The health risks and side effects of fluoroquinolone use include the risk of tendon rupture and myasthenia gravis exacerbation, and on August 15, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration updated its warning to include the risk of permanent peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy in a patient treated for clinically diagnosed urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin antibiotic. PMID:26425618

  12. Diabetic neuropathy: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anu; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2014-06-01

    To conclude, diabetes is associated with a variety of chronic and acute neuropathies, the commonest form being distal symmetric polyneuropathy. Performing an annual screening through a good neurological history and clinical examination and using a sensitive screening tool can facilitate an early diagnosis. More sensitive and quantitative measures of detecting early peripheral nerve injury including skin biopsy for intra-epidermal and dermal nerve fiber density and confocal corneal microscopy, hold promise to identify neuropathy patients early in their disease course. PMID:25252500

  13. Painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda; Goutman, Stephen A; Callaghan, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease [corrected]. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined. PMID:24803311

  14. Inherited demyelinating neuropathies with micromutations of peripheral myelin protein 22 gene.

    PubMed

    Taioli, Federica; Cabrini, Ilaria; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Acler, Michele; Fabrizi, Gian Maria

    2011-02-01

    The peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22) encodes an intrinsic membrane protein of compact myelin. Duplication or deletion of PMP22 causes the most common autosomal dominant neuropathies, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A or hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is a hypertrophic de-remyelinating neuropathy manifesting with peroneal muscular atrophy and uniform, marked, slowing of nerve conduction velocities. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a recurrent focal neuropathy with sausage-like myelin thickening (tomacula) and non-uniform nerve conduction velocity changes. Missense or nonsense mutations also cause more severe Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A forms of infancy or hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, but they are presumably very rare. We performed a mutational scanning of PMP22 in 229 index patients (46 familial, 183 isolated) referred for suspected inherited neuropathy. The series included 125 cases with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (mean age 42.5 years), 47 cases with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (motor nerve conduction velocities at median nerve below 38 m/s) (mean age 40.7 years) and 57 cases with Charcot-Marie-Tooth with unknown nerve conduction velocities (mean age 43 years). Preliminary molecular studies ruled out PMP22 duplication or deletion or mutations in a comprehensive panel of Charcot-Marie-Tooth genes. Mutational scanning of PMP22 was done by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and automated nucleotide sequencing. To investigate the molecular basis of phenotype-to-genotype correlations, we performed a transcriptional analysis of PMP22 using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in two phenotypically divergent nerve biopsies. Ten patients harboured eight micromutations of PMP22 including four novel changes. In six familial and three sporadic cases, detected mutations caused premature or delayed stop codons and were associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies; the related pathological pictures ranged from classical tomaculous neuropathy to a mild demyelinating neuropathy with atypical non-tomaculous myelin thickenings. In a single family a c.179-2A> G mutation affecting the splice acceptor site of intron 2 cosegregated with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A-like syndrome and a peculiar pathological picture of demyelinating neuropathy without Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A-like classical onion bulbs or tomacula. Transcriptional analysis of a novel c.174_178 + 7delAAACGGTGAGGC deletion involving exon 2 and intron 2 demonstrated an unstable mutant transcript leading to a p.Asn59GlyfsX12 change; the mutation represented a null allele and caused a typical tomaculous hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1-like c.179-2A > G allele led to a stable transcript with an in-frame deletion of exon 3 (p.Glu60_Ala106del); the predicted shorter protein could exert variable molecular effects. In conclusion, micromutations of PMP22 cause a clinical and pathological continuum of demyelinating neuropathies that may include atypical phenotypes. PMID:21252112

  15. Hereditary elliptocytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, R. J. L.; Strauss, W. T.

    1961-01-01

    A sibship with four cases of hereditary elliptocytic anaemia is described. The condition in this family may have arisen as a mutation in the mother of the sibship; affected members were unable to taste phenylthiocarbamide while normal members were tasters. Experiments with 32P-orthophosphate in vitro did not show any evidence of biochemical upset as found in hereditary spherocytosis; thus a combination of congenital spherocytosis and elliptocytosis cannot be supported as the cause of the haemolytic state. Clinical evidence of haemolytic disease was accompanied by a tendency to excessive lysis in vitro. Infection may play a part in the precipitation of anaemic crises in this as in other hereditary haemolytic anaemias. Images PMID:13883803

  16. Targeted delivery of growth factors by HSV-mediated gene transfer for peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2013-10-01

    Dysfunction of peripheral nerves due to metabolic, toxic, infectious, or genetic causes is a common and debilitating syndrome resulting in sensory loss. Peripheral neuropathies are one of the most widespread neurological disorders, affecting nearly 20 million people in the United States alone. Pharmacologic treatment for peripheral neuropathies is one of the most challenging fields in the clinical research. Sensory neurons are widely distributed and relatively inaccessible to direct drug delivery. Targeted delivery of neurotrophic factors to the primary sensory afferent for treatment of polyneuropathy by gene transfer approach offers the possibility of a highly selective targeted release of bioactive molecules within the nervous system. Preclinical studies with non-replicating herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vectors injected into the skin to transduce neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) have demonstrated efficacy in preventing progression of sensory neuropathy without any possible systemic side effects. PMID:24369058

  17. Periaxin mutations cause a broad spectrum of demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; De Jonghe, Peter; Ceuterick, Chantal; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Voit, Thomas; Schröder, J-Michael; Williams, Anna; Brophy, Peter J; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apparent loss-of-function mutations in the periaxin gene cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or severe demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this report, we extend the associated phenotypes with the identification of two additional families with novel periaxin gene mutations (C715X and R82fsX96) and provide detailed neuropathology. Each patient had marked sensory involvement; two siblings with a homozygous C715X mutation had much worse sensory impairment than motor impairment. Despite early disease onset, these siblings with the C715X mutation had relatively slow disease progression and adult motor impairment typical of classic demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. In contrast, a patient with the homozygous R82fsX96 mutation had a disease course consistent with Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. The neuropathology of patients in both families was remarkable for demyelination, onion bulb and occasional tomacula formation with focal myelin thickening, abnormalities of the paranodal myelin loops, and focal absence of paranodal septate-like junctions between the terminal loops and axon. Our study indicates a prominent sensory neuropathy resulting from periaxin gene mutations and suggests a role for the carboxyl terminal domain of the periaxin protein. PMID:12112076

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary hyperekplexia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... definitions help with understanding hereditary hyperekplexia? autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; autosomal recessive ; brainstem ; cell ; chromosome ; congenital ; epilepsy ; familial ; gene ; glycine ; ...

  19. Cryoglobulinaemic neuropathy: a further cause of bilateral sciatic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Desireé; de la Torre, Ricardo Gómez; Carrio, Isabel; Pinto, Jesús; Morís, Germán

    2008-01-01

    Bilateral sciatic neuropathy is a rare condition and it has been described as a compression or entrapment neuropathy but it is an uncommon clinical manifestation due to necrotizing vasculitis. We report an unusual case of cryoglobulinaemic neuropathy in an elderly woman with no underlying infectious or neoplastic cause; acute bilateral sciatic mononeuropathy was the presenting clinical manifestation of the cryoglobulinaemia. PMID:18834546

  20. Early onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2A and severe developmental delay: expanding the clinical phenotype of MFN2-related neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tufano, Maria; Cappuccio, Gerarda; Terrone, Gaetano; Manganelli, Fiore; Pisciotta, Chiara; Geroldi, Alessandro; Capponi, Simona; Del Giudice, Ennio

    2015-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) syndromes are a group of clinically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Mutations of mitofusin 2 (MFN2) have been recognized to be associated with CMT type 2A (CMT2A). CMT2A is primarily an axonal disorder resulting in motor and sensory neuropathy. We report a male child with psychomotor delay, dysmorphic features, and weakness of lower limbs associated with electrophysiological features of severe, sensory-motor, axonal neuropathy. The patient was diagnosed with early onset CMT2A and severe psychomotor retardation associated with c.310C>T mutation (p.R104W) in MFN2 gene. CMT2A should be considered in patients with both axonal sensory-motor neuropathy and developmental delay. PMID:26307494

  1. Peripheral neuropathies during biologic therapies.

    PubMed

    Yagita, Masato; Hamano, Toshiaki; Hatachi, Saori; Fujita, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral neuropathies should be recognized as the adverse effects of biological agents, especially anti-TNF agents. However, no solid clinical databases for biological agent-associated peripheral neuropathies (BAPN) have been established in Japan. Here we report two cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with anti-TNF agents. One was peroneal motor neuropathy. The other case was chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. In addition, we summarize the previous reports on BAPN and discuss their prevalence rate, pathogenesis and management. PMID:24313920

  2. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  3. Hereditary coproporphyria and epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, A B; Brodie, M J; Moore, M R; Thompson, G G; Stephenson, J B

    1977-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy with mental deterioration and epilepsy suffered an acute attack of hereditary coproporphyria associated with worsening of seizure control. Leucocyte coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity was undetectable in the patient during this attack, and was reduced in his mother, a latent case. The complex relationship between porphyria, epilepsy, and anticonvulsant drugs is discussed. PMID:921312

  4. Peripheral neuropathies in Sjögren's syndrome: a critical update on clinical features and pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pavlakis, P P; Alexopoulos, H; Kosmidis, M L; Mamali, I; Moutsopoulos, H M; Tzioufas, A G; Dalakas, M C

    2012-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease that, apart from exocrine glands, may affect every organ or system. Involvement of different sections of the peripheral nervous system results in a wide spectrum of neuropathic manifestations. Based on distinct clinical, electrophysiological and histological criteria, the types of neuropathies seen in Sjögren's syndrome include: a) pure sensory which presents with distal symmetric sensory loss due to axonal degeneration of sensory fibers; sensory ataxia due to loss of proprioceptive large fibers (ganglionopathy); or with painful dysethesias (small fiber sensory neuropathy) due to degeneration of cutaneous axons. The latter appears to be the most common neuropathy in Sjögren's syndrome and requires skin biopsy for diagnosis to document loss or reduction of nerve fiber density; b) sensorimotor polyneuropathy affecting sensory and motor axons, often associated with severe systemic or pro-lymhomatous manifestations, such as palpable purpura and cryoglobulinemia, and c) rare types that include autoimmune demyelinating neuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex and autonomic neuropathy. In this review, the frequency, prevalence and diagnostic criteria for each neuropathy subset are discussed and possible pathogenetic mechanisms are outlined. PMID:22318209

  5. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3{alpha}, but not nesprin-3{beta}. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype.

  6. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Young, Kevin G; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3alpha, but not nesprin-3beta. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype. PMID:18638474

  7. Ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Athappilly, Geetha; Pelak, Victoria S; Mandava, Naresh; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2008-10-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most frequent cause of vision loss in middle age. Clinical and laboratory research studies have begun to clarify the natural history, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria and pathogenesis of various ischemic nerve injuries. As a result, physicians are acquiring new tools to aid in the diagnosis and potential treatment of ischemic nerve injury. The aim of this review is to examine recent data on anterior and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy and to provide a framework for physicians to manage and counsel affected individuals. PMID:18826805

  8. Gut sensations in diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Andersen, Søren Due; Ejskaer, Niels; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2007-10-01

    The pathogenesis of gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus is complex and multi-factorial. Diabetes induced peripheral and central changes in the neuronal pain matrix may be of importance and were explored using a new multi-modal and multi-segmental sensory testing approach. The sensitivity to mechanical, thermal and electrical stimulations in the oesophagus and duodenum was assessed in 12 type-1 diabetic patients with proven autonomic neuropathy and severe gastrointestinal symptoms using a comprehensive stimulation device aiming to activate different gut nerves and pain mechanisms. Twelve healthy subjects served as controls. The sensory response and the somatic referred pain areas were recorded. In the diabetic patients an overall hyposensitivity to the combination of all stimulations was found in the oesophagus and duodenum (P=0.02). Post hoc analysis revealed hyposensitivity to mechanical stimulations in the oesophagus (P=0.006) and duodenum (P=0.002), and to thermal (P<0.001) and electrical (P=0.005) stimulations in the oesophagus and duodenum combined. The hyposensitivity in the gut was accompanied by a 46% increase in the somatic referred pain areas (P=0.04) indicating central neuronal changes. The multi-modal and multi-segmental sensory testing approach indicates that the sensory nerves are widely affected in the GI tract and generalized to nerves in all layers of the gut. Changes in the neuronal pain matrix including interactions between peripheral and central pain mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal symptoms in long-standing diabetes. Future targets in the treatment of gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy could be based on modulation of the central nervous system excitability. PMID:17521809

  9. Clinicopathological and genetic study of early-onset demyelinating neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Parman, Yesim; Battaloglu, Esra; Baris, Ibrahim; Bilir, Birdal; Poyraz, Mürüvvet; Bissar-Tadmouri, Nisrine; Williams, Anna; Ammar, Nadia; Nelis, Eva; Timmerman, Vincent; De Jonghe, Peter; Najafov, Ayaz; Necefov, Ayaz; Deymeer, Feza; Serdaroglu, Piraye; Brophy, Peter J; Said, G

    2004-11-01

    Autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4), Dejerine-Sottas disease and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy are variants of hereditary demyelinating neuropathy of infancy, a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. To explore the spectrum of early-onset demyelinating neuropathies further, we studied the clinicopathological and genetic aspects of 20 patients born to unaffected parents. In 19 families out of 20, consanguinity between the parents or presence of an affected sib suggested autosomal recessive transmission. Screening of various genes known to be involved in CMT4 revealed six mutations of which five are novel. Four of these novel mutations occurred in the homozygous state and include: one in GDAP1, one in MTMR2, one in PRX and one in KIAA1985. One patient was heterozygous for a novel MTMR2 mutation and still another was homozygous for the founder mutation, R148X, in NDRG1. All patients tested negative for mutations in EGR2. Histopathological examination of nerve biopsy specimens showed a severe, chronic demyelinating neuropathy, with onion bulb formation, extensive demyelination of isolated fibres and axon loss. We did not discern a specific pattern of histopathology that could be correlated to mutations in a particular gene. PMID:15469949

  10. Restless Leg Syndrome in Different Types of Demyelinating Neuropathies: A Single-Center Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Methods: Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Results: Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). Conclusions: our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy. Citation: Luigetti M; Del Grande A; Testani E; Bisogni G; Losurdo A; Giannantoni NM; Mazza S; Sabatelli M; Della Marca G. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):945-949. PMID:23997707

  11. Molecular genetics and biology of inherited peripheral neuropathies: a fast-moving field.

    PubMed

    Nelis, E; Timmerman, V; De Jonghe, P; Van Broeckhoven, C; Rautenstrauss, B

    1999-09-01

    The recent progress of molecular genetics has considerably increased our knowledge about the underlying disease mechanism of inherited peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in three genes coding for the myelin proteins peripheral myelin protein 22, myelin protein zero and connexin 32 and in one gene coding for the transcription factor early growth response 2 element are associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 and 2, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome and congenital hypomyelination. This review focuses on the correlation of the different human phenotypes associated with distinct mutations with those found in cellular and animal models. PMID:10541586

  12. CaV3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels in Peripheral Sensory Neurons Are Important for Mibefradil-Induced Reversal of Hyperalgesia and Allodynia in Rats with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Obradovic, Aleksandar Lj.; Hwang, Sung Mi; Scarpa, Joseph; Hong, Sung Jun; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that streptozotocin (STZ) injections in rats lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) accompanied by enhancement of CaV3.2 T-type calcium currents (T-currents) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here we used the classical peripherally acting T-channel blocker mibefradil to examine the role of CaV3.2 T-channels as pharmacological targets for treatment of painful PDN. When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), at clinically relevant doses, mibefradil effectively alleviated heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivities in STZ-treated diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that CaV3.2 antisense (AS)-treated diabetic rats exhibit a significant decrease in painful PDN compared with mismatch antisense (MIS)-treated diabetic rats. Co-treatment with mibefradil (9 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reversal of heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivity in MIS-treated but not in AS-treated diabetic rats, suggesting that mibefradil and CaV3.2 AS share the same cellular target. Using patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated DRG neurons, we demonstrated that mibefradil similarly blocked T-currents in diabetic and healthy rats in a voltage-dependent manner by stabilizing inactive states of T-channels. We conclude that antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mibefradil in PDN are at least partly mediated by inhibition of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nociceptors. Hence, peripherally acting voltage-dependent T-channel blockers could be very useful in the treatment of painful symptoms of PDN. PMID:24705276

  13. Post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy. A study of 63 cases

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha, David; Bagán, José V.; Peñarrocha, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Trigeminal neuropathy is most often secondary to trauma. The present study explores the underlying causes and the factors that influence recovery. Material and methods. A retrospective case study was made involving 63 patients with trigeminal neuropathy of traumatologic origin, subjected to follow-up for at least 12 months. Results. Fifty-four percent of all cases were diagnosed after mandibular third molar surgery. In 37 and 19 patients the sensory defect was located in the territory innervated by the mental and lingual nerve, respectively. Pain was reported in 57% of the cases, and particularly among the older patients. Regarding patient disability, quality of life was not affected in three cases, while mild alterations were recorded in 25 subjects and severe alterations in 8. Partial or complete recovery was observed in 25 cases after 6 months, and in 32 after one year. There were few recoveries after this period of time. Recovery proved faster in the youngest patients, who moreover were the individuals with the least pain. Conclusion. Our patients with trigeminal neuropathy recovered particularly in the first 6 months and up to one year after injury. The older patients more often suffered pain associated to the sensory defect. On the other hand, their discomfort was more intense, and the patients with most pain and the poorest clinical scores also showed a comparatively poorer course. Key words:Post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy. PMID:22143689

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Andermann syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for muscle movement and sensation (motor and sensory neuropathy). Absence (agenesis) or malformation of the tissue connecting ... treatment providers. Gene Review: Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Genetic Testing ...

  15. Rare cause of paraparesis: bilateral obturator neuropathy after hysterosalpingectomy.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, Roberto; Mejía-Jiménez, Inmaculada; de Fuenmayor-Fernández de la Hoz, Carlos Pablo; Ruiz-Morales, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral obturator nerve injury during pelvic surgery is an infrequent cause of lower limb paraparesis. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with a large uterine leiomyoma who underwent simple total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy. At 24?h after the surgery, the patient noticed loss of muscle strength when adducting both legs. She had no problem with other movements and no sensory or sphincter abnormalities. Neurological examination confirmed that there was loss of strength only in the adductor muscles, with preserved sensory function and reflexes, suggesting bilateral obturator nerve involvement. Pelvic MRI showed a small postsurgical haematoma in the Douglas recess, but far from the obturator nerves. 2?weeks later, electromyography showed positive sharp waves and low motor unit recruitment in the adductor magnus muscles, confirming acute, bilateral obturator nerve neuropathy. The few cases of bilateral obturator neuropathy that have been reported were mostly related to abdominopelvic interventions. PMID:26689250

  16. Impact of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer: a prospective evaluation at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Dault, R; Rousseau, M P; Beaudoin, A; Frenette, M A; Lemay, F; Beauchesne, M F

    2016-02-01

    Oxaliplatin plays a major role in the treatment of colorectal cancer (crc), but is associated with the development of neuropathies. The main objective of the present prospective study was to estimate the proportion of participants with grade 1, 2, 3, or 4 peripheral sensory neuropathies according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4) among crc patients treated with oxaliplatin (adjuvant or metastatic, folfox or xelox regimens) at the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke. Among the 57 patients so treated between May 2012 and April 2013, about 60% reported grade 2 neuropathy, at maximum, during treatment. About 25% of patients had to stop treatment because of neuropathies. In a subset of patients contacted approximately 22 months after treatment cessation, neuropathies persisted in 70%. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy affects a significant number of crc patients and can influence the course of treatment and outcomes. PMID:26966415

  17. Impact of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in patients with colorectal cancer: a prospective evaluation at a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Dault, R.; Rousseau, M.P.; Beaudoin, A.; Frenette, M.A.; Lemay, F.; Beauchesne, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin plays a major role in the treatment of colorectal cancer (crc), but is associated with the development of neuropathies. The main objective of the present prospective study was to estimate the proportion of participants with grade 1, 2, 3, or 4 peripheral sensory neuropathies according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4) among crc patients treated with oxaliplatin (adjuvant or metastatic, folfox or xelox regimens) at the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke. Among the 57 patients so treated between May 2012 and April 2013, about 60% reported grade 2 neuropathy, at maximum, during treatment. About 25% of patients had to stop treatment because of neuropathies. In a subset of patients contacted approximately 22 months after treatment cessation, neuropathies persisted in 70%. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy affects a significant number of crc patients and can influence the course of treatment and outcomes. PMID:26966415

  18. Prevention of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by lithium pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Michelle; Erdelyi, Ildiko; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Benbow, Jennifer H.; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating side effect that occurs in many patients undergoing chemotherapy. It is often irreversible and frequently leads to early termination of treatment. In this study, we have identified two compounds, lithium and ibudilast, that when administered as a single prophylactic injection prior to paclitaxel treatment, prevent the development of CIPN in mice at the sensory-motor and cellular level. The prevention of neuropathy was not observed in paclitaxel-treated mice that were only prophylactically treated with a vehicle injection. The coadministration of lithium with paclitaxel also allows for administration of higher doses of paclitaxel (survival increases by 60%), protects against paclitaxel-induced cardiac abnormalities, and, notably, does not interfere with the antitumor effects of paclitaxel. Moreover, we have determined a mechanism by which CIPN develops and have discovered that lithium and ibudilast inhibit development of peripheral neuropathy by disrupting the interaction between paclitaxel, neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS-1), and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) to prevent treatment-induced decreases in intracellular calcium signaling. This study shows that lithium and ibudilast are candidate therapeutics for the prevention of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy and could enable patients to tolerate more aggressive treatment regimens.—Mo, M., Erdelyi, I., Szigeti-Buck, K., Benbow, J. H., Ehrlich, B. E. Prevention of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by lithium pretreatment. PMID:22889832

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to prediabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Obrosov, Alexander A; Stavniichuk, Roman; Obrosova, Irina G

    2013-09-01

    Growing evidence suggests that prediabetes and metabolic syndrome are associated with increased risk for the development of microvascular complications including retinopathy, nephropathy, and, most commonly, peripheral painful neuropathy and/or autonomic neuropathy. The etiology of these disabling neuropathies is unclear, and several clinical and experimental studies implicated obesity, impaired fasting glycemia/impaired glucose tolerance, elevated triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acids, as well as oxidative-nitrative stress. Endoplasmic reticulum stress resulting from abnormal folding of newly synthesized proteins and leading to the impairment of metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and gene expression, is emerging as a key mechanism of metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes. We evaluated the role for this phenomenon in prediabetic neuropathy using two animal models i.e., Zucker (fa/fa) rats and high-fat diet fed mice which displayed obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in the absence of overt hyperglycemia. Endoplasmic reticulum stress manifest in upregulation of the glucose-regulated proteins BiP/GRP78 and GRP94 of unfolded protein response was identified in the sciatic nerve of Zucker rats. A chemical chaperone, trimethylamine oxide, blunted endoplasmic reticulum stress and alleviated sensory nerve conduction velocity deficit, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, and tactile allodynia. A selective inhibitor of eukaryotic initiation factor-2? dephosphorylation, salubrinal, improved glucose intolerance and alleviated peripheral nerve dysfunction in high-fat diet fed mice. Our findings suggest an important role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the neurobiology of prediabetic peripheral neuropathy, and identify a new therapeutic target. PMID:23142188

  20. Dysfunction of nodes of Ranvier: a mechanism for anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Susuki, Keiichiro; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Schafer, Dorothy P.; Hirata, Koichi; Zhang, Gang; Funakoshi, Kei; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2011-01-01

    Autoantibodies against gangliosides GM1 or GD1a are associated with acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) and acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), whereas antibodies to GD1b ganglioside are detected in acute sensory ataxic neuropathy (ASAN). These neuropathies have been proposed to be closely related and comprise a continuous spectrum, although the underlying mechanisms, especially for sensory nerve involvement, are still unclear. Antibodies to GM1 and GD1a have been proposed to disrupt the nodes of Ranvier in motor nerves via complement pathway. We hypothesized that the disruption of nodes of Ranvier is a common mechanism whereby various anti-ganglioside antibodies found in these neuropathies lead to nervous system dysfunction. Here, we show that the IgG monoclonal anti-GD1a/GT1b antibody injected into rat sciatic nerves caused deposition of IgG and complement products on the nodal axolemma and disrupted clusters of nodal and paranodal molecules predominantly in motor nerves, and induced early reversible motor nerve conduction block. Injection of IgG monoclonal anti-GD1b antibody induced nodal disruption predominantly in sensory nerves. In an ASAN rabbit model associated with IgG anti-GD1b antibodies, complement-mediated nodal disruption was observed predominantly in sensory nerves. In an AMAN rabbit model associated with IgG anti-GM1 antibodies, complement attack of nodes was found primarily in motor nerves, but occasionally in sensory nerves as well. Periaxonal macrophages and axonal degeneration were observed in dorsal roots from ASAN rabbits and AMAN rabbits. Thus, nodal disruption may be a common mechanism in immune-mediated neuropathies associated with autoantibodies to gangliosides GM1, GD1a, or GD1b, providing an explanation for the continuous spectrum of AMAN, AMSAN, and ASAN. PMID:22178332

  1. Familial amyloidosis with cranial neuropathy and corneal lattice dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, G; Galassi, G; Kamieniecka, Z; Schlaeger, J; Trojaborg, W

    1979-01-01

    Five siblings of a Danish family with slowly progressive involvement of the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves beginning at the age of 55-65 years were examined. All had asymptomatic corneal lattice dystrophy. Clinical and electrophysiological investigations also showed evidence of slight neurogenic involvement of the limbs. Conduction velocity along sensory nerves was normal but amplitude of sensory potentials was severely reduced suggesting an axonal affection which was confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The neuropathy was secondary to amyloidosis revealed by skin and sural nerve biopsies. Images PMID:228009

  2. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images. PMID:26186748

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... deficiency? Hereditary antithrombin deficiency is a disorder of blood clotting. People with this condition are at higher than ... hereditary antithrombin deficiency and other inherited disorders of blood clotting can also influence risk. Women with hereditary antithrombin ...

  4. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  5. Charcot-marie-tooth disease and related neuropathies: molecular basis for distinction and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, D

    1999-11-01

    Great advances have been made in understanding the molecular basis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related neuropathies, namely Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) and congenital hypomyelination (CH). The number of newly uncovered mutations and identified genetic loci is rapidly increasing, and, as a consequence, the classification of these disorders is becoming more complicated. Molecular genetics, animal models, and transfected cell studies are shedding light on function and dysfunction of proteins involved in hereditary myelinopathies-peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), myelin protein zero (PO), connexin 32 (Cx32), and early growth response 2 (EGR2). Gene dosage effect, loss of function, gain of toxic function, and dominant negative effect are possible mechanisms whereby different gene mutations may exert their detrimental action on peripheral nerves. A tentative rational approach to clinical and molecular diagnosis based on genotype-phenotype correlation analysis is described. PMID:10514227

  6. Motor and functional evaluation of patients with spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy (SPOAN).

    PubMed

    Graciani, Zodja; Santos, Silvana; Macedo-Souza, Lucia Inês; Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira de Mello; Veras, Maria Isabel; Amorim, Simone; Zatz, Mayana; Kok, Fernando

    2010-02-01

    Spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy (SPOAN) is an autosomal recessive complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia, which is clinically defined by congenital optic atrophy, infancy-onset progressive spastic paraplegia and peripheral neuropathy. In this study, which included 61 individuals (age 5-72 years, 42 females) affected by SPOAN, a comprehensive motor and functional evaluation was performed, using modified Barthel index, modified Ashworth scale, hand grip strength measured with a hydraulic dynamometer and two hereditary spastic paraplegia scales. Modified Barthel index, which evaluate several functional aspects, was more sensitive to disclose disease progression than the spastic paraplegia scales. Spasticity showed a bimodal distribution, with both grades 1 (minimum) and 4 (maximum). Hand grip strength showed a moderate inverse correlation with age. Combination of early onset spastic paraplegia and progressive polyneuropathy make SPOAN disability overwhelming. PMID:20339643

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Small fiber neuropathy On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed November 2012 What is small fiber neuropathy? Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Ataxia neuropathy spectrum On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... Glossary definitions Reviewed June 2011 What is ataxia neuropathy spectrum? Ataxia neuropathy spectrum is part of a ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Giant axonal neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Giant axonal neuropathy On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed October 2007 What is giant axonal neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy is an inherited condition involving ...

  10. Pediatric hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    MacGinnitie, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a lifelong illness characterized by recurrent swelling of the skin, intestinal tract, and, ominously, the upper airway. It is caused by inadequate activity of the protein C1-inhibitor, with dysfunction in the kallikrein/bradykinin pathway underlying the clinical symptoms. In addition to the physical symptoms, patients experience significant decrements in vocational and school achievement as well as in overall quality of life. Symptoms often begin in childhood and occur by age 20 in most patients, but life-threatening attacks are uncommon in the pediatric population. The availability of new therapies has transformed the management of HAE. PMID:24313851

  11. Multiple Hereditary Exostoses.

    PubMed

    DuBose, Cheryl O

    2016-01-01

    Multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE), also known as multiple osteochondromas, is an autosomal dominant disease that results in the development of osteochondromas throughout the body. The disease typically is diagnosed during childhood and requires lifelong monitoring and treatment of painful osteochondromas. Individuals with MHE must be monitored for complications that can arise and the potential malignant transformation of an osteochondroma into a chondrosarcoma. This article discusses the basic characteristics of MHE, genetic links, the role of medical imaging in diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:26721841

  12. [Hereditary angioedema and hormones].

    PubMed

    Gompel, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disease, which shows a preponderance of female sufferers. There are various types of HAE, with or without C1 inhibitor deficiency but estrogens may worsen the course of the disease in all the types. It is thus mandatory to know this sensitivity to estrogens in order to improve the management of women with HAE during their child-bearing ages. Contraceptive progestin can help to reduce the frequency and severity of the attacks. Pregnancies can be associated with worsening or improvement. Some other situations where endogenous or exogenous estrogens concentration can increase are possibly associated with an aggravation of the attacks (ART, tamoxifène). PMID:25511652

  13. Management of painful neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Brix Finnerup, Nanna; Hein Sindrup, Søren; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is the most common type of pain in neuropathy. In painful polyneuropathies the pain usually has a "glove and stocking" distribution. The pain may be predominantly spontaneous, e.g., with a burning, pricking, or shooting character or characterized by evoked pain such as mechanical or cold allodynia. In the clinical setting, the prevention of painful neuropathies and treatment of underlying neuropathy remains inadequate and thus symptomatic treatment of the pain and related disability needs to be offered. Most randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) published in painful neuropathy have been conducted in patients with diabetes and to what extent a treatment which is found effective in painful diabetic polyneuropathy can be expected to relieve other conditions like chemotherapy- or HIV-induced neuropathy is unknown. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), gabapentin, pregabalin, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are first drug choices. In patients with localized neuropathic pain, a topical lidocaine patch may also be considered. Second-line treatments are tramadol and other opioids. New types of treatment include botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), high-dose capsaicin patches, and cannabinoids. Other types of anticonvulsant drugs such as lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and lacosamide have a more questionable efficacy in painful polyneuropathy but may have an effect in a subgroup of patients. Combination therapy may be considered in patients with insufficient effect from one drug. Treatment is usually a trial-and-error process and has to be individualized to the single patient, taking into account all comorbidities such as possible concomitant depression, anxiety, diseases, and drug interactions. Side-effects to antidepressants include dry mouth, nausea, constipation, orthostatic hypotension, and sedation. ECG should always be obtained prior to treatment with TCAs, which also should not be used in patients with cardiac incompensation and epilepsy. The most common side-effects of gabapentin and pregabalin are CNS-related side-effects with dizziness and somnolence. Peripheral edema, weight gain, nausea, vertigo, asthenia, dry mouth, and ataxia may also occur. Topical treatments are better tolerated due to lack of systemic side-effects but there is still limited evidence for the long-term efficacy of these drugs. With available drugs, the average pain reduction is about 20-30%, and only 20-35% of the patients will achieve at least 50% pain reduction, which stresses the need of a multidisciplinary approach to pain treatment. PMID:23931787

  14. Sjögren Syndrome-Associated Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sène, Damien; Cacoub, Patrice; Authier, François-Jérôme; Haroche, Julien; Créange, Alain; Saadoun, David; Amoura, Zahir; Guillausseau, Pierre-Jean; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We conducted the current study to analyze the clinical, immunologic, and neurophysiologic features of primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS)-associated sensory small fiber neuropathies (SFNs). Forty consecutive pSS patients with SFN were included. SFN was defined by the presence of suggestive sensory painful symptoms with normal nerve conduction studies and abnormal neurophysiologic tests for small nerve fibers or a low intraepidermal nerve fiber density at skin biopsy. Included patients were compared to 100 pSS patients without peripheral neuropathy. SFN patients were mainly female (92.5%). Age at pSS diagnosis was 55.3 ± 13.1 years, and at SFN diagnosis, 58.9 ± 11.8 years, with a median time to SFN diagnosis after symptom onset of 3.4 years. Clinical symptoms included burning pains (90%), numbness (87.5%), tingling (82.5%), pins and needles (72.5%), electric discharges (70%), and allodynia (55%). Dysautonomia included vasomotor symptoms (66%) and hyperhidrosis (47%). Abnormal neurophysiologic tests included laser evoked potentials (97.5%), thermal quantitative sensory testing (67.5%), and sympathetic skin reflex (40%). A skin biopsy revealed low intraepidermal nerve fiber density in 76% of the 17 tested patients. Compared to the 100 pSS patients without peripheral neuropathy, the 40 pSS-SFN patients were older at pSS diagnosis (55.3 ± 13.1 vs. 49.5 ± 14.9 yr; p = 0.03), and more often had xerostomia (97.5% vs. 81%; p = 0.01) and arthralgia (82.5% vs. 65.0%; p = 0.04). Immunologically, they were characterized by a lower prevalence of serum B-cell activation markers, that is, antinuclear antibodies (65% vs. 85%; p = 0.01), anti-SSA (42.5% vs. 71%; p = 0.002), and anti-SSB (17.5% vs. 39%; p = 0.017); rheumatoid factor (32.5% vs. 66%; p = 0.0005); and hypergammaglobulinemia (35% vs. 62%; p = 0.005). In conclusion, we report the main features of SFN in patients with pSS, the first such study to our knowledge. Our results show that patients with pSS-associated SFN are characterized by an older age at pSS diagnosis and a distinctive immunologic profile hallmarked by a lower frequency of serum B-cell activation markers. PMID:23982054

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Giant axonal neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... giant axonal neuropathy? autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; axons ; cell ; central nervous system ; distended ; gene ; incidence ; inherited ; injury ; nervous system ; neuropathy ; peripheral ; peripheral nervous system ; proteasome ; protein ; recessive ; ubiquitin You ...

  16. Optic neuropathy caused by Propionibacterium acnes pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Ore-Ofe O; Stagg, Brian C; Digre, Kathleen B; Katz, Bradley J; Quigley, Edward P; Palmer, Cheryl A; Warner, Judith E A

    2014-09-01

    We describe a patient with vision loss from an optic neuropathy caused by Propionibacterium acnes pachymeningitis. The patient's optic neuropathy was stabilized with appropriate antibiotic therapy. PMID:24614085

  17. Increasing cutaneous afferent feedback improves proprioceptive accuracy at the knee in patients with sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Goulding, Niamh; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Fuente Mora, Cristina; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (HSAN III) features disturbed proprioception and a marked ataxic gait. We recently showed that joint angle matching error at the knee is positively correlated with the degree of ataxia. Using intraneural microelectrodes, we also documented that these patients lack functional muscle spindle afferents but have preserved large-diameter cutaneous afferents, suggesting that patients with better proprioception may be relying more on proprioceptive cues provided by tactile afferents. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing cutaneous sensory feedback by stretching the skin at the knee joint using unidirectional elasticity tape could improve proprioceptive accuracy in patients with a congenital absence of functional muscle spindles. Passive joint angle matching at the knee was used to assess proprioceptive accuracy in 25 patients with HSAN III and 9 age-matched control subjects, with and without taping. Angles of the reference and indicator knees were recorded with digital inclinometers and the absolute error, gradient, and correlation coefficient between the two sides calculated. Patients with HSAN III performed poorly on the joint angle matching test [mean matching error 8.0 ± 0.8° (±SE); controls 3.0 ± 0.3°]. Following application of tape bilaterally to the knee in an X-shaped pattern, proprioceptive performance improved significantly in the patients (mean error 5.4 ± 0.7°) but not in the controls (3.0 ± 0.2°). Across patients, but not controls, significant increases in gradient and correlation coefficient were also apparent following taping. We conclude that taping improves proprioception at the knee in HSAN III, presumably via enhanced sensory feedback from the skin. PMID:26655817

  18. Auditory neuropathy - neural and synaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Moser, Tobias; Starr, Arnold

    2016-03-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment is the most common form of hearing loss, and encompasses pathologies of the cochlea and the auditory nerve. Hearing impairment caused by abnormal neural encoding of sound stimuli despite preservation of sensory transduction and amplification by outer hair cells is known as 'auditory neuropathy'. This term was originally coined for a specific type of hearing impairment affecting speech comprehension beyond changes in audibility: patients with this condition report that they "can hear but cannot understand". This type of hearing impairment can be caused by damage to the sensory inner hair cells (IHCs), IHC ribbon synapses or spiral ganglion neurons. Human genetic and physiological studies, as well as research on animal models, have recently shown that disrupted IHC ribbon synapse function - resulting from genetic alterations that affect presynaptic glutamate loading of synaptic vesicles, Ca(2+) influx, or synaptic vesicle exocytosis - leads to hearing impairment termed 'auditory synaptopathy'. Moreover, animal studies have demonstrated that sound overexposure causes excitotoxic loss of IHC ribbon synapses. This mechanism probably contributes to hearing disorders caused by noise exposure or age-related hearing loss. This Review provides an update on recently elucidated sensory, synaptic and neural mechanisms of hearing impairment, their corresponding clinical findings, and discusses current rehabilitation strategies as well as future therapies. PMID:26891769

  19. An ENU-induced mutation in mouse glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) causes peripheral sensory and motor phenotypes creating a model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Francesca; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Williams, Hazel P.; Banks, Gareth T.; AlQatari, Mona; Chia, Ruth; Tucci, Valter; Groves, Michael; Nickols, Carole D.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Kendall, Rachel; Cader, Muhammed Z.; Talbot, Kevin; van Minnen, Jan; Burgess, Robert W.; Brandner, Sebastian; Martin, Joanne E.; Koltzenburg, Martin; Greensmith, Linda; Nolan, Patrick M.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system in humans, described clinically as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V. Here, we characterise a new mouse mutant, GarsC201R, with a point mutation that leads to a non-conservative substitution within GARS. Heterozygous mice with a C3H genetic background have loss of grip strength, decreased motor flexibility and disruption of fine motor control; this relatively mild phenotype is more severe on a C57BL/6 background. Homozygous mutants have a highly deleterious set of features, including movement difficulties and death before weaning. Heterozygous animals have a reduction in axon diameter in peripheral nerves, slowing of nerve conduction and an alteration in the recovery cycle of myelinated axons, as well as innervation defects. An assessment of GARS levels showed increased protein in 15-day-old mice compared with controls; however, this increase was not observed in 3-month-old animals, indicating that GARS function may be more crucial in younger animals. We found that enzyme activity was not reduced detectably in heterozygotes at any age, but was diminished greatly in homozygous mice compared with controls; thus, homozygous animals may suffer from a partial loss of function. The GarsC201R mutation described here is a contribution to our understanding of the mechanism by which mutations in tRNA synthetases, which are fundamentally important, ubiquitously expressed enzymes, cause axonopathy in specific sets of neurons. PMID:19470612

  20. Peripheral neuropathy and solitary plasmacytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Read, D; Warlow, C

    1978-01-01

    Three patients with peripheral neuropathy and a solitary plasmacytoma are presented, and the literature is reviewed. It is suggested that middle-aged men with an obscure progressive sensorimotor neuropathy, a raised CSF protein, and otherwise negative investigations should have a full skeletal survey since irradiation of a plasmacytoma may lead to a considerable improvement in the associated neurological disability. Images PMID:204745

  1. Neuropathy in a petrol sniffer.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, D M; Ramsey, J; Schwartz, M S; Dookun, D

    1986-01-01

    A 4 year old boy developed a profound motor neuropathy after repeated deliberate inhalation of petroleum vapour. The condition was characterised by extreme slowing of the nerve conduction velocity. He made a gradual recovery over six months. The neuropathy was attributed to the N-hexane component of petroleum. PMID:3021070

  2. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved, but such intervention may be considered in the severe and progressive cases or ones associated with severe neuropathic pain.

  3. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies.

  4. Inflammatory autoimmune neuropathy, presumably induced by bortezomib, in a patient suffering from multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Stefan; Goldschmidt, H; Storch-Hagenlocher, B; Pham, M; Fingerle-Rowson, G; Ho, A D; Neben, K

    2011-06-01

    Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor demonstrating substantial activity in multiple myeloma. One of its key toxicities is peripheral neuropathy, which is reversible in most patients. The possibility that bortezomib might in rare cases induce severe neuropathies by auto-inflammatory mechanisms remains controversial. We report here the case of a 65-year-old female myeloma patient who was initially treated with bortezomib, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone (PAD). At the end of the second cycle of PAD, the patient presented with a rapid and severe onset of paresis of the left arm, accompanied by progressive sensory neuropathy and increasing neuropathic pain. After an extensive neurological work-up, including electrophysiological and laboratory evaluations as well as magnet resonance tomography imaging, we diagnosed an inflammatory autoimmune neuropathy, presumably induced by bortezomib, with accentuation of the left arm nerve plexus. We subsequently initiated regular treatment with polyvalent immunoglobulins, which gradually improved the neurological symptoms. In conclusion, the identification of an inflammatory autoimmune neuropathy, presumably associated with bortezomib, is a rare but important complication. An extensive neurological examination should be performed in patients who develop severe or unusual sensory or motor deficits under therapy with bortezomib, so as to differentiate autoimmune from toxic neuropathies, as therapeutic strategies differ for each. PMID:21553020

  5. Multiple cranial neuropathy (a teaching case).

    PubMed

    Toro, Jaime; Millán, Carlos; Díaz, Camilo; Reyes, Saúl

    2013-10-01

    There are few reports of the multiple cranial neuropathy variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS). Patients usually present with facial diplegia, lower cranial nerve involvement and hypo or areflexia. It is crucial to identify promptly this unusual cranial variant but the clinical characteristics remain poorly defined. This GBS variant usually has a rapid progressive course with respiratory muscle paralysis. Most of the patients recover well, although the process is slow. We report a 54 year old man presenting with facial diplegia, progressive ophthalmoplegia, lower cranial nerve involvement, sensory ataxia and generalized areflexia. This GBS variant is very unusual and seldom described in the literature; it is oftenly misdiagnosed. The clinical features and nerve conduction studies (absent F-waves, motor conduction block) provide evidence to support a diagnosis of an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy consistent with a regional cranial variant of GBS. PMID:25877853

  6. Isoniazid induced motor-dominant neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Rabeeya; Sabzwari, Saniya

    2015-10-01

    Isoniazid though a very effective treatment for tuberculosis can cause severe motor-dominant neuropathy which can be reversible with pyridoxine supplementation. A 45-year-old female diagnosed with psoas abscess, culture positive for mycobacterium tuberculosis, was started on anti- tuberculous treatment with four drugs, including isoniazid at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day. Three months later she developed severe motor weakness of lower limbs with loss of ankle and knee reflexes. She was treated with vitamin B6 injections and isoniazid treatment was continued. Her motor weakness gradually improved in a few months, but mild sensory impairment persisted even after two years. There is need for vigilance regarding neurological effects of isoniazid in seemingly low-risk individuals in whom development of symptoms should raise the suspicion about slow acetylator status. Timely therapeutic intervention with high-dose vitamin B6 can reduce the long-term morbidity associated with this easily reversible condition. PMID:26440850

  7. [Surgical therapy for entrapment neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Shigekuni

    2012-01-01

    Entrapment neuropathy is not uncommon, and surgical treatment is followed by favorite result. Therefore, to obtain an accurate diagnosis based on precise knowledge of the peripheral nervous system is very important. The most popular and useful symptoms and signs of the entrapment neuropathy is paresthesia, dysesthesia and Tinel's like sign at the lesion site. Nerve conduction study is also valuable for the accurate diagnosis. For the last 30 years, the author operated on 1,399 lesions of entrapment neuropathy. They consist of 877 carpal tunnel syndrome (63%), 284 tarsal tunnel syndrome (20%), 135 ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (10%), 53 piriformis syndrome (4%), 15 thoracic outlet syndrome (1%), and others. From the pathophysiological point to view, except for the carpal tunnel syndrome, several locations and factors come into play producing the entrapment of the nerve. The author would like to stress that the entrapment neuropathy is not severe disease, though, it strongly insult the patient's quality of life. PMID:23196438

  8. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Guanti, G; Bukvi?, N

    2000-01-01

    Tumors of large bowel continue to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality with about 300,000 new cases and 200,000 deaths per year in Europe and USA despite recent technological advancements. In sharp contrast with these discouraging data, the basic knowledge of colorectal neoplasms has grown remarkably in the last decades especially with the genetic elucidation of the two inherited cancer-predisposition syndromes, familial polyposis (FAP) and hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Recognition of the genetic component of CRC is growing; gene mutations responsible for cell transformation can be present as inherited germline defect or arise in somatic cells as consequence of environmental insults. The two main hereditary syndromes, FAP and HNPCC, account for about 6-10% of CRCs, remaining cases are attributed to so called sporadic cancer. Although the timescale of the appearance and risk of recurrence of the hereditary and sporadic forms are quite different, they share a common pathway: the adenoma to carcinoma sequence. In 1990 Fearon and Vogelstein proposed a multistep model for the molecular events underlying colorectal tumorigenesis. The model was based on two assumptions: the first one is that the tumors are clonal, the second assumption is that the colorectal tumorigenesis occurs as succession of a series of events that can be described as dyplasia-carcinoma sequence or adenoma-carcinoma sequence. The initial alterations which are not detectable on histologic examination, are subtle changes in the normal balance between cell growth and cell death. With progression precursors to adenoma, the foci of aberrant cripts become detectable. Few adenomas progress to carcinoma, however if the progression of these lesions remain unchecked, there is an increased risk of tumor diffusion. As the cells need time to accumulate the genetic defects including mutational activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes to undergo full malignant transformation, CRC occurs mainly in the elderly. If one of these defects are present at birth as germline mutations, fewer mutational events will be requested to reach malignant transformation and the disease will appear earlier(). PMID:11432238

  9. Effect of High-Fat Diet on Peripheral Neuropathy in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingling; Tang, Dou; Guan, Meiping; Xie, Cuihua; Xue, Yaoming

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Dyslipidemia may contribute to the development of peripheral neuropathy, even in prediabetics; however, few studies have evaluated vascular dysfunction and oxidative stress in patients with peripheral neuropathy. Methods. Using high-fat diet- (HFD-) induced prediabetic C57BL/6 mice, we assessed motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity (NCV) using a BIOPAC System and thermal algesia with a Plantar Test (Hargreaves' method) Analgesia Meter. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density and mean dendrite length were tested following standard protocols. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LOX) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot, respectively. Results. HFD-fed mice showed deficits in motor and sensory NCV, thermal hyperalgesia, reduced mean dendrite length, and VEGF-A expression in the plantar skin and increased 12/15-LOX in the sciatic nerve (P < 0.05 compared with controls). Conclusion. HFD may cause large myelinated nerve and small sensory nerve fiber damage, thus leading to neuropathy. The mean dendrite length may be a more sensitive marker for early detection of peripheral neuropathy. Reduced blood supply to the nerves and increased oxidative stress may contribute to the development and severity of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25404943

  10. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Nagesh; Bhatia, Sumit; Singh, Harneet; Shetty, Anurag; Shetty, Shiran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder, which affects various internal organs and has a tendency for bleeding. It has a classic triad of mucocutaneous telangiectasias, recurrent hemorrhages and positive familial history of first-degree relative. Epistaxis or gastrointestinal telangiectasia can be fatal in a small number of cases. Case Report: A 44-year-old woman came with complaints of recurrent episodes of hematemesis and epistaxis. Patient had a family history of similar complaints. Patient underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), which revealed telangiectasia in the stomach. Imaging of the abdomen showed features suggestive of arteriovenous shunting. Conclusion: HHT can remain undiagnosed for a long time, and is rarely being reported in the literature with management needing a multidisciplinary approach with early inputs from a gastroenterologist. PMID:25839006

  11. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-03-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma. PMID:24892564

  12. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for genetic testing are discussed. PMID:23503650

  13. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Jonas; Bödeker, Hans; Mössner, Joachim; Teich, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP) is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2), the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary) as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer. PMID:17204147

  14. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  15. Metabolic neuropathies and myopathies.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism may impact on muscle and peripheral nerve. Abnormalities involve mitochondria and other subcellular organelles such as peroxisomes and lysosomes related to the turnover and recycling of cellular compartments. Treatable causes are β-oxidation defects producing progressive neuropathy; pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, porphyria, or vitamin B12 deficiency causing recurrent episodes of neuropathy or acute motor deficit mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. On the other hand, lysosomal (mucopolysaccharidosis, Gaucher and Fabry diseases), mitochondriopathic (mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or mDNA depletion), peroxisomal (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, sterol carrier protein-2 deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, α-methylacyl racemase deficiency) diseases are multisystemic disorders involving also the heart, liver, brain, retina, and kidney. Pathophysiology of most metabolic myopathies is related to the impairment of energy production or to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Main symptoms are exercise intolerance with myalgias, cramps and recurrent myoglobinuria or limb weakness associated with elevation of serum creatine kinase. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, followed by acid maltase deficiency, and lipin deficiency, are the most common cause of isolated rhabdomyolysis. Metabolic myopathies are frequently associated to extra-neuromuscular disorders particularly involving the heart, liver, brain, retina, skin, and kidney. PMID:23622366

  16. Sensory development.

    PubMed

    Clark-Gambelunghe, Melinda B; Clark, David A

    2015-04-01

    Sensory development is complex, with both morphologic and neural components. Development of the senses begins in early fetal life, initially with structures and then in-utero stimulation initiates perception. After birth, environmental stimulants accelerate each sensory organ to nearly complete maturity several months after birth. Vision and hearing are the best studied senses and the most crucial for learning. This article focuses on the cranial senses of vision, hearing, smell, and taste. Sensory function, embryogenesis, external and genetic effects, and common malformations that may affect development are discussed, and the corresponding sensory organs are examined and evaluated. PMID:25836703

  17. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: clinico-pathologic features and emerging molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fink, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a syndrome designation describing inherited disorders in which lower extremity weakness and spasticity are the predominant symptoms. There are more than 50 genetic types of HSP. HSP affects individuals diverse ethnic groups with prevalence estimates ranging from 1.2 to 9.6 per 100,000 [39, 70, 77, 154, 185]. Symptoms may begin at any age. Gait impairment that begins after childhood usually worsens very slowly over many years. Gait impairment that begins in infancy and early childhood may not worsen significantly. Post mortem studies consistently identify degeneration of corticospinal tract axons (maximal in the thoracic spinal cord) and degeneration of fasciculus gracilis fibers (maximal in the cervico-medullary region). HSP syndromes thus appear to involve motor-sensory axon degeneration affecting predominantly (but not exclusively) the distal ends of long central nervous system (CNS) axons. In general, proteins encoded by HSP genes have diverse functions including axon transport (e.g. SPG30/KIF1A, SPG10/KIF5A and possibly SPG4/Spastin); endoplasmic reticulum morphology (e.g. SPG3A/Atlastin, SPG4/Spastin, SPG12/reticulon 2, and SPG31/REEP1, all of which interact); mitochondrial function (e.g. SPG13/chaperonin 60/heat shock protein 60, SPG7/paraplegin; and mitochondrial ATP6; 4) myelin formation (e.g. SPG2/Proteolipid protein and SPG42/Connexin 47); 5) protein folding and ER-stress response (SPG6/NIPA1, SPG8/K1AA0196 (Strumpellin), SGP17/BSCL2 (Seipin) [113-115], “mutilating sensory neuropathy with spastic paraplegia” due to CcT5 mutation and presumably SPG18/ERLIN2); 6) corticospinal tract and other neurodevelopment (e.g. SPG1/L1 cell adhesion molecule and SPG22/thyroid transporter MCT8); 7) fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism (e.g. SPG28/DDHD1, SPG35/FA2H, SPG39/NTE, SPG54/DDHD2, and SPG56/CYP2U1); and 8) endosome membrane trafficking and vesicle formation (e.g. SPG47/AP4B1, SPG48/KIAA0415, SPG50/AP4M1, SPG51/AP4E, SPG52/AP4S1, and VSPG53/VPS37A). The availability of animal models (including bovine, murine, zebrafish, Drosophila, and C. elegans) for many types of HSP permits exploration of disease mechanisms and potential treatments. This review highlights emerging concepts of this large group of clinically similar disorders. For recent review of HSP including historical descriptions, differential diagnosis, and additional references see [78]. PMID:23897027

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary spherocytosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eyes and skin (jaundice), and an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly). Most newborns with hereditary spherocytosis have severe anemia, ... it improves after the first year of life. Splenomegaly can occur anytime from early childhood to adulthood. ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary angioedema

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 000 people. Type I is the most common, accounting for 85 percent of cases. Type II occurs ... Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of hereditary angioedema? These resources address the diagnosis ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary hemochromatosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... genes impair the control of iron absorption during digestion and alter the distribution of iron to other ... autosomal dominant ; autosomal recessive ; cell ; cirrhosis ; congenital ; diabetes ; digestion ; excretion ; familial ; gene ; giant cell ; hepatitis ; hereditary ; inheritance ; ...

  1. Deletion of KCC3 in parvalbumin neurons leads to locomotor deficit in a conditional mouse model of peripheral neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jinlong; Delpire, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC or ACCPN) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by the disruption of the SLC12A6 gene, which encodes the K-Cl cotransporter-3 (KCC3). A ubiquitous deletion of KCC3 in mice leads to severe locomotor deficits similar to ACCPN patients. However, the underlying pathological mechanism leading to the disease remains unclear. Even though a recent study suggests that the neuropathic features of ACCPN are mostly due to neuronal loss of KCC3, the specific cell type responsible for the disease is still unknown. Here we established 4 tissue specific KCC3 knockout mouse lines to explore the cell population origin of ACCPN. Our results showed that the loss of KCC3 in parvalbumin-positive neurons led to significant locomotor deficit, suggesting a crucial role of these neurons in the development of the locomotor deficit. Interestingly, mice in which KCC3 deletion was driven by the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) did not develop any phenotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nociceptive neurons targeted with Nav1.8-driven CRE and Schwann cells targeted with a desert hedgehog-driven CRE were not involved in the development of ACCPN. Together, these results establish that the parvalbumin-positive neuronal population is an important player in the pathogenic development of ACCPN. PMID:25116249

  2. Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singman, Eric L; Daphalapurkar, Nitin; White, Helen; Nguyen, Thao D; Panghat, Lijo; Chang, Jessica; McCulley, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (ITON) refers to optic nerve injury resulting from impact remote to the optic nerve. The mechanism of injury is not understood, and there are no confirmed protocols for prevention, mitigation or treatment. Most data concerning this condition comes from case series of civilian patients suffering blunt injury, such as from sports- or motor vehicle-related concussion, rather than military-related ballistic or blast damage. Research in this field will likely require the development of robust databases to identify patients with ITON and follow related outcomes, in addition to both in-vivo animal and virtual human models to study the mechanisms of damage and potential therapies. PMID:26759722

  3. Radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, L.B.; Kim, J.Y.; Ceballos, R.

    1985-08-01

    Following surgery for pituitary adenoma, radiation therapy is an accepted treatment in reducing tumor recurrence. However, a potential therapeutic complication is delayed radionecrosis of perisellar neural structures, including the optic nerves and chiasm. This particular cause of visual loss, radiation optic neuropathy (RON), has not been emphasized in the ophthalmologic literature. Four cases of RON seen in the past five years are reported. Diagnostic criteria include: (1) acute visual loss (monocular or binocular), (2) visual field defects indicating optic nerve or chiasmal dysfunction, (3) absence of optic disc edema, (4) onset usually within three years of therapy (peak: 1-1 1/2 years), and (5) no computed tomographic evidence of visual pathway compression. Pathologic findings, differential diagnosis and therapy will be discussed in outlining the clinical profile of RON.

  4. Hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M; Rellos, P; Cox, T M

    1998-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI, OMIM 22960), caused by catalytic deficiency of aldolase B (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, EC 4.1.2.13), is a recessively inherited condition in which affected homozygotes develop hypoglycaemic and severe abdominal symptoms after taking foods containing fructose and cognate sugars. Continued ingestion of noxious sugars leads to hepatic and renal injury and growth retardation; parenteral administration of fructose or sorbitol may be fatal. Direct detection of a few mutations in the human aldolase B gene on chromosome 9q facilitates the genetic diagnosis of HFI in many symptomatic patients. The severity of the disease phenotype appears to be independent of the nature of the aldolase B gene mutations so far identified. It appears that hitherto there has been little, if any, selection against mutant aldolase B alleles in the population: in the UK, approximately 1.3% of neonates harbour one copy of the prevalent A149P disease allele. The ascendance of sugar as a major dietary nutrient, especially in western societies, may account for the increasing recognition of HFI as a nutritional disease and has shown the prevalence of mutant aldolase B genes in the general population. The severity of clinical expression correlates well with the immediate nutritional environment, age, culture, and eating habits of affected subjects. Here we review the biochemical, genetic, and molecular basis of human aldolase B deficiency in HFI, a disorder which responds to dietary therapy and in which the principal manifestations of disease are thus preventable. Images PMID:9610797

  5. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Cancer.gov

    The pain and discomfort caused by peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common reasons that cancer patients stop their treatment early. Researchers are working to improve new screening, treatment, and prevention options for patients.

  6. Anticonvulsant peripheral neuropathy: a clinical and electrophysiological study of patients on single drug treatment with phenytoin, carbamazepine or barbiturates.

    PubMed Central

    Shorvon, S D; Reynolds, E H

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies of phenytoin neuropathy in selected groups of chronic epileptic patients on polytherapy have indicated a widely varying incidence of clinical or electrophysiological abnormalities. In 51 previously untreated epileptic patients followed prospectively on phenytoin or carbamazepine monotherapy, assisted by blood level monitoring, for 1-5 years we found no clinical evidence of neuropathy. Eighteen per cent of the phenytoin group and none of the carbamazepine group had mild electrophysiological changes (abnormalities of sensory action potentials or sensory conduction). In the former group the occurrence of the electrophysiological abnormalities was possibly related to previous exposure to high phenytoin or low folate levels or both. In 10 chronic epileptic patients we demonstrated reversible slowing of sensory nerve conduction during phenytoin intoxication. In six selected epileptic patients on chronic barbiturate monotherapy we found clinical evidence of neuropathy in two and electrophysiological abnormalities in five, including reversible slowing of sensory conduction during intoxication in one. This suggests that barbiturate drugs may, like phenytoin, also contribute to anticonvulsant neuropathy. Careful monitoring of single drug therapy with avoidance of acute toxicity may reduce the risk of chronic anticonvulsant neuropathy. PMID:6288881

  7. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies – Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies in the general population. Both disorders share striking pathological similarities, marked by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the early involvement of the papillomacular bundle. Three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations; m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C account for over 90% of LHON cases, and in DOA, the majority of affected families harbour mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. Optic nerve degeneration in LHON and DOA is therefore due to disturbed mitochondrial function and a predominantly complex I respiratory chain defect has been identified using both in vitro and in vivo biochemical assays. However, the trigger for RGC loss is much more complex than a simple bioenergetic crisis and other important disease mechanisms have emerged relating to mitochondrial network dynamics, mtDNA maintenance, axonal transport, and the involvement of the cytoskeleton in maintaining a differential mitochondrial gradient at sites such as the lamina cribosa. The downstream consequences of these mitochondrial disturbances are likely to be influenced by the local cellular milieu. The vulnerability of RGCs in LHON and DOA could derive not only from tissue-specific, genetically-determined biological factors, but also from an increased susceptibility to exogenous influences such as light exposure, smoking, and pharmacological agents with putative mitochondrial toxic effects. Our concept of inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies has evolved over the past decade, with the observation that patients with LHON and DOA can manifest a much broader phenotypic spectrum than pure optic nerve involvement. Interestingly, these phenotypes are sometimes clinically indistinguishable from other neurodegenerative disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and multiple sclerosis, where mitochondrial dysfunction is also thought to be an important pathophysiological player. A number of vertebrate and invertebrate disease models has recently been established to circumvent the lack of human tissues, and these have already provided considerable insight by allowing direct RGC experimentation. The ultimate goal is to translate these research advances into clinical practice and new treatment strategies are currently being investigated to improve the visual prognosis for patients with mitochondrial optic neuropathies. PMID:21112411

  8. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies - disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2011-03-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies in the general population. Both disorders share striking pathological similarities, marked by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the early involvement of the papillomacular bundle. Three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations; m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C account for over 90% of LHON cases, and in DOA, the majority of affected families harbour mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. Optic nerve degeneration in LHON and DOA is therefore due to disturbed mitochondrial function and a predominantly complex I respiratory chain defect has been identified using both in vitro and in vivo biochemical assays. However, the trigger for RGC loss is much more complex than a simple bioenergetic crisis and other important disease mechanisms have emerged relating to mitochondrial network dynamics, mtDNA maintenance, axonal transport, and the involvement of the cytoskeleton in maintaining a differential mitochondrial gradient at sites such as the lamina cribosa. The downstream consequences of these mitochondrial disturbances are likely to be influenced by the local cellular milieu. The vulnerability of RGCs in LHON and DOA could derive not only from tissue-specific, genetically-determined biological factors, but also from an increased susceptibility to exogenous influences such as light exposure, smoking, and pharmacological agents with putative mitochondrial toxic effects. Our concept of inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies has evolved over the past decade, with the observation that patients with LHON and DOA can manifest a much broader phenotypic spectrum than pure optic nerve involvement. Interestingly, these phenotypes are sometimes clinically indistinguishable from other neurodegenerative disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and multiple sclerosis, where mitochondrial dysfunction is also thought to be an important pathophysiological player. A number of vertebrate and invertebrate disease models has recently been established to circumvent the lack of human tissues, and these have already provided considerable insight by allowing direct RGC experimentation. The ultimate goal is to translate these research advances into clinical practice and new treatment strategies are currently being investigated to improve the visual prognosis for patients with mitochondrial optic neuropathies. PMID:21112411

  9. Acute motor axonal neuropathy in a child with atypical presentation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Seung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) is a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome. It has been reported to have no sensory symptoms and is diagnosed by typical electrophysiological findings of low-amplitude or unobtainable compound muscle action potentials with normal sensory nerve action potentials. However, the authors experienced atypical case of general electrophysiological findings of AMAN with pain and paresthesia and presented it. This case implies that clinician should be on the alert to atypical sensory symptoms from the classical presentation of AMAN even if the patient is diagnosed with AMAN electrophysiologically and should consider proper treatment options based on clinical presentations. PMID:25621680

  10. Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and vestibular areflexia syndrome: a slowly progressive disorder with stereotypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, Daniele; Bella, Eleonora Dalla; Dacci, Patrizia; Mariotti, Caterina; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy and vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) is a newly described condition with onset in adulthood, characterized by progressive balance impairment and sensory disturbances in the lower limbs, which can severely affect patients' quality of life. Its pathogenesis remains obscure and the diagnosis challenging. We described four patients complaining of slowly progressive gait unbalance and sensory disturbances at the feet followed, after a period ranging 2-6 years, by cerebellar dysfunction. All patients showed gait and limb ataxia, positive Romberg sign, cerebellar dysarthria, gaze-evoked nystagmus, absent deep tendon reflexes, and impaired vibratory sensation. Nerve conduction studies revealed axonal sensory neuropathy, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebellar atrophy, and otoneurological investigation demonstrated bilateral vestibular areflexia with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes. The diagnosis of CANVAS should be suspected on clinical ground based on homogeneous course of symptoms and signs, and addressed by video-oculography eye movement recording. PMID:26566912

  11. [Hereditary prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Heise, Marta; Haus, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers affecting men. It may soon become the main cancer--caused mortality among men all over the world. The genetic basis of prostate cancer is very complex and its etiology is poorly understood. The genes associated with hereditary predisposition to prostate cancer remain largely unknown. Family history of PC, particularly at a young age, is a strong risk factor. Through linkage analysis, numerous prostate cancer susceptibility chromosomal loci have been identified, including: HPC1 (1q24-25), PCaP (1q42.2-43), HPCX (Xq27-28), CAPB (1p36), HPC2 (17p12), HPC20 (20q13). However, it turned out that any of these genes is not a high-risk prostate cancer susceptibility gene. According to literature data HPC is associated with genes involved in androgen metabolism, including androgen receptor gene--AR, SRD5A2 and CYP17, genes involved in the DNA damage repair, including BRCA1, BRCA2, NBS1 and MLH1 or some developmental genes as HOXB13. Identification of PC high predisposition susceptibility genes is very important, because the ascertainment of a higher risk of prostate cancer development in mutation carriers enable to develop and implement in clinical practice suitable prophylactic programs which could prevent the disease or detect it in an early stage. It seems that better knowledge of the molecular pathology of prostate cancer could make it easier to discover new drugs of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity. There are many cellular pathways associated with PC cancerogenesis, which may become a potential goal for such drugs in the future. PMID:24864115

  12. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibition behaviorally and physiologically improves pyridoxine-induced neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Potter, Michelle C; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Callizot, Noelle; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    Pyridoxine is used as a supplement for treating conditions such as vitamin deficiency as well as neurological disorders such as depression, epilepsy and autism. A significant neurologic complication of pyridoxine therapy is peripheral neuropathy thought to be a result of long-term and high dose usage. Although pyridoxine-induced neuropathy is transient and can remit after its withdrawal, the process of complete recovery can be slow. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) inhibition has been shown to improve symptoms of both chemotherapy- and diabetic-induced neuropathy. This study evaluated if GCP II inhibition could behaviorally and physiologically improve pyridoxine-induced neuropathy. In the current study, high doses of pyridoxine (400 mg/kg, twice a day for seven days) were used to induce neuropathy in rats. An orally bioavailable GCP II inhibitor, 2-(3-mercaptopropyl) pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA), was administered daily at a dose of 30 mg/kg starting from the onset of pyridoxine injections. Body weight, motor coordination, heat sensitivity, electromyographical (EMG) parameters and nerve morphological features were monitored. The results show beneficial effects of GCP II inhibition including normalization of hot plate reaction time, foot fault improvements and increased open field distance travelled. H wave frequency, amplitude and latency as well as sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) were also significantly improved by 2-MPPA. Lastly, GCP II inhibition resulted in morphological protection in the spinal cord and sensory fibers in the lumbar region dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In conclusion, inhibition of GCP II may be beneficial against the peripheral sensory neuropathy caused by pyridoxine. PMID:25254647

  13. Bioenergetics in Diabetic Neuropathy- What We Need to Know

    PubMed Central

    Hinder, Lucy M.; Vincent, Andrea M.; Burant, Charles F.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Feldman, Eva L.

    2013-01-01

    Progress in developing treatments for diabetic neuropathy is slowed by our limited understanding of how disturbances in metabolic substrates- glucose and fatty acids- produce nerve injury. In this review, we present the current oxidative stress hypothesis and experimental data that support it. We identify weaknesses in our understanding of diabetes-disordered metabolism in the neurovascular unit; i.e. in critical cell types of the microvascular endothelium, peripheral sensory neurons, and supporting Schwann cells. Greater understanding of peripheral nervous system bioenergetics may provide insight into new drug therapies or improvements in dietary interventions in diabetes or even pre-diabetes. PMID:22548617

  14. Peroxynitrite and Protein Nitration in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stavniichuk, Roman; Shevalye, Hanna; Lupachyk, Sergey; Obrosov, Alexander; Groves, John T.; Obrosova, Irina G.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxynitrite, a product of the reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide, causes oxidative stress with concomitant inactivation of enzymes, poly(ADP-ribosylation), mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired stress signaling, as well as protein nitration. In this study we sought to determine the effect of preventing protein nitration or increasing peroxynitrite decomposition on diabetic neuropathy in mice after an extended period of untreated diabetes. C57Bl6/J male control and diabetic mice were treated with the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Fe(III) tetramesitylporphyrin octasulfonate (FeTMPS, 10 mg/kg/d) or protein nitration inhibitor (?)-epicatechin gallate (20 mg/kg/d) for 4 weeks, after an initial 28 weeks of hyperglycemia. Untreated diabetic mice developed motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers. Both FeTMPS and epicatechin gallate partially corrected sensory nerve conduction slowing and small sensory nerve fiber dysfunction without alleviation of hyperglycemia. Correction of motor nerve conduction deficit and increase in intraepidermal nerve fiber density were found with FeTMPS treatment only. In conclusion, peroxynitrite injury and its component, protein nitration, are implicated in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The findings indicate that both structural and functional changes of chronic diabetic peripheral neuropathy can be reversed, and provide rationale for the development of a new generation of antioxidants and peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts, for treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24687457

  15. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  16. Unraveling the genetics of distal hereditary motor neuronopathies.

    PubMed

    Irobi, Joy; Dierick, Ines; Jordanova, Albena; Claeys, Kristl G; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The hereditary motor neuronopathies (HMN [MIM 158590]) are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by an exclusive involvement of the motor part of the peripheral nervous system. They are usually subdivided in proximal HMN, i.e., the classical spinal muscular atrophy syndromes and distal hereditary motor neuronopathies (distal HMN) that clinically resemble Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndromes. In this review, we concentrate on distal HMN. The distal HMN are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and were initially subdivided in seven subtypes according to mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical evolution. Recent studies have shown that these subtypes are still heterogeneous at the molecular genetic level and novel clinical and genetic entities have been delineated. Since the introduction of positional cloning, 13 chromosomal loci and seven disease-associated genes have been identified for autosomal-dominant, autosomal-recessive, and X-linked recessive distal HMN. Most of the genes involved encode protein with housekeeping functions, such as RNA processing, translation synthesis, stress response, apoptosis, and others code for proteins involved in retrograde survival. Motor neurons of the anterior horn of the spinal cord seems to be vulnerable to defects in these housekeeping proteins, likely because their large axons have higher metabolic requirements for maintenance, transport over long distances and precise connectivity. Understanding the molecular pathomechanisms for mutations in these genes that are ubiquitous expressed will help unravel the neuronal mechanisms that underlie motor neuropathies leading to denervation of distal limb muscles, and might generate new insights for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:16775372

  17. Distinct lymphocytes subsets in IgM-related neuropathy: clinical-immunological correlations.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Raffaele; Sabatelli, Mario; Del Grande, Alessandra; Bisogni, Giulia; Damato, Valentina; Plantone, Domenico; Marti, Alessandro; Frisullo, Giovanni; Romano, Angela; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Luigetti, Marco

    2015-02-01

    IgM-related neuropathy generally presents as a late-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy with predominant sensory loss and ataxia. However, we recently reported the clinical, neurophysiological and pathological findings from our cohort and identified in about a third of patients an atypical phenotype. We analyzed by flow cytometry the different lymphocytes subsets in the peripheral blood of patients affected by IgM-related neuropathy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and healthy subjects, to investigate whether different immunological patterns may differentiate the classical phenotype from atypical forms. IFN-gamma producing CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing T-bet (T-helper type 1, Th1) were increased in CIDP patients. The percentage of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IL-10 as well as the percentage of CD19+ cells expressing Blimp-1 were higher in patients with IgM-neuropathy. We did not find any significant differences in the different lymphocytes subsets in the IgM-related neuropathy between patients with classical and atypical phenotype. Th1 cells are increased in CIDP patients while a T helper type 2-phenotype seems to prevail in patients with IgM-neuropathy. Further studies involving a larger patient population are needed to evaluate if different lymphocytes subset may be involved in different clinical phenotypes of IgM-related neuropathy. PMID:25192662

  18. Sarcoid neuropathy: clinico-pathological study of 4 new cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vital, A; Lagueny, A; Ferrer, X; Louiset, P; Canron, M-H; Vital, C

    2008-01-01

    There are several reviews devoted to neurosarcoidosis and a few reports restricted to sarcoid neuropathy. Since 1989, we have investigated 4 new cases of sarcoid neuropathy, 1 with chronic sensory motor neuropathy (CSMN), another with painful neuropathy and 2 with atypical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). In each case, biopsy specimens from the superficial peroneal nerve and peroneus brevis muscle were taken by the same cutaneous incision and studied on paraffin sections, semi-thin sections and under electron microscope. We compared neuropathological findings from our 4 cases with those from 34 well-studied nerve biopsies previously reported in the literature, and which concerned 16 cases of CSMN, 13 cases ofmononeuropathy multiplex, 2 cases of painful neuropathy and three cases of CIDP. In all of these 38 cases of sarcoid neuropathy, the characteristic noncaseiting granulomas (NCG) were observed on the nerve in 11 cases, on the muscle alone in 5, on both muscle and nerve in 10, and in the nerve and another parenchyma in 4. In the 8 remaining cases, NCG were observed in another parenchyma, mainly lung or lymph nodes. Moreover, necrotizing vasculitis was present in nerve biopsies from 8 cases and microvasculitis without obvious necrosis in 2 others. Nerve fiber lesions, which are mainly axonal, are probably related to mechanical compression by NCG and/or to an ischemic process due to vasculitis. Cytokines and immune factors may also play a role, especially in certain cases with a clinical presentation of CIDP. PMID:18402389

  19. Luteolin improves the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy: behavioral and biochemical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Qingsong; Zhang, Jinchao; Lin, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to now, drugs for improving the impaired nerve functions has been lacking for diabetic neuropathy. The antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of luteolin make it an attractive candidate for diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of luteolin on diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats were intraperitoneally treated with daily luteolin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 weeks from the 28th day after streptozotocin injection. Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate the effect of luteolin on the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy. It was found that luteolin dose dependently alleviated abnormal sensation, improved nerve conduction velocities and nerve blood flow in diabetic rats. Biochanical analysis showed that luteolin significantly lowered the reactive oxygen species production and malondialdehyde level, as well as increased antioxidants activities in a dose dependent manner. In addition, luteolin significantly up-regulated the protein levels of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic nerves. Taken together, luteolin is capable of improving diabetes-induced deficit in motor and sensory functions, which could be attributable, at least in part, to its Nrf2-dependent antioxidant capacity. The findings in the present study highlight the therapeutic value of luteolin for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26617718

  20. [Cellular therapy of hereditary diseases].

    PubMed

    Bochkov, N P; Nikitina, V A; Roslova, T A; Chaushev, I N; Iakushina, I I

    2008-01-01

    This analytical review of the literature on cellular therapy of hereditary diseases summarizes results of their treatment by stem cell transplantation. It describes the main sources of stem cells and considers prospects of and limitations on the use of cell therapy for the management of hereditary disorders. Cell technologies are considered to be promising for the treatment of a variety of inherited diseases including metabolic disturbances, hemopathies, hematopoietic disorders, pulmonary diseases in children, bone and nervous diseases. Special attention is given to the use of genetically modified stem cells. An international register of patients is deemed necessary for the evaluation of outcomes of cellular therapy. PMID:19143072

  1. Ultrasonography of MADSAM neuropathy: focal nerve enlargements at sites of existing and resolved conduction blocks.

    PubMed

    Scheidl, Erika; Böhm, Josef; Simó, Magdolna; Rózsa, Csilla; Bereznai, Benjamin; Kovács, Tibor; Arányi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-07-01

    Using the emerging technique of peripheral nerve ultrasonography, multiple focal nerve swellings corresponding to sites of existing conduction blocks have been described in demyelinating polyneuropathies. We report two cases of multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM). In the first, multiple focal nerve enlargements were detected by ultrasound at sites of previous conduction blocks, well after complete clinical and electrophysiological resolution. In the second case, existing proximal conduction blocks could be localized by ultrasound. Our cases highlight the importance of nerve ultrasound in identifying conduction blocks and demonstrate that ultrasonographic morphological changes may outlast functional recovery in demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:22513319

  2. Paraproteinemic neuropathy: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Rison, Richard A; Beydoun, Said R

    2016-01-01

    The term paraproteinemic neuropathy describes a heterogeneous set of neuropathies characterized by the presence of homogeneous immunoglobulin in the serum. An abnormal clonal proliferation of B-lymphocytes or plasma cells, which may or may not occur in the context of a hematologic malignancy, produces the immunoglobulins in excess. If malignancy is identified, treatment should be targeted to the neoplasm. Most cases, however, occur as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Few prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are available to inform the management of paraproteinemic neuropathies. Clinical experience combined with data from smaller, uncontrolled studies provide a basis for recommendations, which depend on the specific clinical setting in which the paraprotein occurs. In this review, we provide a clinically practical approach to diagnosis and management of such patients. PMID:26821540

  3. Retinoic acid reduces chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in an animal model and patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pedro, N.; Fernández-González- Aragón, M.C.; Saavedra-Pérez, D.; Campos-Parra, A.D.; Ríos-Trejo, M.Á.; Cerón-Lizárraga, T.; Martínez-Barrera, L.; Pineda, B.; Ordóñez, G.; Ortiz-Plata, A.; Granados-Soto, V.; Sotelo, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as treatment for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in an experimental animal model and in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomized in 5 groups: group A, control; groups B and C, treated with cisplatin; and groups D and E, treated with paclitaxel. ATRA (20 mg/kg PO) was administered for 15 days in groups C and E. We evaluated neuropathy and nerve regeneration–related morphologic changes in sciatic nerve, the concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF), and retinoic acid receptor (RAR)–α and RAR-β expression. In addition, 95 patients with NSCLC under chemotherapy treatment were randomized to either ATRA (20 mg/m2/d) or placebo. Serum NGF, neurophysiologic tests, and clinical neurotoxicity were assessed. Results: The experimental animals developed neuropathy and axonal degeneration, associated with decreased NGF levels in peripheral nerves. Treatment with ATRA reversed sensorial changes and nerve morphology; this was associated with increased NGF levels and RAR-β expression. Patients treated with chemotherapy had clinical neuropathy and axonal loss assessed by neurophysiology, which was related to decreased NGF levels. ATRA reduced axonal degeneration demonstrated by nerve conduction velocity and clinical manifestations of neuropathy grades ≥2. Conclusions: ATRA reduced chemotherapy-induced experimental neuropathy, increased NGF levels, and induced RAR-β expression in nerve. In patients, reduction of NGF in serum was associated with the severity of neuropathy; ATRA treatment reduced the electrophysiologic alterations. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that ATRA improves nerve conduction in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Neurology® 2011;77:987–995 PMID:21865574

  4. Hereditary Factors in Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathryn Norcross

    There are two kinds of hereditary influence, genetic inheritance and biological inheritance, that may respond to environmental determinants. The ability to speak is one genetically produced aspect of being human, and research studies based on the assumption that speech is innate to humans have found that infants appear to pay particular attention…

  5. DADS neuropathy associated with anti-TNF-? therapy.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Ronan Niall; McNamara, Brian; Moore, Helena

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old man with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and severe rheumatoid arthritis presented with a 1-year history of progressively worsening limb paraesthesia. Examination showed sensory loss in a glove and stocking distribution, absent reflexes and unsteady tandem gait. Nerve conduction studies suggested an acquired peripheral neuropathy with distal demyelination, which-together with the clinical phenotype-was consistent with a Distal Acquired Demyelinating Symmetric (DADS) neuropathy pattern. This was attributed to therapy with adalimumab, an antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? agent, which the patient had been taking for 2?years for rheumatoid arthritis. One month after discontinuing adalimumab, the limb paraesthesia had resolved completely and the patient had a normal tandem gait. Demyelinating disorders may rarely occur as complications of anti-TNF-? agents and therefore have implications for pretreatment counselling and ongoing monitoring. DADS neuropathy is a subtype of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, which responds poorly to standard therapy and has not previously been described with anti-TNF-? therapy. PMID:26607186

  6. Neuropathy, amyloidosis, and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fitting, J W; Bischoff, A; Regli, F; De Crousaz, G

    1979-01-01

    Three cases of neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy and amyloid deposits in peripheral nerves are described. They appeared to present a benign gammopathy because of the duration of the neuropathy in the absence of any clinical or biological sign of myeloma or macroglobulinaemia. The pathological abnormality found in the sural nerves of the three patients was characterised by a marked loss of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres because of active axonal degeneration with Wallerian degeneration. The most striking feature in all three cases was the finding of deposits identified as an accumulation of microfibrils. Images PMID:220385

  7. [Diabetic neuropathy: new therapeutic options?].

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Manfred

    2006-11-01

    The importance of diabetic neuropathy as an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease and leading risk factor for the diabetic foot syndrome has become firmly established. The first line treatment comprises optimal diabetic control and intensified multifactorial treatment with normalization of blood pressure and blood lipids. In this connection, a fascinating recent discovery is the so called "metabolic memory" of an earlier near normal diabetic control over years, with a reduction of about 50% in nonfatal and fatal cardiac events and the incidence of diabetic neuropathy as a result of a former intensive therapy. PMID:17619441

  8. WNK1/HSN2 Mutation in Human Peripheral Neuropathy Deregulates KCC2 Expression and Posterior Lateral Line Development in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Bercier, Valérie; Brustein, Edna; Liao, Meijiang; Dion, Patrick A.; Lafrenière, Ronald G.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Drapeau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSNAII) is a rare pathology characterized by an early onset of severe sensory loss (all modalities) in the distal limbs. It is due to autosomal recessive mutations confined to exon “HSN2” of the WNK1 (with-no-lysine protein kinase 1) serine-threonine kinase. While this kinase is well studied in the kidneys, little is known about its role in the nervous system. We hypothesized that the truncating mutations present in the neural-specific HSN2 exon lead to a loss-of-function of the WNK1 kinase, impairing development of the peripheral sensory system. To investigate the mechanisms by which the loss of WNK1/HSN2 isoform function causes HSANII, we used the embryonic zebrafish model and observed strong expression of WNK1/HSN2 in neuromasts of the peripheral lateral line (PLL) system by immunohistochemistry. Knocking down wnk1/hsn2 in embryos using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides led to improper PLL development. We then investigated the reported interaction between the WNK1 kinase and neuronal potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, as this transporter is a target of WNK1 phosphorylation. In situ hybridization revealed kcc2 expression in mature neuromasts of the PLL and semi-quantitative RT–PCR of wnk1/hsn2 knockdown embryos showed an increased expression of kcc2 mRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of human KCC2 mRNA in embryos replicated the wnk1/hsn2 knockdown phenotype. We validated these results by obtaining double knockdown embryos, both for wnk1/hsn2 and kcc2, which alleviated the PLL defects. Interestingly, overexpression of inactive mutant KCC2-C568A, which does not extrude ions, allowed a phenocopy of the PLL defects. These results suggest a pathway in which WNK1/HSN2 interacts with KCC2, producing a novel regulation of its transcription independent of KCC2's activation, where a loss-of-function mutation in WNK1 induces an overexpression of KCC2 and hinders proper peripheral sensory nerve development, a hallmark of HSANII. PMID:23300475

  9. Sensory analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sensory evaluation can answer questions about a product that instruments cannot. The human subject is the instrument, and data can provide a wealth of information for a product developer, or results can be very variable and erroneous if all the precautions to minimize bias and external noise are no...

  10. Diphtheritic neuropathy, an analysis based on muscle and nerve biopsy and repeated neurophysiological and autonomic function tests.

    PubMed Central

    Solders, G; Nennesmo, I; Persson, A

    1989-01-01

    A patient with diphtheritic neuropathy was investigated with repeated tests of parasympathetic and sympathetic vasomotor and sudomotor functions for one year after the onset of symptoms. Somatic nerve function was tested with nerve conduction studies and an index based on ten variables was used to follow the course of the neuropathy. Sural nerve and anterior tibial muscle biopsies were performed. A severe but shortlasting impairment of the parasympathetic vagal reflex arc was found. The recovery of this function paralleled the clinical course. Sympathetic functions were normal. The neurophysiological variables of somatic nerve function showed signs of a mainly demyelinating mixed sensory/motor neuropathy. The recovery of these variables was slow. The nerve and muscle biopsies demonstrated mild changes consistent with a mixed, demyelinating, non-inflammatory neuropathy. Images PMID:2549201

  11. Different intracellular pathomechanisms produce diverse Myelin Protein Zero neuropathies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wrabetz, Lawrence; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Pennuto, Maria; Dati, Gabriele; Tinelli, Elisa; Fratta, Pietro; Previtali, Stefano; Imperiale, Daniele; Zielasek, Jurgen; Toyka, Klaus; Avila, Robin L; Kirschner, Daniel A; Messing, Albee; Feltri, M Laura; Quattrini, Angelo

    2006-02-22

    Missense mutations in 22 genes account for one-quarter of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) hereditary neuropathies. Myelin Protein Zero (MPZ, P0) mutations produce phenotypes ranging from adult demyelinating (CMT1B) to early onset [Déjérine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) or congenital hypomyelination] to predominantly axonal neuropathy, suggesting gain of function mechanisms. To test this directly, we produced mice in which either the MpzS63C (DSS) or MpzS63del (CMT1B) transgene was inserted randomly, so that the endogenous Mpz alleles could compensate for any loss of mutant P0 function. We show that either mutant allele produces demyelinating neuropathy that mimics the corresponding human disease. However, P0S63C creates a packing defect in the myelin sheath, whereas P0S63del does not arrive to the myelin sheath and is instead retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it elicits an unfolded protein response (UPR). This is the first evidence for UPR in association with neuropathy and provides a model to determine whether and how mutant proteins can provoke demyelination from outside of myelin. PMID:16495463

  12. Neuropathy and cognitive impairment following vaccination with the OspA protein of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman; Wu, Anita T; Chin, Russell L; Sander, Howard W; Alaedini, Armin; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2004-09-01

    Neurological syndromes that follow vaccination or infection are often attributed to autoimmune mechanisms. We report six patients who developed neuropathy or cognitive impairment, within several days to 2 months, following vaccination with the OspA antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi. Two of the patients developed cognitive impairment, one chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), one multifocal motor neuropathy, one both cognitive impairment and CIDP, and one cognitive impairment and sensory axonal neuropathy. The patients with cognitive impairment had T2 hyperintense white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. The similarity between the neurological sequelae observed in the OspA-vaccinated patients and those with chronic Lyme disease suggests a possible role for immune mechanisms in some of the manifestations of chronic Lyme disease that are resistant to antibiotic treatment. PMID:15363064

  13. Update on medication-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Louis H; Sachdev, Noor

    2009-01-01

    Despite improvements in the identification of causes of peripheral neuropathy, idiopathic polyneuropathy remains common. Medication and toxic neuropathy account for a small but important percentage of potentially preventable or reversible causes of neuropathy. New drugs that can induce neuropathy have been approved over the past several years, including the anticancer agents bortezomib, ixabepilone, and oxaliplatin. We review the neurotoxic effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers infliximab and etanercept, the inflammatory arthritis agent leflunomide, and the antibiotic linezolid. The controversy of statin-induced neuropathy continues to unfold; the large Fremantle Diabetes Study has suggested that statins may have neuroprotective effects. Dichloroacetate is a promising agent for lactic acidosis-associated disorders, but toxic neuropathy is a treatment-limiting factor. We also describe a progressive inflammatory neuropathy in swine slaughterhouse workers that appears to be a toxin-induced immune response. PMID:19080756

  14. Molecular alterations resulting from frameshift mutations in peripheral myelin protein 22: implications for neuropathy severity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J S; Roux, K J; Fletcher, B S; Fortun, J; Notterpek, L

    2005-12-15

    Alterations in peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) expression are associated with a heterogeneous group of hereditary demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Two mutations at glycine 94, a single guanine insertion or deletion in PMP22, result in different reading frameshifts and, consequently, an extended G94fsX222 or a truncated G94fsX110 protein, respectively. Both of these autosomal dominant mutations alter the second half of PMP22 and yet are linked to clinical phenotypes with distinct severities. The G94fsX222 is associated with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, whereas G94fsX110 causes severe neuropathy diagnosed as Dejerine-Sottas disease or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type IA. To investigate the subcellular changes associated with the G94 frameshift mutations, we expressed epitope-tagged forms in primary rat Schwann cells. Biochemical and immunolabeling studies indicate that, unlike the wild-type protein, which is targeted for the plasma membrane, frameshift PMP22s are retained in the cell, prior to reaching the medial Golgi compartment. Similar to Wt-PMP22, both frameshift mutants are targeted for proteasomal degradation and accumulate in detergent-insoluble, ubiquitin-containing aggregates upon inhibition of this pathway. The extended frameshift PMP22 shows the ability to form spontaneous aggregates in the absence of proteasome inhibition. On the other hand, Schwann cells expressing the truncated protein proliferate at a significantly higher rate than Schwann cells expressing the wild-type or the extended PMP22. In summary, these results suggest that a greater potential for PMP22 aggregation is associated with a less severe phenotype, whereas dysregulation of Schwann cell proliferation is linked to severe neuropathy. PMID:16273544

  15. Diabetic neuropathy: mechanisms, emerging treatments, and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Albers, James W; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-08-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) differ in clinical course, distribution, fiber involvement (type and size), and pathophysiology, the most typical type being a length-dependent distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) with differing degrees of autonomic involvement. The pathogenesis of diabetic DSP is multifactorial, including increased mitochondrial production of free radicals due to hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Mechanisms that impact neuronal activity, mitochondrial function, membrane permeability, and endothelial function include formation of advanced glycosylation end products, activation of polyol aldose reductase signaling, activation of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, and altered function of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump. Hyperglycemia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress triggers several neuronal apoptotic processes. Additional mechanisms include impaired nerve perfusion, dyslipidemia, altered redox status, low-grade inflammation, and perturbation of calcium balance. Successful therapies require an integrated approach targeting these mechanisms. Intensive glycemic control is essential but is insufficient to prevent onset or progression of DSP, and disease-modifying treatments for DSP have been disappointing. Atypical forms of DN include subacute-onset sensory (symmetric) or motor (asymmetric) predominant conditions that are frequently painful but generally self-limited. DNs are a major cause of disability, associated with reduced quality of life and increased mortality. PMID:24954624

  16. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Paclitaxel- and Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

      Peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of paclitaxel and oxaliplatin treatment. The major dose-limiting side effect of these drugs is peripheral sensory neuropathy. The symptoms of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy are mostly sensory and peripheral in nature, consisting of mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia, tingling, and numbness. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity manifests as rapid-onset neuropathic symptoms that are exacerbated by cold exposure and as chronic neuropathy that develops after several treatment cycles. Although many basic and clinical researchers have studied anticancer drug-induced peripheral neuropathy, the mechanism is not well understood. In this review, we focus on (1) analysis of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after paclitaxel treatment and (2) analysis of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel in the DRG after oxaliplatin treatment. This review describes that (1) paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain may be the result of up-regulation of TRPV1 in small- and medium-diameter DRG neurons. In addition, paclitaxel treatment increases the release of substance P, but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn. (2) TRPA1 expression via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in small-diameter DRG neurons, at least in part, contributes to the development of oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hyperalgesia. We suggest that TRPV1 or TRPA1 antagonists may be potential therapeutic lead compounds for treating anticancer drug-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26831807

  17. [Hereditary hearing loss: genetic counselling].

    PubMed

    Cabanillas Farpón, Rubén; Cadiñanos Bañales, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an updated overview of hereditary hearing loss, with special attention to the etiological diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss, the genes most frequently mutated in our environment, the techniques available for their analysis and the clinical implications of genetic diagnosis. More than 60% of childhood sensorineural hearing loss is genetic. In adults, the percentage of hereditary hearing loss is unknown. Genetic testing is the highest yielding test for evaluating patients with sensorineural hearing loss. The process of genetic counselling is intended to inform patients and their families of the medical, psychological and familial implications of genetic diseases, as well as the risks, benefits and limitations of genetic testing. The implementation of any genetic analysis must be always preceded by an appropriate genetic counselling process. PMID:21514544

  18. Research priorities in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Brittenham, G M; Franks, A L; Rickles, F R

    1998-12-01

    The Working Group on Research Priorities used a formal nominal group technique to identify and prioritize the specific aims of applied research needed to provide the scientific basis for population screening for iron overload disorders. The most important applied research goal was characterization of the natural history of the relation between genotype and phenotype in hereditary hemochromatosis and other iron overload disorders. Three other important research objectives were development of an optimal approach to screening for iron overload; analyses of the cost-effectiveness of screening; and assessment of the ethical, legal, and social implications of screening. To achieve these specific aims, two research studies were recommended as being of the highest priority: a multicenter, cross-sectional, population-based study of the natural history of iron overload and a multicenter, case-control study of patients with disease manifestations potentially attributable to hereditary hemochromatosis in primary care and subspecialty clinics. PMID:9867753

  19. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Small Fibre Neuropathy in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer and Nerve Regeneration in Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ferdousi, Maryam; Azmi, Shazli; Petropoulos, Ioannis Nikolaos; Fadavi, Hassan; Ponirakis, Georgios; Marshall, Andrew; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Imaan; Mansoor, Wasat; Malik, Rayaz Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    There are multiple neurological complications of cancer and its treatment. This study assessed the utility of the novel non-invasive ophthalmic technique of corneal confocal microscopy in identifying neuropathy in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer before and after platinum based chemotherapy. In this study, 21 subjects with upper gastrointestinal (oesophageal or gastric) cancer and 21 healthy control subjects underwent assessment of neuropathy using the neuropathy disability score, quantitative sensory testing for vibration perception threshold, warm and cold sensation thresholds, cold and heat induced pain thresholds, nerve conduction studies and corneal confocal microscopy. Patients with gastro-oesophageal cancer had higher heat induced pain (P = 0.04) and warm sensation (P = 0.03) thresholds with a significantly reduced sural sensory (P<0.01) and peroneal motor (P<0.01) nerve conduction velocity, corneal nerve fibre density (CNFD), nerve branch density (CNBD) and nerve fibre length (CNFL) (P<0.0001). Furthermore, CNFD correlated significantly with the time from presentation with symptoms to commencing chemotherapy (r = -0.54, P = 0.02), and CNFL (r = -0.8, P<0.0001) and CNBD (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) were related to the severity of lymph node involvement. After the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy, there was no change in any measure of neuropathy, except for a significant increase in CNFL (P = 0.003). Corneal confocal microscopy detects a small fibre neuropathy in this cohort of patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer, which was related to disease severity. Furthermore, the increase in CNFL after the chemotherapy may indicate nerve regeneration. PMID:26430773

  20. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Small Fibre Neuropathy in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer and Nerve Regeneration in Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ferdousi, Maryam; Azmi, Shazli; Petropoulos, Ioannis Nikolaos; Fadavi, Hassan; Ponirakis, Georgios; Marshall, Andrew; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Imaan; Mansoor, Wasat; Malik, Rayaz Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    There are multiple neurological complications of cancer and its treatment. This study assessed the utility of the novel non-invasive ophthalmic technique of corneal confocal microscopy in identifying neuropathy in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer before and after platinum based chemotherapy. In this study, 21 subjects with upper gastrointestinal (oesophageal or gastric) cancer and 21 healthy control subjects underwent assessment of neuropathy using the neuropathy disability score, quantitative sensory testing for vibration perception threshold, warm and cold sensation thresholds, cold and heat induced pain thresholds, nerve conduction studies and corneal confocal microscopy. Patients with gastro-oesophageal cancer had higher heat induced pain (P = 0.04) and warm sensation (P = 0.03) thresholds with a significantly reduced sural sensory (P<0.01) and peroneal motor (P<0.01) nerve conduction velocity, corneal nerve fibre density (CNFD), nerve branch density (CNBD) and nerve fibre length (CNFL) (P<0.0001). Furthermore, CNFD correlated significantly with the time from presentation with symptoms to commencing chemotherapy (r = -0.54, P = 0.02), and CNFL (r = -0.8, P<0.0001) and CNBD (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) were related to the severity of lymph node involvement. After the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy, there was no change in any measure of neuropathy, except for a significant increase in CNFL (P = 0.003). Corneal confocal microscopy detects a small fibre neuropathy in this cohort of patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer, which was related to disease severity. Furthermore, the increase in CNFL after the chemotherapy may indicate nerve regeneration. PMID:26430773

  1. Trend of Recovery after Simple Decompression for Treatment of Ulnar Neuropathy at the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Aviram M.; Gaston, R. Glenn; Haase, Steven C.; Hammert, Warren C.; Lawton, Jeffrey N.; Merrell, Greg A.; Nassab, Paul F.; Song, Jae W.; Yang, Lynda J. S.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although numerous studies have investigated long-term outcomes after surgical treatment of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow with simple decompression, no study has evaluated the trend of postoperative recovery. The authors assessed timing of recovery after simple decompression for ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Methods The five-center Surgery of the Ulnar Nerve Study Group prospectively recruited 58 consecutive subjects with ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and treated them with simple decompression. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Patient-rated outcomes questionnaires included the Michigan Hand Questionnaire; the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire; and the Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Functional tests used were grip strength, key pinch strength, two-point discrimination, and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing. Postoperative improvement was assessed at each time point to establish the trend of recovery in reaching a plateau. Results Significant patient-reported symptomatic and functional recovery occurred over the first 6 weeks postoperatively as represented by improvements in questionnaire scores. Symptomatic recovery occurred earlier than functional recovery as measured by sensory and strength testing and the work domain of the Michigan Hand Questionnaire. Improvement in patient-reported outcomes continued and reached a plateau at 3 months, whereas measured strength and sensory recovery continued over 12 months. Conclusion The greatest clinical improvement after simple decompression for ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, according to questionnaire scores, occurs in the first 6 weeks postoperatively and reaches a plateau by 3 months. PMID:23542274

  2. [Gene therapy of hereditary diseases].

    PubMed

    Ginter, E K

    2000-01-01

    In the review the main advantages in development of the approaches to gene therapy of hereditary diseases are presented. Now more than 1000 genes of hereditary diseases are mapped and some hundreds are cloned which is prerequisite for gene therapy. The transfer of the recombinant gene into the cell and the subsequent expression of the transgene product are the rate-limiting steps for successful gene therapy. A variety of methods, including the use of physical methods, modified viruses and synthetic vectors, are currently being used in experiments and clinical trials. Since the approval and initiation of the first human gene therapy trial to treat ADA deficiency, there have been several dozen approved gene therapy trials but clear clinical result was stated for ADA deficiency only. Cystic Fibrosis, CF was among several hereditary diseases which were considered as a target for gene therapy. Experiments on development of recombinant gene constructions, gene delivery by adenovirus vectors and liposomes as well as by other constructions into epithelial lung cells, gene expression and on the safety of gene therapy procedures were relatively successful. Phase 1 gene therapy clinical trials of CF showed that some unaccounted physiological peculiarities of lung tissue of the patients diminished effectiveness of gene transfer, longevity of CFTR gene expression and in some cases unexpected immunological complications arises during clinical trials. Now an intensive attempt to overcome these problems in gene therapy of CF are undertaken. PMID:11033886

  3. Significant response to lacosamide in a patient with severe chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Samar A; Albany, Zhanna; Albany, Constantine

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a major dose-limiting toxicity of potentially curative cancer therapy regimens. Cisplatin is the class of chemotherapy agent that has a broad spectrum of activity against several solid tumors, but it induces sensory neuropathy of upper and lower extremities. Cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy is usually in a "gloves and socks" distribution that can persist for months or years after completion of chemotherapy treatment. If the pain is severe, it affects the patient's long-term quality of life and can potentially result in chemotherapy dose reduction or treatment discontinuation. The mechanism of CIPN is not well understood, and a number of pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed to explain the phenomenon. Although many therapies have been investigated for the prevention or treatment of CIPN, there is currently no accepted proven therapy. Here we report a case in which lacosamide alleviated painful CIPN symptoms. Lacosamide is an anticonvulsant drug that blocks the voltage-gated sodium channels in the neurons and may also be a promising novel candidate for the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Preclinical data support the role of lacosamide protective effect in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, randomized clinical trial is needed. PMID:26029937

  4. A clinical decision support system with an integrated EMR for diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kunhimangalam, Reeda; Ovallath, Sujith; Joseph, Paul K

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in general population is ever increasing. The diagnosis and classification of peripheral neuropathies is often difficult as it involves careful clinical and electro-diagnostic examination by an expert neurologist. In developing countries a large percentage of the disease remains undiagnosed due to lack of adequate number of experts. In this study a novel clinical decision support system has been developed using a fuzzy expert system. The study was done to provide a solution to the demand of systems that can improve health care by accurate diagnosis in limited time, in the absence of specialists. It employs a graphical user interface and a fuzzy logic controller with rule viewer for identification of the type of peripheral neuropathy. An integrated medical records database is also developed for the storage and retrieval of the data. The system consists of 24 input fields, which includes the clinical values of the diagnostic test and the clinical symptoms. The output field is the disease diagnosis, whether it is Motor (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, sensory (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, mixed type or a normal case. The results obtained were compared with the expert's opinion and the system showed 93.27 % accuracy. The study aims at showing that Fuzzy Expert Systems may prove useful in providing diagnostic and predictive medical opinions. It enables the clinicians to arrive at a better diagnosis as it keeps the expert knowledge in an intelligent system to be used efficiently and effectively. PMID:24692180

  5. Multiple Cranial Neuropathies Without Limb Involvements: Guillain-Barre Syndrome Variant?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang

    2013-01-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunctions. Furthermore, reported cases of the acute multiple cranial neuropathies show electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with the typical Guillain-Barre syndromes (GBS). We recently experienced a patient with a benign infectious disease who subsequently developed symptoms of variant GBS. Here, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male patient who developed multiple symptoms of cranial neuropathy without limb weakness. His laboratory findings showed a positive result for anti-GQ1b IgG antibody. As compared with previously described variants of GBS, the patient exhibited widespread cranial neuropathy, which included neuropathies of cranial nerves III-XII, without limb involvement or ataxia. PMID:24236266

  6. Corneal Confocal Microscopy to Assess Diabetic Neuropathy: An Eye on the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mitra; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate detection and quantification of human diabetic peripheral neuropathy are important to define at-risk patients, anticipate deterioration, and assess new therapies. Easily performed clinical techniques such as neurological examination, assessment of vibration perception or insensitivity to the 10 g monofilament only assess advanced neuropathy, i.e., the at-risk foot. Techniques that assess early neuropathy include neurophysiology (which assesses only large fibers) and quantitative sensory testing (which assesses small fibers), but they can be highly subjective while more objective techniques, such as skin biopsy for intra-epidermal nerve fiber density quantification, are invasive and not widely available. The emerging ophthalmic technique of corneal confocal microscopy allows quantification of corneal nerve morphology and enables clinicians to diagnose peripheral neuropathy in diabetes patients, quantify its severity, and potentially assess therapeutic benefit. The present review provides a detailed critique of the rationale, a practical approach to capture images, and a basis for analyzing and interpreting the images. We also critically evaluate the diagnostic ability of this new noninvasive ophthalmic test to diagnose diabetic and other peripheral neuropathies. PMID:24124944

  7. Hereditary motor neuron disease in a large Norwegian family with a "H46R" substitution in the superoxide dismutase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Østern, Rune; Fagerheim, Toril; Ørstavik, Kristin; Holmøy, Trygve; Heiberg, Arvid; Lund-Petersen, Inger; Strom, Tim M; Nilssen, Øivind; Dahl, Arve

    2012-06-01

    Mutant genes associated with Charcot Marie Tooth type 2, distal hereditary motor neuropathy and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis may cause overlapping clinical phenotypes. We performed whole genome linkage analysis, haplotype analysis, sequencing and detailed clinical and neurophysiological investigations in a large Norwegian kindred with a condition that clinically had been classified as Charcot Marie Tooth type 2. The mutation c.140A>G, p.His47Arg (alias p.His46Arg or H46R) in the superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1) segregated with the disease. The patients present a hereditary motor neuropathy-like clinical picture and long survival (mean 29years). To our knowledge, this is the first extensive report describing a large non-Japanese kindred. The prognostic implications of the condition seen in this family have little in common with what is normally associated with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and illustrates the complexity of the genetic etiology of lower motor neuron disease. PMID:22475618

  8. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting. PMID:26819784

  9. Comparative study of peripheral neuropathy and nerve regeneration in NOD and ICR diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Homs, Judit; Ariza, Lorena; Pagès, Gemma; Verdú, Enrique; Casals, Laura; Udina, Esther; Chillón, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse was suggested as an adequate model for diabetic autonomic neuropathy. We evaluated sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve regeneration following sciatic nerve crush in NOD males rendered diabetic by multiple low doses of streptozotocin, in comparison with similarly treated Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice, a widely used model for type I diabetes. Neurophysiological values for both strains showed a decline in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity at 7 and 8 weeks after induction of diabetes in the intact hindlimb. However, amplitudes of compound muscle and sensory action potentials (CMAPs and CNAPs) were significantly reduced in NOD but not in ICR diabetic mice. Morphometrical analysis showed myelinated fiber loss in highly hyperglycemic NOD mice, but no significant changes in fiber size. There was a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, more pronounced in NOD than in ICR diabetic mice. Interestingly, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities were increased already at 1 week of hyperglycemia, persisting until the end of the experiment in both strains. Muscle and nerve reinnervation was delayed in diabetic mice following sciatic nerve crush, being more marked in NOD mice. Thus, diabetes of mid-duration induces more severe peripheral neuropathy and slower nerve regeneration in NOD than in ICR mice. PMID:22003936

  10. Dorsal root ganglia microenvironment of female BB Wistar diabetic rats with mild neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, D W; Ho, L T; Allison, J A

    1994-12-01

    Abnormalities in the microenvironment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) might play a role in the pathogenesis of sensory abnormalities in human diabetic neuropathy. We examined aspects of DRG microenvironment by measuring local blood flow and oxygen tension in the L4 dorsal root ganglia of female BB Wistar (BBW) diabetic rats with mild neuropathy. The findings were compared with concurrent measurements of local sciatic endoneurial blood flow and oxygen tension. Diabetic rats were treated with insulin and underwent electrophysiological, blood flow and oxygen tension measurements at either 7-11 or 17-23 weeks after the development of glycosuria. Nondiabetic female BB Wistar rats from the same colony served as controls. At both ages, BBW diabetic rats had significant abnormalities in sensory, but not motor conduction compared to nondiabetic controls. Sciatic endoneurial blood flow in the diabetic rats of both ages was similar to control values, but the older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW diabetic rats had a selective reduction in DRG blood flow. Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tensions were not significantly altered in the diabetic rats. DRG oxygen tension appeared lowered in younger (7-11 week diabetic) but not older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW rats. Our findings indicate that there are important changes in the DRG microenvironment of diabetic rats with selective sensory neuropathy. PMID:7699389

  11. Treatment of gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Törnblom, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The symptoms caused by gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus is important to highlight since it affects a large proportion of people with diabetes, regardless of whether this is type 1 or type 2. Gastroparesis and general signs of bowel dysfunction, such as constipation, diarrhoea and abdominal pain are most often encountered and involve both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options. This mini-review summarises a presentation given at the 'Diagnosis and treatment of autonomic diabetic neuropathy in the gut' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by another mini-review on a topic from this symposium (by Azpiroz and Malagelada, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3831-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Péter Kempler (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3826-y ). PMID:26634570

  12. New insights into mechanisms of opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity during painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Shaqura, Mohammed; Khalefa, Baled I; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Zöllner, Christian; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Fürst, Susanna; Schäfer, Michael; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2014-10-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a disease of the peripheral sensory neuron with impaired opioid responsiveness. Since ?-opioid receptor (MOR) activation can inhibit the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) activity in peripherally sensory neurons, this study investigated the mechanisms of impaired opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity in painful diabetic neuropathy. Intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 45 mg/kg) in Wistar rats led to a degeneration of insulin producing pancreatic ?-cells, elevated blood glucose, and mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia). In these animals, local morphine's inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced nocifensive behavior as well as on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current in dorsal root ganglion cells were significantly impaired. These changes were associated with a loss in MOR but not TRPV1 in peripheral sensory neurons. Intrathecal delivery of nerve growth factor in diabetic animals normalized sensory neuron MOR and subsequently rescued morphine's inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity in vivo and in vitro. These findings identify a loss in functional MOR on sensory neurons as a contributing factor for the impaired opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity during advanced STZ-induced diabetes. Moreover, they support growing evidence of a distinct regulation of opioid responsiveness during various painful states of disease (e.g. arthritis, cancer, neuropathy) and may give novel therapeutic incentives. PMID:24863039

  13. [Acquired peripheral neuropathies associated with monoclonal gammopathy].

    PubMed

    Gajos, Agata; Kieli?, Wojciech; Szadkowska, Iwona; Chmielowska, Ewa; Niewodniczy, Aleksander; Bogucki, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is responsible for about 10% of acquired peripheral neuropathies of unknown origin. Monoclonal gammopathy is the result of uncontrolled proliferation of a single clone of plasma cells producing the first class of immunoglobulin (M-protein). The routine diagnostic process of peripheral neuropathy requires electrophysiological studies and several laboratory tests, including the immunoelectrophoresis or immunofixation of serum proteins. Monoclonal gammopathies develop in malignancy, immunological disorders, chronic infections and as so-called "benign form" or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Lymphoproliferative malignancy may develop in MGUS after many years of disease. Patients with MGUS-associated neuropathy should be carefully evaluated, and if malignancy is not found the progress of the disease should be monitored. We present four patients with peripheral neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy. These cases represent different forms of this type of neuropathy and well illustrate the necessity of looking for monoclonal gammopathies in peripheral neuropathy. PMID:17530580

  14. Painful diabetic neuropathy: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Didangelos, Triantafyllos; Doupis, John; Veves, Aristidis

    2014-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of several clinical syndromes in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and presents a major challenge for optimal management. The epidemiology of PDN has not been extensively studied. On the basis of available data, the prevalence of pain ranges from 10% to 20% in patients with diabetes and from 40% to 50% in those with diabetic neuropathy. Neuropathic pain can be disabling and devastating, with a significant impact on the patient's quality of life and associated healthcare cost. Pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying PDN are similar to other neuropathic pain disorders and broadly invoke peripheral and central sensitization. The natural course of PDN is variable, with the majority of patients experiencing spontaneous improvement and resolution of pain. Quantifying neuropathic pain is difficult, especially in clinical practice, but has improved recently in clinical trials with the development of neuropathic pain-specific tools, such as the Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire and the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. Hyperglycemia-induced pathways result in nerve dysfunction and damage, which lead to hyperexcitable peripheral and central pathways of pain. Glycemic control may prevent or partially reverse DPN and modulate PDN. PMID:25410214

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disorder catalog Conditions > Infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... 2007 What is infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis? Infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis is a ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed September 2014 What is autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia? Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia ...

  17. Enriching the diet with menhaden oil improves peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Coppey, Lawrence J; Davidson, Eric P; Obrosov, Alexander; Yorek, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of supplementing the diet of type 1 diabetic rats with menhaden oil on diabetic neuropathy. Menhaden oil is a natural source for n-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to have beneficial effects in cardiovascular disease and other morbidities. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were used to examine the influence of supplementing their diet with 25% menhaden oil on diabetic neuropathy. Both prevention and intervention protocols were used. Endpoints included motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity, thermal and mechanical sensitivity, and innervation and sensitivity of the cornea and hindpaw. Diabetic neuropathy as evaluated by the stated endpoints was found to be progressive. Menhaden oil did not improve elevated HbA1C levels or serum lipid levels. Diabetic rats at 16-wk duration were thermal hypoalgesic and had reduced motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and innervation and sensitivity of the cornea and skin were impaired. These endpoints were significantly improved with menhaden oil treatment following the prevention or intervention protocol. We found that supplementing the diet of type 1 diabetic rats with menhaden oil improved a variety of endpoints associated with diabetic neuropathy. These results suggest that enriching the diet with n-3 fatty acids may be a good treatment strategy for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:25376787

  18. Enriching the diet with menhaden oil improves peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Coppey, Lawrence J.; Davidson, Eric P.; Obrosov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of supplementing the diet of type 1 diabetic rats with menhaden oil on diabetic neuropathy. Menhaden oil is a natural source for n-3 fatty acids, which have been shown to have beneficial effects in cardiovascular disease and other morbidities. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were used to examine the influence of supplementing their diet with 25% menhaden oil on diabetic neuropathy. Both prevention and intervention protocols were used. Endpoints included motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity, thermal and mechanical sensitivity, and innervation and sensitivity of the cornea and hindpaw. Diabetic neuropathy as evaluated by the stated endpoints was found to be progressive. Menhaden oil did not improve elevated HbA1C levels or serum lipid levels. Diabetic rats at 16-wk duration were thermal hypoalgesic and had reduced motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and innervation and sensitivity of the cornea and skin were impaired. These endpoints were significantly improved with menhaden oil treatment following the prevention or intervention protocol. We found that supplementing the diet of type 1 diabetic rats with menhaden oil improved a variety of endpoints associated with diabetic neuropathy. These results suggest that enriching the diet with n-3 fatty acids may be a good treatment strategy for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:25376787

  19. Generation of neural crest cells and peripheral sensory neurons from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ronald S; Pomp, Oz; Brokhman, Irina; Ziegler, Lina

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral somatic sensory neurons (PSNs) are responsible for the critical function of transmitting multiple modalities of information from the outside world, including heat, touch, and pain, as well as the position of muscles required for coordinated voluntary movement to the central nervous system. Many peripheral neuropathies exist, including hereditary neurodegeneration in Familial Dysautonomia, infections of PSNs by viruses such as Varicella zoster and damage to PSNs and/or their process resulting from other disease conditions such as diabetes. Understanding of the etiology of these diseases and development of treatments is hampered by the lack of normal and healthy human PSNs for study, which are only available from abortuses or rare surgical procedures.Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are an ideal source of cells for generating normal PSNs for study of disease and drug development, since they can be grown virtually indefinitely in tissue culture and have the potential to form any cell type in the body. Several years ago, we generated human neurons with the molecular characteristics of PSNs from hESCs at low (less than 1%) yields (Pomp et al., Stem Cells 23:923-930, 2005). The present chapter details our most recently improved method that uses 2 rounds of PA6-induction to rapidly generate PSNs at more than 25% purity (Pomp et al., Br. Res. 1230: 50-60, 2008).The neural crest (NC) is a transient multipotent embryonic stem cell population that is the source of PSNs. NC cells give rise to diverse and important tissues in man, but human NC has not been studied because of the difficulty in obtaining 3-5 week human embryos. The methods described in this chapter can also be used to quickly generate large numbers of human NC for study. PMID:19907983

  20. Further Data Supporting that the Paclitaxel-Associated Acute Pain Syndrome is Associated with the Development of Peripheral Neuropathy: NCCTG Trial N08C11

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Brandi N.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Wolf, Sherry L.; Burger, Kelli N.; Kamal, Arif; Le-Lindqwister, Nguyet A.; Soori, Gamini S.; Jaslowski, Anthony J.; Kelaghan, Joseph; Novotny, Paul J.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel causes an acute pain syndrome (P-APS), occurring within days after each dose and usually abating within days. Paclitaxel also causes a more classic peripheral neuropathy, which steadily increases in severity with increasing paclitaxel total doses. Little detail is available regarding the natural history of these two syndromes, or any relationship between them, although a recent publication does provide natural history data about weekly paclitaxel, supporting an association between the severity of P-APS and eventual peripheral neuropathy symptoms. Methods Patients entering this study were about to receive paclitaxel and carboplatin every 3 weeks. Daily questionnaires were completed for the first week after every chemotherapy dose and EORTC QLQ-CIPN 20 instruments were completed weekly. Results The P-APS severity peaked on day 4 after the initial chemotherapy dose, with 12%, 29%, 23%, and 36% of patients having maximal pain scores of 0, 1–4, 5–6, or 7–10 during the first week after the first dose of therapy, respectively. Patients with P-APS scores of 0–4 with the first dose of chemotherapy had less eventual sensory neuropathy than did patients with P-APS scores of 5–10 (p=0.001). With regard to the more peripheral neuropathy, sensory neuropathy was more problematic than was either motor or autonomic neuropathy. Numbness and tingling were more common components of the sensory neuropathy, than was pain. Conclusions Patients with worse P-APS severities appear to have more eventual chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. This provides support for the concept that the P-APS is a form of nerve pathology. PMID:22415454

  1. 'Pseudocirrhosis' in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, T; Sweeney, E C; Coll, R; Greally, M

    1977-01-01

    Telangiectasia-associated hepatic fibrosis (TAHF) in a 68-year-old woman with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is described. The patient died of oat-cell carcinoma of the lung. In addition to the structural alterations which have been described previously in HHT, the liver exhibited focal midlobular hepatocytic necrosis and tumour metastases. The possibility that treatment of HHT was causally related to some of the hepatic abnormalities found in our patient and the differentiation of TAHF from true cirrhosis are discussed. Images PMID:203609

  2. Guideline of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Transthyretin amyloidosis is a progressive and eventually fatal disease primarily characterized by sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. Given its phenotypic unpredictability and variability, transthyretin amyloidosis can be difficult to recognize and manage. Misdiagnosis is common, and patients may wait several years before accurate diagnosis, risking additional significant irreversible deterioration. This article aims to help physicians better understand transthyretin amyloidosis—and, specifically, familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy—so they can recognize and manage the disease more easily and discuss it with their patients. We provide guidance on making a definitive diagnosis, explain methods for disease staging and evaluation of disease progression, and discuss symptom mitigation and treatment strategies, including liver transplant and several pharmacotherapies that have shown promise in clinical trials. PMID:23425518

  3. The Influence of Peripheral Neuropathy, Gender, and Obesity on the Postural Stability of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Rangel, Aline; Aranda-Moreno, Catalina; Mantilla-Ochoa, Teresa; Zainos-Saucedo, Lylia; Jáuregui-Renaud, Kathrine

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To assess the influence of peripheral neuropathy, gender, and obesity on the postural stability of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods. 151 patients with no history of otology, neurology, or orthopaedic or balance disorders accepted to participate in the study. After a clinical interview and neuropathy assessment, postural stability was evaluated by static posturography (eyes open/closed on hard/soft surface) and the “Up & Go” test. Results. During static posturography, on hard surface, the length of sway was related to peripheral neuropathy, gender, age, and obesity; on soft surface, the length of sway was related to peripheral neuropathy, gender, and age, the influence of neuropathy was larger in males than in females, and closing the eyes increased further the difference between genders. The mean time to perform the “Up & Go” test was 11.6 ± 2.2 sec, with influence of peripheral neuropathy, gender, and age. Conclusion. In order to preserve the control of static upright posture during conditions with deficient sensory input, male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with no history of balance disorders may be more vulnerable than females, and obesity may decrease the static postural control in both males and females. PMID:25258716

  4. Evolving Insights into the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Neuropathy: Implications of Malfunctioning Glia and Discovery of Novel Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy subsequent to chronic high blood glucose-induced nerve damage is one of the most frustrating and debilitating complications of diabetes, which affects the quality of life in patients with diabetes. Approximately 60-70% of patients with diabetes suffer from a distal symmetrical form of mild to severe neuropathy that progresses in a fiber-length-dependent pattern, with sensory and autonomic manifestations predominating. High glucose and oxidative stress-mediated damage in neurons and glial cells, as well as neuroinflammation and crosstalk between these disease processes, have garnered immense attention as the essential mechanisms underlying the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy. Although the metabolic causes of diabetic neuropathy are well understood and documented, treatment options for this disorder are still limited, highlighting the need for further studies to identify new molecular and therapeutic targets. This review covers recent advances in our knowledge of the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy, discusses how persistent hyperglycemic conditions and malfunctioning glia drive disease progression, and finally explores the possibilities and challenges offered by several potential novel therapeutic targets for both preventing and reversing diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26635266

  5. CXCR4 chemokine receptor signaling mediates pain in diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Painful Diabetic Neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating syndrome present in a quarter of diabetic patients that has a substantial impact on their quality of life. Despite this significant prevalence and impact, current therapies for PDN are only partially effective. Moreover, the cellular mechanisms underlying PDN are not well understood. Neuropathic pain is caused by a variety of phenomena including sustained excitability in sensory neurons that reduces the pain threshold so that pain is produced in the absence of appropriate stimuli. Chemokine signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain in a variety of animal models. We therefore tested the hypothesis that chemokine signaling mediates DRG neuronal hyperexcitability in association with PDN. Results We demonstrated that intraperitoneal administration of the specific CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 reversed PDN in two animal models of type II diabetes. Furthermore DRG sensory neurons acutely isolated from diabetic mice displayed enhanced SDF-1 induced calcium responses. Moreover, we demonstrated that CXCR4 receptors are expressed by a subset of DRG sensory neurons. Finally, we observed numerous CXCR4 expressing inflammatory cells infiltrating into the DRG of diabetic mice. Conclusions These data suggest that CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling mediates enhanced calcium influx and excitability in DRG neurons responsible for PDN. Simultaneously, CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling may coordinate inflammation in diabetic DRG that could contribute to the development of pain in diabetes. Therefore, targeting CXCR4 chemokine receptors may represent a novel intervention for treating PDN. PMID:24961298

  6. Novel systems for in vivo monitoring and microenvironmental investigations of diabetic neuropathy in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Amit, Sharon; Yaron, Avraham

    2012-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a devastating complication of diabetes conferring vast morbidity and mortality. Despite prolonged efforts to elucidate the mechanisms underlying diabetic related neuropathic phenomena and develop effective therapies, current treatment is for the most part glycemic control and symptomatic care. This is partially due to the intricate pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy and the scarcity of valid experimental models. The aim of the study was to establish novel systems enabling monitoring and dissection of significant processes in the development of diabetic neuropathy. In a non-invasive in vivo model, two-photon microscopy is applied to evaluate mechanoreceptors (Meissner corpuscles) within an intact footpad of transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent neuronal tracer. By applying this advanced technology, which couples potent tissue penetration with superb resolution, we documented qualitative and quantitative diabetes-specific alterations in these sensory structures. Detection of such changes previously required laborious invasive histopathological techniques. In parallel, we present an ex vivo system that mimics the native microenvironment of the nerve ending via a unique co-culture of primary sensory neurons and thin skin slices. In conjunction with innovative high-throughput digital axonal measurements and computerized quantification tools, this method enables an unbiased exploration of neuronal autonomous and non-autonomous malfunctions. Using this setup we demonstrate that while the diabetic nerve retains a near-normal growth and regeneration capacities, the diabetic skin exhibits a decreased ability to support axonal outgrowth. Thus, an early target organ failure rather than intrinsic neuronal failure may initiate the neuropathy. Overall, the illustrated experimental platforms may greatly facilitate the holistic investigation of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22592935

  7. Hereditary inclusion-body myopathies.

    PubMed

    Broccolini, Aldobrando; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    The term hereditary inclusion-body myopathies (HIBMs) defines a group of rare muscle disorders with autosomal recessive or dominant inheritance and presence of muscle fibers with rimmed vacuoles and collection of cytoplasmic or nuclear 15-21 nm diameter tubulofilaments as revealed by muscle biopsy. The most common form of HIBM is due to mutations of the GNE gene that codes for a rate-limiting enzyme in the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway. This results in abnormal sialylation of glycoproteins that possibly leads to muscle fiber degeneration. Mutations of the valosin containing protein are instead responsible for hereditary inclusion-body myopathy with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD), with these three phenotypic features having a variable penetrance. IBMPFD probably represents a disorder of abnormal cellular trafficking of proteins and maturation of the autophagosome. HIBM with congenital joint contractures and external ophthalmoplegia is due to mutations of the Myosin Heavy Chain IIa gene that exerts a pathogenic effect through interference with filament assembly or functional defects in ATPase activity. This review illustrates the clinical and pathologic characteristics of HIBMs and the main clues available to date concerning the possible pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic perspectives of these disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25149037

  8. Intranasal Insulin Ameliorates Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Francis, George; Martinez, Jose; Liu, Wei; Nguyen, Thuhien; Ayer, Amit; Fine, Jared; Zochodne, Douglas; Hanson, Leah R.; Frey, William H.; Toth, Cory

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We hypothesized that intranasal insulin (I-I) delivery targets the nervous system while avoiding potential adverse systemic effects when compared with subcutaneous insulin (S-I) for experimental streptozotocin-induced diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS I-I or S-I at 0.87 IU daily or placebo were delivered in separate cohorts of diabetic and nondiabetic CD1 mice during 8 months of diabetes. Radiolabeled insulin detection was used to compare delivery and biodistribution for I-I and S-I. Biweekly behavioral testing and monthly electrophysiological and quantitative studies assessed progression of DPN. At and before end point, morphometric analysis of DRG, peripheral nerve, distal epidermal innervation, and specific molecular markers were evaluated. RESULTS Radiolabeled I-I resulted in more rapid and concentrated delivery to the spinal cord and DRG with less systemic insulin exposure. When compared with S-I or intranasal placebo, I-I reduced overall mouse mortality and sensory loss while improving neuropathic pain and electrophysiological/morphological abnormalities in diabetic mice. I-I restored mRNA and protein levels of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, cyclic AMP response element–binding protein, and glycogen synthase kinase 3? to near normal levels within diabetic DRGs. CONCLUSIONS I-I slows the progression of experimental DPN in streptozotocin mice, avoids adverse effects associated with S-I treatment, and prolongs lifespan when compared with S-I. I-I may be a promising approach for the treatment of DPN. PMID:19136650

  9. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-05-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  10. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy – Clinical and Electrophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tae; Prasad, Kalpana; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a primer on the pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of peripheral neuropathy for the radiologist. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) has utility in the diagnosis of many focal peripheral nerve lesions. When combined with history, examination, electrophysiology, and laboratory data, future advancements in high-field MRN may play an increasingly important role in the evaluation of patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24210312

  12. Diabetic Cranio-Cervico-Radiculoplexus Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Massie, Rami; Doherty, Timothy J; Bourque, P R; Radhakrishna, Mohan; Finlayson, Roderick J; Besemann, Markus; Simantirakis, Emmanuel; Dyck, P James Bonham

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of a 53-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus in whom cervical-radiculoplexus neuropathy developed, with concomitant cranial and phrenic nerve involvement, occurring as a stepwise, monophasic course. The patient had a presumed remote history of idiopathic cervical-radiculoplexus neuropathy. PMID:25978945

  13. Abnormal thermoregulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Scott, A R; MacDonald, I A; Bennett, T; Tattersall, R B

    1988-07-01

    Hypothermia has been reported to be more common in diabetic people than in nondiabetic people, and we have investigated the possibility that autonomic neuropathy may be associated with disordered thermoregulation. After an overnight fast and maintenance of normoglycemia, 12 insulin-treated diabetic patients with and 11 without neuropathy and 12 nondiabetic control subjects, all less than 55 yr, were subjected to external cooling by perfusing water at 16 degrees C through a liquid-conditioned coverall for less than or equal to 45 min. Patients with autonomic neuropathy had impaired vasoconstriction to cooling, particularly in the foot, calf, and forearm. Core temperature rose by 0.2 degrees C in control subjects and by 0.15 degrees C in patients with diabetes but no neuropathy. In contrast, group mean core temperature was unchanged in those with autonomic neuropathy and fell in 3 subjects (P less than .001). Cooling caused shivering in 6 patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy, but not in those with neuropathy or control subjects (P less than .05). Baseline metabolic rates were similar in all three groups, but the increase after cooling was significantly greater among those who shivered (P less than .05-.02). Thus, young diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy have impaired thermoregulation to a relatively short period of external cooling, even during metabolic stability, which may predispose to hypothermia. PMID:3384191

  14. Diabetic neuropathy and foot complications.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Andrew J M

    2014-01-01

    Foot ulceration and Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) are well recognized and documented late sequelae of diabetic peripheral, somatic, and sympathetic autonomic neuropathy. The neuropathic foot, however, does not ulcerate spontaneously: it is a combination of loss of sensation due to neuropathy together with other factors such as foot deformity and external trauma that results in ulceration and indeed CN. The commonest trauma leading to foot ulcers in the neuropathic foot in Western countries is from inappropriate footwear. Much of the management of the insensate foot in diabetes has been learned from leprosy which similarly gives rise to insensitive foot ulceration. No expensive equipment is required to identify the high risk foot and recently developed tests such as the Ipswich Touch Test and the Vibratip have been shown to be useful in identifying the high risk foot. A comprehensive screening program, together with education of high risk patients, should help to reduce the all too high incidence of ulceration in diabetes. More recently another very high risk group has been identified, namely patients on dialysis, who are at extremely high risk of developing foot ulceration; this should be preventable. The most important feature in management of neuropathic foot ulceration is offloading as patients can easily walk on active foot ulcers due to the loss of pain sensation. Infection should be treated aggressively and if there is any evidence of peripheral vascular disease, arteriography and appropriate surgical management is also indicated. CN often presents with a unilateral hot, swollen foot and any patient presenting with these features known to have neuropathy should be treated as a Charcot until this is proven otherwise. Most important in the management of acute CN is offloading, often in a total contact cast. PMID:25410217

  15. Management of ischemic optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathies (IONs) consist primarily of two types: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). AION comprises arteritic AION (A-AION: due to giant cell arteritis) and non-arteritic AION (NA-AION: due to other causes). PION consists of arteritic PION (A-PION: due to giant cell arteritis), non-arteritic PION (NA-PION: due to other causes), and surgical PION (a complication of several systemic surgical procedures). These five types of ION are distinct clinical entities etiologically, pathogenetically, clinically and from the management point of view. In the management of AION, the first crucial step with patients aged 50 and over is to identify immediately whether it is arteritic or not because A-AION is an ophthalmic emergency and requires urgent treatment with high-dose steroid therapy to prevent any further visual loss in one or both eyes. Patients with NA-AION, when treated with systemic corticosteroid therapy within first 2 weeks of onset, had significantly better visual outcome than untreated ones. Systemic risk factors, particularly nocturnal arterial hypotension, play major roles in the development of NA-AION; management of them is essential in its prevention and management. NA-PION patients, when treated with high-dose systemic steroid therapy during the very early stages of the disease, showed significant improvement in visual acuity and visual fields, compared to untreated eyes. A-PION, like A-AION, requires urgent treatment with high-dose steroid therapy to prevent any further visual loss in one or both eyes. There is no satisfactory treatment for surgical PION, except to take prophylactic measures to prevent its development. PMID:21350282

  16. ACEMg Diet Supplement Modifies Progression of Hereditary Deafness.

    PubMed

    Green, Kari L; Swiderski, Donald L; Prieskorn, Diane M; DeRemer, Susan J; Beyer, Lisa A; Miller, Josef M; Green, Glenn E; Raphael, Yehoash

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements consisting of beta-carotene (precursor to vitamin A), vitamins C and E and the mineral magnesium (ACEMg) can be beneficial for reducing hearing loss due to aminoglycosides and overstimulation. This regimen also slowed progression of deafness for a boy with GJB2 (CONNEXIN 26) mutations. To assess the potential for treating GJB2 and other forms of hereditary hearing loss with ACEMg, we tested the influence of ACEMg on the cochlea and hearing of mouse models for two human mutations: GJB2, the leading cause of childhood deafness, and DIAPH3, a cause of auditory neuropathy. One group of mice modeling GJB2 (Gjb2-CKO) received ACEMg diet starting shortly after they were weaned (4 weeks) until 16 weeks of age. Another group of Gjb2-CKO mice received ACEMg in utero and after weaning. The ACEMg diet was given to mice modeling DIAPH3 (Diap3-Tg) after weaning (4 weeks) until 12 weeks of age. Control groups received food pellets without the ACEMg supplement. Hearing thresholds measured by auditory brainstem response were significantly better for Gjb2-CKO mice fed ACEMg than for the control diet group. In contrast, Diap3-Tg mice displayed worse thresholds than controls. These results indicate that ACEMg supplementation can influence the progression of genetic hearing loss. PMID:26965868

  17. ACEMg Diet Supplement Modifies Progression of Hereditary Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kari L.; Swiderski, Donald L.; Prieskorn, Diane M.; DeRemer, Susan J.; Beyer, Lisa A.; Miller, Josef M.; Green, Glenn E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements consisting of beta-carotene (precursor to vitamin A), vitamins C and E and the mineral magnesium (ACEMg) can be beneficial for reducing hearing loss due to aminoglycosides and overstimulation. This regimen also slowed progression of deafness for a boy with GJB2 (CONNEXIN 26) mutations. To assess the potential for treating GJB2 and other forms of hereditary hearing loss with ACEMg, we tested the influence of ACEMg on the cochlea and hearing of mouse models for two human mutations: GJB2, the leading cause of childhood deafness, and DIAPH3, a cause of auditory neuropathy. One group of mice modeling GJB2 (Gjb2-CKO) received ACEMg diet starting shortly after they were weaned (4 weeks) until 16 weeks of age. Another group of Gjb2-CKO mice received ACEMg in utero and after weaning. The ACEMg diet was given to mice modeling DIAPH3 (Diap3-Tg) after weaning (4 weeks) until 12 weeks of age. Control groups received food pellets without the ACEMg supplement. Hearing thresholds measured by auditory brainstem response were significantly better for Gjb2-CKO mice fed ACEMg than for the control diet group. In contrast, Diap3-Tg mice displayed worse thresholds than controls. These results indicate that ACEMg supplementation can influence the progression of genetic hearing loss. PMID:26965868

  18. The clinical findings in Leber's hereditary optic neuroretinopathy. Leber's disease.

    PubMed

    Nikoskelainen, E

    1985-01-01

    Leber's disease is a hereditary condition primarily affecting young men. The mechanism of inheritance is unknown. Increased tortuosity and capillary microangiopathy in the peripapillary capillary bed occur in varying degrees in asymptomatic persons in families with Leber's disease. These vascular abnormalities signify an increased risk of developing the acute form of the disease. Progressive microangiopathy is a threatening sign during the presymptomatic stage. In the acute and atrophic stages of Leber's disease striking neurovascular changes take place in the fundus of the eye involved. The ophthalmoscopic observations and nerve function studies in the asymptomatic, presymptomatic and acute stages suggest that Leber's disease starts as a vascular disease. The neuropathy appears later, around the time that vision begins to fail. Both eyes are involved but at varying intervals. At the end stage the patient has bilaterally finger counting vision and a large centrocecal scotoma caused by severe optic atrophy. Examinations of other persons in families with Leber's disease have shown that subclinical and mild forms of the disease also exist. Neurological signs and symptoms can occasionally occur. Cardiac abnormalities such as pre-excitation syndrome have been reported in Leber's disease. The aetiology and precipitating factors and effective treatment to prevent blindness in Leber's disease remain unsolved questions. PMID:3879564

  19. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified, which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention, and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss, and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population. PMID:25520703

  20. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Arjunan Muthu; Sundar, Gangadhara; Chye, Lim Thiam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate current literature on investigation and management of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), propose recommendations for diagnosis and management, and explore novel future treatments. TON, though uncommon, causes substantial visual loss. Without clear guidelines, there is much ambiguity regarding its diagnosis and management. Investigation and treatment (conservative, medical, surgical, and combined) vary widely between centers. Electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, PROSPERO, CENTRAL, and EMBASE were searched for content that matched “Traumatic optic neuropathy.” Articles with abstracts and full text available, published in the past 10 years, written English and limited to human adults, were selected. All study designs were acceptable except case reports and case series with fewer 10 patients. All abstracts were then evaluated for relevance. References of these studies were evaluated and if also relevant, included. A total of 2,686 articles were retrieved and 43 examined for relevance. Of these, 23 articles were included. TON is a clinical diagnosis. Visual-evoked potential is useful in diagnosis and prognosis. Computed tomography demonstrates canal fractures and concomitant injuries. Magnetic resonance images should be reserved for select and stable patients. Conservative treatment is appropriate in mild TON. Steroids are of questionable benefit and may be harmful. Surgery should be reserved for patients with radiological evidence of compression and individualized. PMID:25709751

  1. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified, which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention, and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss, and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population. PMID:25520703

  2. Hereditary Multiple Exostoses with Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hadidy, Azmy M. Al-Smady, Moa'ath M.; Haroun, Azmi A.; Hamamy, Hanan A.; Ghoul, Suha M.; Shennak, Akram O.

    2007-06-15

    A 16-year-old male patient with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) was found to have a pseudoaneurysm of the left popliteal artery caused by osteochondroma in the lower femur. The diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography without the need to perform an angiogram. The osteochondroma was excised and the popliteal artery was repaired with a saphenous graft. Vascular complications are extremely rare in HME, pseudoaneurysm being the most common and mostly located in the popliteal artery. This complication should be considered in young HME patients with a mass at the knee region. The radiological spectrum of investigations allows the diagnosis of this complication with proper and less invasive management procedures for the patient.

  3. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  4. Functional Imaging in Hereditary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Maren; Argyelan, Miklos; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired cortical inhibiton and maladaptive cortical plasticity are functional hallmarks of sporadic focal dystonias. Whether or not these mechanisms translate to generalized dystonias and whether these features reflect state or trait characteristics is a topic of research in hereditary dystonias. Methods We present a series of studies using a multitracer approach with positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) in the DYT1 and the DYT6 genotype. Results In these hereditary dystonias maladaptive motor cortical plasticity was present as a state characteristic. As a trait characteristic neuroplastic changes were also found in secondary motor cortices and in multimodal association regions. Consistent abnormalities of resting regional brain metabolism were additionally found in interconnected elements of cortico-striatal-pallido-thalamocortical (CSPTC) and related cerebellar-thalamo-cortical circuits. Changes in specific subsets of these regions have been found to relate to genotype, phenotype, or both. Thus, a penetrance-related metabolic network was characterized by increases in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and parietal association areas, associated with relative reductions in the cerebellum, brainstem, and ventral thalamus. By contrast, genotype-specific abnormalities were localized to the basal ganglia, SMA and cerebellum. In both genotypes, the striatal metabolic abnormalities were paralleled by genotype-specific reductions in D2 receptor availability. Moreover, DTI studies disclosed microstructural changes within CSPTC and related cerebellar pathways. These disruptions may represent the main intrinsic abnormality underlying cortical downstream effects, such as increased sensorimotor responsivity. Conclusions These studies are consistent with the view of primary torsion dystonia as a neurodevelopmental circuit disorder involving CSPTC and related cerebellar pathways. PMID:20590810

  5. Differential Transcriptome Profile of Peripheral White Cells to Identify Biomarkers Involved in Oxaliplatin Induced Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Manuel; Ávila, Julio; González-Fernández, Rebeca; Boronat, Laia; Soriano, María Luisa; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer chemotherapy (CT) produces non-desirable effects on normal healthy cells and tissues. Oxaliplatin is widely used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and responsible for the development of sensory neuropathy in varying degrees, from complete tolerance to chronic neuropathic symptoms. We studied the differential gene expression of peripheral leukocytes in patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy to find genes and pathways involved in oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. Circulating white cells were obtained prior and after three cycles of FOLFOX or CAPOX chemotherapy from two groups of patients: with or without neuropathy. RNA was purified, and transcriptomes were analyzed. Differential transcriptomics revealed a total of 502 genes, which were significantly up- or down-regulated as a result of chemotherapy treatment. Nine of those genes were expressed in only one of two situations: CSHL1, GH1, KCMF1, IL36G and EFCAB8 turned off after CT, and CSRP2, IQGAP1, GNRH2, SMIM1 and C5orf17 turned on after CT. These genes are likely to be associated with the onset of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. The quantification of their expression in peripheral white cells may help to predict non-desirable side effects and, consequently, allow a better, more personalized chemotherapy. PMID:25563226

  6. Exacerbation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2E neuropathy following traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Eric; Dale, Jeffrey M; Jones, Maria; Shen, Hailian; Garcia, Michael L

    2015-11-19

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gait, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing hNF-L(E397K), which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we challenged wild type, hNF-L and hNF-L(E397K) mice with crush injury to the sciatic nerve. We analyzed functional recovery by measuring toe spread and analyzed gait using the Catwalk system. hNF-L(E397K) mice demonstrated reduced recovery from nerve injury consistent with increased susceptibility to neuropathy observed in CMT patients. In addition, hNF-L(E397K) developed a permanent reduction in their ability to weight bear, increased mechanical allodynia, and premature gait shift in the injured limb, which led to increasingly disrupted interlimb coordination in hNF-L(E397K). Exacerbation of neuropathy after injury and identification of gait alterations in combination with previously described pathology suggests that hNF-L(E397K) mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2. Therefore, hNF-L(E397K) mice provide a model for determining the efficacy of novel therapies. PMID:26423936

  7. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Neuropathy in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes without Retinopathy or Microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes W. S.; Alam, Uazman; Fadavi, Hassan; Marshall, Andrew; Asghar, Omar; Efron, Nathan; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Corneal innervation is increasingly used as a surrogate marker of human diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) however its temporal relationship with the other microvascular complications of diabetes is not fully established. In this cross-sectional, observational study we aimed to assess whether neuropathy occurred in patients with type 1 diabetes, without retinopathy or microalbuminuria. Materials and Methods All participants underwent detailed assessment of peripheral neuropathy [neuropathy disability score (NDS), vibration perception threshold (VPT), peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (PMNCV), sural sensory nerve conduction velocity (SSNCV) and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCCM)], retinopathy (digital fundus photography) and albuminuria status [albumin: creatinine ratio (ACR)]. Results 53 patients with Type 1 diabetes with (n=37) and without retinopathy (n=16) were compared to control subjects (n=27). SSNCV, corneal nerve fibre (CNFD) and branch (CNBD) density and length (CNFL) were reduced significantly (p<0.001) in diabetic patients without retinopathy compared to control subjects. Furthermore, CNFD, CNBD and CNFL were also significantly (p<0.001) reduced in diabetic patients without microalbuminuria (n=39), compared to control subjects. Greater neuropathic severity was associated with established retinopathy and microalbuminuria. Conclusions IVCCM detects early small fibre damage in the absence of retinopathy or microalbuminuria in patients with Type 1 diabetes. PMID:25853247

  8. Hereditary generalized amyloidosis with polyneuropathy. Clinicopathological study of 65 Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Hanyu, N; Hongo, M; Yoshioka, J; Oguchi, H; Yanagisawa, N; Kobayashi, T; Tsukagoshi, H; Ito, N; Yokota, T

    1987-04-01

    A clinicopathological study was made on 65 patients from a small area of Nagano Prefecture, Japan, with hereditary generalized amyloidosis with polyneuropathy to clarify the clinical variety of the disease. Forty-five patients from Ogawa village showed similar clinical features. The age of onset ranged widely from 16 to 62 years. The main neurological manifestations were polyneuropathy starting in the legs and autonomic dysfunction. Lower cranial nerves were also affected in the advanced stages. Severe cardiac and renal involvement was uncommon. All these clinical features are consistent with type I familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP). The remaining 20 patients from five unrelated kinships showed unique clinical pictures. Two families from Ogawa village had type I FAP, but 4 out of the 5 affected patients showed marked nephropathy with heavy proteinuria from an early stage. Of the three other families, one, with 10 patients, was notable for the involvement of the central nervous system. Most of the patients showed cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal tract signs in addition to a sensorimotor and autonomic peripheral neuropathy. Another family had 2 siblings who had severe amyloid heart disease from the onset and developed polyneuropathy with autonomic features at an advanced stage. In the third family, onset occurred in the sixth decade in all 3 patients and the course was mild in 2, although the clinical features were those of typical type I FAP. Immunohistochemical study revealed that the amyloid fibril proteins in the patients with all four unusual clinical phenotypes were related to plasma prealbumin. The most common form of hereditary generalized amyloidosis in Japan is type I FAP, but the disease shows considerable variety in the age of onset and involves more systemic organs than previously recognized. The newly recognized clinical forms of hereditary generalized amyloidosis with severe amyloid heart disease or central nervous dysfunction indicate clinical heterogeneity of hereditary amyloidosis with polyneuropathy. PMID:3032328

  9. Drugs for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent in association with systemic diseases as well as isolated disorders. Recent advances in the therapy of specific neuropathies led to the approval of new drugs/treatments. This review selected those peripheral neuropathies where the most recent approvals were provided and revised the potential future developments in diabetic and toxic-induced neuropathies, although they do not have a currently available causal therapy in view of their epidemiological and social relevance. Data have been extracted from the most important published trials and from clinical experience. In addition, data from the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency indications on the treatment of the selected peripheral neuropathies and from recently updated international guidelines have also been included. The website of the U.S. National Institutes of Health www.clinicaltrials.gov registry has been used as the reference database for phase III clinical trials not yet published or ongoing. This review gives a general overview of the most recent advances in the treatment of amyloid, inflammatory, and paraproteinemic peripheral neuropathies. Moreover, it briefly describes the unmet medical need in disabling and frequent conditions, such as diabetic and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, highlighting the most promising therapeutic approaches to their treatment. PMID:26567516

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Raymond, Neil T.; Begum, Safia; Dubb, Kiran; Mughal, Shanaz; Jose, Biju; Piya, Milan K.; Barnett, Anthony H.; Stevens, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is common and causes significant morbidity. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is also common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Because OSA is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, we hypothesized that OSA is associated with peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetes. Objectives: To assess the relationship between OSA and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A cross-sectional study of adults with type 2 diabetes recruited randomly from the diabetes clinic of two UK hospitals. Measurements and Main Results: Peripheral neuropathy was diagnosed using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument. OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 5 events/h) was assessed using home-based, multichannel respiratory monitoring. Serum nitrotyrosine was measured by ELISA, lipid peroxide by spectrophotometer, and microvascular function by laser speckle contrast imaging. Two hundred thirty-four patients (mean [SD] age, 57 [12] yr) were analyzed. OSA prevalence was 65% (median apnea-hypopnea index, 7.2; range, 0–93), 40% of which were moderate to severe. Neuropathy prevalence was higher in patients with OSA than those without (60% vs. 27%, P < 0.001). After adjustment for possible confounders, OSA remained independently associated with diabetic neuropathy (odds ratio, 2.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.44–5.52; P = 0.0034). Nitrotyrosine and lipid peroxide levels (n = 102, 74 with OSA) were higher in OSA and correlated with hypoxemia severity. Cutaneous microvascular function (n = 71, 47 with OSA) was impaired in OSA. Conclusions: We describe a novel independent association between diabetic peripheral neuropathy and OSA. We identified increased nitrosative/oxidative stress and impaired microvascular regulation as potential mechanisms. Prospective and interventional studies are needed to assess the impact of OSA and its treatment on peripheral neuropathy development and progression in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22723291

  11. Novel MPZ mutations and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Hugh J.; Santagata, Sandro; Shapiro, Frederic; Batish, Sat Dev; Couchon, Libby; Donnelly, Stephen; Kang, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    We report two new MPZ mutations causing congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies; c.368_382delGCACGTTCACTTGTG (in-frame deletion of five amino acids) and c.392A>G, Asn131Ser. Each child had clinical and electrodiagnostic features consistent with an inherited neuropathy, confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The cases illustrate the clinically heterogeneity that exists even within early-onset forms of this disease. They also lend additional support to the emerging clinical and laboratory evidence that impaired intracellular protein trafficking may represent the cause of some congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies. PMID:20621479

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary multiple exostoses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patients and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding hereditary multiple exostoses? autosomal ; ... many other terms in the Genetics Home Reference Glossary . See also Understanding Medical Terminology . References (7 links) ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... than normal and that tend to cluster together (aggregate). These aggregated proteins form protein clumps called amyloid ... definitions help with understanding hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy? aggregate ; amyloid ; amyloidosis ; apoptosis ; autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; cell ; central ...

  14. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kalady, Matthew F; Heald, Brandie

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes. PMID:26664327

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is a disorder related to low levels of phosphate in the blood (hypophosphatemia). Phosphate is a mineral that is essential for the ... condition. Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets is characterized by a phosphate imbalance in the body. Among its many functions, ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... system, which controls involuntary body functions such as digestion and saliva formation. Parasympathetic paragangliomas, typically found in ... autosomal dominant ; benign ; cell ; compound ; dehydrogenase ; difficulty swallowing ; ... familial ; gene ; hereditary ; hypertension ; hypoxia ; inheritance ; inherited ; ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at high pressure into the thinner walled, less elastic veins. The extra pressure tends to strain and ... autosomal ; autosomal dominant ; capillaries ; cell ; chromosome ; compression ; deficiency ; elastic ; gastrointestinal ; gene ; hemorrhage ; hereditary ; incidence ; inherited ; juvenile ; oxygen ; ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary folate malabsorption

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the production of DNA and its chemical cousin, RNA. Infants with hereditary folate malabsorption are born with ... anemia ; microvilli ; neurological ; platelets ; prevalence ; protein ; proton ; recessive ; RNA ; susceptibility ; thrombocytopenia ; vitamins ; white blood cells You may ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the eye (epicanthal fold), a long nasal bridge, a narrow mouth, and differences between one side ... Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy? These resources address the ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... include treatment providers. American Cancer Society: How is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed? Gene Review: Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Genetic ... of Health National Cancer Institute: General Information About Stomach Cancer Educational resources - Information pages (9 links) Patient support - ...