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Sample records for hereditary sensory neuropathy

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA On this page: Description Genetic changes ... definitions Reviewed March 2015 What is hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA? Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE

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    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE On this page: Description Genetic changes ... November 2012 What is hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IE? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (often shortened to HSAN2 ) On this ... 2011 What is HSAN2? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type II (HSAN2) is a condition that primarily ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (often shortened to HSAN5 ) On this ... 2011 What is HSAN5? Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V (HSAN5) is a condition that primarily ...

  5. Hereditary Neuropathies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Hereditary Neuropathies Information Page Synonym(s): Neuropathy - Hereditary Table of Contents ( ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Hereditary Neuropathies? Hereditary neuropathies are a group of inherited disorders ...

  6. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  7. [Two cases of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with proximal dominant involvement (HMSN-P)].

    PubMed

    Mori, Chiaki; Saito, Tomoko; Saito, Toshio; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Sakoda, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    We, herein, report two independent cases with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with proximal dominant involvement (HMSN-P) inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Their common clinical features are slowly progressive proximal dominant muscular atrophy, fasciculations and mild to moderate distal sensory disturbance with areflexia. Nerve conduction study revealed an absence of sensory nerve action potentials, in contrast to almost normal compound muscle action potentials. Gene analysis in both patients elucidated heterozygous mutation (c.854C>T, p.Pro285Leu) in the TFG, which is an identical mutation, already described by Ishiura et al. Okinawa and Shiga are two foci of HMSN-P in Japan. Eventually, one patient is from Okinawa and the other is from a mountain village in Shiga prefecture. When we see a patient who has symptoms suggestive of motor neuron disease with sensory neuropathy, HMSN-P should be considered as a differential diagnosis despite the patient's actual resident place. PMID:26103812

  8. [Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease). Molecular-genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Hertz, M J; Jensen, A D; Brandt, C A; Bisgård, C

    1995-06-19

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) comprises a heterogenous group of peripheral neuropathies which are classified on the basis of symptoms, mode of inheritance and electrophysiological and neuropathological investigations. HMSN type I, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1, is a hypertrophic and demyelinating neuropathy with reduced nerve conduction velocity, and most often with dominant inheritance. HMSN type II (CMT type 2), the neuronal or axonal form, is dominantly inherited with normal or only moderately reduced nerve conduction velocity. HMSN type III, also called Déjérine-Sottas disease, is a hypertrophic neuropathy with markedly reduced nerve conduction velocity. HMSN type I is genetically heterogenous with at least four autosomal loci and at least two X-linked loci. The most frequent form, HMSN type Ia, is associated with a specific duplication on chromosome 17, which can be detected by DNA-analysis. The genes for HMSN type Ia, Ib and an X-linked dominant form have been identified as PMP22, MPZ and GJB1 respectively. Analysis for these molecular defects will become important in the differential diagnosis of peripheral neuropathies and will surely prove invaluable in the genetic counselling of the families. PMID:7652980

  9. X-linked hereditary motor sensory neuropathy (type 1) presenting with a stroke-like episode.

    PubMed

    Anand, Geetha; Maheshwari, Nitin; Roberts, David; Padeniya, Anuruddha; Hamilton-Ayers, Michele; van der Knaap, Marjo; Fratter, Carl; Jayawant, Sandeep

    2010-07-01

    X-linked hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type 1 (CMTX 1) is caused by mutation in the GJB1 gene that codes for the connexin 32 protein. Central nervous system involvement with or without white matter changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has rarely been reported in this condition. We report the case of a 7-year-old, previously well male who presented with a stroke-like episode that manifested as left hemiparesis and dysphasia. An initial brain MRI showed white matter signal changes affecting the corpus callosum and periventricular areas with a posterior predominance. Our patient made a complete clinical recovery in 36 hours. Clinical examination at this stage showed no evidence of a peripheral neuropathy. A repeat brain MRI 6 weeks later showed almost complete resolution of the changes seen initially. Subsequent investigations showed a Val177Ala mutation in the GJB1 gene. This mutation has so far not been described in the Caucasian population and has been only described once before. Electrophysiological studies showed a mixed demyelinating and axonal sensorimotor neuropathy in keeping with CMTX 1. Five months after the initial presentation our patient developed clinical evidence of a peripheral neuropathy in the form of absent ankle reflexes, weak dorsiflexors, and evertors of both feet. PMID:20491857

  10. Genes for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies: a genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; Vriendt, Els De; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Lévy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andrés; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant (SPTLC1 and RAB7) and five genes for autosomal recessive forms of HSAN (WNK1/HSN2, NTRK1, NGFB, CCT5 and IKBKAP). We performed a systematic mutation screening of the coding sequences of six of these genes on a cohort of 100 familial and isolated patients diagnosed with HSAN. In addition, we screened the functional candidate gene NGFR (p75/NTR) encoding the nerve growth factor receptor. We identified disease-causing mutations in SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2 and NTRK1 in 19 patients, of which three mutations have not previously been reported. The phenotypes associated with mutations in NTRK1 and WNK1/HSN2 typically consisted of congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis, and early-onset ulcero-mutilating sensory neuropathy, respectively. RAB7 mutations were only found in patients with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B (CMT2B) phenotype, an axonal sensory-motor neuropathy with pronounced ulcero-mutilations. In SPTLC1, we detected a novel mutation (S331F) corresponding to a previously unknown severe and early-onset HSAN phenotype. No mutations were found in NGFB, CCT5 and NGFR. Overall disease-associated mutations were found in 19% of the studied patient group, suggesting that additional genes are associated with HSAN. Our genotype–phenotype correlation study broadens the spectrum of HSAN and provides additional insights for molecular and clinical diagnosis. PMID:19651702

  11. Misclassification and linkage of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2B

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, J.M.; Speer, M.C.; Stajich, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    Recently Kwon et al. published in the Journal their work describing linkage of a single large family with an inherited axonal neuropathy to chromosome 3, which they suggest is a second locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) type 2 and subsequently named {open_quotes}CMT2B.{close_quotes} We think that the diagnostic classification of this family as CMT2 is incorrect, since the subjects have a severe sensory neuropathy that fits within the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type 1 classification of Dyck (1993). Abnormal sensory findings in CMT2 separate it from distal spinal muscular atrophy but are a minor component of clinical symptoms in most CMT patients, as CMT is primarily a motor neuropathy. When Kwon et al. state that {open_quotes}all [patients] had characteristic findings in their physical examinations, including... evidence of foot sores that were slow to heal, or amputated limbs related to the poorly healing foot ulcers,{close_quotes} it suggests that a different diagnosis is more appropriate. In our experience collecting data on >950 individuals in >60 CMT1, CMT2, CMTX and CMT4 families, we have not seen foot ulcers, osteomyelitis, or amputations. Ulcerations leading to osteomyelitis and amputations are usually associated with severe sensory neuropathies. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Tazir, Meriem; Hamadouche, Tarik; Nouioua, Sonia; Mathis, Stephane; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases are the most common degenerative disorders of the peripheral nervous system. However, the frequency of the different subtypes varies within distinct populations. Although more than seventy clinical and genetic forms are known to date, more than 80% of CMT patients in Western countries have genetic abnormalities associated with PMP22, MPZ, MFN2 and GJB1. Given the considerable genetic heterogeneity of CMT, we emphasize the interest of both clinical and pathological specific features such that focused genetic testing could be performed. In this regard, peripheral nerve lesions in GDAP1 mutations (AR CMT1A), such as mitochondrial abnormalities, have been newly demonstrated. Otherwise, while demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT used to be classified as CMT4 (A, B, C …), we propose a simplified classification such as AR CMT1 (A, B, C …), and AR CMT2 for axonal forms. Also, we stress that next generation sequencing techniques, now considered to be the most efficient methods of genetic testing in CMT, will be helpful in molecular diagnosis and research of new genes involved. Finally, while no effective therapy is known to date, ongoing new therapeutic trials such as PXT3003 (a low dose combination of the three already approved drugs baclofen, naltrexone, and D-sorbitol) give hopes for potential curative treatment. PMID:25454638

  13. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Hilo, Wasseem; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Modi, Naftali; Briscoe, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Lebers hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute severe visual loss in both eyes, which usually manifests in young adulthood. The disease has maternal inheritance due to mitochondrial DNA mutation. The final diagnosis is genetic. There is still no proven treatment, but there is significant progress in developments on the genetics of the disease to reach gene therapy. In this article we review the latest literature relevant to this disease. PMID:24167936

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Leber hereditary optic neuropathy On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... Reviewed December 2013 What is Leber hereditary optic neuropathy? Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited ...

  15. Identification of dietary alanine toxicity and trafficking dysfunction in a Drosophila model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Matthew C. W.; West, Ryan J. H.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Sweeney, Sean T.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is characterized by a loss of distal peripheral sensory and motorneuronal function, neuropathic pain and tissue necrosis. The most common cause of HSAN1 is due to dominant mutations in serine palmitoyl-transferase subunit 1 (SPT1). SPT catalyses the condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in sphingolipid biogenesis. Identified mutations in SPT1 are known to both reduce sphingolipid synthesis and generate catalytic promiscuity, incorporating alanine or glycine into the precursor sphingolipid to generate a deoxysphingoid base (DSB). Why either loss of function in SPT1, or generation of DSBs should generate deficits in distal sensory function remains unclear. To address these questions, we generated a Drosophila model of HSAN1. Expression of dSpt1 bearing a disease-related mutation induced morphological deficits in synapse growth at the larval neuromuscular junction consistent with a dominant-negative action. Expression of mutant dSpt1 globally was found to be mildly toxic, but was completely toxic when the diet was supplemented with alanine, when DSBs were observed in abundance. Expression of mutant dSpt1 in sensory neurons generated developmental deficits in dendritic arborization with concomitant sensory deficits. A membrane trafficking defect was observed in soma of sensory neurons expressing mutant dSpt1, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi block. We found that we could rescue sensory function in neurons expressing mutant dSpt1 by co-expressing an effector of ER–Golgi function, Rab1 suggesting compromised ER function in HSAN1 affected dendritic neurons. Our Drosophila model identifies a novel strategy to explore the pathological mechanisms of HSAN1. PMID:26395456

  16. Identification of dietary alanine toxicity and trafficking dysfunction in a Drosophila model of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Matthew C W; West, Ryan J H; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Sweeney, Sean T

    2015-12-15

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) is characterized by a loss of distal peripheral sensory and motorneuronal function, neuropathic pain and tissue necrosis. The most common cause of HSAN1 is due to dominant mutations in serine palmitoyl-transferase subunit 1 (SPT1). SPT catalyses the condensation of serine with palmitoyl-CoA, the initial step in sphingolipid biogenesis. Identified mutations in SPT1 are known to both reduce sphingolipid synthesis and generate catalytic promiscuity, incorporating alanine or glycine into the precursor sphingolipid to generate a deoxysphingoid base (DSB). Why either loss of function in SPT1, or generation of DSBs should generate deficits in distal sensory function remains unclear. To address these questions, we generated a Drosophila model of HSAN1. Expression of dSpt1 bearing a disease-related mutation induced morphological deficits in synapse growth at the larval neuromuscular junction consistent with a dominant-negative action. Expression of mutant dSpt1 globally was found to be mildly toxic, but was completely toxic when the diet was supplemented with alanine, when DSBs were observed in abundance. Expression of mutant dSpt1 in sensory neurons generated developmental deficits in dendritic arborization with concomitant sensory deficits. A membrane trafficking defect was observed in soma of sensory neurons expressing mutant dSpt1, consistent with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi block. We found that we could rescue sensory function in neurons expressing mutant dSpt1 by co-expressing an effector of ER-Golgi function, Rab1 suggesting compromised ER function in HSAN1 affected dendritic neurons. Our Drosophila model identifies a novel strategy to explore the pathological mechanisms of HSAN1. PMID:26395456

  17. [A review of the oro-dento-facial characteristics of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (familial dysautonomia)].

    PubMed

    Mass, E

    2013-01-01

    The oro-dento-facial features and dysfunction of children with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type Ill, known as familial dysautonomia or Riley-Day syndrome, was first described in the scientific literature in 1949. They include dental trauma; dental and soft tissue self-mutilation; normal dental age; normal sequence and timing of eruption and exfoliation of teeth; smaller tooth size; different and disproportional tooth components; normal alveolar bone height; small jaws, mild crowding, and malocclusions. These persons have craniofacial morphology that is different from accepted norms but they resemble norms of their ethnic origin. The subjects can have gray, pale, shiny faces with an asymmetric suffering expression; frontal bossing, with eventual hypertelorism and narrow lips; a low caries rate; drooling, and hypersalivation. They can have changes in salivary composition and content, which influences plaque and calculus and increases the risk of gingival and periodontal diseases. They also have difficulty in controlling oral muscles; a progressive decrease in number of tongue fungiform papillae, accompanied by lack of taste buds; and specific dysgeusia, but a normal sense of smell. PMID:23697298

  18. A review of the oro-dento-facial characteristics of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III (familial dysautonomia).

    PubMed

    Mass, Eliyahu

    2012-01-01

    The oro-dento-facial features and dysfunction of children with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type III, known as familial dysautonomia or Riley-Day syndrome, was first described in the scientific literature in 1949. They include dental trauma; dental and soft tissue self-mutilation; normal dental age; normal sequence and timing of eruption and exfoliation of teeth; smaller tooth size; different and disproportional tooth components; normal alveolar bone height; small jaws, mild crowding, and malocclusions. These persons have craniofacial morphology that is different from accepted norms but they resemble norms of their ethnic origin. The subjects can have gray, pale, shiny faces with an asymmetric suffering expression; frontal bossing, with eventual hypertelorism and narrow lips; a low-caries rate; drooling, and hypersalivation. They can have changes in salivary composition and content, which influences plaque and calculus and increases the risk of gingival and periodontal diseases. They also have difficulty in controlling oral muscles; a progressive decrease in number of tongue fungiform papillae, accompanied by lack of taste buds; and specific dysgeusia, but a normal sense of smell. PMID:22229594

  19. [Acute Sensory Neuropathies and Acute Autonomic Neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Koike, Haruki

    2015-11-01

    From the perspective of neuropathies with an acute onset mimicking that of Guillain-Barr? syndrome (GBS), cases with profound sensory and/or autonomic impairment without any significant weakness have been reported. Although the possibility of infectious or toxic etiologies should be carefully excluded, immune mechanisms similar to those in GBS are suggested to be involved in these so-called acute sensory neuropathies and acute autonomic neuropathies. The types of neuropathy include those with predominant sensory manifestations, predominant autonomic manifestations such as autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy, and both sensory and autonomic manifestations such as acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Neuronopathy in the sensory and/or autonomic ganglia (i.e., ganglionopathy) has been commonly suggested in patients with these types of neuropathies. The presence of Anti-GD1b antibodies has been reported in some of the patients with acute sensory neuropathy with deep sensory impairment, whereas anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies are reported to be present in half of the patients with autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. The discovery of anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies significantly expanded the spectrum of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy. This is because some of the patients with chronic progression mimicking neurodegenerative diseases such as pure autonomic failure were positive for these antibodies. In contrast, pathologically significant autoantibodies have not been identified in acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenesis and the spectrum of these types of neuropathies. PMID:26560953

  20. Aberrant signature methylome by DNMT1 hot spot mutation in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 1E

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhifu; Wu, Yanhong; Ordog, Tamas; Baheti, Saurabh; Nie, Jinfu; Duan, Xiaohui; Hojo, Kaori; Kocher, Jean-Pierre; Dyck, Peter J; Klein, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is essential for DNA methylation, gene regulation and chromatin stability. We previously discovered DNMT1 mutations cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 with dementia and hearing loss (HSAN1E; OMIM 614116). HSAN1E is the first adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by a defect in a methyltransferase gene. HSAN1E patients appear clinically normal until young adulthood, then begin developing the characteristic symptoms involving central and peripheral nervous systems. Some HSAN1E patients also develop narcolepsy and it has recently been suggested that HSAN1E is allelic to autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness, with narcolepsy (ADCA-DN; OMIM 604121), which is also caused by mutations in DNMT1. A hotspot mutation Y495C within the targeting sequence domain of DNMT1 has been identified among HSAN1E patients. The mutant DNMT1 protein shows premature degradation and reduced DNA methyltransferase activity. Herein, we investigate genome-wide DNA methylation at single-base resolution through whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of germline DNA in 3 pairs of HSAN1E patients and their gender- and age-matched siblings. Over 1 billion 75-bp single-end reads were generated for each sample. In the 3 affected siblings, overall methylation loss was consistently found in all chromosomes with X and 18 being most affected. Paired sample analysis identified 564,218 differentially methylated CpG sites (DMCs; P < 0.05), of which 300?134 were intergenic and 264?084 genic CpGs. Hypomethylation was predominant in both genic and intergenic regions, including promoters, exons, most CpG islands, L1, L2, Alu, and satellite repeats and simple repeat sequences. In some CpG islands, hypermethylated CpGs outnumbered hypomethylated CpGs. In 201 imprinted genes, there were more DMCs than in non-imprinted genes and most were hypomethylated. Differentially methylated region (DMR) analysis identified 5649 hypomethylated and 1872 hypermethylated regions. Importantly, pathway analysis revealed 1693 genes associated with the identified DMRs were highly associated in diverse neurological disorders and NAD+/NADH metabolism pathways is implicated in the pathogenesis. Our results provide novel insights into the epigenetic mechanism of neurodegeneration arising from a hotspot DNMT1 mutation and reveal pathways potentially important in a broad category of neurological and psychological disorders. PMID:25033457

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed August 2009 What is distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V? Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies On this page: ... Glossary definitions Reviewed April 2007 What is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies? Hereditary neuropathy with ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed August 2009 What is distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II? Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II ...

  4. X-Linked Hereditary Motor Sensory Neuropathy Type 1 (CMTX1) in a Three-Generation Gelao Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiao Mei; Tian, Mao Qiang; Li, Juan; Peng, Long Ying; Yu, Xiao Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we describe a three-generation family (the Gelao nationality, a minority ethnic group from Guizhou Province in the southwest China) with one affected member with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy X type 1 (CMTX1) in each generation. The three affected members carrying the R164W mutation in the Cx32 gene had different clinical symptoms. The proband, a 13-year-old boy presented recurrent episodes of transient central nervous system symptoms and concomitant transient diffuse white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. His grandfather had the peripheral neurological presentations with later onset in the fourth decade, characterized by slowly progressive weakness of the distal muscles, atrophy, and foot deformities. But no sensory loss was observed. The proband's 38-year-old mother denied any neurological symptoms. The examination was normal except for pes cavus and diminished deep tendon reflexes in her lower limbs bilaterally. Genetic sequencing revealed the proband and his grandfather had a hemizygous mutation (p.164R?>?W) of CJB1 gene, and his mother had R164W heterozygous mutation. Our three cases denied symptoms of sensory disturbances, the sensory examination including touch, pin prick, and temperature sensation showed no obvious abnormalities. Thus, further investigation is needed to improve our understanding of the Cx32 protein function in the nervous system. PMID:26479765

  5. Oral l-serine supplementation reduces production of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids in mice and humans with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type 1

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Kevin; Penno, Anke; Schmidt, Brian P.; Lee, Ho-Joon; Frosch, Matthew P.; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Brown, Robert H.; Hornemann, Thorsten; Eichler, Florian S.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1) causes sensory loss that predominantly affects the lower limbs, often preceded by hyperpathia and spontaneous shooting or lancinating pain. It is caused by several missense mutations in the genes encoding 2 of the 3 subunits of the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). The mutant forms of the enzyme show a shift from their canonical substrate l-serine to the alternative substrate l-alanine. This shift leads to increased formation of neurotoxic deoxysphingolipids (dSLs). Our initial analysis showed that in HEK cells transfected with SPTLC1 mutants, dSL generation was modulated in vitro in the presence of various amino acids. We therefore examined whether in vivo specific amino acid substrate supplementation influenced dSL levels and disease severity in HSAN1. In mice bearing a transgene expressing the C133W SPTLC1 mutant linked to HSAN1, a 10% l-serine–enriched diet reduced dSL levels. l-serine supplementation also improved measures of motor and sensory performance as well as measures of male fertility. In contrast, a 10% l-alanine–enriched diet increased dSL levels and led to severe peripheral neuropathy. In a pilot study with 14 HSAN1 patients, l-serine supplementation similarly reduced dSL levels. These observations support the hypothesis that an altered substrate selectivity of the mutant SPT is key to the pathophysiology of HSAN1 and raise the prospect of l-serine supplementation as a first treatment option for this disorder. PMID:22045570

  6. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) type X1 in an Argentinean family reveals independent GJB1/Cx32 mutations at the identical nucleotide position.

    PubMed

    Gerding, Wanda Maria; Koetting, Judith; Rey, Lucía Paola; Bibas Bonet, Hilda; Abdala, Mirta Esther; Mazzeo, Anna; Mostacciuolo, Maria Luisa; Arning, Larissa; Carrero-Valenzuela, Roque

    2013-01-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT Type X1, OMIM: 302800) represents a frequent cause of hereditary peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies and is associated with mutations in GJB1 encoding the gap junction beta 1 protein connexin 32 (Cx32). Studying an Argentinean family of Italian origin with seven affected males in three generations exhibiting clinical signs of CMT, eight obligate female carriers were identified genealogically. DNA sequencing of exon 2 and adjacent regions of the GJB1 gene in two symptomatic males whose respective maternal grandfathers, both affected, were brothers, revealed mutations in GJB1/Cx32. Surprisingly, each of the two affected patients had a different mutation in hemizygous state at the same nucleotide position: c.383C>T (p.S128L) and c.383C>A (p.S128X). In both cases, the identified mutation was present in heterozygous state in the corresponding maternal genomic DNA. Furthermore, X-chromosomal microsatellite analysis showed identical marker alleles in both patients. Together with the genealogical information, these molecular data imply that a primarily mutated allele mutated for a second time. In conclusion, two different mutations at the same nucleotide position in this Argentinean family represent a finding with a very low probability of occurrence. PMID:23384994

  7. Medical Management of Hereditary Optic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  8. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  9. [Review of the recent literature on hereditary neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Birouk, N

    2014-12-01

    The recent literature included interesting reports on the pathogenic mechanisms of hereditary neuropathies. The axonal traffic and its abnormalities in some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease were particularly reviewed by Bucci et al. Many genes related to CMT disease code for proteins that are involved directly or not in intracellular traffic. KIF1B controls vesicle motility on microtubules. MTMR2, MTMR13 and FIG4 regulate the metabolism of phosphoinositide at the level of endosomes. The HSPs are involved in the proteasomal degradation. GDAP1 and MFN2 regulate the mitochondrial fission and fusion respectively and the mitochondial transport within the axon. Pareyson et al. reported a review on peripheral neuropathies in mitochondrial disorders. They used the term of "mitochondrial CMT" for the forms of CMT with abnormal mitochondrial dynamic or structure. Among the new entities, we can draw the attention to a proximal form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance, which is characterized by motor deficit with cramps and fasciculations predominating in proximal muscles. Distal sensory deficit can be present. The gene TFG on chromosome 3 has been recently identified to be responsible for this form. Another rare form of axonal autosomal recessive neuropathy due to HNT1 gene mutation is characterized by the presence of hands myotonia that appears later than neuropathy but constitute an interesting clinical hallmark to orientate the diagnosis of this form. In terms of differential diagnosis, CMT4J due to FIG4 mutation can present with a rapidly progressive and asymmetric weakness that resembles CIDP. Bouhy et al. made an interesting review on the therapeutic trials, animal models and the future therapeutic strategies to be developed in CMT disease. PMID:25459128

  10. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  11. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  12. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  13. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  14. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  15. White matter changes in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Küker, W; Weir, A; Quaghebeur, G; Palace, J

    2007-05-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a mitochondrial disorder causing bilateral optic nerve degeneration. It is sometimes associated with clinical signs of multiple sclerosis. We report MRI findings in two patients with LHON-MS and comment on possible distinguishing features of this disease entity. PMID:17437624

  16. [A family of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I with a mutation (Arg98-->His) in myelin Po--report on a second Japanese family].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, A; Kashiwada, E; Hashimoto, T; Yamamoto, T; Murai, Y; Ohashi, H; Ikegami, T; Hayasaka, K; Sudo, K; Yamamori, S

    1996-03-01

    A 46-year-old housewife had complaints of insidiously progressive muscle weakness and paresthesia in the distal lower limbs. On neurological examination, a slight to moderate degree of muscle weakness with slight atrophy was observed in the bilateral intrinsic hand muscles. A severe degree of muscle weakness with moderate atrophy was observed in tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Muscle stretch reflexes were decreased in the upper limbs and absent in the lower limbs, without pathologic reflexes. She had a steppage gait. Vibratory sensation was slightly decreased in the hands and moderately decreased in the feet. Touch, pain and temperature sensations were also moderately decreased only in the feet. On laboratory examination, glycosuria (5.6g/dl) was noted. Fasting blood sugar was 226mg/dl with an elevated hemoglobin A1C level (12.7%). The right median motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities were 14.8 and 20.3 m/sec, respectively, with a markedly prolonged distal latency. No muscle action potential was obtained from stimulation of the right tibial nerve. Also, no nerve action potential was elicited from stimulation of the right sural nerve. A fascicular biopsy of the right sural nerve revealed the presence of both demyelinated and remyelinated axons, and an onion-bulb formation with a marked decrease in the density of the myelinated fibers. Based on the neurological examination and nerve conduction studies of the family members, a younger sister, younger brother and an elder daughter of the proband were found to be affected by demyelinating polyneuropathy. Diabetes mellitus was not found among the family members with laboratory evidences of demyelinating polyneuropathy. Based on the family history, an uncle on the mother's side of the proband, the proband's grandmother and a younger daughter of a proband's brother were considered to be affected. The uncle and grandmother had diabetes mellitus. Therefore, we concluded that this family had HMSN type I with autosomal dominant inheritance. In the studies on fluorescence in situ hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism of the genomic DNA of the proband, a DNA duplication in the 17p11.2-12 region was not observed. However, the direct sequencing analysis of DNA fragments from genomic DNA encoding the Po gene of the proband revealed a substitution of histidine for arginine at the codon 98 in the extramembranous domain of Po. She was heterozygous for the mutant allele and normal allele. Alterations in the tertiary structure of the extramembranous domain of Po may result in an impairment of the peripheral myelin compaction. This is the second Japanese family with the same mutation (Arg98-->His) of myelin Po as reported previously by us, and this type of case is rare in the literature. Therefore, the mutation at the codon 98 may play a critical role in the development of the myelin abnormality in HMSN type IB. PMID:8851708

  17. A reversible functional sensory neuropathy model.

    PubMed

    Danigo, Aurore; Magy, Laurent; Richard, Laurence; Sturtz, Franck; Funalot, Benoît; Demiot, Claire

    2014-06-13

    Small-fiber neuropathy was induced in young adult mice by intraperitoneal injection of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a TRPV1 agonist. At day 7, RTX induced significant thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia. At day 28, mechanical and thermal nociception were restored. No nerve degeneration in skin was observed and unmyelinated nerve fiber morphology and density in sciatic nerve were unchanged. At day 7, substance P (SP) was largely depleted in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, although calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was only moderately depleted. Three weeks after, SP and CGRP expression was restored in DRG neurons. At the same time, CGRP expression remained low in intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) whereas SP expression had improved. In summary, RTX induced in our model a transient neuropeptide depletion in sensory neurons without nerve degeneration. We think this model is valuable as it brings the opportunity to study functional nerve changes in the very early phase of small fiber neuropathy. Moreover, it may represent a useful tool to study the mechanisms of action of therapeutic strategies to prevent sensory neuropathy of various origins. PMID:24792390

  18. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is usually reported as 1:2,500, epidemiological studies show that 20-64% of CMT patients carry the PMP22 duplication. The prevalence of HNPP is not well known. CMT1A usually presents in the first two decades with difficulty walking or running. Distal symmetrical muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is present, legs more frequently and more severely affected than arms. HNPP typically leads to episodic, painless, recurrent, focal motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy, preceded by minor compression on the affected nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation is needed to determine whether the polyneuropathy is demyelinating. Sonography of the nerves can be useful. Diagnosis is confirmed by finding respectively a PMP22 duplication, deletion or point mutation. Differential diagnosis includes other inherited neuropathies, and acquired polyneuropathies. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant and de novo mutations occur. Offspring of patients have a chance of 50% to inherit the mutation from their affected parent. Prenatal testing is possible; requests for prenatal testing are not common. Treatment is currently symptomatic and may include management by a rehabilitation physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and orthopaedic surgeon. Adult CMT1A patients show slow clinical progression of disease, which seems to reflect a process of normal ageing. Life expectancy is normal. PMID:24646194

  19. Sensory pathophysiology in chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Krarup, C; Trojaborg, W

    1996-02-01

    Pathophysiological changes in sensory fibres in chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathy (CADP) are poorly understood, and it is not known to what extent sensory loss may be due to axonal loss or to conduction block. Motor and sensory nerve condition were studied in 18 patients with CADP to delineate abnormalities in the compound sensory action potential (CSAP) recorded proximally along the limb. To distinguish small CSAPs from noise, near-nerve needle electrodes and electronic averaging were used. In all, 58 motor and 78 sensory nerves in the upper and lower limbs were studied, and in 29 nerves, motor and sensory conduction was compared over the same proximal and distal segments of the upper limbs. The proximal/distal amplitude ratio (P/D ratio) of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) was reduced in 76% of the nerves compared with only 21% of the CSAPs. The amplitudes of CMAPs evoked and of CSAPs recorded distally were reduced to the same extent. The prolongation of the distal motor latency (DML) was linearly related to the reduction in amplitude of the CMAP whereas reduction of the distal sensory conduction velocity (SCVd) mainly occurred if the amplitude of the CSAP was reduced more than 70%. The proximal motor nerve conduction velocity (MCVp) was reduced by 40-50%, twice as much as the reduction in distal MCV (MCVd) (calculated from the reciprocal DML), and related to the reduction in the P/D ratio of the CMAP. The proximal SCV (SCVp) decreased approximately 20%, similar to the reduction in SCVd and out of proportion to the marked reduction of the MCVp. The results suggest different pathophysiological changes in sensory and motor fibres in CADP. Thus, nerve fibre loss could account for most of the abnormal parameters in sensory conduction, whereas demyelination was the dominating cause of motor nerve dysfunction. PMID:8624687

  20. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: the first publication (1947).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter J

    2003-04-01

    The first report of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was published in Dutch in 1947. The present paper makes it accessible in the English language. de Jong described two families, but only the cases from the first family may be considered to have had HNPP. Five persons from three generations had recurring peripheral neuropathies. de Jong hypothesized a hereditary disposition for the occurrence of neuropathies, but suggested a relationship with low vitamin B(1) levels. PMID:12682341

  1. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with 3460 mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Chang, Bong Leen; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Sung Sup

    2002-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease causing acute or subacute, bilateral optic atrophy mainly in young men. It is found to be a mitochondrial disorder with the primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations at 11,778, 3460, and 14,484. The incidence of each mutation is reported to be race-dependent. Point mutations at mtDNA nucleotide position 11,778 and 14,484 have been reported in Korean patients with LHON, however there has been no report of mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 3460. Molecular genetic analyses at four primary sites (11,778, 14,484, 15,257, and 3460) of mitochondrial DNA using the polymerase chain reaction, restriction enzyme digestion, and direct sequencing were performed in a 35-yr-old man with severe visual loss. A point mutation in the mtDNA at nucleotide position 3460 was identified and a conversion of a single alanine to a threonine was confirmed. To our knowledge, this is the first report confirming mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 3460 in Korean patients with LHON. Detailed molecular analyses would be very helpful for the correct diagnosis of optic neuropathy of unknown etiology and for genetic counseling. PMID:11961321

  2. Novel therapeutic approaches for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shilpa

    2013-03-01

    Many human childhood mitochondrial disorders result from abnormal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and altered bioenergetics. These abnormalities span most of the mtDNA, demonstrating that there are no "unique" positions on the mitochondrial genome that when deleted or mutated produce a disease phenotype. This diversity implies that the relationship between mitochondrial genotype and clinical phenotype is very complex. The origins of clinical phenotypes are thus unclear, fundamentally difficult-to-treat, and are usually clinically devastating. Current treatment is largely supportive and the disorders progress relentlessly causing significant morbidity and mortality. Vitamin supplements and pharmacological agents have been used in isolated cases and clinical trials, but the efficacy of these interventions is unclear. In spite of recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases, a cure remains elusive. An optimal cure would be gene therapy, which involves introducing the missing gene(s) into the mitochondria to complement the defect. Our recent research results indicate the feasibility of an innovative protein-transduction ("protofection") technology, consisting of a recombinant mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) that avidly binds mtDNA and permits efficient targeting into mitochondria in situ and in vivo. Thus, the development of gene therapy for treating mitochondrial disease offers promise, because it may circumvent the clinical abnormalities and the current inability to treat individual disorders in affected individuals. This review aims to focus on current treatment options and future therapeutics in mitochondrial disease treatment with a special emphasis on Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. PMID:23545042

  3. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy - phenotype, genetics, therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Gallenmüller, C; Klopstock, T

    2014-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a rare genetic disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells leading to a persistent severe bilateral loss of visual acuity within weeks or months. Males are much more likely to be affected than females, disease onset in most cases takes place between age 15 and 35 years. The disease is caused by point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. The penetrance of the disease is incomplete, i.e., not all mutation carriers develop clinical symptoms. The phenotype is relatively uniform, but age at onset, severity and prognosis may vary even within the same family. Environmental and endocrine factors, optic disc anatomy as well as mitochondrial and nuclear genetic factors are discussed to influence penetrance as well as interindividual and intrafamilial variability. However, only cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption have been shown to trigger disease onset. The disease is characterised by a central visual field defect, impaired colour vision and fundoscopically a peripapillary microangiopathy in the acute phase. Most patients end up after some months with a severe visual loss below 0.1 and in most cases there is no significant improvement of visual acuity in the course. In rare cases patients experience a mostly partial visual recovery which depends on the type of mutation. For confirmation of the diagnosis a detailed ophthalmological examination with fundoscopy, family history and genetic analysis of the mitochondrial DNA is needed. To date, there is no proven causal therapy, but at early disease stages treatment with idebenone can be tried. PMID:24658858

  4. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies in childhood: Case series and literature update.

    PubMed

    Chrestian, Nicolas; McMillan, Hugh; Poulin, Chantal; Campbell, Craig; Vajsar, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) is a rare condition in childhood with a diverse range of clinical presentations. We analyzed the clinical presentation and electrophysiological data of 12 children with a confirmed PMP22 gene deletion and reviewed the published reports of HNPP in children and compared our data with the reports from the literature review. Peroneal palsy was the most common presentation (42%) followed by brachial plexus palsy in 25% of our cases. Nerve conduction studies were always suggestive of the diagnosis demonstrating 3 major patterns: multifocal demyelination at the area of entrapment, generalized sensory-motor polyneuropathy and a combination of the two first patterns in a vast majority (60%). Surprisingly, there was bilateral or unilateral electrophysiological entrapment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel in all our patients. The clinical presentation of HNPP in childhood is heterogeneous and electrophysiological findings are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Any unexplained mononeuropathy or multifocal neuropathy should lead to PMP22 gene testing to look for the deletion. Early diagnosis is important in order to facilitate appropriate genetic counseling and also for the appropriate care for these patients. PMID:26189194

  5. Novel use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S W; Ko, C H; Yau, S K; Mak, Chloe; Yuen, Y F; Lee, C Y

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of a young Chinese male presenting with sequential, painless, bilateral visual loss in Hong Kong. He was diagnosed to have Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with genetic workup showing G11778A mutation with over 80% heteroplasmy. He was started on idebenone treatment 11 months after onset of the binocular disease. To our best knowledge, this is the first case of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy treated with idebenone in Hong Kong. The recent evidence of the diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease is reviewed. PMID:25307075

  6. Retinal Failure in Diabetes: a Feature of Retinal Sensory Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ellyn J; Gardner, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Physiologic adaptations mediate normal responses to short-term and long-term stresses to ensure organ function. Organ failure results if adaptive responses fail to resolve persistent stresses or maladaptive reactions develop. The retinal neurovascular unit likewise undergoes adaptive responses to diabetes resulting in a retinal sensory neuropathy analogous to other sensory neuropathies. Vision-threatening diabetic retinal neuropathy results from unremitting metabolic and inflammatory stresses, leading to macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, states of "retinal failure." Current regulatory strategies focus primarily on the retinal failure stages, but new diagnostic modalities and understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy may facilitate earlier treatment to maintain vision in persons with diabetes. PMID:26458378

  7. Pyridoxine-induced sensory ataxic neuronopathy and neuropathy: revisited.

    PubMed

    Kulkantrakorn, Kongkiat

    2014-11-01

    High dose pyridoxine is neurotoxic. Previous case reports were sparse and little is known about the clinical and electrodiagnostic findings. Three patients with pyridoxine-induced sensory ataxic neuropathy were studied and a review of the involved literature was performed. Three patients, aged 80, 83 and 83 years old, presented with sensory ataxia for 3-8 months. Examination showed signs of polyneuropathy and sensory ataxia. Six hundred milligrams of pyridoxine was consumed each day for 3-10 years, in the form of vitamin B1-6-12 combination tablet. Investigations for other causes of neuropathy were unremarkable. Blood levels of vitamin B6 were markedly elevated at 104.6, 81.4 and 66.9 times of upper normal limits. Electrodiagnostic tests showed symmetric axonal sensory polyneuropathy in two patients. Two years after vitamin discontinuation, all patients showed no significant improvement in the neuropathy and gait. In conclusion, consumption of high dose pyridoxine can cause sensory neuronopathy and axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, leading to sensory ataxia which may not be reversible. PMID:25056196

  8. An Analysis of the Symptomatic Domains Most Relevant to Charcot Marie Tooth Neuropathy (CMT) Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT); Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy; Nerve Compression Syndromes; Tooth Diseases; Congenital Abnormalities; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Heredodegenerative Disorders, Nervous System

  9. Antiretroviral therapy-associated acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Capers, Kimberly N; Turnacioglu, Sinan; Leshner, Robert T; Crawford, John R

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has been reported in HIV-infected patients in association with the immune reconstitution syndrome whose symptoms can be mimicked by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. We report a case of a 17-year-old, HIV-infected patient on HAART with a normal CD4 count and undetectable viral load, presenting with acute lower extremity weakness associated with lactatemia. Electromyography/nerve conduction studies revealed absent sensory potentials and decreased compound muscle action potentials, consistent with a diagnosis of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. Lactatemia resolved following cessation of HAART; however, neurological deficits minimally improved over several months in spite of immune modulatory therapy. This case highlights the potential association between HAART, mitochondrial toxicity and acute axonal neuropathies in HIV-infected patients, distinct from the immune reconstitution syndrome. PMID:21327178

  10. Identification of two novel KIF5A mutations in hereditary spastic paraplegia associated with mild peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    López, Eva; Casasnovas, Carlos; Giménez, Javier; Santamaría, Raúl; Terrazas, Jesús M; Volpini, Víctor

    2015-11-15

    Spastic paraplegia type 10 (SPG10) is a rare form of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) due to mutations in KIF5A, a gene encoding the neuronal kinesin heavy-chain involved in axonal transport. KIF5A mutations have been associated with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from pure HSP to isolated peripheral nerve involvement or complicated HSP phenotypes. Most KIF5A mutations are clustered in the motor domain of the protein that is necessary for microtubule interaction. Here we describe two Spanish families with an adult onset complicated AD-HSP in which neurological studies revealed a mild sensory neuropathy. Intention tremor was also present in both families. Molecular genetic analysis identified two novel mutations c.773 C>T and c.833 C>T in the KIF5A gene resulting in the P258L and P278L substitutions respectively. Both were located in the highly conserved kinesin motor domain of the protein which has previously been identified as a hot spot for KIF5A mutations. This study adds to the evidence associating the known occurrence of mild peripheral neuropathy in the adult onset SPG10 type of AD-HSP. PMID:26403765

  11. THE ROLE OF GLYOXALASE I IN HYPERGLYCEMIA-INDUCED SENSORY NEURON DAMAGE AND DEVELOPMENT OF DIABETIC SENSORY NEUROPATHY SYMPTOMS

    E-print Network

    Jack, Megan Marie

    2011-08-31

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes mellitus with over half of all patients developing altered sensation as a result of damage to peripheral sensory neurons. Hyperglycemia results in altered nerve...

  12. The Role of Cutaneous Innervation in the Sensory Abnormalities Associated with Diabetic Neuropathy

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Megan Sarah

    2008-05-05

    Diabetes-induced nerve damage results in cutaneous denervation, nerve conduction slowing, suppressed regenerative responses, and debilitating painful or insensate sensory symptoms. The increasing prevalence of diabetic neuropathy and its persistent...

  13. Relative Contribution of Mutations in Genes for Autosomal Dominant Distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierick, Ines; Baets, Jonathan; Irobi, Joy; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Deconinck, Tine; Merlini, Luciano; Van den Bergh, Peter; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Robberecht, Wim; Fischer, Dirk; Morales, Raul Juntas; Mitrovic, Zoran; Seeman, Pavel; Mazanec, Radim; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Helderman-van den Enden, A. T. J. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Nelis, Eva; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (HMN) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders affecting spinal alpha-motor neurons. Since 2001, mutations in six different genes have been identified for autosomal dominant distal HMN; "glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS)," "dynactin 1 (DCTN1)," "small heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1),"…

  14. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, R. M.; Davis, M. B.; Sweeney, M. G.; Wood, N. W.; Harding, A. E.

    1996-01-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. PMID:8659512

  15. Cisplatin induced sensory neuropathy is prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor-A

    PubMed Central

    Vencappa, Samanta; Donaldson, Lucy F; Hulse, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Increased patient survival is a mark of modern anti-cancer therapy success. Unfortunately treatment side-effects such as neurotoxicity are a major long term concern. Sensory neuropathy is one of the common toxicities that can arise during platinum based chemotherapy. In many cases the current poor understanding of the neurological degeneration and lack of suitable analgesia has led to high incidences of patient drop out of treatment. VEGF-A is a prominent neuroprotective agent thus it was hypothesised to prevent cisplatin induced neuropathy. Systemic cisplatin treatment (lasting 3 weeks biweekly) resulted in mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in mice when compared to vehicle control. PGP9.5 sensory nerve fibre innervation was reduced in the plantar skin in the cisplatin treated group versus vehicle control mice. The cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration was associated with increased cleaved caspase 3 expression as well as a reduction in Activating Transcription Factor 3 and pan VEGF-A expression in sensory neurons. VEGF-A165b expression was unaltered between vehicle and cisplatin treatment. rhVEGF-A165a and rhVEGF-A165b both prevented cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration. Cisplatin exposure blunts the regenerative properties of sensory neurons thus leading to sensory neuropathy. However, here it is identified that administration of VEGF-A isoform subtypes induce regeneration and prevent cell death and are therefore a possible adjunct therapy for chemotherapy induced neuropathy. PMID:26279748

  16. High frequency of mutations at position 11778 in mitochondrial ND4 gene in Japanese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Y; Hiida, Y; Oguchi, Y; Kudoh, J; Shimizu, N

    1993-08-01

    We have investigated the presence of a point mutation at position 11778 in the ND4 gene of mitochondrial DNA in 17 Japanese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and have identified the mutation in 14 (82.4%) of the 17 families. The prevalence of this mutation appears to be much higher in Japanese patients with LHON than in patients of other ethnic origins, such as Finnish, Dutch, German, and English families. PMID:8103501

  17. SENSORY NEURON INSULIN SIGNALING AND ITS ROLE IN DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    E-print Network

    Grote, Caleb W.

    2013-05-31

    Diabetes is a global concern; approximately 366 million people are currently diagnosed worldwide. Complications of diabetes are numerous and can cause damage to almost every organ system in the body. Neuropathy is the most common complication...

  18. White Matter Changes in Two Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees: 12-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Jan?i?, Jasna; Dejanovi?, Ivana; Radovanovi?, Saša; Ostoji?, Jelena; Kozi?, Duško; ?uri?-Jovi?i?, Milica; Samardži?, Janko; ?etkovi?, Mila; Kosti?, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting two Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pedigrees with abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) findings but without neurological manifestation associated with LHON. The study included 14 LHON patients and 41 asymptomatic family members from 12 genealogically unrelated families. MRI showed white matter involvement and H-MRS exhibited metabolic anomalies within 12 LHON families. Main outcome measures were abnormal MRI and H-MRS findings in two pedigrees. MRI of the proband of the first pedigree showed a single demyelinating lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere, while the proband of the second family displayed multiple supratentorial and infratentorial lesions, compatible with the demyelinating process, and both the absolute choline (Cho) concentration and Cho/creatinine ratio were increased. MRI and H-MRS profiles of both affected and unaffected mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers suggest more widespread central nervous involvement in LHON. Although even after 12 years our patients did not develop neurological symptoms, MRI could still be used to detect possible changes during the disease progression. PMID:26540208

  19. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsies Masked by Previous Gunshots and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gencik, Martin; Finsterer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Although hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) presents with a distinct phenotype on history, clinical exam, and nerve conduction studies, it may be masked if diagnostic work-up suggests other causes. Case Report. In a 37-year-old male with pseudoradicular lumbar pain, neurological exam revealed sore neck muscles, peripheral facial nerve palsy, right anacusis and left hypoacusis, hemihypesthesia of the right face, mild distal quadriparesis, diffuse wasting, and generally reduced tendon reflexes. He had a history of skull fracture due to a gunshot behind the right ear and tuberculosis for which he had received adequate treatment for 3 years; MRI revealed a disc prolapse at C6/7 and Th11/12. Nerve conduction studies were indicative of demyelinating polyneuropathy with conduction blocks. Despite elevated antinuclear antibodies and elevated CSF-protein, HNPP was diagnosed genetically after having excluded vasculitis, CIDP, radiculopathy, and the side effects of antituberculous treatment. Conclusions. HNPP may manifest with mild, painless, distal quadriparesis. The diagnosis of HNPP may be blurred by a history of tuberculosis, tuberculostatic treatment, hepatitis, and the presence of elevated CSF-protein. PMID:26640726

  20. A Female Patient with Down Syndrome and Low-Penetrance Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Frousiakis, Starleen E.; Pouw, Andrew E.; Karanjia, Rustum; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old female with a history of Down syndrome (DS) who was referred to our neuro-ophthalmology clinic for evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The patient's family history was significant for a known G11778A mutation in a maternal relative, consistent with LHON. The patient was also positive for the G11778A mutation; however, the genotype demonstrated low penetrance in the pedigree, with only 1 out of 10 adult male offspring showing signs or symptoms of the disease. Mitochondrial mutations implicated in LHON have been shown to impair complex I of the electron transport chain and thereby reducing the effective generation of adenosine triphosphate and increasing the production of toxic reactive oxygen species. Although the partial or complete triplicate of chromosome 21 constitutes the etiology of DS, some of the pleiotropic phenotypes of the syndrome have been attributed to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Given the low penetrance of the mutation and the patient's sex, this case illustrates the possibility that the mitochondrial mutation demonstrated increased penetrance due to pre-existing mitochondrial dysfunction related to DS. PMID:25566062

  1. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy-Gene Therapy: From Benchtop to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Guy, John

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disorder caused by point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Most cases are due to mutations in genes encoding subunits of the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase that is Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC). These mutations are located at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, or 14484 in the mitochondrial genome. The disease is characterized by apoplectic, bilateral, and severe visual loss. While the mutated mtDNA impairs generation of ATP by all mitochondria, there is only a selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and degeneration of optic nerve axons. Thus, blindness is typically permanent. Half of the men and 10% of females who harbor the pathogenic mtDNA mutation actually develop the phenotype. This incomplete penetrance and gender bias is not fully understood. Additional mitochondrial and/or nuclear genetic factors may modulate the phenotypic expression of LHON. In a population-based study, the mtDNA background of haplogroup J was associated with an inverse relationship of low-ATP generation and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Effective therapy for LHON has been elusive. In this paper, we describe the findings of pertinent published studies and discuss the controversies of potential strategies to ameliorate the disease. PMID:21253496

  2. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND6 T14502C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fuxin; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; Guan, Minqiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Liang, Ming; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; Liu, Qi; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yongmei; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; Yang, Li; Tong, Yi; The First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350005 ; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Qu, Jia; Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325003 ; and others

    2009-11-20

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age of onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T14502C (I58V) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved isoleucine at position 58 of ND6, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups M10a, F1a1, and H2. The occurrence of T14502C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Here, mtDNA variants I187T in the ND1, A122V in CO1, S99A in the A6, and V254I in CO3 exhibited an evolutionary conservation, indicating a potential modifying role in the development of visual impairment associated with T14502C mutation in those families. Furthermore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic manifestation of the LHON-associated T14502C mutation in these Chinese families.

  3. Safety and Effects of the Vector for the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Gene Therapy Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Yu, Hong; Chou, Tsung-Han; Feuer, William J.; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Tse, David; Hauswirth, William W.; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Neuringer, Martha; Renner, Lauren; Guy, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE We developed a novel strategy for treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) caused by a mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit IV (ND4) mitochondrial gene. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the safety and effects of the gene therapy vector to be used in a proposed gene therapy clinical trial. DESIGN AND SETTING In a series of laboratory experiments, we modified the mitochondrial ND4 subunit of complex I in the nuclear genetic code for import into mitochondria. The protein was targeted into the organelle by agency of a targeting sequence (allotopic expression). The gene was packaged into adeno-associated viral vectors and then vitreally injected into rodent, nonhuman primate, and ex vivo human eyes that underwent testing for expression and integration by immunohistochemical analysis and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. During serial follow-up, the animal eyes underwent fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal or pattern electroretinography. We tested for rescue of visual loss in rodent eyes also injected with a mutant G11778A ND4 homologue responsible for most cases of LHON. EXPOSURE Ocular infection with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors containing a wild-type allotopic human ND4 gene. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Expression of human ND4 and rescue of optic neuropathy induced by mutant human ND4. RESULTS We found human ND4 expressed in almost all mouse retinal ganglion cells by 1 week after injection and ND4 integrated into the mouse complex I. In rodent eyes also injected with a mutant allotopic ND4, wild-type allotopic ND4 prevented defective adenosine triphosphate synthesis, suppressed visual loss, reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and prevented demise of axons in the optic nerve. Injection of ND4 in the ex vivo human eye resulted in expression in most retinal ganglion cells. Primates undergoing vitreal injection with the ND4 test article and followed up for 3 months had no serious adverse reactions. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Expression of our allotopic ND4 vector in the ex vivo human eye, safety of the test article, rescue of the LHON mouse model, and the severe irreversible loss of visual function in LHON support clinical testing with mutated G11778A mitochondrial DNA in our patients. PMID:24457989

  4. SUBCLINICAL CARRIERS AND CONVERSIONS IN LEBER HEREDITARY OPTIC NEUROPATHY: A PROSPECTIVE PSYCHOPHYSICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Sadun, Alfredo A.; Salomao, Solange R.; Berezovsky, Adriana; Sadun, Federico; DeNegri, Anna Maria; Quiros, Peter A.; Chicani, Filipe; Ventura, Dora; Barboni, Piero; Sherman, Jerome; Sutter, Erich; Belfort, Rubens; Carelli, Valerio

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The authors previously presented the results of their 2001 field investigation to rural Brazil to investigate a 336-member pedigree of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The present work describes the yearly field investigations 2001 to 2005, utilizing a variety of highly sophisticated psychophysical and electrophysiologic procedures, in asymptomatic LHON carriers, some of whom converted to affected status. Methods Careful, repeated examinations of 75 carriers of homoplasmic 11778 LHON mtDNA J-haplogroup mutants were performed as part of the field investigation of this pedigree. All subjects underwent a detailed neuro-ophthalmologic investigation, including formal visual fields (Humphrey; HVF) and fundus photography. In addition, many subjects underwent rigorous psychophysical examination, including Cambridge Research Systems color vision and contrast sensitivity testing, OCT, GDx, and multifocal visual evoked response (mfVER) and multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG). Two patients followed as nonsymptomatic LHON carriers converted to affected status. Results Many LHON carriers did, in fact, show subclinical or occult abnormalities. Focal edema was often seen involving the arcuate nerve fiber bundles, and this corresponded with areas of relative paracentral or arcuate scotomas on HVF testing. Compared to controls, LHON carriers had significant losses in color vision affecting mostly the red-green system and reduction in spatial but not temporal contrast sensitivity. The mfVER and mfERG data showed that most carriers had depressed central responses and abnormal interocular asymmetries. Conclusions In this very large pedigree of 11778 LHON, the carriers frequently showed manifestations of optic nerve impairments. Their occult disease reflected low-grade compromise that waxed and waned. In two cases, these changes led to a crescendo of dramatic impairments that characterize conversion to affected status. PMID:17471325

  5. Targeting estrogen receptor ? as preventive therapeutic strategy for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Annalinda; Preziuso, Carmela; Iommarini, Luisa; Perli, Elena; Grazioli, Paola; Campese, Antonio F; Maresca, Alessandra; Montopoli, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio; Ghelli, Anna; Giordano, Carla

    2015-12-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited blinding disease characterized by degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and consequent optic nerve atrophy. Peculiar features of LHON are incomplete penetrance and gender bias, with a marked male prevalence. Based on the different hormonal metabolism between genders, we proposed that estrogens play a protective role in females and showed that these hormones ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in LHON through the estrogen receptors (ERs). We also showed that ER? localize to the mitochondria of RGCs. Thus, targeting ER? may become a therapeutic strategy for LHON specifically aimed at avoiding or delaying the onset of disease in mutation carriers. Here, we tested the effects of ER? targeting on LHON mitochondrial defective metabolism by treating LHON cybrid cells carrying the m.11778G>A mutation with a combination of natural estrogen-like compounds that bind ER? with high selectivity. We demonstrated that these molecules improve cell viability by reducing apoptosis, inducing mitochondrial biogenesis and strongly reducing the levels of reactive oxygen species in LHON cells. These effects were abolished in cells with ER? knockdown by silencing receptor expression or by using specific receptor antagonists. Our observations support the hypothesis that estrogen-like molecules may be useful in LHON prophylactic therapy. This is particularly important for lifelong disease prevention in unaffected LHON mutation carriers. Current strategies attempting to combat degeneration of RGCs during the acute phase of LHON have not been very effective. Implementing a different and preemptive approach with a low risk profile may be very helpful. PMID:26410888

  6. Corneal confocal microscopy reveals trigeminal small sensory fiber neuropathy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Giulio; Grisan, Enrico; Scarpa, Fabio; Fazio, Raffaella; Comola, Mauro; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Rama, Paolo; Riva, Nilo

    2014-01-01

    Although subclinical involvement of sensory neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously demonstrated, corneal small fiber sensory neuropathy has not been reported to-date. We examined a group of sporadic ALS patients with corneal confocal microscopy, a recently developed imaging technique allowing in vivo observation of corneal small sensory fibers. Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) examination revealed a reduction of corneal small fiber sensory nerve number and branching in ALS patients. Quantitative analysis demonstrated an increase in tortuosity and reduction in length and fractal dimension of ALS patients’ corneal nerve fibers compared to age-matched controls. Moreover, bulbar function disability scores were significantly related to measures of corneal nerve fibers anatomical damage. Our study demonstrates for the first time a corneal small fiber sensory neuropathy in ALS patients. This finding further suggests a link between sporadic ALS and facial-onset sensory and motor neuronopathy (FOSMN) syndrome, a rare condition characterized by early sensory symptoms (with trigeminal nerve distribution), followed by wasting and weakness of bulbar and upper limb muscles. In addition, the finding supports a model of neurodegeneration in ALS as a focally advancing process. PMID:25360111

  7. Clinical variability in hereditary optic neuropathies: Two novel mutations in two patients with dominant optic atrophy and Wolfram syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Dominant optic atrophy (DOA) and Wolfram syndrome share a great deal of clinical variability, including an association with hearing loss and the presence of optic atrophy at similar ages. The objective of this paper was to discuss the phenotypic variability of these syndromes with respect to the presentation of two clinical cases. We present two patients, each with either DOA or Wolfram syndrome, and contribute to the research literature through our findings of two novel mutations. The overlapping of several clinical characteristics in hereditary optic neuropathies can complicate the differential diagnosis. Future studies are needed to better determine the genotype-phenotype correlation for these diseases.

  8. Is Leber hereditary optic neuropathy treatable? Encouraging results with idebenone in both prospective and retrospective trials and an illustrative case.

    PubMed

    Sabet-Peyman, Esfandiar J; Khaderi, Khizer R; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2012-03-01

    A 31-year-old woman developed subacute bilateral visual loss over a 2-week period. Two months later, the diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) 11778/ND4 was established and the patient was treated with 900 mg of idebenone daily. Over the ensuing 9 months, visual acuity improved from 20/200 to 20/25 in each eye with near-total resolution in visual field abnormalities. Our case report is in agreement with 2 large published series of patients with LHON treated with idebenone, raising hope for treatment of this visually devastating mitochondrial disorder. PMID:22269948

  9. Meiotic breakpoint mapping of a proposed X linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Handoko, H Y; Wirapati, P J; Sudoyo, H A; Sitepu, M; Marzuki, S

    1998-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited degenerative disorder characterised by an acute or subacute optic nerve degeneration resulting in visual failure. Mitochondrial DNA mutations have been reported and a nuclear modifier gene(s) on the X chromosome is thought to play an important role in the onset of this disorder. We analysed a LHON family with a novel and more accurate approach using 27 X chromosomal microsatellite markers. Meiotic breakpoint mapping and two point lod score did not point to any particular area on the X chromosome which might contain the X susceptibility locus. PMID:9719375

  10. Clinical characterization and mitochondrial DNA sequence variations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Kaur, Punit; Kumar, Manoj; Saxena, Rohit; Sharma, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited disorder, results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). MtDNA is highly polymorphic in nature with very high mutation rate, 10–17 fold higher as compared to nuclear genome. Identification of new mtDNA sequence variations is necessary to establish a clean link with human disease. Thus this study was aimed to assess or evaluate LHON patients for novel mtDNA sequence variations. Materials and Methods Twenty LHON patients were selected from the neuro-ophthalmology clinic of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. DNA was isolated from whole blood samples. The entire coding region of the mitochondrial genome was amplified by PCR in 20 patients and 20 controls. For structural analysis (molecular modeling and simulation) the MODELER 9.2 program in Discovery Studio (DS 2.0) was used. Results MtDNA sequencing revealed a total of 47 nucleotide variations in the 20 LHON patients and 29 variations in 20 controls. Of 47 changes in patients 21.2% (10/47) were nonsynonymous and the remaining 78.72% (37/47) were synonymous. Five nonsynonymous changes, including primary LHON mutations (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [ND1]:p.A52T, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [ND6]:p.M64V, adenosine triphosphate [ATP] synthase subunit a (F-ATPase protein 6) [ATPase6]:p.M181T, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [ND4]:p.R340H, and cytochrome B [CYB]:p.F181L), were found to be pathogenic. A greater number of changes were present in complex I (53.19%; 25/47), followed by complex III (19.14%; 9/47), then complex IV (19.14%; 9/47), then complex V (8.5%; 4/47). Nonsynonymous variations may impair respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathways, which results in low ATP production and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Oxidative stress is the underlying etiology in various diseases and also plays a crucial role in LHON. Conclusions This study describes the role of mtDNA sequence variations in LHON patients. Primary LHON mutations of mtDNA are main variants leading to LHON, but mutations in other mitochondrial genes may also play an important role in pathogenesis of LHON as indicated in the present study. Certain alleles in certain haplogroups have protective or deleterious roles and hence there is a need to analyze a large number of cases for correlating phenotype and disease severity with mutation and mtDNA haplogroups. PMID:23170061

  11. Trial End Points and Natural History in Patients With G11778A Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Byron L.; Feuer, William J.; Schiffman, Joyce C.; Porciatti, Vittorio; Vandenbroucke, Ruth; Rosa, Potyra R.; Gregori, Giovanni; Guy, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Establishing the natural history of G11778A Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is important to determine the optimal end points to assess the safety and efficacy of a planned gene therapy trial. OBJECTIVE To use the results of the present natural history study of patients with G11778A LHON to plan a gene therapy clinical trial that will use allotopic expression by delivering a normal nuclear-encoded ND4 gene into the nuclei of retinal ganglion cells via an adeno-associated virus vector injected into the vitreous. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective observational study initiated in 2008 was conducted in primary and referral institutional practice settings. Participants included 44 individuals with G11778A LHON, recruited between September 2008 and March 2012, who were evaluated every 6 months and returned for 1 or more follow-up visits (6–36 months) as of August 2012. EXPOSURES Complete neuro-ophthalmic examination and main measures. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Visual acuity, automated visual field testing, pattern electroretinogram, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. RESULTS Clinical measures were stable during the follow-up period, and visual acuity was as good as or better than the other visual factors used for monitoring patients. Based on a criterion of 15 or more letters from the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart, 13 eyes of 8 patients (18%) improved, but 24 months after the onset of symptoms, any further improvements were to no better than 20/100. Acuity recovery occurred in some patients despite continued marked retinal nerve fiber layer thinning indistinguishable from that in patients who did not recover visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Spontaneous improvement of visual acuity in patients with G11778A LHON is not common and is partial and limited when it occurs, so improvements in vision with adeno-associated virus–mediated gene therapy of a synthetic wild-type ND4 subunit gene should be possible to detect with a reasonable sample size. Visual acuity appears to be the most suitable primary end point for the planned clinical trial. PMID:24525545

  12. Phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain is a marker of neurodegeneration in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Gerry; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Quiros, Peter; Salomao, Solange R.; Berezovsky, Adriana; Carelli, Valerio; Feuer, William J.; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the profile of neurodegeneration in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Methods We quantitated serum levels of phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNF-H) in a Brazilian pedigree of 16 affected patients and 59 carriers with LHON, both molecularly characterized as harboring the G to A mutation at nucleotide 11,778 of the mitochondrial genome. The association of subject characteristics to pNF-H levels was studied with multiple regression; pNF-H data were square-root transformed to effect normality of distribution of residuals. Relationships between the square-root of pNF-H and age and sex were investigated within groups with Pearson correlation and the two-sample t-test. Linear regression was used to assess the difference between groups and to determine if the relationship of age was different between affected individuals and carriers. Results of plotting pNF-H levels by age suggested a nonlinear, quadratic association so age squared was used in the statistical analysis. ANCOVA was used to assess the influence of age and group on pNF-H levels. Results In the carrier group, there was a significant correlation of square-root pNF-H (mean=0.24 ng/ml2) with age (r=0.30, p=0.022) and a stronger correlation with quadratic age (r=0.37, p=0.003). With a higher mean pNF-H (0.33 ng/ml2) for the affected group, correlations were of similar magnitude, although they were not statistically significant: age (r=0.22, p=0.42), quadratic age (r=0.22, p=0.45). There was no correlation between age and pNF-H levels (mean=0.34 ng/ml2) in the off-pedigree group: age (r=0.03, p=0.87), quadratic age (r=0.04, p=0.84). There was no difference between sexes and pNF-H levels in any of the groups (affected, p=0.65; carriers, p=0.19; off-pedigree, p=0.93). Conclusions Elevated pNF-H released into the serum of some affected LHON patients may suggest that axonal degeneration occurs at some point after loss of visual function. Increases in pNF-H levels of carriers with increasing age, not seen in off-pedigree controls, may suggest subtle subclinical optic nerve degeneration. PMID:19104679

  13. Gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy as the first candidate for a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Augustin, Sébastien; Ellouze, Sami; Sahel, José-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cannot be ignored anymore in most medical disciplines; indeed their minimum estimated prevalence is superior to 1 in 5000 births. Despite the progress made in the last 25 years on the identification of gene mutations causing mitochondrial pathologies, only slow progress was made towards their effective treatments. Ocular involvement is a frequent feature in mitochondrial diseases and corresponds to severe and irreversible visual handicap due to retinal neuron loss and optic atrophy. Interestingly, three clinical trials for Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 mutations are ongoing since 2007. Overall, the feasibility and safety of ocular Adeno-Associated Virus delivery in adult and younger patients and consistent visual function improvements have been demonstrated. The success of gene-replacement therapy for RPE65 opens the way for the development of similar approaches for a broad range of eye disorders, including those with mitochondrial etiology such as Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). PMID:24702846

  14. The relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory function in entrapment neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Bland, Jeremy D P; Bhat, Manzoor A; Bennett, David L H

    2014-12-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the impact of entrapment neuropathy on target innervation and the relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory symptoms and signs. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy; the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on the morphology of small unmyelinated as well as myelinated sensory axons and relate such changes to somatosensory function and clinical symptoms. Thirty patients with a clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome [17 females, mean age (standard deviation) 56.4 (15.3)] and 26 age and gender matched healthy volunteers [18 females, mean age (standard deviation) 51.0 (17.3)] participated in the study. Small and large fibre function was examined with quantitative sensory testing in the median nerve territory of the hand. Vibration and mechanical detection thresholds were significantly elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (P<0.007) confirming large fibre dysfunction and patients also presented with increased thermal detection thresholds (P<0.0001) indicative of C and A?-fibre dysfunction. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were comparable between groups (P>0.13). A skin biopsy was taken from a median nerve innervated area of the proximal phalanx of the index finger. Immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 and myelin basic protein was used to evaluate morphological features of unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fibre density showed a striking loss in patients (P<0.0001) confirming a significant compromise of small fibres. The extent of Meissner corpuscles and dermal nerve bundles were comparable between groups (P>0.07). However, patients displayed a significant increase in the percentage of elongated nodes (P<0.0001), with altered architecture of voltage-gated sodium channel distribution. Whereas neither neurophysiology nor quantitative sensory testing correlated with patients' symptoms or function deficits, the presence of elongated nodes was inversely correlated with a number of functional and symptom related scores (P<0.023). Our findings suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome does not exclusively affect large fibres but is associated with loss of function in modalities mediated by both unmyelinated and myelinated sensory axons. We also document for the first time that entrapment neuropathies lead to a clear reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, which was independent of electrodiagnostic test severity. The presence of elongated nodes in the target tissue further suggests that entrapment neuropathies affect nodal structure/myelin well beyond the focal compression site. Interestingly, nodal lengthening may be an adaptive phenomenon as it inversely correlates with symptom severity. PMID:25348629

  15. The relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory function in entrapment neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Annina B.; Bland, Jeremy D. P.; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2014-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the impact of entrapment neuropathy on target innervation and the relationship of nerve fibre pathology to sensory symptoms and signs. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy; the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on the morphology of small unmyelinated as well as myelinated sensory axons and relate such changes to somatosensory function and clinical symptoms. Thirty patients with a clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome [17 females, mean age (standard deviation) 56.4 (15.3)] and 26 age and gender matched healthy volunteers [18 females, mean age (standard deviation) 51.0 (17.3)] participated in the study. Small and large fibre function was examined with quantitative sensory testing in the median nerve territory of the hand. Vibration and mechanical detection thresholds were significantly elevated in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (P < 0.007) confirming large fibre dysfunction and patients also presented with increased thermal detection thresholds (P < 0.0001) indicative of C and A?-fibre dysfunction. Mechanical and thermal pain thresholds were comparable between groups (P > 0.13). A skin biopsy was taken from a median nerve innervated area of the proximal phalanx of the index finger. Immunohistochemical staining for protein gene product 9.5 and myelin basic protein was used to evaluate morphological features of unmyelinated and myelinated axons. Evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fibre density showed a striking loss in patients (P < 0.0001) confirming a significant compromise of small fibres. The extent of Meissner corpuscles and dermal nerve bundles were comparable between groups (P > 0.07). However, patients displayed a significant increase in the percentage of elongated nodes (P < 0.0001), with altered architecture of voltage-gated sodium channel distribution. Whereas neither neurophysiology nor quantitative sensory testing correlated with patients’ symptoms or function deficits, the presence of elongated nodes was inversely correlated with a number of functional and symptom related scores (P < 0.023). Our findings suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome does not exclusively affect large fibres but is associated with loss of function in modalities mediated by both unmyelinated and myelinated sensory axons. We also document for the first time that entrapment neuropathies lead to a clear reduction in intraepidermal nerve fibre density, which was independent of electrodiagnostic test severity. The presence of elongated nodes in the target tissue further suggests that entrapment neuropathies affect nodal structure/myelin well beyond the focal compression site. Interestingly, nodal lengthening may be an adaptive phenomenon as it inversely correlates with symptom severity. PMID:25348629

  16. Medical marijuana for HIV-associated sensory neuropathy: legal and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Larriviere, Daniel G

    2014-10-01

    The number of states legalizing medical marijuana is increasing. Medical marijuana is possibly effective therapy for HIV-associated sensory neuropathy. Despite legalization at the state level, however, the current and contradictory federal drug enforcement policy creates the risk that physicians who recommend medical marijuana to their patients will lose their ability to prescribe medications. The federal-state tension has legal and ethical implications for neurologists who receive a request for medical marijuana from their patients since neurologists must strive to both relieve suffering and obey relevant laws. Recommendation of medical marijuana by neurologists to their patients is ethically permissible but is not ethically mandatory. PMID:25299291

  17. Calcium signalling in sensory neurones and peripheral glia in the context of diabetic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Fernyhough, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral sensory nervous system is comprised of neurones with their axons and neuroglia that includes satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia, myelinating, non-myelinating and perisynaptic Schwann cells. Pathogenesis of peripheral diabetic polyneuropathies is associated with aberrant function of both neurones and glia. Deregulated Ca(2+) homoeostasis and aberrant Ca(2+) signalling in neuronal and glial elements contributes to many forms of neuropathology and is fundamental to neurodegenerative diseases. In diabetes both neurones and glia experience metabolic stress and mitochondrial dysfunction which lead to deregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis and Ca(2+) signalling, which in their turn lead to pathological cellular reactions contributing to development of diabetic neuropathies. Molecular cascades responsible for Ca(2+) homeostasis and signalling, therefore, can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25149565

  18. Mutations in VRK1 Associated With Complex Motor and Sensory Axonal Neuropathy Plus Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lotze, Timothy; Jamal, Leila; Penney, Samantha; Campbell, Ian M.; Pehlivan, Davut; Hunter, Jill V.; Woodbury, Suzanne L.; Raymond, Gerald; Adesina, Adekunle M.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Patients with rare diseases and complex clinical presentations represent a challenge for clinical diagnostics. Genomic approaches are allowing the identification of novel variants in genes for very rare disorders, enabling a molecular diagnosis. Genomics is also revealing a phenotypic expansion whereby the full spectrum of clinical expression conveyed by mutant alleles at a locus can be better appreciated. OBJECTIVE To elucidate the molecular cause of a complex neuropathy phenotype in 3 patients by applying genomic sequencing strategies. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Three affected individuals from 2 unrelated families presented with a complex neuropathy phenotype characterized by axonal sensorimotor neuropathy and microcephaly. They were recruited into the Centers for Mendelian Genomics research program to identify the molecular cause of their phenotype. Whole-genome, targeted whole-exome sequencing, and high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays were performed in genetics clinics of tertiary care pediatric hospitals and biomedical research institutions. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing identified the variants responsible for the patients’ clinical phenotype. RESULTS We identified compound heterozygous alleles in 2 affected siblings from 1 family and a homozygous nonsense variant in the third unrelated patient in the vaccinia-related kinase 1 gene (VRK1). In the latter subject, we found a common haplotype on which the nonsense mutation occurred and that segregates in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE We report the identification of disease-causing alleles in 3 children from 2 unrelated families with a previously uncharacterized complex axonal motor and sensory neuropathy accompanied by severe nonprogressive microcephaly and cerebral dysgenesis. Our data raise the question of whether VRK1 mutations disturb cell cycle progression and may result in apoptosis of cells in the nervous system. The application of unbiased genomic approaches allows the identification of potentially pathogenic mutations in unsuspected genes in highly genetically heterogeneous and uncharacterized neurological diseases. PMID:24126608

  19. The Influence of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy on Local Postural Muscle and Central Sensory Feedback Balance Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control) and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing). DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2) and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2) with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, P<0.01), which suggests a compromised local-control balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, P<0.02), which suggests an adaptation mechanism to reduce the overall body sway in DPN patients. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between central-control rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, P<0.05) and the history of diabetes (rPearson = 0.58-071, P<0.05). Results suggest that in the lack of sensory feedback cueing, DPN participants were highly unstable compared to controls. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation mechanism using sensory feedback depends on the level of neuropathy and the history of diabetes. PMID:26258497

  20. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G.; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Kearns, Lisa S.; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Trounce, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function. PMID:26496696

  1. Modulating molecular chaperones improves sensory fiber recovery and mitochondrial function in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Michael J.; Pan, Pan; Farmer, Kevin L.; Zhao, Huiping; Blagg, Brian S.J.; Dobrowsky, Rick T.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (iENFs) is an important approach to stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and is a promising clinical endpoint for identifying beneficial therapeutics. Mechanistically, diabetes decreases neuronal mitochondrial function and enhancing mitochondrial respiratory capacity may aid neuronal recovery from glucotoxic insults. We have proposed that modulating the activity and expression of heat shock proteins (Hsp) may be of benefit in treating DPN. KU-32 is a C-terminal Hsp90 inhibitor that improved thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic C57Bl/6 mice but it was not determined if this was associated with an increase in iENF density and mitochondrial function. After 16 weeks of diabetes, Swiss Webster mice showed decreased electrophysiological and psychosensory responses and a >30% loss of iENFs. Treatment of the mice with ten weekly doses of 20 mg/kg KU-32 significantly reversed pre-existing deficits in nerve conduction velocity and responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli. KU-32 therapy significantly reversed the pre-existing loss of iENFs despite the identification of a sub-group of drug-treated diabetic mice that showed improved thermal sensitivity but no increase in iENF density. To determine if the improved clinical indices correlated with enhanced mitochondrial activity, sensory neurons were isolated and mitochondrial bioenergetics assessed ex vivo using extracellular flux technology. Diabetes decreased maximal respiratory capacity in sensory neurons and this deficit was improved following KU-32 treatment. In conclusion, KU-32 improved physiological and morphologic markers of degenerative neuropathy and drug efficacy may be related to enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetics in sensory neurons. PMID:22465570

  2. Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun

    2014-11-15

    A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged. PMID:25175852

  3. Intravitreal delivery of AAV-NDI1 provides functional benefit in a murine model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chadderton, Naomi; Palfi, Arpad; Millington-Ward, Sophia; Gobbo, Oliverio; Overlack, Nora; Carrigan, Matthew; O'Reilly, Mary; Campbell, Matthew; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Wolfrum, Uwe; Humphries, Peter; Kenna, Paul F; Jane Farrar, G

    2013-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited form of visual dysfunction caused by mutations in several genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex (complex I). Development of gene therapies for LHON has been impeded by genetic heterogeneity and the need to deliver therapies to the mitochondria of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the cells primarily affected in LHON. The therapy under development entails intraocular injection of a nuclear yeast gene NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (NDI1) that encodes a single subunit complex I equivalent and as such is mutation independent. NDI1 is imported into mitochondria due to an endogenous mitochondrial localisation signal. Intravitreal injection represents a clinically relevant route of delivery to RGCs not previously used for NDI1. In this study, recombinant adenoassociated virus (AAV) serotype 2 expressing NDI1 (AAV-NDI1) was shown to protect RGCs in a rotenone-induced murine model of LHON. AAV-NDI1 significantly reduced RGC death by 1.5-fold and optic nerve atrophy by 1.4-fold. This led to a significant preservation of retinal function as assessed by manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and optokinetic responses. Intraocular injection of AAV-NDI1 overcomes many barriers previously associated with developing therapies for LHON and holds great therapeutic promise for a mitochondrial disorder for which there are no effective therapies. PMID:22669418

  4. Idebenone protects against retinal damage and loss of vision in a mouse model of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Fabrice D; Erb, Michael; Anklin, Corinne; Robay, Dimitri; Pernet, Vincent; Gueven, Nuri

    2012-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited disease caused by mutations in complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The disease is characterized by loss of central vision due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dysfunction and optic nerve atrophy. Despite progress towards a better understanding of the disease, no therapeutic treatment is currently approved for this devastating disease. Idebenone, a short-chain benzoquinone, has shown promising evidence of efficacy in protecting vision loss and in accelerating recovery of visual acuity in patients with LHON. It was therefore of interest to study suitable LHON models in vitro and in vivo to identify anatomical correlates for this protective activity. At nanomolar concentrations, idebenone protected the rodent RGC cell line RGC-5 against complex I dysfunction in vitro. Consistent with the reported dosing and observed effects in LHON patients, we describe that in mice, idebenone penetrated into the eye at concentrations equivalent to those which protected RGC-5 cells from complex I dysfunction in vitro. Consequently, we next investigated the protective effect of idebenone in a mouse model of LHON, whereby mitochondrial complex I dysfunction was caused by exposure to rotenone. In this model, idebenone protected against the loss of retinal ganglion cells, reduction in retinal thickness and gliosis. Furthermore, consistent with this protection of retinal integrity, idebenone restored the functional loss of vision in this disease model. These results support the pharmacological activity of idebenone and indicate that idebenone holds potential as an effective treatment for vision loss in LHON patients. PMID:23028832

  5. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND6 T14484C mutation in three Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yanhong; Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Qian Yaping; Zhou Jian; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-08-18

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with maternally transmitted Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. In the affected matrilineal relatives, the loss of central vision is bilateral, the fellow eye becoming affected either simultaneously (45%) or sequentially (55%). The penetrances of vision loss in these pedigrees were 27%, 50%, and 60%, respectively. The age-at-onset of vision loss in these families was 14, 19, and 24 years, respectively. Furthermore, the ratios between affected male and female matrilineal relatives were 1:1, 1:1.2, and 1:2, respectively. Mutational analysis of mitochondrial DNA revealed the presence of homoplasmic ND6 T14484C mutation, which has been associated with LHON. The incomplete penetrance and phenotypic variability implicate the involvement of nuclear modifier gene(s), environmental factor(s) or mitochondrial haplotype(s) in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T14484C mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  6. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND4 G11696A mutation in five Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangtian |; Wei Qiping; Yang Li; Tong Yi |; Zhao Fuxin; Lu Chunjie; Qian Yaping; Sun Yanghong; Lu Fan; Qu Jia |. E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin ||. E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-02-03

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical ND4 G11696A mutation associated with LHON. Indeed, this mutation is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families. In fact, the occurrence of the G11696A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Furthermore, the N405D in the ND5 and G5820A in the tRNA{sup Cys}, showing high evolutional conservation, may contribute to the phenotypic expression of G11696A mutation in the WZ10 pedigree. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in other four Chinese pedigrees carrying the G11696A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated G11696A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  7. Nerve conduction abnormalities and neuromyotonia in genetically engineered mouse models of human hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Zielasek, J; Toyka, K V

    1999-09-14

    We performed electrophysiological studies in myelin protein mutant mice in order to characterize nerve conduction changes. We performed neurographic studies on the facial and sciatic nerves and needle electromyography (EMG). Mice homozygously deficient for the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (Pmp22-/-) exhibited increased motor latencies, reduced nerve conduction velocities, and polyphasia of the M-response, which are the typical electrophysiological signs of dysmyelination. PMP22 +/- mice developed only mild conduction slowing at an old age and a mild reduction of the M-amplitude, which indicates mild axonal dysfunction. Mice overexpressing Pmp22 developed severe electrophysiological signs of dysmyelination. In myelin protein zero-deficient mice (P0 -/-), we found alterations similar to those found in Pmp22 -/- mice, whereas P0 +/- mice developed mildly increased sciatic nerve F-wave latencies only late in life, which indicates only mild dysmyelination. Connexin 32-deficient mice showed electrophysiological evidence of mild axonal damage. By EMG, we found the clinical and electrophysiological signs of neuromyotonia, that is, continuous spontaneous motor unit discharges, often in rhythmic patterns (myokymia), in P0 -/-, Pmp22 -/-, Trembler, Trembler-J, and Pmp22-overexpressing mice. This indicates abnormal impulse generation in these dysmyelinated nerves. In summary, our studies demonstrate nerve conduction changes in mice with myelin protein gene defects that are similar to those found in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorders. In addition, we identified new mouse models of hereditary neuromyotonia. PMID:10586256

  8. Mechanisms of disease: Mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neuropathy and other complications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fernyhough, Paul; Jonathan, McGavock

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that involves the sensory and autonomic nervous systems and leads to significant morbidity and impact on quality of life of patients. Mitochondrial stress has been proposed as a major mediator of insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes and a trigger of diabetic complications such as nephropathy and cardiomyopathy in humans and animal models. Recent studies in the peripheral nervous system in type 1 and type 2 diabetic animal models suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegeneration in diabetes. This chapter focuses on the nature of sensory nerve dysfunction in diabetes and presents these findings in the context of diabetes-induced nerve degeneration mediated by alterations in mitochondrial physiology. Diabetes-induced dysfunction in calcium homeostasis is discussed and causative associations with suboptimal mitochondrial physiology are developed. Comparisons are made with mitochondrial-dependent dysfunction in muscle and cardiac tissue in diabetes. It is clear that across a range of complications of diabetes mitochondrial physiology is impaired; in general, a reduction in respiratory chain capability is apparent. Where appropriate, we provide clinical evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of complications in patients with diabetes. This abnormal activity may predispose mitochondria to generate elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), although experimental proof remains lacking, but more importantly will deleteriously alter the bioenergetic status of neurons. PMID:25410234

  9. Patterns of white matter diffusivity abnormalities in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: a tract-based spatial statistics study.

    PubMed

    Milesi, Jacopo; Rocca, Maria A; Bianchi-Marzoli, Stefania; Petrolini, Melissa; Pagani, Elisabetta; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2012-09-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease characterized by retinal ganglion cell degeneration and optic nerve atrophy, leading to a loss of central vision. The aim of this study was to explore the topographical pattern of damage to the brain white matter (WM) tracts from patients with chronic LHON using diffusion tensor (DT) MRI and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Brain dual-echo and DT MRI scans were acquired from 13 patients with chronic LHON and 25 matched controls using a 3.0 T scanner. TBSS analysis was performed using the FMRIB's Diffusion Toolbox. A complete neuro-ophthalmologic examination, including standardized automated Humphrey perimetry as well as average and temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (PRNFL) measurements, was obtained in all patients. Mean average and temporal PRNFL thicknesses were decreased significantly in LHON patients. Compared to controls, TBSS analysis revealed significant diffusivity abnormalities in these patients, which were characterized by a decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and an increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity, affecting exclusively the optic tracts and optic radiations (OR). In patients, a significant correlation was found between optic tract average FA and mean visual acuity (r = 0.57, p = 0.04). In LHON patients, DT MRI reveals a microstructural alteration of the WM along the entire visual pathways, with a sparing of the other main WM tracts of the brain. Damage to the OR may be secondary either to trans-synaptic degeneration, which in turn is due to neuroaxonal loss in the retina and optic nerve, or to local mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22249289

  10. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways.

    PubMed

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that modulate LHON penetrance must take into account also the exposure to environmental triggers such as tobacco smoke. PMID:26673666

  11. DTI Study of Cerebral Normal-Appearing White Matter in Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Song, Chun-Li; Huang, Liang; Song, Qing-Wei; Liang, Zhan-Hua; Wei, Qiang; Hu, Jia-Ni; Miao, Yan-Wei; Wu, Bing; Xie, Lizhi

    2015-10-01

    The majority of previous studies on hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) were focused on peripheral nerves, whereas cerebral alterations in HNPP have been less attended to. In this work, Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to detect the changes in WM, especially in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in HNPP patients for its sensitivity in probing the microstructure of WM, the sensitive metric was searched for probing cerebral alterations and the regional distribution of cerebral abnormalities was identified. Twelve HNPP patients and 12 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent the conventional MRI, DTI scan, and electrophysiological examination. The conventional MRI images were first analyzed to identify abnormal intense regions and the NAWM regions. NAWM refers to the white matter regions that do not include the lesions on conventional MRI. The apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the NAWM were then measured and compared between patient and control groups. The sensitivity and specificity of 3 methods and the cerebral regional distribution of MR signal abnormalities were further analyzed. Hyperintense foci were observed on T2 weighted image and fluid attenuated inversion recovery images in 6 patients. Compared to the controls, FA values of the patients were significantly lower in bilateral frontal, orbitofrontal, and temporal NAWMs; whereas the electrophysiological examination results of patients and controls exhibited no statistically significant difference. The sensitivity of FA value was higher than that of electrophysiological examination and conventional MRI. The majority of abnormal signals on conventional MRI images and abnormal FA values were located in the frontal and temporal lobes. The results of our study show cerebral WM changes in HNPP patients. FA value in DTI has been shown to be sensitive to the cerebral microstructural changes in HNPP. The frontal lobe is the predilection site that is most involved in HNPP. PMID:26512614

  12. Clustering of Caucasian Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients containing the 11778 or 14484 mutations on an mtDNA lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Sun, F.; Wallace, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a type of blindness caused by mtDNA mutations. Three LHON mtDNA mutations at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, and 14484 are specific for LHON and account for 90% of worldwide cases and are thus designated as {open_quotes}primary{close_quotes} LHON mutations. Fifteen other {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} LHON mtDNA mutations have been identified, but their pathogenicity is unclear. mtDNA haplotype and phylogenetic analysis of the primary LHON mutations in North American Caucasian patients and controls has shown that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, which are distributed throughout the European-derived (Caucasian) mtDNA phylogeny, patients containing the 14484 mutation tended to be associated with European mtDNA haplotype J. To investigate this apparent clustering, we performed {chi}{sup 2}-based statistical analyses to compare the distribution of LHON patients on the Caucasian phylogenetic tree. Our results indicate that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, the 14484 mutation was not distributed on the phylogeny in proportion to the frequencies of the major Caucasian mtDNA haplogroups found in North America. The 14484 mutation was next shown to occur on the haplogroup J background more frequently that expected, consistent with the observation that {approximately}75% of worldwide 14484-positive LHON patients occur in association with haplogroup J. The 11778 mutation also exhibited a moderate clustering on haplogroup J. These observations were supported by statistical analysis using all available mutation frequencies reported in the literature. This paper thus illustrates the potential importance of genetic background in certain mtDNA-based diseases, speculates on a pathogenic role for a subset of LHON secondary mutations and their interaction with primary mutations, and provides support for a polygenic model for LHON expression in some cases. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Clustering of Caucasian Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients containing the 11778 or 14484 mutations on an mtDNA lineage.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M D; Sun, F; Wallace, D C

    1997-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a type of blindness caused by mtDNA mutations. Three LHON mtDNA mutations at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, and 14484 are specific for LHON and account for 90% of worldwide cases and are thus designated as "primary" LHON mutations. Fifteen other "secondary" LHON mtDNA mutations have been identified, but their pathogenicity is unclear. mtDNA haplotype and phylogenetic analysis of the primary LHON mutations in North American Caucasian patients and controls has shown that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, which are distributed throughout the European-derived (Caucasian) mtDNA phylogeny, patients containing the 14484 mutation tended to be associated with European mtDNA haplotype J. To investigate this apparent clustering, we performed chi2-based statistical analyses to compare the distribution of LHON patients on the Caucasian phylogenetic tree. Our results indicate that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, the 14484 mutation was not distributed on the phylogeny in proportion to the frequencies of the major Caucasian mtDNA haplogroups found in North America. The 14484 mutation was next shown to occur on the haplogroup J background more frequently that expected, consistent with the observation that approximately 75% of worldwide 14484-positive LHON patients occur in association with haplogroup J. The 11778 mutation also exhibited a moderate clustering on haplogroup J. These observations were supported by statistical analysis using all available mutation frequencies reported in the literature. This paper thus illustrates the potential importance of genetic background in certain mtDNA-based diseases, speculates on a pathogenic role for a subset of LHON secondary mutations and their interaction with primary mutations, and provides support for a polygenic model for LHON expression in some cases. PMID:9012411

  14. Evidence of GLP-1-mediated neuroprotection in an animal model of pyridoxine-induced peripheral sensory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Perry, TracyAnn; Holloway, Harold W.; Weerasuriya, Ananda; Mouton, Peter R.; Duffy, Kara; Mattison, Julie A.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2007-01-01

    Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) intoxicated rodents develop a peripheral neuropathy characterized by sensory nerve conduction deficits associated with disturbances of nerve fiber geometry and axonal atrophy. To investigate the possibility that glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)-amide (GLP-1) receptor agonism may influence axonal structure and function through neuroprotection neurotrophic support, effects of GLP-1 and its long acting analog, Exendin-4 (Ex4) treatment on pyridoxine-induced peripheral neuropathy were examined in rats using behavioral and morphometric techniques. GLP-1 is an endogenous insulinotropic peptide secreted from the gut in response to the presence of food. GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) are coupled to the cAMP second messenger pathway, and are expressed widely throughout neural tissues of humans and rodents. Recent studies have established that GLP-1 and Ex4, have multiple synergistic effects on glucose-dependent insulin secretion pathways of pancreatic ?-cells and on neural plasticity. Data reported here suggest that clinically relevant doses of GLP-1 and Ex4 may offer some protection against the sensory peripheral neuropathy induced by pyridoxine. Our findings suggest a potential role for these peptides in the treatment of neuropathies, including that associated with type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:17125767

  15. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: heteroplasmy is likely to be significant in the expression of LHON in families with the 3460 ND1 mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Black, G C; Morten, K; Laborde, A; Poulton, J

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of heteroplasmy on the expression of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in a large family with the 3460 LHON mutation. METHODS: Mutation detection was performed by restriction enzyme digestion of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Heteroplasmy was estimated by quantitation of wild type:mutant product ratios. RESULTS: There is a significant association between levels of mutant mtDNA and manifestation of the disease phenotype. CONCLUSION: As a high proportion of families with the 3460 mutation demonstrate heteroplasmy; this is likely to be a significant factor in disease expression. Images PMID:8976705

  16. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tudor J.C.; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D.; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W.; Williams, Amanda C. de C.; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L.H.; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7 day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n = 28), of whom 75% (n = 21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN. PMID:24973717

  17. Sensory, psychological, and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-associated peripheral neuropathy: A cross-sectional deep profiling study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tudor J C; Brown, Matthew; Ramirez, Juan D; Perkins, James; Woldeamanuel, Yohannes W; Williams, Amanda C de C; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L H; Bodi, Istvan; Cox, Sarah; Maier, Christoph; Krumova, Elena K; Rice, Andrew S C

    2014-09-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN) is a frequent complication of HIV infection and a major source of morbidity. A cross-sectional deep profiling study examining HIV-SN was conducted in people living with HIV in a high resource setting using a battery of measures which included the following: parameters of pain and sensory symptoms (7day pain diary, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI] and Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sensory innervation (structured neurological examination, quantitative sensory testing [QST] and intraepidermal nerve fibre density [IENFD]), psychological state (Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20 [PASS-20], Depression Anxiety and Positive Outlook Scale [DAPOS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS], insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), and quality of life (Short Form (36) Health Survey [SF-36]). The diagnostic utility of the Brief Peripheral Neuropathy Screen (BPNS), Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), and Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) were evaluated. Thirty-six healthy volunteers and 66 HIV infected participants were recruited. A novel triumvirate case definition for HIV-SN was used that required 2 out of 3 of the following: 2 or more abnormal QST findings, reduced IENFD, and signs of a peripheral neuropathy on a structured neurological examination. Of those with HIV, 42% fulfilled the case definition for HIV-SN (n=28), of whom 75% (n=21) reported pain. The most frequent QST abnormalities in HIV-SN were loss of function in mechanical and vibration detection. Structured clinical examination was superior to QST or IENFD in HIV-SN diagnosis. HIV-SN participants had higher plasma triglyceride, concentrations depression, anxiety and catastrophizing scores, and prevalence of insomnia than HIV participants without HIV-SN. PMID:24973717

  18. Neuromyotonia, myocloni, sensory neuropathy and cerebellar symptoms in a patient with antibodies to neuronal nucleoproteins (anti-Hu-antibodies).

    PubMed

    Toepfer, M; Schroeder, M; Unger, J W; Lochmüller, H; Pongratz, D; Müller-Felber, W

    1999-09-01

    A middle-aged patient presented with subacute muscular stiffness, myocloni of both extremity and facial muscles, gait ataxia and symmetrical distal painful paraesthesias. Electrophysiologically, neuromyotonia was confirmed. High titer anti-Hu antibodies were detected, but no other paraneoplastic antibodies were found. Small-cell lung cancer was diagnosed. Under chemotherapy tumor remission was achieved and, except for minor sensory deficits, neurological symptoms disappeared. This report shows that paraneoplastic syndromes associated with antibodies to neuronal nucleoproteins (anti-Hu antibodies) may be associated with a syndrome including neuromyotonia, sensory neuropathy, cerebellar symptoms and myocloni. PMID:10536910

  19. [Clinical-genetic characteristics of hereditary motor-sensory neuropathy type 1 X].

    PubMed

    Sharkova, I V; Milovidova, T B; Dadali, E L; Poliakov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Data of own researches and the review of the literary data for studying pathogenesis and features of HMSN, type 1 ? caused by mutations in gene GJB1 are presented in this paper. X-linked HMSN is the genetic variant second for frequency in Russian, it constitute 22% from total of patients of this group. Features of this genetic variant are considerable distinction in weight clinical displays at patients man's and female. It is shown that at the majority of female patients clinical displays are expressed less, and at 20% were absent at all. The assumption is come out that at indicators of CNV from 35 to 52 m/s, it is necessary to conduct research in gene GJB1 especially at patients of a female and as to carry out search of mutations at all relatives with HMSN, type 1 X even in the absence of complaints from their party. PMID:23011429

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-? elevates neurite outgrowth through an NF-?B-dependent pathway in cultured adult sensory neurons: Diminished expression in diabetes may contribute to sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ali; Smith, Darrell R; Balakrishnan, Savitha; Dunn, Lori; Martens, Corina; Tweed, Christopher W; Fernyhough, Paul

    2011-11-14

    The presence of a proinflammatory environment in the sensory neuron axis in diabetes was tested by measuring levels of proinflammatory cytokines in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and peripheral nerve from age matched control and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF?) and other cytokines were diminished in lumbar DRG from diabetic animals. Consequently, we tested the hypothesis that TNF? modulated axonal plasticity in adult sensory neurons and posited that impairments in this signal transduction pathway may underlie degeneration in diabetic sensory neuropathy. Cultured adult rat sensory neurons were grown under defined conditions and TNF? caused a dose-dependent 2-fold (P<0.05) elevation in neurite outgrowth. Neurons derived from 3 to 5month STZ-induced diabetic rats exhibited significantly reduced levels of neurite outgrowth in response to TNF?. TNF? enhanced NF-?B activity as assessed using Western blotting and plasmid reporter technology. Blockade of TNF?-induction of NF-?B activation caused inhibition of neurite outgrowth in cultured neurons. Immunofluorescent staining for NF-?B subunit p50 within neuronal nuclei revealed that medium to large diameter neurons were most susceptible to NF-?B inhibition and was associated with decreased neurite outgrowth. The results demonstrating reduced cytokine expression in DRG confirm that diabetic sensory neuropathy does not involve a neuroinflammatory component at this stage of the disease in experimental animal models. In addition, it is hypothesized that reduced TNF? expression in the DRG and possibly associated deficits in anterograde transport may contribute to impaired collatoral sprouting and regeneration in target tissue in type 1 diabetes. PMID:21985959

  1. AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Susan C.; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, or clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This chapter reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. PMID:23239211

  2. Detection of the mtDNA 14484 mutation on an African-specific haplotype: Implications about its role in causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Torroni, A.; Petrozzi, M.; Terracina, M.

    1996-07-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease whose primary clinical manifestation is acute or subacute bilateral loss of central vision leading to central scotoma and blindness. To date, LHON has been associated with 18 mtDNA missense mutations, even though, for many of these mutations, it remains unclear whether they cause the disease, contribute to the pathology, or are nonpathogenic mtDNA polymorphisms. On the basis of numerous criteria, which include the specificity for LHON, the frequency in the general population, and the penetrance within affected pedigrees, the detection of associated defects in the respiratory chain, mutations at three nucleotide positions (nps), 11778 (G{r_arrow}A), 3460 (G{r_arrow}A), and 14484 (T{r_arrow}C) have been classified as high-risk and primary LHON mutations. Overall, these three mutations encompass {ge}90% of the LHON cases. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Acute optic neuropathy associated with a novel MFN2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Luca; Marcotulli, Christian; Storti, Eugenia; Tessa, Alessandra; Serrao, Mariano; Parisi, Vincenzo; Santorelli, F M; Pierelli, Francesco; Casali, Carlo

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in the mitofusin 2 (MFN2) gene cause CMT2A the most common form of autosomal dominant axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT). In addition, mutations in MFN2 have been shown to be responsible for Hereditary Motor Sensory Neuropathy type VI (HSMN VI), a rare early-onset axonal CMT associated with optic neuropathy. Most reports of HMSN VI presented with a sub-acute form of optic neuropathy. Herein, we report a CMT2A patient, who developed very rapidly progressing severe optic neuropathy. A 40-year-old Caucasian man was evaluated for gait disturbance and lower limbs weakness, slowly progressed over the last 2 years. Due to clinical data and family history, a diagnosis of CMT2 was made. The novel heterozygous c.775C > T (p.Arg259Cys) mutation in MFN2 was detected in the patient and his clinical affected mother. Interestingly, the patient developed a severe sudden bilateral visual deterioration few years early, with clinical and instrumental picture suggestive of acute bilateral optic neuropathy. Our report expands the spectrum of MFN2-related manifestation because it indicates that visual symptoms of HMSN VI may enter in the differential with acquired or hereditary acute optic neuropathies, and that severe optic neuropathy is not invariably an early manifestation of the disease but may occur as disease progressed. This report could have an impact on clinicians who evaluate patients with otherwise unexplainable bilateral acute-onset optic neuropathy, especially if associated with a motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. PMID:25957633

  4. Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial of Amitriptyline for Analgesia in Painful HIV-Associated Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dinat, Natalya; Marinda, Edmore; Moch, Shirra; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Kamerman, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study at a single center in South Africa, to ascertain whether amitriptyline is an effective analgesic for painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy of moderate to severe intensity in: i) antiretroviral drug naive individuals, and ii) antiretroviral drug users. 124 HIV-infected participants (antiretroviral drug naive = 62, antiretroviral drug users = 62) who met the study criteria for painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy were randomized to once-daily oral amitriptyline (titrated to a median: interquartile range of 50: 25-50 mg) or placebo for six weeks, followed by a three-week washout period and subsequent treatment crossover. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline in worst pain intensity of the feet (measured by participant self-report using an 11-point numerical pain rating scale) after six weeks of treatment. 122 of 124 participants completed all study visits and were included in the analysis of the primary outcome. In the antiretroviral drug-naive group (n = 61) there was no significant difference in the mean change in pain score from baseline after six weeks of treatment with placebo or amitriptyline [amitriptyline: 2.8 (SD 3.3) vs. placebo: 2.8 (3.4)]. Similarly, there was no significant difference in the change in pain score after six weeks of treatment with placebo or amitriptyline in the antiretroviral drug-user group (n = 61) [amitriptyline: 2.7 (3.3) vs. placebo: 2.1 (2.8)]. Controlling for period effects and treatment order effects did not alter the outcome of the analyses. Nor did analyzing the intention-to-treat cohort (missing data interpolated using baseline observation carried forward) alter the outcome of the analyses. In summary, amitriptyline, at the doses used here, was no more effective than an inactive placebo at reducing pain intensity in individuals with painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy of moderate to severe intensity, irrespective of whether they were on antiretroviral therapy or not. Trial Registration ISRCTN 54452526 PMID:25974287

  5. A 1.5-Mb deletion in 17p11.2-p12 is frequently observed in Italian families with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, D.; Pandolfo, M. |; Pareyson, D.; Sghirlanzoni, A.; Di Donato, S.; Roa, B.B.; Abbas, N.E.; Lupski, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent mononeuropathies. A 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-p12 has been associated with HNPP. Duplication of the same 1.5-Mb region is known to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1A), a more severe peripheral neuropathy characterized by symmetrically slowed nerve conduction velocity (NCV). The CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion appear to be the reciprocal products of a recombination event involving a repeat element (CMT1A-REP) that flanks the 1.5-Mb region involved in the duplication/deletion. Patients from nine unrelated Italian families who were diagnosed with HNPP on the basis of clinical, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations were analyzed by molecular methods for DNA deletion on chromosome 17p. In all nine families, Southern analysis using a CMT1A-REP probe detected a reduced hybridization signal of a 6.0-kb EcoRI fragment mapping within the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating deletion of one copy of CMT1A-REP in these HNPP patients. Families were also typed with a polymorphic (CA){sub n} repeat and with RFLPs corresponding to loci D17S122, D17S125, and D17S61, which all map within the deleted region. Lack of allelic transmission from affected parent to affected offspring was observed in four informative families, providing an independent indication for deletion. Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of SacII-digested genomic DNA detected junction fragments specific to the 1.5-Mb HNPP deletion in seven of nine Italian families included in this study. These findings suggest that a 1.5-Mb deletion on 17p11.2-p12 is the most common mutation associated with HNPP. 51 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Vasculitic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gwathmey, Kelly Graham; Burns, Ted Michael; Collins, Michael Paul; Dyck, P James Bonham

    2014-01-01

    The vasculitic neuropathies are a diverse group of disorders characterised by the acute-to-subacute onset of painful sensory and motor deficits that result from inflammatory destruction of nerve blood vessels and subsequent ischaemic injury. They are common in patients with primary systemic vasculitis and are seen in vasculitis secondary to disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, viral infections, and diabetic inflammatory neuropathies. It is imperative that neurologists recognise these disorders to initiate treatment promptly and thereby prevent morbidity and mortality. To simplify the approach to patients with vasculitis of the peripheral nerves, a straightforward, dichotomous classification scheme can be used in which the vasculitic neuropathies are divided into two groups-nerve large arteriole vasculitis and nerve microvasculitis-on the basis of the size of the involved vessels. The size of the affected blood vessels correlates with the clinical course and prognosis in patients with vasculitic neuropathy. PMID:24331794

  7. Mitochondrial tRNA(Thr) 15891C>G mutation was not associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Han Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaochang; Yu, Jinfang; Xia, Bohou; Zhuo, Guangchao

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were the most important causes of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). To date, approximately 25 LHON-associated mtDNA mutations have been identified in various ethnic populations. Three primary mutations, the 3460G?>?A, 11778G?>?A and 14484T?>?C, in genes encoding the subunits of respiratory chain complex I, were the most common LHON-associated mtDNA mutations. Moreover, secondary mutations in mt-tRNA genes have been reported increasingly to be associated with LHON, simply due to the high mutation rates of mt-tRNAs. There is a lack of functional analysis and a poor genetic evaluation of a certain mt-tRNA mutation, which failed to meet the classic pathogenicity scoring system. As a result, how to classify a pathogenic mutation in mt-tRNA gene became important for both geneticist and clinician to diagnosis the LHON or the suspicious of LHON. In this study, we reassessed the role of a point mutation in mt-tRNA(Thr) gene which had been reported to be a mutation associated with LHON, the pathogenicity of this mutation has been discussed in this context. PMID:25186221

  8. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangdong Bu; Rotter, J.I. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1991-09-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, the authors show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, they have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11{plus minus}0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.l08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus.

  9. X-inactivation patterns in female Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients do not support a strong X-linked determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Carelli, V.; Cortelli, P.

    1996-02-02

    Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) accounts for about 3% of the cases of blindness in young adult males. The underlying mitochondrial pathogenesis of LHON has been well studied, with specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations of structural genes described and well characterized. However, enigmatic aspects of the disease are not explained by mutation data, such as the higher proportion of affected males, the later onset of the disease in females, and the presence of unaffected individuals with a high proportion of mutant mtDNA. A hypothesis which has been put forward to explain the unusual disease expression is a dual model of mtDNA and X-linked nuclear gene inheritance. If a nuclear X-linked modifier gene influences the expression of the mitochondrial-linked mutant gene then the affected females should be either homozygous for the nuclear determinant, or if heterozygous, lyonization should favor the mutant X. In order to determine if an X-linked gene predisposes to LHON phenotype we studied X-inactivation patterns in 35 females with known mtDNA mutations from 10 LHON pedigrees. Our results do not support a strong X-linked determinant in LHON cause: 2 of the 10 (20%) manifesting carriers showed skewing of X-inactivation, as did 3 of the 25 (12%) nonmanifesting carriers. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION & TREATMENT OF LARGE SENSORY FIBER PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY IN DIABETIC MICE

    E-print Network

    Muller, Karra

    2008-11-17

    Patients with large-fiber diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DPN) can develop altered sensorimotor function. Gait and balance control are regulated, in part, through large sensory nerves innervating muscle spindles. The overall goal...

  11. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal induces mitochondrial dysfunction and aberrant axonal outgrowth in adult sensory neurons that mimics features of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Akude, Eli; Zherebitskaya, Elena; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K; Girling, Kimberly; Fernyhough, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Modification of proteins by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) has been proposed to cause neurotoxicity in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including distal axonopathy in diabetic sensory neuropathy. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of cultured adult rat sensory neurons to 4-HNE would result in the formation of amino acid adducts on mitochondrial proteins and that this process would be associated with impaired mitochondrial function and axonal regeneration. In addition, we compared 4-HNE-induced axon pathology with that exhibited by neurons isolated from diabetic rats. Cultured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons were incubated with varying concentrations of 4-HNE. Cell survival, axonal morphology, and level of axon outgrowth were assessed. In addition, video microscopy of live cells, western blot, and immunofluorescent staining were utilized to detect protein adduct formation by 4-HNE and to localize actively respiring mitochondria. 4-HNE induced formation of protein adducts on cytoskeletal and mitochondrial proteins, and impaired axon regeneration by approximately 50% at 3 microM while having no effect on neuronal survival. 4-HNE initiated formation of aberrant axonal structures and caused the accumulation of mitochondria in these dystrophic structures. Neurons treated with 4-HNE exhibited a distal loss of active mitochondria. Finally, the distal axonopathy and the associated aberrant axonal structures generated by 4-HNE treatment mimicked axon pathology observed in DRG sensory neurons isolated from diabetic rats and replicated aspects of neurodegeneration observed in human diabetic sensory neuropathy. PMID:19557324

  12. Fifteen novel mutations in the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, 2, 3, 4, 4L, 5 and 6 genes from Iranian patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Zahra; Didari, Elmira; Arastehkani, Ahoura; Ghodsinejad, Vadieh; Aryani, Omid; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2013-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an optic nerve dysfunction resulting from mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is transmitted in a maternal pattern of inheritance. It is caused by three primary point mutations: G11778A, G3460A and T14484C; in the mitochondrial genome. These mutations are sufficient to induce the disease, accounting for the majority of LHON cases, and affect genes that encode for the different subunits of mitochondrial complexes I and III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Other mutations are secondary mutations associated with the primary mutations. The purpose of this study was to determine MT-ND variations in Iranian patients with LHON. In order to determine the prevalence and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in the LHON patients, their DNA was studied using PCR and DNA sequencing analysis. Sequencing of MT-ND genes from 35 LHON patients revealed a total of 44 nucleotide variations, in which fifteen novel variations-A14020G, A13663G, C10399T, C4932A, C3893G, C10557A, C12012A, C13934T, G4596A, T12851A, T4539A, T4941A, T13255A, T14353C and del A 4513-were observed in 27 LHON patients. However, eight patients showed no variation in the ND genes. These mutations contribute to the current database of mtDNA polymorphisms in LHON patients and may facilitate the definition of disease-related mutations in human mtDNA. This research may help to understand the disease mechanism and open up new diagnostic opportunities for LHON. PMID:24158608

  13. Amplitudes of Pain-Related Evoked Potentials Are Useful to Detect Small Fiber Involvement in Painful Mixed Fiber Neuropathies in Addition to Quantitative Sensory Testing – An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels; Kahn, Ann-Kathrin; Zeller, Daniel; Katsarava, Zaza; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of pain-related evoked potentials (PREP) elicited by electrical stimulation for the identification of small fiber involvement in patients with mixed fiber neuropathy (MFN). Eleven MFN patients with clinical signs of large fiber impairment and neuropathic pain and ten healthy controls underwent clinical and electrophysiological evaluation. Small fiber function, electrical conductivity and morphology were examined by quantitative sensory testing (QST), PREP, and skin punch biopsy. MFN was diagnosed following clinical and electrophysiological examination (chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy: n?=?6; vasculitic neuropathy: n?=?3; chronic axonal ­neuropathy: n?=?2). The majority of patients with MFN characterized their pain by descriptors that mainly represent C-fiber-mediated pain. In QST, patients displayed elevated cold, warm, mechanical, and vibration detection thresholds and cold pain thresholds indicative of MFN. PREP amplitudes in patients correlated with cold (p?

  14. Ciliary neurotrophic factor activates NF-?B to enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics and prevent neuropathy in sensory neurons of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Ali; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K.; Smith, Darrel R.; Balakrishnan, Savitha; Tessler, Lori; Martens, Corina; Morrow, Dwane; Schartner, Emily; Frizzi, Katie E.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neurons that may contribute to peripheral neuropathy. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes sensory neuron survival and axon regeneration and prevents axonal dwindling, nerve conduction deficits and thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic rats. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF protects sensory neuron function during diabetes through normalization of impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. In addition, we investigated whether the NF-?B signal transduction pathway was mobilized by CNTF. Neurite outgrowth of sensory neurons derived from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats was reduced compared to neurons from control rats and exposure to CNTF for 24 h enhanced neurite outgrowth. CNTF also activated NF-?B, as assessed by Western blotting for the NF-?B p50 subunit and reporter assays for NF-?B promoter activity. Conversely, blockade of NF-?B signaling using SN50 peptide inhibited CNTF-mediated neurite outgrowth. Studies in mice with STZ-induced diabetes demonstrated that systemic therapy with CNTF prevented functional and structural indices of peripheral neuropathy along with deficiencies in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) NF-?B p50 expression and DNA binding activity. DRG neurons derived from STZ-diabetic mice also exhibited deficiencies in maximal oxygen consumption rate and associated spare respiratory capacity that were corrected by exposure to CNTF for 24 h in an NF-?B-dependent manner. We propose that the ability of CNTF to enhance axon regeneration and protect peripheral nerve from structural and functional indices of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is associated with targeting of mitochondrial function, in part via NF-?B activation, and improvement of cellular bioenergetics. PMID:23022047

  15. Ciliary neurotrophic factor activates NF-?B to enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics and prevent neuropathy in sensory neurons of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ali; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K; Smith, Darrell R; Balakrishnan, Savitha; Tessler, Lori; Martens, Corina; Morrow, Dwane; Schartner, Emily; Frizzi, Katie E; Calcutt, Nigel A; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes causes mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neurons that may contribute to peripheral neuropathy. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes sensory neuron survival and axon regeneration and prevents axonal dwindling, nerve conduction deficits and thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic rats. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF protects sensory neuron function during diabetes through normalization of impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. In addition, we investigated whether the NF-?B signal transduction pathway was mobilized by CNTF. Neurite outgrowth of sensory neurons derived from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats was reduced compared to neurons from control rats and exposure to CNTF for 24 h enhanced neurite outgrowth. CNTF also activated NF-?B, as assessed by Western blotting for the NF-?B p50 subunit and reporter assays for NF-?B promoter activity. Conversely, blockade of NF-?B signaling using SN50 peptide inhibited CNTF-mediated neurite outgrowth. Studies in mice with STZ-induced diabetes demonstrated that systemic therapy with CNTF prevented functional indices of peripheral neuropathy along with deficiencies in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) NF-?B p50 expression and DNA binding activity. DRG neurons derived from STZ-diabetic mice also exhibited deficiencies in maximal oxygen consumption rate and associated spare respiratory capacity that were corrected by exposure to CNTF for 24 h in an NF-?B-dependent manner. We propose that the ability of CNTF to enhance axon regeneration and protect peripheral nerve from structural and functional indices of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is associated with targeting of mitochondrial function, in part via NF-?B activation, and improvement of cellular bioenergetics. PMID:23022047

  16. Auditory Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Auditory Neuropathy Auditory Neuropathy On this page: What is auditory neuropathy? What ... can I get additional information? What is auditory neuropathy? Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder in which ...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetisation transfer imaging, and diffusion weighted imaging correlates of optic nerve, brain, and cervical cord damage in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, M; Rovaris, M; Bianchi, S; Mantia, L; Mancardi, G; Ghezzi, A; Montagna, P; Salvi, F; Filippi, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease leading to bilateral loss of central vision and severe optic nerve atrophy. A subtype of LHON presents additional clinical and MRI aspects indistinguishable from those of multiple sclerosis (MS) (LHON-MS). In patients with LHON or LHON-MS, an assessment was made of (a) the severity of optic nerve damage, using MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging (MTI), and (b) the presence and extent of macroscopic and microscopic pathology in the brain and cervical cord, using MRI and MT ratio (MTR) and mean diffusivity (&Dmacr;) histogram analysis.?METHODS—Ten patients with LHON, four with LHON-MS, and 20 age and sex matched healthy controls were studied. For the optic nerve and the brain, dual-echo turbo spin echo (TSE), T1 weighted spin echo, and MT images were obtained. For the brain, fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) and diffusion weighted images were also obtained. For the cervical cord, fast short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and MT images were obtained. The volume and the average MTR value of both the optic nerves were measured. MTR and &Dmacr; histograms of the normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) and MTR histograms of the whole cervical cord tissue were created.?RESULTS—The mean values of optic nerve volumes and MTR were significantly lower in patients with LHON than in healthy controls. Mean NABT-MTR histogram peak height was significantly lower in patients with LHON than in controls, whereas no significant difference was found for any of the cervical cord MTR histogram derived measures. Average diffusivity (&Dmacr;) was higher in patients with LHON than in controls. Optic nerve volume and MTR value and mean NABT-MTR were lower in patients with LHON-MS than in those with LHON.?CONCLUSIONS—The severity of optic nerve pathology in LHON is measurable in vivo using MRI and MTI. MTR and &Dmacr; histogram analysis suggests that microscopic brain damage occurs in LHON and that it is more severe in the MS-like form of the disease.?? PMID:11254765

  18. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal Impairs Mitochondrial Physiology and Induces Aberrant Axonal Outgrowth in Adult Sensory Neurons that Mimics Features of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    AKUDE, ELI; ZHEREBITSKAYA, ELENA; ROY CHOWDHURY, SUBIR K.; GIRLING, KIMBERLY; FERNYHOUGH, PAUL

    2010-01-01

    Modification of proteins by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) has been proposed to cause neurotoxicity in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including distal axonopathy in diabetic sensory neuropathy. We tested the hypothesis that exposure of cultured adult rat sensory neurons to 4-HNE would result in the formation of amino acid adducts on mitochondrial proteins and that this process would be associated with impaired mitochondrial physiology and axonal function. In addition, we compared 4-HNE-induced axon pathology with that exhibited by neurons isolated from diabetic rats. Cultured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons were incubated with varying concentrations of 4-HNE. Cell survival, axonal morphology and level of axon outgrowth were assessed. In addition, video microscopy of live cells, Western blot and immunofluorescent staining were utilized to detect protein adduct formation by 4-HNE and to localize actively respiring mitochondria. 4-HNE induced formation of protein adducts on cytoskeletal and mitochondrial proteins, and impaired axon regeneration by approximately 50% at 3 ?M whilst having no effect on neuronal survival. 4-HNE initiated formation of aberrant axonal structures and caused the accumulation of mitochondria in these dystrophic structures. Neurons treated with 4-HNE exhibited a distal loss of active mitochondria and treatment of mitochondrial preparations from cortex induced a significant and acute reduction in the rate of electron transport. Finally, the distal axonopathy and the associated aberrant axonal structure generated by 4-HNE treatment mimicked axon pathology observed in DRG sensory neurons isolated from diabetic rats and replicated aspects of neurodegeneration observed in human diabetic sensory neuropathy. PMID:19557324

  19. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sames, Lori; Moore, Allison; Arnold, Renee; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN) is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL) assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN) could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF), The Neuropathy Association (TNA) and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies, we can envision treatment options for these rare diseases in the near future. PMID:24860645

  20. A pilot study of a plantar sensory evaluation system for early screening of diabetic neuropathy in a weight-bearing position.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Chikai, Manabu; Takahashi, Noriyo; Ohnishi, Tadasuke; Doi, Kohki; Nunokawa, Kiyohiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop smart equipment to quantify plantar tactile sensibility for the early diagnosis and tracking of peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes mellitus. In this paper, we offer a new testing system that is composed of a plantar tactile stimulation platform with a small moving contactor to stretch the skin tangentially, a response switch for each tactile stimulus, a motor control box, and a personal computer (PC) for psychophysical data processing. This quantitative sensory testing system has detailed measurements available and is easy to use compared with the conventional testing devices, such as von Frey monofilaments, pin-prick testing devices, and current perception threshold testers. When using our testing system in a weight-bearing position, we observed that the plantar tactile thresholds for the tangential stretching stimulus on the plantar surface of the foot ranged from approximately 10 um to 30 um for healthy subjects. However, the threshold for a subject with diabetes was nearly three times higher than that for healthy subjects. The significant difference between these values suggests that the plantar sensory evaluation system using the lateral skin stretch stimulation can be used for early diagnosis, for the accurate staging of diabetic neuropathy, and for evaluating its progression noninvasively in a clinic and at home. PMID:25570747

  1. Distal leg epidermal nerve fiber density as a surrogate marker of HIV-associated sensory neuropathy risk: risk factors and change following initial antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Shikuma, Cecilia M; Bennett, Kara; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Gerschenson, Mariana; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Jadwattanakul, Tanate; DeGruttola, Victor; McArthur, Justin C; Ebenezer, Gigi; Chomchey, Nitiya; Praihirunkit, Pairoa; Hongchookiat, Piranun; Mathajittiphun, Pornpen; Nakamoto, Beau; Hauer, Peter; Phanuphak, Praphan; Phanuphak, Nittaya

    2015-10-01

    Distal leg epidermal nerve fiber density (ENFD) is a validated predictor of HIV sensory neuropathy (SN) risk. We assessed how ENFD is impacted by initiation of first-time antiretroviral therapy (ART) in subjects free of neuropathy and how it is altered when mitochondrial toxic nucleoside medications are used as part of ART. Serial changes in proximal thigh and distal leg ENFD were examined over 72 weeks in 150 Thai subjects randomized to a regimen of stavudine (d4T) switching to zidovudine (ZDV) at 24 weeks vs ZDV vs tenofovir (TDF) for the entire duration of study, all given in combination with nevirapine. We found individual variations in ENFD change, with almost equal number of subjects who decreased or increased their distal leg ENFD over 72 weeks and no relationship to nucleoside backbone or to development of neuropathic signs or symptoms. Lower baseline distal leg ENFD and greater increases in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex I (CI) activity were associated with larger increases in distal leg ENFD over 72 weeks. Distal leg ENFD correlated with body composition parameters (body surface area, body mass index, height) as well as with blood pressure measurements. Assessed together with a companion cross-sectional study, we found that mean distal leg ENFD in all HIV+ subjects was lower than in HIV- subjects but similar among HIV+ groups whether ART-naïve or on d4T with/without neuropathy/neuropathic symptoms. The utility of ENFD as a useful predictor of small unmyelinated nerve fiber damage and neuropathy risk in HIV may be limited in certain populations. PMID:26002840

  2. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  3. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eStore National Pancreas Foundation > Hereditary Pancreatitis test Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition ... HP patients avoid smoking and alcohol consumption. Hereditary Pancreatitis Patient Info Animated Pancreas Patient Pancreatic Cancer Chronic ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... palate ; cytokinesis ; cytoplasm ; epicanthal fold ; familial ; gene ; hereditary ; immune system ; inherited ; isoforms ; neuropathy ; palate ; prevalence ; protein ; short stature ; sign ; spontaneous ; stature ; stress ; surgery ; syndactyly ; tissue ; uvula ; wasting You may find ...

  5. Japanese neuropathy patients with peripheral myelin protein-22 gene aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Lebo, R.V.; Li, L.Y.; Flandermeyer, R.R.

    1994-09-01

    Peripheral myelin protein (PMP-22) gene aneuploidy results in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A) and the Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) in Japanese patients as well as Caucasian Americans. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, results when expression of one of at least seven genes is defective. CMT1A, about half of all CMT mutations, is usually associated with a duplication spanning the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene on distal chromosome band 17p11.2. Autosomal dominant HNPP (hereditary pressure and sensory neuropathy, HPSN) results from a deletion of the CMT1A gene region. Multicolor in situ hybridization with PMP-22 gene region probe characterized HNPP deletion reliably and detected all different size duplications reported previously. In summary, 72% of 28 Japanese CMT1 (HMSNI) patients tested had the CMT1A duplication, while none of the CMT2 (HMSNII) or CMT3 (HMSNIII) patients had a duplication. Three cases of HNPP were identified by deletion of the CMT1A gene region on chromosome 17p. HNPP and CMT1A have been reported to result simultaneously from the same unequal recombination event. The lower frequency of HNPP compared to CMT1A suggests that HNPP patients have a lower reproductive fitness than CMT1A patients. This result, along with a CMT1A duplication found in an Asian Indian family, demonstrates the broad geographic distribution and high frequency of PMP-22 gene aneuploidy.

  6. Anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with acute motor sensory neuropathy resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takeo; Wakida, Kenji; Kimura, Akio; Inuzuka, Takashi; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2015-12-23

    A 69-year-old man experienced general malaise, weight loss, amnesia, gait disturbance, and restlessness a month prior to admission. Brain MRI showed high intensity areas in the bilateral medial temporal lobes and insular cortices on FLAIR images, and therefore, he was diagnosed with limbic encephalitis. After admission, quadriplegia and respiratory failure progressed rapidly, and he needed ventilatory management. A nerve conduction study revealed low compound muscle action potential amplitude with loss of sensory nerve action potential, which indicated axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We administered intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, but he did not recover. Although no tumor was found on CT, his serum was positive for anti-Hu antibody; therefore, we diagnosed him with paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. An FDG-PET study showed accumulation at lesions on two hilar lymph nodes. Small cell lung carcinoma was detected by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Although paraneoplastic acute sensorimotor neuropathy with respiratory failure resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome is rare, identification of antibodies and servey of tumors aids accurate diagnosis. PMID:26511029

  7. A New Regulatory Mechanism for Kv7.2 Protein During Neuropathy: Enhanced Transport from the Soma to Axonal Terminals of Injured Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Elsa; Roza, Carolina; Jackson, Nieka; López-García, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Kv7.2 channel expression has been reported to decrease in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following the induction of a peripheral neuropathy while other experiments show that Kv7.2 accumulates in peripheral neuromas. The mechanisms underlying these novel expression patterns are poorly understood. Here we use immunofluorescence methods to analyze Kv7.2 protein expression changes in sensory neurons following peripheral axotomy and the potential role of axonal transport. Results indicate that DRG neurons express Kv7.2 in ~16% of neurons and that this number decreases by about 65% after axotomy. Damaged neurons were identified in DRG by application of the tracer Fluoro-ruby at the site of injury during surgery. Reduction of Kv7.2 expression was particularly strong in damaged neurons although some loss was also found in putative uninjured neurons. In parallel to the decrease in the soma of axotomized sensory neurons, Kv7.2 accumulated at neuromatose fiber endings. Blockade of axonal transport with either vinblastine (VLB) or colchicine (COL) abolished Kv7.2 redistribution in neuropathic animals. Channel distribution rearrangements did not occur following induction of inflammation in the hind paw. Behavioral tests indicate that protein rearrangements within sensory afferents are essential to the development of allodynia under neuropathic conditions. These results suggest that axotomy enhances axonal transport in injured sensory neurons, leading to a decrease of somatic expression of Kv7.2 protein and a concomitant accumulation in damaged fiber endings. Localized changes in channel expression patterns under pathological conditions may create novel opportunities for Kv7.2 channel openers to act as analgesics. PMID:26696829

  8. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk of ...

  9. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  10. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  11. A 1.5 Mb submicroscopic deletion in 17p11.2-p12 is frequently observed in Italian families with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, D.; Roa, B.B.; Abbas, N.E.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by recurrent mononeuropathies that was recently associated with a 1.5 Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-p12. Duplication of the same region is known to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), a more severe peripheral neuropathy characterized by symmetrically slowed nerve conduction velocity. The CMT1A duplication and HNPP deletion are reciprocal recombination products involving a repeat element (CMT1A-REP) which flanks the 1.5 Mb region involved in the duplication/deletion. Patients from 9 unrelated HNPP Italian families were clinically, electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Families were typed with a polymorphic (CA){sub n} repeat and with RFLPs corresponding to loci D17S122, D17S125 and D17S61, which all map within the deleted region. Lack of allelic transmission from affected parent to affected offspring was observed in four informative families, suggesting the presence of deletion. Southern blot analysis of EcoRI digested genomic DNA from HNPP patients and control subjects was performed using a probe mapping within the CMT1A-REP elements. A reduced hybridization signal of a 6.0 kb EcoRI fragment, mapping within the distal CMT1A-REP, was observed in all HNPP patients suggesting the loss of one copy of this fragment in the HNPP-deleted chromosome. PFGE analysis of SacII digested genomic DNA from selected HNPP subjects showed the presence of a junction fragment which has previously been found in association with the 1.5 Mb HNPP deletion. Evidence for deletion could be demonstrated in all 9 families suggesting that the 17p11.2-p12 deletion is commonly associated with HNPP.

  12. Fasciculations in human hereditary disease.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Aliyev, Rahim

    2015-06-01

    Fasciculations are a manifestation of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability in addition to myokymia, neuromyotonia, cramps, or tetany. Fasciculations occur in hereditary and non-hereditary diseases. Among the hereditary diseases, fasciculations are most frequently reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Among the non-hereditary diseases, fasciculations occur most frequently in peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes (Isaac's syndrome, voltage-gated potassium channelopathy, cramp fasciculation syndrome, Morvan syndrome). If the cause of fasciculations remains unknown, they are called benign. Systematically reviewing the literature about fasciculations in hereditary disease shows that fasciculations can be a phenotypic feature in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA), GM2-gangliosidosis, triple-A syndrome, or hereditary neuropathy. Additionally, fasciculations have been reported in familial amyloidosis, spinocerebellar ataxias, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, central nervous system disease due to L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) mutations, Fabry's disease, or Gerstmann-Sträussler disease. Rarely, fasciculations may be a phenotypic feature in patients with mitochondrial disorders or other myopathies. Fasciculations are part of the phenotype in much more genetic disorders than commonly assumed. Fasciculations not only occur in motor neuron disease, but also in hereditary neuropathy, spinocerebellar ataxia, GM2-gangliosidosis, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, Fabry's disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler disease, mitochondrial disorders, or muscular dystrophies. PMID:25073774

  13. The coexistence of mitochondrial ND6 T14484C and 12S rRNA A1555G mutations in a Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Yang Li; Sun Yanhong; Zhou Jian; Li Guang; Jiang, Robert; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2007-06-15

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of one three-generation Han Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss. Four of 14 matrilineal relatives exhibited the moderate central vision loss at the average age of 12.5 years. Of these, one subject exhibited both LHON and mild hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in the pedigree showed the presence of homoplasmic LHON-associated ND6 T14484C mutation, deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1555 mutation and 47 other variants belonging to Eastern Asian haplogroup H2. None of other mitochondrial variants was evolutionarily conserved and functional significance. Therefore, the coexistence of the A1555G mutation and T14484C mutations in this Chinese family indicate that the A1555G mutation may play a synergistic role in the phenotypic manifestation of LHON associated ND6 T14484C mutation. However, the incomplete penetrance of vision and hearing loss suggests the involvement of nuclear modifier genes and environmental factors in the phenotypic expression of these mtDNA mutations.

  14. Haplotype and phylogenetic analyses suggest that one European-specific mtDNA background plays a role in the expression of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy by increasing the penetrance of the primary mutations 11778 and 14484.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Petrozzi, M; D'Urbano, L; Sellitto, D; Zeviani, M; Carrara, F; Carducci, C; Leuzzi, V; Carelli, V; Barboni, P; De Negri, A; Scozzari, R

    1997-01-01

    mtDNAs from 37 Italian subjects affected by Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) (28 were 11778 positive, 7 were 3460 positive, and 2 were 14484 positive) and from 99 Italian controls were screened for most of the mutations that currently are associated with LHON. High-resolution restriction-endonuclease analysis also was performed on all subjects, in order to define the phylogenetic relationships between the mtDNA haplotypes and the LHON mutations observed in patients and in controls. This analysis shows that the putative secondary/intermediate LHON mutations 4216, 4917, 13708, 15257, and 15812 are ancient polymorphisms, are associated in specific combinations, and define two common Caucasoid-specific haplotype groupings (haplogroups J and T). On the contrary, the same analysis shows that the primary mutations 11778, 3460, and 14484 are recent and are due to multiple mutational events. However, phylogenetic analysis also reveals a different evolutionary pattern for the three primary mutations. The 3460 mutations are distributed randomly along the phylogenetic trees, without any preferential association with the nine haplogroups (H, I, J, K, T, U, V, W, and X) that characterize European populations, whereas the 11778 and 14484 mutations show a strong preferential association with haplogroup J. This finding suggests that one ancient combination of haplogroup J-specific mutations increases both the penetrance of the two primary mutations 11778 and 14484 and the risk of disease expression. PMID:9150158

  15. Sensory neuron subpopulation-specific dysregulation of intracellular calcium in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Gold, M S

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the prediction that the unique manifestation of chemotherapeutic-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) would be reflected in a specific pattern of changes in the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in subpopulations of cutaneous neurons. To test this prediction, we characterized the pattern of changes in mechanical nociceptive threshold associated with paclitaxel administration (2mg/kg, iv, every other day for four days), as well as the impact of target of innervation and paclitaxel treatment on the regulation of [Ca(2+)]i in subpopulations of putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons. Neurons innervating the glabrous and hairy skin of the hindpaw as well as the thigh were identified with retrograde tracers, and fura-2 was used to assess changes in [Ca(2+)]i. Paclitaxel was associated with a persistent decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold in response to stimuli applied to the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but not the hairy skin of the hindpaw or the thigh. However, in both putative nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurons, resting [Ca(2+)]i was significantly lower in neurons innervating the thigh after treatment. The magnitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transient was also lower in putative non-nociceptive thigh neurons. More interestingly, while paclitaxel had no detectable influence on either resting or depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients in putative non-nociceptive neurons, in putative nociceptive neurons there was a subpopulation-specific decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient that was largely restricted to neurons innervating the glabrous skin. These results suggest that peripheral nerve length alone, does not account for the selective distribution of CIPN symptoms. Rather, they suggest the symptoms of CIPN reflect an interaction between the toxic actions of the therapeutic and unique properties of the neurons deleteriously impacted. PMID:25982563

  16. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  17. Profiling the Mitochondrial Proteome of Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) in Thailand: Down-Regulation of Bioenergetics and Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control Pathways in Fibroblasts with the 11778G>A Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Aung Win; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Kaewsutthi, Supannee; Katanyoo, Wanphen; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Peerapittayamongkol, Chayanon; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Lertrit, Patcharee

    2014-01-01

    Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is one of the commonest mitochondrial diseases. It causes total blindness, and predominantly affects young males. For the disease to develop, it is necessary for an individual to carry one of the primary mtDNA mutations 11778G>A, 14484T>C or 3460G>A. However these mutations are not sufficient to cause disease, and they do not explain the characteristic features of LHON such as the higher prevalence in males, incomplete penetrance, and relatively later age of onset. In order to explore the roles of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in development of LHON, we applied a proteomic approach to samples from affected and unaffected individuals from 3 pedigrees and from 5 unrelated controls. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by MS/MS analysis in the mitochondrial lysate identified 17 proteins which were differentially expressed between LHON cases and unrelated controls, and 24 proteins which were differentially expressed between unaffected relatives and unrelated controls. The proteomic data were successfully validated by western blot analysis of 3 selected proteins. All of the proteins identified in the study were mitochondrial proteins and most of them were down regulated in 11778G>A mutant fibroblasts. These proteins included: subunits of OXPHOS enzyme complexes, proteins involved in intermediary metabolic processes, nucleoid related proteins, chaperones, cristae remodelling proteins and an anti-oxidant enzyme. The protein profiles of both the affected and unaffected 11778G>A carriers shared many features which differed from those of unrelated control group, revealing similar proteomic responses to 11778G>A mutation in both affected and unaffected individuals. Differentially expressed proteins revealed two broad groups: a cluster of bioenergetic pathway proteins and a cluster involved in protein quality control system. Defects in these systems are likely to impede the function of retinal ganglion cells, and may lead to the development of LHON in synergy with the primary mtDNA mutation. PMID:25215595

  18. Neurotrophins and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, D R; Fernyhough, P; Diemel, L T

    1996-03-29

    The most common form of peripheral neuropathy is that associated with diabetes mellitus. In rodent models of diabetes there are expression deficits in nerve growth factor (NGF) and in its high-affinity receptor, trkA, leading to decreased retrograde axonal transport of NGF and decreased support of NGF-dependent sensory neurons, with reduced expression of their neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Treatment of diabetic rats with intensive insulin normalized these deficits and treatment with exogenous NGF caused dose-related increases, giving levels of NGF and neuropeptides which were greater than those of controls. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) mRNA was also deficient in leg muscle from diabetic rats and administration of recombinant NT-3 to diabetic rats increased the conduction velocity of sensory nerves without affecting motor conduction velocity. These findings implicate deficient neurotrophic support in diabetic neuropathy and suggest that its correction should be a paramount therapeutic target. PMID:8730785

  19. Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Pierre R; Chardon, Jodi Warman; Massie, Rami

    2015-09-20

    Peripheral nervous system axons and myelin have unique potential protein, proteolipid, and ganglioside antigenic determinants. Despite the existence of a blood-nerve barrier, both humoral and cellular immunity can be directed against peripheral axons and myelin. Molecular mimicry may be triggered at the systemic level, as was best demonstrated in the case of bacterial oligosaccharides. The classification of immune neuropathy has been expanded to take into account specific syndromes that share unique clinical, electrophysiological, prognostic and serological features. Guillain-Barré syndrome encompasses a classical syndrome of acute demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and many variants: axonal motor and sensory, axonal motor, Miller-Fisher, autonomic, and sensory. Similarly, chronic immune neuropathy is composed of classic chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and variants characterized as multifocal (motor or sensorimotor), sensory, distal symmetric, and syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Among putative biomarkers, myelin associated glycoprotein and several anti-ganglioside autoantibodies have shown statistically significant associations with specific neuropathic syndromes. Currently, the strongest biomarker associations are those linking Miller-Fisher syndrome with anti-GQ1b, multifocal motor neuropathy with anti-GM1, and distal acquired symmetric neuropathy with anti-MAG antibodies. Many other autoantibody associations have been proposed, but presently lack sufficient specificity and sensitivity to qualify as biomarkers. This field of research has contributed to the antigenic characterization of motor and sensory functional systems, as well as helping to define immune neuropathic syndromes with widely different clinical presentation, prognosis and response to therapy. Serologic biomarkers are likely to become even more relevant with the advent of new targeted forms of immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25748038

  20. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Jiro; Kamiya, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic criteria of diabetic neuropathy that can be easily used at bedsides and have international consensus have not been established. The most important therapeutic strategy is to maintain strict glycemic control. In addition, treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor that is innovated from the viewpoint of the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy would be useful for preventing the progression of diabetic neuropathy. For painful diabetic neuropathy, pregabalin and duloxetine effectively relieve the pain, and contribute to the improvement of the quality of life. PMID:26666151

  1. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype–phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive results. PMID:25802885

  2. Improved inherited peripheral neuropathy genetic diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Drew, Alexander P; Zhu, Danqing; Kidambi, Aditi; Ly, Carolyn; Tey, Shelisa; Brewer, Megan H; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L

    2015-03-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPNs) are a group of related diseases primarily affecting the peripheral motor and sensory neurons. They include the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), hereditary motor neuropathies (HMN), and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Using whole-exome sequencing (WES) to achieve a genetic diagnosis is particularly suited to IPNs, where over 80 genes are involved with weak genotype-phenotype correlations beyond the most common genes. We performed WES for 110 index patients with IPN where the genetic cause was undetermined after previous screening for mutations in common genes selected by phenotype and mode of inheritance. We identified 41 missense sequence variants in the known IPN genes in our cohort of 110 index patients. Nine variants (8%), identified in the genes MFN2, GJB1, BSCL2, and SETX, are previously reported mutations and considered to be pathogenic in these families. Twelve novel variants (11%) in the genes NEFL, TRPV4, KIF1B, BICD2, and SETX are implicated in the disease but require further evidence of pathogenicity. The remaining 20 variants were confirmed as polymorphisms (not causing the disease) and are detailed here to help interpret sequence variants identified in other family studies. Validation using segregation, normal controls, and bioinformatics tools was valuable as supporting evidence for sequence variants implicated in disease. In addition, we identified one SETX sequence variant (c.7640T>C), previously reported as a putative mutation, which we have confirmed as a nonpathogenic rare polymorphism. This study highlights the advantage of using WES for genetic diagnosis in highly heterogeneous diseases such as IPNs and has been particularly powerful in this cohort where genetic diagnosis could not be achieved due to phenotype and mode of inheritance not being previously obvious. However, first tier testing for common genes in clinically well-defined cases remains important and will account for most positive results. PMID:25802885

  3. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  4. [Genetic diagnosis and molecular pathology of inherited neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic analysis technology have enabled a surprising progress in genetic diagnosis in the field of neurological disease research. High-throughput molecular biology techniques, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing, are the major contributors to this progress and to new discoveries. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a known hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Genetic studies have revealed at least 35 disease causing-genes responsible for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Genetic studies have revealed that abnormalities in the following factors are the cause of inherited neuropathies: myelin components, transcription factors controlling myelination, myelin maintenance system, differentiation factors related to the peripheral nerve, neurofilaments, protein transfer system, mitochondrial proteins, DNA repair, RNA/protein synthesis, ion channels, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. On the other hand concomitant with the increase in the number of genes that must be screened for mutations, the labor and reagent costs for molecular genetic testing have increased significantly. Therefore, new methodology for detecting gene mutations is required. Based on the recent progress in DNA analysis methods, resequencing microarray appears to be an economical and highly sensitive method for detecting mutations. We have been screening CMT patients for mutations using originally designed microarray DNA chips since 2007, thencehaving identified disease causing mutations in MPZ, GJB1, PMP22, EGR2, MFN2, NEFL, PRX, AARS, GARS, DNM2, and SETX genes in CMT patients. PMID:22790800

  5. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by the American Academy of Family Physicians in cooperation with the American Diabetes Association. Symptoms What are ... men) and vaginal dryness (in women) Causes & Risk Factors What causes diabetic neuropathy? Diabetes causes the level ...

  6. Genotype/phenotype correlations in AARS-related neuropathy in a cohort of patients from the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Antoniadi, Thalia; Burton-Jones, Sarah; Murphy, Sinead M; McHugh, John; Alexander, Michael; Wells, Richard; Davies, Joanna; Hilton-Jones, David; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick; Horvath, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited neuropathy with heterogeneous clinical presentation and genetic background. The axonal form (CMT2) is characterised by decreased action potentials indicating primary axonal damage. The underlying pathology involves axonal degeneration which is supposed to be related to axonal protein dysfunction caused by various gene mutations. The overlapping clinical manifestation of CMT2 with distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) and intermediate CMT causes further diagnostic difficulties. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been implicated in the pathomechanism of CMT2. They have an essential role in protein translation by attaching amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. To date six families have been reported worldwide with dominant missense alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mutations leading to clinically heterogeneous axonal neuropathies. The pathomechanism of some variants could be explained by impaired amino acylation activity while other variants implicating an editing defect need to be further investigated. Here, we report a cohort of six additional families originating from the United Kingdom and Ireland with dominant AARS-related neuropathies. The phenotypic manifestation was distal lower limb predominant sensorimotor neuropathy but upper limb impairment with split hand deformity occasionally associated. Nerve conduction studies revealed significant demyelination accompanying the axonal lesion in motor and sensory nerves. Five families have the c.986G>A, p.(Arg329His) variant, further supporting that this is a recurrent loss of function variant. The sixth family, of Irish origin, had a novel missense variant, c.2063A>G, p.(Glu688Gly). We discuss our findings and the associated phenotypic heterogeneity in these families, which expands the clinical spectrum of AARS-related neuropathies. PMID:26032230

  7. Diabetic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Izenberg, Aaron; Perkins, Bruce A; Bril, Vera

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common condition and diabetics are prone to develop a spectrum of neuropathic complications ranging from symmetric and diffuse to asymmetric and focal neuropathies that may be associated with significant morbidity. Diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common of these complications, occurring in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as in those with prediabetes and glucose intolerance. In this review, the authors discuss the wide variety of neuropathies that can present in the context of diabetes, including the clinical manifestations, diagnostic features, and approach to management. PMID:26502765

  8. Hereditary Hyperlipoproteinemias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nora, James J.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Evidence and research indicate that the majority of cases of coronary artery disease represent familial disorders which are best explained by a polygenic hereditary predisposition interacting with emotional triggers such as diet and stress. Early identification is judged necessary. (Authors/JA)

  9. Animal models of HIV peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models in the study of HIV and AIDS has advanced our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of infection. Of the multitude of HIV disease manifestations, peripheral neuropathy remains one of the most common long-term side effects. Several of the most important causes of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients include direct association with HIV infection with or without antiretroviral medication and infection with opportunistic agents. Because the pathogeneses of these diseases are difficult to study in human patients, animal models have allowed for significant advancement in the understanding of the role of viral infection and the immune system in disease genesis. This review focuses on rodent, rabbit, feline and rhesus models used to study HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, focusing specifically on sensory neuropathy and antiretroviral-associated neuropathies. PMID:25214880

  10. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  11. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multifocal Motor Neuropathy? Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder ...

  12. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  13. Recombination hot spot in 3.2-kb region of the Charcot-Marie Tooth type 1A repeat sequences: New tools for molecular diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, J.; LeGuern, E.; Gouider, R.; Tardieu, S.; Abbas, N.

    1996-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) are autosomal dominant neuropathies, associated, respectively, with duplications and deletions of the same 1.5-Mb region on 17p11.2-p12. These two rearrangements are the reciprocal products of an unequal meiotic crossover between the two chromosome 17 homologues, caused by the misalignment of the CMT1A repeat sequences (CMT1A-REPs), the homologous sequences flanking the 1.5-Mb CMT1A/HNPP monomer unit. In order to map recombination breakpoints within the CMT1A-REPs, a 12.9-kb restriction map was constructed from cloned EcoRI fragments of the proximal and distal CMT1A-REPs. Only 3 of the 17 tested restriction sites were present in the proximal CMT1A-REP but absent in the distal CMT1A-REP, indicating a high degree of homology between these sequences. The rearrangements were mapped in four regions of the CMT1A-REPs by analysis of 76 CMT1A index cases and 38 HNPP patients, who were unrelated. A hot spot of crossover breakpoints located in a 3.2-kb region accounted for three-quarters of the rearrangements, detected after EcoRI/SacI digestion, by the presence of 3.2-kb and 7.8-kb junction fragments in CMT1A and HNPP patients, respectively. These junction fragments, which can be detected on classical Southern blots, permit molecular diagnosis. Other rearrangements can also be detected by gene dosage on the same Southern blots. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sun; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes. PMID:26090078

  15. The evolutionarily conserved transcription factor PRDM12 controls sensory neuron development and pain perception.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Vanja; Cole, Tiffany; Van Campenhout, Claude; Khoung, Thang M; Leung, Calvin; Vermeiren, Simon; Novatchkova, Maria; Wenzel, Daniel; Cikes, Domagoj; Polyansky, Anton A; Kozieradzki, Ivona; Meixner, Arabella; Bellefroid, Eric J; Neely, G Gregory; Penninger, Josef M

    2015-01-01

    PR homology domain-containing member 12 (PRDM12) belongs to a family of conserved transcription factors implicated in cell fate decisions. Here we show that PRDM12 is a key regulator of sensory neuronal specification in Xenopus. Modeling of human PRDM12 mutations that cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) revealed remarkable conservation of the mutated residues in evolution. Expression of wild-type human PRDM12 in Xenopus induced the expression of sensory neuronal markers, which was reduced using various human PRDM12 mutants. In Drosophila, we identified Hamlet as the functional PRDM12 homolog that controls nociceptive behavior in sensory neurons. Furthermore, expression analysis of human patient fibroblasts with PRDM12 mutations uncovered possible downstream target genes. Knockdown of several of these target genes including thyrotropin-releasing hormone degrading enzyme (TRHDE) in Drosophila sensory neurons resulted in altered cellular morphology and impaired nociception. These data show that PRDM12 and its functional fly homolog Hamlet are evolutionary conserved master regulators of sensory neuronal specification and play a critical role in pain perception. Our data also uncover novel pathways in multiple species that regulate evolutionary conserved nociception. PMID:25891934

  16. [Painful neuropathies and small fiber involvement].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, J-P

    2014-12-01

    It is customary to consider that a purely sensory and painful neuropathy accompanied by normal electroneuromyographic examination may be or must be a small fiber neuropathy. This leads to perform specific tests, such as measuring the intra-epidermal nerve fiber density on skin biopsy or neurophysiological tests, such as evoked potentials to noxious stimuli (laser) or quantification of thermal sensory thresholds. However, these tests are only sensitive to the loss of small fibers (A-delta and C), which does not reflect the mechanisms responsible for peripheral neuropathic pain. Selective loss of small sensory fibers inherently generates a sensory deficit that does not necessarily present a painful character. Also, assigning the cause of a painful neuropathy to a small fiber neuropathy has no pathophysiological sense, although there are indirect links between these two conditions. In fact, it is not possible to explain univocally peripheral neuropathic pain, which reflects complex and diverse mechanisms, involving different types of nerve fibers. In this context, the clinical and laboratory approach must be improved to better understand the underlying mechanisms. It is imperative to interpret the data provided by laboratory tests and to correlate these data to the clinical signs and symptoms presented by the patients. Thus, one must go beyond many a priori and misinterpretations that unfortunately exist in this area at present and are not based on any solid pathophysiological basis. PMID:25459125

  17. Peripheral neuropathy and indomethacin.

    PubMed Central

    Eade, O E; Acheson, E D; Cuthbert, M F; Hawkes, C H

    1975-01-01

    A patient with seronegative inflammatory polyarthritis developed a predominantly motorperipheral neuropathy associated with the use of indomethacin. Three other cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with indomethacin treatment have been reported to the Committee on Safety of Medicines. In all cases the neuropathy regressed when indomethacinwas stopped. Peripheral neuropathy should be recognized as a rare complication of indomethacin therapy and considered in the differential diagnosis of a neuropathy accompanyingrheumatoid arthritis. PMID:165855

  18. CRYPTOGENIC SENSORY POLYNEUROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy is a common cause for referral to neurologists. Despite extensive diagnostic testing, up to one-third of these patients remain without a known cause. They are referred to as having cryptogenic sensory peripheral neuropathy (CSPN). The age of onset is variable but usually in the sixth to seventh decade of life, affecting men and women equally. CSPN symptoms progress slowly, most patients present with distal leg paresthesias or pain that progressed over years to involve the hands. On examination, there may be additional mild toe flexion and extension weakness. Electrophysiologic testing and histology reveals axonal neuropathy. Prognosis is usually favorable as most patients maintain independent ambulation. Besides patient education and reassurance, management is focused on pharmacotherapy of neuropathic pain (see Treatment of Painful Peripheral Neuropathy chapter) and physical therapy for balance training and occasionally assistive devices. PMID:23642719

  19. Idiopathic Small Fiber Neuropathy: Phenotype, Etiologies, and the Search for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kostulas, Konstantinos; Vrethem, Magnus; Rolfs, Arndt; Press, Rayomand

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The etiology of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) often remains unclear. Since SFN may be the only symptom of late-onset Fabry disease, it may be underdiagnosed in patients with idiopathic polyneuropathy. We aimed to uncover the etiological causes of seemingly idiopathic SFN by applying a focused investigatory procedure, to describe the clinical phenotype of true idiopathic SFN, and to elucidate the possible prevalence of late-onset Fabry disease in these patients. Methods Forty-seven adults younger than 60 years with seemingly idiopathic pure or predominantly small fiber sensory neuropathy underwent a standardized focused etiological and clinical investigation. The patients deemed to have true idiopathic SFN underwent genetic analysis of the alpha-galactosidase A gene (GLA) that encodes the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (Fabry disease). Results The following etiologies were identified in 12 patients: impaired glucose tolerance (58.3%), diabetes mellitus (16.6%), alcohol abuse (8.3%), mitochondrial disease (8.3%), and hereditary neuropathy (8.3%). Genetic alterations of unknown clinical significance in GLA were detected in 6 of the 29 patients with true idiopathic SFN, but this rate did not differ significantly from that in healthy controls (n=203). None of the patients with genetic alterations in GLA had significant biochemical abnormalities simultaneously in blood, urine, and skin tissue. Conclusions A focused investigation may aid in uncovering further etiological factors in patients with seemingly idiopathic SFN, such as impaired glucose tolerance. However, idiopathic SFN in young to middle-aged Swedish patients does not seem to be due to late-onset Fabry disease. PMID:24829596

  20. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation or movement in a part of the body ... weakness. Many medicines may affect the development of neuropathy, including: Heart or blood pressure drugs: Amiodarone Hydralazine ...

  1. Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Can Help Contact Us The Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy works to educate the public and healthcare professionals, ... of-the-art treatment for patients with peripheral neuropathy, and will be the catalyst for advancing innovative ...

  2. Peripheral neuropathies 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Assal, J.P.; Liniger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results and experience in sixteen specific disciplines related to the study of nerve physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-two different peripheral neuropathies are presented, and different models related to health care strategies are discussed. The authors report on Inflammatory and autoimmune neuropathies and Genetic neuropathies.

  3. Selecting a Test for Leprous Neuropathy Screening.

    PubMed

    Baltodano, Pablo A; Wan, Eric L; Noboa, Jonathan; Rosson, Gedge D; Dellon, A Lee

    2015-10-01

    Background?Worldwide, leprosy represents a significant cause of disability due to progressive neurological impairment. Screening for leprous neuropathy is performed with Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM) or ballpoint pen testing (BPT), which results in underreporting of its prevalence. The Pressure-specified sensory device (PSSD; Sensory Management Services, LLC, Baltimore, MD) is a sensitive, noninvasive, portable, neurosensory instrument, which has not been field-tested for leprosy screening. Early identification of leprous neuropathy would permit early antibiotic treatment to prevent contagion and early microsurgical neurolysis. Methods?A prospective, clinical diagnostic, cross-sectional study screened a consecutive sample of patients for leprous neuropathy in the leprosy-endemic province of Los Ríos, Ecuador. Patients meeting the World Health Organization criteria for leprosy and complaining of neuropathy symptoms were classified as leprous neuropathy patients. Patients without any signs of leprosy were used as normal controls. Bilateral ulnar nerve screening with the PSSD, SWM (0.07, 0.4, 2, 4, 10, and 300 g), and BPT was performed in all patients. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared across tests. A total of 71 patients (142 nerves) were evaluated. Results?Compared with the 10?g SWM and the BPT, the PSSD was found to have significantly higher sensitivity (78.3 vs. 0% with p??0.999, for both). Compared with the 0.07?g SWM (lightest filament in our series), the PSSD showed better sensitivity (78.3 vs. 65.2%, p?=?0.514) and significantly higher specificity (97.8 vs. 51.1%, p?neuropathy as compared with SWM and BPT. PMID:26220428

  4. Precise correlation between structural and electrophysiological disturbances in MADSAM neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-11-01

    Multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy is characterised by multifocal clinical deficits. Imaging studies have identified multifocal enlargements of nerve trunks, but a precise correlation between structural abnormalities and electrophysiological dysfunction has not been elucidated. Two patients diagnosed with multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy were evaluated with nerve conduction studies, including short segment nerve conduction studies to precisely localise motor conduction block, and ultrasound studies of corresponding nerve trunks. Motor conduction block was identified in each patient (upper limb nerves in two patients), superimposed on additional demyelinating neurophysiological features. Upper limb ultrasound studies demonstrated focal nerve enlargement that precisely correlated with neurophysiological conduction block. The results of this study suggest that factors contributing to focal structural abnormalities in multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy are also those that produce conduction block. PMID:26314279

  5. Pyridoxine induced neuropathy by subcutaneous administration in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Young; Choi, Jung-Hoon; Hwang, Cheol-Yong

    2008-01-01

    To construct a sensory neuropathy model, excess pyridoxine (150 mg/kg s.i.d.) was injected subcutaneously in dogs over a period of 7 days. During the administrations period, the dogs experienced body weight reduction and proprioceptive loss involving the hindquarters. After pyridoxine administration was completed, electrophysiological recordings showed that the M wave remained at a normal state, but the H-reflex of the treated dogs disappeared at 7 days. The dorsal funiculus of L4 was disrupted irregularly in the axons and myelin with vacuolation. The dorsal root ganglia of L4, and sciatic and tibial nerves showed degenerative changes and vacuolation. However, the lateral and ventral funiculi of L4 showed a normal histopathologic pattern. Although this subcutaneous administration method did not cause systemic toxicity and effectively induced sensory neuropathy, this study confirmed the possibility of producing a pyridoxine-induced sensory neuropathy model in dogs with short-term administration. PMID:18487933

  6. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Fernyhough, Paul; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2010-02-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The central impact of both alterations of Ca2+ signalling at the plasma membrane and also intracellular Ca2+ handling on sensory neurone function is discussed and related to abnormal endoplasmic reticulum performance. We also present new data highlighting sub-optimal axonal Ca2+ signalling in diabetic neuropathy and discuss the putative role for this abnormality in the induction of axonal degeneration in peripheral neuropathies. The accumulating evidence implicating Ca2+ dysregulation in both painful and degenerative neuropathies, along with recent advances in understanding of regional variations in Ca2+ channel and pump structures, makes modulation of neuronal Ca2+ handling an increasingly viable approach for therapeutic interventions against the painful and degenerative aspects of many peripheral neuropathies. PMID:20034667

  7. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Paul; Calcutt, Nigel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The central impact of both alterations of Ca2+ signalling at the plasma membrane and also intracellular Ca2+ handling on sensory neuron function is discussed and related to abnormal endoplasmic reticulum performance. We also present new data highlighting sub-optimal axonal Ca 2+ signalling in diabetic neuropathy and discuss the putative role for this abnormality in the induction of axonal degeneration in peripheral neuropathies. The accumulating evidence implicating Ca2+ dysregulation with both painful and degenerative neuropathies, along with recent advances in understanding of regional variations in Ca2+ channel and pump structures, makes modulation of neuronal Ca2+ handling an increasingly viable approach for therapeutic interventions against the painful and degenerative aspects of many peripheral neuropathies. PMID:20034667

  8. [Dysimmune peripheral neuropathies: evaluation of treatment].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, G

    2007-09-01

    Despite a supposed common mechanism with demyelination, dysimmune peripheral neuropathies compose a heterogeneous group in term of symptoms (sensory, motor, autonomic), localization of lesions (focal, multifocal or widely spreaded) as well as evolutions (acute, relapsing or chronic). The lacks of reliable biological or electrophysiological markers of evolution in dysimmune neuropathies require development of clinical scales for therapeutic trials and therapeutic decisions in daily practice. As elaboration of a universal scale is not a realistic goal, several specific measurement tools have been proposed for dysimmune neuropathies this past ten years. Highlighting the interest of functional scales as the ONLS, the European INCAT group made a remarkable effort to validate these scales in dysimmune neuropathies. However, there is a controversy concerning the relative interest of deficit scales versus functional scales. The deficit scales may be more sensitive to progression of the disease whereas the functional scales reflect the impact of neuropathy. The use of composite scales, mixing the evaluation of deficits, electrophysiological data and functional issues, is a promising solution, but the relative value of these parameters still remains to be defined. PMID:18087234

  9. The variable clinical manifestations of ulnar neuropathies at the elbow.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J D

    1987-01-01

    In twenty-five cases of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, the involvement of the fibres from three sensory and to four motor branches were examined clinically and, where possible, electrophysiologically. Of the sensory fibres, those from the terminal digital nerves were most commonly involved. The fibres to the hand muscles were much more frequently involved than those to the forearm muscles. These findings suggest that in ulnar neuropathies at the elbow there is variable damage to the fascicles within the nerve. PMID:3031220

  10. Diabetic Neuropathy (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Diabetic neuropathy (Beyond the Basics) Author Eva L Feldman, MD, ... This topic last updated: Dec 27, 2013. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY OVERVIEW — Neuropathy is the medical term for nerve ...

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset ... percent disabling by VA's rating regulations. About peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of the peripheral ...

  12. Quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Soomekh, David

    2006-07-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of peripheral neuropathy from any cause has come to the forefront of the research community in the past few years. Both past and new diagnostic and treatment options have been and are being studied to better understand and properly treat this debilitating and sometimes devastating disease. One such advancement is the clinical use of quantitative sensory testing. To identify etiology of the neuropathy early, the testing instrument would need to identify changes throughout the course of the disease, have a normative database, and show a clear distinction between the absence or presence of disease. The pressure specified sensory device (PSSD) was developed in 1992 to painlessly investigate the cutaneous pressure thresholds quantitatively and accurately. PMID:16958387

  13. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  14. Inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 reverses sensory hypoalgesia in diabetic mice

    E-print Network

    Urban, Michael Joseph; Li, Chengyuan; Yu, Cuijuan; Lu, Yuanming; Krise, Joanna M.; McIntosh, Michelle P.; Rajewski, Roger A.; Blagg, Brian S. J.; Dobrowsky, Rick T.

    2010-07-14

    Increasing the expression of Hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) can inhibit sensory neuron degeneration after axotomy. Since the onset of DPN (diabetic peripheral neuropathy) is associated with the gradual decline of sensory neuron function, we evaluated...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary pancreatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Hereditary pancreatitis On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... Glossary definitions Reviewed October 2012 What is hereditary pancreatitis? Hereditary pancreatitis is a genetic condition characterized by ...

  16. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  17. Amiodarone induced optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagra, P K; Foroozan, R; Savino, P J; Castillo, I; Sergott, R C

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To determine the clinical features of amiodarone induced optic neuropathy, which may help distinguish it from non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy. Methods: Retrospective observational case series of patients diagnosed with amiodarone induced optic neuropathy at the neuro-ophthalmology service from March 1998 to February 2001. Amiodarone was discontinued after discussion with the patient's cardiologist. Visual acuity, colour vision, automated perimetry, and funduscopy were performed on initial and follow up examinations. Results: Three patients with amiodarone induced optic neuropathy presented with mildly decreased vision, visual field defects, and bilateral optic disc swelling. Upon discontinuing the medication, visual function and optic disc swelling slowly improved in all three patients. Conclusion: Amiodarone induced optic neuropathy can present with visual dysfunction, and is typically a bilateral process. Upon discontinuation of amiodarone, slow resolution of optic disc swelling occurs and visual function improves in some patients. PMID:12642303

  18. Variants in KIF1A gene in dominant and sporadic forms of hereditary spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Andrea; Arnoldi, Alessia; Panzeri, Elena; Merlini, Luciano; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Bondi, Alice; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Bresolin, Nereo; Bassi, Maria Teresa

    2015-12-01

    KIF1A gene encodes the kinesin 1a protein, an axonal motor protein working in cargo transport along neurites. Variants in KIF1A were identified in different forms of neurodegenerative diseases with dominant and recessive inheritance. Homozygous recessive mutations were found in the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2, HSAN2 and in a recessive subtype of hereditary spastic paraparesis, SPG30. De novo heterozygous dominant variants were found both in a dominant form of SPG30 (AD-SPG30) with one single family reported and in patients with different forms of progressive neurodegenerative diseases. We report the results of a genetic screening of 192 HSP patients, with the identification of four heterozygous variants in KIF1A in four cases, two of whom with family history for the disease. Three of the four variants fall within the motor domain, a frequent target for variants related to the AD-SPG30 subtype. The fourth variant falls downstream the motor domain in a region lacking any functional domain. The KIF1A-related patients show clinical pictures overlapping the known AD-SPG30 phenotype including pure and complicated forms with few differences. Of note, one of the families, originating from the Sicily island, carries the same variant p.S69L detected in the first AD-SPG30 family of Finnish origin reported; differently from the first one, the latter family shows a wide intra-familial phenotype variability. Overall, these data reveal a very low frequency of the AD-SPG30 subtype while confirming the presence of amino acid residues in the motor domain representing preferential targets for mutations, thereby supporting their functional relevance in kinesin 1a activity. PMID:26410750

  19. Hereditary ataxias and paraplegias in Cantabria, Spain. An epidemiological and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Polo, J M; Calleja, J; Combarros, O; Berciano, J

    1991-04-01

    A clinical, genetic and epidemiological study of hereditary ataxias and paraplegias was conducted within a defined area (Cantabria) in Northern Spain from 1974 to 1986. The series comprised 48 index cases and 65 affected relatives. On prevalence day, 103 patients were alive, giving a prevalence of 20.2 cases per 100,000. There were 24 patients (18 families) with Friedreich's ataxia (FA), 12 (6 families) with early onset cerebellar ataxia (EOCA) differing from FA, 6 (3 families) with dominantly transmitted late onset cerebellar ataxia (LOCA), 11 with 'idiopathic' LOCA, 49 (9 families) with 'pure' hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and 1 patient with congenital cerebellar ataxia. The prevalence found here is comparable with the highest figures described in previous surveys. This may in part be due to the great number of secondary cases in our series. A high frequency of parental consanguinity occurred in FA patients, 'pseudodominant' inheritance being observed in 1 family. The clinical features were those of classical FA except for later onset and slower course in 1 family, and retained tendon reflexes in the lower limbs in 2 cases. Such data indicate the need for modification of the essential criteria for the disease. EOCA included 4 patients with normoreflexic ataxia and 1 patient with ataxia and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone deficiency. In addition, there were 7 patients from 2 unrelated families with a homogeneous syndrome characterized by autosomal recessive inheritance, cerebellar ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa and sensory neuropathy. This syndrome is therefore a well defined nosological entity to be added to the list of autosomal recessive mendelian phenotypes. The clinical picture of patients with LOCA was either a 'pure' cerebellar or a 'cerebellar-plus' syndrome. Genetic subgroups of 'pure' HSP were autosomal dominant type I in 5 families and type II in 2, and autosomal recessive in 2 families. PMID:2043954

  20. Loss of function mutations in HARS cause a spectrum of inherited peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Safka Brozkova, Dana; Deconinck, Tine; Griffin, Laurie Beth; Ferbert, Andreas; Haberlova, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Lassuthova, Petra; Roth, Christian; Pilunthanakul, Thanita; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Janecke, Andreas R; Zavadakova, Petra; Chrast, Roman; Rivolta, Carlo; Zuchner, Stephan; Antonellis, Anthony; Beg, Asim A; De Jonghe, Peter; Senderek, Jan; Seeman, Pavel; Baets, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by distal muscle weakness and sensory loss. Mutations in genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been implicated in peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that these tRNA charging enzymes are uniquely important for the peripheral nerve. Recently, a mutation in histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) was identified in a single patient with a late-onset, sensory-predominant peripheral neuropathy; however, the genetic evidence was lacking, making the significance of the finding unclear. Here, we present clinical, genetic, and functional data that implicate HARS mutations in inherited peripheral neuropathies. The associated phenotypic spectrum is broad and encompasses axonal and demyelinating motor and sensory neuropathies, including four young patients presenting with pure motor axonal neuropathy. Genome-wide linkage studies in combination with whole-exome and conventional sequencing revealed four distinct and previously unreported heterozygous HARS mutations segregating with autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy in four unrelated families (p.Thr132Ile, p.Pro134His, p.Asp175Glu and p.Asp364Tyr). All mutations cause a loss of function in yeast complementation assays, and p.Asp364Tyr is dominantly neurotoxic in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. This study demonstrates the role of HARS mutations in peripheral neuropathy and expands the genetic and clinical spectrum of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-related human disease. PMID:26072516

  1. [Hereditary optic neuropathies: from clinical signs to diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Meunier, I; Lenaers, G; Hamel, C; Defoort-Dhellemmes, S

    2013-12-01

    Inherited optic atrophy must be considered when working up any optic nerve involvement and any systemic disease with signs of optic atrophy, even with a negative family history. There are two classical forms: dominant optic atrophy, characterized by insidious, bilateral, slowly progressive visual loss and temporal disc pallor, and Leber's optic atrophy, characterized by acute loss of central vision followed by the same event in the fellow eye within a few weeks to months, with disc hyperemia in the acute phase. Family history is critical for diagnosis. In the absence of family history, the clinician must rule out an identifiable acquired cause, i.e. toxic, inflammatory, perinatal injury, traumatic or tumoral, with orbital and brain imaging (MRI). Recessive optic atrophies are more rare and more severe and occur as part of multisystemic disorders, particularly Wolfram syndrome (diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, and hearing loss). Effective treatments are limited; alcohol and smoking should be avoided. A cyclosporine trial (taken immediately upon visual loss in the first eye) is in progress in Leber's optic atrophy to prevent involvement of the fellow eye. PMID:24161764

  2. Alteration of foot temperature in diabetic neuropathy: is it another piece of puzzle?

    PubMed

    Naicker, A S; Roohi, S A; Lee, C S; Chan, W H; Tay, L S; Din, X J; Eow, L H

    2006-02-01

    Poor glycaemic control and the duration of diabetes mellitus are known to accelerate development and progression of neuropathy. Diabetic co-morbidities: hypertension and hyperlipidaemia, have been postulated to associate with development of neuropathy. A diabetic foot with low temperature and frequent exposure to low temperature environment has recently been hypothesized to be at higher risk to develop early neuropathy. This cross-sectional study is undertaken to identify risk factors for diabetic neuropathy and the association between foot temperature and development of diabetic neuropathy by using simple clinical examination in the outpatient setting. From April 18, to April 30, 2005, universal sampling method was used to select 134 diabetic patients (type 1 or type 2 for >1 year) with peripheral neuropathy. Excluded are those with chronic alcoholism, drug-induced neuropathy, dietary history of vitamin B deficiency and family history of porphyria and hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy. The patient's duration of diabetes, glycaemic control status and the presence of co-morbids: hypertension and hyperlipidemia, were recorded. The temperature of the foot was measured by using thermo buddy. Of 134 patients representing Malaysian ethnic distribution with an equal number of males and females, 20.1% were in the age group of 61 to 65 years and, 85.1% and 67.9% belonged to lower socioeconomic and educational groups respectively. Associations between diabetic neuropathy and glycaemic control (p = 0.018) and duration of diabetes (p < 0.05) were significant. However, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and low foot temperature were not significantly associated with development of diabetic neuropathy. Poor glycaemic control is significantly associated with diabetic neuropathy. Foot temperature alteration is merely an effect of autonomic neuropathy with a cold foot is attributed to co-existing peripheral arterial disease. PMID:17042221

  3. Animal models for inherited peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MARTINI, RUDOLF

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in human genetics and neurobiology has led to the identification of various mutations in particular myelin genes as the cause for many of the known inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. Mutations in 3 distinct myelin genes, PMP22, P0, and connexin 32 cause the 3 major demyelinating subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, CMT1A, CMT1B and CMTX, respectively. In addition, a reduction in the gene dosage of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), while particular point mutations in PMP22 and P0 cause the severe Dejerine-Sottas (DS) neuropathy. A series of spontaneous and genetically engineered rodent mutants for genes for the above-mentioned myelin constituents are now available and their suitability to serve as models for these still untreatable diseases is an issue of particular interest. The spontaneous mutants Trembler-J and Trembler, with point mutations in PMP22, reflect some of the pathological alterations seen in CMT1A and DS patients, respectively. Furthermore, engineered mutants that either over or underexpress particular myelin genes are suitable models for patients who are similarly compromised in the gene dosage of the corresponding genes. In addition, engineered mutants heterozygously or homozygously deficient in the myelin component P0 show the pathology of distinct CMT1B and DS patients, respectively, while Cx32 deficient mice develop pathological abnormalities similar to those of CMTX patients. Mutants that mimic human peripheral neuropathies might allow the development of strategies to alleviate the symptoms of the diseases, and help to define environmental risk factors for aggravation of the disease. In addition, such mutants might be instrumental in the development of strategies to cure the diseases by gene therapy. PMID:9418989

  4. [Hereditary prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Wolski, Zbigniew; Drewa, Tomasz; Olszewska-S?onina, Dorota; Cussenot, Olivier

    2004-06-01

    About 10% of the prostate cancer cases were recognized as familial or hereditary. Till now gene/genes responsible for hereditary prostate cancer are not identified. Hereditary prostate cancer case concerning 3 brothers in family of 6 siblings from first marriage and a grandson from second marriage was presented. Two brothers were treated radical prostatectomy because of confined disease. The third brother with spreading disease died after androgen blockade management. We did not find any linkage between chosen markers of PCaP region (Predisposing for Prostate Cancer) and prostate cancer occurrence in this family. PMID:15510898

  5. Hereditary Hemochromatosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... buildup can be prevented. Doctors usually diagnose iron overload with these blood tests: serum ferritin : measures the ... disease. Back Continue Treatment Doctors treat the iron overload from hereditary hemochromatosis by regularly drawing blood to ...

  6. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gene testing for HNPCC is now available. Hereditary pancreatitis This rare disease is characterized by the development of recurrent episodes of severe chronic pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) starting at an early ...

  7. Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, N. C.

    1971-01-01

    Case studies of two siblings suffering from a gum disorder in which enlargement of the gingival mucosa is caused by a fibrosis. The disorder in the two children was felt to be an hereditary recessive trait. (CD)

  8. Sarcomas in hereditary retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Schonfeld, Sara J; Tucker, Margaret A

    2012-01-01

    Children diagnosed with the hereditary form of retinoblastoma (Rb), a rare eye cancer caused by a germline mutation in the RB1 tumor suppressor gene, have excellent survival, but face an increased risk of bone and soft tissue sarcomas. This predisposition to sarcomas has been attributed to genetic susceptibility due to inactivation of the RB1 gene as well as past radiotherapy for Rb. The majority of bone and soft tissue sarcomas among hereditary Rb survivors occur in the head, within the radiation field, but they also occur outside the radiation field. Sarcomas account for almost half of the second primary cancers in hereditary Rb survivors, but they are very rare following non-hereditary Rb. Sarcomas among hereditary Rb survivors arise at ages similar to the pattern of occurrence in the general population. There has been a trend over the past two decades to replace radiotherapy with chemotherapy and other focal therapies (laser or cryosurgery), and most recently, chemosurgery in order to reduce the incidence of sarcomas and other second cancers in Rb survivors. Given the excellent survival of most Rb patients treated in the past, it is important for survivors, their families and health care providers to be aware of the heightened risk for sarcomas in hereditary patients. PMID:23036192

  9. Neuropathological alterations in diabetic truncal neuropathy: evaluation by skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lauria, G.; McArthur, J.; Hauer, P.; Griffin, J.; Cornblath, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To describe the neuropathological features in skin biopsies from patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy.?METHODS—Three patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy underwent skin biopsies from both symptomatic and asymptomatic regions of the chest and trunk. After local anaesthesia, biopsies were performed using a 3 mm diameter punch device (Acupunch). Intraepidermal nerve fibres (IENFs), the most distal processes of small myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres, were identified after staining with PGP 9.5 as previously described.?RESULTS—Diabetes was diagnosed at the time of the neurological presentation in two, and one was a known diabetic patient. All three had associated sensory-motor polyneuropathy. In all, skin biopsies showed a marked reduction of both epidermal and dermal nerve fibres in the symptomatic dermatomes, compared with skin from asymptomatic truncal areas. In one patient, a follow up skin biopsy when symptoms had improved showed a return of IENFs.?CONCLUSIONS—In diabetic truncal neuropathy, skin biopsies from symptomatic regions show a loss of IENFs. After clinical recovery, there is a return of the IENF population, suggesting that improvement occurs by nerve regeneration. These findings suggest that sensory nerve fibre injury in diabetic truncal neuropathy is distal to or within the sensory ganglia. Skin biopsy provides a possible tool for understanding the pathophysiology of the disease.?? PMID:9810952

  10. The Association between Autoantibodies and Peripheral Neuropathy in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Jih; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chang, Wen-Neng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Kung, Chia-Te; Lin, Wei-Che; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Su, Chih-Min; Cheng, Ben-Chung; Chang, Ya-Ting; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. The sensitivity and specificity of biomarkers used for predicting peripheral neuropathy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and nephritis (SLE-LN) remain unsatisfactory. This study aimed to determine the autoantibodies levels in SLE-LN patients with peripheral neuropathy. Methods. Data of 559 SLE-LN patients were collected retrospectively, including titers of autoantibodies, electrodiagnostic studies, and clinical manifestations. Results. The neurologic manifestations of the SLE-LN patients were diverse and nonspecific. The prevalence rate of peripheral polyneuropathy was 2.68%, of which about 73.33% was mixed sensory-motor polyneuropathy. Numbness and functional gastrointestinal problems were the most prevalent symptoms and these were noted in every subtype of peripheral neuropathy. Among all the serology markers, anti-Ro was significantly associated with neuropathy related to SLE (P = 0.009). Conclusion. Peripheral neuropathy among LN patients is rare and may be easily overlooked. This study demonstrated that positive anti-Ro antibody may imply neuropathy in LN patients. Thus, anti-Ro can be considered a biomarker that should be added to the panel of conventional autoantibodies in LN patients. PMID:24864250

  11. Pathogenesis of alcoholic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kucera, P; Balaz, M; Varsik, P; Kurca, E

    2002-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is a medical, economical and social problem. Motility and mental function disorders are among the complications of chronic alcoholism and have been known for more than two centuries as "alcoholic paralysis", and are caused by alcoholic neuropathy. The pathogenesis of alcoholic neuropathy does not appear to be identical with central nervous system disorders which are caused by chronic alcoholism and it seems that it results from a failure of the protection barrier systems in the peripheral nervous system. To the pathogenesis of alcoholic neuropathy includes: 1. direct toxic effects of alcohol on the cellular population of the central nervous system and other tissues, especially of parenchymatous organs (in particular of the liver), 2. indirect metabolic and exotoxic changes mediated by malabsorption, maldigestion and secondary caloric and energy deprivation, 3. effects of genetic factors. (Fig. 2, Ref. 23.) PMID:12061083

  12. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes. PMID:24768438

  13. Clinical description of toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Little, Ann A; Albers, James W

    2015-01-01

    Toxic neuropathy, although rare, is an important consideration in the setting of a known or suspected toxic exposure in the workplace or other environment. This chapter discusses the clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluation of peripheral neuropathies, highlighting findings that direct further workup and may point to specific toxins as etiology. The difficulty of establishing causality of a toxin in relation to peripheral neuropathy is discussed; guidelines for establishing causality are presented. Examples of common industrial toxins are listed, including their typical industrial uses and their mechanisms of action in producing neuropathy. Characteristic clinical presentations of specific toxic neuropathies are highlighted with selected case studies. PMID:26563794

  14. Hereditary coproporphyria and epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, A B; Brodie, M J; Moore, M R; Thompson, G G; Stephenson, J B

    1977-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy with mental deterioration and epilepsy suffered an acute attack of hereditary coproporphyria associated with worsening of seizure control. Leucocyte coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity was undetectable in the patient during this attack, and was reduced in his mother, a latent case. The complex relationship between porphyria, epilepsy, and anticonvulsant drugs is discussed. PMID:921312

  15. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3{alpha}, but not nesprin-3{beta}. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Andermann syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for muscle movement and sensation (motor and sensory neuropathy). Absence (agenesis) or malformation of the tissue connecting ... treatment providers. Gene Review: Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Genetic Testing ...

  17. Post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy. A study of 63 cases

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha, David; Bagán, José V.; Peñarrocha, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Trigeminal neuropathy is most often secondary to trauma. The present study explores the underlying causes and the factors that influence recovery. Material and methods. A retrospective case study was made involving 63 patients with trigeminal neuropathy of traumatologic origin, subjected to follow-up for at least 12 months. Results. Fifty-four percent of all cases were diagnosed after mandibular third molar surgery. In 37 and 19 patients the sensory defect was located in the territory innervated by the mental and lingual nerve, respectively. Pain was reported in 57% of the cases, and particularly among the older patients. Regarding patient disability, quality of life was not affected in three cases, while mild alterations were recorded in 25 subjects and severe alterations in 8. Partial or complete recovery was observed in 25 cases after 6 months, and in 32 after one year. There were few recoveries after this period of time. Recovery proved faster in the youngest patients, who moreover were the individuals with the least pain. Conclusion. Our patients with trigeminal neuropathy recovered particularly in the first 6 months and up to one year after injury. The older patients more often suffered pain associated to the sensory defect. On the other hand, their discomfort was more intense, and the patients with most pain and the poorest clinical scores also showed a comparatively poorer course. Key words:Post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy. PMID:22143689

  18. Rare cause of paraparesis: bilateral obturator neuropathy after hysterosalpingectomy.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, Roberto; Mejía-Jiménez, Inmaculada; de Fuenmayor-Fernández de la Hoz, Carlos Pablo; Ruiz-Morales, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral obturator nerve injury during pelvic surgery is an infrequent cause of lower limb paraparesis. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with a large uterine leiomyoma who underwent simple total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy. At 24?h after the surgery, the patient noticed loss of muscle strength when adducting both legs. She had no problem with other movements and no sensory or sphincter abnormalities. Neurological examination confirmed that there was loss of strength only in the adductor muscles, with preserved sensory function and reflexes, suggesting bilateral obturator nerve involvement. Pelvic MRI showed a small postsurgical haematoma in the Douglas recess, but far from the obturator nerves. 2?weeks later, electromyography showed positive sharp waves and low motor unit recruitment in the adductor magnus muscles, confirming acute, bilateral obturator nerve neuropathy. The few cases of bilateral obturator neuropathy that have been reported were mostly related to abdominopelvic interventions. PMID:26689250

  19. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images. PMID:26186748

  20. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Ataxia neuropathy spectrum On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance ... Glossary definitions Reviewed June 2011 What is ataxia neuropathy spectrum? Ataxia neuropathy spectrum is part of a ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Giant axonal neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Giant axonal neuropathy On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed October 2007 What is giant axonal neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy is an inherited condition involving ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Small fiber neuropathy On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed November 2012 What is small fiber neuropathy? Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by ...

  4. CaV3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels in Peripheral Sensory Neurons Are Important for Mibefradil-Induced Reversal of Hyperalgesia and Allodynia in Rats with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Obradovic, Aleksandar Lj.; Hwang, Sung Mi; Scarpa, Joseph; Hong, Sung Jun; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that streptozotocin (STZ) injections in rats lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) accompanied by enhancement of CaV3.2 T-type calcium currents (T-currents) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here we used the classical peripherally acting T-channel blocker mibefradil to examine the role of CaV3.2 T-channels as pharmacological targets for treatment of painful PDN. When administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), at clinically relevant doses, mibefradil effectively alleviated heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivities in STZ-treated diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that CaV3.2 antisense (AS)-treated diabetic rats exhibit a significant decrease in painful PDN compared with mismatch antisense (MIS)-treated diabetic rats. Co-treatment with mibefradil (9 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reversal of heat, cold and mechanical hypersensitivity in MIS-treated but not in AS-treated diabetic rats, suggesting that mibefradil and CaV3.2 AS share the same cellular target. Using patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated DRG neurons, we demonstrated that mibefradil similarly blocked T-currents in diabetic and healthy rats in a voltage-dependent manner by stabilizing inactive states of T-channels. We conclude that antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of mibefradil in PDN are at least partly mediated by inhibition of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nociceptors. Hence, peripherally acting voltage-dependent T-channel blockers could be very useful in the treatment of painful symptoms of PDN. PMID:24705276

  5. Optic neuropathy caused by Propionibacterium acnes pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Ore-Ofe O; Stagg, Brian C; Digre, Kathleen B; Katz, Bradley J; Quigley, Edward P; Palmer, Cheryl A; Warner, Judith E A

    2014-09-01

    We describe a patient with vision loss from an optic neuropathy caused by Propionibacterium acnes pachymeningitis. The patient's optic neuropathy was stabilized with appropriate antibiotic therapy. PMID:24614085

  6. The role of aberrant mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir K Roy; Smith, Darrell R; Fernyhough, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a neurological complication of diabetes that causes significant morbidity and, because of the obesity-driven rise in incidence of type 2 diabetes, is becoming a major international health problem. Mitochondrial phenotype is abnormal in sensory neurons in diabetes and may contribute to the etiology of diabetic neuropathy where a distal dying-back neurodegenerative process is a key component contributing to fiber loss. This review summarizes the major features of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons and Schwann cells in human diabetic patients and in experimental animal models (primarily exhibiting type 1 diabetes). This article attempts to relate these findings to the development of critical neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Recent work reveals that hyperglycemia in diabetes triggers nutrient excess in neurons that, in turn, mediates a phenotypic change in mitochondrial biology through alteration of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? coactivator-1? (PGC-1?) signaling axis. This vital energy sensing metabolic pathway modulates mitochondrial function, biogenesis and regeneration. The bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria in diabetic neurons is aberrant due to deleterious alterations in expression and activity of respiratory chain components as a direct consequence of abnormal AMPK/PGC-1? signaling. Utilization of innovative respirometry equipment to analyze mitochondrial function of cultured adult sensory neurons from diabetic rodents shows that the outcome for cellular bioenergetics is a reduced adaptability to fluctuations in ATP demand. The diabetes-induced maladaptive process is hypothesized to result in exhaustion of the ATP supply in the distal nerve compartment and induction of nerve fiber dissolution. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology of diabetic neuropathy is compared with other types of neuropathy with a distal dying-back pathology such as Friedreich ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 and human immunodeficiency virus-associated distal-symmetric neuropathy. PMID:22446165

  7. Peripheral neuropathy and solitary plasmacytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Read, D; Warlow, C

    1978-01-01

    Three patients with peripheral neuropathy and a solitary plasmacytoma are presented, and the literature is reviewed. It is suggested that middle-aged men with an obscure progressive sensorimotor neuropathy, a raised CSF protein, and otherwise negative investigations should have a full skeletal survey since irradiation of a plasmacytoma may lead to a considerable improvement in the associated neurological disability. Images PMID:204745

  8. Neuropathy in a petrol sniffer.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, D M; Ramsey, J; Schwartz, M S; Dookun, D

    1986-01-01

    A 4 year old boy developed a profound motor neuropathy after repeated deliberate inhalation of petroleum vapour. The condition was characterised by extreme slowing of the nerve conduction velocity. He made a gradual recovery over six months. The neuropathy was attributed to the N-hexane component of petroleum. PMID:3021070

  9. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved, but such intervention may be considered in the severe and progressive cases or ones associated with severe neuropathic pain.

  10. Isoniazid induced motor-dominant neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Rabeeya; Sabzwari, Saniya

    2015-10-01

    Isoniazid though a very effective treatment for tuberculosis can cause severe motor-dominant neuropathy which can be reversible with pyridoxine supplementation. A 45-year-old female diagnosed with psoas abscess, culture positive for mycobacterium tuberculosis, was started on anti- tuberculous treatment with four drugs, including isoniazid at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day. Three months later she developed severe motor weakness of lower limbs with loss of ankle and knee reflexes. She was treated with vitamin B6 injections and isoniazid treatment was continued. Her motor weakness gradually improved in a few months, but mild sensory impairment persisted even after two years. There is need for vigilance regarding neurological effects of isoniazid in seemingly low-risk individuals in whom development of symptoms should raise the suspicion about slow acetylator status. Timely therapeutic intervention with high-dose vitamin B6 can reduce the long-term morbidity associated with this easily reversible condition. PMID:26440850

  11. [Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia].

    PubMed

    Plauchu, Henri; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie

    2009-09-20

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HTT, or Osler-Weber-Rendu disease) is a constitutional vascular dysplasia characterized by hemorrhagic manifestations, cutaneous or mucosal telangiectases and visceral shunting due to arteriovenous malformations. In France, its prevalence varies from 1/6,000 to 1/8,500. The diagnosis is clinical and based on the common triad: chronic epistaxis, responsible for anemias, cutaneous or mucosal telangiectases (on typical locations) and the hereditary nature of these signs inheredited in an autosomal dominant way. Penetrance is almost complete at 50 years. Visceral complications produce highly variable manifestations: pulmonary arteriovenous malformations may be manifested by brain abscess or transient ischemic attacks, signs of chronic hypoxia or hemorrhagic rupture; neurological arteriovenous malformations can produce signs of compression or be hemorrhagic; hepatic arteriovenous malformations, which remain latent for a long time, become clinically severe in a limited proportion of patients; hemorrhagic, digestive arteriovenous malformations worsen chronic anemia. HHT is a genetic disorder; two genes (ALK1 and ENG) involved in the signaling pathway of the transforming growth factor-beta have been identified so far. Vascular homeostasis of capillaries is impaired, which leads to an accumulation in time of successive and progressive telangiectases and arteriovenous fistulas. Disease management consists in anemia management, as well as in epistaxis prevention and treatment. The management of arteriovenous malformations lies on early detection and the possibility to occlude them with interventional radiology. PMID:19839452

  12. Revisiting the evidence for neuropathy caused by pyridoxine deficiency and excess.

    PubMed

    Ghavanini, Amer A; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2014-09-01

    Pyridoxine deficiency and excess have been implicated as a cause for peripheral neuropathy. As a result, unrelated neuropathies are often treated with pyridoxine based on questionable evidence. However, neurological practitioners frequently discourage patients from taking pyridoxine in excess of 50 mg/d given concerns around the development of a toxic sensory neuronopathy. There is no systematic review to support either of the 2 practices. To address this gap in knowledge, we reviewed the available literature on neuropathy attributed to pyridoxine deficiency and excess. Based on the current limited data, it can be concluded that very low doses of daily pyridoxine are required to prevent peripheral neuropathy. There is inadequate evidence to support routine pyridoxine supplementation in patients with disorders of peripheral nervous system. Supplementation with pyridoxine at doses greater than 50 mg/d for extended duration may be harmful and should be discouraged. PMID:25137514

  13. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  14. An ENU-induced mutation in mouse glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) causes peripheral sensory and motor phenotypes creating a model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Francesca; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Williams, Hazel P.; Banks, Gareth T.; AlQatari, Mona; Chia, Ruth; Tucci, Valter; Groves, Michael; Nickols, Carole D.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Kendall, Rachel; Cader, Muhammed Z.; Talbot, Kevin; van Minnen, Jan; Burgess, Robert W.; Brandner, Sebastian; Martin, Joanne E.; Koltzenburg, Martin; Greensmith, Linda; Nolan, Patrick M.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system in humans, described clinically as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V. Here, we characterise a new mouse mutant, GarsC201R, with a point mutation that leads to a non-conservative substitution within GARS. Heterozygous mice with a C3H genetic background have loss of grip strength, decreased motor flexibility and disruption of fine motor control; this relatively mild phenotype is more severe on a C57BL/6 background. Homozygous mutants have a highly deleterious set of features, including movement difficulties and death before weaning. Heterozygous animals have a reduction in axon diameter in peripheral nerves, slowing of nerve conduction and an alteration in the recovery cycle of myelinated axons, as well as innervation defects. An assessment of GARS levels showed increased protein in 15-day-old mice compared with controls; however, this increase was not observed in 3-month-old animals, indicating that GARS function may be more crucial in younger animals. We found that enzyme activity was not reduced detectably in heterozygotes at any age, but was diminished greatly in homozygous mice compared with controls; thus, homozygous animals may suffer from a partial loss of function. The GarsC201R mutation described here is a contribution to our understanding of the mechanism by which mutations in tRNA synthetases, which are fundamentally important, ubiquitously expressed enzymes, cause axonopathy in specific sets of neurons. PMID:19470612

  15. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Cancer.gov

    The pain and discomfort caused by peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common reasons that cancer patients stop their treatment early. Researchers are working to improve new screening, treatment, and prevention options for patients.

  16. Persistence of tropical ataxic neuropathy in a Nigerian community

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, O; Onabolu, A; Link, H.; Rosling, H.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The term tropical ataxic neuropathy (TAN) is currently used to describe several neurological syndromes attributed to toxiconutritional causes. However, TAN was initially proposed to describe a specific neurological syndrome seen predominantly among the Ijebu speaking Yorubas in south western Nigeria. In this study, the prevalence of TAN was determined in Ososa, a semiurban community in south western Nigeria described as endemic for TAN in 1969, and its neurological features were compared with Strachan's syndrome, prisoners of war neuropathy, the epidemic neuropathy in Cuba, and konzo.?METHODS—A census of Ososa was followed by door to door screening of all subjects aged 10 years and above with a newly designed screening instrument. Subjects who screened positive had a neurological examination, and the diagnosis of TAN was made if any two or more of bilateral optic atrophy, bilateral neurosensory deafness, sensory gait ataxia, or distal symmetric sensory polyneuropathy were present.?RESULTS—A total of 4583 inhabitants were registered in the census. Of these, 3428 subjects aged 10 years and above were screened. The diagnosis of TAN was made in 206 of 323 subjects who screened positive for TAN. The prevalence of TAN was 6.0%, 3.9% in males and 7.7% in females. The highest age specific prevalence was 24% in the 60-69 years age group in women.?CONCLUSION—The occurrence of TAN in Ososa continues at a higher prevalence than was reported 30 years ago. Its neurological features and natural history do not resemble those described for Strachan syndrome, epidemic neuropathy in Cuba, or konzo. The increasing consumption of cassava foods linked to its causation makes TAN of public health importance in Nigeria, the most populous African country.?? PMID:10864612

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary hyperekplexia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the nose, extend their head forward and have spasms of the limb and neck muscles. Rarely, infants ... providers. Gene Review: Hyperekplexia Genetic Testing Registry: Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 8 Genetic Testing Registry: Hyperekplexia hereditary ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary spherocytosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spleen, the red blood cells break down (undergo hemolysis). The shortage of red blood cells in circulation ... cell membrane ; congenital ; enlarged spleen ; erythrocyte ; gallbladder ; gene ; hemolysis ; hemolytic anemia ; hereditary ; inherited ; jaundice ; mutation ; population ; prevalence ; ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary angioedema

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 000 people. Type I is the most common, accounting for 85 percent of cases. Type II occurs ... Where can I find information about diagnosis or management of hereditary angioedema? These resources address the diagnosis ...

  20. Hereditary aspects of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Keller, G

    2002-10-01

    Although the etiology of gastric cancer and the mechanisms involved in its carcinogenesis are still poorly understood, dietary habits and life style as well as bacterial infections have been suggested to be important in the tumorigenic process. However, there is also an increasing evidence that a genetic predisposition in at least a subset of patients, plays an important role. Germline mutations in the E-cadherin gene have been described to be the molecular genetic cause of an hereditary diffuse type gastric cancer syndrome. In addition, gastric cancer is observed more frequently in association with some hereditary tumor syndromes which are mainly characterized by tumors in other organs. This article will summarize recent findings about the hereditary diffuse type gastric cancer syndrome and about gastric cancer in association with hereditary tumor syndromes with a known molecular genetic basis. PMID:12417969

  1. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies – Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies in the general population. Both disorders share striking pathological similarities, marked by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the early involvement of the papillomacular bundle. Three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations; m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C account for over 90% of LHON cases, and in DOA, the majority of affected families harbour mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. Optic nerve degeneration in LHON and DOA is therefore due to disturbed mitochondrial function and a predominantly complex I respiratory chain defect has been identified using both in vitro and in vivo biochemical assays. However, the trigger for RGC loss is much more complex than a simple bioenergetic crisis and other important disease mechanisms have emerged relating to mitochondrial network dynamics, mtDNA maintenance, axonal transport, and the involvement of the cytoskeleton in maintaining a differential mitochondrial gradient at sites such as the lamina cribosa. The downstream consequences of these mitochondrial disturbances are likely to be influenced by the local cellular milieu. The vulnerability of RGCs in LHON and DOA could derive not only from tissue-specific, genetically-determined biological factors, but also from an increased susceptibility to exogenous influences such as light exposure, smoking, and pharmacological agents with putative mitochondrial toxic effects. Our concept of inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies has evolved over the past decade, with the observation that patients with LHON and DOA can manifest a much broader phenotypic spectrum than pure optic nerve involvement. Interestingly, these phenotypes are sometimes clinically indistinguishable from other neurodegenerative disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and multiple sclerosis, where mitochondrial dysfunction is also thought to be an important pathophysiological player. A number of vertebrate and invertebrate disease models has recently been established to circumvent the lack of human tissues, and these have already provided considerable insight by allowing direct RGC experimentation. The ultimate goal is to translate these research advances into clinical practice and new treatment strategies are currently being investigated to improve the visual prognosis for patients with mitochondrial optic neuropathies. PMID:21112411

  2. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II Inhibition Behaviorally and Physiologically Improves Pyridoxine-Induced Neuropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Michelle C.; Wozniak, Krystyna M.; Callizot, Noelle; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Pyridoxine is used as a supplement for treating conditions such as vitamin deficiency as well as neurological disorders such as depression, epilepsy and autism. A significant neurologic complication of pyridoxine therapy is peripheral neuropathy thought to be a result of long-term and high dose usage. Although pyridoxine-induced neuropathy is transient and can remit after its withdrawal, the process of complete recovery can be slow. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) inhibition has been shown to improve symptoms of both chemotherapy- and diabetic-induced neuropathy. This study evaluated if GCP II inhibition could behaviorally and physiologically improve pyridoxine-induced neuropathy. In the current study, high doses of pyridoxine (400 mg/kg, twice a day for seven days) were used to induce neuropathy in rats. An orally bioavailable GCP II inhibitor, 2-(3-mercaptopropyl) pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA), was administered daily at a dose of 30 mg/kg starting from the onset of pyridoxine injections. Body weight, motor coordination, heat sensitivity, electromyographical (EMG) parameters and nerve morphological features were monitored. The results show beneficial effects of GCP II inhibition including normalization of hot plate reaction time, foot fault improvements and increased open field distance travelled. H wave frequency, amplitude and latency as well as sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) were also significantly improved by 2-MPPA. Lastly, GCP II inhibition resulted in morphological protection in the spinal cord and sensory fibers in the lumbar region dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In conclusion, inhibition of GCP II may be beneficial against the peripheral sensory neuropathy caused by pyridoxine. PMID:25254647

  3. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II inhibition behaviorally and physiologically improves pyridoxine-induced neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Potter, Michelle C; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Callizot, Noelle; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    Pyridoxine is used as a supplement for treating conditions such as vitamin deficiency as well as neurological disorders such as depression, epilepsy and autism. A significant neurologic complication of pyridoxine therapy is peripheral neuropathy thought to be a result of long-term and high dose usage. Although pyridoxine-induced neuropathy is transient and can remit after its withdrawal, the process of complete recovery can be slow. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) inhibition has been shown to improve symptoms of both chemotherapy- and diabetic-induced neuropathy. This study evaluated if GCP II inhibition could behaviorally and physiologically improve pyridoxine-induced neuropathy. In the current study, high doses of pyridoxine (400 mg/kg, twice a day for seven days) were used to induce neuropathy in rats. An orally bioavailable GCP II inhibitor, 2-(3-mercaptopropyl) pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA), was administered daily at a dose of 30 mg/kg starting from the onset of pyridoxine injections. Body weight, motor coordination, heat sensitivity, electromyographical (EMG) parameters and nerve morphological features were monitored. The results show beneficial effects of GCP II inhibition including normalization of hot plate reaction time, foot fault improvements and increased open field distance travelled. H wave frequency, amplitude and latency as well as sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) were also significantly improved by 2-MPPA. Lastly, GCP II inhibition resulted in morphological protection in the spinal cord and sensory fibers in the lumbar region dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In conclusion, inhibition of GCP II may be beneficial against the peripheral sensory neuropathy caused by pyridoxine. PMID:25254647

  4. Peroxynitrite and Protein Nitration in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stavniichuk, Roman; Shevalye, Hanna; Lupachyk, Sergey; Obrosov, Alexander; Groves, John T.; Obrosova, Irina G.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxynitrite, a product of the reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide, causes oxidative stress with concomitant inactivation of enzymes, poly(ADP-ribosylation), mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired stress signaling, as well as protein nitration. In this study we sought to determine the effect of preventing protein nitration or increasing peroxynitrite decomposition on diabetic neuropathy in mice after an extended period of untreated diabetes. C57Bl6/J male control and diabetic mice were treated with the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Fe(III) tetramesitylporphyrin octasulfonate (FeTMPS, 10 mg/kg/d) or protein nitration inhibitor (?)-epicatechin gallate (20 mg/kg/d) for 4 weeks, after an initial 28 weeks of hyperglycemia. Untreated diabetic mice developed motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity deficits, thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia, tactile allodynia, and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers. Both FeTMPS and epicatechin gallate partially corrected sensory nerve conduction slowing and small sensory nerve fiber dysfunction without alleviation of hyperglycemia. Correction of motor nerve conduction deficit and increase in intraepidermal nerve fiber density were found with FeTMPS treatment only. In conclusion, peroxynitrite injury and its component, protein nitration, are implicated in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The findings indicate that both structural and functional changes of chronic diabetic peripheral neuropathy can be reversed, and provide rationale for the development of a new generation of antioxidants and peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts, for treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24687457

  5. Sensory development.

    PubMed

    Clark-Gambelunghe, Melinda B; Clark, David A

    2015-04-01

    Sensory development is complex, with both morphologic and neural components. Development of the senses begins in early fetal life, initially with structures and then in-utero stimulation initiates perception. After birth, environmental stimulants accelerate each sensory organ to nearly complete maturity several months after birth. Vision and hearing are the best studied senses and the most crucial for learning. This article focuses on the cranial senses of vision, hearing, smell, and taste. Sensory function, embryogenesis, external and genetic effects, and common malformations that may affect development are discussed, and the corresponding sensory organs are examined and evaluated. PMID:25836703

  6. Luteolin improves the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy: behavioral and biochemical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Qingsong; Zhang, Jinchao; Lin, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to now, drugs for improving the impaired nerve functions has been lacking for diabetic neuropathy. The antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of luteolin make it an attractive candidate for diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of luteolin on diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats were intraperitoneally treated with daily luteolin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 weeks from the 28th day after streptozotocin injection. Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate the effect of luteolin on the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy. It was found that luteolin dose dependently alleviated abnormal sensation, improved nerve conduction velocities and nerve blood flow in diabetic rats. Biochanical analysis showed that luteolin significantly lowered the reactive oxygen species production and malondialdehyde level, as well as increased antioxidants activities in a dose dependent manner. In addition, luteolin significantly up-regulated the protein levels of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic nerves. Taken together, luteolin is capable of improving diabetes-induced deficit in motor and sensory functions, which could be attributable, at least in part, to its Nrf2-dependent antioxidant capacity. The findings in the present study highlight the therapeutic value of luteolin for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26617718

  7. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  8. Crucifixion and median neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-05-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a "crucified clench" is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the "crucified clench" results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  9. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CMT, also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peroneal muscular atrophy, comprises a group ... Tel: 800-572-1717 Fax: 520-529-5300 Neuropathy Association 110 West 40th Street Suite 1804 New ...

  10. [Hereditary prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Heise, Marta; Haus, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers affecting men. It may soon become the main cancer--caused mortality among men all over the world. The genetic basis of prostate cancer is very complex and its etiology is poorly understood. The genes associated with hereditary predisposition to prostate cancer remain largely unknown. Family history of PC, particularly at a young age, is a strong risk factor. Through linkage analysis, numerous prostate cancer susceptibility chromosomal loci have been identified, including: HPC1 (1q24-25), PCaP (1q42.2-43), HPCX (Xq27-28), CAPB (1p36), HPC2 (17p12), HPC20 (20q13). However, it turned out that any of these genes is not a high-risk prostate cancer susceptibility gene. According to literature data HPC is associated with genes involved in androgen metabolism, including androgen receptor gene--AR, SRD5A2 and CYP17, genes involved in the DNA damage repair, including BRCA1, BRCA2, NBS1 and MLH1 or some developmental genes as HOXB13. Identification of PC high predisposition susceptibility genes is very important, because the ascertainment of a higher risk of prostate cancer development in mutation carriers enable to develop and implement in clinical practice suitable prophylactic programs which could prevent the disease or detect it in an early stage. It seems that better knowledge of the molecular pathology of prostate cancer could make it easier to discover new drugs of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity. There are many cellular pathways associated with PC cancerogenesis, which may become a potential goal for such drugs in the future. PMID:24864115

  11. DADS neuropathy associated with anti-TNF-? therapy.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Ronan Niall; McNamara, Brian; Moore, Helena

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old man with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and severe rheumatoid arthritis presented with a 1-year history of progressively worsening limb paraesthesia. Examination showed sensory loss in a glove and stocking distribution, absent reflexes and unsteady tandem gait. Nerve conduction studies suggested an acquired peripheral neuropathy with distal demyelination, which-together with the clinical phenotype-was consistent with a Distal Acquired Demyelinating Symmetric (DADS) neuropathy pattern. This was attributed to therapy with adalimumab, an antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? agent, which the patient had been taking for 2?years for rheumatoid arthritis. One month after discontinuing adalimumab, the limb paraesthesia had resolved completely and the patient had a normal tandem gait. Demyelinating disorders may rarely occur as complications of anti-TNF-? agents and therefore have implications for pretreatment counselling and ongoing monitoring. DADS neuropathy is a subtype of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, which responds poorly to standard therapy and has not previously been described with anti-TNF-? therapy. PMID:26607186

  12. Spastic paraplegia gene 7 in patients with spasticity and/or optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Klebe, Stephan; Depienne, Christel; Gerber, Sylvie; Challe, Georges; Anheim, Mathieu; Charles, Perrine; Fedirko, Estelle; Lejeune, Elodie; Cottineau, Julien; Brusco, Alfredo; Dollfus, Hélène; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Mancini, Cecilia; Ferrer, Xavier; Sole, Guilhem; Destée, Alain; Mayer, Jean-Michel; Fontaine, Bertrand; de Seze, Jérôme; Clanet, Michel; Ollagnon, Elisabeth; Busson, Philippe; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Stevanin, Giovanni; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Brice, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the spastic paraplegia 7 (SPG7) gene encoding paraplegin are responsible for autosomal recessive hereditary spasticity. We screened 135 unrelated index cases, selected in five different settings: SPG7-positive patients detected during SPG31 analysis using SPG31/SPG7 multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (n = 7); previously reported ambiguous SPG7 cases (n = 5); patients carefully selected on the basis of their phenotype (spasticity of the lower limbs with cerebellar signs and/or cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging/computer tomography scan and/or optic neuropathy and without other signs) (n = 24); patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis referred consecutively from attending neurologists and the national reference centre in a diagnostic setting (n = 98); and the index case of a four-generation family with autosomal dominant optic neuropathy but no spasticity linked to the SPG7 locus. We identified two SPG7 mutations in 23/134 spastic patients, 21% of the patients selected according to phenotype but only 8% of those referred directly. Our results confirm the pathogenicity of Ala510Val, which was the most frequent mutation in our series (65%) and segregated at the homozygous state with spastic paraparesis in a large family with autosomal recessive inheritance. All SPG7-positive patients tested had optic neuropathy or abnormalities revealed by optical coherence tomography, indicating that abnormalities in optical coherence tomography could be a clinical biomarker for SPG7 testing. In addition, the presence of late-onset very slowly progressive spastic gait (median age 39 years, range 18–52 years) associated with cerebellar ataxia (39%) or cerebellar atrophy (47%) constitute, with abnormal optical coherence tomography, key features pointing towards SPG7-testing. Interestingly, three relatives of patients with heterozygote SPG7 mutations had cerebellar signs and atrophy, or peripheral neuropathy, but no spasticity of the lower limbs, suggesting that SPG7 mutations at the heterozygous state might predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, mimicking autosomal dominant inheritance. Finally, a novel missense SPG7 mutation at the heterozygous state (Asp411Ala) was identified as the cause of autosomal dominant optic neuropathy in a large family, indicating that some SPG7 mutations can occasionally be dominantly inherited and be an uncommon cause of isolated optic neuropathy. Altogether, these results emphasize the clinical variability associated with SPG7 mutations, ranging from optic neuropathy to spastic paraplegia, and support the view that SPG7 screening should be carried out in both conditions. PMID:23065789

  13. Peripheral neuropathy and parkinsonism: a large clinical and pathogenic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sebastien; Vital, Claude

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) has been reported in idiopathic and hereditary forms of parkinsonism, but the pathogenic mechanisms are unclear and likely heterogeneous. Levodopa-induced vitamin B12 deficiency has been discussed as a causal factor of PN in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, but peripheral nervous system involvement might also be a consequence of the underlying neurodegenerative process. Occurrence of PN with parkinsonism has been associated with a panel of mitochondrial cytopathies, more frequently related to a nuclear gene defect and mainly polymerase gamma (POLG1) gene. Parkin (PARK2) gene mutations are responsible for juvenile parkinsonism, and possible peripheral nervous system involvement has been reported. Rarely, an association of parkinsonism with PN may be encountered in other neurodegenerative diseases such as fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome related to premutation CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene, Machado-Joseph disease related to an abnormal CAG repeat expansion in ataxin-3 (ATXN3) gene, Kufor-Rakeb syndrome caused by mutations in ATP13A2 gene, or in hereditary systemic disorders such as Gaucher disease due to mutations in the ?-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene and Chediak-Higashi syndrome due to LYST gene mutations. This article reviews conditions in which PN may coexist with parkinsonism. PMID:25582874

  14. Hereditary Factors in Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Kathryn Norcross

    There are two kinds of hereditary influence, genetic inheritance and biological inheritance, that may respond to environmental determinants. The ability to speak is one genetically produced aspect of being human, and research studies based on the assumption that speech is innate to humans have found that infants appear to pay particular attention…

  15. Micturition disturbance in acute idiopathic autonomic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, R; Uchiyama, T; Asahina, M; Suzuki, A; Yamanishi, T; Hattori, T

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To define the nature of micturition disturbance in patients with acute idiopathic autonomic neuropathy (AIAN). Methods: Micturitional symptoms were observed during hospital admissions and the in outpatient clinics in six patients with clinically definite AIAN (typical form in four, cholinergic variant in one, autonomic-sensory variant in one). Urodynamic studies included medium-fill water cystometry, external sphincter electromyography, and a bethanechol test. Results: Four patients had urinary retention and two had voiding difficulty as the initial presentation. Patients with retention became able to urinate within a week (two to seven days). The major symptoms at the time of urodynamic studies (three weeks to four months after disease onset in most cases) were voiding difficulty and nocturnal frequency. None had urinary incontinence. Complete recovery from the micturition disturbance took from three months to >18 years. The recovery period was shorter in a patient with cholinergic variant, and it was longer in two patients who had a longer duration of initial urinary retention. Micturition disturbance tended to improve earlier than orthostatic hypotension. The major urodynamic abnormalities were detrusor areflexia on voiding (5), denervation supersensitivity to bethanechol (3); low compliance detrusor (1); and impaired bladder sensation (2). None had neurogenic motor unit potentials of the external sphincter muscles. Conclusions: In patients with AIAN, urinary retention and voiding difficulty are common initial presentations. The underlying mechanisms seem to be pre- and postganglionic cholinergic dysfunction with preservation of somatic sphincter function. The bladder problems tend to improve earlier than orthostatic hypotension. PMID:14742606

  16. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Small Fibre Neuropathy in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Cancer and Nerve Regeneration in Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ferdousi, Maryam; Azmi, Shazli; Petropoulos, Ioannis Nikolaos; Fadavi, Hassan; Ponirakis, Georgios; Marshall, Andrew; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Imaan; Mansoor, Wasat; Malik, Rayaz Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    There are multiple neurological complications of cancer and its treatment. This study assessed the utility of the novel non-invasive ophthalmic technique of corneal confocal microscopy in identifying neuropathy in patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer before and after platinum based chemotherapy. In this study, 21 subjects with upper gastrointestinal (oesophageal or gastric) cancer and 21 healthy control subjects underwent assessment of neuropathy using the neuropathy disability score, quantitative sensory testing for vibration perception threshold, warm and cold sensation thresholds, cold and heat induced pain thresholds, nerve conduction studies and corneal confocal microscopy. Patients with gastro-oesophageal cancer had higher heat induced pain (P = 0.04) and warm sensation (P = 0.03) thresholds with a significantly reduced sural sensory (P<0.01) and peroneal motor (P<0.01) nerve conduction velocity, corneal nerve fibre density (CNFD), nerve branch density (CNBD) and nerve fibre length (CNFL) (P<0.0001). Furthermore, CNFD correlated significantly with the time from presentation with symptoms to commencing chemotherapy (r = -0.54, P = 0.02), and CNFL (r = -0.8, P<0.0001) and CNBD (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) were related to the severity of lymph node involvement. After the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy, there was no change in any measure of neuropathy, except for a significant increase in CNFL (P = 0.003). Corneal confocal microscopy detects a small fibre neuropathy in this cohort of patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer, which was related to disease severity. Furthermore, the increase in CNFL after the chemotherapy may indicate nerve regeneration. PMID:26430773

  17. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Aróstegui, Juan I; Yagüe, Jordi

    2007-07-14

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are an heterogeneous group of systemic disorders clinically characterized by recurrent or persistent inflammatory episodes, which occur in the absence of infectious, neoplastic or autoimmune etiology. During the past years, genetic defects affecting different proteins involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes have been identified in these diseases. These advances offer new genetic tools to clinicians, in order to achieve an accurate and definitive diagnostic, and to establish a tailored treatment. Present review is an updated and comprehensive overview on hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases, and it has been organized in 2 separate and independent parts. The first of them will introduce the group of hereditary periodic fever syndromes, which includes familial Mediterranean fever, hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), and tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). PMID:17683710

  18. New insights into mechanisms of opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity during painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Shaqura, Mohammed; Khalefa, Baled I; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Zöllner, Christian; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Fürst, Susanna; Schäfer, Michael; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2014-10-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a disease of the peripheral sensory neuron with impaired opioid responsiveness. Since ?-opioid receptor (MOR) activation can inhibit the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) activity in peripherally sensory neurons, this study investigated the mechanisms of impaired opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity in painful diabetic neuropathy. Intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 45 mg/kg) in Wistar rats led to a degeneration of insulin producing pancreatic ?-cells, elevated blood glucose, and mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia). In these animals, local morphine's inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced nocifensive behavior as well as on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current in dorsal root ganglion cells were significantly impaired. These changes were associated with a loss in MOR but not TRPV1 in peripheral sensory neurons. Intrathecal delivery of nerve growth factor in diabetic animals normalized sensory neuron MOR and subsequently rescued morphine's inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity in vivo and in vitro. These findings identify a loss in functional MOR on sensory neurons as a contributing factor for the impaired opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity during advanced STZ-induced diabetes. Moreover, they support growing evidence of a distinct regulation of opioid responsiveness during various painful states of disease (e.g. arthritis, cancer, neuropathy) and may give novel therapeutic incentives. PMID:24863039

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia On this page: Description Genetic changes ... Reviewed September 2014 What is autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia? Autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy with neuromyotonia ...

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Peripheral Neuropathy in Military Aircraft Maintenance

    E-print Network

    Boggess, May M.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Peripheral Neuropathy in Military Aircraft Maintenance Workers in Australia Maya. Conclusion: This study highlights chronic persisting peripheral neuropathy in a population of aircraft maintainers. Peripheral neuropathies encompass a wide spectrum of clinical disorders associated with a large

  1. Harderoporphyria: a variant hereditary coproporphyria.

    PubMed Central

    Nordmann, Y; Grandchamp, B; de Verneuil, H; Phung, L; Cartigny, B; Fontaine, G

    1983-01-01

    Three siblings with intense jaundice and hemolytic anemia at birth were found to excrete a high level of coproporphyrin in their urine and feces; the pattern of fecal porphyrin excretion was atypical for hereditary coproporphyria because the major porphyrin was harderoporphyrin (greater than 60%; normal value is less than 20%). The lymphocyte coproporphyrinogen III oxidase activity of each patient was 10% of control values, which suggests a homozygous state. Both parents showed only mild abnormalities in porphyrin excretion and lymphocyte coproporphyrinogen III oxidase activity decreased to 50% of normal values, as is expected in heterozygous cases of hereditary coproporphyria. Kinetic parameters of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase from these patients were clearly modified, with a Michaelis constant 15-20-fold higher than normal values when using coproporphyrinogen or harderoporphyrinogen as substrates. Maximal velocity was half the normal value, and we also observed a marked sensitivity to thermal denaturation. The possibility that a mutation affecting the enzyme on the active center which is specifically involved in the second decarboxylation (from harderoporphyrinogen to protoporphyrinogen) was eliminated by experiments on rat liver that showed that coproporphyrinogen and harderoporphyrinogen were metabolized at the same active center. The pattern of porphyrin excretion and the coproporphyrinogen oxidase from the three patients exhibited abnormalities that were different from the abnormalities found in another recently described homozygous case of hereditary coproporphyria. We suggest naming this variant of coproporphyrinogen oxidase defect "harderoporphyria." PMID:6886003

  2. A Novel CSF1R Mutation in a Patient with Clinical and Neuroradiological Features of Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Axonal Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Ilaria; Stabile, Carmen; Bianchi, Silvia; Taglia, Ilaria; Mignarri, Andrea; Salvatore, Simona; Giorgio, Elisa; Brusco, Alfredo; Simone, Isabella; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Federico, Antonio

    2015-07-24

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) is an autosomal dominant cerebral white matter degeneration leading to progressive cognitive and motor dysfunction. The peripheral nervous system is generally spared. Recently, mutations in the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene have been shown to be associated with HDLS. Here we report a new case of HDLS, carrying a mutation in CSF1R and manifesting rapidly progressive dementia and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26401554

  3. Hereditary deafness and phenotyping in humans.

    PubMed

    Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Hereditary deafness has proved to be extremely heterogeneous genetically with more than 40 genes mapped or cloned for non-syndromic dominant deafness and 30 for autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. In spite of significant advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of hearing loss, identifying the precise genetic cause in an individual remains difficult. Consequently, it is important to exclude syndromic causes of deafness by clinical and special investigation and to use all available phenotypic clues for diagnosis. A clinical approach to the aetiological investigation of individuals with hearing loss is suggested, which includes ophthalmology review, renal ultrasound scan and neuro-imaging of petrous temporal bone. Molecular screening of the GJB2 (Connexin 26) gene should be undertaken in all cases of non-syndromic deafness where the cause cannot be identified, since it is a common cause of recessive hearing impairment, the screening is straightforward, and the phenotype unremarkable. By the same token, mitochondrial inheritance of hearing loss should be considered in all multigeneration families, particularly if there is a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics, since genetic testing of specific mitochondrial genes is technically feasible. Most forms of non-syndromic autosomal recessive hearing impairment cause a prelingual hearing loss, which is generally severe to profound and not associated with abnormal radiology. Exceptions to this include DFNB2 (MYO7A), DFNB8/10 (TMPRSS3) and DFNB16 (STRC) where age of onset may sometimes be later on in childhood, DFNB4 (SLC26A4) where there may be dilated vestibular aqueducts and endolymphatic sacs, and DFNB9 (OTOF) where there may also be an associated auditory neuropathy. Unusual phenotypes in autosomal dominant forms of deafness, include low frequency hearing loss in DFNA1 (HDIA1) and DFNA6/14/38 (WFS1), mid-frequency hearing loss in DFNA8/12 (TECTA), DFNA13 (COL11A2) and vestibular symptoms and signs in DFNA9 (COCH) and sometimes in DFNA11 (MYO7A). Continued clinical evaluation of types and course of hearing loss and correlation with genotype is important for the intelligent application of molecular testing in the next few years. PMID:12324385

  4. Further Data Supporting that the Paclitaxel-Associated Acute Pain Syndrome is Associated with the Development of Peripheral Neuropathy: NCCTG Trial N08C11

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Brandi N.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Wolf, Sherry L.; Burger, Kelli N.; Kamal, Arif; Le-Lindqwister, Nguyet A.; Soori, Gamini S.; Jaslowski, Anthony J.; Kelaghan, Joseph; Novotny, Paul J.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel causes an acute pain syndrome (P-APS), occurring within days after each dose and usually abating within days. Paclitaxel also causes a more classic peripheral neuropathy, which steadily increases in severity with increasing paclitaxel total doses. Little detail is available regarding the natural history of these two syndromes, or any relationship between them, although a recent publication does provide natural history data about weekly paclitaxel, supporting an association between the severity of P-APS and eventual peripheral neuropathy symptoms. Methods Patients entering this study were about to receive paclitaxel and carboplatin every 3 weeks. Daily questionnaires were completed for the first week after every chemotherapy dose and EORTC QLQ-CIPN 20 instruments were completed weekly. Results The P-APS severity peaked on day 4 after the initial chemotherapy dose, with 12%, 29%, 23%, and 36% of patients having maximal pain scores of 0, 1–4, 5–6, or 7–10 during the first week after the first dose of therapy, respectively. Patients with P-APS scores of 0–4 with the first dose of chemotherapy had less eventual sensory neuropathy than did patients with P-APS scores of 5–10 (p=0.001). With regard to the more peripheral neuropathy, sensory neuropathy was more problematic than was either motor or autonomic neuropathy. Numbness and tingling were more common components of the sensory neuropathy, than was pain. Conclusions Patients with worse P-APS severities appear to have more eventual chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy. This provides support for the concept that the P-APS is a form of nerve pathology. PMID:22415454

  5. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  6. Novel systems for in vivo monitoring and microenvironmental investigations of diabetic neuropathy in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Amit, Sharon; Yaron, Avraham

    2012-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a devastating complication of diabetes conferring vast morbidity and mortality. Despite prolonged efforts to elucidate the mechanisms underlying diabetic related neuropathic phenomena and develop effective therapies, current treatment is for the most part glycemic control and symptomatic care. This is partially due to the intricate pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy and the scarcity of valid experimental models. The aim of the study was to establish novel systems enabling monitoring and dissection of significant processes in the development of diabetic neuropathy. In a non-invasive in vivo model, two-photon microscopy is applied to evaluate mechanoreceptors (Meissner corpuscles) within an intact footpad of transgenic mice expressing a fluorescent neuronal tracer. By applying this advanced technology, which couples potent tissue penetration with superb resolution, we documented qualitative and quantitative diabetes-specific alterations in these sensory structures. Detection of such changes previously required laborious invasive histopathological techniques. In parallel, we present an ex vivo system that mimics the native microenvironment of the nerve ending via a unique co-culture of primary sensory neurons and thin skin slices. In conjunction with innovative high-throughput digital axonal measurements and computerized quantification tools, this method enables an unbiased exploration of neuronal autonomous and non-autonomous malfunctions. Using this setup we demonstrate that while the diabetic nerve retains a near-normal growth and regeneration capacities, the diabetic skin exhibits a decreased ability to support axonal outgrowth. Thus, an early target organ failure rather than intrinsic neuronal failure may initiate the neuropathy. Overall, the illustrated experimental platforms may greatly facilitate the holistic investigation of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22592935

  7. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  8. Damage to sensory fibers in a martin-gruber anomaly after biceps tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Ronald G; Landau, Mark E; Farber, Gerald; Campbell, William W

    2005-06-01

    A patient with a distal biceps tendon rupture developed ulnar distribution sensory loss after surgical repair using the modified two-incision Boyd and Anderson technique. Electrodiagnosis demonstrated an absent ulnar sensory response but no clinical or electrodiagnostic evidence of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Nerve conduction studies demonstrated an anastomosis between the median and ulnar nerves (Martin-Gruber anomaly). Ulnar sensory fibers were probably damaged as they coursed with the median nerve at the elbow as a component of the innervation anomaly. This case documents the presence of ulnar sensory fibers as part of a Martin-Gruber anomaly. PMID:19078769

  9. Generation of neural crest cells and peripheral sensory neurons from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ronald S; Pomp, Oz; Brokhman, Irina; Ziegler, Lina

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral somatic sensory neurons (PSNs) are responsible for the critical function of transmitting multiple modalities of information from the outside world, including heat, touch, and pain, as well as the position of muscles required for coordinated voluntary movement to the central nervous system. Many peripheral neuropathies exist, including hereditary neurodegeneration in Familial Dysautonomia, infections of PSNs by viruses such as Varicella zoster and damage to PSNs and/or their process resulting from other disease conditions such as diabetes. Understanding of the etiology of these diseases and development of treatments is hampered by the lack of normal and healthy human PSNs for study, which are only available from abortuses or rare surgical procedures.Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are an ideal source of cells for generating normal PSNs for study of disease and drug development, since they can be grown virtually indefinitely in tissue culture and have the potential to form any cell type in the body. Several years ago, we generated human neurons with the molecular characteristics of PSNs from hESCs at low (less than 1%) yields (Pomp et al., Stem Cells 23:923-930, 2005). The present chapter details our most recently improved method that uses 2 rounds of PA6-induction to rapidly generate PSNs at more than 25% purity (Pomp et al., Br. Res. 1230: 50-60, 2008).The neural crest (NC) is a transient multipotent embryonic stem cell population that is the source of PSNs. NC cells give rise to diverse and important tissues in man, but human NC has not been studied because of the difficulty in obtaining 3-5 week human embryos. The methods described in this chapter can also be used to quickly generate large numbers of human NC for study. PMID:19907983

  10. Disulfiram-induced neuropathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Satyakam; Sahoo, Manas Ranjan; Rath, Neelmadhav

    2015-01-01

    Disulfiram is widely used for aversive treatment of alcoholism. Neuropathy is one of the most severe side effects of disulfiram therapy. We report the case of a young man who developed a neuropathy following disulfiram administration, with a virtually complete recovery within 2 months. PMID:25445071

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy – Clinical and Electrophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tae; Prasad, Kalpana; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a primer on the pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of peripheral neuropathy for the radiologist. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) has utility in the diagnosis of many focal peripheral nerve lesions. When combined with history, examination, electrophysiology, and laboratory data, future advancements in high-field MRN may play an increasingly important role in the evaluation of patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24210312

  12. Transthyretin V122I amyloidosis with clinical and histological evidence of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Carr, A S; Pelayo-Negro, A L; Jaunmuktane, Z; Scalco, R S; Hutt, D; Evans, M R B; Heally, E; Brandner, S; Holton, J; Blake, J; Whelan, C J; Wechalekar, A D; Gillmore, J D; Hawkins, P N; Reilly, M M

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease manifesting with predominant peripheral and autonomic neuropathy; cardiomyopathy, or both. ATTR V122I is the most common variant associated with non-neuropathic familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. We present an unusual case of V122I amyloidosis with features of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy, supported by histological confirmation in both sites and diffuse tracer uptake on (99m)Tc-3,3-Diphosphono-1,2-Propanodicarboxylic acid (DPD) scintigraphy throughout skeletal and cardiac muscle. A 64 year old Jamaican man presented with cardiac failure. Cardiac MR revealed infiltrative cardiomyopathy; abdominal fat aspirate confirmed the presence of amyloid, and he was homozygous for the V122I variant of transthyretin. He also described general weakness and EMG demonstrated myopathic features. Sural nerve and vastus lateralis biopsy showed TTR amyloid. The patient is being treated with diflunisal, an oral TTR stabilising agent. Symptomatic myopathy and neuropathy with confirmation of tissue amyloid deposition has not previously been described. Extracardiac amyloidosis has implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25819286

  13. Giant axonal neuropathy: MRS findings.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alpay; Kutlu, Ramazan; Sigirci, Ahmet; Baysal, Tamer; Altinok, Tayfun; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2003-10-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare genetic disease of childhood involving the central and peripheral nervous systems. Axonal loss with several giant axons filled with neurofilaments is the main histopathological feature of peripheral nerve biopsies in this disease. Routine neuroimaging studies reveal diffuse hyperintensities in cerebral and cerebellar white matter. In this case report, the authors present the brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic features (normal N-acetylaspartate/creatine and increased choline/creatine and myoinositol/creatine ratios), which might indicate the absence of neuroaxonal loss and the presence of significant demyelination and glial proliferation in white matter, of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with GAN. PMID:14569833

  14. Hereditary inclusion-body myopathies.

    PubMed

    Broccolini, Aldobrando; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    The term hereditary inclusion-body myopathies (HIBMs) defines a group of rare muscle disorders with autosomal recessive or dominant inheritance and presence of muscle fibers with rimmed vacuoles and collection of cytoplasmic or nuclear 15-21 nm diameter tubulofilaments as revealed by muscle biopsy. The most common form of HIBM is due to mutations of the GNE gene that codes for a rate-limiting enzyme in the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway. This results in abnormal sialylation of glycoproteins that possibly leads to muscle fiber degeneration. Mutations of the valosin containing protein are instead responsible for hereditary inclusion-body myopathy with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD), with these three phenotypic features having a variable penetrance. IBMPFD probably represents a disorder of abnormal cellular trafficking of proteins and maturation of the autophagosome. HIBM with congenital joint contractures and external ophthalmoplegia is due to mutations of the Myosin Heavy Chain IIa gene that exerts a pathogenic effect through interference with filament assembly or functional defects in ATPase activity. This review illustrates the clinical and pathologic characteristics of HIBMs and the main clues available to date concerning the possible pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic perspectives of these disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:25149037

  15. The clinical findings in Leber's hereditary optic neuroretinopathy. Leber's disease.

    PubMed

    Nikoskelainen, E

    1985-01-01

    Leber's disease is a hereditary condition primarily affecting young men. The mechanism of inheritance is unknown. Increased tortuosity and capillary microangiopathy in the peripapillary capillary bed occur in varying degrees in asymptomatic persons in families with Leber's disease. These vascular abnormalities signify an increased risk of developing the acute form of the disease. Progressive microangiopathy is a threatening sign during the presymptomatic stage. In the acute and atrophic stages of Leber's disease striking neurovascular changes take place in the fundus of the eye involved. The ophthalmoscopic observations and nerve function studies in the asymptomatic, presymptomatic and acute stages suggest that Leber's disease starts as a vascular disease. The neuropathy appears later, around the time that vision begins to fail. Both eyes are involved but at varying intervals. At the end stage the patient has bilaterally finger counting vision and a large centrocecal scotoma caused by severe optic atrophy. Examinations of other persons in families with Leber's disease have shown that subclinical and mild forms of the disease also exist. Neurological signs and symptoms can occasionally occur. Cardiac abnormalities such as pre-excitation syndrome have been reported in Leber's disease. The aetiology and precipitating factors and effective treatment to prevent blindness in Leber's disease remain unsolved questions. PMID:3879564

  16. Steroid-dependent sensorineural hearing loss in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease showing auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yukihide; Kataoka, Yuko; Sugaya, Akiko; Kariya, Shin; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2015-06-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common form of hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy and sometimes involves disorders of the peripheral auditory system. We present a case of steroid-dependent auditory neuropathy associated with CMT, in which the patient experienced 3 episodes of acute exacerbation of hearing loss and successful rescue of hearing by prednisolone. An 8-year-old boy was referred to the otolaryngology department at the University Hospital. He had been diagnosed with CMT type 1 (demyelinating type) at the Child Neurology Department and was suffering from mild hearing loss due to auditory neuropathy. An audiological diagnosis of auditory neuropathy was confirmed by auditory brainstem response and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions. At 9 years and 0 months old, 9 years and 2 months old, and 10 years and 0 months old, he had experienced acute exacerbations of hearing loss, each of which was successfully rescued by intravenous or oral prednisolone within 2 weeks. Steroid-responsive cases of CMT have been reported, but this is the first case report of steroid-responsive sensorineural hearing loss in CMT. The present case may have implications for the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in the treatment of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25440412

  17. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Neuropathy in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes without Retinopathy or Microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes W. S.; Alam, Uazman; Fadavi, Hassan; Marshall, Andrew; Asghar, Omar; Efron, Nathan; Tavakoli, Mitra; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Corneal innervation is increasingly used as a surrogate marker of human diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) however its temporal relationship with the other microvascular complications of diabetes is not fully established. In this cross-sectional, observational study we aimed to assess whether neuropathy occurred in patients with type 1 diabetes, without retinopathy or microalbuminuria. Materials and Methods All participants underwent detailed assessment of peripheral neuropathy [neuropathy disability score (NDS), vibration perception threshold (VPT), peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (PMNCV), sural sensory nerve conduction velocity (SSNCV) and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCCM)], retinopathy (digital fundus photography) and albuminuria status [albumin: creatinine ratio (ACR)]. Results 53 patients with Type 1 diabetes with (n=37) and without retinopathy (n=16) were compared to control subjects (n=27). SSNCV, corneal nerve fibre (CNFD) and branch (CNBD) density and length (CNFL) were reduced significantly (p<0.001) in diabetic patients without retinopathy compared to control subjects. Furthermore, CNFD, CNBD and CNFL were also significantly (p<0.001) reduced in diabetic patients without microalbuminuria (n=39), compared to control subjects. Greater neuropathic severity was associated with established retinopathy and microalbuminuria. Conclusions IVCCM detects early small fibre damage in the absence of retinopathy or microalbuminuria in patients with Type 1 diabetes. PMID:25853247

  18. Exacerbation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2E neuropathy following traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Eric; Dale, Jeffrey M; Jones, Maria; Shen, Hailian; Garcia, Michael L

    2015-11-19

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gait, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing hNF-L(E397K), which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we challenged wild type, hNF-L and hNF-L(E397K) mice with crush injury to the sciatic nerve. We analyzed functional recovery by measuring toe spread and analyzed gait using the Catwalk system. hNF-L(E397K) mice demonstrated reduced recovery from nerve injury consistent with increased susceptibility to neuropathy observed in CMT patients. In addition, hNF-L(E397K) developed a permanent reduction in their ability to weight bear, increased mechanical allodynia, and premature gait shift in the injured limb, which led to increasingly disrupted interlimb coordination in hNF-L(E397K). Exacerbation of neuropathy after injury and identification of gait alterations in combination with previously described pathology suggests that hNF-L(E397K) mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2. Therefore, hNF-L(E397K) mice provide a model for determining the efficacy of novel therapies. PMID:26423936

  19. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    TALEBIAN, Ahmad; GOUDARZI, Razieh Moazam; MOHAMMADZADEH, Mahdi; MIRZADEH, Azadeh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Vincristine (VCR) is a vinca alkaloid that is used for treatment of many malignancies. The vinca alkaloids are neurotoxic, usually causing a peripheral neuropathy, but cranial neuropathies are rare as side effects. Described here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy, a known case of Wilms’ tumor, treated by vincristine (0.067 mg/kg/day) and dactinomycin (0.045 mg/kg/day) after surgery. Three weeks after treatment, he presented with bilateral ptosis. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis with normal pupillary reflex and eye movement. He received 3.015 mg cumulative dose of vincristine before development of ptosis. Treatment with pyridoxine (150 mg/m2 p.o. BID) and pyridostigmine (3 mg/kg p.o. BID) was started as neuroprotective agents, and after 7 days the problem disappeared. The treatment continued for 6 weeks and there were no signs of ptosis or a recurrence in follow up 2 months later. PMID:24665331

  20. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified, which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention, and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss, and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population. PMID:25520703

  1. The effect of treatment with BRX-220, a co-inducer of heat shock proteins, on sensory fibers of the rat following peripheral nerve injury

    E-print Network

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    The effect of treatment with BRX-220, a co-inducer of heat shock proteins, on sensory fibers the effect BRX-220, a co-inducer of heat shock proteins, in injury-induced peripheral neuropathy. Following sciatic nerve injury in adult rats and treatment with BRX-220, the following features of the sensory

  2. CHRONIC IMMUNE DEMYELINATING NEUROPATHIES: COMPARATIVE FEATURES

    E-print Network

    Baloh, Bob

    Electrophysiology Antibody M-Protein Treatment CIDP Motor > Sensory Weakness: Proximal & Distal Symmetric Onset: 1 Cyclosporine A Methotrexate HIG Plasma Exchange Multifocal CIDP Chronic Motor > Sensory Weakness: Distal

  3. Electrodiagnostic testing in diabetic neuropathy: Which limb?

    PubMed

    Rota, E; Cocito, D

    2015-10-01

    Electrodiagnosis of subclinical diabetic neuropathies by nerve conduction studies remains challenging. The question arises about which nerves should be tested and what the best electrodiagnostic protocol to make an early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathies would be. On the basis of our findings and other evidence, which highlighted the remarkable prevalence of electrophysiological abnormalities in nerve conduction studies of the upper limbs, often in the presence of normal lower limb conduction parameters, we suggest that both ulnar and median nerves, in their motor and sensitive component, should be the two target nerves for electrodiagnostic protocols in diabetic neuropathies. PMID:26272740

  4. CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA1 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC) is the most common hereditary form of breast and ovarian cancer. About 2% of women

  5. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  6. HEREDITARY OSTEOPETROSIS OF THE RABBIT

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Louise; Brown, Wade H.

    1948-01-01

    The manifestations and course of an hereditary disease of the rabbit are reported. The condition is present at birth and is invariably fatal, generally in the 4th and 5th weeks of age. Retardation and eventual cessation of growth with marked reduction in size are conspicuous characteristic symptoms. The condition, which first occurred in the backcross progeny of a pure bred Dutch male rabbit, is inherited. It is determined by the expression of a simple recessive unit factor, affected individuals being homozygous for the factor. Rabbits heterozygous for the factor are identified only by appropriate breeding tests. The condition is not sex-linked. The disease has a remarkable resemblance to osteopetrosis or marble bone disease of infants and children with respect to signs and general course and also, as may be stated in anticipation of later discussions (5, 6), to the characteristic abnormal condition of the skeleton. PMID:18103397

  7. Hereditary Multiple Exostoses with Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hadidy, Azmy M. Al-Smady, Moa'ath M.; Haroun, Azmi A.; Hamamy, Hanan A.; Ghoul, Suha M.; Shennak, Akram O.

    2007-06-15

    A 16-year-old male patient with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) was found to have a pseudoaneurysm of the left popliteal artery caused by osteochondroma in the lower femur. The diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography without the need to perform an angiogram. The osteochondroma was excised and the popliteal artery was repaired with a saphenous graft. Vascular complications are extremely rare in HME, pseudoaneurysm being the most common and mostly located in the popliteal artery. This complication should be considered in young HME patients with a mass at the knee region. The radiological spectrum of investigations allows the diagnosis of this complication with proper and less invasive management procedures for the patient.

  8. N-hexane neuropathy with vertigo and cold allodynia in a silk screen printer: A case study.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sunil; Tandon, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    N-hexane neuropathy is an occupational disease caused by exposure to n-hexane, which is used as a solvent in silk screen printing. Here, we describe a 35-year-old man, a silk screen printer by profession, who presented with dizziness, distal swelling of both lower limbs for 10 months and tingling and burning sensation in both feet for 9.5 months along with cold allodynia. The patient had normal results of a motor and sensory system examination, apart from an impaired temperature sense. Nerve conduction tests showed a conduction block in bilateral common peroneal nerves and absence of conduction in bilateral sural nerves. These symptoms resolved when further exposure to n-hexane was ceased but cold allodynia remained. Thus, cold allodynia and impaired temperature sense can be a manifestation of n-hexane neuropathy. Hence, abnormalities on nerve conduction studies can be detected in n-hexane neuropathy patients, even before clinical examination detects any such abnormalities. In the case of the patients presenting with sensory motor neuropathy, history of occupational exposure to n-hexane becomes important, as the sooner the disease is detected, the better the chances of recovery. PMID:26224503

  9. Diabetic neuropathy: structural analysis of nerve hydration by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Griffey, R.H.; Eaton, P.; Sibbitt, R.R.; Sibbitt, W.L. Jr.; Bicknell, J.M.

    1988-11-18

    The water content of the sural nerve of diabetic patients was quantitatively defined by magnetic resonance proton imaging as a putative reflection of activity of the aldose-reductase pathway. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated, comparing group A, symptomatic diabetic men with sensory neuropathy; group B, similarly symptomatic diabetic men treated aldose-reductase inhibition; group C, neurologically asymptomatic diabetic men; and group D, control nondiabetic men. Marked increase in hydration of the sural nerve was seen in more than half of the symptomatic diabetic patients. Two of 11 neurologically asymptomatic diabetics had increased nerve hydration, suggesting a presymptomatic alteration of the nerve. Symptomatic diabetics treated with aldose-reductase inhibitors had normal nerve water levels. Increased level of peripheral nerve water represents a new finding in diabetes mellitus. It seems to be related to aldose-reductase activity, involved in the development of neuropathy, and similar to events that occur in other target tissue in human diabetes.

  10. Ulnar neuropathy in the forearm: A possible complication of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Juan A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Raynor, Elizabeth M; Nardin, Rachel A; Rutkove, Seward B

    2003-07-01

    Ulnar neuropathy in the forearm is an unusual cause of hand weakness and sensory loss that is most often attributed to compression of the nerve distally within the humero-ulnar arcade (cubital tunnel). An association with diabetes mellitus, however, has not been reported. We identified four patients with type I diabetes mellitus and clinical findings suggestive of ulnar neuropathy in whom electrophysiologic testing revealed partial conduction block or abnormal temporal dispersion within the forearm segment of the ulnar nerve. Although evidence for a mild underlying polyneuropathy was present in three patients, the ulnar nerve abnormalities were disproportionately severe. In all cases, a Martin-Grüber anastomosis was excluded. Whether this lesion is due to an increased propensity to focal compression of the ulnar nerve within the humero-ulnar arcade or whether it represents a localized manifestation of the generalized polyneuropathy remains to be determined. PMID:12811771

  11. Genetics of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer The majority of cancer cases are not attributable to hereditary causes. However, cancer

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    May 2013 Genetics of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer The majority of cancer cases are not attributable to hereditary causes. However, cancer can be hereditary in some families. There are many factors that can increase the probability that the cancers in a family may be hereditary. Some of these factors are

  12. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  13. Modulation of Nociception in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    E-print Network

    Katz, Natalie

    2014-05-31

    modalities are often ineffective and carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. The work contained herein used a rodent model of painful diabetic neuropathy following induction of diabetes with the pancreatic beta cell toxin, streptozocin (STZ...

  14. Mitochondrial stress and the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Paul; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K.; Schmidt, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that affects the sensory and autonomic nervous systems and leads to significant morbidity and impact on quality of life of patients. Mitochondrial stress has been proposed as a major mediator of neurodegeneration in diabetes. This review briefly summarizes the nature of sensory and autonomic nerve dysfunction and presents these findings in the context of diabetes-induced nerve degeneration mediated by alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure, physiology and trafficking. Diabetes-induced dysfunction in calcium homeostasis is discussed at length and causative associations with sub-optimal mitochondrial physiology are developed. It is clear that across a range of complications of diabetes that mitochondrial physiology is impaired, in general a reduction in electron transport chain capability is apparent. This abnormal activity may predispose mitochondria to generate elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), although experimental proof remains lacking, but more importantly will deleteriously alter the bioenergetic status of neurons. It is proposed that the next five years of research should focus on identifying changes in mitochondrial phenotype and associated cellular impact, identifying sources of ROS in neurons and analyzing mitochondrial trafficking under diabetic conditions. PMID:20729997

  15. Mitochondrial stress and the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fernyhough, Paul; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K; Schmidt, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a major complication of diabetes that affects the sensory and autonomic nervous systems and leads to significant morbidity and impact on quality of life of patients. Mitochondrial stress has been proposed as a major mediator of neurodegeneration in diabetes. This review briefly summarizes the nature of sensory and autonomic nerve dysfunction and presents these findings in the context of diabetes-induced nerve degeneration mediated by alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure, physiology and trafficking. Diabetes-induced dysfunction in calcium homeostasis is discussed at length and causative associations with sub-optimal mitochondrial physiology are developed. It is clear that across a range of complications of diabetes that mitochondrial physiology is impaired, in general a reduction in electron transport chain capability is apparent. This abnormal activity may predispose mitochondria to generate elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), although experimental proof remains lacking, but more importantly will deleteriously alter the bioenergetic status of neurons. It is proposed that the next five years of research should focus on identifying changes in mitochondrial phenotype and associated cellular impact, identifying sources of ROS in neurons and analyzing mitochondrial trafficking under diabetic conditions. PMID:20729997

  16. Reliability of nerve function assessments for people with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuqi; Holmes, Matthew; Li, Li

    2015-03-01

    Examining degenerative sensory and reflexive activity among people with peripheral neuropathy (PN) is important for clinical examinations and understanding relevant neural impairments. However, other than the test of presynaptic inhibition, the reliability of other related tests is largely unknown. The purpose of this project was to examine the test-retest reliability of lower extremity sensory and reflexive measures in people with PN. Twelve participants (8 women, 4 men, age = 72.5 ± 9.2 years) diagnosed with PN were assessed on two occasions at least 7 d apart. Plantar sensitivity, H-reflex and active and passive ankle proprioception (AAP and PAP) were tested. Paired student's t-test and Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used for statistical analysis. Significant difference was observed in AAP at 0º position (p = 0.04). No other significant differences were observed. Moderate to high reliability was observed at measures of Plantar sensitivity (0.92), peak to peak H (0.71) and M (0.84) waves, latency between H and M (0.78), H-Index (0.85), AAP (0.62) and PAP index (0.60). Low reliability was observed of other parameters. The measures of Hmax, Mmax, latency, H-Index, plantar sensitivity and AAP & PAP indices of proprioception tests can be measured reliably for further study in this population. PMID:24802152

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary folate malabsorption

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the production of DNA and its chemical cousin, RNA. Infants with hereditary folate malabsorption are born with ... anemia ; microvilli ; neurological ; platelets ; prevalence ; protein ; proton ; recessive ; RNA ; susceptibility ; thrombocytopenia ; vitamins ; white blood cells You may ...

  18. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kalady, Matthew F; Heald, Brandie

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes. PMID:26664327

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is a disorder related to low levels of phosphate in the blood (hypophosphatemia). Phosphate is a mineral that is essential for the ... condition. Hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets is characterized by a phosphate imbalance in the body. Among its many functions, ...

  20. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Language: English Español ( ... also at increased risk of having Lynch syndrome. Genetic Testing for Lynch Syndrome If you have colorectal ...

  1. Chapter Seven – Hereditary Genodermatoses with Cancer Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Alisa M.; Tucker, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Hereditary genodermatoses with cancer predisposition are reviewed, including Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis Types 1 and 2, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Xeroderma Pigmentosum, and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Hereditary melanoma is also included, though it differs from the others in several respects. The underlying genetic aberrations causing these syndromes are largely known, allowing novel treatments to be developed for some of these disorders. Early recognition and diagnosis allows for close follow-up and surveillance for associated malignancies. PMID:20816579

  2. Diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy: A comparative study of five neurophysiological tests.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, J-P; Wahab, A; Planté-Bordeneuve, V; Sène, D; Ménard-Lefaucheur, I; Rouie, D; Tebbal, D; Salhi, H; Créange, A; Zouari, H; Ng Wing Tin, S

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) is a challenge for clinical neurophysiology. Conventional nerve conduction studies are inappropriate for this purpose and therefore various neurophysiological tests have been proposed. In this study, we compared the diagnostic value of five of these tests in 87 patients with clinically definite (n=33) or possible (n=54) SFN related to amyloid neuropathy secondary to transthyretin gene mutation or monoclonal gammopathy (n=30), primary Sjögren's syndrome (n=20), Fabry's disease (n=2), or unknown cause (n=35). Neurophysiological tests included quantitative sensory testing with determination of warm and cold detection thresholds (WDT, CDT), recording of laser-evoked potentials (LEP) and sympathetic skin responses (SSRs), and measurement of electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) using Sudoscan(®) device. All tests were performed at the four extremities (hands and feet). All patients with clinically definite SFN and 70% of the patients with possible SFN had at least one abnormal test. The LEP was the most sensitive test (altered in 79% of the patients with at least one abnormal test), followed by ESC (61%), WDT (55%), SSR (41%), and CDT (32%). The combination of LEP, assessing A-delta sensory fibers, WDT, assessing sensory C fibers, and ESC, assessing autonomic C fibers, appears a relevant approach for the diagnosis of SFN. Compared to SSR and CDT, these three tests, LEP, WDT, and ESC, had a significantly better diagnostic sensitivity and their combination further improved diagnostic accuracy. PMID:26596193

  3. Interventions for preventing neuropathy caused by cisplatin and related compounds

    PubMed Central

    Albers, James W; Chaudhry, Vinay; Cavaletti, Guido; Donehower, Ross C

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin and several related antineoplastic agents used to treat many types of solid tumors are neurotoxic, and most patients completing a full course of cisplatin chemotherapy develop a clinically detectable sensory neuropathy. Effective neuroprotective therapies have been sought. Objectives To examine the efficacy of purported chemoprotective agents to prevent or limit the neurotoxicity of cisplatin and related agents. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (25 August 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 3, 2010 in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (January 1966 to August 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2010), LILACS (January 1982 to August 2010), CINAHL (January 1982 to August 2010) for randomized trials designed to evaluate neuroprotective agents used to prevent or limit neurotoxicity of cisplatin and related agents among human patients. Selection criteria Quasi-randomized or randomized controlled trials whose participants received cisplatin (or related compounds) chemotherapy with or without a potential chemoprotectant (acetylcysteine, amifostine, ACTH, BNP7787, calcium and magnesium, diethyldithiocarbamate, glutathione, Org 2766, oxcarbazepine, or vitamin E) and were evaluated zero to six months after completing chemotherapy using quantitative sensory testing (primary) or other measures including nerve conduction studies or neurological impairment rating using validated scales (secondary). Data collection and analysis We identified 16 randomized trials involving five possible chemoprotective agents in the initial 2006 review. Each study was reviewed by two authors who extracted the data and reached consensus. The 2010 update identified 11 additional randomized trials consisting of nine possible chemoprotective agents, including three treatments (acetylcysteine, calcium and magnesium, and oxcarbazepine) not among those described in the 2006 review. The included trials in the updated review involved eight unrelated treatments and included many disparate measures of neuropathy, resulting in insufficient data for any one measure to combine the results in most instances. Main results One of four eligible amifostine trials (541 total participants in all four trials) used quantitative sensory testing and demonstrated a favorable outcome in terms of amifostine neuroprotection, but the vibration perception threshold result was based on data from only 14 participants receiving amifostine who completed the post-treatment evaluation and should be regarded with caution. Of the six eligible glutathione trials (354 participants), one used quantitative sensory testing but reported only qualitative analyses. Four eligible Org 2766 trials (311 participants) employed quantitative sensory testing reported disparate results; meta-analyses of three trials using comparable measures showed no significant vibration perception threshold neuroprotection. The remaining trial reported only descriptive analyses. The single eligible trials involving acetylcysteine (14 participants), diethyldithiocarbamate (195 participants), calcium and magnesium (33 participants), and oxcarbazepine (32 participants) and the two eligible trials involving vitamin E (57 participants) did not perform quantitative sensory testing. In all, data from 1,537 participants were included. Authors' conclusions At present, the data are insufficient to conclude that any of the purported chemoprotective agents (acetylcysteine, amifostine, calcium and magnesium, diethyldithiocarbamate, glutathione, Org 2766, oxycarbazepine, or Vitamin E) prevent or limit the neurotoxicity of platin drugs among human patients. PMID:21328275

  4. Herpes simplex-mediated gene transfer of nerve growth factor protects against peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Goss, James R; Goins, William F; Lacomis, David; Mata, Marina; Glorioso, Joseph C; Fink, David J

    2002-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common and debilitating complication of diabetes. In animal models, neurotrophic factors can prevent progression of the neuropathy, but adverse effects prevent systemic administration in adequate doses to treat human disease. We examined whether gene transfer with replication-defective genomic herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors modified to express nerve growth factor (NGF) could be used to prevent progression of neuropathy in mice. Diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ) resulted in a sensory neuropathy manifest by a decrease in the foot sensory nerve amplitude (FSA; control = 20 +/- 0.1 microV, treated = 14 +/- 0.1 microV). Transduction of dorsal root ganglia in vivo with an HSV-based vector expressing NGF under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (vector SHN) or the HSV latency active promoter 2 (vector SLN) by footpad inoculation 2 weeks after STZ administration protected against the decrease in FSA (22 +/- 1.4 microV and 21 +/- 1.7 microV, respectively) measured 4 weeks later. Injection of SHN into inguinal adipose tissue 2 weeks after onset of diabetes also prevented the decrease in FSA (20 +/- 3.3 microV). These results suggest that gene transfer with an NGF-producing herpes-based vector may prove useful in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:12086954

  5. Gelsolin-related amyloidosis. Identification of the amyloid protein in Finnish hereditary amyloidosis as a fragment of variant gelsolin.

    PubMed Central

    Maury, C P

    1991-01-01

    The Finnish type of familial amyloidosis is a systemic disease characterized by progressive cranial neuropathy, corneal lattice dystrophy, and distal sensimotor neuropathy. Amyloid fibrils were isolated from the kidney and heart of a patient with Finnish amyloidosis. After solubilization, the amyloid proteins were fractionated by gel filtration and purified by reverse-phase HPLC. Complete amino acid sequence analyses show that the two amyloid components obtained are fragments of gelsolin, an actin-modulating protein occurring in plasma and the cytoskeleton. The larger component represents residues 173-243 and the minor component residues 173-225, respectively, of mature gelsolin. When compared with the predicted primary structure of human gelsolin a single amino acid substitution is present in amyloid: at position 15 of the amyloid proteins an asparagine is found instead of an aspartic acid residue at the corresponding position (187) in gelsolin. Antibodies to a dodecapeptide of the amyloidogenic region of gelsolin specifically stain the tissue amyloid deposits in Finnish hereditary amyloidosis. The results show that the amyloid subunit protein in Finnish hereditary amyloidosis represents a new type of amyloid that is derived from an actin filament-binding region of a variant gelsolin molecule by limited proteolysis. Images PMID:1849145

  6. Benign Hereditary Chorea: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Peall, Kathryn J.; Kurian, Manju A.

    2015-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) is a childhood-onset, hyperkinetic movement disorder normally with little progression of motor symptoms into adult life. The disorder is caused by mutations to the NKX2.1 (TITF1) gene and also forms part of the “brain–lung–thyroid syndrome”, in which additional developmental abnormalities of lung and thyroid tissue are observed. In this review, we summarize the main clinical findings in “classical” BHC syndrome and discuss more recently reported atypical features, including non-choreiform movement phenotypes. We highlight additional non-motor characteristics such as cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms, while discussing the evidence for BHC as a developmental disorder involving impaired neural migration and other multisystem developmental abnormalities. Finally, we will discuss the efficacy of available therapies in both affected pediatric and adult cohorts. Delineation of the BHC disease spectrum will no doubt expand our understanding of this disorder, facilitating better targeting of genetic testing and establish a framework for future clinical trials. PMID:26196025

  7. Chinese Medicine in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Experimental Research on Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Yuanlin; Liang, Xiaochun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common complications of chronic diabetes mellitus. Pathological characteristics of DPN include axonal atrophy, nerve demyelination, and delayed regeneration of peripheral sensory nerve fibers. The goal of treatment in DPN is not only to ameliorate neurological symptoms but also to slow or reverse the underlying neurodegenerative process. Schwann cells and neurotrophic factors play important roles in the repair and regeneration of peripheral nerves. The present paper reviews current studies and evidence regarding the neurological effects of traditional Chinese medicine, with an emphasis on recent developments in the area of nerve repair and regeneration in DPN. PMID:22927874

  8. Focal atrophy of the masticatory muscles caused by pure trigeminal motor neuropathy: case report.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M H; Hodgson, E J; Felstead, A M

    2016-01-01

    Pure trigeminal motor neuropathy is rare and characterised by weakness of the mandibular motor branch with no signs of involvement of the trigeminal sensory or other cranial nerve. Its aetiology is unclear but it has been hypothesised that a viral infection may be a cause. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in its diagnosis and typically shows loss of volume of the affected masticatory muscles and infiltration of fat. We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman who presented with a 12-year history of progressive facial asymmetry, which was later shown on imaging to be caused by unilateral atrophy of the masseter with compensatory contralateral hypertrophy. PMID:26388069

  9. Ultrasound in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy: structure meets function in the neuromuscular clinic.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Elena; Noto, Yu-Ichi; Simon, Neil G

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral nerve ultrasound (US) has emerged as a promising technique for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. While most experience with US has been reported in the context of nerve entrapment syndromes, the role of US in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy (PN) has recently been explored. Distinctive US findings have been reported in patients with hereditary, immune-mediated, infectious and axonal PN; US may add complementary information to neurophysiological studies in the diagnostic work-up of PN. This review describes the characteristic US findings in PN reported to date and a classification of abnormal nerve US patterns in PN is proposed. Closer scrutiny of nerve abnormalities beyond assessment of nerve calibre may allow for more accurate diagnostic classification of PN, as well as contribute to the understanding of the intersection of structure and function in PN. PMID:25653385

  10. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Alam, Uazman; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating consequence of diabetes that may be present in as many as one in five patients with diabetes. The objective assessment of PDN is difficult, making it challenging to diagnose and assess in both clinical practice and clinical trials. No single treatment exists to prevent or reverse neuropathic changes or to provide total pain relief. Treatment of PDN is based on three major approaches: intensive glycaemic control and risk factor management, treatments based on pathogenetic mechanisms, and symptomatic pain management. Clinical guidelines recommend pain relief in PDN through the use of antidepressants such as amitriptyline and duloxetine, the ?-aminobutyric acid analogues gabapentin and pregabalin, opioids and topical agents such as capsaicin. Of these medications, duloxetine and pregabalin were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2004 and tapentadol extended release was approved in 2012 for the treatment of PDN. Proposed pathogenetic treatments include ?-lipoic acid (stems reactive oxygen species formation), benfotiamine (prevents vascular damage in diabetes) and aldose-reductase inhibitors (reduces flux through the polyol pathway). There is a growing need for studies to evaluate the most potent drugs or combinations for the management of PDN to maximize pain relief and improve quality of life. A number of agents are potential candidates for future use in PDN therapy, including Nav 1.7 antagonists, N-type calcium channel blockers, NGF antibodies and angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonists. PMID:25553239

  11. The co-occurrence of myocardial dysfunction and peripheral insensate neuropathy in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiomyopathy and distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSPN), including sensory and autonomic dysfunction, often co-occur in diabetic mellitus (DM) patients. However, the temporal relationship and progression between these two complications has not been investigated. Using a streptozotocin DM animal model that develops insensate neuropathy, our aim was to examine in parallel the development of DSPN and DM-associated changes in cardiac structure and function as well as potential mechanisms, such as autonomic dysfunction, evaluated by changes in urinary and myocardial norepinephrine content and myocardial neuronal markers. Methods Sensory neuropathy was measured by behavioral tests using Von Frey filaments and Hargreaves methods. Echocardiography was used to evaluate myocardial structure and function. Autonomic function was evaluated by measuring urinary and myocardial norepinephrine (NE) levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was used to measure the myocardial neuronal markers, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and general neuronal protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Results The DM group developed tactile and thermal insensate neuropathy 4–5 weeks after DM onset. Cardiovascular changes were found between 4 and 12 weeks after DM onset and included bradycardia, diastolic and systolic dysfunction and cardiac dilation. There was a 2.5-fold reduction in myocardial NE levels and a 5-fold increase in urinary NE levels in the DM group. Finally, there was a 2.3-fold increase in myocardial CGRP levels in the DM group and no change in PGP9.5 levels. Conclusions Cardiovascular structural and functional changes developed early in the course of DM and in combination with insensate neuropathy. In parallel, signs of cardiac autonomic dysfunction were also found and included decreased myocardial NE levels and altered CGRP levels. These results may indicate the need for early cardiovascular evaluation in DM patients with insensate neuropathy. PMID:24410801

  12. PHENYLMETHYLSULFONYL FLUORIDE PROTECTS RATS FROM MIPAFOX-INDUCED DELAYED NEUROPATHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initiation of organophosphorus-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is thought to consist of two molecular events involving the phosphorylation of the target enzyme, neurotoxic esterase or neuropathy target enzyme (NTE), and a subsequent 'aging' reaction which transforms the inhibi...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (often shortened to NARP ) ... Glossary definitions Reviewed November 2006 What is NARP? Neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) is a condition ...

  14. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:24949885

  15. Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy increases substance P release in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Terumasa; Oka, Yusuke; Kambe, Toshie; Koizumi, Naoya; Abe, Kenji; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Utsunomiya, Iku; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of paclitaxel treatment. The major dose-limiting side effect of paclitaxel is peripheral sensory neuropathy, which is characterized by painful paresthesia of the hands and feet. To analyze the contribution of substance P to the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, substance P expression in the superficial layers of the rat spinal dorsal horn was analyzed after paclitaxel treatment. Behavioral assessment using the von Frey test and the paw thermal test showed that intraperitoneal administration of 2 and 4mg/kg paclitaxel induced mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia and thermal hyperalgesia 7 and 14 days after treatment. Immunohistochemistry showed that paclitaxel (4mg/kg) treatment significantly increased substance P expression (37.6±3.7% on day 7, 43.6±4.6% on day 14) in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn, whereas calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression was unchanged. Moreover, paclitaxel (2 and 4mg/kg) treatment significantly increased substance P release in the spinal cord on day 14. These results suggest that paclitaxel treatment increases release of substance P, but not CGRP in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn and may contribute to paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26658369

  16. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Early Nerve Regeneration in Diabetic Neuropathy After Simultaneous Pancreas and Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mitra; Mitu-Pretorian, Maria; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Fadavi, Hassan; Asghar, Omar; Alam, Uazman; Ponirakis, Georgios; Jeziorska, Maria; Marshall, Andy; Efron, Nathan; Boulton, Andrew J.; Augustine, Titus; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To date, limited data in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes demonstrate nerve fiber repair after intervention. This may reflect a lack of efficacy of the interventions but may also reflect difficulty of the tests currently deployed to adequately assess nerve fiber repair, particularly in short-term studies. Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) represents a novel noninvasive means to quantify nerve fiber damage and repair. Fifteen type 1 diabetic patients undergoing simultaneous pancreas–kidney transplantation (SPK) underwent detailed assessment of neurologic deficits, quantitative sensory testing (QST), electrophysiology, skin biopsy, corneal sensitivity, and CCM at baseline and at 6 and 12 months after successful SPK. At baseline, diabetic patients had a significant neuropathy compared with control subjects. After successful SPK there was no significant change in neurologic impairment, neurophysiology, QST, corneal sensitivity, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). However, CCM demonstrated significant improvements in corneal nerve fiber density, branch density, and length at 12 months. Normalization of glycemia after SPK shows no significant improvement in neuropathy assessed by the neurologic deficits, QST, electrophysiology, and IENFD. However, CCM shows a significant improvement in nerve morphology, providing a novel noninvasive means to establish early nerve repair that is missed by currently advocated assessment techniques. PMID:23002037

  17. Acute multiple focal neuropathies and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Che; Yang, Hsiu-Chun; Chen, Yao-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Acute-onset alcohol-associated neuropathy is only occasionally reported, and delayed postanoxic encephalopathy is rare. Here, we report a male who developed acute multiple focal neuropathies and later delayed postanoxic encephalopathy after alcohol intoxication. He had hypoxia and rhabdomyolysis, presenting with acute renal failure initially, and cardiopulmonary support, including mechanical ventilation, led to improvement of the patient at the acute stage. He suffered from bilateral hand numbness and mild weakness of the right lower limb thereafter. Nerve-conduction study revealed no pickup of compound muscle action potential or sensory nerve action potential in the bilateral ulnar nerve, but showed attenuated amplitude of compound muscle action potential in the right femoral nerve. Multiple focal neuropathies were suspected, and he received outpatient rehabilitation after being discharged. However, the patient developed gradual onset of weakness in four limbs and cognitive impairment 23 days after the hypoxia event. Brain computed tomography showed low attenuation over bilateral globus pallidus, and brain magnetic resonance imaging disclosed diffuse increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in bilateral white matter. He was admitted again under the impression of delayed postanoxic brain injury. Supportive treatment and active rehabilitation were given. He had gradual improvement in motor and functional status after rehabilitation. He could walk with festinating gait under supervision, and needed only minimal assistance in performing activities of daily living approximately 1 year later. PMID:26229472

  18. Clinical guideline seom: hereditary colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Ponce, C; Serrano, R; Sánchez-Heras, A B; Teulé, A; Chirivella, I; Martín, T; Martínez, E; Morales, R; Robles, L

    2015-12-01

    Genetic mutations have been identified as the cause of inherited cancer risk in some colon cancer; these mutations are estimated to account for only 5-6 % of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases overall. Up to 25-30 % of patients have a family history of CRC that suggests a hereditary component, common exposures among family members, or a combination of both. Cancers in people with a hereditary predisposition typically occur at an earlier age than in sporadic cases. A predisposition to CRC may include a predisposition to other cancers, such as endometrial cancer. We describe genetics, current diagnosis and management of CRC hereditary syndromes pointing to a multidisciplinary approach to achieve the best results in patients and family outcomes. PMID:26586118

  19. [Paediatric retinal detachment and hereditary vitreoretinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Meier, P

    2013-09-01

    The number of retinal detachments in children is very low in comparison to the number in adults. One predisposing factor for development of paediatric retinal detachment is suffering from hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration (e.g., Stickler syndrome, Wagner syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, congenital X-linked retinoschisis, Knobloch syndrome, incontinentia pigmenti, Norrie disease). Hereditary vitreoretinopathies are characterised by an abnormal-appearing vitreous gel with associated retinal changes. In most of these eyes further ocular abnormalities can be diagnosed. A group of hereditary disorders is associated with characteristic systemic abnormalities. Allied conditions should be considered in the clinical diagnosis. Vitreoretinopathies are the most common cause of inherited retinal detachment. In most eyes primary vitrectomy is necessary, and disease-specific surgical treatment is discussed. PMID:23986190

  20. Uses of skin biopsy for sensory and autonomic nerve assessment.

    PubMed

    Myers, M Iliza; Peltier, Amanda C

    2013-01-01

    Skin biopsy is a valuable diagnostic tool for small-fiber-predominant neuropathy by the quantification of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). It has the unique advantage of being a minimally invasive procedure with the potential for longitudinal evaluation of both sensory and autonomic fibers. Unmyelinated small fibers are not otherwise quantified objectively with such a level of sensitivity as has been reported with IENFD. Recent advances include an expansion of the skin punch biopsy technique to evaluate larger myelinated fibers and mechanoreceptors, and recent work has also focused on additional methods of quantifying dermal fibers and densely innervated autonomic structures. This review discusses current work using skin biopsy for the pathologic analysis of peripheral nerve fibers in neuropathy of various causes as well as its use in clinical trials. PMID:23250768

  1. Toxic optic neuropathies: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Zülsdorff, Magdalena; Wilhelm, Helmut; Tonagel, Felix

    2015-08-01

    Toxic optic neuropathy (TON) is caused by the damage to the optic nerve through different toxins, including drugs, metals, organic solvents, methanol and carbon dioxide. A similar clinical picture may also be caused by nutritional deficits, including B vitamins, folic acid and proteins with sulphur-containing amino acids. This review summarizes the present knowledge on disease-causing factors, clinical presentation, diagnostics and treatment in TON. It discusses in detail known and hypothesized relations between drugs, including tuberculostatic drugs, antimicrobial agents, antiepileptic drugs, antiarrhythmic drugs, disulfiram, halogenated hydroquinolones, antimetabolites, tamoxifen and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and optic neuropathy. PMID:25159832

  2. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association. PMID:26520200

  3. CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA2 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? People with BRCA2 alterations have a genetic condition called Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC). HBOC is caused by an error

  4. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  5. Sildenafil Ameliorates Long Term Peripheral Neuropathy in Type II Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chopp, Michael; Szalad, Alexandra; Jia, LongFei; Lu, XueRong; Lu, Mei; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, RuiLan; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of long-standing diabetes mellitus. To mimic clinical trials in which patients with diabetes enrolled have advanced peripheral neuropathy, we investigated the effect of sildenafil, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase type 5 enzyme, on long term peripheral neuropathy in middle aged male mice with type II diabetes. Treatment of diabetic mice (BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J, db/db) at age 36 weeks with sildenafil significantly increased functional blood vessels and regional blood flow in the sciatic nerve, concurrently with augmentation of intra-epidermal nerve fiber density in the skin and myelinated axons in the sciatic nerve. Functional analysis showed that the sildenafil treatment considerably improved motor and sensory conduction velocities in the sciatic nerve and peripheral thermal stimulus sensitivity compared with the saline treatment. In vitro studies showed that mouse dermal endothelial cells (MDE) cultured under high glucose levels exhibited significant down regulation of angiopoietin 1 (Ang1) expression and reduction of capillary-like tube formation, which were completely reversed by sildenafil. In addition, incubation of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons with conditioned medium harvested from MDE under high glucose levels suppressed neurite outgrowth, where as conditional medium harvested from MDE treated with sildenafil under high glucose levels did not inhibit neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons. Moreover, blockage of the Ang1 receptor, Tie2, with a neutralized antibody against Tie2 abolished the beneficial effect of sildenafil on tube formation and neurite outgrowth. Collectively, our data indicate that sildenafil has a therapeutic effect on long term peripheral neuropathy of middle aged diabetic mice and that improvement of neurovascular dysfunction by sildenafil likely contributes to the amelioration of nerve function. The Ang1/Tie2 signaling pathway may play an important role in these restorative processes. PMID:25689401

  6. Organophosphates induce distal axonal damage, but not brain oedema, by inactivating neuropathy target esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Read, David J.; Li Yong; Chao, Moses V.; Cavanagh, John B.; Glynn, Paul

    2010-05-15

    Single doses of organophosphorus compounds (OP) which covalently inhibit neuropathy target esterase (NTE) can induce lower-limb paralysis and distal damage in long nerve axons. Clinical signs of neuropathy are evident 3 weeks post-OP dose in humans, cats and chickens. By contrast, clinical neuropathy in mice following acute dosing with OPs or any other toxic compound has never been reported. Moreover, dosing mice with ethyloctylphosphonofluoridate (EOPF) - an extremely potent NTE inhibitor - causes a different (subacute) neurotoxicity with brain oedema. These observations have raised the possibility that mice are intrinsically resistant to neuropathies induced by acute toxic insult, but may incur brain oedema, rather than distal axonal damage, when NTE is inactivated. Here we provide the first report that hind-limb dysfunction and extensive axonal damage can occur in mice 3 weeks after acute dosing with a toxic compound, bromophenylacetylurea. Three weeks after acutely dosing mice with neuropathic OPs no clinical signs were observed, but distal lesions were present in the longest spinal sensory axons. Similar lesions were evident in undosed nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice in which NTE had been genetically-deleted from neural tissue. The extent of OP-induced axonal damage in mice was related to the duration of NTE inactivation and, as reported in chickens, was promoted by post-dosing with phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride. However, phenyldipentylphosphinate, another promoting compound in chickens, itself induced in mice lesions different from the neuropathic OP type. Finally, EOPF induced subacute neurotoxicity with brain oedema in both wild-type and nestin-cre:NTEfl/fl mice indicating that the molecular target for this effect is not neural NTE.

  7. Metformin attenuates hyperalgesia and allodynia in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy induced by streptozotocin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiong; Yu, Hailong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-10-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which often makes the patients suffer from severe hyperalgesia and allodynia. Thus far, the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy remains unsatisfactory. Metformin, which is the first-line drug for type-2 diabetes, has been proved to attenuate hyperexcitability in sensory neurons linked to chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain, highlighting its potential in alleviating pain related with painful diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the potential beneficial effect of metformin on hyperalgesia and allodynia in diabetic rats. The mechanical sensitivity, heat nociception, and cold allodynia were examined. The levels of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and advanced glycation end-products in the blood were measured. The expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and AMPK target genes were examined in the sciatic nerves of the animals. It was found that metformin was capable of attenuating diabetes-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia. In addition, metformin was capable of decreasing malondialdehyde and glycation end-products levels in blood, as well as increasing superoxide dismutas activity, indicating the inhibitory effect of metformin against diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Further studies showed that metformin could activate AMPK and increase the AMPK target genes in sciatic nerves in diabetic rats. In conclusion, metformin is able to attenuate diabetes-induced hyperalgesia and allodynia, which might be associated its anti-oxidative effect through AMPK pathway. Metformin might be used as an effective drug, especially with fewer side effects, for abnormal sensation in painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26054810

  8. Sulfatide levels correlate with severity of neuropathy in metachromatic leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Dali, Christine í; Barton, Norman W; Farah, Mohamed H; Moldovan, Mihai; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Nair, Nitin; Dunø, Morten; Risom, Lotte; Cao, Hongmei; Pan, Luying; Sellos-Moura, Marcia; Corse, Andrea M; Krarup, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder due to deficient activity of arylsulfatase A (ASA) that causes accumulation of sulfatide and lysosulfatide. The disorder is associated with demyelination and axonal loss in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The late infantile form has an early-onset, rapidly progressive course with severe sensorimotor dysfunction. The relationship between the degree of nerve damage and (lyso)sulfatide accumulation is, however, not established. Methods In 13 children aged 2–5 years with severe motor impairment, markedly elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and sural nerve sulfatide and lysosulfatide levels, genotype, ASA mRNA levels, residual ASA, and protein cross-reactive immunological material (CRIM) confirmed the diagnosis. We studied the relationship between (lyso)sulfatide levels and (1) the clinical deficit in gross motor function (GMFM-88), (2) median and peroneal nerve motor and median and sural nerve sensory conduction studies (NCS), (3) median and tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), (4) sural nerve histopathology, and (5) brain MR spectroscopy. Results Eleven patients had a sensory-motor demyelinating neuropathy on electrophysiological testing, whereas two patients had normal studies. Sural nerve and CSF (lyso)sulfatide levels strongly correlated with abnormalities in electrophysiological parameters and large myelinated fiber loss in the sural nerve, but there were no associations between (lyso)sulfatide levels and measures of central nervous system (CNS) involvement (GMFM-88 score, SSEP, and MR spectroscopy). Interpretation Nerve and CSF sulfatide and lysosulfatide accumulation provides a marker of disease severity in the PNS only; it does not reflect the extent of CNS involvement by the disease process. The magnitude of the biochemical disturbance produces a continuously graded spectrum of impairments in neurophysiological function and sural nerve histopathology. PMID:26000324

  9. Speech Perception in Individuals with Auditory Neuropathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Liu, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Speech perception in participants with auditory neuropathy (AN) was systematically studied to answer the following 2 questions: Does noise present a particular problem for people with AN: Can clear speech and cochlear implants alleviate this problem? Method: The researchers evaluated the advantage in intelligibility of clear speech over…

  10. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrix, Linda W.; Velenovsky, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, or ANSD, can be a confusing diagnosis to physicians, clinicians, those diagnosed, and parents of children diagnosed with the condition. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an understanding of the disorder, the limitations in current tools to determine site(s) of lesion, and…

  11. Systemic corticosteroids in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Zhang, Jason; Spitze, Arielle; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most prevalent optic nerve disorders seen in ophthalmic practice. The role of corticosteroid therapy in NAION remains a highly controversial area of debate in ophthalmology. This brief review will provide an overview of the current clinical evidence on this topic as well as some comment on the medical debate. PMID:25449939

  12. Effect of pain in pediatric inherited neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Mamta; Feldman, Eva; Shy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Assess the prevalence and impact of pain in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study on children with CMT disease seen at study sites of the Inherited Neuropathy Consortium, we collected standardized assessments of pain (Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale) from 176 patients (140 children aged 8–18 years, and 36 children aged 2–7 years through parent proxies), along with standardized clinical assessments and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes. We then developed a series of multivariate regression models to determine whether standardized measures of neuropathy severity, functional impact, or structural changes to the feet explained the observed pain scores. Results: The mean score on the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale was 2 (range 0–5). Increased pain strongly correlated with worse QOL scores but not with more severe neuropathy. Independent determinants of increased pain in children with CMT disease included measures of ankle inflexibility. Conclusion: Pain is present in children with CMT disease and negatively affects QOL. Pain scores do not positively correlate with neuropathy severity but do correlate in limited univariate analyses with measures of ankle inflexibility. Further studies to elucidate the mechanisms of pain may help identify treatments that can reduce pain and improve QOL in patients with CMT disease. PMID:24477108

  13. Hereditary myeloperoxidase deficiency: study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Larrocha, C; Fernández de Castro, M; Fontan, G; Viloria, A; Fernández-Chacón, J L; Jiménez, C

    1982-11-01

    12 cases of hereditary myeloperoxidase (MPO) deficiency are reported. Histochemical stainings, lysosomal enzyme determinations, electron microscopic study of MPO and granulocytic function were performed. Family studies on 2 generations were carried out in 5 patients and histochemical stainings and biochemical lysosomal enzyme determinations were done. MPO deficiency was found to follow autosomal recessive inheritance and only rarely to have clinical effects. PMID:6296995

  14. Pathophysiological mechanisms and functional hearing consequences of auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rance, Gary; Starr, Arnold

    2015-11-01

    The effects of inner ear abnormality on audibility have been explored since the early 20th century when sound detection measures were first used to define and quantify 'hearing loss'. The development in the 1970s of objective measures of cochlear hair cell function (cochlear microphonics, otoacoustic emissions, summating potentials) and auditory nerve/brainstem activity (auditory brainstem responses) have made it possible to distinguish both synaptic and auditory nerve disorders from sensory receptor loss. This distinction is critically important when considering aetiology and management. In this review we address the clinical and pathophysiological features of auditory neuropathy that distinguish site(s) of dysfunction. We describe the diagnostic criteria for: (i) presynaptic disorders affecting inner hair cells and ribbon synapses; (ii) postsynaptic disorders affecting unmyelinated auditory nerve dendrites; (iii) postsynaptic disorders affecting auditory ganglion cells and their myelinated axons and dendrites; and (iv) central neural pathway disorders affecting the auditory brainstem. We review data and principles to identify treatment options for affected patients and explore their benefits as a function of site of lesion. PMID:26463676

  15. Coexistent Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 2 diabetes mellitus neuropathies in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Sun, A-ping; Tang, Lu; Liao, Qin; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Ying-shuang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene on chromosome 17. It is the most common inherited demyelinating neuropathy. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder that frequently causes predominantly sensory neuropathy. In this study, we report the occurrence of CMT1A in a Chinese family affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this family, seven individuals had duplication of the PMP22 gene, although only four had clinical features of polyneuropathy. All CMT1A patients with a clinical phenotype also presented with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The other three individuals had no signs of CMT1A or type 2 diabetes mellitus. We believe that there may be a genetic link between these two diseases.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A165b prevents diabetic neuropathic pain and sensory neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Richard P; Beazley-Long, Nicholas; Ved, Nikita; Bestall, Samuel M; Riaz, Hamza; Singhal, Priya; Ballmer Hofer, Kurt; Harper, Steve J; Bates, David O; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2015-10-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects up to half of diabetic patients. This neuronal damage leads to sensory disturbances, including allodynia and hyperalgesia. Many growth factors have been suggested as useful treatments for prevention of neurodegeneration, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family. VEGF-A is generated as two alternative splice variant families. The most widely studied isoform, VEGF-A165a is both pro-angiogenic and neuroprotective, but pro-nociceptive and increases vascular permeability in animal models. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats develop both hyperglycaemia and many of the resulting diabetic complications seen in patients, including peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, we show that the anti-angiogenic VEGF-A splice variant, VEGF-A165b, is also a potential therapeutic for diabetic neuropathy. Seven weeks of VEGF-A165b treatment in diabetic rats reversed enhanced pain behaviour in multiple behavioural paradigms and was neuroprotective, reducing hyperglycaemia-induced activated caspase 3 (AC3) levels in sensory neuronal subsets, epidermal sensory nerve fibre loss and aberrant sciatic nerve morphology. Furthermore, VEGF-A165b inhibited a STZ-induced increase in Evans Blue extravasation in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), saphenous nerve and plantar skin of the hind paw. Increased transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel activity is associated with the onset of diabetic neuropathy. VEGF-A165b also prevented hyperglycaemia-enhanced TRPA1 activity in an in vitro sensory neuronal cell line indicating a novel direct neuronal mechanism that could underlie the anti-nociceptive effect observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that in a model of Type I diabetes VEGF-A165b attenuates altered pain behaviour and prevents neuronal stress, possibly through an effect on TRPA1 activity. PMID:26201024

  17. Antenatal presentation of hereditary lymphedema type I.

    PubMed

    Boudon, E; Levy, Y; Abossolo, T; Cartault, François; Brouillard, P; Vikkula, M; Kieffer-Traversier, M; Ramful, D; Alessandri, J L

    2015-01-01

    Fetal edema can present as limited subcutaneous edema, fluid accumulation in body cavities or hydrops fetalis. Hydrops fetalis is the end stage of a variety of fetal/maternal disorders and nonimmune etiology represents more than 3/4 of cases. Lymphatic dysplasia may account for a subset of patients with nonimmune and "idiopathic" hydrops fetalis, fetal chylous ascites or chylothorax. We present two unrelated patients with antenatal features of hereditary lymphedema syndrome, in whom Milroy disease was diagnosed after birth. At least, 20 genes have been identified to cause primary lymphedema, with sometimes antenatal features. Hereditary lymphedema syndrome should be considered in cases of nonimmune hydrops fetalis/fetal edema after ruling out the more common etiologies. PMID:25896638

  18. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ...Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs...for acute and sub-acute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain...of service connection for peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to...

  19. Intravenous Lidocaine Infusion to Treat Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Peter; Kumar, Aashish J; Muppuri, Rudram; Chakrabortty, Shushovan

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy, which manifests as paresthesias, dysesthesias, and numbness in the hands and feet. Numerous chemoprotective agents and treatments have been used with limited success to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. We report a case in which a patient presenting with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy received an IV lidocaine infusion over the course of 60 minutes with complete symptomatic pain relief for a prolonged period of 2 weeks. PMID:26528700

  20. Sensory Conversion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medelius, Pedro

    The human body has five basic sensory functions: touch, vision, hearing, taste, and smell. The effectiveness of one or more of these human sensory functions can be impaired as a result of trauma, congenital defects, or the normal ageing process. Converting one type of function into another, or translating a function to a different part of the body, could result in a better quality of life for a person with diminished sensorial capabilities.

  1. Paclitaxel alters sensory nerve biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bober, Brian G; Shah, Sameer B

    2015-10-15

    Paclitaxel is an effective chemotherapeutic that, despite its common use, frequently causes debilitating peripheral sensory neuropathy. Paclitaxel binds to and stabilizes microtubules, and through unknown mechanisms, causes abnormal microtubule aggregation. Given that microtubules contribute to the mechanical properties of cells, we tested the hypothesis that paclitaxel treatment would alter the stiffness of sensory nerves. Rat sural nerves were excised and soaked in Ringer's solution with or without paclitaxel. Nerves were secured between a force transducer and actuator, and linearly strained. Stress-strain curves were generated, from which elastic moduli were calculated. Paclitaxel treated nerves exhibited significantly higher moduli in both linear and transition regions of the curve. A composite-tissue model was then generated to estimate the stiffness increase in the cellular fraction of the nerve following paclitaxel treatment. This model was supported experimentally by data on mechanical properties of sural nerves stripped of their epineurium, and area fractions of the cellular and connective tissue components of the rat sural nerve, calculated from immunohistochemical images. Model results revealed that the cellular components of the nerve must stiffen 12x to 115x, depending on the initial axonal modulus assumed, in order to achieve the observed tissue level mechanical changes. Consistent with such an increase, electron microscopy showed increased microtubule aggregation and cytoskeletal packing, suggestive of a more cross-linked cytoskeleton. Overall, our data suggests that paclitaxel treatment induces increased microtubule bundling in axons, which leads to alterations in tissue-level mechanical properties. PMID:26321364

  2. [Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Llamas Esperón, G; García Ramos, G; Gaos, C; Jiménéz, J L; Villavicencio, R; Cueto, L; Arriaga Gracia, J

    1985-01-01

    The importance of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) derives from its remarkable frequency and its clinical impact. The clinical features are postural hypotension and resting tachycardia, these abnormalities may be overlooked in a high number of patients asymptomatic. Although rarely life threatening, CAN causes considerable morbidity, which can be ameliorated by its identification and appropriate treatment. Circulatory reflexes were studied in 48 diabetic patients and 14 normal control subjects. Twenty-six of the diabetic patients had normal response. The remaining 22 had evidence of neuropathy and abnormal cardiac response during these tests. Only one patient had postural syncope but he had severe orthostatic hypotension. The others remained asymptomatic. All the control subjects had normal reflexes. Beat-to-beat variation with deep breathing (sinus arrhythmia), carotid body massage and mental stress, were important for the detection of CAN (86, 90 and 90% sensitivity respectively). The Valsalva maneuver and sinus arrhythmia showed 82 and 92% of specificity for the diagnosis of CAN. Our findings suggest that CAN in diabetic patients can be detected by these relatively simple test. We propose a rational approach to the diagnosis. Our method is applicable as a clinical routine examination for cardiac neuropathy. PMID:2932078

  3. Identification of a new hereditary amyloidosis prealbumin variant, Tyr-77, and detection of the gene by DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, M R; Dwulet, F E; Williams, E C; Conneally, P M; Benson, M D

    1988-01-01

    In the last several years, five human plasma prealbumin (transthyretin) variants have been discovered in association with hereditary amyloidosis, a late-onset fatal disorder. We recently studied a patient of German descent with peripheral neuropathy and bowel dysfunction. Biopsied rectal tissue contained amyloid that stained with anti-human prealbumin. Amino acid sequence analysis of the patient's plasma prealbumin revealed both normal and variant prealbumin molecules, with the variant containing a tyrosine at position 77 instead of serine. We predicted a single nucleotide change in codon 77 of the variant prealbumin gene, which we then detected in the patient's DNA using the restriction enzyme SspI and a specifically tailored genomic prealbumin probe. DNA tests of other family members identified several gene carriers. This is the sixth prealbumin variant implicated in amyloidosis, and adds to the accumulating evidence that the prealbumin amyloidoses are more varied and prevalent than previously thought. Images PMID:2891727

  4. Development of reverse dot-blot system for screening of mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schollen, E; Vandenberk, P; Cassiman, J J; Matthijs, G

    1997-01-01

    We developed a diagnostic test based on the reverse dot-blot principle, in which five mitochondrial point mutations responsible for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) were screened simultaneously. A series of wild-type and mutant oligonucleotides representing each mutation were covalently bound to a single nylon membrane strip. The target sites were amplified in a multiplex PCR and the products were hybridized to the membrane. Detection is based on chemiluminescence. To test the developed assay, 47 patients suspected of having LHON were screened. In 11 cases (23%) the diagnosis of LHON could be confirmed (3460, 1; 9804, 1; 11778, 5; 14484, 3; 15257, 1). The results suggest that the clinical identification of the mitochondrial defect is not trivial and the availability of a rapid screening method simplifies the molecular analysis of these cases. PMID:8990216

  5. Glomerular changes in hereditary single-gene diseases.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Adalberto; Meroni, Mietta; Battini, Graziana; Maglio, Alessia; Righetti, Marco; Fabris, Elisabetta; Nebuloni, Manuela; Pallotti, Francesco; Giordano, Ferdinando; Tosoni, Antonella

    2002-01-01

    Molecular genetics has strongly influenced clinical medicine and particularly nephrology. Several gene mutations of single-gene hereditary nephropathies have been recently identified. These data are useful to develop methods of diagnosis and treatment, but also to understand the pathogenesis of these particular disorders. In this review we focused on several monogenic hereditary renal diseases inducing nephrotic syndrome and other hereditary diseases with renal involvement and progression towards end-stage renal failure. PMID:12515374

  6. Impaired adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signalling in dorsal root ganglia neurons is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Darrell R.; Saleh, Ali; Schapansky, Jason; Marquez, Alexandra; Gomes, Suzanne; Akude, Eli; Morrow, Dwane; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in sensory neurons and may contribute to distal axonopathy in animal models of diabetic neuropathy. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? coactivator-1? (PGC-1?) signalling axis senses the metabolic demands of cells and regulates mitochondrial function. Studies in muscle, liver and cardiac tissues have shown that the activity of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and PGC-1? is decreased under hyperglycaemia. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that deficits in adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/PGC-1? signalling in sensory neurons underlie impaired axonal plasticity, suboptimal mitochondrial function and development of neuropathy in rodent models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Phosphorylation and expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/PGC-1? and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex proteins were downregulated in dorsal root ganglia of both streptozotocin-diabetic rats and db/db mice. Adenoviral-mediated manipulation of endogenous adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity using mutant proteins modulated neurotrophin-directed neurite outgrowth in cultures of sensory neurons derived from adult rats. Addition of resveratrol to cultures of sensory neurons derived from rats after 3–5 months of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, significantly elevated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase levels, enhanced neurite outgrowth and normalized mitochondrial inner membrane polarization in axons. The bioenergetics profile (maximal oxygen consumption rate, coupling efficiency, respiratory control ratio and spare respiratory capacity) was aberrant in cultured sensory neurons from streptozotocin-diabetic rats and was corrected by resveratrol treatment. Finally, resveratrol treatment for the last 2 months of a 5-month period of diabetes reversed thermal hypoalgesia and attenuated foot skin intraepidermal nerve fibre loss and reduced myelinated fibre mean axonal calibre in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. These data suggest that the development of distal axonopathy in diabetic neuropathy is linked to nutrient excess and mitochondrial dysfunction via defective signalling of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/PGC-1? pathway. PMID:22561641

  7. Impaired adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signalling in dorsal root ganglia neurons is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Roy Chowdhury, Subir K; Smith, Darrell R; Saleh, Ali; Schapansky, Jason; Marquez, Alexandra; Gomes, Suzanne; Akude, Eli; Morrow, Dwane; Calcutt, Nigel A; Fernyhough, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in sensory neurons and may contribute to distal axonopathy in animal models of diabetic neuropathy. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? coactivator-1? (PGC-1?) signalling axis senses the metabolic demands of cells and regulates mitochondrial function. Studies in muscle, liver and cardiac tissues have shown that the activity of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and PGC-1? is decreased under hyperglycaemia. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that deficits in adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/PGC-1? signalling in sensory neurons underlie impaired axonal plasticity, suboptimal mitochondrial function and development of neuropathy in rodent models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Phosphorylation and expression of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/PGC-1? and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex proteins were downregulated in dorsal root ganglia of both streptozotocin-diabetic rats and db/db mice. Adenoviral-mediated manipulation of endogenous adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activity using mutant proteins modulated neurotrophin-directed neurite outgrowth in cultures of sensory neurons derived from adult rats. Addition of resveratrol to cultures of sensory neurons derived from rats after 3-5 months of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, significantly elevated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase levels, enhanced neurite outgrowth and normalized mitochondrial inner membrane polarization in axons. The bioenergetics profile (maximal oxygen consumption rate, coupling efficiency, respiratory control ratio and spare respiratory capacity) was aberrant in cultured sensory neurons from streptozotocin-diabetic rats and was corrected by resveratrol treatment. Finally, resveratrol treatment for the last 2 months of a 5-month period of diabetes reversed thermal hypoalgesia and attenuated foot skin intraepidermal nerve fibre loss and reduced myelinated fibre mean axonal calibre in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. These data suggest that the development of distal axonopathy in diabetic neuropathy is linked to nutrient excess and mitochondrial dysfunction via defective signalling of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/PGC-1? pathway. PMID:22561641

  8. NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SENSORY SYSTEMS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to many neurotoxic compounds has been shown to produce a sensory system dysfunction. Neurophysiological assessment of sensory function in humans and animal models often uses techniques known as sensory evoked potentials. Because both humans and animals show analogous res...

  9. Sensory Correlations in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Janet K.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Garver, Carolyn R.; Johnson, Danny G.; Andrews, Alonzo A.; Savla, Jayshree S.; Mehta, Jyutika A.; Schroeder, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between auditory, visual, touch, and oral sensory dysfunction in autism and their relationship to multisensory dysfunction and severity of autism. The Sensory Profile was completed on 104 persons with a diagnosis of autism, 3 to 56 years of age. Analysis showed a significant correlation between the different…

  10. Hereditary disease discovery from a clinical data warehouse Hong Yu, George Hripcsak, MD

    E-print Network

    Yu, Hong

    Hereditary disease discovery from a clinical data warehouse Hong Yu, George Hripcsak, MD Department of Medical Informatics, Columbia University Introduction: Hereditary disease discovery and pattern for hereditary disease and pattern discovery without obtaining family health history. Background and Rationale

  11. A painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat produced by the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Polomano, R C; Mannes, A J; Clark, U S; Bennett, G J

    2001-12-01

    Paclitaxel, an effective anti-neoplastic agent in the treatment of solid tumors, produces a dose-limiting painful peripheral neuropathy in a clinically significant number of cancer patients. Prior work has demonstrated paclitaxel-induced neurodegeneration and sensory loss in laboratory rodents. We describe here an experimental paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy. Adult male rats were given four intraperitoneal injections on alternate days of vehicle or 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg of paclitaxel (Taxol). Behavioral tests for pain using mechanical and thermal stimuli applied to the tail and hind paws, and tests for motor performance, were taken before, during and after dosing for 22-35 days. All three doses of paclitaxel caused heat-hyperalgesia, mechano-allodynia, mechano-hyperalgesia, and cold-allodynia, but had no effect on motor performance. Neuropathic pain began within days and lasted for several weeks. We did not detect any dose-response relationship. Tests at the distal, mid, and proximal tail failed to show evidence of a length-dependent neuropathy. Vehicle control injections had no effect on any measure. No significant systemic toxicities were noted in the paclitaxel-treated animals. Light-microscopic inspection of the sciatic nerve (mid-thigh level), L4-L5 dorsal root ganglia, and dorsal and ventral roots, and the gray and white matter of the L4-L5 spinal cord, showed no structural abnormalities. Electron microscopic examination of the sciatic nerve (mid-thigh level) and the L4-L5 dorsal root ganglia and dorsal horns demonstrated no degeneration of myelinated and unmyelinated axons in the sciatic nerve and roots, but revealed endoneurial edema. This model may be useful in understanding a significant source of pain in cancer patients, and in finding ways to avoid the neurotoxicity that limits paclitaxel therapy. PMID:11731066

  12. Pharmacological, behavioural and mechanistic analysis of HIV-1 gp120 induced painful neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Victoria C.J.; Blackbeard, Julie; Pheby, Timothy; Segerdahl, Andrew R.; Davies, Meirion; Hasnie, Fauzia; Hall, Susan; McMahon, Stephen B.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2007-01-01

    A painful neuropathy is frequently observed in people living with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The HIV coat protein, glycoprotein 120 (gp120), implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders associated with HIV, is capable of initiating neurotoxic cascades via an interaction with the CXCR4 and/or CCR5 chemokine receptors, which may underlie the pathogenesis of HIV-associated peripheral neuropathic pain. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying HIV-induced painful peripheral neuropathy, we have characterised pathological events in the peripheral and central nervous system following application of HIV-1 gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve. Perineural HIV-1 gp120 treatment induced a persistent mechanical hypersensitivity (44% decrease from baseline), but no alterations in sensitivity to thermal or cold stimuli, and thigmotactic (anxiety-like) behaviour in the open field. The mechanical hypersensitivity was sensitive to systemic treatment with gabapentin, morphine and the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2, but not with amitriptyline. Immunohistochemical studies reveal: decreased intraepidermal nerve fibre density, macrophage infiltration into the peripheral nerve at the site of perineural HIV-1 gp120; changes in sensory neuron phenotype including expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) in 27% of cells, caspase-3 in 25% of cells, neuropeptide Y (NPY) in 12% of cells and galanin in 13% of cells and a spinal gliosis. These novel findings suggest that this model is not only useful for the elucidation of mechanisms underlying HIV-1-related peripheral neuropathy but may prove useful for preclinical assessment of drugs for the treatment of HIV-1 related peripheral neuropathic pain. PMID:17433546

  13. A Novel Prion Disease Associated with Diarrhea and Autonomic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Jon; Caine, Diana; Gallujipali, Dillip; Carswell, Christopher; Hyare, Harpreet; Joiner, Susan; Ayling, Hilary; Lashley, Tammaryn; Linehan, Jacqueline M.; Al-Doujaily, Huda; Sharps, Bernadette; Revesz, Tamas; Sandberg, Malin K.; Reilly, Mary M.; Koltzenburg, Martin; Forbes, Alastair; Rudge, Peter; Brandner, Sebastian; Warren, Jason D.; Wadsworth, Jonathan D.F.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human prion diseases, although variable in clinicopathological phenotype, generally present as neurologic or neuropsychiatric conditions associated with rapid multi-focal central nervous system degeneration that is usually dominated by dementia and cerebellar ataxia. Approximately 15% of cases of recognized prion disease are inherited and associated with coding mutations in the gene encoding prion protein (PRNP). The availability of genetic diagnosis has led to a progressive broadening of the recognized spectrum of disease. METHODS We used longitudinal clinical assessments over a period of 20 years at one hospital combined with genealogical, neuropsychological, neurophysiological, neuroimaging, pathological, molecular genetic, and biochemical studies, as well as studies of animal transmission, to characterize a novel prion disease in a large British kindred. We studied 6 of 11 affected family members in detail, along with autopsy or biopsy samples obtained from 5 family members. RESULTS We identified a PRNP Y163X truncation mutation and describe a distinct and consistent phenotype of chronic diarrhea with autonomic failure and a length-dependent axonal, predominantly sensory, peripheral polyneuropathy with an onset in early adulthood. Cognitive decline and seizures occurred when the patients were in their 40s or 50s. The deposition of prion protein amyloid was seen throughout peripheral organs, including the bowel and peripheral nerves. Neuropathological examination during end-stage disease showed the deposition of prion protein in the form of frequent cortical amyloid plaques, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and tauopathy. A unique pattern of abnormal prion protein fragments was seen in brain tissue. Transmission studies in laboratory mice were negative. CONCLUSIONS Abnormal forms of prion protein that were found in multiple peripheral tissues were associated with diarrhea, autonomic failure, and neuropathy. (Funded by the U.K. Medical Research Council and others.) PMID:24224623

  14. Symptomatology of Peripheral Neuropathy in an African Language

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Asma; Bentley, Alison; Kamerman, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    The terminology used to describe neuropathic pain appears to be conserved across languages, which facilitates the translation of validated neuropathic pain screening tools into other languages. However, this assumption has not been assessed in an African language. Therefore we investigated the terminology used by 54 patients whose native language was isiZulu, a major Bantu language of Africa, when describing their symptomatic HIV-associated sensory neuropathy. Also, because English is a commonly spoken second-language in the region, we assessed these patients’ knowledge and understanding of 21 English terms commonly used to describe neuropathic pain. English translations of the most commonly used isiZulu symptom descriptors included: “hot/burning” (50%), “cramping” (35%), “painful/sore/aching” (32%), “itching” (22%), “numb” (22%), “cold/freezing” (17%), and “stabbing/pricking/pins-and-needles” (13%). Thus, the isiZulu terminology to describe neuropathic pain was very similar to that used in non-African languages. However, knowledge and understanding of English neuropathic pain descriptors by these non-native English speakers was highly variable. For example, knowledge of English terms ranged from>98% (“hot”, “cold/freezing”, “cramping”) to <25% (“pricking”, “radiating”, “throbbing”), and true understanding of English terms ranged from>90% (“hot”, “burning”, “cramping”) to <35% (“tingling”, “jumping”, “shooting”, “radiating”). In conclusion, we show significant similarity in the terms used to describe neuropathic pain in isiZulu compared to non-African languages, thus indicating that translation of existing neuropathic pain screening tools into this, and possibly other Bantu languages, is a viable option. However, the usefulness of English-language screening tools in this non-native English speaking population may be limited. PMID:23691133

  15. The Center for Peripheral Neuropathy Department of Neurology

    E-print Network

    Sherman, S. Murray

    neuropathy is one of many nervous system disorders, and discoveries related to one disease often apply, Departments of Pathology and Neurology #12;2 Center for Peripheral Neuropathy The peripheral nervous system transmits vital communications between the brain, spinal cord, and all other parts of the body. The disorder

  16. Disruptive SCYL1 Mutations Underlie a Syndrome Characterized by Recurrent Episodes of Liver Failure, Peripheral Neuropathy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Rutledge, S Lane; Schüle, Rebecca; Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Züchner, Stephan; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bittner, Reginald E

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary ataxias comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by clinically variable cerebellar dysfunction and accompanied by involvement of other organ systems. The molecular underpinnings for many of these diseases are widely unknown. Previously, we discovered the disruption of Scyl1 as the molecular basis of the mouse mutant mdf, which is affected by neurogenic muscular atrophy, progressive gait ataxia with tremor, cerebellar vermis atrophy, and optic-nerve thinning. Here, we report on three human individuals, from two unrelated families, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute liver failure in early infancy and are affected by cerebellar vermis atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. By whole-exome sequencing, compound-heterozygous mutations within SCYL1 were identified in all affected individuals. We further show that in SCYL1-deficient human fibroblasts, the Golgi apparatus is massively enlarged, which is in line with the concept that SCYL1 regulates Golgi integrity. Thus, our findings define SCYL1 mutations as the genetic cause of a human hepatocerebellar neuropathy syndrome. PMID:26581903

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy: a series of unfortunate metabolic events.

    PubMed

    Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a dying back neurodegenerative disease of the peripheral nervous system where mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an etiological factor. Diabetes (type 1 or type 2) invokes an elevation of intracellular glucose concentration simultaneously with impaired growth factor support by insulin, and this dual alteration triggers a maladaptation in metabolism of adult sensory neurons. The energy sensing pathway comprising the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/sirtuin (SIRT)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? coactivator ? (PGC-1?) signaling axis is the target of these damaging changes in nutrient levels, e.g., induction of nutrient stress, and loss of insulin-dependent growth factor support and instigates an aberrant metabolic phenotype characterized by a suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and shift to anaerobic glycolysis. There is discussion of how this loss of mitochondrial function and transition to overreliance on glycolysis contributes to the diminishment of collateral sprouting and axon regeneration in diabetic neuropathy in the context of the highly energy-consuming nerve growth cone. PMID:26370700

  18. Patterns and severity of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ellen M. Lavoie; Li, Lang; Chiang, ChienWei; Thomas, Karin; Hutchinson, Raymond J.; Wells, Elizabeth M.; Ho, Richard H.; Skiles, Jodi; Chakraborty, Arindom; Bridges, Celia M.; Renbarger, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Vincristine, a critical component of combination chemotherapy treatment for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), can lead to vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN). Longitudinal VIPN assessments were obtained over 12 months from newly diagnosed children with ALL (N = 128) aged 1–18 years who received vincristine at one of four academic children’s hospitals. VIPN assessments were obtained using the Total Neuropathy Score-Pediatric Vincristine (TNS©-PV), National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE©), Balis© grading scale, and Pediatric Neuropathic Pain Scale©–Five (PNPS©-5). Of children who provided a full TNS©-PV score, 85/109 (78%) developed VIPN (TNS©-PV ?4). Mean TNS©-PV, grading scale, and pain scores were low. CTCAE©-derived grades 3 and 4 sensory and motor VIPN occurred in 1.6%/0%, and 1.9%/0% of subjects, respectively. VIPN did not resolve in months 8–12 despite decreasing dose density. VIPN was worse in older children. Partition cluster analysis revealed 2–3 patient clusters; one cluster (n = 14) experienced severe VIPN. In this population, VIPN occurs more commonly than previous research suggests, persists throughout the first year of treatment, and can be severe. PMID:25977177

  19. Peripheral neuropathy in metachromatic leucodystrophy. A study of 40 cases from south India

    PubMed Central

    Bindu, P; Mahadevan, A; Taly, A; Christopher, R; Gayathri, N; Shankar, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of literature from India on metachromatic leucodystrophy (MLD), a rare metabolic disorder of childhood resulting from aryl sulfatase A (ASA) deficiency. Patients/Methods: Case records of histopathologically verified cases of MLD, evaluated over a period of 12 years at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India, were reviewed. Results: The late infantile group (36) manifested with regression of milestones (all), delayed mile stones (14), gait abnormalities (14), and seizures (11). Despite spasticity (29), there was hypo/areflexia in 25 patients. Optic atrophy (six) was rare. Consanguinity was noted in 25 children and four had a history of similar illness in siblings. Behavioural problems dominated in the juvenile group (four), but associated cognitive decline and hyporeflexia provided a clue to the diagnosis. Low serum ASA (seven of 20), raised cerebrospinal fluid protein (five of 12), and urinary metachromatic granules (two of 32) were infrequent. Electrophysiological evidence of severe demyelinating and length dependent sensory motor neuropathy was observed in all, even in the presence of hyper-reflexia. In addition to metachromatic dysmyelinating neuropathy in all patients, sural nerve biopsy in 20 patients revealed orthochromatic deposits within perivascular macrophages, particularly among those patients with normal ASA values (11 of 14), suggesting the accumulation of other glycosphingolipids. Conclusions: This study produced some noteworthy observations: the high degree of consanguinity associated with MLD in India, the existence of MLD with normal serum concentrations of ASA, the deposition of orthochromatic lipids, and electrophysiological evidence of a partial conduction block. PMID:16291896

  20. Gene replacement therapy for hereditary emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnick, A.

    1989-11-10

    Investigators suggest that human trials of gene therapy to correct a genetic disorder that usually leads to emphysema early in life may be only a few years away. Speaking at the American Lung Association's Second Annual Science Writers' Forum, R. G. Crystal, chief of the Pulmonary Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute offered an explanation of how hereditary emphysema may be more amenable to genetic therapy than other such diseases. In persons who lack a functioning gene for alpha{sup 1}-antitrypsin, a proteolytic enzyme, neutrophil elastase, attacks the walls of the lungs' alveoli, eventually leading to progressive pulmonary function loss. Two animal models of gene insertion are described.

  1. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia and severe respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Halawa, Mahmoud; Abu-Hasan, Mutasim N.; ElMallah, Mai K.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucoepithelial disruption of the skin, hair and mucous membranes. It results from defective gap junction formation and leads to non-scarring alopecia, mucosal erythema, perineal erythematous intertrigo, involvement of the conjunctival mucosa, and pulmonary disease. We present a case of severe respiratory distress in an initially healthy full term infant born to a mother with HMD. This infant later developed signs and symptoms of HMD. A high index of suspicion for pulmonary infection with atypical organism is essential in infants with a family history of HMD who present with respiratory distress. PMID:26236594

  2. The role of miR-146a in dorsal root ganglia neurons of experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chopp, M; Szalad, A; Zhang, Y; Wang, X; Zhang, R L; Liu, X S; Jia, L; Zhang, Z G

    2014-02-14

    Sensory neurons mediate diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Using a mouse model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (BKS.Cg-m+/+Lepr(db)/J (db/db) mice) and cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, the present study showed that hyperglycemia downregulated miR-146a expression and elevated interleukin-1 receptor-activated kinase (IRAK1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) levels in DRG neurons. In vitro, elevation of miR-146a by miR-146a mimics in DRG neurons increased neuronal survival under high-glucose conditions. Downregulation and elevation of miR-146a in DRG neurons, respectively, were inversely related to IRAK1 and TRAF6 levels. Treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, augmented miR-146a expression and decreased levels of IRAK1 and TRAF6 in the DRG neurons. In vitro, blockage of miR-146a in DRG neurons abolished the effect of sildenafil on DRG neuron protection and downregulation of IRAK1 and TRAF6 proteins under hyperglycemia. Our data provide the first evidence showing that miR-146a plays an important role in mediating DRG neuron apoptosis under hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:24316060

  3. Therapeutic Benefit of Extended Thymosin ?4 Treatment Is Independent of Blood Glucose Level in Mice with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chopp, Michael; Jia, Longfei; Lu, Xuerong; Szalad, Alexandra; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, RuiLan; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. To investigated the efficacy and safety of the extended treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with thymosin ?4 (T?4), male diabetic mice (db/db) at the age of 24 weeks were treated with T?4 or saline for 16 consecutive weeks. Treatment of diabetic mice with T?4 significantly improved motor (MCV) and sensory (SCV) conduction velocity in the sciatic nerve and the thermal and mechanical latency. However, T?4 treatment did not significantly alter blood glucose levels. Treatment with T?4 significantly increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Furthermore, T?4 counteracted the diabetes-induced axon diameter and myelin thickness reductions and the g-ratio increase in sciatic nerve. In vitro, compared with dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons derived from nondiabetic mice, DRG neurons derived from diabetic mice exhibited significantly decreased neurite outgrowth, whereas T?4 promoted neurite growth in these diabetic DRG neurons. Blockage of the Ang1/Tie2 signaling pathway with a neutralized antibody against Tie2 abolished T?4-increased neurite outgrowth. Our data demonstrate that extended T?4 treatment ameliorates diabetic-induced axonal degeneration and demyelination, which likely contribute to therapeutic effect of T?4 on diabetic neuropathy. The Ang1/Tie2 pathway may mediate T?4-induced axonal remodeling. PMID:25945352

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Vitamin Deficiency, Toxins, and Medications

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Peripheral neuropathies secondary to vitamin deficiencies, medications, or toxins are frequently considered but can be difficult to definitively diagnose. Accurate diagnosis is important since these conditions are often treatable and preventable. This article reviews the key features of different types of neuropathies caused by these etiologies and provides a comprehensive list of specific agents that must be kept in mind. Recent Findings: While most agents that cause peripheral neuropathy have been known for years, newly developed medications that cause peripheral neuropathy are discussed. Summary: Peripheral nerves are susceptible to damage by a wide array of toxins, medications, and vitamin deficiencies. It is important to consider these etiologies when approaching patients with a variety of neuropathic presentations; additionally, etiologic clues may be provided by other systemic symptoms. While length-dependent sensorimotor axonal peripheral neuropathy is the most common presentation, several examples present in a subacute severe fashion, mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. PMID:25299283

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pain in Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hovaguimian, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Small fiber neuropathy manifests in a variety of different diseases and often results in symptoms of burning pain, shooting pain, allodynia, and hyperesthesia. Diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy is determined primarily by the history and physical exam, but functional neurophysiologic testing and skin biopsy evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fiber density can provide diagnostic confirmation. Management of small fiber neuropathy depends on the underlying etiology with concurrent treatment of associated neuropathic pain. A variety of recent guidelines propose the use of antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, topical therapies, and nonpharmacologic treatments as part of the overall management of neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, little data about the treatment of pain specifically in small fiber neuropathy exist because most studies combine mixed neuropathic pain syndromes in the analysis. Additional studies targeting the treatment of pain in small fiber neuropathy are needed to guide decision making. PMID:21286866

  6. Taxane induced neuropathy in patients affected by breast cancer: Literature review.

    PubMed

    De Iuliis, Francesca; Taglieri, Ludovica; Salerno, Gerardo; Lanza, Rosina; Scarpa, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Taxane induced neuropathy (TIN) is the most limiting side effect of taxane based chemotherapy, relative to the majority of breast cancer patients undergoing therapy with both docetaxel and paclitaxel. The symptoms begin symmetrically from the toes, because the tips of the longest nerves are affected for first. The patients report sensory symptoms such as paresthesia, dysesthesia, numbness, electric shock-like sensation, motor impairment and neuropathic pain. There is a great inter-individual variability among breast cancer women treated with taxanes, in fact 20-30% of them don't develop neurotoxicity. Actually, there is no standard therapy for TIN, although many medications, antioxidants and natural substances have been tested in vitro and in vivo. We will summarize all most recent literature data on TIN prevention and treatment, in order to reach an improvement in TIN management. Further studies are needed to evaluate new therapies that restore neuronal function and improve life quality of patients. PMID:26004917

  7. Median palmar digital neuropathy in a cheerleader.

    PubMed

    Shields, R W; Jacobs, I B

    1986-11-01

    Median palmar digital neuropathy developed in a 16-year-old girl as a result of chronic trauma to the palm during cheerleading activities. The clinical findings on examination, which included paresthesias in the distribution of a palmar digital nerve and exacerbation of symptoms with compression of the palm, were consistent with this diagnosis. Nerve conduction studies documented a lesion of the median palmar digital nerve. Avoidance of cheerleading activities resulted in nearly total resolution of the symptoms. Awareness of this entity and the value of nerve conduction studies in establishing the diagnosis may avoid confusion and facilitate correct diagnosis and management. PMID:3778181

  8. Acute Toxic Neuropathy Mimicking Guillain Barre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Muhammed Jasim Abdul; Fernandez, Shirley Joan; Menon, Murali Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Case: A 30 year old male presented with numbness of palms and soles followed by weakness of upper limbs and lower limbs of 5 days duration, which was ascending and progressive. Three months back he was treated for oral and genital ulcers with oral steroids. His ulcers improved and shifted to indigenous medication. His clinical examination showed polyneuropathy. CSF study did not show albuminocytological dissociation. Nerve conduction study showed demyelinating polyneuropathy. His blood samples and the ayurvedic drug samples were sent for toxicological analysis. Inference: Acute toxic neuropathy - Arsenic PMID:25811007

  9. Optic neuropathy in superficial intracranial siderosis.

    PubMed

    Painter, Sally L; Mathew, Liberty; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Esiri, Margaret M; Elston, John S

    2010-12-01

    Superficial intracranial siderosis is a degenerative condition secondary to recurrent occult subarachnoid hemorrhage. Progressive sensorineural deafness, cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal signs are well-documented clinical manifestations, but optic neuropathy is not a recognized feature. We describe 2 patients with clinical and electrophysiological evidence of optic nerve/chiasm dysfunction and MRI signal abnormalities consistent with hemosiderin staining of the anterior visual pathway. In a third case, neuropathological examination of the optic chiasm showed demyelination attributed to hemosiderin deposition. We suggest that anterior visual pathway damage may be underrecognized in this condition. PMID:21107121

  10. Molecular basis of a progressive juvenile-onset hereditary cataract

    E-print Network

    Benedek, George B.

    Molecular basis of a progressive juvenile-onset hereditary cataract Ajay Pande*, Jayanti Pande, December 17, 1999 In a recent paper, patients with a progressive juvenile-onset hereditary cataract have to cataract. We have expressed recombinant wild-type human D crystallin (HGD) and its Arg-14 to Cys mutant (R

  11. Carrier frequency of the GJB2 mutations that cause hereditary hearing loss in the Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Mirei; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Shimizu, Seiko; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Suzuki, Koji; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Nishio, Shinya; Kosugi, Shinji; Usami, Shin-ichi; Ito, Juichi; Kitajiri, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Hearing impairment is one of the most common sensory disorders that affect ~1 in 1000 children, and half of them are considered to be hereditary. Information about the carrier frequencies of mutations that underlie autosomal recessive disorders is indispensable for accurate genetic counseling to predict the probability of patients' children's disease. However, there have been few reports specific to the Japanese population. GJB2 mutations are reported to be the most frequent cause of hereditary hearing loss, and the mutation spectrum and frequency of GJB2 mutations were reported to vary among different ethnic groups. In this study, we investigated the carrier frequency of GJB2 mutations and the mutation spectrum in 509 individuals randomly selected from the general Japanese population. We show that the carrier frequencies of the two most common pathogenic mutations are 1.57% (8/509) for c.235delC and 1.77% (9/509) for p.Val37Ile. In addition to these mutations, we found two pathogenic variants (p.[Gly45Glu;Tyr136*] and p.Arg143Trp), and the total carrier frequency was estimated to be around 3.73% (19/509). We also detected six unclassified variants, including two novel variants (p.Cys60Tyr and p.Phe106Leu), with the former predicted to be pathogenic. These findings will provide indispensable information for genetic counseling in the Japanese population. PMID:26178431

  12. Carrier frequency of the GJB2 mutations that cause hereditary hearing loss in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Mirei; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Shimizu, Seiko; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Suzuki, Koji; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Nishio, Shinya; Kosugi, Shinji; Usami, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Juichi; Kitajiri, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Hearing impairment is one of the most common sensory disorders that affect ~1 in 1000 children, and half of them are considered to be hereditary. Information about the carrier frequencies of mutations that underlie autosomal recessive disorders is indispensable for accurate genetic counseling to predict the probability of patients' children's disease. However, there have been few reports specific to the Japanese population. GJB2 mutations are reported to be the most frequent cause of hereditary hearing loss, and the mutation spectrum and frequency of GJB2 mutations were reported to vary among different ethnic groups. In this study, we investigated the carrier frequency of GJB2 mutations and the mutation spectrum in 509 individuals randomly selected from the general Japanese population. We show that the carrier frequencies of the two most common pathogenic mutations are 1.57% (8/509) for c.235delC and 1.77% (9/509) for p.Val37Ile. In addition to these mutations, we found two pathogenic variants (p.[Gly45Glu;Tyr136*] and p.Arg143Trp), and the total carrier frequency was estimated to be around 3.73% (19/509). We also detected six unclassified variants, including two novel variants (p.Cys60Tyr and p.Phe106Leu), with the former predicted to be pathogenic. These findings will provide indispensable information for genetic counseling in the Japanese population. PMID:26178431

  13. Genetics of Hereditary Colon, Uterine and Ovarian Cancer The majority of cancer cases are not attributable to hereditary causes. However,

    E-print Network

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    (on chromosome 2), and PMS2 (on chromosome 7). Lynch syndrome is passed down in families to cause a hereditary colon cancer syndrome called Lynch syndrome (also called Hereditary Non in Lynch syndrome, including MLH1 (on chromosome 3), MSH2 (on chromosome 2), MSH6 (on chromosome 2), EPCAM

  14. Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy: a reversible case.

    PubMed

    Ghamdi, M; Armstrong, D L; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    A boy was born at 39 weeks gestation with severe weakness and hypotonia, fractured femurs, poor suck and swallow, and absent deep tendon reflexes. Electrodiagnostic studies revealed marked slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities and normal muscle electrical activity with no evidence of acute denervation. Muscle biopsy showed mild type 2 fiber predominance, and sural nerve biopsy revealed large axons without myelin, and axons with insufficient amount of myelin for their diameter. There was no evidence of inflammation or demyelination. Gradual clinical improvement in tone and strength occurred in a cephalocaudal direction. By 4 months, motor nerve conduction velocities and clinical examination were normal apart from absent deep tendon reflexes. On review at 19 months, motor development and neurological examination were completely normal. Pathogenesis of this reversible pathologically documented case of congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy is unclear. No evidence was found for an inflammatory, toxic, metabolic, or demyelinating cause. Abnormal expression of a developmental gene, as in reversible cytochrome oxidase deficiency, may be a cause of this neuropathy. PMID:9044408

  15. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  16. Connexins, gap junctions and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kleopa, Kleopas A; Sargiannidou, Irene

    2015-06-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) have emerged as an important molecular component of peripheral myelinated fibers following the discovery of mutations affecting the GJ protein connexin32 (Cx32) in patients with the X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT1X). CMT1X is the second most common CMT form and is caused by over 400 different mutations in the GJB1 gene encoding Cx32. In peripheral nerves, Cx32 is expressed by Schwann cells and forms reflexive GJs through non-compact myelin areas, which allow the diffusion of ions and small molecules including second messengers across apposed cell membranes connecting directly the Schwann cell perinuclear cytoplasm with the adaxonal cell compartment inside the myelin sheath. GJs formed by Cx32 play an important role in the homeostasis of myelinated axons. Patients with CMT1X typically present with a progressive peripheral neuropathy characterized by mixed demyelinating and axonal features electrophysiologically and pathologically, which may be accompanied by transient or chronic CNS myelin dysfunction. Both in vitro and in vivo models of the disease indicate that most Cx32 mutations cause loss of function and inability of the mutant Cx32 to form functional GJs. Increased understanding of CMT1X pathogenesis will lead to the development of effective therapies for this currently incurable disease. PMID:25449862

  17. Examining Sensory Quadrants in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Janet K.; Garver, Carolyn R.; Carmody, Thomas; Andrews, Alonzo A.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Mehta, Jyutika A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine sensory quadrants in autism based on Dunn's Theory of Sensory Processing. The data for this study was collected as part of a cross-sectional study that examined sensory processing (using the Sensory Profile) in 103 persons with autism, 3-43 years of age, compared to 103 age- and gender-matched community…

  18. Comparison of measures of large-fiber nerve function in patients with chronic nerve compression and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Radoiu, Horatio; Rosson, Gedge D; Andonian, Eugenia; Senatore, John; Dellon, A Lee

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of large-fiber peripheral nerve function is critical to the assessment of patients with nerve injury, chronic nerve compression, and neuropathy. We evaluated the Semmes-Weinstein nylon monofilament (SWM), vibrometry, and the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device (PSSD) (Sensory Management Services LLC, Baltimore, Maryland) prospectively on the plantar surface of the hallux, bilaterally, in 35 patients with peripheral nerve problems related to nerve compression and neuropathy. Five patients had carpal tunnel syndrome and, therefore, had normal hallux measurements. Normative data for the SWM were obtained for 59 age-stratified people. A moderately strong Pearson product moment correlation was found for large-fiber nerve function between the PSSD and the SWM and between the PSSD and vibrometry. However, when these functions were compared with normative values for each neurosensory testing technique, sensitivity for detecting the presence of a peripheral nerve problem was 100% for the PSSD, 63% for the SWM, and 30% for vibrometry. False-positive test results were obtained for the hallux in 0% of normal feet when the PSSD was used, in 20% when vibrometry was used, and in 30% when the SWM was used as the test instrument. The PSSD was the most sensitive in identifying the presence of a large-fiber peripheral nerve problem in patients with pain or paresthesia in the foot related to the posterior tibial nerve. PMID:16166460

  19. Subtle neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive changes in hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis).

    PubMed

    Kantanen, Mari; Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Salonen, Oili; Kaipainen, Markku; Hokkanen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis) is an autosomal dominant form of systemic amyloidosis caused by a c.640G>A or c.640G>T mutation in the gene coding for gelsolin. Principal clinical manifestations include corneal lattice dystrophy, cranial neuropathy and cutis laxa with vascular fragility. Signs of minor CNS involvement have also been observed, possibly related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). To investigate further if AGel amyloidosis carries a risk for a specific neuropsychological or psychiatric symptomatology we studied 35 AGel patients and 29 control subjects. Neuropsychological tests showed abnormalities in visuocontructional and -spatial performance in AGel patients, also some indication of problems in processing efficacy was found. At psychiatric evaluation the patient group showed more psychiatric symptomatology, mainly depression. In brain MRI, available in 16 patients and 14 controls, we found microhemorrhages or microcalcifications only in the patient group, although the number of findings was small. Our study shows that AGel amyloidosis can be associated with visuoconstructional problems and depression, but severe neuropsychiatric involvement is not characteristic. The gelsolin mutation may even induce cerebrovascular fragility, but further epidemiological and histopathological as well as longitudinal follow-up studies are needed to clarify gelsolin-related vascular pathology and its clinical consequences. PMID:25097823

  20. A DNA test for Indiana/Swiss hereditary amyloidosis (FAP II).

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, M R; Conneally, P M; Benson, M D

    1988-01-01

    Autosomal dominant amyloidosis of the Indiana/Swiss type is a late-onset disorder characterized by carpal tunnel syndrome, progressive peripheral neuropathy, vitreous deposits, and cardiomyopathy. This disorder was originally described in a large Indiana family of Swiss descent and is also known as familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) type II. In the Indiana family, the genetic basis of the disease is a variant of plasma prealbumin (transthyretin), which has a serine-for-isoleucine substitution at amino acid 84 of the 127-residue prealbumin molecule. We predicted that the corresponding mutation in the prealbumin gene consisted of a T-to-G change in codon 84 (which created an AluI recognition site) and then demonstrated the extra AluI site in the DNA of patients by Southern blot analysis with a genomic prealbumin probe. This verifies the protein findings at the DNA level and provides a direct, reliable DNA test for the Ser-84 prealbumin gene associated with Indiana/Swiss hereditary amyloidosis. Images Figure 3 PMID:2840822

  1. Subtle neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive changes in hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis)

    PubMed Central

    Kiuru-Enari, Sari; Salonen, Oili; Kaipainen, Markku; Hokkanen, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis) is an autosomal dominant form of systemic amyloidosis caused by a c.640G>A or c.640G>T mutation in the gene coding for gelsolin. Principal clinical manifestations include corneal lattice dystrophy, cranial neuropathy and cutis laxa with vascular fragility. Signs of minor CNS involvement have also been observed, possibly related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). To investigate further if AGel amyloidosis carries a risk for a specific neuropsychological or psychiatric symptomatology we studied 35 AGel patients and 29 control subjects. Neuropsychological tests showed abnormalities in visuocontructional and -spatial performance in AGel patients, also some indication of problems in processing efficacy was found. At psychiatric evaluation the patient group showed more psychiatric symptomatology, mainly depression. In brain MRI, available in 16 patients and 14 controls, we found microhemorrhages or microcalcifications only in the patient group, although the number of findings was small. Our study shows that AGel amyloidosis can be associated with visuoconstructional problems and depression, but severe neuropsychiatric involvement is not characteristic. The gelsolin mutation may even induce cerebrovascular fragility, but further epidemiological and histopathological as well as longitudinal follow-up studies are needed to clarify gelsolin-related vascular pathology and its clinical consequences. PMID:25097823

  2. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  3. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: Current status and progress.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Jamie R; Morrison, Gladys; Dolan, M Eileen; Fleming, Gini F

    2016-01-01

    As there are increasing numbers of cancer survivors, more attention is being paid to the long term unwanted effects patients may experience as a result of their treatment and the impact these side effects can have on their quality of life. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is one of the most common long-term toxicities from chemotherapy. In this review we will briefly review the clinical presentation, evaluation and management of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, with a focus on CIPN related to platinum and taxane agents. We will then discuss current clinical models of peripheral neuropathy and ongoing research to better understand CIPN and develop potential treatment options. PMID:26556766

  4. Necessity of Distinguishing Verrucous Carcinoma From Verrucous Skin Lesion Overlaying Residual Skin Staples in an Area of Sensory Loss: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tokiyoshi, Takahiro; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Terashi, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy is a condition usually induced by chronic mechanical stimulation of the feet of patients with diabetic neuropathy and usually occurs at weight-bearing sites. We here present a rare case involving a man with verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy at an unusual, non–weight-bearing site. Methods: A 58-year-old man with diabetic neuropathy presented with a verrucous skin lesion overlaying residual skin staples and an amputation stump of the second metatarsal bone on the dorsal foot. Results: The biopsy findings were inconclusive and suggested the necessity of distinguishing the lesion from verrucous carcinoma. The lesion was resected, and the residual skin staples were simultaneously removed. Investigation of the excisional biopsy confirmed our diagnosis of verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy. Conclusions: Verrucous skin lesions on the feet in diabetic neuropathy is often difficult to distinguish from verrucous carcinoma; in this case, the unusual location of the lesion could be attributed not only to sensory loss but also to the presence of an amputation stump and the persistence of the residual skin staples. PMID:26171095

  5. Lymphangiosarcoma in chronic hereditary oedema (Milroy's disease).

    PubMed

    Broström, L A; Nilsonne, U; Kronberg, M; Söderberg, G

    1989-01-01

    Lymphangiosarcoma arising in chronic lymphoedema is extremely rare. In a reference population of about four million people, during a thirty year period (1957-1987), only four patients were treated for such a tumour. The neoplasm is almost exclusively seen in elderly patients after mastectomy but in two of our patients, reported in this paper, it arose in chronic hereditary oedema (Milroy's disease). In both these patients there was a considerable treatment delay because of wrong diagnosis. The tumour extent was difficult to assess macroscopically and ablative surgery had to be a disarticulation of the involved extremity. Macular or papular purple lesions in a lymphoedematous extremity should be a manifestation of this aggressive neoplasm. PMID:2624407

  6. Pulmonary hypertension in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Vorselaars, Veronique MM; Velthuis, Sebastiaan; Snijder, Repke J; Vos, Jan Albert; Mager, Johannes J; Post, Martijn C

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterised by vascular malformations in predominantly the brain, liver and lungs. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is increasingly recognised as a severe complication of HHT. PH may be categorised into two distinct types in patients with HHT. Post-capillary PH most often results from a high pulmonary blood flow that accompanies the high cardiac output state associated with liver arteriovenous malformations. Less frequently, the HHT-related gene mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 appear to predispose patients with HHT to develop pre-capillary pulmonary arterial hypertension. Differentiation between both forms of PH by right heart catheterisation is essential, since both entities are associated with severe morbidity and mortality with different treatment options. Therefore all HHT patients should be referred to an HHT centre. PMID:26015855

  7. [Hereditary angioedema: treatment and educational therapeutic program].

    PubMed

    Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a chronic disease with unpredictable and severe acute attacks that are potentially life threatening. The treatment of HAE has two main objectives: treat acute attacks and limit their occurrence in the short term and long term. The acute treatment should be administered as soon as possible for better efficiency and patient safety. Self-administration should be encouraged for greater patient autonomy and safety (reducing delay to receive treatment injection). Long-term prophylaxis treatments should be set up to limit acute attacks occurrences and finally improve patients' quality of life and safety. Short-term prophylaxis treatments are required and should be thoroughly applied in case of exposure to known potential triggers (surgery, dental care…). CREAK protocols are available. The HAE National Educational Therapeutic Program "Educreak" is in place to allow the patient and his close family or partners to acquire skills for greater autonomy in day to day disease management. PMID:25499251

  8. The histopathology of PRSS1 hereditary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Aatur D; Pai, Reetesh K; Kant, Jeffrey A; Bartholow, Tanner L; Zeh, Herbert J; Lee, Kenneth K; Wijkstrom, Martin; Yadav, Dhiraj; Bottino, Rita; Brand, Randall E; Chennat, Jennifer S; Lowe, Mark E; Papachristou, Georgios I; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C; Humar, Abhinav

    2014-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disorder with 80% penetrance and variable expressivity. The vast majority of cases have been linked to mutations within the cationic trypsinogen gene, also referred to as serine protease 1 (PRSS1). Other than inheritance, PRSS1 pancreatitis has been considered clinically and pathologically indistinguishable from other etiologies of chronic pancreatitis. However, to date, the histologic findings of PRSS1 pancreatitis have not been well described. We, therefore, collected pancreatic specimens from 10 PRSS1 patients of various ages and examined their clinicopathologic features. Patients at the time of resection ranged in age from 9 to 66 years (median, 29 y), with a slight female predominance (60%). All patients reported a history of intermittent abdominal pain, with an age of onset ranging from infancy to 21 years of age. Examination of the gross and microscopic findings suggested a sequential pattern of changes with increasing patient age. In pediatric patients (n=4), although in most cases the pancreas was grossly normal, there was microscopic variation in lobular size and shape. Although the central portions of the pancreas displayed parenchymal loss accompanied by loose perilobular and interlobular fibrosis, the periphery was remarkable for replacement by mature adipose tissue. These changes were more developed in younger adults (n=2), in whom fatty replacement seemed to extend from the periphery to the central portions of the pancreas. With older patients (n=4), the pancreas showed marked atrophy and extensive replacement by mature adipose tissue with scattered islets of Langerhans and rare acinar epithelium concentrated near the main pancreatic duct. In summary, PRSS1 hereditary pancreatitis is characterized by progressive lipomatous atrophy of the pancreas. PMID:24525505

  9. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  10. Vasculitic neuropathy following exposure to minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, John M.; Dyck, P. James B.; Brand, Patricio; Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat; Dyck, Peter J.; Engelstad, JaNean K.; Goodman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report 3 patients with minocycline-induced autoimmunity resulting in peripheral nerve vasculitis. Methods: We report 3 patients who, during minocycline treatment for acne vulgaris, developed subacute onset of pain and weakness caused by vasculitis in single and multiple mononeuropathy patterns. Results: Each patient underwent either a nerve or muscle biopsy that confirmed vasculitis. One patient additionally developed systemic symptoms (including fever, fatigue, and night sweats) and another had a posterior circulation stroke. Symptoms developed with either early or prolonged use of minocycline. Despite withdrawal of minocycline, patients needed long-term immunotherapy to gain neurologic improvement. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the typical neuropathy associated with minocycline use is painful single or multiple mononeuropathy due to peripheral nerve vasculitis, which may also be accompanied by presumed CNS vasculitis (presenting as stroke). PMID:26601119

  11. Endoneurial Microvascular Pathology in Feline Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Jeannelyn S.; Nelson, Richard N.; Sturges, B.K.; Vernau, Karen M.; Williams, D. Collette; LeCouteur, Richard A.; Shelton, G. Diane; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Endoneurial capillaries in nerve biopsies from 12 adult diabetic cats with varying degrees of neurological dysfunction were examined for evidence of microvascular pathology and compared to nerves obtained at autopsy from 7 adult non-diabetic cats without clinical evidence of neurological dysfunction. As reported previously (Mizisin et al., 2007), the diabetic cats had elevated glycosylated hemoglobin and serum fructosamine levels, decreased motor nerve conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), and markedly decreased myelinated nerve fiber densities. Compared to non-diabetic cats, there was a non-significant 26% increase in capillary density and a significant (P<0.009) 45% increase in capillary size in diabetic cats. Capillary luminal size was also significantly (P<0.001) increased, while an index of vasoconstriction was significantly decreased (P<0.001) in diabetic cats compared to non-diabetic controls. No differences in endothelial cell size, endothelial cell number or pericyte size were detected between non-diabetic and diabetic cats. In diabetic cats, basement membrane thickening, seen as a reduplication of the basal lamina, was significantly (P<0.0002) increased by 73% compared to non-diabetic controls. Regression analysis of either myelinated nerve fiber density or CMAP amplitude against basement membrane size demonstrated a negative correlation with significant slopes (P<0.03 and P<0.04, respectively). These data demonstrate that myelinated nerve fiber injury in feline diabetic neuropathy is associated with microvascular pathology and that some of these changes parallel those documented in experimental rodent and human diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18207200

  12. Antioxidant Strategies in the Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oyenihi, Ayodeji Babatunde; Ayeleso, Ademola Olabode; Masola, Bubuya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycaemia (an abnormally high glucose concentration in the blood) resulting from defects in insulin secretion/action, or both, is the major hallmark of diabetes in which it is known to be involved in the progression of the condition to different complications that include diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy (diabetes-induced nerve damage) is the most common diabetic complication and can be devastating because it can lead to disability. There is an increasing body of evidence associating diabetic neuropathy with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress results from the production of oxygen free radicals in the body in excess of its ability to eliminate them by antioxidant activity. Antioxidants have different mechanisms and sites of actions by which they exert their biochemical effects and ameliorate nerve dysfunction in diabetes by acting directly against oxidative damage. This review will examine different strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy which rely on exogenous antioxidants. PMID:25821809

  13. EFFECT OF AEROBIC EXERCISE INTERVENTION ON PAINFUL DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    E-print Network

    Yoo, Min

    2013-05-31

    Background: Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes. While the beneficial effect of exercise on diabetes has been well established, its effect specifically on painful DPN has not been thoroughly explored...

  14. Elevated Vibration Perception Thresholds in CIDP Patients Indicate More Severe Neuropathy and Lower Treatment Response Rates

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alon; Albulaihe, Hana; Alabdali, Majed; Qrimli, Mohammad; Breiner, Ari; Barnett, Carolina; Katzberg, Hans D.; Lovblom, Leif E.; Perkins, Bruce A.; Bril, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vibration perception threshold (VPT) examination using a neurothesiometer provides objective, sensitive and specific information, and has been utilized mainly in patients with diabetic polyneropathy. Objectives Explore the utility of VPT examination in CIDP patients. Methods CIDP subjects attending the Neuromuscular clinic between 01/2013 and 12/2014 were evaluated. Demographic data, clinical history, physical examination, VPT values, and electrophysiologic data from their charts were extracted. Results 70 charts were reviewed. 55 CIDP patients had elevated VPT, associated with higher frequency of abnormal sensory testing for various modalities (92.7% vs. 46.7%, p<0.0001), lower sensory and motor amplitudes and reduced conduction velocities on nerve conduction studies, and lower treatment response rates (54% vs. 93%, p = 0.01). Conclusion VPT examination is a simple tool, which is a reliable and sensitive measure not only for diabetic neuropathy, but also for CIDP. Moreover, in CIDP, elevated VPT values are also associated with lower treatment response rates. PMID:26545096

  15. Characterization and Treatment of Chemotherapy Neuropathy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Numbness, tingling, and pain in the hands and feet following the administration of chemotherapy (also called chemotherapy-induced neuropathy (CIN)) is a common problem in oncology patients. However, more information is needed on why patients develop neuropathy and how it impacts their mood, ability to function, and their quality of life. In addition, effective treatments for this problem are not available at the present time. This study will be conducted in two parts.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... skeletal muscles) and in heart (cardiac) muscle. Within muscle cells, titin is an essential component of structures called ... autosomal dominant ; cardiac ; cell ; contraction ; gene ; hereditary ; inherited ; muscle cells ; mutation ; protein ; proximal ; respiratory You may find definitions ...

  17. The clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lenworth N.; Krohel, Gregory B.; Thomas, Eric R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. METHODS: Observational cases series and review. RESULTS: Of 55 cases, the median interval for onset of optic neuropathy was four months after initiating amiodarone; 88% occurred within 12 months. Seven (13%) patients were asymptomatic. Twenty-two (40%) patients presented with sudden visual loss, while 26 (47%) had insidious loss of vision. Visual acuity ranged from 20/15 to light perception; 10 (18%) patients had legal blindness with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. Visual field loss was present in 91% of cases. Color vision loss was present in eight (40%) of 20 cases. Optic disc edema was present in 85% of cases, while eight (15%) patients had retrobulbar optic neuropathy, without evidence of disc edema. Optic disc edema resolved over a median time of three months. Five patients had raised intracranial pressure on lumbar puncture. CONCLUSION: We were able to classify amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy into five clinical categories with respect to temporal characteristics and optic nerve appearance: insidious-onset (43%), acute-onset (28%), retrobulbar (13%), increased intracranial pressure (8%), and delayed-progressive onset (8%). Most cases of optic neuropathy commenced within 12 months of initiating amiodarone, with the median onset being four months. Over 10% of patients will have no visual symptoms at the onset. Ophthalmologic examinations within the first 12 months--and particularly within four months of initiating amiodarone--should improve early detection of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. PMID:15586652

  18. Animal Models of Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Environmental Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Deepa B.; Jortner, Bernard S.; Sills, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress in our understanding of pathogeneses and the identification of etiologies of peripheral neuropathy, idiopathic neuropathy remains common. Typically, attention to peripheral neuropathies resulting from exposure to environmental agents is limited relative to more commonly diagnosed causes of peripheral neuropathy (diabetes and chemotherapeutic agents). Given that there are more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce registered with the Environmental Protection Agency and that at least 1000 chemicals are known to have neurotoxic potential, very few chemicals have been established to affect the peripheral nervous system (mainly after occupational exposures). A wide spectrum of exposures, including pesticides, metals, solvents, nutritional sources, and pharmaceutical agents, has been related, both historically and recently, to environmental toxicant-induced peripheral neuropathy. A review of the literature shows that the toxicity and pathogeneses of chemicals adversely affecting the peripheral nervous system have been studied using animal models. This article includes an overview of five prototypical environmental agents known to cause peripheral neuropathy—namely, organophosphates, carbon disulfide, pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), acrylamide, and hexacarbons (mainly n-hexane, 2,5-hexanedione, methyl n-butyl ketone). Also included is a brief introduction to the structural components of the peripheral nervous system and pointers on common methodologies for histopathologic evaluation of the peripheral nerves. PMID:24615445

  19. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Heung Yong; Baek, Hong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed. PMID:26706915

  20. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heung Yong; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed. PMID:26706915

  1. Psychophysical testing in rodent models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Stephanie L; Koulen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Processing of visual information begins in the retina, with photoreceptors converting light stimuli into neural signals. Ultimately, signals are transmitted to the brain through signaling networks formed by interneurons, namely bipolar, horizontal and amacrine cells providing input to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which form the optic nerve with their axons. As part of the chronic nature of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, the increasing and irreversible damage and ultimately loss of neurons, RGCs in particular, occurs following progressive damage to the optic nerve head (ONH), eventually resulting in visual impairment and visual field loss. There are two behavioral assays that are typically used to assess visual deficits in glaucoma rodent models, the visual water task and the optokinetic drum. The visual water task can assess an animal's ability to distinguish grating patterns that are associated with an escape from water. The optokinetic drum relies on the optomotor response, a reflex turning of the head and neck in the direction of the visual stimuli, which usually consists of rotating black and white gratings. This reflex is a physiological response critical for keeping the image stable on the retina. Driven initially by the neuronal input from direction-selective RGCs, this reflex is comprised of a number of critical sensory and motor elements. In the presence of repeatable and defined stimuli, this reflex is extremely well suited to analyze subtle changes in the circuitry and performance of retinal neurons. Increasing the cycles of these alternating gratings per degree, or gradually reducing the contrast of the visual stimuli, threshold levels can be determined at which the animal is no longer tracking the stimuli, and thereby visual function of the animal can be determined non-invasively. Integrating these assays into an array of outcome measures that determine multiple aspects of visual function is a central goal in vision research and can be realized, for example, by the combination of measuring optomotor reflex function with electroretinograms (ERGs) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the retina. These structure-function correlations in vivo are urgently needed to identify disease mechanisms as potential new targets for drug development. Such a combination of the experimental assessment of the optokinetic reflex (OKR) or optomotor response (OMR) with other measures of retinal structure and function is especially valuable for research on GON. The chronic progression of the disease is characterized by a gradual decrease in function accompanied by a concomitant increase in structural damage to the retina, therefore the assessment of subtle changes is key to determining the success of novel intervention strategies. PMID:26144667

  2. The Management of Diabetic Neuropathy in CKD and Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Roberts, Laurel; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kretzler, Mathias; Brosius, Frank C.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation A 64-year-old male with a 15-year history of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and a 10-year history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia had developed multiple diabetes-related complications within the last 5 years. He first developed albuminuria 5 years ago, and over the next several years experienced fairly rapid decline in kidney function, with eGFR of 55 mL/min/1.73m2 noted 2 years ago. He was diagnosed with proliferative retinopathy 5 years ago and underwent laser photocoagulation. Four years ago, he noted symptoms of peripheral neuropathy manifested as shooting pain and numbness with loss of light touch, thermal and vibratory sensation in a stocking distribution. Last year he developed a non-healing ulcer on the plantar aspect of his left foot which was complicated with gangrene and resulted in a below-the-knee amputation of the left leg one year ago. He now reports a new onset of weakness, lightheadedness and dizziness on standing that affects his daily activities. He reports lancinating pain in his right lower extremity, worse in the evening. Medications include: neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin twice daily and regular insulin on a sliding scale, metoprolol 50 mg/d, lisinopril 40 mg/d, atorvastatin 80 mg/d, furosemide 40 mg/d and aspirin 81 mg/d. Blood pressure is 127/69 mm Hg with a pulse rate of 96 bpm while supine and 94/50 mmHg with a pulse rate of 102 bpm while standing. Strength is normal but with a complete loss of all sensory modalities to the knee in his remaining limb and up to the wrists in both upper extremities, and he is areflexic. Today's laboratory evaluations show a serum creatinine of 2.8 mg/dl, an estimated GFR (eGFR) of 24 ml/min/1.73m2, a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 7.9 % and 2.1 g of urine protein per gram of creatinine. What would be the most appropriate management for this patient? PMID:20042258

  3. Environmental Awareness (Sensory Awareness).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Marian

    Capitalizing on the resources available within a city block, this resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) describes methods and procedures for developing sensory awareness in the urban out-of-doors. Conceptual focus is on interdependency ("living things are interdependent"). Involvement in the environment (observing, thinking, doing)…

  4. Recording Sensory Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    From children's viewpoints, what they experience in the world is what the world is like--for everyone. "What do others experience with their senses when they are in the same situation?" is a question that young children can explore by collecting data as they use a "feely box," or take a "sensory walk." There are many ways to focus the children's…

  5. Structured Sensory Trauma Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, William; Kuban, Caelan

    2010-01-01

    This article features the National Institute of Trauma and Loss in Children (TLC), a program that has demonstrated via field testing, exploratory research, time series studies, and evidence-based research studies that its Structured Sensory Intervention for Traumatized Children, Adolescents, and Parents (SITCAP[R]) produces statistically…

  6. INTRODUCTION Sensory antennae

    E-print Network

    Reichenbach, Tobias

    , on the scale of organs, the cornea and lens of the human eye constitute a sensory antenna that captures light antennae, for they provide a large surface over which to capture light and transfer the resultant, enhancing the animal's sensitivity, but also spectrally modifies the incoming sound (Middlebrooks and Green

  7. Our Sensory World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liesman, C.; Barringer, M. D.

    The booklet explores the role of sensory experiences in the severely developmentally disabled child. Developmental theory is addressed, followed by specific activity suggestions (broken down into developmental levels) for developing tactile sense, auditory sense, gustatory (taste) sense, olfactory sense, visual sense, and kinesthetic sense.…

  8. Comparing the NIS vs. MRC and INCAT sensory scale through Rasch analyses.

    PubMed

    Draak, Thomas H P; Vanhoutte, Els K; van Nes, Sonja I; Gorson, Kenneth C; Van der Pol, W-Ludo; Notermans, Nicolette C; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Lewis, Richard A; Léger, Jean-Marc; Van den Bergh, Peter Y K; Lauria, Giuseppe; Bril, Vera; Katzberg, Hans; Lunn, Michael P T; Pouget, Jean; van der Kooi, Anneke J; Hahn, Angelika F; van den Berg, Leonard H; van Doorn, Pieter A; Cornblath, David R; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2015-09-01

    We performed a comparison between Neuropathy Impairment Scale-sensory (NISs) vs. the modified Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment sensory scale (mISS), and NIS-motor vs. the Medical Research Council sum score in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance-related polyneuropathy (MGUSP). The ordinal data were subjected to Rasch analyses, creating Rasch-transformed (RT)-intervals for all measures. Comparison between measures was based on validity/reliability with an emphasis on responsiveness (using the patient's level of change related to the individually obtained varying SE for minimum clinically important difference). Eighty stable patients (GBS: 30, CIDP: 30, and MGUSP: 20) were assessed twice (entry: two observers; 2-4?weeks later: one observer), and 137 newly diagnosed or relapsing patients (GBS: 55, CIDP: 59, and IgM-MGUSP: 23) were serially examined with 12?months follow-up. Data modifications were needed to improve model fit for all measures. The sensory and motor scales demonstrated approximately equal and acceptable validity and reliability scores. Responsiveness scores were poor but slightly higher in RT-mISS compared to RT-NISs. Responsiveness was equal for the RT-motor scales, but higher in GBS compared to CIDP; responsiveness was poor in patients with MGUSP, suggesting a longer duration of follow-up in the latter group of patients. PMID:26110493

  9. Coinheritance of hereditary spherocytosis and reversibility of cirrhosis in a young female patient with hereditary hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Here we report a 33-years-old woman with hereditary spherocytosis and hemochromatosis due to homozygosity for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. The coinheritance of both conditions led to severe iron overload and liver cirrhosis at young age. The patient was treated by repeated phlebotomy, and reversibility of cirrhosis was documented by transient elastography. This report discusses the pathophysiology of iron accumulation in patients with hemolytic anemia combined with HFE C282Y homozygosity. The case indicates that patients with hematological disorders characterized by increased erythropoetic activity should be screened for HFE mutations. PMID:19380292

  10. Understanding Sensory Integration. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMatties, Marie E.; Sammons, Jennifer H.

    This brief paper summarizes what is known about sensory integration and sensory integration dysfunction (DSI). It outlines evaluation of DSI, treatment approaches, and implications for parents and teachers, including compensatory strategies for minimizing the impact of DSI on a child's life. Review of origins of sensory integration theory in the…

  11. Multiple Hereditary Osteochondromatosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Küçükesmen, Çi?dem; Özen, Bu?ra; Akçam, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Common carious lesions owing to vomiting are not widespread in children. In this case, we aimed to report an 11-years-old male patient with common carious lesions due to repeated vomitings, chewing and eating difficulty and retarded growth with Multiple Hereditary Osteochondromatosis (MHO). Case Report An 11-years-old boy was referred to Department of Pediatric Dentistry in Faculty of Dentistry because of eating difficulty owing to common carious lesions. It was seen that the patient growth was generally retarded in extra-oral examination. Some exostoses were also present on the extremities. It was learned that he was previously diagnosed as MHO in Faculty of Medicine. Nausea and vomiting have been commonly occurring after taking of Didronat. Chewing and eating difficulty and inadequate nutrition were present because of bad oral hygiene, carious lesions and remained roots. Growth was negatively affected by malnutrition and MHO. Results Diet recommendations were given and oral hygiene behaviors were rearranged. Preventive, surgical, restorative and prosthetical dental applications were applied for dental treatments. PMID:19212564

  12. Biochemical and clinical features of hereditary hyperprolinemia.

    PubMed

    Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Endo, Fumio

    2014-08-01

    There are two classifications of hereditary hyperprolinemia: type I (HPI) and type II (HPII). Each type is caused by an autosomal recessive inborn error of the proline metabolic pathway. HPI is caused by an abnormality in the proline-oxidizing enzyme (POX). HPII is caused by a deficiency of ?-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase (P5CDh). The clinical features of HPI are unclear. Nephropathy, uncontrolled seizures, mental retardation or schizophrenia have been reported in HPI, but a benign phenotype without neurological problems has also been reported. The clinical features of HPII are also unclear. In addition, the precise incidences of HPI and HPII are unknown. Only two cases of HPI and one case of HPII have been identified in Japan through a questionnaire survey and by a study of previous reports. This suggests that hyperprolinemia is a very rare disease in Japan, consistent with earlier reports in Western countries. The one case of HPII found in Japan was diagnosed in an individual with influenza-associated encephalopathy. This suggests that HPII might reduce the threshold for convulsions, thereby increasing the sensitivity of individuals with influenza-associated encephalopathy. The current study presents diagnostic criteria for HPI and HPII, based on plasma proline level, with or without measurements of urinary P5C. In the future, screening for HPI and HPII in healthy individuals, or patients with relatively common diseases such as developmental disabilities, epilepsy, schizophrenia or behavioral problems will be important. PMID:24931297

  13. Biochemical and clinical features of hereditary hyperprolinemia

    PubMed Central

    Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Endo, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    There are two classifications of hereditary hyperprolinemia: type I (HPI) and type II (HPII). Each type is caused by an autosomal recessive inborn error of the proline metabolic pathway. HPI is caused by an abnormality in the proline-oxidizing enzyme (POX). HPII is caused by a deficiency of ?-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase (P5CDh). The clinical features of HPI are unclear. Nephropathy, uncontrolled seizures, mental retardation or schizophrenia have been reported in HPI, but a benign phenotype without neurological problems has also been reported. The clinical features of HPII are also unclear. In addition, the precise incidences of HPI and HPII are unknown. Only two cases of HPI and one case of HPII have been identified in Japan through a questionnaire survey and by a study of previous reports. This suggests that hyperprolinemia is a very rare disease in Japan, consistent with earlier reports in Western countries. The one case of HPII found in Japan was diagnosed in an individual with influenza-associated encephalopathy. This suggests that HPII might reduce the threshold for convulsions, thereby increasing the sensitivity of individuals with influenza-associated encephalopathy. The current study presents diagnostic criteria for HPI and HPII, based on plasma proline level, with or without measurements of urinary P5C. In the future, screening for HPI and HPII in healthy individuals, or patients with relatively common diseases such as developmental disabilities, epilepsy, schizophrenia or behavioral problems will be important. PMID:24931297

  14. Hepatic regenerating nodules in hereditary tyrosinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Day, D.L.; Letourneau, J.G.; Allan, B.T.; Sharp, H.L.; Ascher, N.; Dehner, L.P.; Thompson, W.M.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia is an autosomal recessive, enzymatic disorder that results in micro- and macronodular cirrhosis in early childhood. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in approximately one-third of affected children. We evaluated the imaging studies performed in five children with this disorder. Pathologic examination of all five of the livers revealed cirrhosis and multiple regenerating nodules; hepatocellular carcinoma was present in two of the five livers. All five patients had high-attenuation or high- and low-attenuation foci within the liver. These high-attenuation foci were not apparent as focal lesions in three of four hepatic sonograms or in one of two hepatic nuclear scans. Angiography showed tumor vascularity in one patient with a focal hepatocellular carcinoma, but was indeterminate in a second patient with severe cirrhosis and multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma. Children with cirrhosis due to tyrosinemia may develop regenerating nodules that appear as high-attenuation hepatic foci on CT scans. It is difficult to differentiate regenerating nodules from multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma in these patients.

  15. Perioperative management for patients with hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Anesu H.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare autosomal dominant disease that results from mutations in the C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) gene. HAE is characterized by recurrent episodes of angioedema of the skin (face, extremities, genitalia, trunk), the gastrointestinal tract, and respiratory tract. Symptoms experienced can be debilitating, may impact quality of life, and can be life threatening. Preventing attacks particularly for patients undergoing procedures is critical. Patients with HAE may now treat acute attacks or prevent attacks with medications that have recently become available in the United States; however, these same medications can be used for perioperative management for patients undergoing medical, surgical, and dental procedures. Periprocedural planning is important for patients to reduce the incidence of acute attacks. Education is critical and increasing awareness of short-term prophylaxis options will allow providers to develop an appropriate action plan for their patients. The goal of this review is to increase awareness for HAE treating physicians, surgeons, anesthesia, and emergency room physicians by examining the available treatment options, researching the literature, and summarizing available data for periprocedural management. The availability of treatment options has increased over the past few years, expanding options for physicians and patients living with HAE and improve safety during the perioperative period and at the time of other procedures. PMID:25860171

  16. Optimal management of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Neetika; Khunger, Monica; Gupta, Arjun; Kumar, Nilay

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known by the eponym Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome, is a group of related disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the skin, mucous membranes, and/or internal organs such as brain, lungs, and liver. Its prevalence is currently estimated at one in 5,000 to 8,000. Most cases are due to mutations in the endoglin (HHT1) or ACVRLK1 (HHT2) genes. Telangiectasias in nasal and gastrointestinal mucosa generally present with recurrent/chronic bleeding and iron deficiency anemia. Larger AVMs occur in lungs (~40%–60% of affected individuals), liver (~40%–70%), brain (~10%), and spine (~1%). Due to the devastating and potentially fatal complications of some of these lesions (for example, strokes and brain abscesses with pulmonary AVMs), presymptomatic screening and treatment are of utmost importance. However, due to the rarity of this condition, many providers lack an appreciation for the whole gamut of its manifestations and complications, age-dependent penetrance, and marked intrafamilial variation. As a result, HHT remains frequently underdiagnosed and many families do not receive the appropriate screening and treatments. This article provides an overview of the clinical features of HHT, discusses the clinical and genetic diagnostic strategies, and presents an up-to-date review of literature and detailed considerations regarding screening for visceral AVMs, preventive modalities, and treatment options. PMID:25342923

  17. Hypercoagulability in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Sehnal, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT), low iron levels due to inadequate replacement after hemorrhagic iron losses are associated with elevated factor-VIII plasma levels and consecutively increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism. Here, we report a patient with HHT, low iron levels, elevated factor-VIII, and recurrent venous thrombo-embolism. A 64-year-old multimorbid Serbian gipsy was diagnosed with HHT at age 62 years. He had a history of recurrent epistaxis, teleangiectasias on the lips, renal and pulmonary arterio-venous malformations, and a family history positive for HHT. He had experienced recurrent venous thrombosis (mesenteric vein thrombosis, portal venous thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis), insufficiently treated with phenprocoumon during 16 months and gastro-intestinal bleeding. Blood tests revealed sideropenia and elevated plasma levels of coagulation factor-VIII. His history was positive for diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, cerebral abscess, recurrent ischemic stroke, recurrent ileus, peripheral arterial occluding disease, polyneuropathy, mild renal insufficiency, and epilepsy. Following recent findings, hypercoagulability was attributed to the sideropenia-induced elevation of coagulation factor-VIII. In conclusion, HHT may be associated with hypercoagulability due to elevated factor-VIII associated with low serum iron levels from recurrent bleeding. Iron substitution may prevent HHT patients from hypercoagulability. PMID:26167029

  18. Alcohol consumption enhances antiretroviral painful peripheral neuropathy by mitochondrial mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    A major dose-limiting side effect of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) chemotherapies, such as the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), is a small-fiber painful peripheral neuropathy, mediated by its mitochondrial toxicity. Co-morbid conditions may also contribute to this dose-limiting effect of HIV/AIDS treatment. Alcohol abuse, which alone also produces painful neuropathy, is one of the most important co-morbid risk factors for peripheral neuropathy in patients with HIV/AIDS. Despite the prevalence of this problem and its serious impact on the quality of life and continued therapy in HIV/AIDS patients, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse exacerbates highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced neuropathic pain has not been demonstrated. In this study, performed in rats, we investigated the cellular mechanism by which consumed alcohol impacts antiretroviral-induced neuropathic pain. NRTI 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) (50 mg/kg) neuropathy was mitochondrial dependent and PKC? independent, and alcohol-induced painful neuropathy, PKC? dependent and mitochondrial independent. At low doses, ddC (5 mg/kg) and alcohol (6.5% ethanol diet for one week), which alone do not affect nociception, together produce profound mechanical hyperalgesia. This hyperalgesia is mitochondrial dependent but PKC? independent. These experiments, which provide the first model for studying the impact of co-morbidity in painful neuropathy, support the clinical impression that alcohol consumption enhances HIV/AIDS therapy neuropathy, and provide evidence for a role of mitochondrial mechanisms underlying this interaction. PMID:20726883

  19. Sensory Organs Types of Sensory Stimuli Insects detect 4 types of sensory

    E-print Network

    Brown, Christopher A.

    Photoreceptors These detect photons of light Photon strikes a pigment cell, causing a chemical or mechanical1 Sensory Organs Types of Sensory Stimuli Insects detect 4 types of sensory stimuli: Mechanical Heat/temperature Chemical Visual Mechanoreceptors These detect pressure changes resulting from: Air

  20. Phenotypic variability of TRPV4 related neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Bansagi, Boglarka; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Douroudis, Konstantinos; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Antoniadi, Thalia; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Horvath, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene have been associated with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias and peripheral nervous system syndromes (PNSS). PNSS include Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) type 2C, congenital spinal muscular atrophy and arthrogryposis and scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. We report the clinical, electrophysiological and muscle biopsy findings in two unrelated patients with two novel heterozygous missense mutations in the TRPV4 gene. Whole exome sequencing was carried out on genomic DNA using Illumina TruseqTM 62Mb exome capture. Patient 1 harbours a de novo c.805C?>?T (p.Arg269Cys) mutation. Clinically, this patient shows signs of both scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy and skeletal dysplasia. Patient 2 harbours a novel c.184G?>?A (p.Asp62Asn) mutation. While the clinical phenotype is compatible with CMT type 2C with the patient's muscle harbours basophilic inclusions. Mutations in the TRPV4 gene have a broad phenotypic variability and disease severity and may share a similar pathogenic mechanism with Heat Shock Protein related neuropathies. PMID:25900305

  1. Extracellular matrix remodelling in human diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix of peripheral nerve plays a vital role in terms of normal nerve fibre function and also in the regenerative response following nerve injury. Nerve fibre loss is a major feature of diabetic neuropathy; however, the regenerative response is limited and this may be associated with changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix. Glycoproteins and collagens are major components of the extracellular matrix and are known to be important in terms of axonal growth. This work has therefore examined whether changes in the expression of two major glycoproteins, laminin and tenascin, and three collagen types (IV, V and VI) occur in the endoneurial and perineurial connective tissue compartments of human diabetic nerve. Despite being known to have a positive effect in terms of axonal growth, laminin levels were not elevated in the diabetic nerves. However, the pattern of tenascin expression did differ between the two groups being found in association with axon myelin units in the diabetic samples only. The pattern of collagen IV expression was the same in both tissue groups and was not found to be up-regulated. However, levels of collagen V and VI were both significantly increased in the endoneurium and for collagen VI also in the perineurium. PMID:19207983

  2. Understanding the biology of compressive neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ranjan; Rummler, Laura; Steward, Oswald

    2005-07-01

    Compressive neuropathies are highly prevalent, debilitating conditions with variable functional recovery after surgical decompression. Chronic nerve compression injury induces concurrent Schwann cell proliferation and apoptosis in the early stages of the disorder, independent of axonal injury. These proliferating Schwann cells locally demyelinate and remyelinate in the region of injury. Furthermore, Schwann cells upregulate vascular endothelial growth factor secondary to chronic nerve compression injury and induce neovascularization to facilitate the recruitment of macrophages. In contrast to Wallerian degeneration, macrophage recruitment occurs gradually with chronic nerve compression injury and continues for a longer time. Schwann cells change their gene and protein expression in response to mechanical stimuli as shear stress decreases the expression of myelin associated glycoprotein and myelin basic protein mRNA and protein for in vitro promyelinating Schwann cells. The local down-regulation of myelin associated glycoprotein in the region of compression injury creates an environment allowing axonal sprouting that may be reversed with intraneural injections of purified myelin associated glycoprotein. These studies suggest that while the reciprocal relationship between neurons and glial cells is maintained, chronic nerve compression injury is a Schwann cell-mediated disease. PMID:15995449

  3. Hereditary Kidney Cancer: Unique Opportunity for Disease-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, W. Marston; Pinto, Peter A.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Pfaffenroth, Elizabeth; Merino, Maria; Vocke, Cathy D.; Toro, Jorge R.; Bottaro, Donald; Neckers, Len; Schmidt, Laura S.; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2009-01-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease; it is made up of a number of different types of cancer, each with a different histology, a different clinical course, caused by a different gene, and responding differently to therapy. The VHL gene is the gene for the hereditary cancer syndrome, von Hippel-Lindau, as well as for the common form of sporadic, non-inherited, clear cell kidney cancer. Understanding the VHL-HIF pathway has provided the foundation for the development of a number of agents targeting this pathway, such as sunitinib, sorafenib and temsirolimus. Hereditary Papillary Renal Carcinoma (HPRC) is a hereditary renal cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are at risk for the development of bilateral, multifocal, type 1 papillary renal cell carcinoma. The genetic defect underlying HPRC is MET, the cell surface receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Mutations of MET have also been found in a subset of tumors from patients with sporadic type 1 papillary renal cell carcinoma. Clinical trials targeting the MET pathway are underway in patients with HPRC as well as patients with sporadic (non-hereditary) papillary kidney cancer. The BHD (also known as FLCN) gene is the gene for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, an autosomal dominant genodermatosis associated with a hereditary form of chromophobe, and oncocytic hybrid RCC. Preclinical studies are underway targeting the BHD gene pathway in preparation for clinical trials in Birt-Hogg-Dubé and sporadic chromophobe RCC. Hereditary Leiomyomatosis Renal Cell Carcinoma (HLRCC) patients are at risk for the development of cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and a very aggressive type of RCC. HLRCC is characterized by germline mutation of the Krebs cycle enzyme, fumarate hydratase (FH). Studies of the TCA cycle and VHL-HIF pathways have provided the foundation for therapeutic approaches in patients with HLRCC-associated kidney cancer, as well as other hereditary and sporadic forms of RCC. PMID:19402075

  4. Hereditary Spherocytosis and Hereditary Elliptocytosis: Aberrant Protein Sorting during Erythroblast Enucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Salomao, Marcela; Chen, Ke; Villalobos, Jonathan; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2010-02-08

    During erythroblast enucleation, membrane proteins distribute between extruded nuclei and reticulocytes. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), deficiencies of membrane proteins, in addition to those encoded by the mutant gene, occur. Elliptocytes, resulting from protein 4.1R gene mutations, lack not only 4.1R but also glycophorin C, which links the cytoskeleton and bilayer. In HS resulting from ankyrin-1 mutations, band 3, Rh-associated antigen, and glycophorin A are deficient. The current study was undertaken to explore whether aberrant protein sorting, during enucleation, creates these membrane-spanning protein deficiencies. We found that although glycophorin C sorts to reticulocytes normally, it distributes to nuclei in 4.1R-deficient HE cells. Further, glycophorin A and Rh-associated antigen, which normally partition predominantly to reticulocytes, distribute to both nuclei and reticulocytes in an ankyrin-1-deficient murine model of HS. We conclude that aberrant protein sorting is one mechanistic basis for protein deficiencies in HE and HS.

  5. Outbreak of progressive inflammatory neuropathy following exposure to aerosolized porcine neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Deangelis, Tracy M; Shen, Liang

    2009-10-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Minnesota Department of Health was notified of 11 cases of an unexplained neurological illness, all linked to a pork processing plant, Quality Pork Processors, Inc., in Austin, MN. The cluster of workers had been experiencing similar symptoms, including fatigue, pain, numbness, and tingling in their extremities as well as weakness. The symptoms were described as more sensory than motor, and all patients had evidence of polyradiculoneuropathy with signs of nerve root irritation. An epidemiological investigation revealed that the only commonality between cases was their exposure to a pork brain extraction procedure involving compressed air. As relatives of the cases remained asymptomatic and all cultures for known pathogens were negative, the etiology of the syndrome seemed not to be infectious. Clinically, the syndrome was most akin to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Laboratory tests corroborated the clinical findings, revealing inflammation of peripheral nerves and nerve roots; however, these cases also had features clinically distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy as well as laboratory testing revealing a novel immunoglobulin G immunostaining pattern. This suggested that the observed inflammation was the result of 1 or more unidentified antigens. This syndrome was ultimately dubbed progressive inflammatory neuropathy and was theorized to be an autoimmune reaction to aerosolized porcine neural tissue. Since the investigation's outset, 18 cases of progressive inflammatory neuropathy have been identified at the Minnesota pork processing plant, with 5 similar cases at an Indiana plant and 1 case at a Nebraskan plant. The plants in which cases have been identified have since stopped the use of compressed air in removing pork brains. All cases have stabilized or improved, with some requiring immunosuppressive and analgesic treatment. The study of progressive inflammatory neuropathy is ongoing, and the details of this investigation highlight the value of epidemiological principles in the identification and containment of outbreaks while researchers attempt to uncover the unique pathophysiology and potential etiology of the illness. Mt Sinai J Med 76:442-447, 2009. (c) 2009 Mount Sinai School of Medicine. PMID:19787653

  6. NEUROPATHY TARGET ESTERASE INHIBITION BY ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ESTERS IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Certain organophosphorus compounds (OPs) produce a delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) in man and some animal species. apability to cause OPIDN is generally predicted in animal models by early and irreversible inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE, neurotoxic esterase) . In this s...

  7. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy and painful peripheral neuropathy in Turkish diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Tomris; Ertas, Mustafa; Yucel, Aysen; Keskinaslan, Abdulkadir; Senocak, Mustafa

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and neuropathic pain in diabetic patients attending university outpatient clinics in Turkey. In this multicenter cross-sectional study, neurologic examinations and nerve conduction studies along with clinical diabetic neuropathy score, and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale were performed on 1,113 patients (46.2% male) from 14 centers. Prevalence of DPN determined only by clinical examination was 40.4% and increased to 62.2%, by combining nerve conduction studies with clinical examination. According to Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs scores, neuropathic pain prevalence was 16.0% in those who reported pain. Poor glycemic control, retinopathy, microalbuminuria, hyperlipidemia, diabetic foot, and foot amputation were more commonly observed in patients with DPN. Clinical DPN affected 40.4% of diabetic patients, and neuropathic pain prevalence in diabetic patient population was 14.0%. Clinical examinations and nerve conduction studies are important components for early detection and accurate diagnosis of DPN and painful DPN. PMID:21221008

  8. Skin denervation, neuropathology, and neuropathic pain in a laser-induced focal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hou-Yu; Chen, Chin-Tin; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2005-02-01

    Small-diameter sensory nerves innervating the skin are responsive to noxious stimuli, and an injury to these nerves is presumably related to neuropathic pain. Injury-induced neuropathic pain in animals can be produced by laser irradiation, which usually requires concomitant use of photosensitive dyes, known as the photochemical approach. It is not clear whether laser irradiation alone can induce neuropathic pain. In addition, two issues are important to apply these approaches: the relationship between the extent of laser irradiation and the occurrence of neuropathic pain, and the susceptibility of small-diameter sensory nerves in the skin to laser-induced neuropathic pain. To address these issues, we designed a new model of focal neuropathy by applying a diode laser of 532 nm (100 mW) to the sciatic nerve and evaluated small-diameter nerves by quantifying skin innervation and large-diameter nerves by measuring amplitudes of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP). Immediately after laser irradiation, epineurial vessels were occluded due to the formation of thrombi, and the blood flow through these vessels was markedly reduced. On postoperative day (POD) 2, animals developed characteristic manifestations of neuropathic pain, including spontaneous pain behaviors, thermal hyperalgesia, and mechanical allodynia. These phenomena peaked during PODs 7-21, and lasted for 3-6 weeks. The neuropathology at the irradiated site of the sciatic nerve included a focal area of axonal degeneration surrounded by demyelination and endoneurial edema. The extent of damage to large-diameter motor and sensory nerves after laser irradiation was evaluated by nerve conduction studies. On the irradiated sides, amplitudes of the compound muscle action potentials and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) were reduced to 65.0% (P < 0.0001) and 42.5% (P < 0.01) of those on the control sides, respectively. Motor innervation of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) on plantar muscles was examined by combined cholinesterase histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. The ratio of innervated NMJs on the operated sides decreased to 76.3% of that on the control side. Skin innervation in the territory of the irradiated sciatic nerves was evaluated by immunohistochemistry with neuronal markers. Among these markers, epidermal nerve densities for protein gene product (PGP) 9.5, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and substance P (SP) were significantly lower on the irradiated sides than the control sides with a different degree of loss for each marker (42.1-53.1%, P < 0.05). Results suggest that laser-induced focal neuropathy provides a new system for studying neuropathic pain. With this approach, the extent of nerve injury can be quantified. Both small-diameter epidermal nerves and large-diameter sensory and motor nerves are susceptible to laser-induced injury of different degrees. PMID:15649695

  9. Subclinical Ulnar Neuropathy at the Elbow in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Yun Tae; Park, Byung Kyu; Cheong, In Yae

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the prevalence and characteristics of subclinical ulnar neuropathy at the elbow in diabetic patients. Methods One hundred and five patients with diabetes mellitus were recruited for the study of ulnar nerve conduction analysis. Clinical and demographic characteristics were assessed. Electrodiagnosis of ulnar neuropathy at the elbow was based on the criteria of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM1 and AANEM2). The inching test of the ulnar motor nerve was additionally performed to localize the lesion. Results The duration of diabetes, the existence of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) symptoms, the duration of symptoms, and HbA1C showed significantly larger values in the DPN group (p<0.05). Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow was more common in the DPN group. There was a statistically significant difference in the number of cases that met the three diagnostic criteria between the no DPN group and the DPN group. The most common location for ulnar mononeuropathy at the elbow was the retrocondylar groove. Conclusion Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow is more common in patients with DPN. If the conduction velocities of both the elbow and forearm segments are decreased to less than 50 m/s, it may be useful to apply the AANEM2 criteria and inching test to diagnose ulnar neuropathy. PMID:24639928

  10. An Early Diagnostic Tool for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kambiz, Shoista; van Neck, Johan W.; Cosgun, Saniye G.; van Velzen, Marit H. N.; Janssen, Joop A. M. J. L.; Avazverdi, Naim; Hovius, Steven E. R.; Walbeehm, Erik T.

    2015-01-01

    The skin’s rewarming rate of diabetic patients is used as a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. At present, the relationship between microvascular changes in the skin and diabetic neuropathy is unclear in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the skin rewarming rate in diabetic rats is related to microvascular changes and whether this is accompanied by changes observed in classical diagnostic methods for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Computer-assisted infrared thermography was used to assess the rewarming rate after cold exposure on the plantar skin of STZ diabetic rats’ hind paws. Peripheral neuropathy was determined by the density of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), mechanical sensitivity, and electrophysiological recordings. Data were obtained in diabetic rats at four, six, and eight weeks after the induction of diabetes and in controls. Four weeks after the induction of diabetes, a delayed rewarming rate, decreased skin blood flow and decreased density of IENFs were observed. However, the mechanical hyposensitivity and decreased motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) developed 6 and 8 weeks after the induction of diabetes. Our study shows that the skin rewarming rate is related to microvascular changes in diabetic rats. Moreover, the skin rewarming rate is a non-invasive method that provides more information for an earlier diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy than the classical monofilament test and MNCV in STZ induced diabetic rats. PMID:25984949

  11. Instabilities in sensory processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2014-07-01

    In any organism there are different kinds of sensory receptors for detecting the various, distinct stimuli through which its external environment may impinge upon it. These receptors convey these stimuli in different ways to an organism's information processing region enabling it to distinctly perceive the varied sensations and to respond to them. The behavior of cells and their response to stimuli may be captured through simple mathematical models employing regulatory feedback mechanisms. We argue that the sensory processes such as olfaction function optimally by operating in the close proximity of dynamical instabilities. In the case of coupled neurons, we point out that random disturbances and fluctuations can move their operating point close to certain dynamical instabilities triggering synchronous activity.

  12. Diabetic Neuropathies: Update on Definitions, Diagnostic Criteria, Estimation of Severity, and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Dyck, Peter J.; Freeman, Roy; Horowitz, Michael; Kempler, Peter; Lauria, Giuseppe; Malik, Rayaz A.; Spallone, Vincenza; Vinik, Aaron; Bernardi, Luciano; Valensi, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Preceding the joint meeting of the 19th annual Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (NEURODIAB) and the 8th International Symposium on Diabetic Neuropathy in Toronto, Canada, 13–18 October 2009, expert panels were convened to provide updates on classification, definitions, diagnostic criteria, and treatments of diabetic peripheral neuropathies (DPNs), autonomic neuropathy, painful DPNs, and structural alterations in DPNs. PMID:20876709

  13. Relationship between peripheral nerve decompression and gain of pedal sensibility and balance in patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ducic, Ivica; Taylor, Nathan S; Dellon, A Lee

    2006-02-01

    This was an initial exploratory study to determine if decompression of the 4 medial ankle tunnels (neurolysis of the tibial, medial and lateral plantar, and calcaneal nerves) could lead to improved foot sensibility, increased proprioception and balance, and decreased falls in a population of patients with impaired lower extremity sensation. Fourteen patients with peripheral neuropathy were included in this study. Seventy-one percent of patients were females. Average age was 67 years. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively to assess their lower extremity sensibility, as well as their ability to stand still, maintaining their balance with their eyes open and then closed, which is defined as "sway." Lower extremity sensibility was measured with the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device (PSSD), which evaluates 1- and 2-point discrimination for the pulp of the big toe and medial heel. The MatScan Measurement System measured each patient's sway. Neuropathy was the result of diabetes in 72% of patients, a combination of diabetes and hypothyroidism in 7%, chemotherapy in 7%, and idiopathic in 14%. Eight patients underwent peripheral nerve decompression on 1 lower extremity, whereas 6 patients underwent bilateral lower extremity peripheral nerve decompression. Mean toe and heel sensibility improved 9% and 7%, respectively, in the unilateral group, whereas the bilateral group experienced an improvement in mean toe and heel sensibility of 42% (P = 0.02) and 32%, respectively. Preoperative and postoperative sway comparison in the unilateral group revealed a reduction in sway with eyes open and eyes closed by 5% and 31%, respectively. Comparison of preoperative and postoperative sway in the bilateral group showed a reduction with eyes open and eyes closed by 23% and 145% (P = 0.05), respectively. This initial study suggests that there may be benefit from bilateral lower extremity peripheral nerve decompression in helping improve pedal sensibility and balance within the peripheral neuropathy patient population, although further investigation with a larger sample size is warranted to further evaluate these preliminary findings. PMID:16432321

  14. Complications and mortality in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, Tricia M.; Hall, Ian P.; Hubbard, Richard B.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies report that the risks of significant neurologic complications (including stroke, cerebral abscess, and migraine) and hemorrhagic sequelae are high in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), and that life expectancy in this cohort is reduced. However, most published cohorts derive from specialist centers, which may be susceptible to bias. Methods: We used a population-based approach to estimate the risks of developing neurologic and hemorrhagic complications of HHT, the association of a diagnosis of HHT with common cardiovascular and malignant comorbidities, and also long-term survival of those with the disease. Results: From a UK primary care database of 3.5 million patients (The Health Improvement Network), we identified 675 cases with a diagnosis of HHT and compared them with 6,696 controls matched by age, sex, and primary care practice. Risks of stroke (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–2.6), cerebral abscess (OR 30.0, CI 3.1–288), and migraine (OR 1.7, CI 1.3–2.2) were elevated over controls. Bleeding complications including epistaxis (OR 11.6, CI 9.1–14.7) and gastrointestinal hemorrhage (OR 6.1, CI 2.8–13.4) were more common in cases with HHT. Survival of cases with HHT was poorer than controls with a hazard ratio for death of 2.0 (CI 1.6–2.6) and a median age at death 3 years younger. Conclusions: Patients with HHT are at substantially increased risk of serious neurologic and hemorrhagic complications of the disease. Because a diagnosis of HHT is associated with a significantly poorer survival compared with those who have no disease, evaluation of new strategies to improve clinical management is required. PMID:25862798

  15. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Molecular Genetics, Pathology, Management, and Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Henry T.; Casey, Murray Joseph; Snyder, Carrie L.; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Jane F.; Butts, Matthew; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary ovarian cancer accounts for at least 5% of the estimated 22,000 new cases of this disease during 2009. During this same time, over 15,000 will die from malignancy ascribed to ovarian origin. The bulk of these hereditary cases fit the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, while virtually all of the remainder will be consonant with the Lynch syndrome, disorders which are autosomal dominantly inherited. Advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations which predispose to the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, and mutations in mismatch repair genes, the most common of which are MSH2 and MLH1, which predispose to Lynch syndrome. These discoveries enable relative certainty limited only by their variable penetrance, so that early diagnosis through a comprehensive cancer family history might be possible. This paper reviews the subject of hereditary ovarian cancer, with particular attention given to its molecular genetic basis, its pathology, and its phenotypic/genotypic heterogeneity. PMID:19383374

  16. 77 FR 59930 - Clinical Development Programs for Disease-Modifying Agents for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...-modifying agents for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy. Discussion will focus on possible therapeutic targets for these agents, the types of painful peripheral neuropathies amenable to treatment with...

  17. Facial neuropathy with imaging enhancement of the facial nerve: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Sehreen; Jensen, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    A young women developed unilateral facial neuropathy 2 weeks after a motor vehicle collision involving fractures of the skull and mandible. MRI showed contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. We review the literature describing facial neuropathy after trauma and facial nerve enhancement patterns with different causes of facial neuropathy. PMID:25574155

  18. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy: a consensus statement of the diabetic neuropathy study group of the EASD (Neurodiab).

    PubMed

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A; Dobrowsky, R; Feldman, E L; Fernyhough, P; Jakobsen, J; Malik, R A; Mizisin, A P; Oates, P J; Obrosova, I G; Pop-Busui, R; Russell, J W; Sima, A A; Stevens, M J; Schmidt, R E; Tesfaye, S; Veves, A; Vinik, A I; Wright, D E; Yagihashi, S; Yorek, M A; Ziegler, D; Zochodne, D W

    2014-06-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy. The discussion was divided into five areas: (1) status of commonly used rodent models of diabetes, (2) nerve structure, (3) electrophysiological assessments of nerve function, (4) behavioral assessments of nerve function, and (5) the role of biomarkers in disease phenotyping. Participants discussed the current understanding of each area, gold standards (if applicable) for assessments of function, improvements of existing techniques, and utility of known and exploratory biomarkers. The research opportunities in each area were outlined, providing a possible roadmap for future studies. The meeting concluded with a discussion on the merits and limitations of a unified approach to phenotyping rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and a consensus formed on the definition of the minimum criteria required for establishing the presence of the disease. A neuropathy phenotype in rodents was defined as the presence of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted toward the therapeutic efficacy of drug interventions. PMID:24934510

  19. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy: a consensus statement of the diabetic neuropathy study group of the EASD (Neurodiab)

    PubMed Central

    Biessels, G.J.; Bril, V.; Calcutt, N.A.; Cameron, N.E.; Cotter, M.A.; Dobrowsky, R.; Feldman, E.L.; Fernyhough, P.; Jakobsen, J.; Malik, R.A.; Mizisin, A.P.; Oates, P.J.; Obrosova, I.G.; Pop-Busui, R.; Russell, J.W.; Sima, A.A.; Stevens, M.J.; Schmidt, R.E.; Tesfaye, S.; Veves, A.; Vinik, A.I.; Wright, D.E.; Yagihashi, S.; Yorek, M.A.; Ziegler, D.; Zochodne, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy. The discussion was divided into five areas: (1) status of commonly used rodent models of diabetes, (2) nerve structure, (3) electrophysiological assessments of nerve function, (4) behavioral assessments of nerve function, and (5) the role of biomarkers in disease phenotyping. Participants discussed the current understanding of each area, gold standards (if applicable) for assessments of function, improvements of existing techniques, and utility of known and exploratory biomarkers. The research opportunities in each area were outlined, providing a possible roadmap for future studies. The meeting concluded with a discussion on the merits and limitations of a unified approach to phenotyping rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and a consensus formed on the definition of the minimum criteria required for establishing the presence of the disease. A neuropathy phenotype in rodents was defined as the presence of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted toward the therapeutic efficacy of drug interventions. PMID:24934510

  20. Electrophysiological study of forearm sensory fiber crossover in Martin-Gruber anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, S

    2001-03-01

    Although anatomical studies have shown that a crossover of sensory fibers is not rare in forearm Martin-Gruber median-ulnar anastomosis (MGA), it has been electrophysiologically described only in rare subjects. Using a near-nerve needle technique, the possibility of electrophysiologically detecting a forearm median-ulnar crossover of sensory fibers was investigated in 24 arms of 21 subjects with unilateral or bilateral MGA, by stimulating the fifth digit of the hand and recording along the median nerve. Small-amplitude elbow responses were found in the median nerve in 10 of the 24 arms but, in 9, the responses disappeared after lidocaine block of the ulnar nerve distal to the elbow sulcus, indicating their volume-conducted origin. In one subject with carpal tunnel syndrome and a subclinical ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, the elbow response was not affected by the ulnar block, thus confirming the presence of a sensory anastomosis in the forearm. In another subject with MGA, a clear-cut sensory response was recorded in the median nerve at the elbow by stimulating the fifth digit of the right hand but no anesthetic block was performed, because ulnar responses were absent above the elbow sulcus due to a severe lesion at the elbow. Thus, use of a near-nerve recording technique facilitates recognition of median-ulnar crossover of sensory fibers to the fifth digit, which is, however, uncommon. PMID:11353423

  1. Image analysis software for following progression of peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epplin-Zapf, Thomas; Miller, Clayton; Larkin, Sean; Hermesmeyer, Eduardo; Macy, Jenny; Pellegrini, Marco; Luccarelli, Saverio; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Timothy

    2009-02-01

    A relationship has been reported by several research groups [1 - 4] between the density and shapes of nerve fibers in the cornea and the existence and severity of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a complication of several prevalent diseases or conditions, which include diabetes, HIV, prolonged alcohol overconsumption and aging. A common clinical technique for confirming the condition is intramuscular electromyography (EMG), which is invasive, so a noninvasive technique like the one proposed here carries important potential advantages for the physician and patient. A software program that automatically detects the nerve fibers, counts them and measures their shapes is being developed and tested. Tests were carried out with a database of subjects with levels of severity of diabetic neuropathy as determined by EMG testing. Results from this testing, that include a linear regression analysis are shown.

  2. Is there a relationship between oral health and diabetic neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Borgnakke, Wenche S; Anderson, Patricia F; Shannon, Carol; Jivanescu, Anca

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus with high morbidity and mortality, and low quality of life. It has a broad spectrum of clinical forms, although distal symmetrical polyneuropathy is the most prevalent. Several oral complications including burning mouth syndrome, dry mouth, and impairment of the senses taste and smell are less-known manifestations of diabetic neuropathy and often overlooked. Periodontitis, tooth loss, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction may be also present in these patients and are equally debilitating. Periodontitis was declared the sixth complication of diabetes in 1993 and may contribute to poor glucose control. Hence, periodontitis and diabetes mutually and adversely affect each other. This review summarizes the available body of scientific literature that discusses oral manifestations in patients with diabetic neuropathy and identifies important areas where more research is needed. PMID:26374570

  3. [Electron microscopy as a tool for the diagnosis of neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Richard, Laurence; Sindou, Philippe; Magy, Laurent

    2008-12-01

    Ultrastructural examination of a peripheral nerve biopsy may be particularly useful and sometimes indispensable for identification of the type of nerve lesion and of the aetiologies of peripheral neuropathies. The ultrastructural findings have, anyway, to be correlated with the clinical findings, the electrophysiological examination and the laboratory investigations. In this presentation, the various causes of peripheral neuropathies for which nerve biopsy study by electron microscope can provide diagnostic information are discussed. The principal aetiologies that will benefit from such an ultrastructural study are toxic, infectious, haemopathic and storage disorders. Chiefly for Charcot-Marie-Tooth sporadic cases, there are still indications for nerve biopsy to orientate diagnostic research in molecular biology. Sometimes, the electron microscopic examination will help to determine not only the cause of the peripheral neuropathy, but also the mechanism of nerve lesions which may induce specific and efficient treatments. PMID:19084717

  4. Characterization of Diabetic Neuropathy in the Zucker Diabetic Sprague-Dawley Rat: A New Animal Model for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Eric P.; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Holmes, Amey; Lupachyk, Sergey; Dake, Brian L.; Oltman, Christine L.; Peterson, Richard G.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently a new rat model for type 2 diabetes the Zucker diabetic Sprague-Dawley (ZDSD/Pco) was created. In this study we sought to characterize the development of diabetic neuropathy in ZDSD rats using age-matched Sprague-Dawley rats as a control. Rats were examined at 34 weeks of age 12 weeks after the onset of hyperglycemia in ZDSD rats. At this time ZDSD rats were severely insulin resistant with slowing of both motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities. ZDSD rats also had fatty livers, elevated serum free fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol, and elevated sciatic nerve nitrotyrosine levels. The corneas of ZDSD rats exhibited a decrease in subbasal epithelial corneal nerves and sensitivity. ZDSD rats were hypoalgesic but intraepidermal nerve fibers in the skin of the hindpaw were normal compared to Sprague-Dawley rats. However, the number of Langerhans cells was decreased. Vascular reactivity of epineurial arterioles, blood vessels that provide circulation to the sciatic nerve, to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide was impaired in ZDSD rats. These data indicate that ZDSD rats develop many of the neural complications associated with type 2 diabetes and are a good animal model for preclinical investigations of drug development for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:25371906

  5. Towards a Diagnosis of Cochlear Neuropathy with Envelope Following Responses.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Luke A; Valero, Michelle D; Liberman, M Charles

    2015-12-01

    Listeners with normal audiometric thresholds can still have suprathreshold deficits, for example, in the ability to discriminate sounds in complex acoustic scenes. One likely source of these deficits is cochlear neuropathy, a loss of auditory nerve (AN) fibers without hair cell damage, which can occur due to both aging and moderate acoustic overexposure. Since neuropathy can affect up to 50 % of AN fibers, its impact on suprathreshold hearing is likely profound, but progress is hindered by lack of a robust non-invasive test of neuropathy in humans. Reduction of suprathreshold auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) can be used to quantify neuropathy in inbred mice. However, ABR amplitudes are highly variable in humans, and thus more challenging to use. Since noise-induced neuropathy is selective for AN fibers with high thresholds, and because phase locking to temporal envelopes is particularly strong in these fibers, the envelope following response (EFR) might be a more robust measure. We compared EFRs to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated tones and ABRs to tone-pips in mice following a neuropathic noise exposure. EFR amplitude, EFR phase-locking value, and ABR amplitude were all reduced in noise-exposed mice. However, the changes in EFRs were more robust: the variance was smaller, thus inter-group differences were clearer. Optimum detection of neuropathy was achieved with high modulation frequencies and moderate levels. Analysis of group delays was used to confirm that the AN population was dominating the responses at these high modulation frequencies. Application of these principles in clinical testing can improve the differential diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26323349

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... catalog Conditions > Hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps syndrome (often shortened to HANAC syndrome ) On ... HANAC syndrome? Hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps (HANAC) syndrome is part of a group ...

  7. CMT subtypes and disease burden in patients enrolled in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium natural history study: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, V; Bundy, B; Reilly, M M; Pareyson, D; Bacon, C; Burns, J; Day, J; Feely, S; Finkel, R S; Grider, T; Kirk, C A; Herrmann, D N; Laurá, M; Li, J; Lloyd, T; Sumner, C J; Muntoni, F; Piscosquito, G; Ramchandren, S; Shy, R; Siskind, C E; Yum, S W; Moroni, I; Pagliano, E; Zuchner, S; Scherer, S S; Shy, M E

    2015-01-01

    Background The international Inherited Neuropathy Consortium (INC) was created with the goal of obtaining much needed natural history data for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. We analysed clinical and genetic data from patients in the INC to determine the distribution of CMT subtypes and the clinical impairment associated with them. Methods We analysed data from 1652 patients evaluated at 13 INC centres. The distribution of CMT subtypes and pathogenic genetic mutations were determined. The disease burden of all the mutations was assessed by the CMT Neuropathy Score (CMTNS) and CMT Examination Score (CMTES). Results 997 of the 1652 patients (60.4%) received a genetic diagnosis. The most common CMT subtypes were CMT1A/PMP22 duplication, CMT1X/GJB1 mutation, CMT2A/MFN2 mutation, CMT1B/MPZ mutation, and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy/PMP22 deletion. These five subtypes of CMT accounted for 89.2% of all genetically confirmed mutations. Mean CMTNS for some but not all subtypes were similar to those previously reported. Conclusions Our findings confirm that large numbers of patients with a representative variety of CMT subtypes have been enrolled and that the frequency of achieving a molecular diagnosis and distribution of the CMT subtypes reflects those previously reported. Measures of severity are similar, though not identical, to results from smaller series. This study confirms that it is possible to assess patients in a uniform way between international centres, which is critical for the planned natural history study and future clinical trials. These data will provide a representative baseline for longitudinal studies of CMT. Clinical trial registration ID number NCT01193075. PMID:25430934

  8. Pontine Tegmental Cap Dysplasia: MR Evaluation of Vestibulocochlear Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dalveer; Hsu, Charlie Chia-Tsong; Kwan, Gigi Nga Chi; Korah, Ipeson

    2015-11-01

    Pontine tegmental cap dysplasia (PTCD) is recently recognized as a rare congenital brain stem malformation with typical neuroimaging hallmarks of ventral pontine hypoplasia and vaulted pontine tegmentum projecting into the fourth ventricle. PTCD patients also demonstrate variable cranial neuropathy with predilection for involvement of the vestibulocochlear and facial nerves. We present a case of PTCD diagnosed on MRI in the neonatal period. During early infancy, the patient displayed features of multiple cranial neuropathies and bilateral hearing loss. At the age of 2, the patient underwent further MRI assessment with dedicated high resolution T2 SPACE sequence to delineate the cranial nerve deficiencies. PMID:25691269

  9. Severe Acute Orthopnea: Ipilimumab-Induced Bilateral Phrenic Nerve Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jinnur, Praveen; Lim, Kaiser G

    2015-08-01

    Ipilimumab is a monoclonal antibody used in the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma. Several immune-related adverse events including potential fatal events have been reported following its use. We report a case of a 66-year-old man who presented with severe acute exertional dyspnea and orthopnea following administration of ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma. Although various peripheral neuropathy syndromes associated with ipilimumab have been reported, bilateral phrenic nerve paralysis has not been previously reported. This case also highlights the clinical features of bilateral phrenic nerve neuropathy. Pulmonologists have to be aware of these unusual immune-related respiratory adverse events in patients being treated with monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25956728

  10. Peripheral neuropathy in chronic occupational inorganic lead exposure: a clinical and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Rubens, O; Logina, I; Kravale, I; Eglite, M; Donaghy, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES—Traditionally the neuromuscular disorder associated with lead poisoning has been purely motor. This study assessed peripheral nerve function clinically and electrophysiologically in 46 patients with neuropathic features out of a total population of 151 workers with raised blood and/or urinary lead concentrations.?RESULTS—Average duration of occupational exposure for the neuropathic group ranged from 8-47 years (mean 21.7). Their mean blood lead concentration (SD) was 63.9 (18.3) µg/dl (normal <40), urinary lead 8.6 (3.3) µg/dl (normal<5.0), urinary coproporphyrins 66.7(38.4) µg/g creatinine (20-80), urinary aminolaevulinic acid 1.54(0.39) mg/g creatinine (0.5-2.5). All 46 had distal paraesthesiae, pain, impaired pin prick sensation, diminished or absent ankle jerks, and autonomic vasomotor or sudomotor disturbances. Reduced vibration sensation and postural hypotension were present in all 20 studied. None of these 46 patients had motor anormalities. Motor conduction velocity and compound muscle action potential amplitudes were normal, with marginally prolonged distal motor latencies. Sensory nerve action potential amplitudes lay at the lower end of the normal range, and the distal sensory latencies were prolonged. No direct correlation was found between the biochemical variables, and the clinical or electrophysiological data.?CONCLUSIONS—One additional patient was seen with shorter term exposure to lead fumes with subacute development of colicky abdominal pain, severe limb weakness, and only minor sensory symptoms. Unlike the patients chronically exposed to lead, he had massively raised porphyrins (aminolaevulinic acid 21 mg/g creatinine, coproporhyrins 2102 µg/g creatinine). Patients with unusually long term inorganic lead exposure showed mild sensory and autonomic neuropathic features rather than the motor neuropathy classically attributed to lead toxicity. It is proposed that the traditional motor syndrome associated with subacute lead poisoning is more likely to be a form of lead induced porphyria rather than a direct neurotoxic effect of lead.?? PMID:11459892

  11. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert (Helsingfors, FI); Vogelstein, Bert (Baltimore, MD); Kinzler, Kenneth W. (Baltimore, MD)

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  12. Management of hereditary angioedema in pregnant women: a review

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Teresa; Canabal, Julio; Rivero-Paparoni, Daniela; Cabañas, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Three types of hereditary angioedema (HAE) have been described: two are due to C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency (C1-INH-HAE types I and II) and one is characterized by normal C1-INH (nC1-INH-HAE). The management of pregnancy in patients with HAE is often a clinical challenge owing to potential worsening of the disease in relation to the physiological increase in estrogens and the limited treatment options. This review addresses the potential influence of pregnancy on the clinical severity of hereditary angioedema and the management of this disease during pregnancy with currently available treatments. PMID:25228822

  13. Generalized peripheral neuropathy in a dental technician exposed to methyl methacrylate monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Donaghy, M.; Rushworth, G.; Jacobs, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    A 58-year-old dental prosthetic technician developed generalized sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy. Neurophysiologic studies showed a generalized sensorimotor neuropathy of axonal degeneration type. Examination of a sural nerve biopsy showed a moderately severe axonal neuropathy with loss of large myelinated fibers and unmyelinated axons. There was evidence of slow ongoing degeneration and considerable fiber regeneration. Electron microscopy showed increased numbers of filaments in a few fibers. These findings show resemblances to the nerve changes caused by another acrylic resin, acrylamide. They suggest that the neuropathy may have been caused by 30 years of occupational cutaneous and inhalational exposure to methyl methacrylate monomer since they excluded other recognized causes of neuropathy.

  14. Ghrelin reverses experimental diabetic neuropathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoraku, Itaru; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2009-11-20

    Ghrelin, an acylated peptide produced in the stomach, increases food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation and oxidative stress, and promotes cell survival and proliferation. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of polyneuropathy in uncontrolled streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice. Ghrelin or desacyl-ghrelin was administered daily for 4 weeks after STZ-induced diabetic polyneuropathy had developed. Ghrelin administration did not alter food intake, body weight gain, blood glucose levels, or plasma insulin levels when compared with mice given saline or desacyl-ghrelin administration. Ghrelin administration ameliorated reductions in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in diabetic mice and normalized their temperature sensation and plasma concentrations of 8-isoprostaglandin {alpha}, an oxidative stress marker. Desacyl-ghrelin failed to have any effect. Ghrelin administration in a mouse model of diabetes ameliorated polyneuropathy. Thus, ghrelin's effects represent a novel therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of this otherwise intractable disorder.

  15. Ulnar nerve sonography in leprosy neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Liu, Da-Yue; Lei, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with a half-year history of right forearm sensory and motor dysfunction. Ultrasound imaging revealed definite thickening of the right ulnar nerve trunk and inner epineurium, along with heterogeneous hypoechogenicity and unclear nerve fiber bundle. Color Doppler exhibited a rich blood supply, which was clearly different from the normal ulnar nerve presentation with a scarce blood supply. The patient subsequently underwent needle aspiration of the right ulnar nerve, and histopathological examination confirmed that granulomatous nodules had formed with a large number of infiltrating lymphocytes and a plurality of epithelioid cells in the fibrous connective tissues, with visible atypical foam cells and proliferous vascularization, consistent with leprosy. Our report will familiarize readers with the characteristic sonographic features of the ulnar nerve in leprosy, particularly because of the decreasing incidence of leprosy in recent years. PMID:26703181

  16. Evaluation of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy using Current Perception Threshold and Clinical Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Kathleen A.; Couture, Darren J.; Zhu, Shijun; Pandya, Naimish; Johantgen, Mary E.; Cavaletti, Guido; Davenport, Joan M.; Tanguay, Lori J.; Choflet, Amanda; Milliron, Todd; Glass, Erica; Gambill, Nancy; Renn, Cynthia L.; Dorsey, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is increasing with introduction of new and combination cancer pharmacotherapies. This study evaluated associations between clinical and self-report measurements and current perception threshold (CPT), a neuroselective measure of sensory nerve function that may detect asymptomatic CIPN damage. Methods Data for this secondary analysis were from a prospective, observational study using CPT to evaluate CIPN. Bivariate mixed models, accounting for the intra-class correlation between repeated patient assessments, were used to assess the relationship between CPT at each frequency (5Hz, 250Hz and 2000 Hz) and each subjective measure (Neuropathic Pain Scale, FACT-GOGntx) and objective measurement (quantitative sensory testing, deep tendon reflexes, grip strength). Results A total of 29 chemotherapy-naïve subjects with various cancer types had a mean age of 56.7 (SD 10.4); 9 subjects developed CIPN grade > 1 using NCI CTC-AE criteria. Cold detection thresholds were inversely associated with CPT 5 [b(95% CI) =?2.5(?4.5, ?0.5)] and CPT 2000 [?7.5(?11.8, ?3.3)] frequencies. FACT GOG-ntx quality of life (QoL) scale and neurotoxicity and function subscales were inversely associated with CPT 2000 [?1.8 (?3.5, ?0.05), ?2.2 (?4.2, ?0.2), and ?5.4(?9.8, ?0.9), respectively], indicating worsening QoL, impairment, and function as hypoesthesia increases. Conclusions CPT 2000 may identify impending worsening of patient-reported outcomes, such as QoL. PMID:24362842

  17. Assessment of the utility of ultrasonography with high-frequency transducers in the diagnosis of posttraumatic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this paper was to assess the relevance of high-frequency ultrasound examination in qualifying patients for either surgical or conservative treatment of posttraumatic peripheral neuropathies. The study was conducted in a group of 47 patients aged 16–65 (mean age 33) who in 2009–2011 were referred to ultrasound examinations due to a clinical suspicion of posttraumatic peripheral neuropathies. The group included 30 females and 17 males. The patients examined presented with neuropathies of the following peripheral nerves: median, ulnar, common peroneal, digital, cutaneous in the deltoid area, mental, PIN and RSNR. In 21 patients, nerve injuries were partial, and in 24 – complete. In 2 cases, the nerve was entrapped between bony fragments. 17 of 21 patients with partial nerve injuries (80.95%) underwent an EMG examination. No functional tests were conducted in the cases of complete injuries when ultrasound imaging had confirmed the result of the clinical examination. All patients underwent the interview, physical examination and ultrasound examination. Ultrasound examinations were performed with Esaote MyLab 50 and MyLab 60 systems using high-frequency broadband linear transducers: 6–18 MHz. The nerves were evaluated in the gray-scale and in the power Doppler mode in longitudinal and transverse sections for localization, morphology and the grade of injury as well as for possible anatomic variants of the nerve trunk and pathologies of the adjacent tissues. Moreover, a dynamic examination was performed, and it was attempted to induce pain or paresthesia by palpation at the site of the visualized pathology. Additionally, the motor and sensory–motor nerves were assessed indirectly based on the images of the skeletal muscles innervated by these nerves. The analyses of the collected material were performed by means of descriptive statistics. The results of clinical and surgical verification were consistent with ultrasound findings in 100% of cases. The results obtained indicate that high-frequency ultrasonography is a valuable method in qualifying patients for various types of treatment of peripheral neuropathies resulting from trauma. PMID:26675749

  18. Nanostructured Biosensor for Measuring Neuropathy Target Esterase Activity

    E-print Network

    Lee, Ilsoon

    Nanostructured Biosensor for Measuring Neuropathy Target Esterase Activity Neeraj Kohli, Devesh, such as motor neuron disease. This paper describes development of the first nanostructured biosensor interface containing a catalytically active fragment of NTE known as NEST. The biosensor was fabricated using the layer

  19. Clinical research for neuropathies. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The author discusses several ways in which participation in clinical research on neuropathies can be improved. Both patients and providers need to become better informed about the availability of trials. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations should play a major role in informing their constituents about the value of clinical research and assist patients and providers in becoming involved.

  20. Exercise as Therapy for Diabetic and Prediabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singleton, J Robinson; Smith, A Gordon; Marcus, Robin L

    2015-12-01

    Length-dependent neuropathy is the most common and costly complication of diabetes and frequently causes injury primarily to small-diameter cutaneous nociceptive fibers. Not only persistent hyperglycemia but also metabolic, endocrine, and inflammatory effects of obesity and dyslipidemia appear to play an important role in the development of diabetic neuropathy. Rational therapies aimed at direct control of glucose or its increased entry into the polyol pathway, oxidative or nitrosative stress, advanced glycation end product formation or signaling, microvascular ischemia, or adipocyte-derived toxicity have each failed in human trials of diabetic neuropathy. Aerobic exercise produces salutary effects in many of these pathogenic pathways simultaneously and, in both animal models and human trials, has been shown to improve symptoms of neuropathy and promote re-growth of cutaneous small-diameter fibers. Behavioral reduction in periods of seated, awake inactivity produces multimodal metabolic benefits similar to exercise, and the two strategies when combined may offer sustained benefit to peripheral nerve function. PMID:26538074

  1. Diabetic Neuropathy: What is a Total Contact Cast?

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Diabetic Neuropathy | What is a Total Contact Cast? What is a total contact cast? A total contact cast is a cast used to treat ulcers (serious, deep sores) on a person’s foot. It consists of a fiberglass shell that fits around your leg and foot very ...

  2. Canadian guideline on genetic screening for hereditary renal cell cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reaume, M. Neil; Graham, Gail E.; Tomiak, Eva; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Jewett, Michael A.S.; Bjarnason, Georg A.; Blais, Normand; Care, Melanie; Drachenberg, Darryl; Gedye, Craig; Grant, Ronald; Heng, Daniel Y.C.; Kapoor, Anil; Kollmannsberger, Christian; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Maher, Eamonn R.; Pause, Arnim; Ruether, Dean; Soulieres, Denis; Tanguay, Simon; Turcotte, Sandra; Violette, Philippe D.; Wood, Lori; Basiuk, Joan; Pautler, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hereditary renal cell cancer (RCC) is an ideal model for germline genetic testing. We propose a guideline of hereditary RCC specific criteria to suggest referral for genetic assessment. Methods: A review of the literature and stakeholder resources for existing guidelines or consensus statements was performed. Referral criteria were developed by expert consensus. Results: The criteria included characteristics for patients with RCC (age ?45 years, bilateral or multifocal tumours, associated medical conditions and non-clear cell histologies with unusual features) and for patients with or without RCC, but a family history of specific clinical or genetic diagnoses. Conclusions: This guideline represents a practical RCC-specific reference to allow healthcare providers to identify patients who may have a hereditary RCC syndrome, without extensive knowledge of each syndrome. RCC survivors and their families can also use the document to guide their discussions with healthcare providers about their need for referral. The criteria refer to the most common hereditary renal tumour syndromes and do not represent a comprehensive or exclusive list. Prospective validation of the criteria is warranted. PMID:24319509

  3. DNA structures, repeat expansions and human hereditary Sergei M Mirkin

    E-print Network

    Mirkin, Sergei

    fragile X syndrome, myotonic dystrophy, Huntington's disease, various spinocerebellar ataxias, Friedreich for the human hereditary disorder myotonic dystrophy. This disease appeared to have ear- lier onset of (CAG)n repeat expansions in spinobulbar muscular atro- phy [6], (CTG)n repeat expansions in myotonic

  4. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  5. Success and Failure for Hereditary Harrop Formulae James Harland

    E-print Network

    Harland, James

    Success and Failure for Hereditary Harrop Formulae James Harland Department of Computer Science to a pair of sets of atoms which denote the success and (finite) failure sets. This is inspired by the work of success and failure will be mutually dependent in a logic programming system using the NAF rule

  6. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Toss, Angela; Tomasello, Chiara; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Contu, Giannina; Grandi, Giovanni; Cagnacci, Angelo; Schilder, Russell J.; Cortesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR) genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making. PMID:26075229

  7. [Small fiber neuropathy in a patient with complete Heerfordt syndrome manifesting as refractory facial pain].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Toshiaki; Miyagawa, Shinji; Matsui, Kazutaka; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of complete Heerfordt syndrome accompanied by the involvement of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) manifesting as refracory facial pain. A 30-year-old man presented with pyrexia, a 2-week history of facial burning pain, and difficulty of mastication. After admission to our hospital, neurological examinations showed bilateral facial pain, trigeminal motor palsy, left facial nerve palsy, bilateral sensory neural deafness, uveitis and swelling of the parotid gland. Other examinations revealed bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, high serum titer of angiotensin coenzyme, and no response in a tuberculin-tested, non-caseating epithelioid granuloma from lip biopsy, leading to the diagnosis of complete Heerfordt syndrome. Mandibular skin biopsy with immunostaining for PGP 9.5 showed SFN. High-dose corticosteroids proved somewhat effective against SFN as facial pain, but reducing the corticosteroid dose proved difficult, as symptoms were refractory to other immunosuppressants and pain-control drugs such as anti-epileptics and anti-depressants. The patient died of acute pancreatitis 3 years after disease onset. Autopsy showed no granuloma in hilar lymph node, trigeminal nerve, cranial base, nerve root, and muscle. SFN in this case probably represent a cause of refractory facial pain. PMID:25087562

  8. Kelch Domain of Gigaxonin Interacts with Intermediate Filament Proteins Affected in Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Kerner, Bethany L.; Garcia Diaz, Alejandro; Ekins, Sean; Wichterle, Hynek

    2015-01-01

    Patients with giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) show progressive loss of motor and sensory function starting in childhood and typically live for less than 30 years. GAN is caused by autosomal recessive mutations leading to low levels of gigaxonin (GIG), a ubiquitously-expressed BTB/Kelch cytoplasmic protein believed to be an E3 ligase substrate adaptor. GAN pathology is characterized by aggregates of intermediate filaments (IFs) in multiple tissues. To delineate the molecular pathway between GIG deficiency and IF pathology, we undertook a proteomic screen to identify the normal binding partners of GIG. Prominent among them were several classes of IFs, including the neurofilament subunits whose accumulation leads to the axonal swellings for which GAN is named. We showed these interactions were dependent on the Kelch domain of GIG. Furthermore, we identified the E3 ligase MYCBP2 and the heat shock proteins HSP90AA1/AB1 as interactors with the BTB domain that may result in the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of intermediate filaments. Our open-ended proteomic screen provides support to GIG’s role as an adaptor protein, linking IF proteins through its Kelch domain to the ubiquitin pathway proteins via its BTB domain, and points to future approaches for reversing the phenotype in human patients. PMID:26460568

  9. Transforming Growth Factor-? Induces Cellular Injury in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyulu, Muragundla; Berent-Spillson, Alison; Inoue, Tatsuya; Choi, Joungil; Cherian, Kay; Russell, James W.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism/s leading to diabetic neuropathy are complex. Transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) has been associated with diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy but not neuropathy. In this study, changes in TGF-? isoforms were examined in-vivo and in-vitro. Two groups of animals, streptozotocin diabetic with neuropathy and non-diabetic controls were examined at 4 weeks (n=10/group) and 12 weeks (n=8/group). In diabetic DRG using quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), TGF-?1 and TGF-?2 mRNA, but not TGF-?3, was increased at 4 and 12 weeks. In sciatic nerve TGF-?3 mRNA was primarily increased. Immunohistochemistry (DRG) and immunoblotting (sciatic nerve) showed similar differential protein expression. In sciatic nerve TGF-? formed homo- and heterodimers, of which ?2/?3, ?1/?1, and ?1/?3 were significantly increased, while that of the TGF-?2/?2 homodimer was decreased, in diabetic compared to non-diabetic rats. In-vitro, pretreatment of embryonic DRG with TGF-? neutralizing antibody prevents the increase in total TGF-? protein observed with high glucose using immunoblotting. In high glucose conditions, combination with TGF-?2 > ?1 increases the percent of cleaved caspase-3 compared to high glucose alone and TGF-? neutralizing antibody inhibits this increase. Furthermore, consistent with the findings in diabetic DRG and nerve, TGF-? isoforms applied directly in vitro reduce neurite outgrowth, and this effect is partially reversed by TGF-? neutralizing antibody. These findings implicate upregulation of TGF-? in experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy and indicate a novel mechanism of cellular injury related to elevated glucose levels. In combination, these findings indicate a potential new target for treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:18406405

  10. Sensory adaptation for timing perception.

    PubMed

    Roseboom, Warrick; Linares, Daniel; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-04-22

    Recent sensory experience modifies subjective timing perception. For example, when visual events repeatedly lead auditory events, such as when the sound and video tracks of a movie are out of sync, subsequent vision-leads-audio presentations are reported as more simultaneous. This phenomenon could provide insights into the fundamental problem of how timing is represented in the brain, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that the effect of recent experience on timing perception is not just subjective; recent sensory experience also modifies relative timing discrimination. This result indicates that recent sensory history alters the encoding of relative timing in sensory areas, excluding explanations of the subjective phenomenon based only on decision-level changes. The pattern of changes in timing discrimination suggests the existence of two sensory components, similar to those previously reported for visual spatial attributes: a lateral shift in the nonlinear transducer that maps relative timing into perceptual relative timing and an increase in transducer slope around the exposed timing. The existence of these components would suggest that previous explanations of how recent experience may change the sensory encoding of timing, such as changes in sensory latencies or simple implementations of neural population codes, cannot account for the effect of sensory adaptation on timing perception. PMID:25788590

  11. Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia: sensory features and pain mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dubner, R; Sharav, Y; Gracely, R H; Price, D D

    1987-10-01

    We present a case report of a patient with the typical sensory features of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN). The pain was elicited by innocuous stimuli, summated with repeated stimulation, radiated outside the stimulus zone, referred to a distant site, persisted beyond the period of stimulation, and exhibited a variable refractory period. Unusual sensory features included multiple trigger zones that changed over time and involved all 3 trigeminal divisions. Our sensory evaluation indicated that the pain was evoked by repetitive activation of rapidly adapting, A beta, low-threshold mechanoreceptive afferents. However, activation of such mechanoreceptive afferents alone never produces pain in normal situations and often leads to a suppression of pain responsivity. The findings support the idea that the mechanism of pain in ITN involves pathophysiological mechanisms in the central nervous system. Our hypothesis is that structural and functional changes in the trigeminal system result in an alteration in the receptive field organization of wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons. There appears to be an alteration in the surround inhibition mechanism of these neurons leading to an expansion of their touch receptive fields. This results in touch stimuli producing activity in WDR neurons that mimics the activity produced under normal conditions by noxious stimuli. Since WDR neurons participate in the encoding of the perceived intensity of noxious stimuli, a series of punctate tactile stimuli are now perceived as localized, pin-prick or electric shock-like sensations. Similar pathophysiological mechanisms may explain, in part, the pain of peripheral neuropathies associated with postherpetic neuralgia, diabetes and causalgia. PMID:3696741

  12. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID:24379786

  13. Novel myosin mutations for hereditary hearing loss revealed by targeted genomic capture and massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, Zippora; Abu-Rayyan, Amal; Karfunkel-Doron, Daphne; Sirigu, Serena; Davidov, Bella; Shohat, Mordechai; Frydman, Moshe; Houdusse, Anne; Kanaan, Moien; Avraham, Karen B

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is genetically heterogeneous, with a large number of genes and mutations contributing to this sensory, often monogenic, disease. This number, as well as large size, precludes comprehensive genetic diagnosis of all known deafness genes. A combination of targeted genomic capture and massively parallel sequencing (MPS), also referred to as next-generation sequencing, was applied to determine the deafness-causing genes in hearing-impaired individuals from Israeli Jewish and Palestinian Arab families. Among the mutations detected, we identified nine novel mutations in the genes encoding myosin VI, myosin VIIA and myosin XVA, doubling the number of myosin mutations in the Middle East. Myosin VI mutations were identified in this population for the first time. Modeling of the mutations provided predicted mechanisms for the damage they inflict in the molecular motors, leading to impaired function and thus deafness. The myosin mutations span all regions of these molecular motors, leading to a wide range of hearing phenotypes, reinforcing the key role of this family of proteins in auditory function. This study demonstrates that multiple mutations responsible for hearing loss can be identified in a relatively straightforward manner by targeted-gene MPS technology and concludes that this is the optimal genetic diagnostic approach for identification of mutations responsible for hearing loss. PMID:24105371

  14. Sensory receptors in monotremes.

    PubMed

    Proske, U; Gregory, J E; Iggo, A

    1998-07-29

    This is a summary of the current knowledge of sensory receptors in skin of the bill of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, and the snout of the echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus. Brief mention is also made of the third living member of the monotremes, the long-nosed echidna, Zaglossus bruijnii. The monotremes are the only group of mammals known to have evolved electroreception. The structures in the skin responsible for the electric sense have been identified as sensory mucous glands with an expanded epidermal portion that is innervated by large-diameter nerve fibres. Afferent recordings have shown that in both platypuses and echidnas the receptors excited by cathodal (negative) pulses and inhibited by anodal (positive) pulses. Estimates give a total of 40,000 mucous sensory glands in the upper and lower bill of the platypus, whereas there are only about 100 in the tip of the echidna snout. Recording of electroreceptor-evoked activity from the brain of the platypus have shown that the largest area dedicated to somatosensory input from the bill, S1, shows alternating rows of mechanosensory and bimodal neurons. The bimodal neurons respond to both electrosensory and mechanical inputs. In skin of the platypus bill and echidna snout, apart from the electroreceptors, there are structures called push rods, which consist of a column of compacted cells that is able to move relatively independently of adjacent regions of skin. At the base of the column are Merkel cell complexes, known to be type I slowly adapting mechanoreceptors, and lamellated corpuscles, probably vibration receptors. It has been speculated that the platypus uses its electric sense to detect the electromyographic activity from moving prey in the water and for obstacle avoidance. Mechanoreceptors signal contact with the prey. For the echidna, a role for the electrosensory system has not yet been established during normal foraging behaviour, although it has been shown that it is able to detect the presence of weak electric fields in water. Perhaps the electric sense is used to detect moving prey in moist soil. PMID:9720114

  15. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level. METHODS: MSI was detected in the specimens from 20 cases with HNPCC, 20 cases with ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and 20 cases with sporadic colorectal cancer by means of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism. RESULTS: The positive rate of MSI was 85% (17/20) in HNPCC group, 40% (8/20) in ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer group and 10% (2/20) in the sporadic colorectal cancer group respectively. The differences were significant. The mean ages of the three groups were 43.6, 52.2, and 61.8 years respectively, which increased gradually. The incidence of right hemicolon cancer was 64.7%, 37.5%, and 0% respectively, which decreased gradually and had significant difference. The expression ratio of BAT26 and BAT25 was 94.1% respectively, which was highest in the 5 gene sites studied. The incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was 70.6% in HNPCC group among high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), which was higher than the other two groups, which had 50% and 50% respectively. CONCLUSION: The incidence of MSI-H is higher in HNPCC group. The detection of MSI is simple and economical and has high correlation with the clinicopathologic feature of HNPCC and can be used as a screening method to detect the germ line mutation of the mismatch repair gene. PMID:16937450

  16. ENDEAVOUR: Phase 3 Multicenter Study of Revusiran (ALN-TTRSC) in Patients With Transthyretin (TTR) Mediated Familial Amyloidotic Cardiomyopathy (FAC)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-12

    Transthyretin (TTR) Mediated Familial Amyloidotic Cardiomyopathy (FAC); Amyloidosis, Hereditary; Amyloid Neuropathies, Familial; Amyloid Neuropathies; Amyloidosis, Hereditary, Transthyretin-Related; Familial Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis

  17. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N.; Stum, Morgane; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W.; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNAGly aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT. PMID:26138142

  18. The Association between Serum Cytokines and Damage to Large and Small Nerve Fibers in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Magrinelli, Francesca; Briani, Chiara; Romano, Marcello; Ruggero, Susanna; Toffanin, Elisabetta; Triolo, Giuseppa; Peter, George Chummar; Praitano, Marialuigia; Lauriola, Matteo Francesco; Zanette, Giampietro

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a frequent complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and may involve small and large peripheral nerve fibers. Recent evidence suggests a role of cytokines in DPN. The paper is aimed at exploring whether the serum concentration of cytokines is associated with small and large nerve fiber function and with neuropathic pain (NP). We recruited a group of 32 type 2 DM patients who underwent serum cytokines (TNF-?, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10) dosage as well as electrodiagnostic and quantitative sensory testing (QST) assessment to explore damage to large and small nerve fibers. Raised serum levels of IL-6 and IL-10 correlated with markers of large nerve fiber sensory and motor axonal damage. Raised IL-10 serum level was associated with signs of motor nerve demyelination. No differences were found in pain characteristics and electrodiagnostic and QST markers of small nerve fiber function in relation to cytokines serum levels. IL-6 and IL-10 serum levels were associated with large nerve fiber damage but not to small fibers function or NP. IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines might play a role in the pathogenesis of nerve fiber damage or represent a compensatory or neuroprotective mechanism. PMID:25961054

  19. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N; Stum, Morgane; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNA(Gly) aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT. PMID:26138142

  20. Reply to Vance et al.

    SciTech Connect

    Woon-Chee Yee; Elliott, J.L; Kwon, J.M.; Goodfellow, P.

    1996-07-01

    In our report of a family with a motor and sensory polyneuropathy that was linked to chromosome 3q, we classified this neuropathy as a form of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy II (HMSN II, also known as {open_quotes}CMT2{close_quotes}). Doubts have been raised by Vance et al. as to whether this neuropathy should be classified as hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy I (HSAN I) instead of HMSN II. While it is reasonable to raise such doubts, we believe that the neuropathy is best designated as HMSN II for the reasons described below. The group of disorders described as HSAN are characterized by primary or predominant involvement of sensory and autonomic neurons that fail to develop or that undergo atrophy and degeneration. These disorders were extensively reviewed by Dyck and Ohta, who initially described them as the hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN). It was Dyck who subsequently suggested that these disorders be designated HSAN rather than HSN, because of the presence of autonomic involvement. 8 refs.

  1. Toxic optic neuropathy following ingestion of homeopathic medication Arnica-30.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Devendra V; Goel, Shubhra; Ratra, Vineet; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of acute, bilateral and severe vision loss after inadvertent consumption of a large quantity of the homoeopathic medication Arnica-30. Severe vomiting which required hospitalization preceded visual symptoms. In the acute stage, pupillary responses to light were absent and fundus examination was normal. Vision loss followed a fluctuating course, with profound loss noted after 6 weeks along with bilateral optic disc pallor. Neuro-ophthalmic examination and detailed investigations were performed, including magnetic resonance imaging, electroretinography (ERG) and visual evoked potentials (VEP). Ocular coherence tomography (OCT) showed gross thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer. While a differential diagnosis of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was kept in mind, these findings supported a diagnosis of bilateral toxic optic neuropathy. Arnica-30 is popularly used to accelerate wound healing, including after oculoplastic surgery. While homeopathic medicines are generally considered safe due to the very low concentrations involved, Arnica-30 may be neurotoxic if consumed internally in large quantities. PMID:22877081

  2. Suspected hypothyroid-associated neuropathy in a female rottweiler dog

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, James Oliver; Leschnik, Michael; Nell, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    A 7-year-old, 46-kg spayed female rottweiler dog was presented with sudden onset of disorientation, bilateral convergent strabismus, and enophthalmos. Diagnostic workup revealed hypothyroid-associated cranial neuropathy. Symptoms abated considerably upon treatment with levothyroxine-sodium (T4) at an initial dose of 800 ?g/kg body weight (BW), PO, q12h, which was reduced 3 days later to 600 ?g/kg BW, q12h due to severe agitation and panting. Two weeks later the dosage of the levothyroxine-sodium (T4) was reduced to 400 ?g/kg BW in the morning and 600 ?g/kg BW in the evening. Eight weeks after the initial presentation, the dog had recovered with only mild convergent strabismus in the right eye. This is the first case report of suspected hypothyroid-associated neuropathy resulting in these symptoms. PMID:24082164

  3. Ulnar neuropathy with prominent proximal Martin-Gruber anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Burakgazi, Ahmet Z; Russo, Mary; Bayat, Elham; Richardson, Perry K

    2014-07-01

    Martin-Gruber anastomosis (MGA) is the most common nerve anastomosis in the upper extremities and it crosses from the median nerve to the ulnar nerve. Proximal MGA is an under recognized anastomosis between the ulnar and median nerves at or above the elbow and should not be missed during nerve conduction studies. We presented two patients with ulnar neuropathy mimicking findings including numbness and tingling of the 4th and 5th digits and mild weakness of intrinsic hand muscles. However, both cases had an apparently remarkable conduction block between the below- and above-elbow sites that was disproportionate to their clinical findings. To explain this discrepancy, a large MGA was detected with stimulation of the median nerve at the elbow. Thus, proximal MGA should be considered in ulnar neuropathy at the elbow when apparent conduction block or/and discrepancy between clinical and electrodiagnostic findings is found. PMID:24147570

  4. Hereditary Renal Cell Carcinoma Syndromes: Clinical, Pathologic, and Genetic Features.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, Adebowale J; Shuch, Brian; Humphrey, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Renal cell carcinomas associated with syndromes of a heritable nature account for about 4% of all renal cell carcinomas. They are characterized by an earlier age of onset, and are often multicentric and bilateral. Some of these patients may fit into well-characterized kidney cancer syndromes, while many more may have a genetic component that is not fully recognized or understood. The presence of extrarenal clinical features may suggest a specific renal tumor susceptibility syndrome. Moreover, each syndrome is associated with specific renal pathology findings. Recognition of individuals and families with a high risk of renal neoplasia is important so that surveillance for renal tumors may be initiated. This manuscript reviews the clinical, pathological, and molecular features of hereditary renal cell carcinoma syndromes with emphasis on the morphologic features of these tumors and the molecular mechanisms of hereditary renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26559379

  5. Difference equation state approximations for nonlinear hereditary control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.

    1982-01-01

    Discrete approximation schemes for the solution of nonlinear hereditary control problems are constructed. The methods involve approximation by a sequence of optimal control problems in which the original infinite dimensional state equation has been approximated by a finite dimensional discrete difference equation. Convergence of the state approximations is argued using linear semigroup theory and is then used to demonstrate that solutions to the approximating optimal control problems in some sense approximate solutions to the original control problem. Two schemes, one based upon piecewise constant approximation, and the other involving spline functions are discussed. Numerical results are presented, analyzed and used to compare the schemes to other available approximation methods for the solution of hereditary control problems.

  6. Difference equation state approximations for nonlinear hereditary control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    Discrete approximation schemes for the solution of nonlinear hereditary control problems are constructed. The methods involve approximation by a sequence of optimal control problems in which the original infinite dimensional state equation has been approximated by a finite dimensional discrete difference equation. Convergence of the state approximations is argued using linear semigroup theory and is then used to demonstrate that solutions to the approximating optimal control problems in some sense approximate solutions to the original control problem. Two schemes, one based upon piecewise constant approximation, and the other involving spline functions are discussed. Numerical results are presented, analyzed and used to compare the schemes to other available approximation methods for the solution of hereditary control problems. Previously announced in STAR as N83-33589

  7. Hereditary cancer risk assessment: essential tools for a better approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary cancer risk assessment (HCRA) is a multidisciplinary process of estimating probabilities of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes and assessing empiric risks of cancer, based on personal and family history. It includes genetic counseling, testing and management of at-risk individuals so that they can make well-informed choices about cancer surveillance, surgical treatment and chemopreventive measures, including biomolecular cancer therapies. Providing patients and family members with an appropriate HCRA will contribute to a better process of making decisions about their personal and family risks of cancer. Following individuals at high risk through screening protocols, reassuring those at low risk, and referring those at increased risk of hereditary cancer to a cancer genetics center may be the best suitable approach of HCRA. PMID:24165150

  8. [Aspects of diagnosis and treatment of the facial nerve neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Mironenko, T V; Korotnev, V N

    2002-01-01

    As many as 86 patients with neuropathy of the facial nerve complicated by development of postneuritic muscular contractures were examined. Based on the clinical-and-neurophysiological investigation, findings from rheoencephalography, electroencephalography, echoencephaloscopy, electrodiagnosis of the facial nerve, clinical variants of the facial nerve function return to normal were defined together with causes of development of muscular contractures. Efficiency is shown of use of acupuncture and magnetotherapy combined in treatment of the above trouble. PMID:12442521

  9. Clinical results using informatics to evaluate hereditary cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S.; Lynch, H. T.; Fusaro, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    A 12-year medical informatics project is described whose goal was to create a distributable computer-based service to support the identification of hereditary cancer patterns and recommend concomitant protocols of patient care surveillance. Key elements of the successful implementation strategy are described as the service has been successfully utilized at more than a dozen other cancer centers. Multi-year clinical results are presented from the implementation of this service. PMID:8563409

  10. The armadillo as a model for peripheral neuropathy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Pena, Maria T; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Scollard, David M; McArthur, Justin C; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  11. The Armadillo as a Model for Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Ebenezer, Gigi J.; Pena, Maria T.; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Scollard, David M.; McArthur, Justin C.; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  12. [A case of Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy successfully treated with duloxetine].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Satoshi; Kiba, Takayoshi; Ogawa, Yoshikazu; Mura, Takuya; Kajiume, Sayoko; Okada, Yuuko; Morii, Nao; Takahashi, Hirotoshi; Ichiba, Yasunori; Yamashiro, Hiroyasu

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report about a 60-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who was successfully treated for paclitaxelinduced peripheral neuropathy with duloxetine. She was administered trastuzumab plus paclitaxel(PTX)combination therapy that was ultimately discontinued because of grade 3 peripheral neuropathy detected on day 15, according to the CTCAE (v4.0). She was administered duloxetine on day 90 after the end of the previous therapy because of the peripheral neuropathy. Thereafter, the peripheral neuropathy decreased to grade 1, which enabled PTX administration on her request. Further trials are required to confirm the efficacy of duloxetine. PMID:25981658

  13. Progressive Axonal Dysfunction Precedes Development of Neuropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jia-Ying; Park, Susanna B.; Liu, Ya-Ting; Kwai, Natalie; Arnold, Ria; Krishnan, Arun V.; Lin, Cindy S.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the development of diabetic neuropathy, the current study examined changes in peripheral axonal function. Nerve excitability techniques were undertaken in 108 type 2 diabetic patients with nerve conduction studies (NCS), HbA1c levels, and total neuropathy score (TNS). Patients were categorized into two cohorts: patients with diabetes without neuropathy (DWN group [n = 56]) and patients with diabetes with neuropathy (DN group [n = 52]) and further into severity grade 0 (TNS 0–1 [n = 35]), grade 1 (TNS 2–8 [n = 42]), and grade 2/3 (TNS 9–24 [n = 31]). Results revealed that the DWN group had a significantly increased threshold, prolonged latency, and changes in excitability parameters compared with age-matched control subjects. Patients with neuropathy demonstrated significant alteration in recovery cycle parameters and depolarizing threshold electrotonus. Within the DWN cohort, there were significant correlations between HbA1c level and latency and subexcitability, whereas the estimated glomerular filtration rate correlated with superexcitability in patients with neuropathy. Furthermore, excitability parameters became progressively more abnormal with increasing clinical severity. These results suggest a spectrum of excitability abnormalities in patients with diabetes and that early axonal dysfunction may be detected prior to the development of neuropathy. As progressive changes in excitability parameters correlated to neuropathy severity, excitability testing may provide a biomarker of the early development and severity of diabetic neuropathy, providing insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms producing axonal dysfunction. PMID:22522615

  14. Risk-reducing surgery in hereditary gynecological cancer: Clinical applications in Lynch syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    ADACHI, MASATAKA; BANNO, KOUJI; YANOKURA, MEGUMI; IIDA, MIHO; NAKAMURA, KANAKO; NOGAMI, YUYA; UMENE, KIYOKO; MASUDA, KENTA; KISU, IORI; UEKI, ARISA; HIRASAWA, AKIRA; TOMINAGA, EIICHIRO; AOKI, DAISUKE

    2015-01-01

    Risk-reducing surgery (RRS) is defined as a prophylactic approach with removal of organs at high risk of developing cancer, which is performed in cases without lesions or absence of clinically significant lesions. Hereditary gynecological cancers for which RRS is performed include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and Lynch syndrome. For HBOC, RRS in the United States (US) is recommended for women with mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility (BRCA)1 and BRCA2 genes and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is generally performed. This procedure may reduce the risk of breast, ovarian, Fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer, although ovarian deficiency symptoms occur postoperatively. For Lynch syndrome, RRS in the US is considered for postmenopausal women or for women who do not desire to bear children and BSO and hysterectomy are usually performed. This approach may reduce the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer, although ovarian deficiency symptoms also occur. For RRS, there are several issues that must be addressed to reduce the risk of cancer development in patients with HBOC or Lynch syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to discuss RRS with a focus on hereditary gynecological cancer. PMID:25798252

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Spastic paraplegia type 11

    MedlinePLUS

    ... system ; neuropathy ; nystagmus ; paraplegia ; peripheral ; peripheral nervous system ; pes cavus ; prevalence ; protein ; recessive ; scoliosis ; sensory cells ; sensory neuropathy ; spasticity ; tissue ; ...

  16. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3?6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice. PMID:25928068

  17. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hee; Chae, Jisook; Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3?6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice. PMID:25928068

  18. Incidence, prevalence, and predictors of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Seretny, Marta; Currie, Gillian L; Sena, Emily S; Ramnarine, Sabrina; Grant, Robin; MacLeod, Malcolm R; Colvin, Leslie A; Fallon, Marie

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a disabling pain condition resulting from chemotherapy for cancer. Severe acute CIPN may require chemotherapy dose reduction or cessation. There is no effective CIPN prevention strategy; treatment of established chronic CIPN is limited, and the prevalence of CIPN is not known. Here we used a systematic review to identify studies reporting the prevalence of CIPN. We searched Embase, Medline, CAB Abstracts, CINAHL, PubMed central, Cochrane Library, and Web of Knowledge for relevant references and used random-effects meta-regression to estimate overall prevalence. We assessed study quality using the CONSORT and STROBE guidelines, and we report findings according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidance. We provide a qualitative summary of factors reported to alter the risk of CIPN. We included 31 studies with data from 4179 patients in our analysis. CIPN prevalence was 68.1% (57.7-78.4) when measured in the first month after chemotherapy, 60.0% (36.4-81.6) at 3months and 30.0% (6.4-53.5) at 6months or more. Different chemotherapy drugs were associated with differences in CIPN prevalence, and there was some evidence of publication bias. Genetic risk factors were reported in 4 studies. Clinical risk factors, identified in 4 of 31 studies, included neuropathy at baseline, smoking, abnormal creatinine clearance, and specific sensory changes during chemotherapy. Although CIPN prevalence decreases with time, at 6months 30% of patients continue to suffer from CIPN. Routine CIPN surveillance during post-chemotherapy follow-up is needed. A number of genetic and clinical risk factors were identified that require further study. PMID:25261162

  19. Autoantibody-Mediated Sensory Polyneuropathy Associated with Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormalities of the peripheral nervous system occur in 5% of patients with lymphoma. Polyneuropathy has not been described in patients with mantle-cell and marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. Case Report Two elderly patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma developed a progressive sensory polyneuropathy that was associated with serum autoantibodies directed against asialosyl/sialosyl gangliosides and myelin-associated glycoprotein/sulfated glucuronyl paragloboside, respectively, which are peripheral-nerve antigens. The oligoclonal pattern of these antibodies hinted at a lymphoma-induced immune dysregulation. The neuropathy stabilized clinically during treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin G. B-cell lymphoma was managed with a "watchful waiting" approach. Conclusions The concept of antigen-specific, immune-mediated neuropathy associated with slow-growing lymphoma of mature B-cells may be underrecognized. The principle of treating the illness underlying neuropathy may not be always indicated or necessary if risk-benefit and cost-benefit analyses are taken into account. PMID:25749823

  20. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  1. Effects of a T-type calcium channel blocker, ABT-639, on spontaneous activity in C-nociceptors in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Serra, Jordi; Duan, W Rachel; Locke, Charles; Solà, Romà; Liu, Wei; Nothaft, Wolfram

    2015-11-01

    T-type calcium channels are a potential novel target for treatment of neuropathic pain such as painful diabetic neuropathy. ABT-639 is a peripherally acting highly selective T-type Cav3.2 calcium channel blocker that has demonstrated analgesic efficacy in preclinical models and may have the potential to reduce spontaneous fiber activity. Microneurography is a unique technique that directly assesses the function of peripheral sensory afferents and measures abnormal spontaneous activity in single peripheral nociceptive C fibers. Abnormal spontaneous activity in C-nociceptors functions as a marker for spontaneous pain, as reduction of this activity could indicate analgesic efficacy. This randomized, double-blind controlled study evaluated the effects of a single 100-mg oral dose of ABT-639, compared with placebo, on abnormal spontaneous activity in peripheral C-nociceptors, measured for the first time by microneurography in adult patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Lidocaine was included in this study and compared with placebo. Pharmacokinetics and safety of ABT-639 were evaluated. Thirty-nine patients were randomized, and a total of 56 analyzable C-nociceptors with spontaneous activity were identified in 34 patients. There were no significant differences in C-nociceptor activities after ABT-639 treatment vs placebo. Similar findings were observed for lidocaine vs placebo. There were no clinically significant findings in the safety of ABT-639. Further research of T-type Cav3.2 calcium channels as potential treatment targets for painful diabetic neuropathy is warranted. The utilization of microneurography as a means to measure abnormal activity in C-nociceptors in human clinical studies opens new possibilities for future studies of compounds targeting peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01589432. PMID:26035253

  2. Early-Onset Osteoarthritis, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Like Neuropathy, Autoimmune Features, Multiple Arterial Aneurysms and Dissections: An Unrecognized and Life Threatening Condition

    PubMed Central

    Aubart, Mélodie; Gobert, Delphine; Aubart-Cohen, Fleur; Detaint, Delphine; Hanna, Nadine; d’Indya, Hyacintha; Lequintrec, Janine-Sophie; Renard, Philippe; Vigneron, Anne-Marie; Dieudé, Philippe; Laissy, Jean-Pierre; Koch, Pierre; Muti, Christine; Roume, Joelle; Cusin, Veronica; Grandchamp, Bernard; Gouya, Laurent; LeGuern, Eric; Papo, Thomas; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe osteoarthritis and thoracic aortic aneurysms have recently been associated with mutations in the SMAD3 gene, but the full clinical spectrum is incompletely defined. Methods All SMAD3 gene mutation carriers coming to our centre and their families were investigated prospectively with a structured panel including standardized clinical workup, blood tests, total body computed tomography, joint X-rays. Electroneuromyography was performed in selected cases. Results Thirty-four SMAD3 gene mutation carriers coming to our centre were identified and 16 relatives were considered affected because of aortic surgery or sudden death (total 50 subjects). Aortic disease was present in 72%, complicated with aortic dissection, surgery or sudden death in 56% at a mean age of 45 years. Aneurysm or tortuosity of the neck arteries was present in 78%, other arteries were affected in 44%, including dissection of coronary artery. Overall, 95% of mutation carriers displayed either aortic or extra-aortic arterial disease. Acrocyanosis was also present in the majority of patients. Osteoarticular manifestations were recorded in all patients. Joint involvement could be severe requiring surgery in young patients, of unusual localization such as tarsus or shoulder, or mimicking crystalline arthropathy with fibrocartilage calcifications. Sixty eight percent of patients displayed neurological symptoms, and 9 suffered peripheral neuropathy. Electroneuromyography revealed an axonal motor and sensory neuropathy in 3 different families, very evocative of type II Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2) disease, although none had mutations in the known CMT2 genes. Autoimmune features including Sjogren’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s disease, or isolated autoantibodies- were found in 36% of patients. Interpretation SMAD3 gene mutations are associated with aortic dilatation and osteoarthritis, but also autoimmunity and peripheral neuropathy which mimics type II Charcot-Marie-Tooth. PMID:24804794

  3. Immediate and Delayed Cochlear Neuropathy after Noise Exposure in Pubescent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jane Bjerg; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Liberman, M. Charles; Qvortrup, Klaus; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2015-01-01

    Moderate acoustic overexposure in adult rodents is known to cause acute loss of synapses on sensory inner hair cells (IHCs) and delayed degeneration of the auditory nerve, despite the completely reversible temporary threshold shift (TTS) and morphologically intact hair cells. Our objective was to determine whether a cochlear synaptopathy followed by neuropathy occurs after noise exposure in pubescence, and to define neuropathic versus non-neuropathic noise levels for pubescent mice. While exposing 6 week old CBA/CaJ mice to 8-16 kHz bandpass noise for 2 hrs, we defined 97 dB sound pressure level (SPL) as the threshold for this particular type of neuropathic exposure associated with TTS, and 94 dB SPL as the highest non-neuropathic noise level associated with TTS. Exposure to 100 dB SPL caused permanent threshold shift although exposure of 16 week old mice to the same noise is reported to cause only TTS. Amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response, which reflects the summed activity of the cochlear nerve, was complemented by synaptic ribbon counts in IHCs using confocal microscopy, and by stereological counts of peripheral axons and cell bodies of the cochlear nerve from 24 hours to 16 months post exposure. Mice exposed to neuropathic noise demonstrated immediate cochlear synaptopathy by 24 hours post exposure, and delayed neurodegeneration characterized by axonal retraction at 8 months, and spiral ganglion cell loss at 8-16 months post exposure. Although the damage was initially limited to the cochlear base, it progressed to also involve the cochlear apex by 8 months post exposure. Our data demonstrate a fine line between neuropathic and non-neuropathic noise levels associated with TTS in the pubescent cochlea. PMID:25955832

  4. Neuroprotective Effect of Erythropoietin against Pressure Ulcer in a Mouse Model of Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Danigo, Aurore; Magy, Laurent; Richard, Laurence; Desmoulière, Alexis; Bourthoumieu, Sylvie; Funalot, Benoît; Demiot, Claire

    2014-01-01

    An increased risk of skin pressure ulcers (PUs) is common in patients with sensory neuropathies, including those caused by diabetes mellitus. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has been shown to protect the skin against PUs developed in animal models of long-term diabetes. The aim of this work was to determine whether rhEPO could prevent PU formation in a mouse model of drug-inducedSFN. Functional SFN was induced by systemic injection of resiniferatoxin (RTX, 50 µg/kg, i.p.). RhEPO (3000 UI/kg, i.p.) was given the day before RTX injection and then every other day. Seven days after RTX administration, PUs were induced by applying two magnetic plates on the dorsal skin. RTX-treated mice expressed thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia and showed calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) depletion without nerve degeneration or vascular dysfunction. RTX mice developed significantly larger stage 2 PUs than Vehicle mice. RhEPO prevented thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia and neuropeptide depletion in small nerve fibers. RhEPO increased hematocrit and altered endothelium-dependent vasodilatation without any effect on PU formation in Vehicle mice. The characteristics of PUs in RTX mice treated with rhEPO and Vehicle mice were found similar. In conclusion, RTX appeared to increased PU development through depletion of CGRP and SP in small nerve fibers, whereas systemic rhEPO treatment had beneficial effect on peptidergic nerve fibers and restored skin protective capacities against ischemic pressure. Our findings support the evaluation of rhEPO and/or its non-hematopoietic analogs in preventing to prevent PUs in patients with SFN. PMID:25422898

  5. Neuroprotective effect of erythropoietin against pressure ulcer in a mouse model of small fiber neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Danigo, Aurore; Magy, Laurent; Richard, Laurence; Desmoulière, Alexis; Bourthoumieu, Sylvie; Funalot, Benoît; Demiot, Claire

    2014-01-01

    An increased risk of skin pressure ulcers (PUs) is common in patients with sensory neuropathies, including those caused by diabetes mellitus. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) has been shown to protect the skin against PUs developed in animal models of long-term diabetes. The aim of this work was to determine whether rhEPO could prevent PU formation in a mouse model of drug-induced SFN. Functional SFN was induced by systemic injection of resiniferatoxin (RTX, 50 µg/kg, i.p.). RhEPO (3000 UI/kg, i.p.) was given the day before RTX injection and then every other day. Seven days after RTX administration, PUs were induced by applying two magnetic plates on the dorsal skin. RTX-treated mice expressed thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia and showed calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) depletion without nerve degeneration or vascular dysfunction. RTX mice developed significantly larger stage 2 PUs than Vehicle mice. RhEPO prevented thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia and neuropeptide depletion in small nerve fibers. RhEPO increased hematocrit and altered endothelium-dependent vasodilatation without any effect on PU formation in Vehicle mice. The characteristics of PUs in RTX mice treated with rhEPO and Vehicle mice were found similar. In conclusion, RTX appeared to increased PU development through depletion of CGRP and SP in small nerve fibers, whereas systemic rhEPO treatment had beneficial effect on peptidergic nerve fibers and restored skin protective capacities against ischemic pressure. Our findings support the evaluation of rhEPO and/or its non-hematopoietic analogs in preventing to prevent PUs in patients with SFN. PMID:25422898

  6. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ...: Peripheral Neuropathy AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Department... connection for acute and sub-acute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents... clarify and expand the terminology regarding presumption of service connection for peripheral...

  7. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hong-Xia; Fu, Wen-Yi; Cui, Hua-Dong; Yang, Li-Li; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Li-Juan

    2015-05-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ? 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide. PMID:26109960

  8. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hong-xia; Fu, Wen-yi; Cui, Hua-dong; Yang, Li-li; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Li-juan

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ? 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide. PMID:26109960

  9. Noise-Enhanced Vibrotactile Sensitivity in Older Adults, Patients With Stroke, and Patients With Diabetic Neuropathy

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    12 elderly subjects, for 4 of the 5 patients with stroke, and all 8 patients with diabetic neuropathy function. Key Words: Cerebrovascular accident; Diabetic neuropa- thies; Elderly; Rehabilitation; Sensation With Diabetic Neuropathy Wen Liu, PhD, Lewis A. Lipsitz, MD, Manuel Montero-Odasso, MD, Jonathan Bean, MD, D

  10. Subacute axonal neuropathy in Parkinson's disease with cobalamin and vitamin B6 deficiency under duodopa therapy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Peter P; Wellach, Ingmar; Faiss, Siegbert; Layer, Peter; Rosenkranz, Thorsten; Knop, Karl; Weis, Joachim

    2010-08-15

    We describe two patients who developed subacute axonal peripheral neuropathy under duodopa treatment. Comprehensive diagnostic workup including muscle and sural nerve biopsy revealed that the most probable cause of subacute axonal peripheral neuropathy was cobalamin and vitamin B6 deficiency in both the patients. PMID:20740570

  11. Modulating Molecular Chaperones Improves Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Decreases the Inflammatory Transcriptome in Diabetic Sensory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiacheng; Pan, Pan; Anyika, Mercy; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2015-09-16

    We have previously demonstrated that modulating molecular chaperones with KU-32, a novobiocin derivative, ameliorates physiologic and bioenergetic deficits of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Replacing the coumarin core of KU-32 with a meta-fluorinated biphenyl ring system created KU-596, a novobiocin analogue (novologue) that showed neuroprotective activity in a cell-based assay. The current study sought to determine whether KU-596 offers similar therapeutic potential for treating DPN. Administration of 2-20 mg/kg of KU-596 improved diabetes induced hypoalgesia and sensory neuron bioenergetic deficits in a dose-dependent manner. However, the drug could not improve these neuropathic deficits in diabetic heat shock protein 70 knockout (Hsp70 KO) mice. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which KU-596 improved DPN, we performed transcriptomic analysis of sensory neuron RNA obtained from diabetic wild-type and Hsp70 KO mice using RNA sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that diabetes strongly increased inflammatory pathways and that KU-596 therapy effectively reversed these increases independent of Hsp70. In contrast, the effects of KU-596 on decreasing the expression of genes regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were more Hsp70-dependent. These data indicate that modulation of molecular chaperones by novologue therapy offers an effective approach toward correcting nerve dysfunction in DPN but that normalization of inflammatory pathways alone by novologue therapy seems to be insufficient to reverse sensory deficits associated with insensate DPN. PMID:26161583

  12. Suppression of pain-related behavior in two distinct rodent models of peripheral neuropathy by a homopolyarginine-conjugated CRMP2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Ju, Weina; Li, Qi; Allette, Yohance M; Ripsch, Matthew S; White, Fletcher A; Khanna, Rajesh

    2013-03-01

    The N-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2) is a clinically endorsed target in chronic pain treatments. As directly targeting the channel can lead to multiple adverse side effects, targeting modulators of CaV2.2 may prove better. We previously identified ST1-104, a short peptide from the collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), which disrupted the CaV2.2-CRMP2 interaction and suppressed a model of HIV-related neuropathy induced by anti-retroviral therapy but not traumatic neuropathy. Here, we report ST2-104 -a peptide wherein the cell-penetrating TAT motif has been supplanted with a homopolyarginine motif, which dose-dependently inhibits the CaV2.2-CRMP2 interaction and inhibits depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) influx in sensory neurons. Ca(2+) influx via activation of vanilloid receptors is not affected by either peptide. Systemic administration of ST2-104 does not affect thermal or tactile nociceptive behavioral changes. Importantly, ST2-104 transiently reduces persistent mechanical hypersensitivity induced by systemic administration of the anti-retroviral drug 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) and following tibial nerve injury (TNI). Possible mechanistic explanations for the broader efficacy of ST2-104 are discussed. PMID:23106100

  13. Effect of diet-induced obesity or type 1 or type 2 diabetes on corneal nerves and peripheral neuropathy in C57Bl/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yorek, Matthew S; Obrosov, Alexander; Shevalye, Hanna; Holmes, Amey; Harper, Matthew M; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    We determined the impact diet-induced obesity (DIO) and types 1 and 2 diabetes have on peripheral neuropathy with emphasis on corneal nerve structural changes in C57Bl/6J mice. Endpoints examined included nerve conduction velocity, response to thermal and mechanical stimuli and innervation of the skin and cornea. DIO mice and to a greater extent type 2 diabetic mice were insulin resistant. DIO and both types 1 and 2 diabetic mice developed motor and sensory nerve conduction deficits. In the cornea of DIO and type 2 diabetic mice there was a decrease in sub-epithelial corneal nerves, innervation of the corneal epithelium, and corneal sensitivity. Type 1 diabetic mice did not present with any significant changes in corneal nerve structure until after 20?weeks of hyperglycemia. DIO and type 2 diabetic mice developed corneal structural damage more rapidly than type 1 diabetic mice although hemoglobin A1 C values were significantly higher in type 1 diabetic mice. This suggests that DIO with or without hyperglycemia contributes to development and progression of peripheral neuropathy and nerve structural damage in the cornea. PMID:25858759

  14. RNA-based mutation screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kohonen-Corish, M.; Ross, V.L.; Doe, W.F.

    1996-10-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a cancer syndrome inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Four susceptibility genes are known, which code for DNA mismatch repair enzymes. The purpose of this study was to identify the HNPCC gene defects in a cohort of Australian HNPCC families and to evaluate the use of RNA-based screening methods. Six mutations were identified, four in the hMLH1 gene and two in hMSH2, by using a combination of DNA-based and RNA-based methods. One of the hMLH1 defects was a missense mutation, and the other five mutations would be expected to result in a shortened protein. These included a rare type of mRNA splicing mutation in hMLH1 exon 17. By use of reverse-transcriptase (RT) PCR, defective transcripts were detectable for three of the hMLH1 mutations but not for the fourth one, which was predicted to cause skipping of exon 15. Furthermore, many more alternative transcripts for the hMLH1 gene were found than previously described, and these were more abundant in the RNA samples prepared from whole blood than from lymphoblastoid cell lines. This confounded RNA-based screening for HNPCC mutations, because it was difficult to determine which aberrant RT-PCR fragment was the real hereditary defect. One of the splice-site mutations reported here causes skipping of exons 9 and 10, which also occurs as an alternative transcript. When the protein-truncation test was used, the results were indistinguishable between the patients in this family and controls. Other aberrant transcripts were also observed that varied in size between individuals but were unrelated to the hereditary defects. This study has important implications for the design of reliable diagnostic tests for HNPCC gene defects. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Cochlear neuropathy and the coding of supra-threshold sound

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Hari M.; Verhulst, Sarah; Shaheen, Luke; Liberman, M. Charles; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2014-01-01

    Many listeners with hearing thresholds within the clinically normal range nonetheless complain of difficulty hearing in everyday settings and understanding speech in noise. Converging evidence from human and animal studies points to one potential source of such difficulties: differences in the fidelity with which supra-threshold sound is encoded in the early portions of the auditory pathway. Measures of auditory subcortical steady-state responses (SSSRs) in humans and animals support the idea that the temporal precision of the early auditory representation can be poor even when hearing thresholds are normal. In humans with normal hearing thresholds (NHTs), paradigms that require listeners to make use of the detailed spectro-temporal structure of supra-threshold sound, such as selective attention and discrimination of frequency modulation (FM), reveal individual differences that correlate with subcortical temporal coding precision. Animal studies show that noise exposure and aging can cause a loss of a large percentage of auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) without any significant change in measured audiograms. Here, we argue that cochlear neuropathy may reduce encoding precision of supra-threshold sound, and that this manifests both behaviorally and in SSSRs in humans. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that noise-induced neuropathy may be selective for higher-threshold, lower-spontaneous-rate nerve fibers. Based on our hypothesis, we suggest some approaches that may yield particularly sensitive, objective measures of supra-threshold coding deficits that arise due to neuropathy. Finally, we comment on the potential clinical significance of these ideas and identify areas for future investigation. PMID:24600357

  16. Giant axonal neuropathy: diffusion-weighted imaging features of the brain.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alpay; Sigirci, Ahmet; Kutlu, Ramazan; Doganay, Selim; Erdem, Gulnur; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2006-10-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy is a rare autosomal recessive childhood disorder characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and features of central nervous system involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an 11-year-old boy with giant axonal neuropathy revealed high signal intensity in the white matter of the cerebrum and cerebellum on T(2)-weighted imaging. An apparent diffusion coefficient map revealed increased apparent diffusion coefficient values in the periventricular, deep, and cerebellar white matter, basal ganglia, and thalamus. Increased apparent diffusion coefficient values in distinct locations suggest increased mobility of water molecules in the brain of a patient with giant axonal neuropathy. This finding could indicate a myelin disorder such as demyelination. Diffusion-weighted imaging should be performed to reveal apparent diffusion coefficient changes and determine brain involvement in patients with giant axonal neuropathy. PMID:17005115

  17. Establishment of a Novel In Vitro Model for Predicting Incidence and Severity of Microtubule-targeting Agent-induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sawaguchi, Yuichi; Ueno, Satoshi; Nishiyma, Yukiko; Yamazaki, Ryuta; Matsuzaki, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a major dose-limiting side-effect of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs), considered to be induced by inhibition of axonal microtubules. Therefore, it was thought that a useful method for predicting the frequencies of severe sensory-PN (FPN) would be to evaluate the neurite-disrupting effects of MTAs. Using neurite outgrowth from neuron-like cell lines, we comprehensively evaluated the neurite-disrupting effects of several anti-cancer drugs including MTAs, and the reversibility of the effects of MTAs. MTAs that induce PN showed neurite-disrupting effects more strongly than MTAs and anticancer drugs that do not induce PN, but the effects were not related to the FPN. On the other hand, MTAs with high FPN exhibited lower reversibility than those with low FPN. These findings suggest that neurite-disrupting effects are associated with the incidence of PN, and the reversibility of the effects is associated with FPN. PMID:26637853

  18. Ischaemic neuropathy of the lumbosacral plexus following intragluteal injection.

    PubMed Central

    Stöhr, M; Dichgans, J; Dörstelmann

    1980-01-01

    A lesion of the lumbo sacral plexus may result from an inadvertent intra-arterial injection of vasotoxic drugs into one of the gluteal arteries. Symptoms and follow-up of three cases are reported. The neuropathy is attributed to a toxic endarteritis with retrograde propagation of spasm and thrombosis. Swelling an bluish discoloration of the buttocks ("embolia cutis medicamentosa") as well as an impaired circulation in the homolateral leg are associated with the neurological syndrome in fully developed cases and makes possible a correct diagnosis. Images PMID:7205289

  19. Auditory Neuropathy/Dys-Synchrony Disorder: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Hood, Linda J

    2015-12-01

    Auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony disorder affects neural responses, either directly or indirectly. Patients may demonstrate good ability to detect sound, but have significant difficulty listening in noise. Clinical auditory physiologic measures are used to characterize cochlear, eighth nerve, and brainstem function, and are needed to accurately identify this disorder. Cochlear implants provide benefit to many patients, and some patients derive benefit from amplification. This disorder can be identified and managed in infants, may have later onset, may be a part of a syndrome, and may include fluctuation in hearing ability. PMID:26296649

  20. The perceptions of force and of movement in a man without large myelinated sensory afferents below the neck.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, J D; Sedgwick, E M

    1992-01-01

    1. Motor memory and the sense of effort have been investigated in a man with a complete large fibre sensory neuropathy for over 16 years. The perceptions of pain, heat, cold and muscular fatigue remained but he was without perceptions of light touch and proprioception below the neck. 2. The subject was able to discriminate weights held in the hand with an accuracy only slightly worse than control subjects (20 g in 200 g) when forearm movement and visual inspection were allowed. With eyes shut however he could only distinguish a weight of 200 g from 400 g. It is concluded that a crude sense of effort remains which may have a peripheral origin. 3. A limited motor memory was also present, which allowed him to maintain a posture or continue a simple repetitive movement. No novel movement was possible without visual feedback. 4. Differences in movement ability between this subject and others with similar if less pure sensory neuropathies are ascribed to rehabilitation. PMID:1522522