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1

Pulmonary hernia secondary to limited access for mitral valve surgery and repaired by video thoracoscopic surgery.  

PubMed

Iatrogenic pulmonary hernia is a rare condition. Repair is performed due to persistent symptoms and it is usually carried out by open surgery. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who developed a lung hernia after small anterior thoracotomy that was performed for mitral valve surgery. The herniated lung is reduced with success by video thoracoscopic surgery and the chest wall defect is repaired by a polypropylene mesh fitted to the thoracic wall. At six-month follow-up, she was asymptomatic and without recurrence of hernia. Our experience suggests that video thoracoscopic surgery is a feasible surgical technique even for lung hernia secondary to mini-thoracotomy. However, before performing video thoracoscopic surgery, several factors preclusive to using this strategy must be considered, including the extensiveness of pleural adhesions due to the time interval between the previous operation and lung hernia, the site and the size of the hernia, and the insufficient experience in video thoracoscopic surgery. PMID:18948304

Santini, Mario; Fiorello, Alfonso; Vicidomini, Giovanni; Busiello, Luigi

2009-01-01

2

Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.  

PubMed

Ventral hernias, whether naturally occurring or the result of previous surgery, comprise one of the most common problems confronting general surgeons. As many as 25% of laparotomy incisions develop a hernia over long-term follow-up, which is a difficult problem with many treatment algorithms. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair has improved over the last decade and has proven to be an effective treatment option. With fewer wound complications and low recurrence rates, it is a useful tool in the surgeon's armamentarium. Care should be taken regarding patient selection, operative technique, and mesh size to ensure adequate repair of the hernia, thereby preventing recurrence at a later date. The first attempt at a hernia repair has the highest chance of long-term success, so it is important that the surgeon take all the factors into mind before proceeding with operative repair. PMID:21424876

Melvin, W Scott; Renton, David

2011-07-01

3

Safety and Efficacy of Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for Total Extraperitoneal Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Almost 20 years after the first laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair was performed, single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS™) is set to revolutionize minimally invasive surgery. However, the loss of triangulation must be overcome before the technique can be popularized. This study reports the first 100 laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repairs using a single incision. The study cohort comprised 68 patients with a mean age of 44 (range, 18 to 83): 36 unilateral and 32 bilateral hernias. Twelve patients also underwent umbilical hernia repair with the Ventralex patch requiring no additional incisions. A 2.5-cm to 3-cm crescentic incision within the confines of the umbilicus was performed. Standard dissecting instruments and 52-cm/5.5-mm/300 laparoscope were used. Operation times were 50 minutes for unilateral and 80 minutes for bilateral. There was one conversion to conventional 3-port laparoscopic repair and none to open surgery. Outpatient surgery was achieved in all (except one). Analgesic requirements were minimal: 8 Dextropropoxyphene tablets (range, 0 to 20). There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications with a high patient satisfaction score. Single-incision laparoscopic hernia repair is safe and efficient simply by modifying dissection techniques (so-called “inline” and “vertical”). Comparable success can be obtained while negating the risks of bowel and vascular injuries from sharp trocars and achieving improved cosmetic results. PMID:21902942

2011-01-01

4

Preperitoneal Surgery Using a Self-Adhesive Mesh for Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair with mesh has been reported to result in improved patient outcomes. However, there are few published data on the use of a totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and evaluate early outcomes of TEP inguinal hernia repair with self-adhesive mesh. Methods: This cohort study was a retrospective review of patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernial repair from April 4, 2010, through July 22, 2014. Data assessed were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hernia repair indications, hernia type, pain, paresthesia, occurrence (bilateral or unilateral), recurrence, and patient satisfaction. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: Six hundred forty patients underwent laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia surgery with self-adhesive mesh. The average age was 56 years, nearly all were men (95.8%), and the mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m2. Cases involved primary hernia more frequently than recurrent hernia (94% vs 6%; P < .05). After surgery, 92% of the patients reported no more than minimal pain, <1% reported paresthesia, and 0.2% had early recurrence. There were 7 conversions to an open procedure. The patients had no adverse reactions to anesthesia and no bladder injury. Postoperative acute pain or recurrence was not explained by demographics, BMI, or preoperative pain. There were significant associations of hernia side, recurrence, occurrence, and sex with composite end points. Nearly all patients (98%) were satisfied with the outcome. Conclusion: The use of self-adhesive, Velcro-type mesh in laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair is associated with reduced pain; low rates of early recurrence, infection, and hematoma; and improved patient satisfaction.

Oguntodu, Olakunle F.; Rodriguez, Francisco; Rassadi, Roozbeh; Haley, Michael; Shively, Cynthia J.; Dzandu, James K.

2014-01-01

5

Reoperation After Recurrent Groin Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Objective To analyze reoperation rates for recurrent and primary groin hernia repair documented in the Swedish Hernia Register from 1996 to 1998, and to study variables associated with increased or decreased relative risks for reoperation after recurrent hernia. Methods Data were retrieved for all groin hernia repairs prospectively recorded in the Swedish Hernia register from 1996 to 1998. Actuarial analysis adjusted for patients’ death was used for calculating the cumulative incidence of reoperation. Relative risk for reoperation was estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results From 1996 to 1998, 17,985 groin hernia operations were recorded in the Swedish Hernia Register, 15% for recurrent hernia and 85% for primary hernia. At 24 months the risk for having had a reoperation was 4.6% after recurrent hernia repair and 1.7% after primary hernia repair. The relative risk for reoperation was significantly lower for laparoscopic methods and for anterior tension-free repair than for other techniques. Postoperative complications and direct hernia were associated with an increased relative risk for reoperation. Day-case surgery and local infiltration anesthesia were used less frequently for recurrent hernia than for primary hernia. Conclusions Recurrent groin hernia still constitutes a significant quantitative problem for the surgical community. This study supports the use of mesh by laparoscopy or anterior tension-free repair for recurrent hernia operations. PMID:11420492

Haapaniemi, Staffan; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Nordin, Pär; Nilsson, Erik

2001-01-01

6

Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.  

PubMed

Between March 1991 and May 1994, 444 laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs were undertaken in 375 patients: 386 transperitoneal and 58 extraperitoneal. During a follow-up period of 20.5 months (range 1-38) there have been three recurrences at 6, 7 and 12 months, all direct and all after transperitoneal repair. A total of 52 patients were treated as a day case (< 6 h), 317 patients spent less than 24 h in hospital and four patients were discharged on the second postoperative day. Operating time for transperitoneal hernia repair was 27 min (range 10-68) and extraperitoneal repair, 29 min (range 11-48). Short-term complications occurred in 18 patients: six haematomas, four seromas, one urinary retention and seven suffered persistent groin pain. Six patients have had neuralgia, three have had mesh removed and three further patients had individual clips removed from within the inguinal canal. There have been two adhesive small bowel obstructions. The first occurred 2 months after laparoscopic surgery and required laparotomy; the second occurred 2 years after surgery and had laparoscopic division of an adhesive band to a pelvic staple. There was one infected lymphocoele treated percutaneously. PMID:7741670

Fielding, G A

1995-05-01

7

Risk of Late-Onset Adhesions and Incisional Hernia Repairs after Surgery  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Long-term adhesion-related complications and incisional hernias after abdominal surgery are common and costly. There are few data on the risk of these complications after different abdominal operations. STUDY DESIGN We identified Medicare beneficiaries who underwent endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm from 2001–2008 who presumably are not at risk for laparotomy-related complications. We identified all laparoscopic and open operations involving the abdomen, pelvis, or retroperitoneum and categorized them into 5 groups according to invasiveness. We then identified laparotomy-related complications for up to 5 years after the index operation and compared these with the baseline rate of complications in a control group of patients who did not undergo an abdominal operation. RESULTS We studied 85,663 patients, 7,513 (8.8%) of which underwent a laparotomy, including 2,783 major abdominal operations, 709 minor abdominal operations, 963 ventral hernia repairs, 493 retroperitoneal/pelvic operations, and 2,565 laparoscopic operations. Mean age was 76.7 years and 82.0% were male. Major abdominal operations carried the highest risk for adhesion-related complications (14.3% and 25.0% at 2 and 5 years compared with 4.0% and 7.8% for the control group; p < 0.001) and incisional hernias (7.8% and 12.0% compared with 0.6% and 1.2% for the control group; p < 0.001). Laparoscopic operations (4.6% and 10.7% for adhesions, 1.9% and 3.2% for incisional hernias) carried the lowest risk. CONCLUSIONS Late-onset laparotomy-related complications are frequent and their risk extends through 5 years beyond the perioperative period. With the advancement and expansion of laparoscopic techniques and its attendant lower risk for long-term complications, these results can alter the risk-to-benefit profile of various types of abdominal operations and can also strengthen the rationale for additional development of laparoscopic approaches to abdominal operations. PMID:23623220

Bensley, Rodney P; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Hurks, Rob; Sachs, Teviah; Boyd, Christopher A; O’Malley, A James; Cotterill, Philip; Landon, Bruce E

2013-01-01

8

Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery Inguinal Hernia Repair: A Survival Canine Model  

PubMed Central

Abstract Introduction With over 20 million repairs performed worldwide annually, inguinal hernias represent a significant source of disability and loss of productivity. Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES™), as a potentially less invasive form of surgery may reduce postoperative disability and accelerate return to work. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and short-term effectiveness of transgastric inguinal herniorrhaphy using a biologic mesh in a survival canine model. Materials and Methods Under general anesthesia with the animal in trendelenburg position, a gastrostomy was created. A 4?×?6?cm acellular dermal implant was deployed endoscopically across the myopectineal orifice, draped over the cord structures, and secured with Bioglue. Following completion of bilateral repairs the animals were survived for 14 days. At the end of the study period, the animals were euthanized and a necropsy performed. Cultures of a random site within the peritoneal cavity and at the site of implant deployment were obtained. In addition, a visual inspection of the peritoneal cavity was performed. Results All animals thrived postoperatively and did not manifest signs of peritonitis or sepsis at any point. At necropsy accurate placement and adequate myopectineal coverage was confirmed in all subjects. Cultures of a random site within the peritoneal cavity and at the site of implant deployment had no growth. Discussion This study confirms that NOTES-inguinal herniorrhaphy using a biologic implant can be performed safely. In addition, the transgastric technique provided good short-term myopectineal coverage without infectious sequelae. PMID:21457111

Gupta, Amar; Eckstein, Jeremy G.

2011-01-01

9

Femoral hernia repair.  

PubMed

Femoral hernia repair has a long history. In the nineteenth century, simple closure of the femoral orifice by the femoral approach was favored. Such renowned surgeons as Bassini, Marcy, and Cushing authored papers about the femoral approach to femoral hernia. The recurrence rate was so high, however, that it was replaced by the inguinal approach. The man who popularized the inguinal approach was Chester McVay, who demonstrated the precise insertion of the tranversus abdominis muscle and transversalis fascia to the Cooper's ligament. He used Cooper's ligament for the femoral hernia repair by the inguinal approach. The complication and recurrence rate after the Cooper's ligament repair for femoral hernia was not satisfactory, however, due to tension on the approximated tissues, which caused postoperative pain and inability to resume normal activities. Irving Lichtenstein first introduced the plug technique to femoral hernia repair and it was further developed by Gilbert and Rutkow. In the present series, all elective cases were repaired by the PerFix mesh plug technique without any complications. Patients were discharged from the hospital on the first postoperative day and returned to normal activities shortly thereafter. These patients had few complaints of pain in the groin. The operating time using a PerFix plug was markedly shorter when contrasted with the Cooper's ligament repair. No infection of the prosthesis occurred, even in the cases in which the small intestine was necrotic and resected. From our 7-year experience of mesh plug femoral hernia repairs, I have come to regard this operation as the first choice in elective and noninfected cases of femoral hernia. In strangulated cases in which severe infection occurs. Cooper's ligament repair should be used, because there is a risk or infection to implanted prosthesis. Finally, femoral hernia is usually thought of as requiring emergency surgical treatment. Only 30% of our cases were treated as emergency operations, however, whereas 70% were elective. Unless patients complain of severe abdominal pain or ileus, surgeons need not perform emergency operations. In summary, the PerFix mesh plug hernia repair for femoral hernia has resulted in a reduced recurrence rate, shortened hospital stay, and a low rate of postoperative complications. PMID:14533910

Hachisuka, Takehiro

2003-10-01

10

Laparoscopic Repair of Incidentally Found Spigelian Hernia  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: A Spigelian hernia is a rare type of hernia that occurs through a defect in the anterior abdominal wall adjacent to the linea semilunaris. Estimation of its incidence has been reported as 0.12% of all abdominal wall hernias. Traditionally, the method of repair has been an open approach. Herein, we discuss a series of laparoscopic repairs. Methods: Case series and review of the literature. Cases: Three patients are presented. All were evaluated and taken to surgery initially for a different disease process, and all were incidentally found to have a spigelian hernia. These patients underwent laparoscopic repair of their hernias; 2 were repaired intraperitoneally and one was repaired totally extraperitoneally. Two patients initially underwent a mesh repair, while the third had an attempted primary repair. Conclusions: There is evidence that supports the use of laparoscopy for both diagnosis and repair of spigelian hernias. There are also reports of successful repairs both primarily and with mesh. In our experience with the preceding 3 patients, we found that laparoscopic repair of incidentally discovered spigelian hernias is a viable option, and we also found that implantation of mesh, when possible, resulted in satisfactory results and no recurrence. PMID:21902949

Nickloes, Todd; Mancini, Greg; Solla, Julio A.

2011-01-01

11

Surgery for an Inguinal Hernia  

MedlinePLUS

... Inguinal Hernia" /> Consumer Summary – Jul. 24, 2013 Surgery for an Inguinal Hernia Formats View PDF (PDF) ... pronounced lah-puh-ruh-SKAHP-ik) surgery. Open Surgery In an open surgery, the surgeon makes a ...

12

Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

2009-01-01

13

Psychological risk factors for chronic post-surgical pain after inguinal hernia repair surgery: A prospective cohort study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A significant proportion of patients experience chronic post-surgical pain (CPSP) following inguinal hernia surgery. Psychological models are useful in predicting acute pain after surgery, and in predicting the transition from acute to chronic pain in non-surgical contexts. This is a prospective cohort study to investigate psychological (cognitive and emotional) risk factors for CPSP after inguinal hernia surgery. Participants were asked

Rachael Powell; Marie Johnston; W. Cairns Smith; Peter M. King; W. Alastair Chambers; Zygmunt Krukowski; Lorna McKee; Julie Bruce

14

The laparoscopic hiatoplasty with antireflux surgery is a safe and effective procedure to repair giant hiatal hernia  

PubMed Central

Background Although minimally invasive repair of giant hiatal hernias is a very surgical challenge which requires advanced laparoscopic learning curve, several reports showed that is a safe and effective procedure, with lower morbidity than open approach. In the present study we show the outcomes of 13 patients who underwent a laparoscopic repair of giant hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 13 patients underwent laparoscopic posterior hiatoplasty and Nissen fundoplication. Follow-up evaluation was done clinically at intervals of 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery using the Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality of Life scale, a barium swallow study, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, an oesophageal manometry, a combined ambulatory 24-h multichannel impedance pH and bilirubin monitoring. Anatomic recurrence was defined as any evidence of gastric herniation above the diaphragmatic edge. Results There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open technique. Symptomatic GORD-HQL outcomes demonstrated a statistical significant decrease of mean value equal to 3.2 compare to 37.4 of preoperative assessment (p?hernia recurrence was recorded in the study group, treated respecting several crucial surgical principles, e.g., complete sac excision, appropriate crural closure, also with direct hiatal defect where possible, and routine use of antireflux procedure. PMID:24401085

2014-01-01

15

Robotic Single-Port Hernia Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Since the introduction of single-incision laparoscopic surgery in 2009, an increasing number of surgical procedures including hernia repair are being performed using this technique. However, its large-scale adoption awaits results of prospective randomized controlled studies confirming its potential benefits. Parallel with single-port surgery development, the issue of the chronic lack of good camera assistants is being addressed by the robotic Freehand® camera controller, which has the potential to replace camera assistants in a large percentage of routine laparoscopic surgery. Although the robotic Freehand has been used in certain operations in urology and gynecology, there have been no published reports in robotic (single-port) hernia surgery. Methods: This study reports the first case and a series of 16 patients who underwent robotic single-port total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair compared to 16 consecutive cases of conventional single-port inguinal hernia repair. Patients were matched for age, sex, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, and types of hernia. Results: Although operation time was comparable in both, the time wasted for scope cleaning was 8.5 minutes for conventional compared to 1.5 minutes for robotic surgery. Conclusion: Robotic single-port inguinal hernia repair is feasible and efficient. This represents a further milestone in laparoscopic surgery. PMID:21985715

2011-01-01

16

Inguinal hernia repair: Toward Asian guidelines.  

PubMed

Groin hernias are very common, and surgical treatment is usually recommended. In fact, hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure performed worldwide. In countries such as the USA, China, and India, there may easily be over 1?million repairs every year. The need for this surgery has become an important socioeconomic problem and may affect health-care providers, especially in aging societies. Surgical repair using mesh is recommended and widely employed in Western countries, but in many developing countries, tissue-to-tissue repair is still the preferred surgical procedure due to economic constraints. For these reason, the development and implementation of guidelines, consensus, or recommendations may aim to clarify issues related to best practices in inguinal hernia repair in Asia. A group of Asian experts in hernia repair gathered together to debate inguinal hernia treatments in Asia in an attempt to reach some consensus or develop recommendations on best practices in the region. The need for recommendations or guidelines was unanimously confirmed to help overcome the discrepancy in clinical practice between countries; the experts decided to focus mainly on the technical aspects of open repair, which is the most common surgery for hernia in our region. After the identification of 12 main topics for discussion (indication, age, and sex; symptomatic and asymptomatic hernia: type of hernia; type of treatment; hospital admission; preoperative care; anesthesia; surgical technique; perioperative care; postoperative care; early complications; and long-term complications), a search of the literature was carried out according to the five levels of the Oxford Classification of Evidence and the four grades of recommendation. PMID:25598054

Lomanto, Davide; Cheah, Wei-Keat; Faylona, Jose Macario; Huang, Ching Shui; Lohsiriwat, Darin; Maleachi, Andy; Yang, George Pei Cheung; Li, Michael Ka-Wai; Tumtavitikul, Sathien; Sharma, Anil; Hartung, Rolf Ulrich; Choi, Young Bai; Sutedja, Barlian

2015-02-01

17

Repair of the inguinal hernia using the hernia sac to correct the abdominal wall defect  

PubMed Central

Summary Surgery of the inguinal hernia is a challenge for the great incidence of recurrences. The aim of this study is demonstrate the usefulness of hernia sac in the repair of inguinal hernia. In 200 patients the hernia sac was used to reinforce the abdominal wall. The patients have been observed two years along and still now few recurrences (20%) have been observed. The hernia sac can be used to repair the inguinal hernia because it’s a patient’s tissue with no inflammation and rejection. PMID:24091173

LAIZO, A.; da FONSECA DELGADO, F.E.; TERZELLA, M.R.; da SILVA, A. LÁZARO

2013-01-01

18

Hernia Surgery: From Guidelines to Clinical Practice  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Over the last 30 years, hernia surgery has developed into an evidence-based practice assisted by the development of guidelines. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prior to 1993, best practice in the UK was a nylon darn repair under general anaesthesia as an in-patient with prolonged recovery. The publication of The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCSE) Guidelines on Groin Hernia Repair stimulated debate and coincided with the introduction of mesh hernioplasty and laparoscopic techniques. Further evolution of hernia management has occurred to enable the production of the European Hernia Society (EHS) guidelines in 2008. RESULTS The EHS guidelines cover all aspects of abdominal wall surgery including: indications for operation; investigations; organising surgical care; techniques; local anaesthesia; after-care, complications and outcome; and information for patients. CONCLUSIONS Surgeons have many choices when selecting an appropriate hernia operation for an individual patient. The EHS guidelines provide a basis for this decision-making. PMID:19416585

Kingsnorth, Andrew N

2009-01-01

19

Repair of diaphragmatic hernia following spinal surgery by laparoscopic mesh application: a case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

We describe the laparoscopic management of diaphragmatic hernia (DH) caused by vertebral pedicle screw displacement. A 58-year-old woman underwent surgery for scoliosis and underwent posterior pedicle screw fixation. In the first postoperative (PO)day, she developed mild dyspnea. An anteroposterior chest radiograph revealed bilateral pleural effusion, which was more pronounced on the left side. A thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT) scan, performed in the second PO day, revealed a solid mass in the pleural cavity that was associated with screw displacement, which had also entered into the peritoneal cavity without apparent other lesion of hollow and solid viscous. In the third PO day, after the screw was removed, explorative laparoscopy was carried out. We observed herniation of the omentum through a small diaphragmatic tear. Once the absence of visceral injury was confirmed, we reduced the omentum into the abdomen. Then, we repaired the hernia by applying a dual layer polypropylene mesh over the defect with a 3-cm overlap. The remainder of the postoperative period was uneventful. Iatrogenic DH due to a pedicle screw displacement has never been described before. In cases of pleural effusion following spinal surgery, rapid assessment and treatment are crucial. We conclude that a laparoscopic approach to iatrogenic DH could be feasible and effective in a hemodynamically stable patient with negative CT findings because it enables the completion of the diagnostic cascade and the repair of the tear, providing excellent visualization of the abdominal viscera and diaphragmatic tears. PMID:24808922

2014-01-01

20

Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated paraesophageal hernias  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paraesophageal hernias comprise only 2–5% of all hiatal hernias, yet unlike the more common sliding hiatal hernia, paraesophageal hernias are prone to undergo volvulus, with obstruction, ischemia, and gangrenous perforation. Due to their propensity toward calamitous complications, they must be recognized and repaired as expeditiously as possible. Traditionally these hernias have been repaired by either an open transabdominal or an

D. W. Cloyd

1994-01-01

21

Evolution of an inguinal hernia surgery practice  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND—Inguinal hernia surgery has undergone numerous advances in the last few years. This study analysed the changes in the practice of one surgeon in a district general hospital over a seven year interval. The effect of changing from Bassini to Lichtenstein repair in 1994 was evaluated.?METHODS—The study involved two parts: first a search of a computerised database of inguinal hernia procedures, and second, postal audits of men who had an inguinal hernia repair in 1993 and 1994 with outpatient follow up for those with a possible recurrence.?RESULTS—A total of 1037 hernias were repaired over the seven years. There was an increase in the proportion of day cases from 18% to 70% and the number of operations performed under local anaesthetic rose from 1% to 45%. The postal audits had response rates of 79% (1993) and 66% (1994). Some 5/98 (5%) recurrent hernias were identified from the 1993 (Bassini) patients compared with 1/67 (1.5%) from the 1994 (Lichtenstein) cohort.?CONCLUSION—Lichtenstein hernia repair can be performed safely as a day case using local anaesthetic in the majority of patients and appears to have a lower recurrence rate than Bassini repair.???Keywords: inguinal hernia; postoperative complications PMID:11222828

Mokete, M; Earnshaw, J

2001-01-01

22

Robotic Repair of Giant Paraesophageal Hernias  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Giant paraesophageal hernia accounts for 5% of all hiatal hernias, and it is commonly seen in elderly patients with comorbidities. Some series report complication rates up to 28%, recurrence rates between 10% and 25%, and a mortality rate close to 2%. Recently, the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) has shown equivocal benefits when used for elective surgeries, whereas for complex procedures, the benefits appear to be clearer. The purpose of this study is to present our preliminary experience in robotic giant paraesophageal hernia repair. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from patients who had a diagnosis of giant paraesophageal hernia and underwent a paraesophageal hernia repair with the da Vinci Surgical System. Results: Nineteen patients (12 women [63.1%]) underwent surgery for giant paraesophageal hernia at our center. The mean age was 70.4 ± 13.9 years (range, 40–97 years). The mean American Society of Anesthesiologists score was 2.15. The mean surgical time and hospital length of stay were 184.5 ± 96.2 minutes (range, 96–395 minutes) and 4.3 days (range, 2–22 days), respectively. Nissen fundoplications were performed in 3 cases (15.7%), and 16 patients (84.2%) had mesh placed. Six patients (31.5%) presented with gastric volvulus, and 2 patients had other herniated viscera (colon and duodenum). There were 2 surgery-related complications (10.5%) (1 dysphagia that required dilatation and 1 pleural injury) and 1 conversion to open repair (partial gastric resection). No recurrences or deaths were observed in this series. Conclusion: In our experience robotic giant paraesophageal hernia repair is not different from the laparoscopic approach in terms of complications and mortality rate, but it may be associated with lower recurrence rates. However, larger series with longer follow-up are necessary to further substantiate our results. PMID:24398199

Seetharamaiah, Rupa; Romero, Rey Jesús; Kosanovic, Radomir; Gallas, Michelle; Verdeja, Juan-Carlos; Rabaza, Jorge

2013-01-01

23

Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernia: one-year experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, 101 consecutive laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repairs (LTPR) were performed in 62 patients by a single surgeon. The series was begun in April 1991, and involved repair of 49 direct, 41 indirect, 4 femoral, 3 umbilical, 3 sliding, and 1 incisional hernias. Twelve cases were bilateral, eleven hernias were incarcerated, and fifteen hernias were recurrent. There were no intraoperative complications, and none of the procedures required conversion to open surgery. Patients experienced the following postoperative complications: transient testicular pain (1), transient anterior thigh paresthesias (2), urinary retention requiring TURP (1), and hernia recurrences (2). Follow up has ranged from 4 - 15 months and initial results have been encouraging.

Kavic, Michael S.

1993-05-01

24

Mediastinal Seroma Post Laparoscopic Repair of Type IV Paraesophageal Hernia  

PubMed Central

Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hernia is safe and feasible and can provide comparable results for patients with type IV paraesophageal hernia. We report a rare case of mediastinal seroma in an 80-year-old gentleman who had a giant type IV paraesophageal hernia and was eventually admitted to our hospital for elective laparoscopic repair and recovered very well after surgery with resolution of the atelectatic lungs and air-fluid collection in his chest. PMID:21727737

Alnassar, Sami A.

2011-01-01

25

Initial experience of single port laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair: nearly-scarless inguinal hernia repair  

PubMed Central

Purpose In the early 1990's laparoscopic hernioplasty gained popularity worldwide. Thereafter, laparoscopic surgeons have attempted to improve cosmesis using single port surgery. This study aims to introduce and assess the safety and feasibility of single port laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair with a nearly-scarless umbilical incision. Methods Sixty three single port laparoscopic TEP hernia repairs were performed in sixty patients from June 2010 to March 2011 at Incheon St. Mary's Hospital, with the use of a glove single-port device and standard laparoscopic instruments. Demographic and clinical data, intraoperative findings, and postoperative course were reviewed. Results Of the 63 hernias treated, 31 were right inguinal hernias, 26 were left inguinal hernias and 3 were both inguinal hernias. There was one conversion to conventional three port laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernioplasty. Mean operative time was 62 minutes (range, 32 to 150 minutes). There were no intraoperative complications. Postoperative complications occurred in two cases (wound seroma and urinary retension) and were successfully treated conservatively. Mean hospital stay was 2.15 days. Conclusion Single port laparoscopic TEP hernia repair is safe and feasible. Umbilical incision provides an excellent cosmetic outcome. Prospective randomized studies comparing single port and conventional three port laparoscopic TEP repairs with short-term outcome and long-term recurrence rate are needed for confirmation. PMID:22148127

Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Jo; Lee, Yoon Suk

2011-01-01

26

Laparoscopic surgery for inguinal hernia: Current status and controversies  

PubMed Central

Repair of inguinal hernia is one of the commonest operations performed by surgeons around the world. The treatment of this common problem has seen an evolution from the pure tissue repairs to the prosthetic repairs and in the recent past to laparoscopic repair. The fact that so many hernia repairs are practiced is a testimony to the fact that probably none is distinctly superior to the other. This review assesses the current status of surgery for repair of inguinal hernia and examines the various controversial issues surrounding the subject. PMID:21187993

Bhandarkar, Deepraj S; Shankar, Manu; Udwadia, Tehemton E

2006-01-01

27

WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias  

PubMed Central

Emergency repair of complicated abdominal hernias is associated with poor prognosis and a high rate of post-operative complications. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013, during the 2nd Congress of the World Society of Emergency Surgery with the goal of defining recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. PMID:24289453

2013-01-01

28

Recurrences After Conventional Anterior and Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Objective To study the long-term recurrence rate and other complications after conventional and laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Summary Background Data Reliable long-term follow-up of patients with inguinal hernias treated by laparoscopic repair techniques is lacking. Methods The authors performed a randomized, multicenter trial in which 487 patients with inguinal hernia were treated by totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic repair and 507 patients were treated by conventional anterior hernia repair. Patients were followed and examined for recurrence and chronic inguinal pain 2, 3, and 5 years after surgery. Risk factors for recurrence and chronic inguinal pain were assessed. Results Patients who underwent conventional repair had a high risk for recurrence compared to patients who underwent laparoscopic repair. Risk factors for recurrence were operative time and type of conventional repair. Predictive independent risk factors for chronic inguinal pain were conventional repair (Bassini repairs and non-bassini repairs), inguinal pain before surgery, and perioperative lesion of the ilioinguinal nerve. Conclusions Patients with inguinal hernia who undergo laparoscopic repair have fewer recurrences and less chronic inguinal pain than those who undergo conventional open repair. The Bassini repair produces unacceptably high recurrence rates. PMID:12496541

Liem, Mike S. L.; van Duyn, Eino B.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; van Vroonhoven, Theo J. M. V.

2003-01-01

29

Laparoscopic repair of a Morgagni hernia  

PubMed Central

We report a case of laparoscopic repair of symptomatic Morgagni hernia (MH) in an adult. A tension-free closure of the defect was carried out using a polypropylene mesh. The recovery was quick and uneventful. Two years after surgery, the patient is doing well. A search of the English-language surgical literature revealed a total of 55 cases of laparoscopic repair of MH reported: 40 in adults and 15 in children. The various modalities of diagnosis, operative techniques, and disease presentation are discussed. PMID:21206651

Sherigar, J. M.; Dalal, A. D.; Patel, J. R.

2005-01-01

30

[Postoperative hematomas after inguinal hernia repair].  

PubMed

It was done the analysis of the results of 625 open and endoscopic prosthetic and autoplastic hernia repairs made in a planned and emergency basis during the period from 2005 to 2012. The autoplastic group was divided into three subgroups: the plastic by Bassini, Shouldays and Postempski. The prosthesis group was divided into open and endoscopic subgroups. The open prosthesis group was also divided into subgroups in accordance with the options of hernia sac preparation (excised, reseted, untouched) and the reconstruction of the posterior wall of the inguinal canal (without reconstruction, with a single-layer and double-layer plastic). It was noted hematocele scrotum - 19 (3.04%), hematoma of the spermatic cord - 16 (2.56%), wound infiltration with a hemorrhagic component - 13 (2.08%). It was not noted the hemorrhagic complications in the subgroups of open prosthesis without hernia sac preparation. Reducing surgical aggression against inguinal hernias during the operation can reduce the frequency of hematomas. The absence of a clear classification of hematomas brings to difficulties in assessment of the role of specific surgical techniques in the development of postoperative complications after surgery for inguinal hernias. PMID:24429713

Cherepanin, A I; Pokrovski?, K A; Povetkin, A P; Antonov, O N; Baulina, E A

2014-01-01

31

Laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernias: early results  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Open repair of parastomal hernias is associated with high rates of morbidity and recurrence. Laparoscopic repair with mesh has been described, and good results have been reported in small case series with short-term follow-up. The purpose of this study was to review our institution’s experience with the laparoscopic repair of parastomal hernias. Methods: Nine patients with symptomatic parastomal hernias

B. Safadi

2004-01-01

32

Clinical usefulness of laparoscopic total extraperitoneal hernia repair for recurrent inguinal hernia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Hernia repair after recurrence is a challenging procedure, and many approaches have been suggested for it. Total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair should be considered in recurrent hernia. This study was conducted for the purpose of investigating the clinical usefulness of laparoscopic TEP hernia repair for recurrent inguinal hernia. Methods Among the 191 patients who underwent TEP hernia repair at these authors' center from June 2006 to January 2010, the bilateral-hernia cases and the patients with a history of previous pelvic surgery were excluded. A total of 19 patients (12.5%) were enrolled in the recurrent-inguinal-hernia group (group R), and 133 patients (87.5%) in the primary-hernia group (group P). Data were investigated retrospectively, based on the medical records. Results The mean operation time was 97 minutes in group R and 99 minutes in group P (>0.05). In group R, no operation modality change occurred, and temporary urinary retention was developed in four patients (21.1%). In group P, on the other hand, operation modality change from TEP to the transabdominal preperitoneal approach was necessary in four patients (3%). Additionally, in group P, 30 patients (22.6%) had temporary urinary retention and six (4.5%) had testicular edema. No recurrence was identified during the follow-up period in both groups (mean follow-up period: 15.8 months for group R and 18.0 months for group P). Conclusion Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair seems to be a safe and useful method for correcting recurrent inguinal hernia. PMID:22066054

Jang, In Sik; Kim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Beum Su; Choi, Sung Il

2011-01-01

33

Groin hernia repair: open techniques.  

PubMed

Since the introduction of the Bassini method in 1887, more than 70 types of pure tissue repair have been reported in the surgical literature. An unacceptable recurrence rate and prolonged postoperative pain and recovery time after tissue repair along with our understanding of the metabolic origin of inguinal hernias led to the concept of tension-free hernioplasty with mesh. Currently, the main categories of inguinal hernia repair are the open repairs and the laparoscopic repairs. In the open category, repair of the hernia is achieved by pure tissue approximation or by tension-free mesh repair. The most commonly performed tissue repairs are those of Bassini, Shouldice, and to a lesser extent McVay. In the tension-free mesh repair category, the mesh is placed in front of the transversalis fascia, such as with the Lichtenstein tension-free hernioplasty, or behind the transversalis fascia in the preperitoneal space, such as during the Nyhus, Rives, Read, Stoppa, Wantz, and Kugel procedures. Numerous comparative randomized trials have clearly demonstrated the superiority of the tension-free mesh repair over the traditional tissue approximation method. Placing mesh behind the transversalis fascia, although a sound concept, requires extensive dissection in the highly complex preperitoneal space and can lead to injury of the pelvic structures, major hematoma formation, or both. In addition, according to the prospective randomized comparative study of mesh placement in front of versus behind the transversalis fascia, the latter offers no advantage over the former, and it is more difficult to perform, learn, and teach. More importantly, preperitoneal mesh implantation (via open and laparoscopic procedure) leads to obliteration of the spaces of Retzius and Bogros, making certain vascular and urologic procedures, in particular radical prostatectomy and lymph node dissection, extremely difficult if not impossible. In conclusion, according to level A evidence from randomized comparative studies, (1) mesh repair is superior to pure tissue approximation repairs, and (2) mesh implantation in front of the transversalis fascia is superior, safer, and easier than open or laparoscopic mesh implantation behind the transversalis fascia. PMID:15983714

Amid, Parviz K

2005-08-01

34

Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair  

MedlinePLUS

... Global: Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts SAGES HELPS: Humanity Education Leadership Perspective Support SAGES STEP: Surgeons Training ... for a surgery. Specific recommendations may vary among health care professionals. If you have a question about ...

35

Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair  

MedlinePLUS

... Global: Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts SAGES HELPS: Humanity Education Leadership Perspective Support SAGES STEP: Surgeons Training ... for a surgery. Specific recommendations may vary among health care professionals. If you have a question about ...

36

Sutureless Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair in Obese Patients  

PubMed Central

Background and Objective: Transfascial sutures (TFS) are a standard component of laparoscopic ventral herniorrhaphy (LVHR) that contribute to the durability of repair, but also pain and, resultantly, hospital stay. We sought to examine LVHR without TFS in obese patients with small abdominal wall hernias. Methods: Between September 2002 and December 2007, 174 patients underwent LVHR at Yale-New Haven Hospital. Patients with BMI >30kg/m2 and small primary abdominal wall hernias were eligible for repair without TFS. Correlation between BMI, defect surface area, operative time, and postoperative stay was assessed. Results: Fourteen patients underwent LVHR with no TFS, 2 with normal BMI and recurrent hernia after open repair and 12 with BMI>30 kg/m2 and primary small hernia. Mean age was 38.8 years. The average defect size was 5.3cm2; mean operative time (OT) was 42 minutes. Eleven patients (92%) were discharged home the day of surgery. No infectious or bleeding complications occurred. One patient required chronic pain management, and 8 patients (67%) developed seromas that resorbed spontaneously. There was no hernia recurrence at 7-month follow-up. Conclusion: LVHR is feasible without TFS provided the hernia defect is small. Surgery can be performed on an outpatient basis in obese individuals with minimal postoperative morbidity. PMID:21902966

Akkary, Ehab; Panait, Lucian; Roberts, Kurt; Duffy, Andrew

2011-01-01

37

Tubal occlusion after inguinal hernia repair. A case report.  

PubMed

Midtubal occlusion and infertility occurred subsequent to an inguinal hernia repair. Recognition of the traumatic etiology is important because other causes of midtubal obstruction, such as endometriosis, tuberculosis and adenomatoid tumor of the oviduct, may be considered contraindications to reconstructive surgery. Once recognized, the condition is highly amendable to microsurgical reconstruction. PMID:2030492

Urman, B C; McComb, P F

1991-03-01

38

Controversies in laparoscopic repair of incisional hernia  

PubMed Central

Background: Incisional hernias can be a significant problem after open abdominal surgery. Laparoscopic incisional hernia repair (LIHR) is conceptually appealing: a large, abdominal wall re-incision with potential wound-related ill effects is avoided and an intra-peritoneal onlay mesh is expected to provide security that is equivalent to open, retro-muscular mesh repair. As such, LIHR has gained substantial popularity despite sparse, randomised clinical data to compare with conventional, open repair. Aim: To enumerate and discuss important, controversial issues in patient-selection, technique and early post-operative care for LIHR. Materials and Methods: Pragmatic summary of comprehensive review of English language literature, discussion with experts and personal experience. Outcomes: Six important areas of some dispute were identified: 1. Size of abdominal-wall defect that is suitable for LIHR: Generally, defect-diameter > 10 cm is better served by open retromuscular repair with tension-free re-approximation of the edges of the defect. 2. Extent of adhesiolysis: Complete division of adhesions to the anterior abdominal wall may identify sub-clinical “Swiss-cheese” defects but incurs some risk of additional complications. 3. Intra-operative recognition of enterotomy: Possible options are either laparoscopic suture of bowel injury and simultaneous completion of LIHR, or staged LIHR or conversion to open suture-repair. 4. Choice of mesh: “Composite” meshes are regarded as the current standard of care but there is paucity of data regarding potential dangers of intra-peritoneal polypropylene mesh. 5. Technique of mesh-fixation: Trans-parietal sutures are more secure than tacks, with limited data to correlate with post-operative pain. 6. Alarm over post-operative pain: Unlike other advanced laparoscopic operations, the specificity of pain as a marker of intra-abdominal sepsis after LIHR remains unclear. Conclusion: Recognition of and attention to controversial issues will promote increased success of LIHR. PMID:21170220

Sarela, Abeezar I.

2006-01-01

39

Fasciitis Necroticans after Elective Hernia Inguinal Surgery  

PubMed Central

Necrotising fasciitis is a rare but disastrous complication after elective surgery. We present two patients (both male, 58 and 18 years old) who developed necrotising fasciitis following elective inguinal hernia repair according to Lichtenstein. The importance of both recognition and time interval between symptom occurrence and surgical intervention is illustrated, emphasising the need for immediate action when necrotising fasciitis is suspected. A high index of suspicion of necrotising fasciitis should be maintained when a wound infection is accompanied by disproportional pain, lethargy, or sepsis. Epidermolysis and subcutaneous emphysema are often very late symptoms. Recognition and immediate intervention decrease mortality and morbidity. PMID:24511409

Sigterman, T. A.; Gorissen, Kim J.; Dolmans, Dennis E. J. G. J.

2014-01-01

40

Technical consideration for subxiphoidal incisional hernia repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The main principle of incisional hernia repair with mesh augmentation is a wide overlap of at least 5 cm in all directions. This is complicated when cartilaginous or osseous structures border the fascial defect, most notably at the xiphoid after sternotomy or in large proximal incisional hernias. Method: We performed an anatomic investigation of this ''problematic'' area with its

J. Conze; A. Prescher; K. Kisielinski; U. Klinge; V. Schumpelick

2005-01-01

41

Simultaneous Paraesophageal Hernia Repair and Gastric Banding  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of a hiatal hernia is generally considered a contraindication to gastric banding in the morbidly obese, despite\\u000a recent reports indicating favorable outcomes following simultaneous repair of sliding hernias and laparoscopic adjustable\\u000a gastric banding (LAGB). A 66-year-old woman weighing 120 kg (BMI 45) with arterial hypertension and gastroesophageal reflux-related\\u000a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent repair of a large paraesophageal

Serge Landen

2005-01-01

42

The History of Hiatal Hernia Surgery  

PubMed Central

Objective: This review addresses the historical evolution of hiatal hernia (HH) repair and reports in a chronological fashion the major milestones in HH surgery before the laparoscopic era. Methods: The medical literature and the collections of the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine were searched. Secondary references from all sources were studied. The senior author's experience and personal communications are also reported. Results: The first report of HH was published in 1853 by Bowditch. Rokitansky in 1855 demonstrated that esophagitis was due to gastroesophageal reflux, and Hirsch in 1900 diagnosed an HH using x-rays. Eppinger diagnosed an HH in a live patient, and Friedenwald and Feldman related the symptoms to the presence of an HH. In 1926, Akerlund proposed the term hiatus hernia and classified HH into the 3 types that we use today. The first elective surgical repair was reported in 1919 by Soresi. The physiologic link between HH and gastroesophageal reflux was made at the second half of the 20th century by Allison and Barrett. In the midst of a physiologic revolution, Nissen and Belsey developed their famous operations. In 1957, Collis published his innovative operation. Thal described his technique in 1965, and in 1967, Hill published his procedure. Many modifications of these procedures were published by Pearson and Henderson, Orringer and Sloan, Rossetti, Dor, and Toupet. Donahue and Demeester significantly improved Nissen's operation, and they were the first to truly understand its physiologic mechanism. Conclusion: Hiatal hernia surgery has evolved from anatomic repair to physiological restoration. PMID:15622007

Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Rattner, David W.

2005-01-01

43

Guidelines for inguinal hernia repair in everyday practice.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The Royal College of Surgeons of England published clinical guidelines for the management of groin hernia in adults in July 1993. We compared our indications, techniques, complications and outcome with these guidelines. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A consecutive series of 440 patients who underwent a groin hernia repair from the 1 July 1994 to 30 July 1995 were studied retrospectively. Special consideration was given to the advantages and acceptance of day-case surgery. Confidential questionnaires were sent to all patients 6-12 months following surgery. RESULTS: The majority of elective primary inguinal hernias (83%) were repaired by the open tension-free Lichtenstein mesh technique. Our selection criteria for day-case surgery included ASA I, age (< 65 years) and social situation; 56% underwent an operation on a day-case basis. Including in-patients discharged within 24 h following operation, this proportion of 'day-cases' increased to 72.5%. Less complications occurred in the day-case group (P = 0.018). However, this difference may be caused by incomplete reporting of complications in the day-case group. There were no significant differences in patients' satisfaction, postoperative attendance for medical advice or time back to work between the day-case and in-patient group. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines need to be reviewed. The Lichtenstein repair offers an excellent and simple technique for hernia repair as a day-case procedure. Our results suggest that the number of hernia repairs performed as a day-case could substantially be increased to more than the recommended 30%. Time off work is mainly influenced by the advice given by GPs and surgeons. Reducing time off work by giving more appropriate recommendations and increasing the number of day-case surgery cases could significantly reduce the costs of health-care. Images Figure 1 PMID:11432143

Metzger, J.; Lutz, N.; Laidlaw, I.

2001-01-01

44

Open tension free repair of inguinal hernias; the Lichtenstein technique  

PubMed Central

Background Recurrences have been a significant problem following hernia repair. Prosthetic materials have been increasingly used in hernia repair to prevent recurrences. Their use has been associated with several advantages, such as less postoperative pain, rapid recovery, low recurrence rates. Methods In this retrospective study, 540 tension-free inguinal hernia repairs were performed between August 1994 and December 1999 in 510 patients, using a polypropylene mesh (Lichtenstein technique). The main outcome measure was early and late morbidity and especially recurrence. Results Inguinal hernia was indirect in 55 % of cases (297 patients), direct in 30 % (162 patients) and of the pantaloon (mixed) type in 15 % (81 patients). Mean patient age was 53.7 years (range, 18 – 85). Follow-up was completed in 407 patients (80 %) by clinical examination or phone call. The median follow-up period was 3.8 years (range, 1 – 6 years). Seroma and hematoma formation requiring drainage was observed in 6 and 2 patients, respectively, while transient testicular swelling occurred in 5 patients. We have not observed acute infection or abscess formation related to the presence of the foreign body (mesh). In two patients, however, a delayed rejection of the mesh occurred 10 months and 4 years following surgery. There was one recurrence of the hernia (in one of these patients with late mesh rejection) (recurrence rate = 0.2 %). Postoperative neuralgia was observed in 5 patients (1 %). Conclusion Lichtenstein tension-free mesh inguinal hernia repair is a simple, safe, comfortable, effective method, with extremely low early and late morbidity and remarkably low recurrence rate and therefore it is our preferred method for hernia repair since 1994. PMID:11696246

Sakorafas, George H; Halikias, Ioannis; Nissotakis, Christos; Kotsifopoulos, Nikolaos; Stavrou, Alexios; Antonopoulos, Constantinos; Kassaras, George A

2001-01-01

45

Aspects of hernia surgery in Wales.  

PubMed Central

The management of elective inguinal herniorrhaphy in Wales was assessed by means of a postal survey of consultant general surgeons. This included technique of repair, length of inpatient stay, follow-up, use of heparin thromboprophylaxis and advice regarding driving, strenuous activities and work. In all, 54 replies (77%) were received. The views of patients on their surgery was assessed by a questionnaire sent to 80 patients treated on a single surgical unit; 60 replies (75%) were received. Waiting times were relatively short among this group, 67.5% of patients being treated within 6 months of seeking medical advice; 16.25% suffered a complication. All wound infections occurred after discharge and 15% of patients had some groin discomfort 6 months after operation. Accuracy of clinical examination of 50 inguinal hernias by different grades of surgeon was assessed. Consultants were significantly more accurate when compared with house officers (P < 0.001). There is a wide range of repair techniques and postoperative advice practised by consultant general surgeons in Wales. Patients' main complaint was that of a sparsity of postoperative advice, although there also appears to be an appreciable postoperative morbidity. Clinical experience plays a significant role in assessment of the suitability of hernias for surgery. PMID:7598418

Boyce, D. E.; Crosby, D. L.; Shandall, A. A.

1995-01-01

46

[Hernia repair--which technique? Help in making the decision].  

PubMed

Operation of the inguinal hernia is the most common operation in general surgery. Many criteria influence the kind of operation the surgeon will perform. Detailed anatomic knowledge of the inguinal region, standardised tactical and technical performance of the operation team, careful preparation and a minimum of blood loss reduce complications to low levels. These items are the same for all operation methods. The Shouldice procedure has been the golden standard for many years, nowadays (1998) in America in more than 80% of operations a mesh is implanted in the abdominal wall. A Cochran review of EBM showed advantages for mesh repair compared to nonmesh repair. Patient oriented decision making in choosing a method for inguinal hernia repair should be the new standard of modern general surgery. PMID:11824337

Schweins, M; Edelmann, M; Holthausen, U

2001-01-01

47

Polypropelene mesh eroding transverse colon following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.  

PubMed

Polypropylene mesh when used in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair can produce the worst complication such as enterocutaneous fistula. We report an interesting case of incisional hernia operated with laparoscopic polypropylene mesh hernioplasty who subsequently developed an enterocutaneous fistula 1 month after surgery. A fistulogram showed dye entering into the transverse colon. On exploration, the culprit polypropylene mesh was found to have eroded into the mid-transverse colon causing the fistula. Resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the colon were done with the removal of the mesh. On literature review, polypropylene mesh erosion in to transverse colon is rare. PMID:23626421

Sahoo, Manash Ranjan; Bisoi, Suryakanta; Mathapati, Santosh

2013-01-01

48

Outcome of the patients with chronic mesh infection following open inguinal hernia repair  

PubMed Central

Purpose Hernia repairs are the most common elective abdominal wall procedures performed by general surgeons. The use of a mesh has become the standard for hernia repair surgery. Herein, we discuss a management strategy for chronic mesh infections following open inguinal hernia repair with onlay prosthetic mesh. Methods In this study, 15 patients with chronic mesh infections following open inguinal hernia repairs were included. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed and information regarding presentation, type of previous hernia repair, type of mesh, operative findings and bacteriological examination results were obtained. In all cases, the infected mesh was removed completely and the patients were treated with antibiotic regimens and local wound care. Results Fifteen mesh removals due to chronic infection were performed between January 2000 and March 2012. The mean interval of hernia repair to mesh removal was 49 months. All patients were followed up for a median period of 62 months (range, 16 to 115 months). In all patients, the infections were resolved successfully and none were persistent or recurrent. However, one patient developed recurrent hernia and one developed nerve injury. Conclusion Chronic mesh infection following hernia repair mandates removal of the infected mesh, which rarely results in hernia recurrence. PMID:23646314

Kocaay, Firat; Orozakunov, Erkinbek; Genc, Volkan; Kepenekci Bayram, Ilknur; Cakmak, Atil; Baskan, Semih; Kuterdem, Ercument

2013-01-01

49

Inguinal hernia repair using local anaesthesia.  

PubMed Central

This is a review of a large and long experience in one hospital with more than 100 000 elective inguinal hernia repairs using local anaesthesia and emphasising the advantages of this type of anaesthetic. Subsections deal briefly with facets of this experience such as age, preoperative assessment, skin incision, the cremaster muscle, the testis, bilateral hernias, hernias in women, short hospital stay, follow-up, return to work and recurrence rates. Considerable emphasis is given to the principles of technique and this is described in detail. Images p[381]-a p[381]-b p[381]-c p[381]-d Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6391342

Glassow, F.

1984-01-01

50

Laparoscopy for Hemoperitoneum After Traditional Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Hemoperitoneum after inguinal hernia repair, with the exception of laparoscopic herniorrhaphy, is extremely rare. No other case of hemoperitoneum after traditional open inguinal hernia repair has been reported in the English-language literature. A 39-year-old woman had undergone inguinal hernia repair with the Bassini repair technique. Lower abdominal pain and anemia occurred on postoperative day 1. Laparoscopy was performed and revealed hemoperitoneum caused as a complication of inguinal hernia repair. The abdominal cavity was thoroughly washed with saline solution, and the aspirated blood was processed and reinfused. Laparoscopy for hemoperitoneum as a complication after inguinal hernia repair was very useful for both diagnosis and treatment. PMID:12166761

Kasamatsu, Hajime; Fujita, Sadanori; Mori, Hiroshi

2002-01-01

51

Learning curve for laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernia  

PubMed Central

Background Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair has been accepted as a popular procedure for inguinal hernia repair, but surgeons still encounter technical difficulties owing to unfamiliar pelvic anatomy and limited working space. We sought to estimate the learning curve for laparoscopic TEP repair without supervision. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients scheduled for laparoscopic TEP repair of an inguinal hernia from December 2000 to October 2007. Results We reviewed medical records for 700 patients. The cases were divided into 8 groups: 20 patients each in groups I–V and 200 patients each in groups VI–VIII. No significant difference in demographic characteristics was identified among the groups. The mean duration of surgery significantly decreased (p < 0.001) in relation to experience; it reached a plateau of less than 30 minutes (mean 28 min) after 60 cases. The mean length of stay in hospital was 0.97 days, reaching a plateau after 20 cases. Six patients were converted to other techniques: 1 patient each in groups III and VIII and 4 patients in group VII. Three recurrences were detected; however, 2 were excluded because the patient had bilateral inguinal hernias. Conclusion We estimate the learning curve for laparoscopic TEP repair is 60 cases for a beginner surgeon. The presence of an experienced supervisor during the first 60 cases can help prevent unnecessary complications and shorten the duration of surgery. PMID:22269299

Choi, Yoon Young; Kim, Zisun; Hur, Kyung Yul

2012-01-01

52

Results of Laparoscopic Versus Open Abdominal and Incisional Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Background: Incisional hernia is a frequent complication of abdominal surgery. The object of this study was to confirm the safety, efficacy, and feasibility of laparoscopic treatment of abdominal wall defects. Methods: Fifty consecutive laparoscopic abdominal and incisional hernia repairs from September 2001 to May 2003 were compared with 50 open anterior repairs. Results: The 2 groups were not different for age, body mass index, or American Society of Anaesthesiologists scores. Mean operative time was 59 minutes for the laparoscopic group, 164.5 minutes for the open group. Mean hernia diameter was 10.6 cm for the laparoscopic group, 10.5 cm for the open group. Mean length of stay was 2.1 days for the laparoscopic group, 8.1 days for the open group. Complications occurred in 16% of the laparoscopic and 50% of open group. Median follow-up was 9.0 months for the laparoscopic group, 24.5 months for the open group. Recurrence rates were 2% for laparoscopic group and 0% for the open group. Conclusion: Results for laparoscopic abdominal and incisional hernia repair seem to be superior to results for open repair in terms of operative time, length of stay, wound infection, major complications, and overall hospital reimbursement. PMID:15984708

Magnone, Stefano; Erba, Luigi; Bertolini, Aimone; Croce, Enrico

2005-01-01

53

A novel technique for perineal hernia repair.  

PubMed

Perineal hernia is an uncommon complication of abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. Gracilis muscle flaps can be used to reconstruct the pelvic floor. The traditional repair utilises gracilis muscle alone, without overlying tissues and skin. We present the case of a 69-year-old white man who presented with a perineal hernia subsequent to abdominoperineal resection for advanced rectal cancer who was successfully treated with a modified de-epithelised gracilis myocutaneous flap with no evidence of recurrence at 18 months postsurgery. Surgical repair of postoperative perineal hernia using a gracilis flap spares the morbidity of abdominal-based reconstruction and provides a good option for patients in whom the abdomen is unavailable. Use of a myocutaneous flap adds strength to the repair when compared to reconstruction with the gracilis muscle alone, owing to the strength imparted by the dermis. PMID:23580682

Douglas, Stephanie R; Longo, Walter E; Narayan, Deepak

2013-01-01

54

DeGarengeot Hernia: Transabdominal Preperitoneal Hernia Repair and Appendectomy  

PubMed Central

Background: The incarcerated appendix in the femoral hernia represents a rare clinical case that was first described by the Frenchman de Garengeot in 1731. Besides the open procedures, laparoscopy presented itself as a treatment option. Case Report: Our case concerns a 38-year-old patient with a right femoral hernia with an inflamed incarcerated appendix. Because of the clinically inconclusive finding, we chose transperitoneal preperitoneal hernia repair (TAPP) combined with a laparoscopic appendectomy. The intra- and postoperative course was uneventful. This case shows that a laparoscopic procedure is possible even in the case of an incarceration in conjunction with an appendicitis that has not spread to the adjacent peritoneum. Discussion: Compared with open interventions, the subjective social advantages (shorter hospital stay, earlier return to work, less need for pain killers, and others) of laparoscopic hernia treatment have been extensively studied. The use of both methods in the case of an incarcerated hernia is open to dispute, though various small series confirm the feasibility. Conclusion: Here, TAPP seems to be the more reliable method in terms of patient safety because of the simultaneous possibility of using laparoscopy. PMID:18237518

Comman, A.; Gaetzschmann, P.; Hanner, T.

2007-01-01

55

Clinical presentation and operative repair of Morgagni hernia  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Morgagni hernia (MH) is an uncommon type of diaphragmatic hernia. This study aimed to summarize clinically relevant data with respect to MHs in adults. METHODS We performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent surgical repair of foramen due to MH at our hospitals between 1996 and 2010. Data were collected on patient demographics, presenting symptoms, modes of diagnosis, surgical procedures, surgery outcomes, recurrence of hernia and follow-up of the patients. RESULTS We included 36 patients with the mean age of 50.2 years. Of these 66.7% (n = 24) were female. Thirty-one patients had MH on the right side and 1 patient had bilateral MH. Most of the patients experienced abdominal symptoms. 72.2% of patients underwent laparotomy (n = 26, 72.2%), (n = 6, 16.7%) thoracotomy (n = 6, 16.7%), and a thoraco-abdominal approach (n = 4, 11.1%). Resection of the hernia sac and insertion of a mesh were not done in any patients. No recurrence occurred. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that preoperative diagnosis and early diagnosis of MH by using laparotomy and thoracotomy is useful for safe and effective repair. Also we suggest that resection of the hernia sac and insertion of a mesh are not necessary. PMID:22778140

Aghajanzadeh, Manouchehr; Khadem, Shahram; Khajeh Jahromi, Sina; Gorabi, Hamed Esmaili; Ebrahimi, Hannan; Maafi, Alireza Amir

2012-01-01

56

Laparoscopic repair of ventral / incisional hernias  

PubMed Central

Despite its significant prevalence, there is little in the way of evidence-based guidelines regarding the timing and method of repair of incisional hernias. To add to the above is the formidable rate of recurrence that has been seen with conventional tissue repairs of these hernias. With introduction of different prosthetic materials and laparoscopic technique, it was hoped that an improvement in the recurrence and complication rates would be realized. The increasing application of the laparoscopic technique across the world indicates that these goals might indeed be achieved. PMID:21187995

Chowbey, Pradeep K; Sharma, Anil; Mehrotra, Magan; Khullar, Rajesh; Soni, Vandana; Baijal, Manish

2006-01-01

57

Laparoscopic hernia repair--the best option?  

PubMed

For 100 years the Bassini-type repair for inguinal hernia was the standard method. The Lichtenstein "tension free" mesh repair replaced it on the grounds of much lower recurrence rates, < 5% vs approximately 15%. However, open procedures all have significant long-term discomfort rates of up to 53%. Laparoscopic repair has become a genuine option in the last 15 years and offers low recurrence (< 1%) and minimal long-term discomfort. However, it has not been widely taken up. There is a common misconception that it takes longer to perform, has more complications and is much more expensive. None of these caveats stand up under objective scrutiny. It is time that laparoscopic repair became the method of choice for most elective inguinal hernia repairs. PMID:18557141

Wall, M L; Cherian, Th; Lotz, J C

2008-01-01

58

Postoperative Pain After Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair: a Prospective Comparison of Sutures Versus Tacks  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Mesh fixation in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair typically involves the use of tacks, transabdominal permanent sutures, or both of these. We compared postoperative pain after repair with either of these 2 methods. Methods: Patients undergoing laparoscopic ventral hernia repair at the Mount Sinai Medical Center were prospectively enrolled in the study. They were sorted into 2 groups (1) those undergoing hernia repairs consisting primarily of transabdominal suture fixation and (2) those undergoing hernia repairs consisting primarily of tack fixation. The patients were not randomized. The technique of surgical repair was based on surgeon preference. A telephone survey was used to follow-up at 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months postoperatively. Results: From 2004 through 2005, 50 patients were enrolled in the study. Twenty-nine had hernia repair primarily with transabdominal sutures, and 21 had repair primarily with tacks. Both groups had similar average age, BMI, hernia defect size, operative time, and postoperative length of stay. Pain scores at 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months were similar. Both groups also had similar times to return to work and need for narcotic pain medication. Conclusions: Patients undergoing laparoscopic ventral hernia repair with primarily transabdominal sutures or tacks experience similar postoperative pain. The choice of either of these fixation methods during surgery should not be based on risk of postoperative pain. PMID:18435881

Nguyen, Scott Q.; Buch, Kerri E.; Schnur, Jessica; Weber, Kaare J.; Katz, L. Brian; Reiner, Mark A.; Aldoroty, Robert A.; Herron, Daniel M.

2008-01-01

59

Single Incision Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVH) requires several skin incisions for trocar placement. We have developed a single incision approach to LVH repair. The technique was introduced in clinical practice to any consenting patients who were candidates for a standard multi-port laparoscopic hernia repair. A consecutive series of patients was then followed to evaluate feasibility. Methods: Over an 8-month period, 14 patients (9 females, 5 males) underwent LVH repair by an academic surgeon. One of 2 access methods was used in each patient through a single 1.5-cm to 2-cm skin incision. One technique utilized two 5-mm ports with a temporarily placed 11-mm port for mesh insertion. The second technique utilized the SILS port (Covidien, Norwalk, CT). Standard or roticulating laparoscopic instruments were used with both techniques. Results: Range (mean) BMI: 23 to 59 (38), Age: 26 to 73 years (53), Duration: 37 to 87 minutes (57), Defect size: 1cm to 8cm (2), 3 with Swiss-cheese defect hernias. The procedure was successfully performed in all patients. No conversions to a multiple-port approach or to an open procedure were necessary. There were no mortalities, major complications, or recurrences during the mean follow-up period of 4 weeks. Conclusion: Single incision ventral hernia repair is technically feasible, effective, and reproducible. The technique is easy to master, and safe for any patient who is a candidate for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. Further data collection with long-term follow-up will be needed to ensure equivalent outcomes. There will be demand for this approach by patients for cosmetic reasons, and it may serve as a bridge to natural orifice techniques. PMID:21902968

Love, Katie M.

2011-01-01

60

[Asymptomatic inguinal hernia: is there an indication for surgery].  

PubMed

Until recently, the repair of asymptomatic groin hernia has been advocated as a prophylaxis for incarceration. However, incarcerations of inguinal hernias are rare events and can be treated adequately if the patient presents himself early after onset of symptoms. Randomized controlled trials showed, that watchful waiting is not associated with increased incarcerations and can be offered as a save alternative. However, within seven years after randomization 50 % to 70 % of the patients in the watchful waiting groups required surgery, mainly because of new onset or increasing symptoms. PMID:25447094

Kohler, Andreas; Beldi, Guido

2014-12-01

61

Morgagni hernia treated by reduced port surgery  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION The laparoscopic repair of a rare diaphragmatic Morgagni hernia using the reduced port approach is described. PRESENTATION OF CASE An 85-year-old female presented with a 2 days history of upper abdominal discomfort and loss of appetite. We diagnosed her condition as a Morgagni hernia by morphological studies and performed laparoscopic mesh placement with a multi-channel port and 12-mm port. This elderly patient had a rapid postoperative recovery. A 2-year follow-up CT showed no recurrence of the hernia. DISCUSSION Recent trends in laparoscopic procedures have been toward minimizing the number of incisions to reduce invasiveness. This case indicated that the reduced port approach can be considered a suitable and safe procedure for treatment of Morgagni hernia. CONCLUSION The reduced port approach is a good indication for Morgagni hernia. PMID:25437681

Kashiwagi, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Kenta; Nozue, Mutsumi; Terada, Yasushi

2014-01-01

62

Predictors of mesh explantation after incisional hernia repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundProsthetic mesh used for incisional hernia repair (IHR) reduces hernia recurrence. Mesh infection results in significant morbidity and challenges for subsequent abdominal wall reconstruction. The risk factors that lead to mesh explantation are not well known.

Mary T. Hawn; Stephen H. Gray; Christopher W. Snyder; Laura A. Graham; Kelly R. Finan; Catherine C. Vick

2011-01-01

63

Transthoracic Repair of Paraesophageal Diaphragmatic Hernia Presenting with Symptoms Mimicking Cardiac Disease (Chest Pain and Breathlessness)  

PubMed Central

We discuss a case of 60-year-old female patient, who presented with history of chest pain radiating to left shoulder, breathlessness and postprandial discomfort. Patient was initially suspected to be suffering from cardiac pathology and was evaluated accordingly. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy also missed the findings of paraesophageal hernia as the gastroesophageal junction was at its normal position. Chest roentgenogram raised the suspicion of diaphragmatic hernia, computed tomogram of chest and abdomen was done later on and showed characteristic features of paraesophageal hernia. Patient underwent transthoracic repair of the paraesophageal hernia along with partial fundoplication and had complete relief from the symptoms after surgery. PMID:25478401

Sharma, Sanjeev; Mahajan, Som; Kumar, Ashwani

2014-01-01

64

Endoscope-assisted Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Background: Since the advent of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, the procedure has invited numerous controversies, and although the procedure has some definitive advantages, no definitive indications for its use have been formulated. The objective of this study was to investigate a novel method for inguinal hernia repair (through a small 2 cm to 2.5 cm) single skin incision that combines the time-tested fundamentals of Lichtenstein's tension-free repair with the advantages of laparoscopic assistance. Methods: The study was conducted as a randomized, controlled trial over a 1-year period and included 50 patients. Only patients with simple reducible hernias without associated comorbid conditions were included. The patients were randomized into 2 groups of 25 patients each. One group underwent conventional tension-free meshplasty, while the other group underwent the repair through a single 2-cm to 2.5-cm skin incision with laparoscopic assistance. This repair was carried out with the help of an indigenously designed steel retractor, 10-mm laparoscope, and conventional instruments; the mesh was fixed with the help of endotacks. Univariate analysis of variance techniques using SPSS 7.5 software was used for data analysis. Results: Two groups were compared for time taken for the procedure, size of skin incision, postoperative pain, complications, return to work, and cosmetic appearance. The results showed a significant decrease in postoperative pain and an earlier return to work, along with much improved cosmesis for the new procedure. Conclusions: Although the study was conducted with a limited number of patients and a very short follow-up, it is worth considering this method over laparoscopic and conventional techniques, especially in reducible hernias. PMID:15791969

Lal, Pawan; Ganguly, P. K.; Arora, M. P.; Hadke, N. S.

2005-01-01

65

The Laparoscopic Approach to Paraesophageal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair continues to be one of the most challenging procedures facing the minimally invasive surgeon. A thorough understanding of the tenets of the operation and advanced skills in minimally invasive laparoscopy are needed for long-term freedom from symptomatic and anatomic recurrence. These include complete reduction of the hernia sac from the mediastinum back into the abdomen with careful preservation of the integrity of muscle and peritoneal lining of the crura, aggressive and complete mobilization of the esophagus to the level of the inferior pulmonary vein, clear identification of the gastroesophageal junction to allow accurate assessment of the intraabdominal esophageal length and use of Collis gastroplasty when esophageal lengthening is required for a tension-free intraabdominal repair. Liberal mobilization of the phrenosplenic and phrenogastric attachments substantially increases the mobility of the left limb of the crura, allowing for a tension-free primary closure in a large percentage of patients. The following describes our current approach to laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair following a decade of refinement in a high-volume center. PMID:22160778

Nason, Katie S.; Levy, Ryan M.; Witteman, Bart P.L.; Luketich, James D.

2014-01-01

66

Simultaneous sleeve gastrectomy and hiatus hernia repair: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Sleeve gastrectomy can exacerbate gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in some patients and cause de novo reflux in others. Some surgeons believe Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the best bariatric surgical procedure for obese patients with hiatus hernia. Others believe that even patients with hiatus hernia can also be safely offered sleeve gastrectomy if combined with a simultaneous hiatus hernia repair. Still, others will offer these patients sleeve gastrectomy without any attempt to diagnose or repair hiatus hernia repair. The effectiveness of concurrent hiatal hernia repair in reducing the incidence of postoperative reflux after sleeve gastrectomy is unclear. This review systematically investigates the results and techniques of simultaneous sleeve gastrectomy and hiatus hernia repair for the treatment of obesity in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. PMID:25348434

Mahawar, Kamal K; Carr, William R J; Jennings, Neil; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

2015-01-01

67

Tailored approach in inguinal hernia repair - decision tree based on the guidelines.  

PubMed

The endoscopic procedures TEP and TAPP and the open techniques Lichtenstein, Plug and Patch, and PHS currently represent the gold standard in inguinal hernia repair recommended in the guidelines of the European Hernia Society, the International Endohernia Society, and the European Association of Endoscopic Surgery. Eighty-two percent of experienced hernia surgeons use the "tailored approach," the differentiated use of the several inguinal hernia repair techniques depending on the findings of the patient, trying to minimize the risks. The following differential therapeutic situations must be distinguished in inguinal hernia repair: unilateral in men, unilateral in women, bilateral, scrotal, after previous pelvic and lower abdominal surgery, no general anesthesia possible, recurrence, and emergency surgery. Evidence-based guidelines and consensus conferences of experts give recommendations for the best approach in the individual situation of a patient. This review tries to summarize the recommendations of the various guidelines and to transfer them into a practical decision tree for the daily work of surgeons performing inguinal hernia repair. PMID:25593944

Köckerling, Ferdinand; Schug-Pass, Christine

2014-01-01

68

Tailored Approach in Inguinal Hernia Repair – Decision Tree Based on the Guidelines  

PubMed Central

The endoscopic procedures TEP and TAPP and the open techniques Lichtenstein, Plug and Patch, and PHS currently represent the gold standard in inguinal hernia repair recommended in the guidelines of the European Hernia Society, the International Endohernia Society, and the European Association of Endoscopic Surgery. Eighty-two percent of experienced hernia surgeons use the “tailored approach,” the differentiated use of the several inguinal hernia repair techniques depending on the findings of the patient, trying to minimize the risks. The following differential therapeutic situations must be distinguished in inguinal hernia repair: unilateral in men, unilateral in women, bilateral, scrotal, after previous pelvic and lower abdominal surgery, no general anesthesia possible, recurrence, and emergency surgery. Evidence-based guidelines and consensus conferences of experts give recommendations for the best approach in the individual situation of a patient. This review tries to summarize the recommendations of the various guidelines and to transfer them into a practical decision tree for the daily work of surgeons performing inguinal hernia repair.

Köckerling, Ferdinand; Schug-Pass, Christine

2014-01-01

69

Simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias under local anesthesia.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The authors confirm the advantages of simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias, indicate that it is feasible to perform the procedure under local anesthesia, and suggest that when an open tension-free technique is used, the results are superior to those of laparoscopic repair of bilateral inguinal hernias. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Between 1971 and 1995, simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias were performed in 2953 men. Initially, between 1971 and 1984, patients with indirect hernias underwent the traditional tissue approximation repair. Those with direct hernias had the same procedure, with the repair additionally buttressed by a sheet of Marlex mesh (Davol, Inc., Cronston, RI). Between 1984 and 1995, both direct and indirect hernias were repaired using the open tension-free hernioplasty procedure. METHOD: The 2953 patients underwent simultaneous repair of bilateral inguinal hernias under local anesthesia in a private practice setting in general hospitals. RESULTS: In those cases in which the "tension free" technique was used, patients experienced minimal to mild postoperative pain and had a short recovery period, with a recurrence rate of 0.1%. CONCLUSIONS: Uncomplicated bilateral inguinal hernias in adults are best treated simultaneously. It is feasible to perform the operation under local anesthesia, and when an open tension-free repair is used, postoperative pain and recovery periods are equally comparable with those of laparoscopic repair, although the complication and the recurrence rates are significantly less. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8604904

Amid, P K; Shulman, A G; Lichtenstein, I L

1996-01-01

70

Laparoscopic repair of paraesophageal hiatus hernia in infancy  

PubMed Central

Paraesophageal hiatus hernia (PEHH) is an uncommon type of diaphragmatic hernia in the pediatric age group. Two patients aged 5-months and 8-months presented with respiratory symptoms and underwent a laparoscopic repair. Preoperative assessment included chest x-ray and CT scan. We suggest that laparoscopic repair of PEHH in infants is safe and preferred mode of the treatment. PMID:20011498

Kundal, Anjani Kumar; Zargar, Noor Ullah; Krishna, Anurag

2008-01-01

71

Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair: Pros and Cons Compared With Open Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study was to analyse the surgical techniques, perioperative complications, and recurrence rate of laparocopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR), in comparison with the open ventral hernia repair (OVHR), based on the international literature. Methods: A Medline search of the English literature was performed using the term “laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.” Further articles were found by cross-referencing the references of each main article. Results: Current literature on the topic suggests that LVHR is a safe alternative to the open method with the main advantages being minimal postoperative pain, a shorter convalescence period, and better cosmetic results. Main complications after the laparoscopic approach, such as incidental enterotomy, protracted pain, postoperative seroma, or mesh infection occur at an acceptable rate. Furthermore, most articles favor LVHR versus OVHR in terms of recurrence rate. Conclusions: Although further randomized studies are needed to draw safe conclusions in terms of complications and recurrence, LVHR is fast becoming the standard approach in the repair of abdominal wall hernias. PMID:18435882

Machairas, Anastasios; Patapis, Paul; Liakakos, Theodore

2008-01-01

72

The Role of Fibrin Glue Polypropylene Mesh Fixation in Open Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The aim: of this study was to compare two methods of polypropylene mesh fixation for inguinal hernia repair according to Lichtenstein using fibrin glue and suture fixation. Material and Methods: The study included 60 patients with unilateral inguinal hernia, divided into two groups of 30 patients – Suture fixation and fibrin glue fixation. All patients were analyzed according to: age, gender, body mass index (BMI), indication for surgery–the type, localization and size of the hernia, preoperative level of pain and the type of surgery. Overall postoperative complications and the patient’s ability to return to regular activities were followed for 3 months. Results and discussion: Statistically significant difference in the duration of surgery, pain intensity and complications (p<0.05) were verified between method A, the group of patients whose inguinal hernia was repaired using polypropylene mesh–fibrin glue and method B, where inguinal hernia was repaired with polypropylene mesh using suture fixation. Given the clinical research, this systematic review of existing results on the comparative effectiveness, will help in making important medical decisions about options for surgical treatment of inguinal hernia. Conclusions: The results of this study may impact decision making process for recommendations of methods of treatment by professional associations, making appropriate decisions on hospital procurement of materials, as well as coverage of health funds and insurance. PMID:24937929

Odobasic, Amer; Krdzalic, Goran; Hodzic, Mirsad; Hasukic, Sefik; Sehanovic, Aida; Odobasic, Ademir

2014-01-01

73

Changes in the frequencies of abdominal wall hernias and the preferences for their repair: a multicenter national study from Turkey.  

PubMed

Abstract Abdominal wall hernias are a common problem in the general population. A Western estimate reveals that the lifetime risk of developing a hernia is about 2%. (1 - 3) As a result, hernia repairs likely comprise the most frequent general surgery operations. More than 20 million hernias are estimated to be repaired every year around the world. (4) Numerous repair techniques have been described to date however tension-free mesh repairs are widely used today because of their low hernia recurrence rates. Nevertheless, there are some ongoing debates regarding the ideal approach (open or laparoscopic), (5 , 6) the ideal anesthesia (general, local, or regional), (7 , 8) and the ideal mesh (standard polypropylene or newer meshes). (9 , 10.) PMID:25216417

Seker, Gaye; Kulacoglu, Hakan; Oztuna, Derya; Topgül, Koray; Akyol, Cihangir; Cakmak, At?l; Karateke, Faruk; Ozdo?an, Mehmet; Ersoy, Eren; Gürer, Ahmet; Zerbaliyev, Elbrus; Seker, Duray; Yorganc?, Kaya; Pergel, Ahmet; Ayd?n, Ibrahim; Ensari, Cemal; Bilecik, Tuna; Kahraman, Izzettin; Reis, Erhan; Kalayc?, Murat; Canda, Aras Emre; Demira?, Alp; Kesicio?lu, Tu?rul; Malazgirt, Zafer; Gündo?du, Haldun; Terzi, Cem

2014-01-01

74

Simultaneous Prosthetic Mesh Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Abdominoplasty for Ventral Hernia and Severe Rectus Diastasis Repairs  

PubMed Central

Background: Standard abdominoplasty rectus plication techniques may not suffice for severe cases of rectus diastasis. In the authors’ experience, prosthetic mesh facilitates the repair of severe rectus diastasis with or without concomitant ventral hernias. Methods: A retrospective review of all abdominal wall surgery patients treated in the past 8 years by the senior author (G.A.D.) was performed. Patients with abdominoplasty and either rectus diastasis repair with mesh or a combined ventral hernia repair were analyzed. Results: Thirty-two patients, 29 women and three men, underwent mesh-reinforced midline repair with horizontal or vertical abdominoplasty. Patient characteristics included the following: mean age, 53 years; mean body mass index, 26 kg/m2; average width of diastasis or hernia, 6.7 cm; and average surgery time, 151 minutes. There were no surgical-site infections and two surgical-site occurrences—two seromas treated with drainage in the office. After an average of 471 days’ follow-up, none of the patients had recurrence of a bulge or a hernia. Conclusions: For patients with significant rectus diastasis, with or without concomitant hernias, the described mesh repair is both safe and durable. Although this operation requires additional dissection and placement of prosthetic mesh in the retrorectus plane, it may be safely combined with standard horizontal or vertical abdominoplasty skin excision techniques to provide an aesthetically pleasing overall result. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, IV. PMID:25539311

Cheesborough, Jennifer E.

2015-01-01

75

Laparoscopic Spigelian Hernia Repair: A Series of 40 Patients.  

PubMed

Spigelian hernias are a rare abdominal wall hernia. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and outcomes of patients who underwent a laparoscopic spigelian hernia repair. A retrospective study was performed reviewing all patients who had a laparoscopic spigelian hernia repair. We assessed the success of the procedure including conversion rates, postoperative morbidities, and recurrence rates. Forty patents had a laparoscopic repair. Two thirds (n=25) had an intraperitoneal repair. There was no conversion to open repair. Four patients had postoperative morbidities. At 6-month follow-up all patients were pain free, with 1 recurrence. There is considerable evidence supporting the opinion that laparoscopic repair offers excellent outcomes. This report is the largest series to date, and we advocate that this approach should become the standard of care. PMID:25383942

Kelly, Michael E; Courtney, Danielle; McDermott, Frank D; Heeney, Anna; Maguire, Donal; Geoghegan, Justin G; Winter, Des C

2014-11-01

76

Parastomal Hernia-Repair Using Mesh and an Open Technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Parastomal hernia occurs in 35%-50% of patients who have had a stoma formed, whether for the digestive tract or the urinary\\u000a tract. There are many repair techniques including primary repair and repair using different types of mesh prosthesis, and\\u000a the surgical approach may be open or laparoscopic. However, all techniques suffer the disadvantage of a high index of hernia\\u000a recurrence.

Gilberto Guzmán-Valdivia; Teresa Soto Guerrero; Hilda Varela Laurrabaquio

2008-01-01

77

Current options in inguinal hernia repair in adult patients  

PubMed Central

Inguinal hernia is a very common problem. Surgical repair is the current approach, whereas asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic hernias may be good candidate for watchful waiting. Prophylactic antibiotics can be used in centers with high rate of wound infection. Local anesthesia is a suitable and economic option for open repairs, and should be popularized in day-case setting. Numerous repair methods have been described to date. Mesh repairs are superior to "nonmesh" tissue-suture repairs. Lichtenstein repair and endoscopic/laparoscopic techniques have similar efficacy. Standard polypropylene mesh is still the choice, whereas use of partially absorbable lightweight meshes seems to have some advantages. PMID:22435019

Kulacoglu, H

2011-01-01

78

Risk Factors for Long-term Pain After Hernia Surgery  

PubMed Central

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of residual pain 2 to 3 years after hernia surgery, to identify factors associated with its occurrence, and to assess the consequences for the patient. Summary Background Data: Iatrogenic chronic pain is a neglected problem that may totally annul the benefits from hernia repair. Methods: From the population-based Swedish Hernia Register 3000 patients aged 15 to 85 years were sampled from the 9280 patients registered as having undergone a primary groin hernia operation in the year 2000. Of these, the 2853 patients still alive in 2003 were requested to fill in a postal questionnaire. Results: After 2 reminders, 2456 patients (86%), 2299 men and 157 women responded. In response to a question about “worst perceived pain last week,” 758 patients (31%) reported pain to some extent. In 144 cases (6%), the pain interfered with daily activities. Age below median, a high level of pain before the operation, and occurrence of any postoperative complication were found to significantly and independently predict long-term pain in multivariate logistic analysis when “worst pain last week” was used as outcome variable. The same variables, along with a repair technique using anterior approach, were found to predict long-term pain with “pain right now” as outcome variable. Conclusion: Pain that is at least partly disabling appears to occur more often than recurrences. The prevalence of long-term pain can be reduced by preventing postoperative complications. The impact of repair technique on the risk of long-term pain shown in our study should be further assessed in randomized controlled trials. PMID:16858183

Fränneby, Ulf; Sandblom, Gabriel; Nordin, Pär; Nyrén, Olof; Gunnarsson, Ulf

2006-01-01

79

[Implantation of alloplastic surgical mesh in hernia repair. An anterior pre-peritoneal approach].  

PubMed

Despite the fact that more than one century has passed from the first radically performed surgery of inguinal hernia by Bassini there is still an appreciable problem in repair of abdominal hernias. In reconstructive-plastic surgeries, without the application of prosthesis, recurrences amount to 10% in primary repairs, and up to 20% or more in repairing recurrences. Synthetic surgical meshes have been used in repair of hernias for over 4 decades. During that period, extensive experience has been gained in use of various kinds of nonabsorbent and absorbent synthetic meshes in either experimental animals or in clinical investigations. Following our experience with one hundred patients managed with dacron "Mersilene" mesh, throughout the period 1960-1974, we were very rigorous, i. e. we used synthetic meshes only in cases when defect could not be repaired by the tension-free living tissue from the surrounding area. Today, synthetic meshes are routinely used for almost all kinds of hernias and even in primary reconstruction of inguinal and femoral hernias without the plastic surgery of the surrounding tissue. During the past 20 years, Lichtenstein IL, Shulman AG, Parviz KA et al. from Los Angeles have been recommending "the tension-free hernioplasty" for the repair of all kinds of primary and recurrent hernias with the results (infections, recurrences) being far more better than those achieved with the old classical operations. At present, the polypropylene "Marlex" mesh sewn with monofilamented polypropylene threads yields very good results and should be found in the hands of every surgeon practitioner. PMID:8656975

Kraljevi?, L

1995-01-01

80

Symposium on the management of inguinal hernias: 3. Laparoscopic groin hernia surgery: the TAPP procedure  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe the technique and results of laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) hernia repair. Design A case series, with a detailed description of the operative technique. Setting A university affiliated hospital. Patients A consecutive series of 554 patients (494 male, 60 female) who underwent laparoscopic hernia repair in a single institution. The mean follow-up was 14 months. Interventions Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair was performed in almost all patients. Simple closure was performed in a patient with a strangulated hernia, and a mesh-based repair was used in a patient with bilateral obturator hernias. Main outcome measures Complications and recurrence. Results The laparoscopic TAPP repair was successful in 550 of the 554 patients who underwent 632 hernia repairs. Conversion was necessary in 4 patients. Complications were infrequent and there were no recurrences. Only 3.4% of patients were lost to follow-up. The most frequent complications were urinary retention (27) and hematoma and seroma (38) in the early postoperative period. Neuralgia (11) and hydrocele (10) also occurred. Mesh infection occurred in only 1 patient and port-site hernias in 3 patients. There was 1 death from an acute myocardial infarction. Conclusion Laparoscopic TAPP hernia repair is associated with an exceedingly low recurrence rate and an acceptable complication rate. PMID:9194780

Litwin, Demetrius E.M.; Pham, Quynh N.; Oleniuk, Fredrick H.; Kluftinger, Andreas M.; Rossi, Ljubomir

1997-01-01

81

A Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia Repair: A Laparoscopic Approach  

PubMed Central

Background: Traumatic abdominal wall hernias from blunt trauma usually occur as a consequence of motor vehicle collisions where the force is tangential, sudden, and severe. Although rare, these hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Open repairs can be challenging and unsuccessful due to avulsion of muscle directly from the iliac crest, with or without bone loss. A laparoscopic approach to traumatic abdominal wall hernia can aid in the delineation of the hernia and allow for a safe and effective repair. Case Description: A 36-year-old female was admitted to our Level 1 trauma center with a traumatic abdominal wall hernia located in the right flank near the iliac crest after being involved in a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen revealed the presence of an abdominal wall defect that was unapparent on physical examination. The traumatic abdominal wall hernia in the right flank was successfully repaired laparoscopically. One-year follow-up has shown no sign of recurrence. Discussion: A traumatic abdominal wall hernia rarely presents following blunt trauma, but should be suspected following a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Frequently, repair is complicated by the need to have fixation of mesh to bony landmarks (eg, iliac crest). In spite of this challenge, the laparoscopic approach with tension-free mesh repair of a traumatic abdominal wall hernia can be accomplished successfully using an approach similar to that taken for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:23477181

Wilson, Kenneth L.; Rosser, James C.

2012-01-01

82

Thoracoscopic-assisted repair of a bochdalek hernia in an adult: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Bochdalek hernia is a congenital defect of the diaphragm that usually presents in the neonatal period with life-threatening cardiorespiratory distress. It is rare for Bochdalek hernias to remain silent until adulthood. Once a Bochdalek hernia has been diagnosed, surgical treatment is necessary to avoid complications such as perforation and necrosis. Case presentation We present a 17-year-old Japanese boy with left-upper-quadrant pain for two months. Chest radiography showed an elevated left hemidiaphragm. Computed tomography revealed a congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The spleen and left colon had been displaced into the left thoracic cavity through a left posterior diaphragmatic defect. We diagnosed a Bochdalek hernia. Surgical treatment was performed via a thoracoscopic approach. The boy was placed in the reverse Trendelenburg position and intrathoracic pressure was increased by CO2 gas insufflations. This is a very useful procedure for reducing herniated contents and we were able to place the herniated organs safely back in the peritoneal cavity. The diaphragmatic defect was too large to close with thoracoscopic surgery alone. Small incision thoracotomy was required and primary closure was performed. His postoperative course was uneventful and there has been no recurrence of the diaphragmatic hernia to date. Conclusion Thoracoscopic surgery, performed with the boy in the reverse Trendelenburg position and using CO2 gas insufflations in the thoracic cavity, was shown to be useful for Bochdalek hernia repair. PMID:21083878

2010-01-01

83

Laparoscopic Repair of a Traumatic Intrapericardial Diaphragmatic Hernia  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia is a rare injury. We present a case of an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia from blunt trauma. In this report we will review the current literature and also describe the first report of a primary laparoscopic repair of the defect. Case Description: A 38-year-old unrestrained male passenger had blunt chest and abdominal trauma from a motor vehicle collision. Two months later, on a computed tomography scan, he was found to have an intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia. The defect was repaired primarily through a laparoscopic approach. Discussion: Symptoms of intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia are chest pain, upper abdominal pain, dysphagia, and dyspnea. Chest computed tomography is the most useful diagnostic test to define the defect. Even when the injury is diagnosed late, laparoscopy can be used for primary and patch repair. PMID:24960502

Kuy, SreyRam; Weigelt, John A.

2014-01-01

84

Light weight meshes in incisional hernia repair  

PubMed Central

Incisional hernias remain one of the most common surgical complications with a long-term incidence of 10–20%. Increasing evidence of impaired wound healing in these patients supports routine use of an open prefascial, retromuscular mesh repair. Basic pathophysiologic principles dictate that for a successful long-term outcome and prevention of recurrence, a wide overlap underneath healthy tissue is required. Particularly in the neighborhood of osseous structures, only retromuscular placement allows sufficient subduction of the mesh by healthy tissue of at least 5 cm in all directions. Preparation must take into account the special anatomic features of the abdominal wall, especially in the area of the Linea alba and Linea semilunaris. Polypropylene is the material widely used for open mesh repair. New developments have led to low-weight, large-pore polypropylene prostheses, which are adjusted to the physiological requirements of the abdominal wall and permit proper tissue integration. These meshes provide the possibility of forming a scar net instead of a stiff scar plate and therefore help to avoid former known mesh complications. PMID:21187980

Schumpelick, Volker; Klinge, Uwe; Rosch, Raphael; Junge, Karsten

2006-01-01

85

Complications of Groin Hernia Repair: Their Prevention and Management  

PubMed Central

An estimated overall complication rate of approximately ten percent is found in the half million patients who annually undergo groin hernia repair in the United States. Certain features in the operative technique are emphasized which should prevent many of these complications. Intraoperative complications during the groin hernia repair are primarily hemorrhage and injury to the vas deferens, the three nerves in the area, the vascular supply of the testis, and the abdominal and pelvic viscera. Miscellaneous intraoperative complications relate to problems associated with the repair of massive hernias, missed hernia, and the loss of strangulated bowel into the abdominal cavity. Early postoperative complications may be either systemic or local with cardiac and respiratory conditions comprising the former group. The early local complications are primarily wound problems of infection, hematoma formation, and scrotal swelling involving the skin and testis. High ligation in excision of the sac in all hernias, repair of the defect in the plane of its occurrence, and suture of fascia to fascia in the same plane without tension are the basic tenets of inguinal hernia repair which should result in a low incidence of recurrence. The most effective prophylactic measures necessary for the prevention of complications considered are a thorough knowledge of inguinofemoral anatomy, mature surgical judgment, and meticulous surgical technique. PMID:691083

Gaines, Ray D.

1978-01-01

86

Mini-Hernia: Inguinal Hernia Repair through a 2-cm Incision.  

PubMed

The optimal management of inguinal hernia continues to excite lively debate and, despite centuries of research, the ideal approach has yet to be established. The traditional repairs of McVay, Bassini, and Shouldice involve suturing together tissues that are not normally in apposition. This approximation of tissues under tension may account for the reported recurrence rates of up to 21% for primary repairs and also explain the lengthy, painful recovery periods. Laparoscopic hernia repair has demonstrated good short-term results but is technically demanding, requires violation of the peritoneal cavity, and has unknown long-term results. Between October 1993 and April 1995, we performed 103 hernia repairs using a novel approach, the mini-hernia repair (endoscopically guided surface repair of inguinal hernia). This technique allows the benefits of an open surgical approach such as hands-on manipulation, three-dimensional vision, a familiar anatomical approach, and the use of conventional instruments, to be combined with the advantages derived from the use of laparoscopic instrumentation, namely, minimized tissue trauma and improved cosmesis. PMID:21400427

Nduka, C C; Darzi, A

1995-01-01

87

JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia  

MedlinePLUS

... Weight lifting, coughing, straining during bowel movement • Cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infections • Previous abdominal surgery COMPLICATIONS ... hernia recurring, but the mesh material can become infected. In some cases, hernia repairs may be performed ...

88

Acute diaphragmatic rupture following open type IV paraesophageal hernia repair  

PubMed Central

Open primary transthoracic repair is a well established treatment for large paraesophageal hernias. The rate of major post-operative complications has been reported to be low, and no cases of acute diaphragmatic injury have previously been reported. Here we present a case of open primary transthoracic repair of a type IV paraesophageal hernia that was complicated by rupture of the left diaphragm in the immediate post-operative period, and was successfully repaired with Gore DualMesh® (W.L Gore and Assoc. Flagstaff, AZ). PMID:24949700

Reames, Bradley N.; Reddy, Rishindra M.

2011-01-01

89

Parastomal hernia repair with the use of Parietex composite mesh: a technical note.  

PubMed

Parastomal hernia is an incisional hernia related to an abdominal wall stoma. The incidence ranges from 5 to 50% and only 10% of these require surgical treatment. The authors propose an innovative surgical technique for treatment of parastomal hernia. Many kinds of repair for paracolostomal hernias have been proposed: simple fascia repair, stoma relocation and repair with prosthetic devices. We describe a successful local repair and a new approach to treat this defect using a polypropylene mesh. PMID:19694238

Succi, Lino; Ohazuruike, Nnawuihe Luca; Oliveri, Conchita Emanuela; Privitera, Antonino Carlo; Prumeri, Serafina; Politi, Antonino; Randazzo, Giuseppe

2009-01-01

90

Inguinal hernia repair in the Amsterdam region 1994-1996.  

PubMed

In the Netherlands, approximately 30,000 inguinal hernia repairs are performed yearly. At least 15% are for recurrence. New procedures are being introduced creating discussion on which technique is the best. Currently it is not possible to choose on evidence alone because of the long follow-up that is needed. In 1996 an inventory was taken of all inguinal hernia repairs that were performed in the Amsterdam region (9 hospitals). These results were compared with the results from a similar study performed in 1994. Major changes in treatment strategy were noted. The Bassini repair was replaced by Shouldice and Lichtenstein techniques. There was a significant increase in the use of prostheses for both primary and recurrent inguinal hernias. There was no significant decrease in the percentage of operations performed for recurrent hernia from 19.5% to 16.8%. However, there was a significant decrease in operations performed for early recurrences (5.1%-3.4%) (p = 0.05). These results suggest that the Shouldice and Lichtenstein repairs may be superior to the Bassini repair in terms of early hernia recurrence. PMID:11387721

Schoots, I G; van Dijkman, B; Butzelaar, R M; van Geldere, D; Simons, M P

2001-03-01

91

Parastomal hernia repair--Bielañski Hospital experience.  

PubMed

The most common occurred long-term stoma complication is parastomal hernia (PH). The incidence of this complication reaches 50% and, according to Goligher, the parastomal hernia is an inevitable consequence in a certain percentage of all cases of stoma formation. The factors that may affect the incidence of parastomal hernia include the site of stoma, particularly its position relative to the rectus muscle of abdomen, preoperative mapping out of the stoma site, stoma diameter, intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal bringing out of the intestine and its fixation to fascia, closing of the area around the stoma opening, the mode of operation--planned or emergency, and finally the kind of stoma--ileostomy, colostomy, end stoma and loop stoma. None of these factors, however, has been identified to have the key importance in parastomal hernia formation. It seems that the only factor that significantly increases the incidence of parastomal hernia is the length of post-operative period. PMID:17139894

Szczepkowski, Marek; Gil, Grzegorz; Kobus, Adam

2006-01-01

92

Subsequent abdominal surgery after laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene mesh: a single institution experience with 72 reoperations  

PubMed Central

Purpose Laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair (LVIHR) carries a risk of adhesion formation and can influence subsequent abdominal operations (SAOs). We performed a retrospective study of findings during reoperations of patients who had previously had an LVIHR by using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene mesh (DualMesh®; WL Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). Methods The medical records of all 695 patients who had LVIHR at our hospital were reviewed. Patients who underwent SAO for various indications were identified (n = 72) and analyzed. Results Seven LVIHR patients (1%) had early SAO (within a few days). In six patients (86%), removal of the mesh was required. Intra-operatively, in all six of these patients with peritonitis, there were no adhesions against the implant identified. Late SAOs (after more than 1 month) were performed in 65 patients (9.4%). Only one patient required acute surgical intervention due to an LVIHR-related adhesion (0.15%). Laparoscopy was performed in 83% and laparotomy in 17% of patients. Adhesions against the implant were present in 83% of patients; in 65%, the adhesions involved omentum only, and in 18%, they involved the bowel. Adhesiolysis was always easy and caused no inadvertent enterotomies. SAOs were devoid of postoperative complications. Conclusions In this largest series of reoperations after LVIHR, the majority of patients had mild or moderate adhesions against the implant. The specific observations that: (1) no relaparoscopies had to be converted, (2) no inadvertent enterotomies were made during adhesiolysis, and (3) SAOs have practically been devoid of peri- and postoperative complications indicate that SAOs can be safely performed after previous LVIHR with DualMesh. PMID:19806422

Schoenmaeckers, E. J. P.; Raymakers, J. T. F. J.; Rakic, S.

2009-01-01

93

Evaluation of various prosthetic materials and newer meshes for hernia repairs  

PubMed Central

The use of prosthesis has become essential for repair of all hernias since the recurrence rates are consistently lower when they are used. To fulfill this requirement, a variety of newer meshes have been engineered. An ideal prosthesis should be strong, pliable, non-allergenic, inert, non-biodegradable, non-carcinogenic and should stimulate adequate fibroblastic activity for optimum incorporation into the tissues. Prosthesis used for hernia repairs can be non-absorbable, composite (combination of absorbable and non-absorbable fibres) or with an absorbable or a non-absorbable barrier. Surgeons should acquire sufficient knowledge of different types of prosthesis so as to select an appropriate one for a given case. Non-absorbable or composite mesh is recommended for hernia repair where it will not come in contact with the bowel. Prosthesis with a barrier only should be used for intra-abdominal placement to prevent bowel adhesions since it is increasingly difficult to defend the use of a biomaterial that has no adhesion barriers. This review highlghts all these different types of meshes and their appropriate selection for a given hernia repair. Selection of the optimum size and its proper fixation is mandaory. Complications can be avoided or minimized with proper selection of mesh for a given case and by performing the surgery with a meticulous technique. PMID:21187889

Doctor, H G

2006-01-01

94

Operation Hernia to Ghana.  

PubMed

Inguinal hernia repair and Caesarian section are the two most commonly occurring operations in Africa. Trained surgeons are few, distances between hospitals are large and strangulated hernia is the most common cause of intestinal obstruction. Numerous deaths and cases of permanent disability occur because patients with inguinal hernias requiring elective or urgent surgery are not properly cared for, or they do not actually reach hospital. Operation Hernia was a humanitarian mission between the European Hernia Society and the Plymouth-Takoradi (Ghana) Link conceived specifically to treat and teach groin hernia surgery in the Western region of Ghana. PMID:16912846

Kingsnorth, A N; Oppong, C; Akoh, J; Stephenson, B; Simmermacher, R

2006-10-01

95

Necrotizing fasciitis following laparoscopic total extra peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia.  

PubMed

There are rare reports of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) following laparoscopic surgery. The clinical presentation of this condition may be delayed due to non-specific symptoms and sign. The diagnosis is essentially clinical and early recognition is crucial in the management. We present a case of NF of the lower abdominal wall extending to thigh, scrotum and perianal area following the laparoscopic extraperitoneal repair of left inguinal hernia managed with extensive debridment, removal of mesh, antibiotic, and skin grafting. He was seen 6 months after his surgeries and had no disability. The extensive search on Medline, Medscape, and Google engine revealed only one case report of NF following laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernia that died and this is the second case report and the only surviving one. PMID:20668615

Golash, Vishwanath

2007-01-01

96

Necrotizing fasciitis following laparoscopic total extra peritoneal repair of left inguinal hernia  

PubMed Central

There are rare reports of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) following laparoscopic surgery. The clinical presentation of this condition may be delayed due to non-specific symptoms and sign. The diagnosis is essentially clinical and early recognition is crucial in the management. We present a case of NF of the lower abdominal wall extending to thigh, scrotum and perianal area following the laparoscopic extraperitoneal repair of left inguinal hernia managed with extensive debridment, removal of mesh, antibiotic, and skin grafting. He was seen 6 months after his surgeries and had no disability. The extensive search on Medline, Medscape, and Google engine revealed only one case report of NF following laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of inguinal hernia that died and this is the second case report and the only surviving one. PMID:20668615

Golash, Vishwanath

2007-01-01

97

Retroperitoneoscopic tension-free repair of lumbar hernia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lumbar hernia is an infrequent pathology that is difficult to treat through open surgery. A 65-year-old man presented with\\u000a a right-sided lumbar mass responsible for pain. This was a fatty mass of 10×15 cm, located in the lumbar fossa. A CT scan\\u000a showed the hernia and the defect. Through a small incision in the flank, dissection was initiated with one

E. Habib

2003-01-01

98

Incidence of Port-Site Incisional Hernia After Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity among minimally invasive surgeons and is now being applied to a broad number of surgical procedures. Although this technique uses only 1 port, the diameter of the incision is larger than in standard laparoscopic surgery. The long-term incidence of port-site hernias after single-incision laparoscopic surgery has yet to be determined. Methods: All patients who underwent a single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedure from May 2008 through May 2009 were included in the study. Single-incision laparoscopic surgical operations were performed either by a multiport technique or with a 3-trocar single-incision laparoscopic surgery port. The patients were seen at 30 to 36 months' follow-up, at which time they were examined for any evidence of port-site incisional hernia. Patients found to have hernias on clinical examination underwent repairs with mesh. Results: A total of 211 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The types of operations included were cholecystectomy, appendectomy, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric banding, Nissen fundoplication, colectomy, and gastrojejunostomy. We found a port-site hernia rate of 2.9% at 30 to 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Port-site incisional hernia after single-incision laparoscopic surgical procedures remains a major setback for patients. The true incidence remains largely unknown because most patients are asymptomatic and therefore do not seek surgical aid. PMID:24960483

Rainville, Harvey; Ikedilo, Ojinika; Vemulapali, Pratibha

2014-01-01

99

Right paraduodenal hernia successfully treated with laparoscopic surgery.  

PubMed

A 23-year-old Japanese man presented with a history of sudden-onset right abdominal pain accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a large cluster on the right side of the retroperitoneum, with most of the small bowel incarcerated. The patient was diagnosed with small bowel obstruction caused by a right paraduodenal hernia, and emergency laparoscopic surgery was performed. The large retroperitoneal cluster on the right side contained almost all segments of the small bowel, although the incarcerated bowel showed no evidence of volvulus or ischemia. The bowel was reduced, and the hernia orifice was closed. The patient made good progress and was discharged 7 days after surgery. We herein report an acute case of right paraduodenal hernia with small bowel obstruction that was successfully treated with emergency laparoscopic surgery. With an early preoperative diagnosis, laparoscopic surgery is appropriate for the treatment of right paraduodenal hernia. PMID:25598063

Tomino, Takahiro; Itoh, Shinji; Yoshida, Daisuke; Nishida, Takahiro; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Kohnoe, Shunji; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

2015-02-01

100

[Hernia surgery in Hungary today--effect of the Lichtenstein-study].  

PubMed

Based on extensive randomized, multicenter studies, the recent trend in inguinal hernia surgery has been towards using a mesh-based tension-free repair, and Lichtenstein method is considered to be the procedure of choice. Based on above mentioned concern a prospective, multicenter study was conducted. In 15 centers, between March of 1999 and 2000, 1434 patients were included in this trial. Lichtenstein hernia repair was associated with less postoperative pain, lower complications rate,faster recovery, and lower recurrence rate compared with suture repair made under tension. Both the attitude and practice has been changed thoroughly in Hungary and the Bassini repair seems to be replaced by the Lichtenstein procedure. Mesh implantation increased from 1% (1998) to 34% (2005). The study has largely contributed to the national spread of this operation and has doubtlessly verified the advantage of data processing through the internet. PMID:17432080

Weber, György; Csontos, Zsolt; Horváth, Ors Péter

2006-12-01

101

Laparoscopic Repair of a Posttraumatic Left-Sided Diaphragmatic Hernia Complicated by Strangulation and Colon Obstruction  

PubMed Central

Background: Posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernias (PDH) are serious complications of blunt and penetrating abdominal or thoracic trauma. Traditional thoracic or abdominal operations are usually performed in these cases. Methods: We present 2 cases of posttraumatic left-sided diaphragmatic hernia complicated by strangulation and colon obstruction. Both cases were successfully treated with laparoscopy. Results: We found that laparoscopy is a safe, successful, and gentle procedure not only for diagnosis but also for treatment of complicated PDH. Strangulation and colon obstruction were not contraindications to performing laparoscopic procedures. The postoperative course and long-term follow-up (range, 12 to 30 months) were uneventful and short. We expect the same good long-term results after laparoscopic repair as after open conventional surgery. Conclusion: We recommend the use a minimally invasive approach to treat posttraumatic diaphragmatic hernia complicated by strangulation and colon obstruction in hemodynamically stable patients. PMID:21333198

Protsenko, A.V.; Globin, A.V.

2010-01-01

102

Laparoscopic Incisional Hernia Repair With Fibrin Glue in Select Patients  

PubMed Central

Background and Objective: Laparoscopic treatment of incisional hernias can be performed using different types of fixation devices and prosthesis. We present a case series of 19 patients with incisional hernias with a diameter of <6cm, who underwent laparoscopic repair using Hi-tex dual-side mesh, positioned intraperitoneally, fixed to the abdominal wall by fibrin glue (Tissucol). Methods: Nineteen patients with incisional hernias <6cm in diameter were enrolled in this study and treated laparoscopically with Hi-tex and Tissucol. Surgical complications and patient outcomes were assessed with a clinical follow-up. Results: Laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias by using Hi-tex mesh affixed to the parietal wall with fibrin glue was feasible and easy in patients with parietal defects <6cm in diameter. Mean operating time was 30 minutes. Mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. Almost no postoperative pain, major surgical complications, seroma formation, relapses, or prosthesis infection occurred during a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: In select patients, Hi-tex mesh affixed using fibrin glue allows laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias with very good patient outcomes, especially in terms of postoperative pain and seroma formation. PMID:20932376

Stefano, Olmi; Luca, Saguatti; Claudio, Pagano; Giuseppe, Vittoria; Enrico, Croce

2010-01-01

103

Laparoscopic surgery of esophageal hiatus hernia – single center experience  

PubMed Central

Introduction Esophageal hiatal hernias are the most frequent types of internal hernias. This condition involves disturbance of normal functioning of the stomach cardiac mechanism and reflux of the gastric contents to the esophagus. Aim: To evaluate postoperative results in our Clinic and the comparison of these results to data from the literature. Material and methods One hundred and seventy-eight patients underwent surgery due to esophageal hiatal hernia at the Clinic of General, Gastroenterological and Oncological Surgery, Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland, from 2006 to 2011. All operations were performed using laparoscopy. Fundoplication by means of the Nissen-Rossetti method was carried out in 172 patients while Toupet's and Dor's methods were applied in 4 and 2 patients, respectively. Results Average time of the surgery was 82 min (55–140 min). Conversion was performed in 4 cases. No serious intraoperative complications were noted. In the postoperative period, dysphagia was reported in 20 patients (11.2%). Postoperative wound infection was observed in 1 patient (0.56%). Hernias in the trocar insertion area were reported in 3 patients (1.68%). Ailments recurred in 6 patients. The recurrence of esophageal hiatal hernia was confirmed in 2 patients. Patients with recurrent hernia were re-operated using a laparoscopic approach. Conclusions Laparoscopic surgery is a simple and effective approach for patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms due to diaphragmatic esophageal hiatus hernia. The number of complications is lower after laparoscopic procedures than after “open” operations. PMID:24729804

Pi?tkowski, Jacek; Jackowski, Marek

2014-01-01

104

Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair in a Developing Nation: Short-term Outcomes in 103 Consecutive Procedures  

PubMed Central

Background: There are no published data on the outcomes of inguinal hernia repair from the Anglophone Caribbean. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a series of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repairs from the region. Materials and Methods: Data was extracted from a prospectively maintained database of consecutive trans abdominal pre-peritoneal (TAPP) repairs done between June 1, 2005 and May 30, 2012. Perioperative data collected included patient demographics, hernia type, operative technique, duration of surgery, intra-operative details, morbidity, analgesia requirements, and duration of hospitalization. A telephone survey was also performed to identify late recurrences and complications. Descriptive statistics were generated using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Ver 12.0. Results: There were 103 consecutive TAPP procedures in 88 patients at an average age of 35.4 years ± 12.9 (standard deviation; SD) and average body mass index (BMI) of 28.9 Kg/m2 ± 2.23 (SD). The indications were bilateral (30), recurrent unilateral (24), and primary unilateral (49) inguinal hernias. The mean duration of operation was 68.5 minutes (SD ± 10.4; Range: 55-95; Median 65; Mode 65) minutes for unilateral TAPP and 89 minutes (SD ± 7.61; Range: 80-105; Median 90; Mode 90) for bilateral repairs. Post-operatively, 65/70 patients required ?1 dose of parenteral opioid analgesia and 74 (84.1%) patients discontinued oral analgesia within 48 hours of operation. Complications were recorded in six (5.8%) cases and a recurrence in one (0.97%) case after a mean follow-up period of 3.2 years (SD ± 1.8; Range: 0.5-7). Conclusion: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is a safe and effective operation in this setting. PMID:24470844

Cawich, Shamir O.; Mohanty, Sanjib K.; Bonadie, Kimon O.; Simpson, Lindberg K.; Johnson, Peter B.; Shah, Sundeep; Williams, Eric W.

2013-01-01

105

Early results of inguinal hernia repair by the 'mesh plug' technique--first 200 cases.  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION: Inguinal hernia repair is the most common surgical procedure performed in the UK. Evidence from several earlier studies suggests that primary inguinal hernia repair has a high recurrence rate of 10-15%. The Royal College of Surgeons of England guidelines suggested the use of layered suture (Shouldice) or prosthetic (Lichtenstein) repair. Per-fix plugs have been used in the US for more than a decade with excellent results. This study was a series of 200 consecutive cases. The aim was to evaluate the mesh plug technique in the repair of all types of inguinal hernias and its results in one consultant practice within a district general hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a 15-month period between 1997 and 1998, all patients with inguinal hernias presenting to the general surgical clinic of one consultant were recruited to the study. All had mesh plug repair under local (n = 40), regional (n = 50) or general (n = 110) anaesthesia either by the consultant, associate specialist or specialist registrar (following initial training), using the same standard technique. The majority 80% (n = 160) were done as day cases. The results were evaluated by questionnaire and personal outpatient review initially at 3 weeks, then at 1 year (9-13 months). RESULTS: 200 consecutive patients with inguinal hernias underwent mesh plug repair; mean age was 54 years (95% CI, 46-61). The majority of patients had primary (n = 180) and others had recurrent (n = 20) hernia. All types of hernia (Gilbert's I-VII) were included. Median follow-up was 1 year (9-15 months). Groin pain, which was the leading symptom at presentation, was relieved in 96% of the patients; 79% returned to previous jobs within 4 weeks (95% CI, 0.71-0.87). All retired patients resumed normal life activities within 2 days. Postoperative pain was minimal; 28 patients did not require any postoperative analgesia. There were very few minor (n = 6) and no major complications. During the follow-up, one recurrence occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Mesh plug repair is associated with minimal postoperative pain, quick recovery and return to work. It is an ideal technique for day-case surgery. Although longer follow-up will be required to assess true recurrence rate, so far the recurrence rate at 0.5% is acceptable, particularly in the light of other published series. PMID:11103156

Fasih, T.; Mahapatra, T. K.; Waddington, R. T.

2000-01-01

106

Fournier's Gangrene as a Postoperative Complication of Inguinal Hernia Repair.  

PubMed

Fournier's gangrene is the necrotizing fasciitis of perianal, genitourinary, and perineal regions. Herein, we present a case of scrotal Fournier's gangrene as a postoperative complication of inguinal hernia repair. A 51-year-old male with giant indirect hernia is presented. Patient underwent inguinal hernia repair, and after an unproblematic recovery period, he was discharged. He applied to our outpatient clinic on the fifth day with swollen and painful scrotum and it turned out to be Fournier's gangrene. Polypropylene mesh was not infected. Patient recovered and was discharged after repeated debridements. Basic principles in treatment of Fournier's gangrene are comprised of initial resuscitation, broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy, and early aggressive debridement. In the management of presented case, aggressive debridement was made right after diagnosis and broad-spectrum antibiotics were given to the hemodynamically stable patient. In these circumstances, the important question is whether we could prevent occurrence of Fournier's gangrene. PMID:25506030

Dinc, Tolga; Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Sozen, Isa; Yildiz, Baris Dogu; Coskun, Faruk

2014-01-01

107

The current status of biosynthetic mesh for ventral hernia repair.  

PubMed

Although synthetic mesh has dramatically reduced recurrence in elective hernia repair, its use in contaminated surgical fields has been traditionally associated with complications such as wound sepsis, enterocutaneous fistulas, and chronic prosthetic infection. Biologic meshes emerged in the late 1990s with a rapid popularity fueled largely by the demand for an appropriate substitute in lieu of synthetic mesh in these complex cases; however, the high cost and rate of hernia recurrence have tempered the initial enthusiasm. Biosynthetic meshes were developed as a possible cost-effective alternative to both synthetic and tissue-derived products. Using biodegradable polymers instead of animal or cadaver tissue, they provide a temporary scaffold for deposition of proteins and cells necessary for tissue ingrowth, neovascularization, and host integration. Herein we review the current status of biosynthetic meshes for hernia repair. PMID:25396323

Kim, Mimi; Oommen, Bindhu; Ross, Samuel W; Lincourt, Amy E; Matthews, Brent D; Heniford, B Todd; Augenstein, Vedra A

2014-11-01

108

Clinical presentation and operative repair of hernia of Morgagni  

PubMed Central

A 77 year old woman who presented with an incarcerated hernia of Morgagni was successfully treated without complications. A Medline search (1996 to date) along with cross referencing was done to quantify the number of acute presentations in adults compared to children. Different investigating modalities—for example, lateral chest and abdominal radiography, contrast studies or, in difficult cases, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging—can be used to diagnose hernia of Morgagni. The favoured method of repair—laparotomy or laparoscopy—is also discussed. A total of 47 case reports on children and 93 case reports on adults were found. Fourteen percent of children (seven out of 47) presented acutely compared with 12% of adults (12 out of 93). Repair at laparotomy was the method of choice but if uncertain, laparoscopy would be a useful diagnostic tool before attempted repair. Laparoscopic repair was favoured in adults especially in non-acute cases. PMID:15640427

Loong, T; Kocher, H

2005-01-01

109

[Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia as a late complication of laparoscopic right hepatectomy: a case report].  

PubMed

Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia after laparoscopic right hepatectomy is very rare. An 81-year-old man underwent laparoscopic right hepatectomy for giant hepatic hemangioma. Twenty months after the surgery, he began to complain of nausea and abdominal pain and was brought to our hospital. Chest X-ray showed an abdominal gas shadow above the right diaphragm and computed tomography showed herniation of the colon into the right thoracic cavity. We diagnosed ileus due to incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia and performed emergency operation under laparoscopic surgery. After successfully reducing the prolapsed colon back to the abdominal cavity, the diaphragmatic hernia orifice was repaired. Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia sometimes causes the fatal state. Clinicians must therefore consider such findings a late complication of laparoscopic hepatectomy. PMID:24693692

Yonemura, Yusuke; Umeda, Kenji; Kumashiro, Ryuichi; Mashino, Kohjiro; Ogawa, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Saeki, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Tashiro, Hideya; Sakata, Hisanobu; Maehara, Yoshihiko

2013-12-01

110

Laparoscopic patch repair of diaphragmatic hernias with Surgisis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundLaparoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernias has been sparsely reported. Moreover, each report has primarily been a single operative case. In most of the reports, prosthetic mesh has not been used, and when used, it has been nonabsorbable in nature. Most of these case reports have documented only a few months of clinical follow-up.

George W. Holcomb; Daniel J. Ostlie; Kelly A. Miller

2005-01-01

111

Laparoscopic patch repair of diaphragmatic hernias with Surgisis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Laparoscopic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernias has been sparsely reported. Moreover, each report has primarily been a single operative case. In most of the reports, prosthetic mesh has not been used, and when used, it has been nonabsorbable in nature. Most of these case reports have documented only a few months of clinical follow-up. Methods: After institutional review board

George W. Holcomb III; Daniel J. Ostlie; Kelly A. Miller

2005-01-01

112

Day case inguinal hernia repair under local anaesthetic.  

PubMed Central

Local anaesthetic day case inguinal hernia repair has been performed on 135 patients under the care of one surgeon in a nine month period. Results of a questionnaire answered by 129 patients (95.6%) and 31 of their general practitioners (85%) have been analysed. The complication rate is very low and both patient and GP acceptability is high. PMID:6870127

Baskerville, P. A.; Jarrett, P. E.

1983-01-01

113

Laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair using a nonslit mesh technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The management of parastomal hernia is associated with high morbidity and recurrence rates (20–70%). This study investigated\\u000a a novel laparoscopic approach and evaluated its outcomes.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A consecutive multi-institutional series of patients undergoing parastomal hernia repair between 2001 and 2005 were analyzed\\u000a retrospectively. Laparoscopy was used with modification of the open Sugarbaker technique. A nonslit expanded polytetrafluoroethylene\\u000a (ePTFE) mesh was placed

G. J. Mancini; D. A. McClusky III; L. Khaitan; E. A. Goldenberg; B. T. Heniford; Y. W. Novitsky; A. E. Park; S. Kavic; K. A. LeBlanc; M. J. Elieson; G. R. Voeller; B. J. Ramshaw

2007-01-01

114

Laparoscopic repair of strangulated Morgagni hernia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 73 year old man presented with vomiting and pain due to a strangulated Morgagni hernia containing a gastric volvulus. Laparoscopic operation allowed reduction of the contents, excision of necrotic omentum and the sac, with mesh closure of the large defect. A brief review of the condition is presented along with discussion of the technique used.

Michael D Kelly

2007-01-01

115

Core Outcomes Measures for Inguinal Hernia Repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Demands on the medical profession to develop performance measures and demonstrate cost-effectiveness make it imperative that a uniform approach to the measurement of outcomes for common conditions be adopted. We report here on patient acceptance, response rates, and utility of a new set of core outcomes measures for patients with inguinal hernia (IH), which incorporates patient reporting of outcomes.Methods:

Richard E Burney; Katherine R Jones; Jane Wilson Coon; Darby K Blewitt; Ann Herm; Melissa Peterson

1997-01-01

116

Laparoscopic repair of strangulated Morgagni hernia  

PubMed Central

A 73 year old man presented with vomiting and pain due to a strangulated Morgagni hernia containing a gastric volvulus. Laparoscopic operation allowed reduction of the contents, excision of necrotic omentum and the sac, with mesh closure of the large defect. A brief review of the condition is presented along with discussion of the technique used. PMID:17935621

Kelly, Michael D

2007-01-01

117

Repair of large paraesophageal hernia with complete intrathoracic stomach.  

PubMed

Paraesophageal hiatal hernia accounts for only five per cent of all diaphragmatic defects but is a potentially dangerous lesion. Herniation of the entire stomach, at times accompanied by the omentum, transverse colon, and small bowel, may occur in some patients, and incarceration and strangulation may be the result. Three patients underwent repair of large paraesophageal hernias, in one instance as an emergency. Symptoms of pain, bloating, and occasional regurgitation had been present for 17, 30, and 40 years. The operations included repair of the hiatal defect, anterior gastropexy, and Nissen fundoplication in two patients. In the third patient, a pyloromyotomy was performed as well. A subsequent thoracotomy was necessary in one patient to excise a persistent large hernia sac, which was densely adherent to the lung and mediastinal structures. All patients were asymptomatic after periods of 9 months, 1 year, and 7 years. The unique anatomic and clinical features of large paraesophageal hernias containing intrathoracic abdominal viscera, as well as the technique of operative repair, are presented. PMID:1928981

Allen, B; Tompkins, R K; Mulder, D G

1991-10-01

118

From Bassini to tension-free mesh hernia repair. Review of 1409 consecutive cases.  

PubMed

The short and long-term results of traditional and tension-free inguinal hernia repairs have been assessed in three surgical units. In order to standardise the results, hernias were classified according with Nyhus. There were 109 type I, 311 type II, 854 type III, and 125 type IV hernias. Follow-up was possible in 1201 patients (1249 hernia repairs). Postoperative course, postoperative pain, and recurrences were analysed. Recurrences ranged from 0.7% up to 9.3%. The tension-free methods of repair provided the most important advantages in term of low recurrence rate and early return to work even if, in our series, recurrences resulted mainly related to the type of hernia than to the type of repair. The Authors conclude that any hernia repair should be sized to the type of hernia defect in order to avoid over-treatment and abusive placing of a foreign body such as polypropylene mesh. PMID:9707835

Rulli, F; Percudani, M; Muzi, M; Tucci, G; Sianesi, M

1998-01-01

119

Simultaneous bilateral hernia repair. A case against conventional wisdom.  

PubMed Central

The timing of bilateral hernia repair remains controversial. Because of reported high recurrence rates after simultaneous bilateral repair, staged procedures have been suggested. This study determined recurrence and complication rates of unilateral versus simultaneous bilateral repair. Of 659 patients undergoing hernia repair between 1974 and 1980, 333 underwent unilateral repair and 329 had simultaneous bilateral repair. More than 90% of patients were followed until death or a minimum of 60 months (median, 104 months). Perioperative complications were associated with 18% of repairs. More morbidity occurred in the bilateral group. However complication rates for specific events were not significantly different, except for urinary retention, which occurred in 20 patients (6.1%) of the unilateral group and 49 (15%) of the bilateral group (p less than 0.001). Overall 25 recurrences occurred in the unilateral group and 31 in the bilateral group. Recurrence rates at 5 and 9 years were, respectively, 4.8% and 8.8% in the unilateral group and 5.0% and 9.1% in the bilateral group (p = 0.861). These data suggest that simultaneous bilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy does not result in increased rates of most postoperative complications or recurrence when compared with unilateral repair. PMID:1998409

Miller, A R; van Heerden, J A; Naessens, J M; O'Brien, P C

1991-01-01

120

Single-Incision Laparoscopic Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh Repair for the Treatment of Multiple Recurrent Inguinal Hernias  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Despite an exponential rise in laparoscopic surgery for inguinal herniorrhaphy, overall recurrence rates have remained unchanged. Therefore, an increasing number of patients present with recurrent hernias after having failed anterior and laparoscopic repairs. This study reports our experience with single-incision laparoscopic (SIL) intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair for these hernias. Materials and methods: All patients referred with multiply recurrent inguinal hernias underwent SIL-IPOM from November 1 2009 to October 30 2013. A 2.5-cm infraumbilical incision was made and a SIL surgical port was placed intraperitoneally. Modified dissection techniques, namely, “chopsticks” and “inline” dissection, 5.5 mm/52 cm/30° angled laparoscope and conventional straight dissecting instruments were used. The peritoneum was incised above the symphysis pubis and dissection continued laterally and proximally raising an inferior flap, below a previous extraperitoneal mesh, while reducing any direct/indirect/femoral/cord lipoma before placement of antiadhesive mesh that was fixed into the pubic ramus as well as superiorly with nonabsorbable tacks before fixing its inferior border with fibrin sealant. The inferior peritoneal flap was then tacked back onto the mesh. Results: There were 9 male patients who underwent SIL-IPOM. Mean age was 55 years old and mean body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2. Mean mesh size was 275 cm2. Mean operation time was 125 minutes with hospital stay of 1 day and umbilical scar length of 21 mm at 4 weeks' follow-up. There were no intraoperative/postoperative complications, port-site hernias, chronic groin pain, or recurrence with mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusions: Multiply recurrent inguinal hernias after failed conventional anterior and laparoscopic repairs can be treated safely and efficiently with SIL-IPOM. PMID:25392643

Tran, Kim; Zajkowska, Marta; Lam, Vincent; Hawthorne, Wayne

2014-01-01

121

Laparoscopic Parastomal Hernia Repair: Pitfalls and Complications  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Parastomal herniation is a common complication of stoma formation. The incidence varies significantly and may be as high as\\u000a 48% for colostomies and 28% for ileostomies (?Table 58.1) [1]. The different open surgical approaches for treating parastomal hernias are shown in ?Table 58.2 [1]. Stoma relocation involves relaparotomy and replacement of the stoma to the contralateral side. Besides the problem

B. Hansson; I. de Hingh; R. P. Bleichrodt

122

Laparoscopic incisional hernia repair in liver transplant and other immunosuppressed patients.  

PubMed

We report the early results of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair in a small group of immunosuppressed patients and compare these results with a cohort of patients with open repair. We describe a modification used to secure the cephalad portion of the Gore-Tex mesh in high epigastric incisional hernias often encountered after liver transplantation. Data were gathered retrospectively for all incisional hernia repairs by our group from March 1996 to January 2001. Twelve of 13 attempted patients had successful completion of their laparoscopic hernia repairs with no reported recurrences to date. Two of these procedures were performed for recurrent hernias. We completed nine of nine attempted laparoscopic hernia repairs in liver transplant patients with epigastric incisional hernias. We repaired two of three attempted lower midline incisional hernias in renal disease patients. One of these patients was soon able to reuse his peritoneal dialysis catheter. A total of 15 patients, 12 with liver transplants, underwent open repair of their incisional hernias. These patients had seven recurrences and/or serious mesh infections with five patients electing repeated operations. In our initial series, laparoscopic mesh repair of incisional hernias is practical and safe in the abdominal organ transplant population with a low incidence of early recurrence and serious infections. PMID:12118857

Andreoni, Kenneth A; Lightfoot, Harry; Gerber, David A; Johnson, Mark W; Fair, Jeffery H

2002-04-01

123

Prosthetic mesh plug repair of femoral and recurrent inguinal hernias: the American experience.  

PubMed Central

Prosthetic mesh in the form of a plug has been used extensively in the United States for hernia repair. It has been popular for all types of femoral hernias and for the majority of recurrent inguinal hernias. It follows the basic principle of 'tension-free' repair and permits unrestricted postoperative physical activity. The method has resulted in a long-term success rate better than the many modifications of the Bassini repair. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1567151

Shulman, A. G.; Amid, P. K.; Lichtenstein, I. L.

1992-01-01

124

Hernia Repair Mesh-Associated Mycobacterium goodii Infection  

PubMed Central

We report on a patient with an abdominal wall abscess that developed after an inguinal hernia repair that utilized synthetic mesh. Mycobacterium goodii, a recently recognized, rapidly growing mycobacterium related to M. smegmatis, was isolated both from the abdominal wall aspirate and from surgically drained material. Infection resolved following thorough debridement, mesh removal, and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. This case report extends our understanding of the spectrum of M. goodii infection. PMID:15184492

Sohail, Muhammad R.; Smilack, Jerry D.

2004-01-01

125

Anterior Tension-Free Repair of Recurrent Inguinal Hernia Under Local Anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe a 7-year experience with recurrent inguinal hernia repair performed mainly with tension-free mesh or plug technique under local anesthesia through the anterior approach, and to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this method of treatment. Methods One hundred forty-five elective and 1 emergency herniorrhaphies for recurrent groin hernia were performed in 141 subjects (134 men and 7 women) with a mean age of 65 years (range 30–89). Concomitant medical and surgical problems were present in 73% and 8% of subjects, respectively. In 28 instances, the relapsed hernia had already been operated on once or twice for recurrence. A traditional hernioplasty had been previously performed in the vast majority of cases (136). Tension-free mesh or plug techniques through an anterior approach under local anesthesia were performed in 144 reoperations. Preperitoneal mesh repair and general or spinal anesthesia were used in all but one case when herniorrhaphy was performed during simultaneous operations. Results Mean hospital stay after surgery was 1.5 days (range 3 hours–14 days). No perioperative deaths occurred in this series. General complications were one case of acute intestinal bleeding and two cases of urinary retention. Local complications consisted of eight (5.5%) minor complications and one case of orchitis (0.7%) followed by testicular atrophy. In no instance was postoperative neuralgia or chronic pain reported. Two re-recurrences occurred. Conclusions Given the low complication rate in this and other reported series and the absence of surgical or general complications described after preperitoneal open or laparoscopic repair and after general and spinal anesthesia, anterior mesh repair under local anesthesia seems to be a low-cost surgical technique that can be safely and effectively used even in a teaching hospital for the treatment of the majority of patients with recurrent groin hernias. PMID:10636113

Gianetta, Ezio; Cuneo, Sonia; Vitale, Bruno; Camerini, Giovanni; Marini, Paola; Stella, Mattia

2000-01-01

126

Preincisional Treatment to Prevent Pain After Ambulatory Hernia Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

We designed this study as a randomized comparison of postoperative pain after inguinal hernia repair in pa- tients treated with triple preincisional analgesic ther- apy versus standard care. Triple therapy consisted of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory, a local anesthetic field block, and an N-methyl-d-aspartate inhibitor before in- cision. The treatment group (n 17) received rofecoxib, 50 mg PO, a field block

D. Janet Pavlin; Karen D. Horvath; Edward G. Pavlin; Kristien Sima

2003-01-01

127

Laparoscopic repair of secondary parahiatal hernia with incarceration of the stomach: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Parahiatal hernia is an extremely rare subtype of hiatal hernia, which in turn is a type of diaphragmatic hernia in adults, and only a few cases have been reported to date. We report the case of a patient who suffered from gastric incarceration through an anatomically separate diaphragmatic defect, immediately lateral to a structurally normal esophageal hiatus, that developed after treatment of a malignant mesothelioma. Case presentation A 70-year-old Japanese man, who had undergone treatment for a left malignant pleural mesothelioma a year ago at another hospital, was referred to our institution following a 4-day history of epigastric pain. Esophagogastroscopy demonstrated a normal esophagogastric junction, with remarkable stenosis and active gastric ulcer of the gastric body. Histopathological examination of the gastric biopsy specimen confirmed a gastric ulcer. Furthermore, computed tomography revealed a large fluid-filled structure in the retrocardiac space. On the basis of preoperative data, we decided to attempt laparoscopic repair for the gastric volvulus. During surgery, gastric and omental herniation was observed within a peritoneal lined defect immediately lateral to the esophageal hiatus. Dissection near the esophageal hiatus revealed a discrete extrahiatal defect 3cm in diameter immediately adjacent to the left crus of the diaphragm. The parahiatal defect was closed using interrupted nonabsorbable heavy suture. The patient’s postoperative course was uneventful, and anastomotic leakage was not observed at postoperative barium swallowing. Conclusions Although preoperative diagnosis of parahiatal hernia is difficult, a laparoscopic approach can be a useful therapeutic procedure not only for paraesophageal hernia but also for parahiatal hernia. PMID:23421939

2013-01-01

128

Laparoscopic repair of complicated umbilical hernia with Strattice Laparoscopic™ reconstructive tissue matrix  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Complex hernias continue to present a challenge. Surgical techniques for repair are carefully considered to reduce risk for complications. Laparoscopic repairs improve postoperative infection rates, and placement of biologic mesh decreases mesh infection rates. However, laparoscopic repairs using biologic mesh is generally challenging due to difficulty with maneuverability. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a complex ventral hernia that was laparoscopically repaired using a new FDA cleared laparoscopic biologic graft. The patient had multiple comorbidities, including obesity, hepatitis C, endocarditis secondary to IV drug use, tobacco smoking, bilateral inguinal hernia, and recurrent umbilical hernia. The recurrent hernia was larger, irreducible, and discolored compared to original defect. The patient underwent laparoscopic repair with primary closure and reinforcement with Strattice™ Tissue Matrix Laparoscopic (LifeCell Corporation, Branchburg, NJ). At nine months postoperative, the patient had no evidence of recurrence, infection, or chronic pain, demonstrating early success from the surgical management. DISCUSSION Presence of multiple comorbidities and incarcerated recurrent hernia increase risk for complications during and/or after hernia repair. Considering these factors, laparoscopic repair with Strattice Laparoscopic and defect closure was a reasonable technique for repair. CONCLUSION Laparoscopic suture repair reinforced with biologic dermal tissue matrix was successfully performed during a complex hernia repair. PMID:25437666

Tsuda, Shawn

2014-01-01

129

Laparoscopic repair of a rare acquired abdominal intercostal hernia  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION An acquired abdominal intercostal hernia (AIH) is a very rare and sporadically reported entity. Most cases of AIH are secondary to major trauma and the treatment of choice is surgical repair. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a 58-year-old man who presented with a painless intercostal swelling, which started after previous penetrating trauma to the same area. Radiological assessment was done with CT scan and the hernia was repaired with a laparoscopic approach using mesh. DISCUSSION AIH is a rare entity and trauma has an integral role in the pathophysiology. Surgical repair is the treatment of choice, however, due to the paucity of cases, there is no established method of choice for such repair. We present the first reported case in the Caribbean, which was repaired with the laparoscopic approach. CONCLUSION Although AIH is a rare condition, the pathophysiology seems relatively straightforward and the use of CT scan is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. The laparoscopic approach, with all its established benefits, appears to be a safe and feasible option in its management. PMID:25460469

Dan, Dilip; Ramraj, Parasram; Solomon, Verin; Ramnarine, Malini; Kawal, Trudy; Bascombe, Nigel; Naraynsingh, Vijay

2014-01-01

130

Transthoracic repair of an incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia using hexamethylene diisocyanate cross-linked porcine dermal collagen (Permacol).  

PubMed

It is the general surgeon who commonly repairs paraesophageal hernias nowadays, and they are repaired laparoscopically, making the performance of thoracotomy relatively rare. Whether to use prosthetic materials to repair the hiatus is still under debate, as is the question of which material to use, if any. We report a case of a 38-year-old man who had a large, incarcerated paraesophageal hernia. He had a past history of extensive abdominal surgery for exomphalos, which rendered any abdominal surgical approach a high-risk procedure. We therefore decided to proceed with thoracotomy and repair of the hiatus with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) cross-linked porcine dermal collagen. He made a good recovery with no complications. PMID:22419182

Gooch, Benn; Smart, Neil; Wajed, Saj

2012-03-01

131

Randomised controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open repair of inguinal hernia: early results.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--To establish the safety, short term outcome, and theatre costs of transabdominal laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia performed as day surgery. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial. The control operation was the two layer modified Maloney darn. SETTING--Teaching hospital and district general hospital. SUBJECTS--125 men randomised to laparoscopic or open repair of inguinal hernia. OUTCOME MEASURES--Morbidity, postoperative pain and use of analgesics, quality of life, and theatre costs. Outcome was assessed by questionnaires administered to patients daily for 10 days and at six weeks postoperatively and by outpatient review at six weeks. Return to normal activity was assessed by questionnaire at three months. RESULTS--One vascular complication (2%) occurred in the group that had open repair. Seven complications (12%) including vessel injury and early recurrence arose in the group that had laparoscopic repair (difference in complication rate 10% (95% confidence interval 4% to 18%; P = 0.02). Pain scores and quality of life assessed by the short form 36 showed a significant benefit to the group that had laparoscopic repair in the early postoperative period. Return to normal activity was not significantly different between the two groups. Total theatre costs were higher in the group that had laparoscopic repair (mean cost for laparoscopic repair 850 pounds (622 pounds to 1078 pounds); mean cost for open repair 268 pounds (245 pounds to 292 pounds)). CONCLUSIONS--Because of the greater complication rate and higher theatre costs for laparoscopic repair and the patient outcome preferences expressed, the results of larger trials of clinical and cost effectiveness using recurrence as the primary outcome measure should be known before laparoscopic herniorrhaphy is widely adopted. PMID:7580639

Lawrence, K.; McWhinnie, D.; Goodwin, A.; Doll, H.; Gordon, A.; Gray, A.; Britton, J.; Collin, J.

1995-01-01

132

Comparative Study of Inguinal Hernia Repair Rates After Radical Prostatectomy or External Beam Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We tested the hypothesis that patients treated for localized prostate cancer with radical prostatectomy (RP) have a higher risk of requiring an inguinal hernia (IH) repair than their counterparts treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Within the Quebec Health Plan database, we identified 6,422 men treated with RP and 4,685 men treated with EBRT for localized prostate cancer between 1990 and 2000, in addition to 6,933 control patients who underwent a prostate biopsy. From among that population, we identified patients who underwent a unilateral or bilateral hernia repair after either RP or EBRT. Kaplan-Meier plots showed IH repair-free survival rates. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression models tested the predictors of IH repair after RP or EBRT. Covariates consisted of age, year of surgery, and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results: IH repair-free survival rates at 1, 2, 5, and 10 years were 96.8, 94.3, 90.5, and 86.2% vs. 98.9, 98.0, 95.4, and 92.2%, respectively, in RP vs. EBRT patients (log-rank test, p < 0.001). IH repair-free survival rates in the biopsy population were 98.3, 97.1, 94.9, and 90.2% at the same four time points. In multivariable Cox regression models, RP predisposed to a 2.3-fold higher risk of IH repair than EBRT (p < 0.001). Besides therapy type, patient age (p < 0.001) represented the only other independent predictor of IH repair. Conclusions: RP predisposes to a higher rate of IH repair relative to EBRT. This observation should be considered at informed consent.

Lughezzani, Giovanni [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Department of Urology, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan (Italy); Sun, Maxine [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Perrotte, Paul [Department of Urology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Alasker, Ahmed; Jeldres, Claudio [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Isbarn, Hendrik; Budaeus, Lars [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Martini-clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Valiquette, Luc; Benard, Francois; Saad, Fred [Department of Urology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Graefen, Markus [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Martini-clinic, Prostate Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Montorsi, Francesco [Department of Urology, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan (Italy); Karakiewicz, Pierre I., E-mail: pierre.karakiewicz@umontreal.c [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2010-12-01

133

What is a Certified Hernia Center? The Example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery.  

PubMed

To date, the scientific definition "hernia center" does not exist and this term is being used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the past 25?years. Differentiated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a "tailored approach" program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore, there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and its verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present, there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations. PMID:25593950

Köckerling, Ferdinand; Berger, Dieter; Jost, Johannes O

2014-01-01

134

What is a Certified Hernia Center? The Example of the German Hernia Society and German Society of General and Visceral Surgery  

PubMed Central

To date, the scientific definition “hernia center” does not exist and this term is being used by hospitals and private institutions as a marketing instrument. Hernia surgery has become increasingly more complex over the past 25?years. Differentiated use of the various techniques in hernia surgery has been adopted as a “tailored approach” program and requires intensive engagement with, and extensive experience of, the entire field of hernia surgery. Therefore, there is a need for hernia centers. A basic requirement for a credible certification process for hernia centers involves definition of requirements and its verification by hernia societies and/or non-profit organizations that are interested in assuring the best possible quality of hernia surgery. At present, there are two processes for certification of hernia centers by hernia societies or non-profit organizations.

Köckerling, Ferdinand; Berger, Dieter; Jost, Johannes O.

2014-01-01

135

Adult hernia surgery in Wales revisited: impact of the guidelines of The Royal College of Surgeons of England.  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the impact of the guidelines of The Royal College of Surgeons of England on the practice of hernia surgery in Wales. This was assessed by means of a postal survey to all consultant general surgeons in Wales in 1996-1997. The areas covered were: awareness of the guidelines of The Royal College of Surgeons of England and the impact of such guidelines on their practice, attendance at hernia courses, operative technique, materials used for repair and skin suture, proportion of day case hernias, length of inpatient stay, thromboembolic (TE) prophylaxis and postoperative advice to patients with regard to light work, heavy work and sport. In all, 79 replies were received (85%). Almost all the surgeons had read the guidelines; this changed the practice of 20% of respondents but did not in 32%. A further 48% did not answer the question. In contrast with our 1993 survey results, in Wales there is now a uniform surgical management of adult inguinal hernias: the most common operation is the Liechtenstein, with monofilament non-absorbable suture to secure the mesh, followed by the Shouldice repair. The Bassini and inguinal darn operations are becoming much less common and none now uses braided or absorbable sutures for the repair. Skin closure is still rather variable, with only 58% of respondents adhering to the recommended absorbable subcuticular suture. Postoperative advice is now uniform and in accordance with the guidelines. A trend towards more TE prophylaxis and more day case hernia surgery is also seen. PMID:9849333

Ciampolini, J.; Boyce, D. E.; Shandall, A. A.

1998-01-01

136

Laparoscopic Repair of Inguinal Hernia with Biomimetic Matrix  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Materials utilized for the repair of hernias fall into 2 broad categories, synthetics and biologics. Each has its merits and drawbacks. The synthetics have a permanent, inherent strength but are associated with some incidence of chronic pain. The biologics rely on variable tissue regeneration to give strength to the repair, limiting their use to specific situations. However, thanks to their transient presence and tissue ingrowth, the biologics do not result in a significant incidence of chronic pain. We studied the use of a biomimetic (REVIVE, Biomerix Corporation, Fremont, CA) in this setting in an attempt to obviate the disadvantages of each material. Methods: Fourteen patients underwent laparoscopic repair by totally extraperitoneal and transabdominal preperitoneal techniques of 16 inguinal hernias. Follow-up was as long as 19 mo, and 8 patients were followed for > 12 mo. There were no recurrences and a 5% incidence of functionally insignificant discomfort. Results: REVIVE is shown in histology and in vivo to demonstrate regeneration and tissue ingrowth into the polycarbonate/polyuria matrix similar to that in the biologics rather than scarring or encapsulation. There were no recurrences, indicating its strength and resilience as a permanent repair similar to that in the synthetics. Conclusion: This is proof of the concept that a biomimetic may bridge the gap between the biologics and synthetics and may be able to be utilized on a regular basis with the benefits of both materials and without their drawbacks. PMID:23484565

2012-01-01

137

Pneumothorax during laparoscopic repair of giant paraesophageal hernia  

PubMed Central

Giant paraesophageal hernia is an uncommon morbid disorder which may present a risk of catastrophic complications and should be repaired electively as soon as possible. Laparoscopic fundoplication is the mainstay of surgical management of this disorder due to several advantages such as lower post-operative morbidity and pain. We report a case of a 70-year-old patient with a giant paraesophageal hernia, who developed subcutaneous emphysema with pneumothorax during laparoscopic fundoplication. Early diagnosis was possible by close clinical evaluation and simultaneous monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide levels and airway pressures. Although positive end-expiratory pressure application is an effective way of managing pneumothorax secondary to the passage of gas into the interpleural space, insertion of an intercostal drain may be used in an emergent situation. PMID:21897511

Kaur, Ranvinder; Kohli, Santvana; Jain, Aruna; Vajifdar, Homay; Babu, Raghavendra; Sharma, Deborshi

2011-01-01

138

Two-layer repair of the transversalis fascia is sufficient for inguinal hernia repair.  

PubMed Central

The Shouldice four-layer repair is considered to be the gold standard procedure for repair of inguinal hernia with low recurrence rates around 1%. Tension-free two-layer repair of the transversalis fascia may be all that is required to avoid recurrence. We compared the early recurrence rate after two-layer repair of the transversalis fascia or the standard four-layer Shouldice technique in a randomised study of elective inguinal herniorrhaphy. In 48 patients (53 repairs) who had a two-layer transversalis fascia repair, there was one recurrence (2%) in the first 12 months after operation, though there was one more recurrence within 36 months (total 4%). In 39 patients who had a four-layer Shouldice repair (42 repairs), there was no recurrence at 12 months but at 36 months two recurrences (5%) were found. We conclude that a two-layer repair of the transversalis fascia is anatomically correct, physiologically sound and can provide equivalent results to the standard Shouldice repair for inguinal hernia. PMID:7574325

Varshney, S.; Burke, D.; Johnson, C. D.

1995-01-01

139

Inguinal hernia surgery in the Netherlands: are patients treated according to the guidelines?  

PubMed Central

Purpose In 2003, a dedicated Dutch committee developed evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of inguinal hernia (IH) in children and adults. The aim of this study was to describe trends in hernia care before and after the publication of the guidelines on IH surgery in the Netherlands. Methods Originally, a retrospective baseline analysis of IH surgery in 90 Dutch hospitals was performed among patients treated for IH in 2001. The results of this baseline analysis were compared with a recently performed second analysis of patients treated for IH in 2005. Results In children <4 years of age, the study showed a significant decrease of contralateral explorations. In adults, the study showed that significantly more patients were treated with a mesh-based repair in 2005 (95.9 vs. 78.8%, P < 0.01). Moreover, there was an increase of patients with bilateral hernia treated with an endoscopic technique (41.5 vs. 22.3%, P < 0.01) and more patients were treated in day surgery (53.5 vs. 38.6%, P < 0.01). Lastly, a decline in operations performed for recurrent IH in adults was observed (10.9 vs. 13.3%, P < 0.01). Conclusion This study showed that most patients with IH in the Netherlands were treated according to the main recommendations of the Dutch evidence-based guidelines. PMID:19882299

de Lange, D. H.; Kreeft, M.; van Ramshorst, G. H.; Aufenacker, T. J.; Rauwerda, J. A.

2009-01-01

140

An anterior transversalis fascia repair for adult inguinal hernias.  

PubMed

During the eight year period from 1967 to 1975, 1,020 patients more than eighteen years old underwent 1,311 inguinal herniorrhaphies. Group I consisted of 723 inguinal herniorrhaphies in which either a Bassini or a Cooper's ligament repair was used. During a four to nine year follow-up period, the total recurrence rate was 11.5 per cent; the recurrence rate for the primary repair group was 7 per cent and for the recurrent group 32 per cent. The follow-up rate was 93.7 per cent. Group II consisted of 591 herniorrhaphies in which the repair was performed by an anterior transversalis fascia technic. During a two to five year follow-up period, the total recurrence rate was 2.7 per cent; 1.8 per cent for primary repairs and 8.0 per cent for recurrent hernias. The follow-up rate was 98 per cent (95 per cent by personal examination). Assuming that the recurrences in group II will occur with the same frequency as in group I, our projected four to nine year recurrence rate is 3.4 per cent. This suggests that the anterior transversalis fascia repair results in a lower recurrence rate than either the Bassini or Cooper's ligament repairs. PMID:646036

Berliner, S; Burson, L; Katz, P; Wise, L

1978-05-01

141

Delayed Presentation of a Bowel Bovie Injury After Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Bowel injury during laparoscopic surgery is a rare but serious complication. A Bovie injury to the bowel can cause delayed perforation of the viscus, thus increasing the possibility of a preventable morbidity. Patients presenting with perforation peritonitis within 24 hours and up to 2 to 3 weeks after laparoscopic Bovie injury to the bowel have been reported in the literature. Case Description: A 74-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic ventral hernia mesh repair. Intraoperatively, a small area of superficial Bovie injury to the small bowel was repaired with Lembert sutures and tissue glue. Postoperatively, the patient recovered well, but she presented with perforation peritonitis 3 months after surgery. An exploratory laparotomy showed a jejunal perforation in the same area that was injured with cautery and repaired during the previous surgery. The patient was only using inhaled steroids for asthma on and off but had a remote history of chemotherapy and radiation for colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Bovie injury to the bowel has a hidden depth, causing a slow transmural tissue necrosis, and it might also impair local healing and eventually lead to perforation. Thus, the patient may present later than the usual period for wound healing and remodeling as previously reported. Given the disastrous consequence, it is imperative to perform a good surgical repair of even a minor Bovie injury to the bowel. This is the first report of a delayed presentation (>1 month) of a Bovie injury of the bowel. PMID:24018096

Gayagoy, Jennifer; Chaudhary, Sushant; Kolachalam, Ramachandra B.

2013-01-01

142

Extraperitoneal Surgical Repair of Parastomal Hernia of Bricker’s Urinary Diversion with Polypropylene Mesh: Stoma Reimplantation through the Mesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Parastomal hernias affect 4.5–9% of patients submitted to ileostomy. Correcting this hernia represents a challenge. There are two basic approaches to the surgical correction of parastomal hernias: stoma relocation and repair in situ. We describe an alternative modified technique for extraperitoneal correction of large parastomal hernias using a polypropylene mesh and reimplantation of the urostomy in situthrough the mesh.

Marcos Venício Alves Lima; Rommel Prata Regadas; José Marconi Tavares; Lúcio Flávio Gonzaga Silva

2010-01-01

143

Minimally invasive surgery in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia: outcome and selection criteria  

PubMed Central

Purpose The aim of the study was to determine clinical indications for performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) with acceptable results by reviewing our experience in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) repair and comparing outcomes of MIS with open surgery. Methods Medical records of patients who underwent CDH repair were reviewed retrospectively between January 2008 and December 2012, and outcomes were compared between MIS and open repair of CDH. Results From 2008 to 2012, 35 patients were operated on for CDH. Among these patients, 20 patients underwent open surgery, and 15 patients underwent MIS. Patients with delayed presentations (60.0% [9/15] in the MIS group vs. 20.0% [4/20] in the open surgery group; P = 0.015) and small diaphragmatic defect less than 3 cm (80.0% [12/15] in the MIS group vs. 0.0% [0/20] in the open surgery group; P < 0.001) were more frequently in the MIS group than the open surgery group. All 10 patients who also had other anomalies underwent open surgery (P = 0.002). Moreover, nine patients who needed a patch for repair underwent open surgery (P = 0.003). Patients in the MIS group showed earlier enteral feeding and shorter hospital stays. There was no recurrence in either group. Conclusion CDH repair with MIS can be suggested as the treatment of choice for patients with a small sized diaphragmatic defect, in neonates with stable hemodynamics and without additional anomalies, or in infants with delayed presen tation of CDH, resulting in excellent outcomes. PMID:23908966

Cha, Chihwan; Hong, Young Ju; Chang, Eun Young; Oh, Jung-Tak; Han, Seok Joo

2013-01-01

144

Outcomes of emergent inguinal hernia repair in veteran octogenarians.  

PubMed

Outcomes from emergent inguinal hernia (IH) repair in veteran octogenarians are not well described. We reviewed outcomes for this cohort from 2005 to 2012 at the VA North Texas Health Care System. There were 15 emergent (Group I) and 86 elective (Group II) operations performed in octogenarians. Age and American Society of Anesthesiologists status were similar in both groups. The rate of minor and major complications was higher in Group I compared with Group II (33 and 19% vs 22 and 2%, respectively; both Ps < 0.001). Hospital length of stay (LOS) and intensive care unit LOS were also longer in Group I compared with Group II (6.7 ± 7.0 and 2.5 ± 4.4 vs 0.8 ± 1.9 and 0.12 ± 0.6 days, respectively; both Ps < 0.001). Thirty-day mortality was 13 per cent for Group I and 0 per cent for Group II. Despite the high rate of comorbid conditions in our group, the risk associated with elective repair of IH was not prohibitive. In contrast, we observed that 15 per cent of patients presented with an incarcerated hernia during the study period and the mortality rate was 13 per cent in this cohort. Factors that might predict incarceration in veteran octogenarians need to be further investigated. PMID:24887727

Huerta, Sergio; Pham, Thai; Foster, Scott; Livingston, Edward H; Dineen, Sean

2014-05-01

145

Tension-free inguinal hernia repair: a retrospective study of 3000 cases in one center.  

PubMed

The tension-free anterior repair of inguinal hernia using a mesh, initially described by Zagdoun in 1959 and perfectly described by Lichtenstein, was used as a basis for the technique we adapted 17 years ago. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the clinical long-term results of this modified tension-free technique. Three thousand inguinal hernias were operated by the same surgeon. The Lichtenstein technique modifications were the nature and the enlarged size of the mesh (polyester-Parietex, 13 x 9 cm) and the fixation method (staples). Complications, pain, and recurrence were carefully reported on a standardized file. Immediate complications were rare and always minor: hematomas and parietal abscesses. With a mean follow-up of 8 years, 48 cases of persisting pains (2%) coming from nervous irritation were reported, and only 12 recurrences (0.5%) were detected more than 10 years after surgery. Based on follow-up of these 3000 hernias, the results of this study exhibit a very low rate of recurrence (0.5%). This technique seems to be easy, painless, safe, and effective. PMID:15912901

Chastan, Philippe

2005-01-01

146

Laparoscopic Mesh Versus Open Preperitoneal Mesh Versus Conventional Technique for Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the influence of the laparoscopic technique in hernia repair regarding time to full recovery and return to work, complications, recurrence rate, and economic aspects. Summary Background Data Several studies have shown advantages in terms of less pain and faster recovery after laparoscopic hernia repair, whereas others have not, and the cost-effectiveness has been questioned. The laparoscopic technique must be thoroughly compared with the open procedures before its true place in hernia surgery can be defined. Methods Six hundred thirteen male patients aged 40 to 75 years were randomized to the conventional procedure, preperitoneal mesh placed by the open technique, or laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh (TAPP). Follow-up was after 7 days, 8 weeks, and 1 year. Results Of 613 patients undergoing surgery, 604 (98.5%) were followed for 1 year. Patients who underwent TAPP gained full recovery after 18.4 days, compared with 24.2 days for open mesh (p < 0.001) and 26.4 days for the conventional procedure (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent TAPP returned to work after 14.7 days, compared with 17.7 days for open mesh (p = 0.05) and 17.9 days for the conventional procedure (p = 0.04). They also had significantly less restriction in physical activities after 7 days. The TAPP procedure was more expensive, mainly as a result of longer surgical time and equipment costs, even after compensation for earlier return to work. Complications were more common in the TAPP group, with a varying pattern between the groups. Four recurrences in the conventional, 11 in the open mesh, and 4 in the TAPP group were recorded after 1 year (p = n.s.). Conclusion The laparoscopic technique results in both shorter time to full recovery and shorter time to return to work, at the price of substantially increased costs. PMID:10450737

Johansson, Bo; Hallerbäck, Bengt; Glise, Hans; Anesten, Bengt; Smedberg, Sam; Román, Jonas

1999-01-01

147

Unusual findings in inguinal hernia surgery: Report of 6 rare cases  

PubMed Central

Background and aim: To present our experience with unexpected findings during hernia surgery, either unusual hernial contents or pathologic entities, like neoplastic masses, masquerading as a hernia. Patients and methods: We studied retrospectively 856 patients with inguinal hernia who were admitted to our surgical department over a 9-year period. In addition, our study included patients complaining of inguinal protrusion, even without a definitive diagnosis of inguinal hernia upon admission. Results: Five patients presented with unusual hernial contents. Three of them had a vermiform appendix in their sac. Acute appendicitis (Amyands hernia) was found in only one case. One patient had epiploic appendagitis related with a groin hernia. Moreover, an adult woman was diagnosed with ovarian and tubal inguinal hernia. Finally, we report a case of a massive extratesticular intrascrotal lipoma, initially misdiagnosed as a scrotal hernia. Conclusion: a hernia surgeon may encounter unexpected intraoperative findings. It is important to be prepared to detect them and apply the appropriate treatment. PMID:19918306

Ballas, K; Kontoulis, Th; Skouras, Ch; Triantafyllou, A; Symeonidis, N; Pavlidis, Th; Marakis, G; Sakadamis, A

2009-01-01

148

Allograft AlloDerm® tissue for laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal groin hernia repair: A case report  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Synthetic mesh is the prosthetic material used for most inguinal hernioplasties. However, when left in contact with intra-abdominal viscera, it often becomes associated with infection and migration, particularly in irradiated tissues, contaminated fields, immunosuppressed individuals, and patients with intestinal obstruction or fistula. AlloDerm® Regenerative Tissue Matrix (LifeCell Corporation, Branchburg, NJ) is derived from human cadaver skin and may be associated with fewer visceral adhesions and more durability in infected fields than synthetic mesh. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the first case in which AlloDerm was used in a laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal repair of a multiple recurrent right inguinal hernia, a left femoral hernia, and an umbilical hernia in the same patient. Use of AlloDerm greatly enhanced the maneuverability during laparoscopic hernia repair due to its pliability and strength and eliminated the need to cover the prosthetic with peritoneum. DISCUSSION Previous pelvic radiation and multiple previous groin repairs can render the peritoneum friable, resulting in obstacles to successful closure. AlloDerm is a reasonable choice for groin hernia repairs when such factors are present. CONCLUSION The long-term durability of AlloDerm for laparoscopic groin hernia repairs is yet to be determined, but based on current data it seems prudent to use this technique in laparoscopic repair of complex groin hernias where infection is suspected or inadequate prosthetic coverage with peritoneum is anticipated. PMID:24780773

Amirlak, Bardia; Gerdes, Jodi; Puri, Varun; Fitzgibbons, Robert J.

2014-01-01

149

Mechanisms of hernia recurrence after preperitoneal mesh repair. Traditional and laparoscopic.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The authors provide an assessment of mechanisms leading to hernia recurrence after laparoscopic and traditional preperitoneal herniorrhaphy to allow surgeons using either technique to achieve better results. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The laparoscopic and traditional preperitoneal approaches to hernia repair are analogous in principle and outcome and have experienced a similar evolution over different time frames. The recurrence rate after preperitoneal herniorrhaphy should be low (< 2%) to be considered a viable alternative to the most successful methods of conventional herniorrhaphy. METHODS: Experienced surgeons supply specifics regarding the mechanisms of recurrence and technical measures to avoid hernia recurrence when using the preperitoneal prosthetic repair. Videotapes of laparoscopic herniorrhaphy in 13 patients who subsequently experienced a recurrence also are used to determine technical causes of recurrence. RESULTS: Factors leading to recurrence include surgeon inexperience, inadequate dissection, insufficient prosthesis size, insufficient prosthesis overlap of hernia defects, improper fixation, prosthesis folding or twisting, missed hernias, or mesh lifting secondary to hematoma formation. CONCLUSIONS: The predominant factor in successful preperitoneal hernia repair is adequate dissection with complete exposure and coverage of all potential groin hernia sites. Hematoma mesh lifting and inadequate lateral inferior and medial inferior mesh fixation represent the most common causes of recurrence for surgeons experienced in traditional or laparoscopic preperitoneal hernia repair. PMID:9114802

Lowham, A S; Filipi, C J; Fitzgibbons, R J; Stoppa, R; Wantz, G E; Felix, E L; Crafton, W B

1997-01-01

150

Outcomes of the open mesh repair of large incisional hernias using an intraperitoneal composite mesh: our experience with 100 cases.  

PubMed

Incisional hernia repair sometimes requires intraperitoneal implantation of a mesh. This becomes necessary when the hernia opening is large, in particular, in patients with a low abdominal wall surface/wall defect surface (AWS/WDS) ratio, in large boundary incisional hernias where the proximity to bone structures or cartilage often complicates retromuscular mesh implantation and in multi-recurrent incisional hernias that are sometimes characterised by an actual loss of abdominal wall tissue. The authors report on the results of a series of 100 incisional hernias treated between 1999 and 2006 using the open technique to implant an intraperitoneal mesh (Parietex Composite). Mean follow-up time was 42 months (range 12-96 months). The mean wall defect surface was 95 cm(2) (range 60-210 cm(2)). Twelve percent of patients suffered minor complications: 5 seromas (5%), 3 haematomas (3%) and 4 parietal suppurations (4%). No mesh had to be removed. The recurrence rate was 6%. At 6 months after surgery, no patient lamented pain or discomfort due to foreign body sensation. None of these patients presented intestinal occlusion or enterocutaneous fistulae. In conclusion, it is our opinion that the mesh should be implanted in direct contact with the viscera only where absolutely necessary, i.e., when it cannot be implanted in the retromuscular area without creating excessive parietal tension. Our experience with PC mesh, over the short-to-medium term, was positive. Naturally, further studies are required to evaluate long-term biocompatibility. PMID:20845102

Ammaturo, Carmine; Bassi, Uberto Andrea; Bassi, Gaspare

2010-08-01

151

Cardiac compression following cardiac surgery due to unrecognised hiatus hernia.  

PubMed

A 76-year-old man who had undergone a routine coronary artery bypass grafting operation developed severe haemodynamic instability in the early postoperative period in spite of multiple inotropic supports. Due to persistent instability of haemodynamics and worsening acidosis his chest was re-explored with detection of no obvious abnormality. An intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) was inserted for additional support. The chest had to be left open overnight and closed formally next morning. A chest X-ray at that stage showed a large hiatus hernia with huge gastric dilatation compressing the heart. Decompressions of the stomach lead to dramatic improvement in his circulatory status with rapid weaning of inotropes and IABP and he could be extubated. This case illustrates the importance of recognising the presence of hiatus hernia in preoperative chest X-ray and prophylactic NG tube insertion at the time of cardiac surgery in these cases. PMID:17881242

Devbhandari, Mohan P; Khan, Mohammad Aamir; Hooper, Timothy L

2007-11-01

152

Repair of Giant Midline Abdominal Wall Hernias: “Components Separation Technique” versus Prosthetic Repair  

PubMed Central

Background Reconstruction of giant midline abdominal wall hernias is difficult, and no data are available to decide which technique should be used. It was the aim of this study to compare the “components separation technique” (CST) versus prosthetic repair with e-PTFE patch (PR). Method Patients with giant midline abdominal wall hernias were randomized for CST or PR. Patients underwent operation following standard procedures. Postoperative morbidity was scored on a standard form, and patients were followed for 36 months after operation for recurrent hernia. Results Between November 1999 and June 2001, 39 patients were randomized for the study, 19 for CST and 18 for PR. Two patients were excluded perioperatively because of gross contamination of the operative field. No differences were found between the groups at baseline with respect to demographic details, co-morbidity, and size of the defect. There was no in-hospital mortality. Wound complications were found in 10 of 19 patients after CST and 13 of 18 patients after PR. Seroma was found more frequently after PR. In 7 of 18 patients after PR, the prosthesis had to be removed as a consequence of early or late infection. Reherniation occurred in 10 patients after CST and in 4 patients after PR. Conclusions Repair of abdominal wall hernias with the component separation technique compares favorably with prosthetic repair. Although the reherniation rate after CST is relatively high, the consequences of wound healing disturbances in the presence of e-PTFE patch are far-reaching, often resulting in loss of the prosthesis. PMID:17372669

van Goor, H.; Charbon, J. A.; Rosman, C.; Hesselink, E. J.; van der Wilt, G. J.; Bleichrodt, R. P.

2007-01-01

153

[Surgery of lumbar disk hernia: historical perspective].  

PubMed

Although the clinical picture of discogenic sciatica is well known already in the ancient world, it is not until 1933 that WJ Mixter and JS Barr provide the correct pathogenetic interpretation and suggest surgery as the treatment of choice. The work of the American Authors was however based on the knowledge acquired during the previous centuries starting with Domenico Cotugno, who first suggested the neurogenic nature of sciatica (1764) and later with the neurologists of the french school Valleix, Lasègue, Dejerine, Sicard who elucidated the semeiology and debated in detail the etiopathogenesis of the condition. The german pathologists Schmorl and Andrae (1927-29) are to be credited for their contribution to the pathology of intervertebral disc, recognizing the frequency and degenerative (not neoplastic) nature of nucleus pulposus herniation. Surgery of disc herniation starts with Oppenheim and Krause (1909). Mixter and Barr used laminectomy and a transdural route although a more limited approach to the spinal canal had already been proposed by the italian Bonomo (1902), unknown to many. Love, of the Mayo Clinic (1937-39) introduced the extradural/interlaminar approach while Caspar and Yasargil (1977) applied the concepts of microsurgery to the procedure. The latest advances are represented by percutaneous and endoscopic techniques. PMID:9835099

Brunori, A; De Caro, G M; Giuffrè, R

1998-01-01

154

Shouldice inguinal hernia repair in the male adult: the gold standard? A multicenter controlled trial in 1578 patients.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Hernia repair is the second most frequently performed operation in France and in the United States, the prevalence being 36 for every 1000 males. Lowering the recurrence rate by 1% would mean 1000 fewer operations for hernia repair per year in France. METHODS: Between 1983 and 1989, 1578 adult males with a total of 1706 nonrecurrent inguinal hernias were prospectively and randomly allotted to undergo either a Bassini's repair, Cooper's ligament, or Shouldice repair with polypropylene or a Shouldice repair with stainless steel for determination of which technique was associated with the lowest recurrence rate. Fifty-nine hernia repairs were withdrawn after inclusion. Of the 1647 remaining hernias, 52.2% were indirect, 25.6% were direct, and 23.2% were combined. Patients were seen every 6 months for 3 years and then every year. Median follow-up was 5 years 8 months (range, 3 months-8.5 years). RESULTS: At 8.5 years, 5.6% of hernias were lost to follow-up. Ninety-seven hernia repairs failed, 50% during the first 2 years. The actuarial recurrence rate was 7.94% at 8.5 years. The Shouldice repair (stainless steel or polypropylene) was associated with fewer recurrences (6.1%) than either the Bassini's (8.6%) or Cooper's ligament repair (11.2%) technique (p < 0.001). This difference remained significant even when the maximal bias test was used. Fewer recurrences (5.9%) were observed with the stainless steel wire Shouldice repair than with polypropylene version (6.5%), but the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Shouldice hernia repair provides the patient with the best chances of nonrecurrence regardless of the anatomical type of hernia. The Shouldice hernia repair should be the gold standard for inguinal hernia repair in men and serves as the basis for comparison with all other techniques, be they prosthetic or laparoscopic. PMID:8526578

Hay, J M; Boudet, M J; Fingerhut, A; Poucher, J; Hennet, H; Habib, E; Veyrières, M; Flamant, Y

1995-01-01

155

The Tilburg double blind randomised controlled trial comparing inguinal hernia repair according to Lichtenstein and the transinguinal preperitoneal technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Anterior open treatment of the inguinal hernia with a tension free mesh has reduced the incidence of recurrence and direct postoperative pain. The Lichtenstein procedure rules nowadays as reference technique for hernia treatment. Not recurrences but chronic pain is the main postoperative complication in inguinal hernia repair after Lichtenstein's technique. Preliminary experiences with a soft mesh placed in the

Giel G Koning; Hans JP de Schipper; Henk JM Oostvogel; Michiel HJ Verhofstad; Pieter G Gerritsen; Kees CJHM van Laarhoven; Patrick WHE Vriens

2009-01-01

156

Hernia  

MedlinePLUS

... of a hernia. Sometimes, hernias occur with heavy lifting, straining while using the toilet, or any activity ... Extra weight Fluid in the abdomen ( ascites ) Heavy lifting Peritoneal dialysis Poor nutrition Smoking Overexertion Undescended testicles

157

Choice of Anesthesia and Risk of Reoperation for Recurrence in Groin Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Objective: To analyze the relative risk of reoperation for recurrence using 3 anesthetic alternatives, general anesthesia (GA), regional (spinal-, epidural-) anesthesia (RA), and local anesthesia (LA), and to study time trends for various anesthetic and operative methods, as well as other risk factors regarding reoperation for recurrence. Background: The method of anesthesia used for hernia repair is generally assumed not to affect the long-term outcome. The few studies on the topic have rendered conflicting results. Methods: Data from the Swedish Hernia Register was used. Relative risk was first estimated using univariate analysis for assumed risk variables and then selecting variables with the highest or lowest univariate risk for multivariate analysis. Results: From 1992 through 2001, 59,823 hernia repairs were recorded. Despite the fact that univariate analysis showed a somewhat lower risk for reoperation in the LA group, the multivariate analysis showed that LA was associated with a significantly increased risk for reoperation in primary but not in recurrent hernia repair. The Lichtenstein technique carried a significantly lower reoperation risk than any other method of operation. Conclusions: LA was associated with a higher risk of reoperation for recurrence after primary hernia repair. The use of mesh techniques has increased considerably, and among these the Lichtenstein repair was associated with a significantly lower risk for reoperation than any other repair. PMID:15213635

Nordin, Pär; Haapaniemi, Staffan; van Der Linden, Willem; Nilsson, Erik

2004-01-01

158

Suture Versus Tack Fixation of Mesh in Laparoscopic Umbilical Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Mesh fixation in laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair is poorly studied. We compared postoperative outcomes of laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair in suture versus tack mesh fixation. Methods: Patients who underwent laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair were separated by method of mesh fixation: sutures versus primarily tacks. Medical history and follow-up data were collected through medical records. The primary outcome of this study was the recurrence rates of hernias. Postoperative major and minor complications, such as surgical site infection, small-bowel obstruction, and seroma formation, were regarded as secondary outcomes. Additionally, a telephone interview was conducted to assess postoperative pain, recovery time, and overall patient satisfaction. Results: Eighty-six patients were identified: 33 in the suture group and 53 in the tacks group. The number of emergent cases was increased in the tacks group (6 vs 0; P = .022). Mean follow-up time was 2.7 years for both groups. Documented postoperative follow-up was obtained in 29 (90%) suture group and 31 (58%) tacks group patients. Hernia recurrence occurred in 3 and 2 patients in the sutures and tacks groups, respectively (P was not significant). No differences were found in secondary outcomes, including subjective outcomes from telephone interviews, between groups. Conclusions: There are no differences in postoperative complication rates in suture versus tack mesh fixation in laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair. PMID:24398197

Kitamura, Riley K.; Choi, Jacqueline; Lynn, Elizabeth

2013-01-01

159

[Surgery treatment of vast abdominal hernias with application of unpressed syntetic mesh--preliminary communications].  

PubMed

This presentation present outcome of surgery treatment of vast abdominal hernias occurred in 9 patients with application of unpressed synthetic mesh: Gore-Dualmesh and SurgimeshVN. All of operated hernias was complications post previous surgery. Surgery perfomed by 5 male and 4 female patients. One of implanted mesh was removed due to faecal fistula. Patients were followed for 2 to 12 month. PMID:19140495

Waz, Krzyszrof; Buczynowska, Miros?awa; Ciencia?a, Antoni; Friediger, Jerzy; Topa, Jacek; Steczko-Sieczkowska, Ma?gorzata; Kisiel, Andrzej; Pedziwiatr, Wies?aw; Gotfryd-Bugajska, Katarzyna

2008-01-01

160

Comparison of Laparoscopic vs Open Modified Shouldice Technique in Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Inguinal hernia repair has been a common procedure performed by general surgeons. Recently, a newly developed approach has been introduced using the pre-peritoneal laparoscopic repair. The laparoscopic approach allows patients to recover faster, with less pain; however, a disadvantage is the higher cost. We conducted a retrospective study of inguinal hernia repairs performed by one surgeon at the same institution, comparing the laparoscopic technique to the modified Shouldice procedure with regard to surgical time, postoperative recovery time, charge, and time to return to work and to activities. Patients undergoing laparoscopic hernia repairs were able to return to work and to activities sooner than patients undergoing the modified Shouldice procedure. The results obtained in this study showed a higher charge for the laparoscopic procedure, with longer surgical and recovery room time. The more rapid return to work and activities may outweigh the higher charge and longer surgical and recovery room time. PMID:10323168

Tiruchelvam, V.

1999-01-01

161

Trends in the utilization of inguinal hernia repair techniques: a population-based study  

PubMed Central

Background The use of inguinal hernia repair techniques in the community setting is poorly understood. Methods A retrospective review of all inguinal hernia repairs performed on adult residents of Olmsted County, MN, from 1989 to 2008 was performed through the Rochester Epidemiology Project. Results A total of 4,433 inguinal hernia repairs among 3,489 individuals were reviewed. Non–mesh-based repairs predominated in the late 1980s (94% in 1989), declined throughout the 1990s (40% in 1996), and are rarely used nowadays (4% in 2008). Open mesh-based repairs comprised 21% in 1990, peaked in 2001 with 72%, and declined to 55% in 2008. The adoption of laparoscopic repairs began in 1992 (6%) and has increased steadily to 41% in 2008 (P < .001). Conclusions Although non–mesh-based repairs, once the predominant method, have been supplanted by open mesh-based techniques, nowadays the use of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair techniques has increased substantially to nearly equal that of open mesh-based techniques. PMID:22221993

Zendejas, Benjamin; Ramirez, Tatiana; Jones, Trahern; Kuchena, Admire; Martinez, Jaime; Ali, Shahzad M.; Lohse, Christine M.; Farley, David R.

2013-01-01

162

Laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair in a cirrhotic patient with a peritoneovenous shunt.  

PubMed

A 62-year-old Japanese woman who had developed massive cirrhotic ascites was referred to our hospital for a peritoneovenous shunt implant. However, CT examination revealed an umbilical hernia that had not been observed before the peritoneovenous shunt was implanted. We decided to perform laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair to keep carbon dioxide from flowing backward into the central circulatory system. We first clamped the catheter and set the upper limit of the pneumoperitoneum pressure to 6?mmHg. The central venous pressure was also measured simultaneously. Mesh was then applied over the hernia and fixed by the double-crown technique. Finally, 1000-mL physiological saline was infused into the abdominal cavity while the pneumoperitoneum was slowly released. In this case, we safely performed laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair while making some alterations, specifically catheter clamping, reducing pneumoperitoneum pressure, monitoring central venous pressure, and infusing physiological saline. PMID:25418015

Umemura, Akira; Suto, Takayuki; Sasaki, Akira; Fujita, Tomohiro; Endo, Fumitaka; Wakabayashi, Go

2014-11-23

163

Simultaneous open preperitoneal repair of inguinal hernia with open prostatectomy for benign prostate hyperplasia.  

PubMed

Where surgical resources are slim, patients may suffer the obstructive symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia until they present with frank urinary retention and they may have unattended inguinal hernia. The best strategy to take care of patients who have both problems at once has remained elusive. We report a small case series of 10 patients in whom open preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair was done together with suprapubic prostatectomy over a 10-year period in the district hospital. PMID:25406258

Johnson, O Kenneth

2015-01-01

164

Parastomal hernia repair: laparoscopic ventral hernia meshplasty with stoma relocation. The current state and a clinical case presentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Parastomal hernia is a frequent complication after performing an ostomy, and although different technical options have been\\u000a described, it lacks an ideal intervention to resolve it. The use of meshes and the laparoscopic approach, has led to a significant\\u000a advance in resolving this condition. However, the ideal technique should guarantee must ensure integral repair of the abdominal\\u000a wall, taking into

L. Garcia-VallejoP; P. Concheiro; E. Mena; J. Baltar; I. Baamonde; L. Folgar

2011-01-01

165

A biomechanical study of the aponeurotic inguinal hernia repair.  

PubMed

The aponeurotic inguinal hernia repair is essentially a union of the aponeuroses of the external oblique and transversus abdominis muscles in the groin. Its tension-free status and resistance to intra-abdominal stress were measured in a biomechanical study. Comparative studies were made with the American Bassini procedure. Suture tensions were measured at three sites in six aponeurotic repairs and the mean tension was 3.9 +/- 2.9 grams, which was within the accuracy of the combined transducer and recorder measurement. Similar measurements in six American Bassini operations registered 633 +/- 230 grams mean tension. A relaxing incision in the Bassini repair reduced but did not eliminate tension. Mean tension figures remained at 401 +/- 198 grams. Specimens of external oblique aponeuroses in six random patients were tested, counter to their parallel fibers, in a tensiometer. The thickness of the specimens varied from 0.21 to 1.2 millimeters. The tissue mean stress capacity under tension was 4.1 +/- 1.9 x 10(6) pascals with a range of 2.5 to 6.5 x 10(6) pascals. An analysis was made of the impact of intra-abdominal pressure at five possible sites of failure in the aponeurotic repair. Established values of suture bite tissue tear resistance and our values of external oblique aponeurosis stress tension were used to calculate the resistance of the aponeurotic repair to established values of intra-abdominal pressure. The maximum reported intra-abdominal pressure is 26.6 kilopascals. In this series, the largest reconstructed inguinal floor was 5 square centimeters and supported a load of 1,360 grams force. There was a safety margin of 2.4 against a failure of tissue of minimal thickness (0.2 millimeter) in the aponeurotic repairs when subjected to maximum intra-abdominal pressure. With average thickness of specimen (0.45 millimeter) there was a safety margin of 5.4. The 2-0 polypropylene suture had a requirement of 1,590 grams force maximum knot pull strength, which was much greater than our measured tensions. The added suture-line tension created by the assumed intra-abdominal pressure with sutures spaced one-half centimeter apart was calculated to be 65 grams force. This figure is well below the reported tensions of 5,300 and 9,100 grams force resisting tissue pull through failure in the external oblique and transversus aponeurosis, respectively. The transversalis aponeurosis component of the repair had shown in the proceeding study a tensile strength greater than the external oblique aponeurosis, and by analogy, a competence to resist intra-abdominal pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8193752

Lipton, S; Estrin, J; Nathan, I

1994-06-01

166

Porcine incisional hernia model: Evaluation of biologically derived intact extracellular matrix repairs  

PubMed Central

We compared fascial wounds repaired with non-cross-linked intact porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix versus primary closure in a large-animal hernia model. Incisional hernias were created in Yucatan pigs and repaired after 3 weeks via open technique with suture-only primary closure or intraperitoneally placed porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix. Progressive changes in mechanical and biological properties of porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix and repair sites were assessed. Porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix–repaired hernias of additional animals were evaluated 2 and 4 weeks post incision to assess porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix regenerative potential and biomechanical changes. Hernias repaired with primary closure showed substantially more scarring and bone hyperplasia along the incision line. Mechanical remodeling of porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix was noted over time. Porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix elastic modulus and ultimate tensile stress were similar to fascia at 6 weeks. The biology of porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix–reinforced animals was more similar to native abdominal wall versus that with primary closure. In this study, porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix–reinforced repairs provided more complete wound healing response compared with primary closure. PMID:24555008

Delossantos, Aubrey I; Rodriguez, Neil L; Patel, Paarun; Franz, Michael G; Wagner, Christopher T

2013-01-01

167

Repair of ventral hernias in morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass should not be deferred  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment of ventral hernias in patients who present for weight loss surgery. Methods: Medical records of consecutive morbidly obese patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y (LRYGB) gastric bypass with a secondary diagnosis of ventral hernia were reviewed. Only patients who were beyond 6 months of follow-up were included. Results: The study population was

G. M. Eid; S. G. Mattar; G. Hamad; D. R. Cottam; J. L. Lord; A. Watson; M. Dallal; P. R. Schauer

2004-01-01

168

A New Proposal for Learning Curve of TEP Inguinal Hernia Repair: Ability to Complete Operation Endoscopically as a First Phase of Learning Curve  

PubMed Central

Background. The exact nature of learning curve of totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia and the number required to master this technique remain controversial. Patients and Methods. We present a retrospective review of a single surgeon experience on patients who underwent totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. Results. There were 42 hernias (22 left- and 20 right-sided) in 39 patients with a mean age of 48.8 ± 15.1 years. Indirect, direct, and combined hernias were present in 18, 12, and 12 cases, respectively. The mean operative time was 55.1 ± 22.8 minutes. Peritoneal injury occurred in 9 cases (21.4%). Conversion to open surgery was necessitated in 7 cases (16.7%). After grouping of all patients into two groups as cases between 1–21 and 22–42, it was seen that the majority of peritoneal injuries (7 out of 9, 77.8%, P = 0.130) and all conversions (P = 0.001) occurred in the first 21 cases. Conclusions. Learning curve of totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair can be divided into two consequent steps: immediate and late. At least 20 operations are required for gaining anatomical knowledge and surgical pitfalls based on the ability to perform this operation without conversion during immediate phase. PMID:24864207

Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Basak, Fatih; Acar, Aylin

2014-01-01

169

Outcomes after a Decade of Laparoscopic Giant Paraesophageal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Laparoscopic repair of giant paraesophageal hernia (GPEH) is a complex operation requiring significant laparoscopic expertise. Our objective was to compare our current approach and outcomes with LRGPEH to our previous experience. METHODS A retrospective review of patients undergoing non-emergent LRGPEH, stratified by early and current era (1/1997–6/2003 and 7/2003–6/2008) was performed. Surgeon credentialing required a minimally invasive surgical fellowship and/or careful proctoring prior to independent LRGPEH. We evaluated clinical outcomes, barium esophagram and quality-of-life (QoL). RESULTS LRGPEH was performed in 662 patients (median age 70, range 19–92); median percent of herniated stomach 70% (range 30–100%). Over time, use of Collis gastroplasty decreased (86% to 53%) as did crural mesh reinforcement (17% to 12%). Current era patients were 50% more likely to have a Charlson comorbidity index score >3. Common complications included pleural effusion (56/652; 9%) and pneumonia (29/653; 4%). Thirty-day mortality was 1.7% (11/662). Mortality and complication rates were stable over time, despite increasing comorbid disease in the current patient cohort. Post-operative GERD-health-related QoL scores were available for 489 patients (30-month median follow-up) with “Good” to “Excellent” results in 90% (438/489). Radiographic recurrence (15.7%) was not associated with symptom recurrence. Reoperation occurred in 3.2% (21/662). CONCLUSIONS Over time, we have obtained significant minimally invasive experience and refined our approach to LRGPEH. Perioperative morbidity and mortality remain low, despite increased comorbid disease in the current patient cohort. LRGPEH provided excellent patient satisfaction and symptom improvement, even with small radiographic recurrences. Reoperation rates were comparable to the best open series. PMID:20004917

Luketich, James D.; Nason, Katie S.; Christie, Neil A.; Pennathur, Arjun; Jobe, Blair A.; Landreneau, Rodney J.; Schuchert, Matthew J.

2009-01-01

170

Integrating a novel shape memory polymer into surgical meshes to improve device performance during laparoscopic hernia surgery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

About 600,000 hernia repair surgeries are performed each year. The use of laparoscopic minimally invasive techniques has become increasingly popular in these operations. Use of surgical mesh in hernia repair has shown lower recurrence rates compared to other repair methods. However in many procedures, placement of surgical mesh can be challenging and even complicate the procedure, potentially leading to lengthy operating times. Various techniques have been attempted to improve mesh placement, including use of specialized systems to orient the mesh into a specific shape, with limited success and acceptance. In this work, a programmed novel Shape Memory Polymer (SMP) was integrated into commercially available polyester surgical meshes to add automatic unrolling and tissue conforming functionalities, while preserving the intrinsic structural properties of the original surgical mesh. Tensile testing and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was performed on four different SMP formulas to identify appropriate mechanical properties for surgical mesh integration. In vitro testing involved monitoring the time required for a modified surgical mesh to deploy in a 37°C water bath. An acute porcine model was used to test the in vivo unrolling of SMP integrated surgical meshes. The SMP-integrated surgical meshes produced an automated, temperature activated, controlled deployment of surgical mesh on the order of several seconds, via laparoscopy in the animal model. A 30 day chronic rat model was used to test initial in vivo subcutaneous biocompatibility. To produce large more clinical relevant sizes of mesh, a mold was developed to facilitate manufacturing of SMP-integrated surgical mesh. The mold is capable of manufacturing mesh up to 361 cm2, which is believed to accommodate the majority of clinical cases. Results indicate surgical mesh modified with SMP is capable of laparoscopic deployment in vivo, activated by body temperature, and possesses the necessary strength and biocompatibility to function as suitable ventral hernia repair mesh, while offering a reduction in surgical operating time and improving mesh placement characteristics. Future work will include ball-burst tests similar to ASTM D3787-07, direct surgeon feedback studies, and a 30 day chronic porcine model to evaluate the SMP surgical mesh in a realistic hernia repair environment, using laparoscopic techniques for typical ventral hernia repair.

Zimkowski, Michael M.

171

Early recurrence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia is higher after thoracoscopic than open repair: a single institutional study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Experience in thoracoscopic congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) repair has expanded, yet efficacy equal to that of open repair has not been demonstrated. In spite of reports suggesting higher recurrent hernia rates after thoracoscopic repair, this approach has widely been adopted into practice. We report a large, single institutional experience with thoracoscopic CDH repair with special attention to recurrent hernia rates. Methods We reviewed the records of neonates with unilateral CDH repaired between January 2006 and February 2010 at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital. Completely thoracoscopic repairs were compared to open repairs of the same period. In addition, successful thoracoscopic repairs were compared with thoracoscopic repairs that developed recurrence. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U and Fisher exact tests. Results Thirty-five neonates underwent attempted thoracoscopic repair, with 26 completed. Concurrently, 19 initially open CDH repairs were performed. Preoperatively, patients in the open repair group required more ventilatory support than the thoracoscopic group. Recurrence was higher after thoracoscopic repair (23% vs 0%; P = .032). In comparing successful thoracoscopic repairs to those with recurrence, none of the factors analyzed were predictive of recurrence. Conclusions Early recurrence of hernia is higher in thoracoscopic CDH repairs than in open repairs. Technical factors and a steep learning curve for thoracoscopy may account for the higher recurrence rates, but not patient severity of illness. In an already-tenuous patient population, performing the repair thoracoscopically with a higher risk of recurrence may not be advantageous. PMID:21763826

Gander, Jeffrey W.; Fisher, Jason C.; Gross, Erica R.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Cowles, Robert A.; Aspelund, Gudrun; Stolar, Charles J.H.; Kuenzler, Keith A.

2015-01-01

172

Outcome of abdominal wall hernia repair with biologic mesh: Permacol™ versus Strattice™.  

PubMed

The use of biologic mesh in abdominal wall operations has gained popularity despite a paucity of outcome data. Numerous biologic products are available with virtually no clinical comparison studies. A retrospective study was conducted to compare patients who underwent abdominal wall hernia repair with Permacol™ (crosslinked porcine dermis) and Strattice™ (noncrosslinked porcine dermis). Of 270 reviewed patients, 195 were implanted with Permacol™ and 75 with Strattice™. Ventral hernia repairs comprised the majority (85% for Permacol, 97% for Strattice™). Postoperative infection rate was lower in the Strattice™ group (5 vs 21%, P < 0.01). In the Permacol™ group only, the overall complication rates were significantly higher in patients with infected versus clean wounds (55 vs 35%, P < 0.05) and in obese patients (body mass index 40 kg/m(2) or greater [57 vs 34%], P < 0.01). Short-term complication and recurrence rates were higher when mesh was used as a fascial bridge: 51 versus 28 per cent for Permacol™, 58 versus 20 per cent for Strattice™. The hernia recurrence was similar in both groups. In this review of patients undergoing abdominal hernia repair with biologic mesh, Strattice™ mesh was associated with a lower short-term complication rate compared with Permacol™, but the hernia recurrence rate was similar. PMID:25264647

Cheng, Amy W; Abbas, Maher A; Tejirian, Talar

2014-10-01

173

Giant Inguinoscrotal Hernia Repaired by Lichtensteins Technique Without Loss of Domain -A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Giant inguinal hernia is a formidable surgical problem. It is defined as inguinal hernia extending up to mid thigh or below in standing position. Giant inguinal hernia is usually associated with compromised quality of life due to sexual discomfort and constant weight bearing. It is a challenge for the operating surgeon since it is rare. It may require multistage repair with recurrence being common. A 45-year-old male patient presented with Giant inguinal hernia and compromised quality of life due to pain and sexual discomfort. Lichtenstein’s polypropylene mesh repair was done after reducing the sac contents (omentum and transverse colon) with partial omentectomy. There was no loss of intra-abdominal domain. Postoperative period was uneventful. In literature many techniques are available to increase the intra-abdominal cavity (a) Creating progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum (b) Creation of ventral wall defect (c) surgical debulking of hernia contents. Recurrence is prevented by reconstruction of the abdominal wall using Marlex mesh and a Tensor fasciae lata flap. Laparoscopic repair is associated with more recurrence. Lichtenstein’s technique is one of the preferred treatments. PMID:25386483

HN, Dinesh; N, Shreyas

2014-01-01

174

Giant inguinoscrotal hernia repaired by lichtensteins technique without loss of domain -a case report.  

PubMed

Giant inguinal hernia is a formidable surgical problem. It is defined as inguinal hernia extending up to mid thigh or below in standing position. Giant inguinal hernia is usually associated with compromised quality of life due to sexual discomfort and constant weight bearing. It is a challenge for the operating surgeon since it is rare. It may require multistage repair with recurrence being common. A 45-year-old male patient presented with Giant inguinal hernia and compromised quality of life due to pain and sexual discomfort. Lichtenstein's polypropylene mesh repair was done after reducing the sac contents (omentum and transverse colon) with partial omentectomy. There was no loss of intra-abdominal domain. Postoperative period was uneventful. In literature many techniques are available to increase the intra-abdominal cavity (a) Creating progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum (b) Creation of ventral wall defect (c) surgical debulking of hernia contents. Recurrence is prevented by reconstruction of the abdominal wall using Marlex mesh and a Tensor fasciae lata flap. Laparoscopic repair is associated with more recurrence. Lichtenstein's technique is one of the preferred treatments. PMID:25386483

Hn, Dinesh; Kumar Cd, Jagadish; N, Shreyas

2014-09-01

175

Abdominal wall reconstruction with components separation and mesh reinforcement in complex hernia repair  

PubMed Central

Background Abdominal closure in the presence of enterocutaneous fistula, stoma or infection can be challenging. A single-surgeon’s experience of performing components separation abdominal reconstruction and reinforcement with mesh in the difficult abdomen is presented. Methods Medical records from patients undergoing components separation and reinforcement with hernia mesh at Royal Liverpool Hospital from 2009 to 2012 were reviewed. Patients were classified by the Ventral Hernia Working Group (VHWG) grading system. Co-morbidities, previous surgeries, specific type of reconstruction technique, discharge date, complications and hernia recurrence were recorded. Results Twenty-three patients’ (15 males, 8 females) notes were reviewed. Median age was 57 years (range 20-76 years). Median follow-up at the time of review was 17 months (range 2-48 months). There were 13 grade III hernias and 10 grade IV hernias identified. Synthetic mesh was placed to reinforce the abdomen in 6 patients, cross-linked porcine dermis was used in 3, and a Biodesign® Hernia Graft was placed in 14. Complications included wound infection (13%), superficial wound dehiscence (22%), seroma formation (22%) and stoma complications (9%). To date, hernias have recurred in 3 patients (13%). Conclusions Components separation and reinforcement with biological mesh is a successful technique in the grade III and IV abdomen with acceptable rate of recurrence and complications. PMID:24886111

2014-01-01

176

Sports Hernia Treatment  

PubMed Central

Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

2013-01-01

177

Comparison of the outcomes between laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair and prolene hernia system for inguinal hernia; review of one surgeon's experience  

PubMed Central

Purpose To compare the outcomes between laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) repair and prolene hernia system (PHS) repair for inguinal hernia. Methods A retrospective analysis of 237 patients scheduled for laparoscopic TEP or PHS repair of groin hernia from 2005 to 2009 was performed. Results The mean age was 52.3 years in TEP group and 55.7 years in PHS group. Of 119 TEP cases, 98 were indirect inguinal hernia, 15 direct type, 5 femoral hernia and 1 complex hernia; Of 118 PHS cases, 100 indirect, 18 direct type. All in TEP group were performed under general anesthesia and 64% of PHS group were performed under spinal or epidural anesthesia. Preoperatively, 10 cases of recurrent inguinal hernia were involved in our study (4 in TEP, 6 in PHS group). The mean operative time was similar in both groups (74.8 in TEP, 71.2 in PHS group), however mean hospital stay (1.6 days in TEP, 3.2 days in PHS group, P = 0.018) and mean usage of analgesics (0.54 times in TEP, 2.03 times in PHS group, P < 0.01), complications (36 cases in TEP, 6 cases in PHS group, P < 0.01) showed statistical differences. There is only 1 case of postoperative recurrence inguinal hernia in PHS group but it has no statistical significance (P = 0.314). Conclusion Compared to PHS repair, laparoscopic TEP repair has some advantages; shorter hospital stay, less frequent need of analgesics; as well as more postoperative complications such as hematoma, seroma, scrotal swelling. PMID:22324045

Choi, Yoon Young; Han, Sun Wook; Bae, Sang Ho; Kim, Sung Yong; Hur, Kyung Yul

2012-01-01

178

[Urological surgical effect of the repair of inguinal hernia using bilateral subperitoneal prosthetic mesh].  

PubMed

In view of the increasing frequency of using subperitoneal bilateral prosthesis for inguinal hernia repairs, urologists should be aware of the genitourinary implications of this procedure: risk of infection due to potentially septic procedures on bladder or prostate, postoperative genitourinary complications, interval before subsequent trans-prosthetic surgical incision, operative tactical outcomes of subperitoneal pelvic fibrosis. PMID:1867466

Houdelette, P; Dumotier, J; Berthod, N; Peyrottes, A

1991-01-01

179

Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials comparing open and laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The aim was to conduct a meta-analysis of the randomized evidence to determine the relative merits of laparoscopic (LIHR) and open (OIHR) inguinal hernia repair. Methods: A search of the Medline, Embase, Science Citation Index, Current Contents and PubMed databases identified all randomized clinical trials that compared OIHR and LIHR and were published in the English language between January

M. A. Memon; N. J. Cooper; B. Memon; M. I. Memon; K. R. Abrams

2003-01-01

180

Ventral hernia repair using allogenic acellular dermal matrix in a swine model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background This study was designed to assess the long-term efficacy of allogenic acellular dermal matrix (ADM) used as an interpositional graft for ventral hernia repair in a swine model. Methods We created 12×4-cm full-thickness abdominal wall defects in 22 Yucatan miniature pigs. The defect was repaired with either two 6×4-cm pieces of AlloDerm (acellular dermal matrix processed from pig skin

R. P. Silverman; E. N. Li; L. H. Holton; K. T. Sawan; N. H. Goldberg

2004-01-01

181

Inguinal hernia  

PubMed Central

Introduction The main risk factors for inguinal hernia are male sex and increasing age. Complications of inguinal hernia include strangulation, intestinal obstruction, and infarction. Recurrence can occur after surgery. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of elective treatments for primary unilateral, primary bilateral, and recurrent inguinal hernia in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 24 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: expectant management, open mesh repair, open suture repair, totally extraperitoneal (TEP) laparoscopic repair, and transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) laparoscopic repair. PMID:19445744

2008-01-01

182

Incisional hernia through iliac crest defects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the iliac crest ist the most common site from which autogenous bone grafts are obtained, complications are surprisingly rare. One of these is incisional hernia through the resulting bony defect. Occasionally, the herniated contents may proceed to obstruction or strangulation and require emergency surgery. Elective repair of such hernias is advisable in order to avoid such complications. Attention to

M. M. Hamad; S. A. Majeed

1989-01-01

183

A Comparative Study between Modified Bassini’s Repair and Lichtenstein Mesh Repair (LMR) of Inguinal Hernias in Rural Population  

PubMed Central

Background: Bassini’s repair and the Lichtenstein’s tension free mesh hernioplasty are commonly used hernia repair techniques and yet there is no unison as to which is the best technique. Our hospital being in a rural setup and catering to majority of poor patients who are daily wagers, open hernia repairs are commonly done. This study was undertaken to compare the technique and post-operative course so as to determine the best suitable of the two procedures for them. Materials and Methods: A comparative randomized study was conducted on a total of 70 patients with inguinal hernia and were operated upon by either of technique and followed up. Outcome of both the techniques were analyzed and compared with other similar studies. Results: Study involved 35 each of Modified Bassini’s Repair (MBR) and Lichtenstein’s Mesh Repair (LMR), over a period of 18 months. MBR took more operating time than LMR. Commonest complication in both the groups was seroma formation. There were two recurrences in the MBR group and none in LMR group. Conclusion: LMR was comparatively better than MBR due to its simplicity, less dissection and early ambulation in the post-operative period and with no recurrence, in our study. PMID:24701491

N., Naveen; R., Srinath

2014-01-01

184

Hernias  

MedlinePLUS

... may induce hernias: obesity or sudden weight gain lifting heavy objects diarrhea or constipation persistent coughing or ... prevent constipation and straining. Be careful when weight lifting or lifting heavy objects. Make sure you lift ...

185

Case report and review of lumbar hernia.  

PubMed

Lumbar hernias are uncommon and about 300 cases have been reported till date. They commonly occur due to trauma, surgery and infection. They are increasingly being reported after motor vehicle collision injuries. However, spontaneous lumbar hernias are rare and are reported infrequently. It is treated with different surgical approaches and methods. We report a case of primary spontaneous lumbar hernia which was repaired by transperitonial laparoscopic approach using Vypro (polypropylene/polyglactin) mesh and covered with a peritoneal flap. PMID:25555145

Walgamage, Thilan B; Ramesh, B S; Alsawafi, Yaqoob

2015-01-01

186

Laparoscopic repair of incisional and ventral hernias with the new type of meshes: randomized control trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction Laparoscopic incisional and ventral hernia repair (LIVHR) was first reported by Le Blanc and Booth in 1993. Many studies are available in the literature that have shown that laparoscopic repair of incisional and ventral hernia is preferred over open repair because of lower recurrence rates (less than 10%), less wound morbidity, less pain, and early return to work. Aim To identify the long-term outcomes between the different types of meshes and two techniques of mesh fixation, i.e., tacks (method Double crown) and transfascial polypropylene sutures. Material and methods A total of 92 patients underwent LIVHR at our department between January 2009 and August 2012. The hernias were umbilical in 26 patients, paraumbilical in 15 patients and incisional in 51 patients. All patients admitted for LIVHR were randomized to either group I (tacker fixation of ePTFE meshes) or group II (suture fixation of meshes with nitinol frame) using computer-generated random numbers with block randomization and sealed envelopes for concealed allocation. Results The mean mesh fixation time was significantly higher in the tacker fixation group (117 ±15 min vs. 72 ±6 min, p < 0.01). There were no conversions in either group. The median postoperative hospital stay was 3.5 ±1.5 days. All patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, 12 and every 6 months thereafter postoperatively. There were 5 recurrences in the study population. In group I there were 4 patients with recurrence, and only 1 patient in the group with meshes with a nitinol frame. Conclusions Meshes of the new generation with a nitinol framework can significantly improve laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. The fixation of these meshes is very simple using 3–4 transfascial sutures. The absence of shrinkage of these meshes makes the probability of recurrence minimal. Absence of tackers allows postoperative pain to be minimized. We consider that these new meshes can significantly improve laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. PMID:25097679

Grubnik, Aleksandra V.; Vorotyntseva, Kseniya O.

2014-01-01

187

Short- and long-term outcomes of incarcerated inguinal hernias repaired by Lichtenstein technique  

PubMed Central

Introduction The use of tension-free inguinal hernia repair techniques using commercially available implants is now rather common. However, it is widely accepted that the use of biomaterials should be limited to non-infected surgical fields. As such, most current studies pertain to the application of various implants during the surgical repair of uncomplicated hernias. Aim To compare the short- and long-term outcomes of incarcerated inguinal hernia repair using the Lichtenstein or Bassini technique. Material and methods Between 1997 and 2012, 107 patients were operated on an emergency basis due to the incarceration of inguinal hernias – 105 subjects were included for further analysis in our study. Results Postoperative complications were observed in 13 out of the 84 (15.5%) patients subjected to Lichtenstein repair. In 9 of these patients (10.7%), morbidity was associated with the surgical wound. In 2 cases (2.4%), a small inflammatory infiltration was observed and resolved within a few days. Serous fluid accumulation within the wound was observed in 3 patients (3.6%), but the fluid was successfully drained by puncture. Finally, hematoma formed in 4 cases (4.8%). In total, 4 complications (19%) were recorded in the group of 21 patients who were operated on with the Bassini technique. In 3 of these cases (14.3%), the complications were related to suppuration of the surgical wound. Conclusions Polypropylene mesh may be safely implanted during the repair of incarcerated hernia and this approach is reflected by satisfactory long-term outcomes. PMID:25097686

Wysocki, Andrzej; Strza?ka, Marcin; Budzy?ski, Piotr

2014-01-01

188

Is transverse abdominis plane block effective following local anesthetic infiltration in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair?  

PubMed Central

Background Transverse abdominis plane (TAP) block can be recommended as a multimodal method to reduce postoperative pain in laparoscopic abdominal surgery. However, it is unclear whether TAP block following local anesthetic infiltration is effective. We planned this study to evaluate the effectiveness of the latter technique in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair (TEP). Methods We randomly divided patients into two groups: the control group (n = 37) and TAP group (n = 37). Following the induction of general anesthesia, as a preemptive method, all of the patients were subjected to local anesthetic infiltration at the trocar sites, and the TAP group was subjected to ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block with 30 ml of 0.375% ropivacaine in addition before TEP. Pain was assessed in the recovery room and post-surgery at 4, 8, and 24 h. Additionally, during the postoperative 24 h, the total injected dose of analgesics and incidence of nausea were recorded. Results: On arrival in the recovery room, the pain score of the TAP group (4.33 ± 1.83) was found to be significantly lower than that of the control group (5.73 ± 2.04). However, the pain score was not significantly different between the TAP group and control group at 4, 8, and 24 h post-surgery. The total amounts of analgesics used in the TAP group were significantly less than in the control group. No significant difference was found in the incidence of nausea between the two groups. Conclusions TAP block following local infiltration had a clinical advantage only in the recovery room.

Kim, Mun Gyu; Ok, Si Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Se-Jin; Park, Sun Young; Yoo, Jae-Hwa; Cho, Ana; Hur, Kyung Yul; Kim, Myung Jin

2014-01-01

189

Inguinal Hernia and Airport Scanners: An Emerging Indication for Repair?  

PubMed Central

The use of advanced imaging technology at international airports is increasing in popularity as a corollary to heightened security concerns across the globe. Operators of airport scanners should be educated about common medical disorders such as inguinal herniae in order to avoid unnecessary harassment of travelers since they will encounter these with increasing frequency. PMID:24368923

Cawich, Shamir O.; Maharaj, Ravi; Dan, Dilip

2013-01-01

190

Laparoscopic mesh repair of a Morgagni hernia using the double-crown technique: A case study.  

PubMed

We report a case of Morgagni hernia in which the patient underwent laparoscopic mesh repair. A 65-year-old woman presented with an abnormal shadow in the right lower lung field on a routine medical checkup. CT showed that the transverse colon passed between the liver and abdominal wall, and herniated into the thoracic cavity. Simple closure was precluded by the large hernial orifice. We therefore performed laparoscopic repair using a Parietex Optimized Composite Mesh. The double-crown technique was used to fix the margin of the mesh to the region around the hernial orifice. Our procedure for repair of a Morgagni hernia with a large hernial orifice is safe and minimally invasive, and it may effectively prevent recurrence. PMID:25354379

Kaida, Takeshi; Ikeda, Atsushi; Shimoda, Hirofumi; Sako, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Hiroshi; Wada, Masahiro; Ikeda, Ken; Okusawa, Seijiro; Watanabe, Masahiko

2014-11-01

191

Medial Versus Traditional Approach to US-guided TAP Blocks for Open Inguinal Hernia Repair  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Abdominal Muscles/Ultrasonography; Adult; Ambulatory Surgical Procedures; Anesthetics, Local/Administration & Dosage; Ropivacaine/Administration & Dosage; Ropivacaine/Analogs & Derivatives; Hernia, Inguinal/Surgery; Humans; Nerve Block/Methods; Pain Measurement/Methods; Pain, Postoperative/Prevention & Control; Ultrasonography, Interventional

2012-04-30

192

Cholecystocutaneous fistula: an unusual complication of a para-umbilical hernia repair.  

PubMed

This case describes a 94-year-old woman who presented 2?years postsutured para-umbilical hernia repair with a painful black lump protruding through her scar with blood stained discharge. This was initially thought to be either ischaemic bowel secondary to strangulated incisional hernia or a large organised haematoma. An urgent CT scan was performed following which the patient passed two large calculi and bile-stained fluid spontaneously through the wound, making the diagnosis somewhat clearer. The scan revealed an incisional hernia containing the gallbladder and two large calculi at the skin surface and an incidental large caecal cancer with surrounding lymphadenopathy. Frail health and the incidental finding of a colon cancer rendered invasive surgical management inappropriate. Therefore, she was managed conservatively with antibiotics. A catheter was inserted into the fistula tract to allow free drainage and alleviate pressure-related symptoms. The patient was discharged following a multidisciplinary team discussion. PMID:24862413

Dixon, Steven; Sharma, Mitesh; Holtham, Stephen

2014-01-01

193

Conventional mesh repair of a giant iatrogenic bilateral diaphragmatic hernia with an enterothorax  

PubMed Central

Purpose Diaphragmatic hernias (DHs) are divided into congenital and acquired hernias, most of which are congenital. Among acquired DHs, up to 80% are left-sided, only a few iatrogenic DHs have been reported, and bilateral hernias are extremely rare. For diagnostic reasons, many DHs are overlooked by ultrasonography or X-ray and are only recognized at a later stage when complications occur. Methods In 2009, we performed three partial diaphragm replacements in our clinic for repairing DHs using a PERMACOL™ implant. Results As all patients had uneventful postoperative courses and the clinical outcomes were very good, we present one special case of a 65-year-old male with a giant iatrogenic bilateral DH with an enterothorax. Conclusion We see a good indication for diaphragm replacements by using a PERMACOL™ implant for fixing especially DHs with huge hernial gaps and in cases with fragile tissue. PMID:24600251

Lingohr, Philipp; Galetin, Thomas; Vestweber, Boris; Matthaei, Hanno; Kalff, Jörg C; Vestweber, Karl-Heinz

2014-01-01

194

The great debate: open or thoracoscopic repair for oesophageal atresia or diaphragmatic hernia.  

PubMed

Controversy exists over the best method and technique of repair of oesophageal atresia and diaphragmatic hernia. Open surgical repairs have a long established history of over 60 years of experience. Set against this has been a series of successful thoracoscopic repairs of both congenital anomalies reported over the past decade. This review was based upon a four-handed debate on the merits and weaknesses of the two contrasting surgical philosophies and reviews existing literature, techniques, complications, and importantly outcome and results. PMID:25638610

Davenport, Mark; Rothenberg, Steven S; Crabbe, David C G; Wulkan, Mark L

2015-02-01

195

Chronic Pain after Laparoscopic Transabdominal Preperitoneal Hernia Repair: A Randomized Comparison of Light and Extralight Titanized Polypropylene Mesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The aim of this prospective, randomized, single-blinded clinical trial was to compare the incidence of chronic pain after\\u000a laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernia repair (TAPP) using a 35-g\\/m2 titanized polypropylene mesh and a 16-g\\/m2 titanized polypropylene mesh. The reported incidence of chronic pain in patients who underwent laparoscopic hernia repair\\u000a is a serious problem. The techniques of dissection, mesh fixation, and

Stefan Schopf; Thomas von Ahnen; Martin von Ahnen; Hans Schardey

2011-01-01

196

From ancient to contemporary times: a concise history of incisional hernia repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  This historical review explores the origins of incisional hernia surgery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods   Resources from each significant historical time period were reviewed, namely ancient times, the Greco-Roman period, the Middle\\u000a Ages and the dawn of the surgeon anatomist, and the modern era.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Although incisional hernias only started to be widely reported in the literature in the early twentieth century, an awareness\\u000a of

D. L. Sanders; A. N. Kingsnorth

197

Bilateral Morgagni Hernia: Primary Repair without a Mesh  

PubMed Central

We present a case of bilateral Morgagni hernia in a 68-year-old male with an intermittent history of progressive onset of breath shortness and occasional cardiac arrhythmias. Diagnosis was made by clinical examination and the findings in a plain chest radiograph and was confirmed by computed tomography scan. The patient was operated electively and subjected to a transabdominal approach. A bilateral subcostal incision revealed a large right side anterior diaphragmatic defect with a hernia containing the ascending colon, the majority of the transverse colon and a huge amount of omentum. Also a second smaller defect was found on the left side with no hernia inside. After large bowel and omentum had been taken down to the peritoneal cavity, both defects were primarily closed using interrupted nylon sutures without the use of a mesh. The patient recovered very well, had an uneventful postoperative course and was released on the 5th postoperative day. 15-month follow-up failed to reveal any signs of recurrence. PMID:21490893

Papanikolaou, Vassilios; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios; Margari, Paraskevi; Ouzounidis, Nikolaos; Antoniadis, Nikolaos; Giakoustidis, Alexander; Kardasis, Dimitrios; Takoudas, Dimitrios

2008-01-01

198

A case of incarcerated umbilical hernia in an adult treated by laparoscopic surgery.  

PubMed

A 42-year-old, obese woman was admitted to our hospital 3 h after the sudden development of abdominal pain. Her umbilical region was swollen and she was diagnosed with incarceration of an umbilical hernia by computed tomography. Although we tried, we were unable to reduce the hernia with a manipulative procedure. We decided to perform an emergency laparoscopy. Once general anesthesia was induced, we achieved hernia reduction. From a laparoscopic view, the portion of strangulated small intestine was neither necrotic nor perforated. The size of the hernial orifice was ?2 × 2 cm, and thus, we selected a 12 × 12 cm composite mesh to cover the hernia defect by at least 5 cm in all directions. The surgical procedure was uneventful and the total operation time was 112 min. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged on postoperative day 9. She remains free of recurrence 20 months after surgery. PMID:25672973

Tsushimi, Takaaki; Mori, Hirohito; Nagase, Takashi; Harada, Takasuke; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

2015-01-01

199

Symposium on the management of inguinal hernias: 4. The Shouldice technique: a canon in hernia repair  

PubMed Central

Controversy exists on the merits of the various approaches to inguinal repair. Evolution of the classic open repair has culminated in the Shouldice repair. Challenges from newcomers, namely, tension-free repair and laparoscopy, are being examined. These two techniques have a number of disadvantages: the presence of foreign bodies (prostheses) and their implication in cases of infection; the cost of prosthetic material, which is no longer negligible (particularly with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene); and problems of safety in that the laparoscopic approach is no longer a dependable asset except in the hands of a highly specialized and dextrous operator. Still, complications occur with laparoscopic repair that should not be associated with a surgical procedure that is considered benign, safe and cost-effective. Surgeons must recognize the pertinent facts and decide according to their conscience which method of repair to use. PMID:9194781

Bendavid, Robert

1997-01-01

200

Experience with delayed repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a European center  

Microsoft Academic Search

In high-risk patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), we conducted a strategy of delayed repair following preoperative stabilization, including ECMO if necessary. From January 1991 to July 1992, preoperative ECMO treatment was delivered to 6 out of 14 high-risk patients with CDH. In this study, we report our experience with this policy of preoperative stabilization in six ECMO-treated patients in

F. vd. Staak; W. Geven; B. Oeseburg; C. Festen

1993-01-01

201

Repair of an inguinoscrotal hernia containing the urinary bladder: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Cases of patients with inguinoscrotal hernia containing the urinary bladder are very rare. These patients usually present with frequent episodes of urinary tract infection, difficulty in walking, pollakisuria and difficulty in initiating micturition because of incarceration of the urinary bladder into the scrotum. Case presentation We describe the case of an 80-year-old Caucasian man with an incarcerated urinary bladder into the scrotum who underwent surgical repair with mesh. Conclusions Diagnosis of such cases often requires not only clinical examination but also specialized radiological examinations to show the ectopic position of the urinary bladder. Surgical repair in these patients is a real challenge for surgeons. PMID:22448739

2012-01-01

202

Immediate and long-term outcomes of Lichtenstein and Kugel patch operations for inguinal hernia repair  

PubMed Central

Aim The aim of this retrospective study is to compare the immediate and long-term postoperative outcomes of Lichtenstein and Kugel repair of inguinal hernia. Methods From 1996 to 2006, 219 consecutive patients underwent inguinal hernia repair - 92 using a standard Lichtenstein repair and 127 with a Kugel patch. Patient characteristics, length of postoperative hospital stay and complication rates were assessed by retrospective review of the notes. Recurrence and chronic groin pain were assessed by postal questionnaire (with a follow up by telephone interview for non-responders). Patients with symptoms or an apparent groin swelling were reassessed by one of the authors (BD). Results There were 214 men and 5 women. Patients ranged from 18 to 87 years of age (mean 54 years). Seventy two percent of postal questionnaires were returned. Following telephone calls the overall response rate was 80%. The mean follow up period was 60 months (range: 9 – 132 months). Immediate complications were similar in both groups. The recurrence rates were 1.1% for Lichtenstein repair and 6.3% for Kugel patch (p= 0.09). None of the patients in the Lichtenstein group and 1.6% of patients in Kugel patch group complained of severe chronic pain in inguinal region. Conclusion There was no significant difference in the immediate complication rates between the two groups. Although recurrence and chronic groin pain rates are higher with Kugel repair, this was not statistically significant. PMID:19568448

Dasari, Bobby; Grant, Lorraine; Irwin, Terry

2009-01-01

203

Chronic pain following inguinal hernia repair: assessment of quality of life and medico-legal aspects.  

PubMed

The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) of a group of patients who underwent tension-free inguinal hernia repair in light of the possible medicolegal implications. We conducted a retrospective study on the QoL of patients who underwent inguinal hernioplasty. One hundred and fifty patients who answered the SF-36 questionnaire were included in the study. Twenty-six (17.3%) had chronic pain, 18 (12%), sensory deficits, and 106 (70.6%) did not complain of any symptoms. There was no a significant deterioration in QoL compared to the reference population. In the group with chronic pain, 10 patients (38.4%) reported being very limited in performing "physically demanding activities"; 18 (69.2%) reported a deficit of performance in activities of daily living; 8 (30.7%) complained of a reduction of time spent at work because of emotional disorders. In one case the pain was particularly severe and required surgical treatment. The answers obtained through the questionnaire show that tension-free hernioplasty does not degrade patients'QoL. However in the group of patients with chronic pain examined one year after surgery, QoL had deteriorated so much that it affected the employment sphere and the social and relational sphere. Although there is a relatively low incidence and frequency of problems relating to chronic pain following inguinal hernioplasty, chronic pain can sometimes have serious effects on QoL and socio-economic and legal implications. PMID:23857324

Calò, Pietro Giorgio; Pittau, Maria Rita; Contu, Paolo; D'Aloja, Ernesto; Nicolosi, Angelo; Demontis, Roberto

2013-01-01

204

Tension-free mesh hernia repair: review of 1098 cases using local anaesthesia in a day unit.  

PubMed Central

The technical problems, early complications and short-term results of a tension-free method of 1098 inguinal hernia repairs in 1017 patients have been assessed. The operation was conducted under local anaesthesia, and the inguinal canal floor was reinforced by a polypropylene mesh. Patients were discharged home the same day. There was no mortality, no urinary complications and one case of venous thrombosis. There was one recurrence after a primary hernia repair and two patients have developed recurrences after repair of a recurrent hernia. The overall sepsis rate was 0.9% and 1% of patients had persistent neuralgia. No prosthesis required removal. In all, 49.6% of office workers returned to work in 1 week or less and 61% of manual workers in 2 weeks or less. The major advantages of the tension-free mesh repair under local anaesthesia are simplicity, substantial cost savings and very low rates of complications. PMID:7574324

Kark, A. E.; Kurzer, M.; Waters, K. J.

1995-01-01

205

Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair With a Novel Hernia Mesh Incorporating a Nitinol Alloy Frame Compared With a Standard Lightweight Polypropylene Mesh.  

PubMed

Background. Numerous mesh materials are available for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. The role of fixation of mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair remains controversial. Mesh materials have been engineered to anatomically conform to the pelvis to potentially reduce or eliminate the need for fixation. This study evaluates the outcomes of laparoscopic inguinal hernia utilizing a device consisting of a lightweight polypropylene mesh with a nitinol frame (Rebound HRD) compared with repair with lightweight polypropylene mesh with permanent tack fixation. Methods. A prospective randomized trial evaluating the outcomes of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with a lightweight polypropylene mesh with a nitinol frame (N-LWM) compared with standard lightweight polypropylene mesh (LWM) was conducted. Randomization was performed at an N-LWM to LWM ratio of 2:1. Repairs were standardized to a laparoscopic extraperitoneal approach without fixation for N-LWM and titanium tack fixation for LWM repairs. Follow-up assessments were performed at 7 days, 6 months, and 1 year. Outcome measures include visual analog pain scale (VAS), Short Form 36 (SF-36), Carolinas Comfort Scale (CCS), operative details, complications, and recurrences. Results. There were 47 patients that underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair and adhered to study protocol (31 N-LWM, 16 LWM). The groups did not differ significantly in age, body mass index, ethnicity, or employment. The N-LWM group had bilateral mesh placed in 51.6% and LWM 43.8% (P = .76). Operative duration was similar, 59.6 ± 23.1 minutes for LWM and 62.4 ± 26.7 minutes for N-LWM (P = .705) as was mesh handling time was 5.4 ± 3.1 minutes LWM versus 7.3 ± 3.9 minutes N-LWM (P = .053). VAS, CCS, and SF-36 survey results were similar between groups. There was one recurrence (0.03%) in the N-LWM group. Conclusions. Nitinol-framed lightweight polypropylene mesh may be safely used during laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with outcomes comparable to LWM at 1 year. N-LWM does not impact operating room time, mesh handling time, pain, recurrences, or complications. PMID:25392151

Bower, Curtis; Hazey, Jeffrey W; Jones, Edward L; Perry, Kyle A; Davenport, Daniel L; Roth, J Scott

2014-11-12

206

Danish Hernia Database recommendations for the management of inguinal and femoral hernia in adults.  

PubMed

The nationwide Danish Hernia Database, recording more than 10,000 inguinal and 400 femoral hernia repairs annually, provides a unique opportunity to present valid recommendations in the management of Danish patients with groin hernia. The cumulated data have been discussed at biannual meetings and guidelines have been approved by the Danish Surgical Society. Diagnosis of groin hernia is based on clinical examination. Ultrasonography, CT or MRI are rarely needed, while herniography is not recommended. In patients with indicative symptoms of hernia, but no detectable hernia, diagnostic laparoscopy may be an option. Once diagnosed, hernia repair is recommended in the presence of symptoms affecting daily life. In male patients with minimal or absent symptoms watchful waiting is recommended. In females, however, repair is recommended also in asymptomatic patients. In male patients with primary unilateral or bilateral groin hernia the preferred method is mesh repair, either at open surgery (Lichtenstein) or laparoscopically, irrespective of age. Conventional tension-producing methods like Bassini, McVay or Shouldice are no longer recommended in a routine elective setting. Whether repair should be done by open or laparoscopic technique, depends on local expertise, economical considerations and patient preference. Compared to the Lichtenstein operation laparoscopic repair is associated with less acute pain and faster recovery. Furthermore, available data suggest less chronic long-term pain after laparoscopic repair. In female patients laparoscopic repair is the recommended method. In patients with recurrent hernia laparoscopic repair is preferred in patients with a previous open repair, while patients with recurrence after laparoscopic repair should undergo open mesh repair. In open repair it is recommended to use a mesh secured with a nonabsorbable monofilament suture. In laparoscopic repair a mesh without a slit and with a minimum size of 15 by 10 cm is used. For mesh fixation absorbable or nonabsorbable tacks or glue can be used. Elective surgery for groin hernia should be performed in an outpatient setting, using cost-effective local anaesthesia in open mesh repair and general anaesthesia for laparoscopic repair. Spinal anaesthesia is not recommended. Routine prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated. In the early convalescence period there are no physical restrictions. These guidelines will also be available at the website for the Danish Hernia Database (www.herniedatabasen.dk). The guidelines will be updated when new substantial evidence becomes available. PMID:21299930

Rosenberg, Jacob; Bisgaard, Thue; Kehlet, Henrik; Wara, Pål; Asmussen, Torsten; Juul, Poul; Strand, Lasse; Andersen, Finn Heidmann; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

2011-02-01

207

Single-Port Parastomal Hernia Repair by Using 3-D Textile Implants  

PubMed Central

Background: Parastomal hernias (PSHs) are a frequent complication and remain a surgical challenge. We present a new option for single-port PSH repair with equilateral stoma relocation using preshaped, prosthetic 3-dimensional implants and flat mesh insertion in intraperitoneal onlay placement for additional augmentation of the abdominal wall. Methods: We describe our novel technique in detail and performed an analysis of prospectively collected data from patients who underwent single-port PSH repair, focusing on feasibility, conversions, and complications. Results: From September 2013 to January 2014, 9 patients with symptomatic PSHs were included. Two conversions to reduced-port laparoscopy using a second 3-mm trocar were required because of difficult adhesiolysis, dissection, and reduction of the hernia sac content. No major intra- or postoperative complications or reoperations were encountered. One patient incurred a peristomal wound healing defect that could be treated conservatively. Conclusion: We found that single-port PSH repair using preshaped, elastic 3-dimensional devices and additional flat mesh repair of the abdominal wall is feasible, safe, and beneficial, relating to optimal coverage of unstable stoma edges with wide overlap to all sides and simultaneous augmentation of the midline in the IPOM technique. The stoma relocation enables prolapse treatment and prevention. The features of a modular and rotatable multichannel port system offer benefits in clear dissection ongoing from a single port. Long-term follow-up data on an adequate number of patients are awaited to examine efficacy. PMID:25392655

Emmanuel, Klaus; Schrittwieser, Rudolf

2014-01-01

208

A clinical prediction rule for perioperative mortality and major morbidity after laparoscopic giant paraesophageal hernia repair  

PubMed Central

Objective In the current era, giant paraesophageal hernia repair by experienced minimally-invasive surgeons has excellent perioperative outcomes when performed electively. Nonelective repair, however, is associated with significantly greater morbidity and mortality, even when performed laparoscopically. We hypothesized that clinical prediction tools using pretreatment variables could be developed that would predict patient-specific risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Methods We assessed 980 patients who underwent giant paraesophageal hernia repair (1997-2010; 80% elective; 97% laparoscopic). The association between clinical predictor covariates, including demographics, comorbidity and urgency of operation, and risk for in-hospital or 30-day mortality and major morbidity was assessed. Using forward, stepwise logistic regression, clinical prediction models for mortality and major morbidity were developed. Results Urgency of operation was a significant predictor of mortality (elective 1.1% [9/778] versus nonelective 8% [16/199]; p<0.001) and major morbidity (elective 18% [143/781] versus nonelective 41% [81/199]; p<0.001). The most common adverse outcomes were pulmonary complications (n=199; 20%). A 4-covariate prediction model consisting of age 80 or greater, urgency of operation and two Charlson comorbidity index variables (congestive heart failure and pulmonary disease) provided discriminatory accuracy for postoperative mortality of 88% while a 5-covariate model (sex, age by decade, urgency of operation, congestive heart failure and pulmonary disease) for major postoperative morbidity was 68% predictive. Conclusions Predictive models using pretreatment patient characteristics can accurately predict mortality and major morbidity after giant paraesophageal hernia repair. After prospective validation, these models could provide patient-specific risk prediction, tailored for individual patient characteristics, and contribute to decision-making regarding surgical intervention. PMID:23312974

Ballian, Nikiforos; Luketich, James D.; Levy, Ryan M.; Awais, Omar; Winger, Dan; Weksler, Benny; Landreneau, Rodney J.; Nason, Katie S.

2014-01-01

209

Are current techniques of inguinal hernia repair optimal? A survey in the United Kingdom.  

PubMed Central

Data was collected on the techniques currently employed in adult inguinal hernia repair by means of a postal questionnaire to consultants in four Regional Health Authorities in England. Questionnaires were returned by 240 consultants (85%). This identified a considerable range in methods of repair, with a Moloney nylon darn being the sole method used by 35% of consultants, and the Shouldice technique, either alone or in combination with other methods, being used by 20%. Overall, 51% employ a subcuticular suture for skin closure, and traditional skin sutures are used by 31%. There was no association between consultant's date of qualification or subspecialty and type of repair. Consultants qualifying after 1969 are most likely to use a subcuticular suture. Some 14% of all consultants and 19% of those qualifying since 1969 employ a Shouldice procedure and a subcuticular suture. PMID:1759760

Morgan, M.; Reynolds, A.; Swan, A. V.; Beech, R.; Devlin, H. B.

1991-01-01

210

Influence of injection site for low-dose heparin on wound complication rates after inguinal hernia repair.  

PubMed Central

A high incidence of complications related to bleeding was observed after open prosthetic inguinal hernia repair. The site of injection of low-dose heparin into the abdominal wall was thought to be a possible causal factor for these complications. The wound complication rate after repair of primary unilateral inguinal hernias was recorded for 51 patients who had been given abdominal wall injections of heparin. Subsequently the injection site was changed to the upper limb in a further 63 patients and the incidence of wound complications recorded. A significantly higher incidence of haematomas and seromas was found in the abdominal wall injection group (39.2% vs 17.5%, P = 0.01). The role of low-dose heparin prophylaxis in inguinal hernia repair is discussed. We conclude that in those patients receiving heparin prophylaxis the injections should be given at a site remote from the operative area. PMID:9579130

Wright, D. M.; O'Dwyer, P. J.; Paterson, C. R.

1998-01-01

211

A Rare Case of Mesh Infection 3 Years After a Laparoscopic Totally Extraperitoneal (TEP) Inguinal Hernia Repair.  

PubMed

Late complications after a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair are extremely rare and have only recently entered into the literature. One such late complication is mesh infection, of which there have been a handful of cases reported in the literature. Mesh infections occurring many years after inguinal hernia repairs are not only of significance because they are not well documented in the literature, and the pathogenesis and risk factors contributing to their development are not well understood. This report details a rare case of mesh infection 3 years after a laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair, describes our management of the condition, highlights the current options for management, and attempts to define its pathophysiology. PMID:25187073

Jalilvand, Anahita; Sarker, Sharfi; Fisichella, Piero M

2014-09-01

212

Two cross-linked porcine dermal implants in a single patient undergoing hernia repair  

PubMed Central

A 50-year-old woman with a history of multiple recurrent incisional hernias and multiple comorbidities received two different porcine dermal implants during the same procedure due to the availability of products in stock. At 3.5?months following this procedure, the patient developed a secondary hernia inferior and lateral to the site of previous surgery. Both the implants were biopsied and sent for pathological evaluation. One implant was compliant and well integrated while the other was non-compliant and exhibited extensive foreign body reaction. In this case report, we examine the differences between the two porcine implants that may have caused them to react so differently in the same subject under the same conditions. PMID:23345480

Linz, Luke A; Burke, Leandra H; Miller, Lisa A

2013-01-01

213

Management of inguinal hernia in premature infants: 10-year experience  

PubMed Central

Aim: Debatable issues in the management of inguinal hernia in premature infants remain unresolved. This study reviews our experience in the management of inguinal hernia in premature infants. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart review of premature infants with inguinal hernia from 1999 to 2009. Infants were grouped into 2: Group 1 had repair (HR) just before discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and Group 2 after discharge. Results: Eighty four premature infants were identified. None of 23 infants in Group 1 developed incarcerated hernia while waiting for repair. Of the 61 infants in Group 2, 47 (77%) underwent day surgery repair and 14 were admitted for repair. At repair mean postconceptional age (PCA) in Group1 was 39.5 ± 3.05 weeks. Mean PCA in Group 2 was 66.5 ± 42.73 weeks for day surgery infants and 47.03 ± 8.87 weeks for admitted infants. None of the 84 infants had an episode of postoperative apnea. Five (5.9%) infants presented subsequently with metachronous contralateral hernia and the same number of infants had hernia recurrence. Conclusions: Delaying HR in premature infants until ready for discharge from the NICU allows for repair closer to term without increasing the risk of incarceration. Because of low occurrence of metachronous hernia contralateral inguinal exploration is not justified. Day surgery HR can be performed in former premature infant if PCA is >47 weeks without increasing postoperative complications. PMID:25552826

Crankson, Stanley John; Al Tawil, Khalil; Al Namshan, Mohammad; Al Jadaan, Saud; Baylon, Beverly Jane; Gieballa, Mutaz; Ahmed, Ibrahim Hakim

2015-01-01

214

Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Lysostaphin-Coated Hernia Repair Meshes?  

PubMed Central

Bacterial infections by antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains are among the most common postoperative complications in surgical hernia repair with synthetic mesh. Surface coating of medical devices/implants using antibacterial peptides and enzymes has recently emerged as a potentially effective method for preventing infections. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of hernia repair meshes coated by the antimicrobial enzyme lysostaphin at different initial concentrations. Lysostaphin was adsorbed on pieces of polypropylene (Ultrapro) mesh with binding yields of ?10 to 40% at different coating concentrations of between 10 and 500 ?g/ml. Leaching of enzyme from the surface of all the samples was studied in 2% (wt/vol) bovine serum albumin in phosphate-buffered saline buffer at 37°C, and it was found that less than 3% of adsorbed enzyme desorbed from the surface after 24 h of incubation. Studies of antibacterial activity against a cell suspension of S. aureus were performed using turbidity assay and demonstrated that the small amount of enzyme leaching from the mesh surface contributes to the lytic activity of the lysostaphin-coated samples. Colony counting data from the broth count (model for bacteria in wound fluid) and wash count (model for colonized bacteria) for the enzyme-coated samples showed significantly decreased numbers of CFU compared to uncoated samples (P < 0.05). A pilot in vivo study showed a dose-dependent efficacy of lysostaphin-coated meshes in a rat model of S. aureus infection. The antimicrobial activity of the lysostaphin-coated meshes suggests that such enzyme-leaching surfaces could be efficient at actively resisting initial bacterial adhesion and preventing subsequent colonization of hernia repair meshes. PMID:21709102

Satishkumar, Rohan; Sankar, Sriram; Yurko, Yuliya; Lincourt, Amy; Shipp, John; Heniford, B. Todd; Vertegel, Alexey

2011-01-01

215

Cost-effectiveness of extraperitoneal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair: a randomized comparison with conventional herniorrhaphy. Coala trial group.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair seems superior to open techniques with respect to short-term results. An issue yet to be studied in depth remains the cost-effectiveness of the procedure. As part of a multicenter randomized study in which >1000 patients were included, a cost-effectiveness analysis from a societal point of view was performed. METHODS: After informed consent, all resource costs, both in and outside the hospital, for patients between August 1994 and July 1995 were recorded prospectively. Actual costs were calculated in a standardized fashion according to international guidelines. The main measures used for the evaluation of inguinal hernia repair were the number of averted recurrences and quality of life measured with the Short Form 36 questionnaire. RESULTS: Resource costs were recorded for 273 patients, 139 in the open and 134 in the laparoscopic group. Both groups were comparable at baseline. Average total hospital costs were Dfl 1384.91 (standard deviation: Dfl 440.15) for the open repair group and Dfl 2417.24 (standard deviation: Dfl 577.10) for laparoscopic repair, including a disposable kit of Dfl 676. Societal costs, including costs for days of sick leave, were lower for the laparoscopic repair and offset the hospital costs by Dfl 780.83 (75.6%), leaving the laparoscopic repair Dfl 251.50 more expensive (Dfl 4665 versus Dfl 4916.50). At present, the recurrence rate is 2.6% lower after laparoscopic repair. Thus, 38 laparoscopic repairs, costing an additional Dfl 9,557, prevent the occurrence of one recurrent hernia. Quality of life was better after laparoscopic repair. CONCLUSION: A better quality of life in the recovery period and the possibility of replacing parts of the disposable kit with reusable instruments may result in the laparoscopic repair becoming dominantly better--that is, less expensive and more effective from a societal perspective. PMID:9409566

Liem, M S; Halsema, J A; van der Graaf, Y; Schrijvers, A J; van Vroonhoven, T J

1997-01-01

216

The Analysis of Infection after Polypropylene Mesh Repair of Abdominal Wall Hernia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim  The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of superficial and prosthetic mesh infection following polypropylene mesh\\u000a repair of different abdominal wall hernia in individual patients and to analyze the manifestation, clinical process and outcomes\\u000a in patients with prosthetic mesh infection.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This was a retrospective analysis of 375 patients with 423 implanted meshes for groin, femoral, umbilical, incisional

Arnolds Jezupors; M?ris Mihelsons

2006-01-01

217

Open suture versus mesh repair of primary incisional hernias: a cost–utility analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Despite 100,000 ventral hernia repairs (VHR) being performed annually, no gold standard for the technique exists. Mesh has\\u000a been shown to decrease recurrence rates, yet, concerns of increased complications and costs prevent its systematic use. We\\u000a examined the cost-effectiveness of open suture (OS) versus open mesh (OM) in primary VHR.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A decision analysis model from the payer’s perspective comparing OS

K. R. Finan; M. L. Kilgore; M. T. Hawn

2009-01-01

218

Paraesophageal hernia repair followed by cardiac tamponade caused by ProTacks.  

PubMed

We describe a case of cardiac tamponade caused by ProTacks Autosuture used for mesh fixation during a laparoscopic Nissen operation with giant paraesophageal hernia repair. Perforations of the posterior descendent artery and epicardial vein of the right ventricle were caused by ProTacks used for Parietex Composite Mesh fixation. Protruding ProTacks were secured from inside the pericardiac sac with a synthetic vascular patch during emergency sternotomy. Quick and multidisciplinary cooperation ended with emergency cardiothoracic procedure saving the patient's life and preventing further damage to the heart muscle and its vessels. PMID:23006720

Makarewicz, Wojciech; Jaworski, ?ukasz; Bobowicz, Maciej; Roszak, Krzysztof; Jaroszewicz, Krzysztof; Rogowski, Jan; Jastrz?bski, Tomasz; Ja?kiewicz, Janusz

2012-10-01

219

Transinguinal preperitoneal memory ring patch versus Lichtenstein repair for unilateral inguinal hernias  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The aim of this study was to compare the transinguinal preperitoneal technique (TIPP) using a memory ring patch versus the\\u000a Lichtenstein technique in relation to acute and chronic pain, post-operative complications and recurrence rates.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  During an 18-month period, all adult patients that needed treatment for a unilateral inguinal or femoral hernia were treated\\u000a by the TIPP repair using the Polysoft™

Frederik Berrevoet; Leander Maes; Koen Reyntjens; Xavier Rogiers; Roberto Troisi; Bernard de Hemptinne

2010-01-01

220

Ketorolac analgesia for inguinal hernia repair is not improved by peripheral administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  It has been suggested that ketorolac, a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) available for parenteral use, may result\\u000a in prolonged (24 hr) postoperative analgesia through a peripheral mechanism when added to local anesthetic infiltration. Our\\u000a objective was to assess this effect by controlling for systemic absorption of the drug.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This randomized, double-blind trial studied 40 men undergoing elective inguinal hernia repair

Kenneth J. Kardash; Jacob Garzon; Ana M. Velly; Michael J. Tessler

2005-01-01

221

Preperitoneal repair (open posterior approach) for recurrent inguinal hernias previously treated with Lichtenstein tension-free hernioplasty  

PubMed Central

Background: The repair of recurrent inguinal hernias after prosthetic mesh repair is usually diffucult due to considerable technical challenge and complications. There is also a greater risk of developing further recurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of preperitoneal repair (open posterior approach) for recurrent inguinal hernias after Lichtenstein tension-free hernioplasty. Methods: We performed a prospective clinical study in 44 patients having recurrent inguinal hernias the period 2002- 2008. Preperitoneal repair was performed on all patients who have had Lichtenstein tension-free hernioplasty previously. The age, gender, operating time, hospital stay, postoperative complication rates and recurrence rates of patients were evaluated. Results: There were no serious intraoperative complications. There were 36 men and 9 women in the study, whose average age was 38.45 (25-68) years. The average operative time and hospital stay were 44.56 (30-120) min and 1.6 (1-3) days, respectively. Complications included 4.5 % seromas, 4.5 % hematomas and urinary retention in 9.09 % patients. Follow-up to date is 1-90 months (range, median 40 months). Conclusions: We concluded that the preperitoneal repair (open posterior approach) in recurrent inguinal hernias after Lichtenstein tension-free hernioplasty is a safe and efficient method with low complication and rerecurrence rates. PMID:20596268

Karatepe, O; Acet, E; Altiok, M; Adas, G; Cak?r, A; Karahan, S

2010-01-01

222

Adipose-Derived Stem-Cell-Seeded Non-Cross-Linked Porcine Acellular Dermal Matrix Increases Cellular Infiltration, Vascular Infiltration, and Mechanical Strength of Ventral Hernia Repairs.  

PubMed

Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) facilitate wound healing by improving cellular and vascular recruitment to the wound site. Therefore, we investigated whether ASCs would augment a clinically relevant bioprosthetic mesh-non-cross-linked porcine acellular dermal matrix (ncl-PADM)-used for ventral hernia repairs in a syngeneic animal model. ASCs were isolated from the subcutaneous adipose tissue of Brown Norway rats, expanded, and labeled with green fluorescent protein. ASCs were seeded (2.5×10(4) cells/cm(2)) onto ncl-PADM for 24?h before surgery. In vitro ASC adhesion to ncl-PADM was assessed at 0.5, 1, and 2?h after seeding, and cell morphology on ncl-PADM was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Ventral hernia defects (2×4?cm) were created and repaired with ASC-seeded (n=31) and control (n=32) ncl-PADM. Explants were harvested at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after surgery. Explant remodeling outcomes were evaluated using gross evaluation (bowel adhesions, surface area, and grade), histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining), immunohistochemical analysis (von Willebrand factor VIII), fluorescent microscopy, and mechanical strength measurement at the tissue-bioprosthetic mesh interface. Stem cell markers CD29, CD90, CD44, and P4HB were highly expressed in cultured ASCs, whereas endothelial and hematopoietic cell markers, such as CD31, CD90, and CD45 had low expression. Approximately 85% of seeded ASCs adhered to ncl-PADM within 2?h after seeding, which was further confirmed by scanning electron microcopy examination. Gross evaluation of the hernia repairs revealed weak omental adhesion in all groups. Ultimate tensile strength was not significantly different in control and treatment groups. Conversely, elastic modulus was significantly greater at 4 weeks postsurgery in the ASC-seeded group (p<0.001). Cellular infiltration was significantly higher in the ASC-seeded group at all time points (p<0.05). Vascular infiltration was significantly greater at 4 weeks postsurgery in the ASC-seeded group (p<0.001). The presence of ASCs improved remodeling outcomes by yielding an increase in cellular infiltration and vascularization of ncl-PADM and enhanced the elastic modulus at the ncl-PADM-tissue interface. With the ease of harvesting adipose tissues that are rich in ASCs, this strategy may be clinically translatable for improving ncl-PADM ventral hernia repair outcomes. PMID:25156009

Iyyanki, Tejaswi S; Dunne, Lina W; Zhang, Qixu; Hubenak, Justin; Turza, Kristin C; Butler, Charles E

2014-10-01

223

Mesh-Based Transperineal Repair of a Perineal Hernia After a Laparoscopic Abdominoperineal Resection  

PubMed Central

A perineal hernia (PH) is formed by a protrusion of intra-abdominal viscera through a defect in the pelvic floor. This is a rare complication after a conventional abdominoperineal resection (APR). However, the risk of a PH may be increased after a laparoscopic resection because this technique can cause fewer postoperative adhesions, predisposing the small bowel to sliding down toward the pelvis. However, only a few case reports describe the transperineal approach for the repair of a PH after a laparoscopic APR. We present a case of a PH after a laparoscopic APR; the PH was repaired with synthetic mesh by using a transperineal approach. A transperineal approach using a mesh to reconstruct the pelvic floor is less invasive and more effective. We suggest that this technique should probably be the first choice for treating an uncomplicated PH that occurs after a laparoscopic APR. PMID:25210690

Lee, Taek-Gu

2014-01-01

224

Assessment of Pain and Quality of Life in Lichtenstein Hernia Repair Using a New Monofilament PTFE Mesh: Comparison of Suture vs. Fibrin-Sealant Mesh Fixation  

PubMed Central

Background: Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common operations in general surgery. The Lichtenstein tension-free operation has become the gold standard in open inguinal hernia repair. Despite the low recurrence rates, pain and discomfort remain a problem for a large number of patients. The aim of this study was to compare suture fixation vs. fibrin sealing by using a new monofilament PTFE mesh, i.e., the Infinit® mesh by W. L. Gore & Associates. Methods: This study was designed as a controlled prospective single-center two-cohort study. A total of 38 patients were enrolled and operated in Lichtenstein technique either standard suture mesh fixation or fibrin-sealant mesh fixation were used as described in the TIMELI trial. Primary outcome parameters were postoperative complications with the new mesh (i.e., seroma, infection), pain, and quality of life evaluated by the VAS and the SF-36 questionnaire. Secondary outcome was recurrence assessed by ultrasound and physical examination. Follow-up time was 1?year. Results: Significantly, less postoperative pain was reported in the fibrin-sealant group compared to the suture group at 6?weeks (P?=?0.035), 6?months (P?=?0.023), and 1 year (P?=?0.011) postoperatively. Additionally, trends toward a higher postoperative quality of life, a faster surgical procedure, and a shorter hospital stay were seen in the fibrin-sealant group. Conclusion: Fibrin-sealant mesh fixation in Lichtenstein hernioplasty effectively reduces acute and chronic postoperative pain. Monofilament, macro-porous, knitted PTFE meshes seem to be a practicable alternative to commonly used polypropylene meshes in open inguinal hernia repair. PMID:25593969

Fortelny, René H.; Petter-Puchner, Alexander H.; Redl, Heinz; May, Christopher; Pospischil, Wolfgang; Glaser, Karl

2014-01-01

225

[New polypropylene hernia prosthesis].  

PubMed

Since the first true hernioplasty performed by Edoardo Bassini more than 100 years ago (1884) all surgical reconstruction techniques have shared a common defect i.e. tension on suture line. This is the first etiologic factor of recurrent hernia. On the contrary by the use of modern prosthetic materials (mesh and plug) it is now possible to marriage all hernia repairs without distorting normal body anatomy and avoid undesirable tensions. The technique proposed is simple, efficient, characterized by a rapid performing procedure, giving way to an excellent clinical outcome: postoperative pain relief permitting the patient to resume in a short time his normal physical activities. In this paper the authors present their experience in wall defects reconstruction by means of outpatient surgery and in general anesthesia in the period spanning from 1994 to 1996. Five different types of hernia mesh in hernioplasty procedures were evaluated and used. PMID:9701992

Trabucco, E; Campanelli, P; Cavagnoli, R

1998-04-01

226

Physiological repair of inguinal hernia: a new technique (study of 860 patients).  

PubMed

The author has developed a new operation technique based on the physiological principle that provides dynamic posterior wall for inguinal hernia repair. Results of the first series of 400 patients were published in 2001 (ANZ J Surg 71:241-244, 2001). Now the author has described the results of the second series of 860 patients having 920 hernias with follow-up for more than 7 years. An undetached strip of the external oblique aponeurosis (EOA) is sutured to the inguinal ligament below and the muscle arch above, behind the cord, to form a new posterior wall. External oblique muscle gives additional strength to the weakened muscle arch to keep this strip physiologically dynamic. In this prospective study, 920 inguinal hernia repairs were performed between August 1990 and December 2003 in 860 patients. Follow-up was done for 7 years. The main outcome measure was early and late morbidities and especially recurrence in a long-term follow-up. Mean patient age was 50.5 years (range 18-90). A total of 851 (98.95%) patients were operated under local or regional anesthesia; 838 (97.4%) patients were ambulatory with limited movements in 6 h and free movements in 18-24 h; 792 (92%) patients had a hospital stay of one night and 840 (97.6%) patients returned to normal activities within 1-2 weeks. Hematoma formation requiring drainage was observed in one patient, while seven patients had wound edema during the postoperative period which subsided on its own. Follow-up was completed in 623 patients (72.5 %) by clinical examination or questionnaire. The median follow-up period was 7.8 years (range 1-12 years). There was no recurrence of hernia or postoperative neuralgia. This operation is simple to perform, does not require foreign body like a mesh or complicated dissection of the inguinal floor as in Bassini/Shouldice. It has shown excellent results with virtually zero recurrence rates. PMID:16341627

Desarda, M P

2006-04-01

227

Liposomal bupivacaine infiltration into the transversus abdominis plane for postsurgical analgesia in open abdominal umbilical hernia repair: results from a cohort of 13 patients  

PubMed Central

Background Achieving adequate control of postsurgical pain remains a challenge in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) infiltration has been shown to provide postsurgical analgesia following lower abdominal surgery. We assessed the safety and efficacy of a prolonged-release liposomal formulation of the local anesthetic bupivacaine administered via infiltration into the TAP in a cohort of patients undergoing open abdominal umbilical hernia repair. Methods Patients included in the study were 18–75 years of age, had American Society of Anesthesiologists physical classification status 1–3, and underwent open abdominal umbilical hernia repair with ultrasound-guided TAP infiltration immediately after surgery using an equal-volume bilateral infusion of liposomal bupivacaine 266 mg (diluted to 30 mL in normal saline). Outcome measures included patient-reported pain intensity (11-point numeric rating scale), satisfaction with postsurgical analgesia (5-point Likert scale), incidence of opioid-related adverse events, and time to first use of supplemental rescue analgesia. Results Thirteen patients underwent surgery and received bilateral TAP infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine; TAP infiltration failed in the first patient. Mean numeric rating scale pain scores were 0.6 immediately before TAP infiltration and remained ?2.3 through 120 hours after infiltration; mean scores at 120 hours and 10 days were 0.9 and 0.4, respectively. Ten patients (77%) required supplemental analgesia; median time to first use was 11 hours. At discharge and day 10, 54% and 62% of patients, respectively, were “extremely satisfied” with postsurgical analgesia (Likert score 5). There were no opioid-related or other adverse events. Conclusion Although the current study was limited by both its lack of a control group and its small size, to our knowledge, it is the first published report on use of liposomal bupivacaine for TAP infiltration. In this cohort, liposomal bupivacaine was observed to be well tolerated with encouraging analgesic efficacy. PMID:25170277

Feierman, Dennis E; Kronenfeld, Mark; Gupta, Piyush M; Younger, Natalie; Logvinskiy, Eduard

2014-01-01

228

[Spigelian hernias].  

PubMed

Spigelian hernias represent 1-2% of all abdominal wall hernias. The pathogenesis often involves a dehiscence of the transverse and internal oblique muscle aponeurosis. The diagnosis is made by physical examination; but sometimes it is complicated by obesity. The risk of strangulation is important and can reach 30%. The abdominal CT scan is helpful in the description of hernia's topography and sometimes in diagnostic confirmation. The treatment is surgical. The rate of recurrence after direct closure is considerable. Synthetic mesh repair seems to be a more adequate alternative. The advent of laparoscopy has improved the management of these hernias. PMID:24439537

Noomene, Rabii; Bouhafa, Ahmed; Maamer, Anis Ben; Haoues, Noomen; Oueslati, Abdelaziz; Cherif, Abderraouf

2014-03-01

229

Biomechanical analyses of prosthetic mesh repair in a hiatal hernia model.  

PubMed

Recurrence rate of hiatal hernia can be reduced with prosthetic mesh repair; however, type and shape of the mesh are still a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of four conventional meshes: pure polypropylene mesh (PP-P), polypropylene/poliglecaprone mesh (PP-U), polyvinylidenefluoride/polypropylene mesh (PVDF-I), and pure polyvinylidenefluoride mesh (PVDF-S). Meshes were tested either in warp direction (parallel to production direction) or perpendicular to the warp direction. A Zwick testing machine was used to measure elasticity and effective porosity of the textile probes. Stretching of the meshes in warp direction required forces that were up to 85-fold higher than the same elongation in perpendicular direction. Stretch stress led to loss of effective porosity in most meshes, except for PVDF-S. Biomechanical impact of the mesh was additionally evaluated in a hiatal hernia model. The different meshes were used either as rectangular patches or as circular meshes. Circular meshes led to a significant reinforcement of the hiatus, largely unaffected by the orientation of the warp fibers. In contrast, rectangular meshes provided a significant reinforcement only when warp fibers ran perpendicular to the crura. Anisotropic elasticity of prosthetic meshes should therefore be considered in hiatal closure with rectangular patches. PMID:24599834

Alizai, Patrick Hamid; Schmid, Sofie; Otto, Jens; Klink, Christian Daniel; Roeth, Anjali; Nolting, Jochen; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Klinge, Uwe

2014-10-01

230

Single-incision laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal obturator hernia repair in a patient on antiplatelet therapy: A case report.  

PubMed

An 83-year-old woman who complained of right lower limb discomfort was diagnosed with a right obturator hernia by CT scan. On examination, she had a soft and flat abdomen without signs of peritoneal irritation. The Howship-Romberg sign was present. She had a history of vasospastic angina and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, and took aspirin and dipyridamole until she was admitted to the hospital. Exploratory laparoscopy identified a spontaneously reduced small bowel from the right obturator canal, but there were no signs of ischemic and necrotic bowel. The patient underwent SILS for totally extraperitoneal obturator hernia repair without a dissection balloon. The patient recovered without perioperative complications such as hemorrhage and thrombotic episodes. She remains well, and CT scans showed no signs of obturator hernia recurrence at the 7-month follow-up. PMID:25598062

Wakasugi, Masaki; Masuzawa, Toru; Tei, Mitsuyoshi; Omori, Takeshi; Ueshima, Shigeyuki; Tori, Masayuki; Akamatsu, Hiroki

2015-02-01

231

Left hepatic vein injury during laparoscopic antireflux surgery for large para-oesophageal hiatus hernia  

PubMed Central

Although the advent of laparoscopic fundoplication has increased both patient and physician acceptance of antireflux surgery, it has become apparent that the laparoscopic approach is associated with an increased risk of some complications and as well as the occurrence of new complications specific to this approach. One such complication occurred in our patient who had intra-operative left hepatic vein injury during laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication for large para-oesophageal rolling hernia. With timely conversion to open procedure, the bleeding was controlled and the antireflux and the procedure were completed uneventfully. However, this suggests that even with an experience in advanced laparoscopy surgery, complications can occur. Clear understanding of the normal and pathologic anatomy and its variations facilitates laparoscopic surgery and should help the surgeon avoid complications. The incidence of some of these complications decreases as surgeons gain experience; however, new complications can arise due to the increase in such procedures. PMID:20040801

Nagpal, Anish P; Soni, Harshad; Haribhakti, Sanjiv P

2009-01-01

232

Pericardial cyst in a 2-year-old Maine Coon cat following peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia repair.  

PubMed

A pericardial cyst developed in a 2-year-old male neutered Maine Coon cat following surgery for an incidentally diagnosed congenital peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia. The cyst caused no clinical signs in the cat, although clinical findings included positional right-sided cardiac tamponade and compression of thoracic structures, associated with a cardiac arrhythmia and axis deviation on electrocardiography. Extensive assessment of the cyst included radiography, echocardiography, computed tomography, exploratory thoracotomy, electrocardiography, histopathology and fluid analysis. Surgical removal of the cyst was curative, and the arrhythmia and axis deviation resolved. This report details case management from initial diagnosis to long-term follow-up, adding to the limited body of literature available on feline pericardial cysts. This is also the first report to associate cardiac arrhythmia with a pericardial cyst. PMID:24966244

Hodgkiss-Geere, Hannah M; Palermo, Valentina; Liuti, Tiziana; Philbey, Adrian W; Marques, Ana

2014-06-25

233

Clinical usefulness, safety, and plasma concentration of ropivacaine 0.5% for inguinal hernia repair in regional anesthesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, feasibility, and clinical effects of ropivacaine in regional anesthesia (ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric blocks [IIB], genitofemoral block plus local infiltration) for inguinal hernia repair. Methods: Following ethics committee approval and informed consent, 21 male adults received 60 mL ropivacaine 0.5% (without vasoconstrictor). In 11 patients, further injections of 5 to

Hinnerk Wulf; Hagen Behnke; Ilka Vogel; Jörg Schröder

2001-01-01

234

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in 120 infants treated consecutively with permissive hypercapnea\\/spontaneous respiration\\/elective repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Purpose: Poor prognosis (approximately 50% survival rate and significant morbidity) traditionally has been associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The authors reviewed a single institution experience and challenged conventional wisdom in the context of a care strategy based on permissive hypercapnea\\/spontaneous respiration\\/elective repair. Methods: From August 1992 through February 2000, all infants with CDH and (1) respiratory distress requiring mechanical

Judd Boloker; David A. Bateman; Jen-Tien Wung; Charles J. H. Stolar

2002-01-01

235

Hernia emergencies.  

PubMed

Hernia emergencies are commonly encountered by the acute care surgeon. Although the location and contents may vary, the basic principles are constant: address the life-threatening problem first, then perform the safest and most durable hernia repair possible. Mesh reinforcement provides the most durable long-term results. Underlay positioning is associated with the best outcomes. Components separation is a useful technique to achieve tension-free primary fascial reapproximation. The choice of mesh is dictated by the degree of contamination. Internal herniation is rare, and preoperative diagnosis remains difficult. In all hernia emergencies, morbidity is high, and postoperative wound complications should be anticipated. PMID:24267501

Yeh, D Dante; Alam, Hasan B

2014-02-01

236

[A new method for plastic repair of the inguinal canal in treating inguinal hernias].  

PubMed

An analysis of the 20-years experience with treatment of inguinal hernias is presented. Patients with "light" forms of inguinal hernias and with a good condition of the posterior wall, inconsiderable widening of the deep opening of the inguinal canal can be successfully treated by Martynov's and Girard's methods. In complicated forms of the inguinal hernia it is necessary to strengthen the posterior wall of the inguinal canal, in cases with big recurrent and repeatedly recurring hernias it must be completely reconstructed, often with the help of alloplasty. A method of alloplasty of the inguinal canal is proposed for complicated forms of inguinal hernias. Operations were made on 62 patients, recurrent hernias were noted in 2 patients (3.4%). Another method of operations is proposed used in men of young and middle age excluding traumas of elements of the spermatic cord. Operations were performed on 111 patients, recurrences were noted in 2 of them (2%). PMID:8743798

Zhebrovski?, V V; Toskin, K D; Babanin, A A; Vorovski?, S N; Kisliakov, V V; Naima, A A

1995-01-01

237

Open mesh versus non-mesh repair of groin hernia meta-analysis of randomized trials leased on individual patient data  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Abstract\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Background. The EU Hernia Trialists Collaboration was established to provide reliable evaluation of newer methods of groin hernia repair.\\u000a It involved 70 investigators in 20 countries.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods. Twenty eligible trials (5016 participants) of open mesh vs. non-mesh groin hernia repair were identified. Meta-analysis was\\u000a performed using raw individual patient data where possible.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results. Fewer hernia recurrences were

A. Grant

2002-01-01

238

The treatment of complicated groin and incisional hernias.  

PubMed

One hundred years ago, Edoardo Bassini said: "L'ernia é una malattia meccanica." Before that, Ambroise Paré (1598) and Joseph-Pierre Desault (1798) asserted the mechanical nature of strangulation. Beside strangulation, the most serious of all complications even today, I have studied huge hernias, which are natural complications, and recurrent hernias, which are the complications of suboptimal repairs. In this article, I consider the general features and diagnostic and technical consequences of the repair of groin and incisional hernias. The treatment of strangulating hernias, usually an emergency operation, has not seen any recent technical progress. Huge and recurrent hernias, however, usually allow time for adequate surgical preparation. These hernias are also amenable to modern prosthetic repairs. In prosthetic repairs, large pieces of polyester mesh are inserted beneath the muscular wall outside the peritoneum. They act as artificial, nonabsorbable endoabdominal fascia, making the abdominal wall instantly and definitively pressure tight. The state of hernial surgery has advanced to the point that one must consider the systematic surgical cure of all diagnosed hernias. PMID:2683400

Stoppa, R E

1989-01-01

239

Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Open Prosthetic Inguinal Hernia Repair: Efficacy of Parenteral Versus Oral Prophylaxis with Amoxicillin-Clavulanic Acid in a Randomized Clinical Trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this prospective study was to compare the efficacy of oral versus parenteral prophylactic amoxicillin–clavulanic acid for preventing surgical site infection after open prosthetic mesh repair of inguinal hernia. A total of 480 inguinal-hernia patients were randomly assigned to two groups. Group I (n = 240) received 1.313 g oral amoxicillin–clavulanic acid 2 hours before operation, and group

Mehmet A. Kuzu; Selçuk Hazinedaro?lu; ?ükrü Dolalan; Nam?k Özkan; Samet Yalç?n; A. Bülent Erkek; Hatem Mahmoudi; Acar Tüzüner; Atilla H. Elhan; Ercümet Kuterdem

2005-01-01

240

Importance of CT in Evaluating Internal Hernias after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery  

PubMed Central

As the incidence of obesity increases, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (REYGB) surgery has become a surgical option for many patients. Although the laparoscopic Roux-en Y procedure has been shown to reduce weight and improve diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and sleep apnea, it is not without significant risks, as more than 10% of patients who undergo this procedure have postoperative GI complications. This is a case of a 51 year old man who presented with diffuse abdominal pain one month status-post Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. CT imaging proved to be crucial in the diagnosis of this pathology with small bowel volvulus and ischemia. We review some key CT findings that can aid clinicians in diagnosing internal hernias since this complication is often misdiagnosed and have a mortality rate of more than 50%. PMID:22470668

Merali, Hasan S.; Miller, Christopher A.; Erbay, Nazli; Ghosh, Arundhati

2009-01-01

241

No-mesh Inguinal Hernia Repair with Continuous Absorbable Sutures: A Dream or Reality? (A Study of 229 Patients)  

PubMed Central

Background/Aim The author has published results from two series based on his new technique of inguinal hernia repair. Interrupted sutures with a nonabsorbable material were used for repairs in both theses series. The author now describes the results of repairs done with continuous absorbable sutures. Materials and Methods This is a prospective study of 229 patients having 256 hernias operated from December 2003 to December 2006. An undetached strip of the external oblique aponeurosis was sutured between the inguinal ligament and the muscle arch to form the new posterior wall. Continuous sutures were taken with absorbable suture material (Monofilament Polydioxanone Violet). Data of hospital stay, complications, ambulation, recurrences, and pain were recorded. Follow-up was done until June 2007. Results A total of 224 (97.8%) patients were ambulatory within 6-8 h (mean: 6.42 h) and they attained free ambulation within 18-24 h (mean: 19.26 h). A total of 222 (96.4%) patients returned to work within 6-14 days (mean: 8.62 days) and 209 (91.26%) patients had one-night stays in the hospital. A total of 216 (94.3%) patients had mild pain for 2 days. There were four minor complications, but no recurrence or incidence of chronic groin pain. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 24.28 months (range: 6-42 months). Conclusions The results of this study correlate well with the author's previous publications. Continuous suturing saves operative time and one packet of suture material. The dream of every surgeon to give recurrence-free inguinal hernia repair without leaving any foreign body inside the patient may well become a reality in future. PMID:19568520

Desarda, Mohan P.

2008-01-01

242

Laparoscopic Hernia: Umbilical-Pubis Length Versus Technical Difficulty  

PubMed Central

Laparoscopic hernia repair is more difficult than open hernia repair. The totally extraperitoneal procedure with 3 trocars on the midline is more comfortable for the surgeon. We studied the impact of the length between the umbilicus and the pubis on the totally extraperitoneal procedure (95 hernias operated on in 70 patients). This length did not influence the totally extraperitoneal procedure in this study. Background: The laparoscopic repair of hernias is considered to be difficult especially for the totally extra-peritoneal technique (TEP) due to a limited working space and different appreciation of the usual anatomical landmarks seen through an anterior approach. The aim of our study has been to answer a question: does the umbilical-pubic distance, which influences the size of the mesh, affect the TEP technique used in the treatment of inguinal hernias? Methods: From January 2001 to May 2011, the umbilical-pubic (UP) distance was measured with a sterile ruler graduated in centimeters in all patients who underwent a symptomatic inguinal hernia by the TEP technique in two hernia surgery centers. The sex, age, BMI, hernia type, UP distance, operation time, hospital stay and complications were prospectively examined based on the medical records. Results: Seventy patients underwent 95 inguinal hernia repairs by the TEP technique. The umbilical-pubic distance average was 14 cm (10 to 22) and a 25 kg/m2 (16–30) average concerning the body mass index (BMI). Seventy percent of patients were treated on an outpatient basis. The postoperative course was very simple. There was no recurrence of hernia within this early postoperative period. Conclusion: The umbilical-pubic distance had no influence on the production of TEP with 3 trocars on the midline in this study. PMID:25392661

Blanc, Pierre; Kassir, Radwan; Atger, Jérôme

2014-01-01

243

Incidence of Incisional Hernia after Cesarean Delivery: A Register-Based Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Objective To estimate the incidence of incisional hernias requiring surgical repair after cesarean delivery over a 10-year period. Methods This population- and register-based cohort study identified all women in Denmark with no history of previous abdominal surgery who had a cesarean delivery between 1991 and 2000. The cohort was followed from their first until 10 years after their last cesarean delivery within the inclusion period or until the first of the following events: hernia repair, death, emigration, abdominal surgery, or cesarean delivery after the inclusion period. For women who had a hernia repair, hospital records regarding the surgery and previous cesarean deliveries were tracked and manually analyzed to validate the relationship between hernia repair and cesarean delivery. Data were analyzed with a competing risk analysis that included each cesarean delivery. Results We identified 57,564 women who had had 68,271 cesarean deliveries during the inclusion period. During follow-up, 134 of these women had a hernia requiring repair. Of these 68 (51% [95% CI 42–60%]) were in a midline incision although the transverse incision was the primary approach at cesarean delivery during the inclusion period. The cumulated incidence of a hernia repair within 10 years after a cesarean delivery was 0.197% (95% CI 0.164–0.234%). The risk of a hernia repair was higher during the first 3 years after a cesarean delivery, with an incidence after 3 years of 0.157% (95% CI 0.127–0.187%). Conclusions The overall risk of an incisional hernia requiring surgical repair within 10 years after a cesarean delivery was 2 per 1000 deliveries in a population in which the transverse incision was the primary approach at cesarean delivery. PMID:25268746

Aabakke, Anna J. M.; Krebs, Lone; Ladelund, Steen; Secher, Niels J.

2014-01-01

244

The Glubran 2 glue for mesh fixation in Lichtenstein's hernia repair: a double-blind randomized study  

PubMed Central

Introduction With an average incidence rate of 11%, chronic pain is considered the most serious complication of inguinal hernioplasty after surgical site infection. One of the proposed solutions to this problem is to use tissue adhesive for mesh fixation, which helps prevent nerve and tissue damage. Aim The goal of this study was to compare mesh fixation with the use of sutures vs. adhesive in Lichtenstein's inguinal hernia repair in a randomized, double-blind one-center study. Material and methods The study group consisted of 41 males with primary inguinal hernia undergoing Lichtenstein's repair (20 – adhesive; 21 – suture) and remaining in follow-up from July 2008 to November 2010. Randomization took place during the operation. The follow-up was performed by one surgeon (blinded) according to a pre-agreed schedule; the end-of-study unblinding was performed during the last follow-up visit, usually 16 months postoperatively. Results In 1 patient from the “adhesive” group, a recurrence was observed one year after the initial repair. The early postoperative pain was less intense in this group. In later postoperative periods the method of mesh fixation had no influence on the pain experienced by the patient. Other complications were not correlated with the method of mesh fixation. Conclusions In this randomized, one-center double-blind clinical study of males with primary inguinal hernia it has been show during follow-up that the use of Glubran 2 cyanoacrylate adhesive for mesh implant fixation yields similar recurrence and chronic pain rates as the classical suture technique. In the early postoperative period, the pain reported by these patients was relatively weaker; patients undergoing adhesive mesh fixation experienced a quicker return to daily household activities. PMID:23256009

D?browiecki, Stanis?aw; Pier?ci?ski, Stanis?aw

2012-01-01

245

Ultrasound Prenatal Diagnosis of Inguinal Scrotal Hernia and Contralateral Hydrocele  

PubMed Central

Fetal inguinal scrotal hernia is a rare condition resulting in an abnormal embryonic process of the tunica vaginalis. We report a case of ultrasound prenatal diagnosis of inguinal scrotal hernia associated with contralateral hydrocele in a woman at 37 weeks of gestation, referred to our clinic for a scrotal mass. Differential diagnosis includes hydrocele, teratoma, hemangiomas, solid tumours of testis, bowel herniation, and testicular torsion. Bowel peristalsis is an important ultrasound sign and it allowed us to make diagnosis of inguinal scrotal hernia. Diagnosis was confirmed at birth and a laparoscopic hernia repair was performed without complications on day 10. During surgery, a bilateral defect of canal inguinal was seen and considered as the cause of scrotal inguinal hernia and contralateral hydrocele observed in utero. PMID:24455356

Massaro, G.; Sglavo, G.; Cavallaro, A.; Pastore, G.; Nappi, C.; Di Carlo, C.

2013-01-01

246

Endometriosis in a spigelian hernia sac: an unexpected finding.  

PubMed

Describes the existence of endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac. Spigelian Hernia is a rare ventral hernia, presenting difficulties in diagnosis and carrying a high incarceration and obstruction risk. Endometriomas occur due to implantation of endometrial cells into a surgical wound, most often after a cesarean delivery. A 37-year-old woman presented to our department with persistent abdominal pain, exacerbating during menses, and vomiting for 2 days. Physical examination revealed a mass-like lesion in the border between the left-upper and left-lower quadrant. Ultrasound examination was inconclusive and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed an abdominal wall mass. During surgery, a spigelian hernia was found 5 to 7 cm above a previous cesarean incision. Tissue like "chocolate cysts" was present at the hernia sac. Hernia was repaired while tissue was excised and sent for histological examination that confirmed the diagnosis. Spigelian hernia is a hernia presenting difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. Endometrioma in a spigelian hernia sac is a rare diagnosis, confirmed only histologically. Clinical suspicion can be posed only through symptoms and thorough investigation. PMID:25594648

Moris, Demetrios; Michalinos, Adamantios; Vernadakis, Spiridon

2015-01-01

247

Open transinguinal preperitoneal mesh repair of inguinal hernia: a targeted systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials  

PubMed Central

Objective: The objective of this article is to systematically analyse the randomized, controlled trials comparing transinguinal preperitoneal (TIPP) and Lichtenstein repair (LR) for inguinal hernia. Methods: Randomized, controlled trials comparing TIPP vs LR were analysed systematically using RevMan® and combined outcomes were expressed as risk ratio (RR) and standardized mean difference. Results: Twelve randomized trials evaluating 1437 patients were retrieved from the electronic databases. There were 714 patients in the TIPP repair group and 723 patients in the LR group. There was significant heterogeneity among trials (P < 0.0001). Therefore, in the random effects model, TIPP repair was associated with a reduced risk of developing chronic groin pain (RR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26, 0.89; z = 2.33; P < 0.02) without influencing the incidence of inguinal hernia recurrence (RR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.36, 1.83; z = 0.51; P = 0.61). Risk of developing postoperative complications and moderate-to-severe postoperative pain was similar following TIPP repair and LR. In addition, duration of operation was statistically similar in both groups. Conclusion: TIPP repair for inguinal hernia is associated with lower risk of developing chronic groin pain. It is comparable with LR in terms of risk of hernia recurrence, postoperative complications, duration of operation and intensity of postoperative pain. PMID:24759818

Sajid, Muhammad S.; Craciunas, L.; Singh, K.K.; Sains, P.; Baig, M.K.

2013-01-01

248

Measurement issues when assessing quality of life outcomes for different types of hernia mesh repair  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION The NHS is required to collect data from patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for inguinal hernia surgery. We explored the use of one such measure, the Carolinas Comfort Scale® (CCS), to compare long-term outcomes for patients who received two different types of mesh. The CCS questionnaire asks about mesh sensation, pain and movement limitations, and combines the answers into a total score. PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 684 patients were treated between January 2007 and August 2008 and were followed up in November 2009. RESULTS Data on 215 patients who met the inclusion criteria were available (96 patients who received Surgipro™ mesh and 119 who received Parietene™ Progrip™ mesh). Recurrence rates were similar in the Surgipro™ group (2/96, 2.1%) and Progrip™ group (3/118, 2.5%) (Fisher's exact test = 1.0). Chronic pain occurred less frequently in the Surgipro™ group (11/95, 11.6%) than in the Progrip™ group (22/118, 18.6%) (p<0.157). Overall, 90% of CCS total scores indicated a good outcome (scores of 10 or less out of 115). A principal component analysis of the CCS found that responses clustered into two subscales: ‘mesh sensation’ and ‘pain+movement limitations’. The Progrip™ group had a slightly higher mesh sensation score (p<0.051) and similar pain+movement limitations scores (p<0.120). CONCLUSIONS In this study of quality of life outcomes related to different mesh types, the CCS subscales were more sensitive to differences in outcome than the total CCS score for the whole questionnaire. Future research should consider using the CCS subscales rather than the CCS total score. PMID:21944792

Zaborszky, Andras; Gyanti, Rita; Barry, John A; Saxby, Brian K; Bhattacharya, Panchanan; Hasan, Fazal A

2011-01-01

249

Laparoscopic Treatment of Subxiphoid Incisional Hernias in Cardiac Transplant Patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Symptomatic subxiphoid incisional hernias present difficult surgical problems, especially in immuno-suppressed cardiac transplant patients. Here, we describe the laparoscopic repair of subxiphoid incisional hernias in patients with a history of cardiac transplantation. Methods: Four patients with subxiphoid hernias who had previously undergone heart transplantation were identified from a prospective database. Each underwent a laparoscopic repair with mesh implantation. Results: Three patients had a previous open repair. The mean age was 62.5 years, an average of 64.3 months after transplantation. At the time of surgery, all patients were immunosuppressed, and each had a subxiphoid, poststernotomy incisional hernia. Gore dual mesh was used in 2 patients, while Parietex mesh was used in 2. Mean operative time was 122 minutes, and all were completed laparoscopically. The mean length of stay was 6.5 days, and the mean defect size was 286.25 cm2. There was a significant correlation between hernia size and length of stay (P=0.037). Postoperatively, one patient (25%) developed pulmonary edema, and 1 patient (25%) had a prolonged ileus. Conclusion: Symptomatic subxiphoid incisional hernias are a challenging surgical problem in patients with a history of sternotomy. Laparoscopic repair is safe and effective in immunosuppressed patients who have previously undergone cardiac transplantation. PMID:18765049

Popescu, Wanda M.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Bell, Robert L.

2008-01-01

250

Minimal Incision Scar-Less Open Umbilical Hernia Repair in Adults – Technical Aspects and Short-Term Results  

PubMed Central

Background: There is no gold standard technique for umbilical hernia (UH) repair. Conventional open UH repair often produces an undesirable scar. Laparoscopic UH repair requires multiple incisions beyond the umbilicus, specialized equipments, and expensive tissue separating mesh. We describe our technique of open UH repair utilizing a small incision. The technique was derived from our experience with single incision laparoscopy. We report the technical details and short-term results. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of the first 20 patients, who underwent minimal incision scar-less open UH repair, from June 2011 to February 2014. A single intra-umbilical curved incision was used to gain access to the hernia sac. Primary suture repair was performed for defects up to 2?cm. Larger defects were repaired using an onlay mesh. In patients with a BMI of 30?kg/m2 or greater, onlay mesh hernioplasty was performed irrespective of the defect size. Results: A total of 20 patients, 12 males and 8 females underwent the procedure. Mean age was 50 (range 29–82) years. Mean BMI was 26.27 (range 20.0–33.1) kg/m2. Average size of the incision was 1.96 range (1.5–2.5) cm. Mesh hernioplasty was done in nine patients. Eleven patients underwent primary suture repair alone. There were no postoperative complications associated with this technique. Average postoperative length of hospital stay was 3.9 (range 2–10) days. Mean follow-up was 29.94?months (2?weeks to 2.78?years). On follow-up there was no externally visible scar in any of the patients. There were no recurrences on final follow-up. Conclusion: This technique provides a similar cosmetic effect as obtained from single port laparoscopy. It is easy to perform, safe, offers good cosmesis, does not require incisions beyond the umbilicus, and cost effective, with encouraging results on short-term follow-up. Further research is needed to assess the true potential of the technique and the long-term results.

Zachariah, Sanoop K.; Kolathur, Najeeb Mohamed; Balakrishnan, Mahesh; Parakkadath, Arun Joseph

2014-01-01

251

[Randomized trial of three types of repair used in 324 consecutive operations of hernia. A study of the frequency of recurrence].  

PubMed

In order to assess the recurrence-rate of the commonly used repairs of inguinal hernia: Bassini, McVay and Shouldice, 324 consecutive non-recurrence hernias were randomly allocated to one of those repairs. The age range 18-65 years. Ninety-six percent of the operations were carried out by the author. After a median observation-period of 32 months (range 5-75), ten recurrences had occurred, two Bassini, four McVay and four Shouldice, showing no significant differences in recurrence rate between the three types of repair. All recurrences were re-operated, five of them suffered a second recurrence. Other complications occurred in 36 patients (11%). With extensive training, low recurrence-rates can be achieved with any of the above-mentioned repairs. It is recommended that herniasurgery be centralised, and that other outcome-measures than recurrence be scrutinized as well. PMID:9477750

Strand, L

1998-02-01

252

Effectiveness of mesh hernioplasty in incarcerated inguinal hernias  

PubMed Central

Introduction The use of mesh is still controversial in patients undergoing emergency incarcerated hernia repair, mostly because of potential infectious complications. Aim The main aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of tension-free methods in treating incarcerated inguinal hernias (IIH), with and without intestine resection. The secondary aim was to establish an algorithm on how to proceed with incarcerated hernias. Material and methods A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent surgery due to an inguinal hernia at the First Department of General Surgery Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow, in the period 1999–2009. Operative methods included Lichtenstein, Robbins-Rutkow and Prolene Hernia System. The rate of postoperative complications was compared in patients who underwent elective and emergency surgery. Results The study group consisted of 567 patients (546 male) age 19–91 years. In this group 624 hernias were treated using the three tension-free techniques – 295 using the Lichtenstein method, 236 using PHS and 93 using the RR technique. Out of the 561 operations 89.9% were elective. No correlation (p > 0.05) was found between the type of surgery and such complications as postoperative pain duration and intensity, fever, micturation disorders, wound healing disorders, testicle hydrocoele, testicle atrophy, spermatic cord cyst, sexual dysfunction, wound dehiscence, wound suppuration, seroma, haematoma and hernia recurrence. Conclusions Mesh repairs can be safely performed while operating due to an IIH. The use of a synthetic implant, in emergency IIH repairs, does not increase the rate of local complications. Synchronous, partial resection of the small intestine, due to intestinal necrosis, is not a contraindication to use mesh. PMID:25337167

Kamtoh, Georges; Kibil, Wojciech; Matyja, Andrzej; Solecki, Rafal; Banas, Bartlomiej; Kulig, Jan

2014-01-01

253

Multimedia manuscript: inguinal hernia repair by single-incision pediatric endosurgery (SIPES) using the hydrodissection-lasso technique.  

PubMed

Many different techniques for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair have been introduced recently, using either an intraperitoneal [1-3] or an extraperitoneal [4-6] approach. One of the main challenges is to obtain a complete circumferential closure of the sack at the level of the internal ring without injury to the adjacent vas deferens or spermatic vessels. In an effort to separate these structures from the peritoneum before passing a suture around the base of the sack, we developed the hydrodissection-lasso technique, which is performed using a single-incision endosurgical approach.With the patient in Trendelenburg position, an 8-mm skin incision is made in the umbilicus, and a 5-mm trocar is placed in the inferior aspect for the endoscope. A 3-mm Maryland grasper is placed directly through the fascia in the upper part of the incision. Using a 22-gauge needle inserted percutaneously over the internal inguinal ring, saline is injected into the subperitoneal plane circumferentially, hydrodissecting the peritoneum off the vas deferens and vessels and creating a safe space through which the suture can pass without compromising these structures. A 2-mm stab incision is made directly over the internal inguinal ring, and a lasso technique is used to pass two strands of braided polyester suture around the hernia sack, as demonstrated in the video. Both sutures are tied tightly, leaving the knots under the skin. No direct or indirect manipulation of the vas deferens or vessels takes place during any part of the procedure.In contrast to other described techniques [7], the hydrodissection-lasso technique can be used for all indirect inguinal hernias in both girls and boys, and hydrodissection itself may be a useful adjunct to any of the other aforementioned techniques. Although an age limit for exclusive high ligation of the hernia sack for indirect inguinal hernias has not been established, the recurrence rate may be higher for adults if the procedure is not combined with inguinal floor reconstruction [8]. At this time, we therefore limit the proposed technique to prepubertal patients.We have performed the described procedure for 22 patients without any recurrences during a maximum follow-up period of 12 months (Table 1). The patients had minimal postoperative pain. There were no complications except for a transient genitofemoral nerve paresis experienced by one girl in whom the hydrodissection was performed using 1% lidocaine instead of the usual normal saline solution. Although the sack was not resected, there were no cases of postoperative hydroceles.To evaluate whether this novel technique is an adequate long-term solution, a prospective clinical trial comparing standard open and single-incision endosurgical inguinal hernia repair using hydrodissection should be performed. PMID:21638190

Muensterer, Oliver J; Georgeson, Keith E

2011-10-01

254

Metabolic and inflammatory responses after laparoscopic and open inguinal hernia repair.  

PubMed Central

A prospective comparison of metabolic and inflammatory responses after laparoscopic and open inguinal hernia operations was undertaken. There were 10 patients in each group. Plasma levels of cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured preoperatively and at fixed intervals up to 120 h postoperatively. In vitro, endotoxin stimulated whole blood tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) was measured in preoperative and 24 h postoperative blood samples. Changes in the plasma levels of cortisol, growth hormone and prolactin showed no statistically significant difference between the groups. No significant change in IL-6 levels were recorded in any group. Changes in CRP levels were significantly higher (P < 0.006) in open hernia patients. Endotoxin stimulated TNF alpha production was suppressed in both groups. The degree of suppression in open hernia patients was significantly higher (P < 0.005). This study has shown that both these operations produce similar stress responses. However, open hernia operation results in a higher acute phase response and induces a greater endotoxin tolerance. PMID:9623379

Akhtar, K.; Kamalky-asl, I. D.; Lamb, W. R.; Laing, I.; Walton, L.; Pearson, R. C.; Parrott, N. R.

1998-01-01

255

Thalassemia and heart surgery: aortic valve repair after endocarditis.  

PubMed

Outcome after heart valve surgery in patients affected by thalassemia is an unreported issue and to the best of our knowledge only 7 cases have been described in the literature. Heart valve disease is commonly encountered in thalassemia patients and heart valve replacement carries high risk of prosthesis complications including thrombosis and embolization despite optimal anticoagulation management. We report a successful long-term outcome after a case of aortic valve repair after mycotic valve endocarditis. PMID:25555980

Raffa, Giuseppe Maria; Mularoni, Alessandra; Di Gesaro, Gabriele; Vizzini, Giovanni; Cipolla, Tommaso; Pilato, Michele

2015-01-01

256

[Developments in inguinal hernia based on newly introduced intervention techniques in the North Rhine district].  

PubMed

In Germany inguinal hernia surgery has changed over the last decade from conventional repairs without alloplastic material to video-assisted minimal invasive techniques or Lichtenstein repair. Since 1991 every patient undergoing inguinal hernia repair has been documented in the North-Rhine area in a routine quality-surveillance study. A total of 173,923 patients with 192,718 groin hernias (85.26% male and 14.74% female) were operated on. In 1993 the Shouldice repair was performed in 54.2%, the Bassini operation in 26%, the transabdominal laparoscopic TAPP repair in only 3.2% of cases. In 1999 the TAPP repair was performed in 13%, the extraperitoneal video-assisted TEP repair in 14%, Lichtenstein repair in 18.5%, Shouldice repair in 35% and the Bassini operation in only 4.8%. The percentage of operations was 13.4% over the last 10 years. However, there was an increase from 12.8% in 1993 to 14.1% in 1997, and a rate of 13.5% in 1999. The following complications were observed: hematoma/seroma formation in 3.78%, wound infection in 1.15%, testicular edema in 0.37% and scrotal edema in 0.64%. The data document the introduction of three new methods for inguinal hernia repair (TAPP, TEP and Lichtenstein repair). A decrease in operations on recurrences is not observed. PMID:11357540

Lammers, B J; Meyer, H J; Huber, H G; Gross-Weege, W; Röher, H D

2001-04-01

257

Virgin and Recurrent Groin Hernia: A Comparison of Patient Recovery Following Endoscopic Preperitoneal Herniorrhaphy  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The advantage of minimally invasive hernia repair techniques remains controversial. One of the more established indications for this technique's use is the presence of a recurrent hernia. No prior study has compared the recovery following endoscopic repair of virgin and recurrent hernias. Patients and Methods: Between July 15, 1994 through August 16, 1996, one primary surgeon supervised the performance of 373 hernia repairs on 250 patients. Twenty-two patients underwent endoscopic preperitoneal herniorrhaphy for unilateral recurrent groin hernia (RH), while 105 patients underwent repair of a virgin unilateral hernia (VH) in the absence of prior contralateral open hernia repair. No significant differences were seen for age (VH: 54, RH: 64), male:female ratio (VH: 92:13, RH: 22:0), operative time (VH: 58 min, RH: 59 min), anesthetic used, IV fluid requirements or blood loss (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). At the time of discharge, all patients were given a postoperative survey and asked to record their level of pain, narcotic use, and level of activity on the day of surgery and postoperative days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, and 28. Results: Patients undergoing repair of virgin hernias had statistically significant increased levels of pain and/or narcotic use on the day of surgery and postoperative days 1, 2 and 3. Despite these differences, level of activity and return to work/normal activity (VH: 6.35+/- 3.44 days, RH: 6.40 +/- 2.67 days) were the same for the two groups. Conclusion: Despite the differences in pain perception and narcotic use in the early postoperative period, overall patient recovery appears similar for the two groups. Differences seen are likely due to a lack of any prior surgical pain to serve as a benchmark for comparison. PMID:9876699

Ahmad, Syed A.

1997-01-01

258

Treatment of unfavourable results of flexor tendon surgery: Ruptured repairs, tethered repairs and pulley incompetence  

PubMed Central

As primary repair of divided flexor tendons becomes more common, secondary tendon surgery becomes largely that of the complications of primary repair, namely ruptured and adherent repairs. These occur with an incidence of each in most reported series world-wide of around 5%, with these problems having changed little in the last two decades, despite strengthening our suture repairs. Where the primary referral service is less well-developed, and as a more occasional occurrence where primary treatment is the routine, the surgeon faces different problems. Patients arrive at a hand unit variable, but longer, times after the primary insult, having had no, or bad, previous treatment. Sometimes the situation is the same, viz. an extended finger with no active flexion, but now no longer amenable to primary repair. Frequently, it is much more complex as a result of injuries to the other tissues of the digit and, also, as a result of the unaided healing process within the digit in the presence of an inactive flexor system. We present our experience in dealing with ruptured repairs, tethered repairs and pulley incompetence. PMID:24459333

Elliot, David; Giesen, Thomas

2013-01-01

259

Incisional Hernia Following Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery for Renal Cell Cancer  

PubMed Central

Objectives: For renal cell cancer, the hand-assisted laparoscopic approach provides several advantages while maintaining equal advantages with regards to patient recovery. We offer our experience with laparoscopic hand-assisted radical nephrectomy and the incidence of ventral wall hernia. Methods: Between February 1999 and July 2002, we performed 50 laparoscopic hand-assisted radical nephrectomies. A midline or a muscle splitting right lower quadrant incision was used depending on the side of the tumor. Hand-port incisions were all between 7 cm and 8 cm and closed with #1 polydioxanone sulfate suture in a running fashion. Three (6%) patients developed hand-port incisional hernias. All hernias occurred in midline hand-port sites. The average body weight of those who developed an incisional hernia was 137 kg. Although the cause of incisional hernia is multifactorial, we believe that obesity plays a significant role. The technical limitations involved in closing a short, deep ventral incision combined with the earlier return to activity of laparoscopy patients put this patient population at significant risk. Conclusion: We now perform an interrupted closure with nonabsorbable suture for the hand-assist incision and limited activity for 4 weeks to 6 weeks post procedure in high-risk patients. We have had no further wound hernias since adopting these changes. PMID:15984709

Das, Sakti

2005-01-01

260

Femoral hernia: the dire consequences of a missed diagnosis.  

PubMed

Femoral hernia has always presented more difficulty in diagnosis than other external abdominal hernias. The incidence of incarceration and strangulation is higher in our series than the published literature would suggest. A retrospective study was performed at our institution from February 1990 to June 1995. In that period, 22 patients were operated on for femoral hernia. There were 16 women and 6 men, average ages 51 and 48 years, respectively. The men weighed on average 209 lb, and the women, 154 lb. Three of our patients had elective repair of their hernias (16%); 19 were performed urgently or emergently (86%). Of the emergency repairs, 3 had strangulated small bowel requiring resection (16%), 1 had a strangulated vermiform appendix with abscess formation (5%), 3 had strangulated omentum requiring excision (16%), giving a total of 7 patients with strangulation and necrosis of the hernial contents (36%). The remainder had viable contents in the hernia sac. The time from the onset of symptoms to presentation at the hospital varied from 1 day to 3 years. The time from strangulation to presentation was between a few hours and 4 days. Surgery was performed on the day of admission (within 24 hours) on all but 2 of our patients. Procedures performed were McVay repair, 13; Bassini, 4; laparoscopic with Marlex mesh, 1 patient; drainage of a groin abscess in 2 patients with later repair; and on 2 patients the type of repair was not specified. One of the patients died. Postoperative wound infection occurred in 2 heavily contaminated patients, and 3 had pneumonia. Patients with no regular physician and no routine physical examinations are at higher risk for developing strangulation of femoral hernias. Emergency physicians and general practitioners are in the best position to diagnose these hernias early, when treatment can be elective. PMID:9375551

Naude, G P; Ocon, S; Bongard, F

1997-11-01

261

Rate of repair in minimally invasive mitral valve surgery  

PubMed Central

Background Valve repair has been shown to be the method of choice in the treatment of patients with severe mitral valve regurgitation. Minimally invasive surgery has raised skepticism regarding the rate of repair especially for supposedly complex lesions, when anterior leaflet involvement or bileaflet prolapse is present. We sought to review our experience of all our patients presenting with degenerative mitral valve regurgitation and operated on minimally invasively. Method From September 2006 to December 2012, 842 patients (mean age 56.12±11.62 years old) with degenerative mitral valve regurgitation and anterior leaflet (n=82, 9.7%), posterior leaflet (n=688, 81.7%) and bileaflet (n=72, 8.6%) prolapses were operated on using a minimally invasive approach. Results 836 patients had a valve repair (99.3%) and received a concomitant ring annuloplasty (mean size, 33.7; range, 28-40). Six patients (0.7%) underwent valve replacement. Two patients had a re-repair due to MR progression or infective endocarditis. Thirty-day mortality was 0.2% (two patients). There were 60 major adverse events (MAE) (7.1%). Conclusions A minimally invasive approach allows repair of almost all degenerative valves with good short-term outcomes in a tertiary referral center, when using proven and efficient surgical techniques. PMID:24349977

Hohenberger, Wolfgang; Lakew, Fitsum; Batz, Gerhard; Diegeler, Anno

2013-01-01

262

Umbilical endometriosis associated with large umbilical hernia. Case report.  

PubMed

Umbilical endometriosis is a rare condition, usually following laparoscopic and surgical procedures involving the umbilicus.Spontaneous umbilical endometriosis occurring without any previous abdominal or uterine surgery is extremely rare. The maximal depth of penetration of the umbilical endometriosis described is up to fascial level. There have been only two cases of endometriosis reported arising within umbilical hernia. The authors report a case of a patient with spontaneous umbilical endometriosis associated with a large umbilical hernia, treated by surgical excision and mesh repair of the abdominal wall. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first described case of the association of umbilical endometriosis with a large umbilical hernia that requires prosthetic mesh repair of the abdominal wall defect. PMID:24742424

Stojanovic, M; Radojkovic, M; Jeremic, L; Zlatic, A; Stanojevic, G; Janjic, D; Mihajlovic, S; Dimov, I; Kostov, M; Zdravkovic, M; Stojanovic, M

2014-01-01

263

[The role of Shouldice's operation in treating inguinal hernia].  

PubMed

Clinical estimation of Shouldice procedure in the surgical treatment of inguinal hernia was performed in the group of 95 patients (102 operations) treated in the Second Department of General and Vascular Surgery Clinic at Zabrze between 1994 and 1996. Their ages ranged from 18 to 78 years with an average 53.6. The sex index (men to women) was 11:1. The bilateral hernia was found in seven cases and all of them were treated surgically at the same time. The most treated hernias was considered as type II and V by Gilbert classification. Among treated patients there were six cases of recurrence hernia earlier operated according to other procedures (mainly Bassini, Girard, Halsted, and artificial knitted-graft placed up intraperitoneally). In 28 cases of fascia transversalis large deficiency (the third and fourth type of Gilbert classification) authors used the two-layer modification method of reconstruction instead four layer of hernial canal posterior wall reconstruction the typical for Shouldice procedure. It was sufficient in all cases without respect to hernia size and fascia transversalis deficiency. There were no complications in postoperative periods. The recurrence of hernia, appeared only in one patient (0.98%) nine months after operation. In authors opinion, the Shouldice procedure is the most effective among all classical ways of inquinal hernia repairs. PMID:9446390

Kultys, J; Pardela, M; Drózdz, M; Witkowski, K; Machelska, J

1997-01-01

264

A ventral incisional hernia with herniation of the left hepatic lobe and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Ventral incisional hernias with hepatic herniation are extremely rare. Only six cases have been reported so far in the literature. We report a case of a ventral incisional hernia with hepatic herniation along with a review of the literature. A 70-year-old female patient with a history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery 6?months earlier, was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of epigastric swelling and discomfort for 3?months. On examination, she had a mild tender 5?cm×5?cm epigastric lump and was diagnosed as ventral incisional hernia. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen revealed a ventral hernia with herniation of omentum and left hepatic lobe. The patient underwent onlay mesh repair and is asymptomatic at 1-month follow-up. There is a need for evaluation of risk factors for this type of ventral incisional hernia and to recognise it as a special entity. PMID:25631758

Neelamraju Lakshmi, Harish; Saini, Devendra; Om, Prabha; Bagree, Rajendra

2015-01-01

265

Combined Treatment of Symptomatic Massive Paraesophageal Hernia in the Morbidly Obese  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Repair of large paraesophageal hernias by itself is associated with high failure rates in the morbidly obese. A surgical approach addressing both giant paraesophageal hernia and morbid obesity has, to our knowledge, not been explored in the surgical literature. Methods: A retrospective review of a bariatric surgery database identified patients who underwent simultaneous repair of large type 3 paraesophageal hernias with primary crus closure and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Operative time, intraoperative and 30-day morbidity, weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions and use of anti-reflux medication were outcome measures. Integrity of crural closure was studied with a barium swallow. Results: Three patients with a mean body mass index of 46kg/m2 and mean age of 46 years underwent repair of a large paraesophageal hernia, primary crus closure, and RYGB. Mean operative time was 241 minutes and length of stay was 4 days. There was no intraoperative or 30-day morbidity. One patient required endoscopic balloon dilatation of the gastrojejunostomy. At 12 months, all patients were asymptomatic with excellent weight loss and resolution of comorbidities. Contrast studies showed no recurrence of the hiatal hernia. Conclusion: Simultaneous laparoscopic repair of large paraesophageal hernias in the morbidly obese is safe and effective. PMID:21902973

Kasotakis, George; Mittal, Sumeet K.

2011-01-01

266

Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia  

PubMed Central

External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

Yang, Xue-Fei

2014-01-01

267

Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia.  

PubMed

External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

Yang, Xue-Fei; Liu, Jia-Lin

2014-11-01

268

CT findings in Petersen's hernia as a complication of bariatric surgery with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass Achados tomográficos na hérnia de Petersen como complicação de cirurgia bariátrica com bypass gástrico em Y de Roux  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To describe tomographic findings in Petersen's hernia associated with laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Methods: Two radiologists, experts in abdominal radiology, independently and retrospectively reviewed four cases of Petersen's hernia confirmed surgically in three patients, between March 2007 and July 2008, who had undergone laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery with an antecolic anastomosis for treating morbid obesity. The main

Mauricio Álvares; Salum Ximenes; Ronaldo Hueb Baroni; Ronald Trindade; Rodrigo Abdala; Marcelo de Castro; Jorge Racy; Alberto Goldenberg; Thomas Szego; Almino Cardoso Ramos; Marcelo Buarque de Gusmão Funari

269

Intrapericardial diaphragmatic hernia after coronary artery bypass grafting using the right gastroepiploic artery graft: report of a case.  

PubMed

Surgeons should be aware of diaphragmatic hernia in obese patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using a gastroepiploic artery graft (GEA), even if the antegastric route is utilized.We report a case of diaphragmatic hernia, which occurred 88 months after initial CABG. A 64-year-old obese man underwent surgical repair of a diaphragmatic hernia. At initial surgery, the diaphragm was incised vertically and re-sutured, leaving a route for GEA graft. Both the stomach and the lateral segment of the liver were dislocated in the pericardial space. The diaphragmatic defect was closed with a polytetrafluoroethylene patch. PMID:21881348

Takiuchi, Hiroki; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Tamaki, Takahiko; Kuinose, Masahiko; Yoshitaka, Hidenori; Tsusima, Yoshimasa

2011-01-01

270

A multicentric comparison of transabdominal versus totally extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair using PARIETEX meshes.  

PubMed

The authors report a series of 1972 inguinal hernias treated between 1993 and 1997 by the insertion of a PARIETEX mesh via either a transabdominal-preperitoneal (TAPP) (1,290 procedures) or a totally extraperitoneal TEP approach (682 procedures). Pain scores were equivalent in both groups, while the hospital stay and time to return to normal activity was lower in the TEP group than in the TAPP group (p<0.001). In both groups, the average incidence of the total reported events (complications) was around 10% with no statistical difference. This ratio seemed to compare favorably to previously published reports. Chronic pain was extremely rare (0.6% and 0.7% in the TAPP and TEP groups, respectively). Whatever the approach was, sepsis was also very rare (1/1,526 laparoscopic procedures). These findings illustrate the local tolerance of the mesh. Recurrence rates were below 1% with no statistical difference between groups. This retrospective study demonstrates the clinically apparent local tolerance of this type of mesh. Prospective and long-term clinical results will be necessary to demonstrate that the optimized short-term tolerance of PARIETEX mesh will influence the long term functional results. PMID:10917122

Lepere, M; Benchetrit, S; Debaert, M; Detruit, B; Dufilho, A; Gaujoux, D; Lagoutte, J; Saint Leon, L M; Pavis d'Escurac, X; Rico, E; Sorrentino, J; Therin, M

2000-01-01

271

A Multicentric Comparison of Transabdominal versus Totally Extraperitoneal Laparoscopic Hernia Repair using PARIETEX® Meshes  

PubMed Central

The authors report a series of 1972 inguinal hernias treated between 1993 and 1997 by the insertion of a PARIETEX® mesh via either a transabdominal-preperitoneal (TAPP) (1290 procedures) or a totally extraperitoneal TEP approach (682 procedures). Pain scores were equivalent in both groups, while the hospital stay and time to return to normal activity was lower in the TEP group than in the TAPP group (p<0.001). In both groups, the average incidence of the total reported events (complications) was around 10% with no statistical difference. This ratio seemed to compare favorably to previously published reports. Chronic pain was extremely rare (0.6% and 0.7% in the TAPP and TEP groups, respectively). Whatever the approach was, sepsis was also very rare (1/1526 laparoscopic procedures). These findings illustrate the local tolerance of the mesh. Recurrence rates were below 1% with no statistical difference between groups. This retrospective study demonstrates the clinically apparent local tolerance of this type of mesh. Prospective and long-term clinical results will be necessary to demonstrate that the optimized short-term tolerance of PARIETEX® mesh will influence the long term functional results. PMID:10917122

Benchetrit, S.; Debaert, M.; Detruit, B.; Dufilho, A.; Gaujoux, D.; Lagoutte, J.; Leon, L. Martin Saint; d'Escurac, X. Pavis; Rico, E.; Sorrentino, J.; Therin, J.

2000-01-01

272

Acute intestinal obstruction secondary to left paraduodenal hernia: a case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

Introduction An internal hernia is a protrusion of bowel through a normal or abnormal orifice in the peritoneum or mesentery. Although they are considered as a rare cause of intestinal obstruction, paraduodenal hernias are the most common type of congenital hernias. Methods A literature search using PubMed was performed to identify all published cases of left paraduodenal hernia (LPDH). Results In Literature search between 1980 and 2012 using PubMed revealed only 44 case reports before the present one. Median age was 47 years (range 18 – 82 years). Nearly 50% reported previous mild symptoms. Two-third of patients required emergency surgery in form of laparotomy or laparoscopic repair. Reduction of hernia contents with widening or suture repair of the hernia orifice were the most common standards in surgical management of LPDH. Conclusion Intestinal obstruction secondary to internal hernias is a rare presentation. High index of suspicion and preoperative imaging are essential to make an early diagnosis in order to improve outcome. PMID:23324390

2013-01-01

273

Intestinal Obstruction due to Bilateral Strangulated Femoral Hernias  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Femoral hernias are at high risk of strangulation due to the narrow femoral canal and femoral ring. This can lead to symptoms of obstruction or strangulation requiring emergency surgery and possible bowel resection. To our knowledge, there is only one previous published report of bilateral strangulated femoral hernia. We present our case of this phenomenon. Case Report. An 86-year-old woman presented with symptoms of small bowel obstruction. Examination revealed two tender lumps in the area of the femoral triangle. CT scan revealed bilateral femoral hernias. Both hernias were repaired and a small bowel resection on the right side was performed with side to side anastomosis. She made an uneventful recovery. Conclusion. Bilateral femoral hernias are a rare occurrence with only one reported case of bilateral strangulation. Our case highlights the importance of meticulous history taking and clinical examination as any delay in diagnosis will increase the risk of mortality and morbidity for the patient. Hernias should always be considered as a cause if one presents with symptoms of abdominal pain or obstruction. PMID:25057426

Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Oderuth, Eshan; Ntakomyti, Eleni; Kald, Bengt

2014-01-01

274

Use of acellular dermal matrix combined with a component separation technique for repair of contaminated large ventral hernias: a possible ideal solution for this clinical challenge.  

PubMed

Repair of large contaminated ventral hernias is always challenging because of massive loss of muscular and fascial tissues, high risk of surgical infection and recurrence, and contraindication to use of a permanent prosthesis. This study reviewed retrospectively data of 35 patients with contaminated large ventral hernias who received repair using acellular dermal matrix combined with a component separation technique from 2009 to 2011. Twenty-one males and 14 females were identified with a mean age of 45.5 ± 12.5 years and a mean body mass index of 22.5 ± 5.8 kg/m(2). Simultaneously, nine patients underwent bowel fistula resection, 13 patients underwent ostomy takedown, five patients underwent recurrent colon cancer dissection, and eight patients underwent infectious permanent mesh removal and wound débridement. Mean defect size was 125.0 ± 23.5 cm(2). The aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle was transected and separated from internal oblique muscle to reach abdominal closure. Acellular dermal matrix was placed in an onlay fashion and mean mesh size was 300.0 ± 65.0 cm(2). Thirty-five patients had a mean follow-up period of 36.5 ± 12.5 months. Wound bleeding and partial dehiscence occurred at 36 hours postoperatively. Five patients reported abdominal wall pain during the first postoperative month. Five patients developed surgical site infection. Four patients were detected to develop seroma with volume more than 20 mL by B-ultrasound examination. No recurrence and chronic foreign body sensation were followed up. Use of acellular dermal matrix combined with a component separation technique is safe and efficient management for repair of contaminated large ventral hernia, in which permanent prosthesis placement is contraindicated. PMID:25642876

Yang, Fei; Ji-Ye, Li; Rong, Li; Wen, Tian

2015-02-01

275

Incisional Hernia in Women: Predisposing Factors and Management Where Mesh is not Readily Available  

PubMed Central

Background / Aim: Incisional hernia is still relatively common in our practice. The aim of the study was to identify risk factors associated with incisional hernia in our region. The setting is the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria during a period when prosthetic mesh was not readily available. Patients and Methods: All the women who presented with incisional hernia between 1996 and 2005 were prospectively studied using a standard form to obtain information on pre-hernia (index) operations and possible predisposing factors. They all had open surgical repair and were followed up for 18–60 months. Results: Forty-four women were treated during study period. The index surgeries leading to the hernias were emergency caesarian section 26/44 (59.1%), emergency exploratory laparotomy 6/44 (13.6%), and elective surgeries 12/44 (27.3%). Major associated risk factors were the use of wrong suture materials for fascia repair, midline incisions, wound sepsis, and overweight. Conclusion: For elective surgeries, reduction of weight should be encouraged when appropriate, and transverse incisions are preferred. Absorbable sutures, especially chromic catgut, should be avoided in fascia closure. Antibiotics should be used for complicated obstetric cases. PMID:21483511

Agbakwuru, EA; Olabanji, JK; Alatise, OI; Okwerekwu, RO; Esimai, OA

2009-01-01

276

Strangulated lesser sac hernia.  

PubMed

Internal hernias account for less than 1% of acute mechanical bowel obstruction. Because of their rarety, they are often not considered in the clinical or radiologic diagnosis of bowel obstruction; diagnosis is often delayed, and is most often made at the time of surgery. We present images obtained during the management of a strangulated transomental internal hernia; computerized tomography permitted timely preoperative diagnosis and specifically adapted surgical therapy. PMID:22424797

Guinier, D; Tissot, O

2012-06-01

277

Medium-term follow-up confirms the safety and durability of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair with PTFE  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundVentral abdominal wall hernias are common lesions and may be associated with life-threatening complications. The application of laparoscopic principles to the treatment of ventral hernias has reduced recurrence rates from a range of 25% to 52% to a range of 3.4% to 9%. In this study, we review our experience and assess the clinical outcome of patients who have undergone

George M Eid; Jose M Prince; Samer G Mattar; Giselle Hamad; Sayeed Ikrammudin; Philip R Schauer

2003-01-01

278

The Totally Extraperitoneal Method versus Lichtenstein's Technique for Inguinal Hernia Repair: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analyses and Trial Sequential Analyses of Randomized Clinical Trials  

PubMed Central

Background Lichtenstein's technique is considered the reference technique for inguinal hernia repair. Recent trials suggest that the totally extraperitoneal (TEP) technique may lead to reduced proportions of chronic pain. A systematic review evaluating the benefits and harms of the TEP compared with Lichtenstein's technique is needed. Methodology/Principal Findings The review was performed according to the ‘Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews’. Searches were conducted until January 2012. Patients with primary uni- or bilateral inguinal hernias were included. Only trials randomising patients to TEP and Lichtenstein were included. Bias evaluation and trial sequential analysis (TSA) were performed. The error matrix was constructed to minimise the risk of systematic and random errors. Thirteen trials randomized 5404 patients. There was no significant effect of the TEP compared with the Lichtenstein on the number of patients with chronic pain in a random-effects model risk ratio (RR 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61 to 1.04; p?=?0.09). There was also no significant effect on number of patients with recurrences in a random-effects model (RR 1.41; 95% CI 0.72 to 2.78; p?=?0.32) and the TEP technique may or may not be associated with less severe adverse events (random-effects model RR 0.91; 95% CI 0.73 to 1.12; p?=?0.37). TSA showed that the required information size was far from being reached for patient important outcomes. Conclusions/Significance TEP versus Lichtenstein for inguinal hernia repair has been evaluated by 13 trials with high risk of bias. The review with meta-analyses, TSA and error matrix approach shows no conclusive evidence of a difference between TEP and Lichtenstein on the primary outcomes chronic pain, recurrences, and severe adverse events. PMID:23349689

Koning, G. G.; Wetterslev, J.; van Laarhoven, C. J. H. M.; Keus, F.

2013-01-01

279

Acute direct inguinal hernia resulting from blunt abdominal trauma: Case Report.  

PubMed

We report a case of traumatic inguinal hernia following blunt abdominal trauma after a road traffic accident and describe the circumstances and technique of repair. The patient suffered multiple upper limb fractures and developed acute swelling of the right groin and scrotum. CT scan confirmed the acute formation of a traumatic inguinal hernia. Surgical repair was deferred until resolution of the acute swelling and subcutaneous haematoma. The indication for surgery was the potential for visceral strangulation or ischaemia with the patient describing discomfort on coughing. At surgery there was complete obliteration of the inguinal canal with bowel and omentum lying immediately beneath the attenuated external oblique aponeurosis. A modified prolene mesh hernia repair was performed after reconstructing the inguinal ligament and canal in layers.To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of the formation of an acute direct inguinal hernia caused as a result of blunt abdominal trauma with complete disruption of the inguinal canal. Surgical repair outlines the principles of restoration of normal anatomy in a patient who is physiologically recovered from the acute trauma and whose anatomy is distorted as a result of his injuries. PMID:20537142

Biswas, Seema; Vedanayagam, Maria; Hipkins, Gabrielle; Leather, Andrew

2010-01-01

280

Use of intraperitoneal ePTFE Gore dual-mesh plus in a giant incisional hernia after kidney transplantation: a case report.  

PubMed

We evaluated the incidence of and predisposing factors for an incisional hernia after kidney transplantation. Numerous techniques have been used to repair postoperative fascial dehiscences or simple incisional hernias, but no clear treatment exists for giant hernias. Our aim was to obtain (1) a safe procedure to repair a large abdominal defect and reinforce the surrounding, fragile zones and (2) a simple, rapid technique to reduce the operative time. Herein we have described the surgical repair of a giant incisional hernia using intraperitoneal Gore ePTFE dual-mesh plus (Gore-Tex; W. L. Gore, Flagstaff, Ariz, USA) in a 55-year-old man status-post renal transplantation. Total necrosis of distal graft ureter had caused a giant urinoma. The patient was reexplored on day 2 posttransplantation with a primary fascial approximation. Thirty days after transplantation we discovered a large incisional hernia and performed a repair. No drain was used. The patient continued immunosuppressive therapy (cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, prednisolone) and was discharged on postoperative day 4 with no complications. An ultrasonographic follow-up at 1 year revealed the prosthesis to be correctly positioned. Incisional hernia is not rare after renal transplantation but the real incidence is unknown. Immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged pretransplantation dialysis, obesity, and diabetes are probably the major causes of incisional hernias in these patients. Surgical complications of renal transplantation surgery, such as wound hematoma, urinoma, and lymphocele, are the most important predisposing factors for an incisional hernia. The use of intraperitoneal ePTFE dual-mesh is feasible, safe, and easy to repair a large incisional hernia in a kidney transplant patient. PMID:19460570

Lo Monte, A I; Damiano, G; Maione, C; Gioviale, M C; Lombardo, C; Buscemi, G; Romano, M

2009-05-01

281

Frequency of abdominal wall hernias: is classical teaching out of date?  

PubMed Central

Objectives Abdominal wall hernias are common. Various authors all quote the following order (in decreasing frequency): inguinal, femoral, umbilical followed by rarer forms. But are these figures outdated? We investigated the epidemiology of hernia repair (retrospective review) over 30 years to determine whether the relative frequencies of hernias are evolving. Design All hernia repairs undertaken in consecutive adult patients were assessed. Data included: patient demographics; hernia type; and operation details. Data were analysed using Microsoft Excel 2007 and SPSS. Setting A single United Kingdom hospital trust during three periods: 1985–1988; 1995–1998; and 2005–2008. Main outcome measures Frequency data of different hernia types during three time periods, patient demographic data. Results Over the three time periods, 2389 patients underwent 2510 hernia repairs (i.e. including bilateral and multiple hernias in a single patient). Inguinal hernia repair was universally the commonest hernia repair, followed by umbilical, epigastric, para-umbilical, incisional and femoral, respectively. Whereas femoral hernia repair was the second commonest in the 1980s, it had become the fifth most common by 2005–2008. While the proportion of groin hernia repairs has decreased over time, the proportion of midline abdominal wall hernias has increased. Conclusion The current relative frequency of different hernia repair type is: inguinal; umbilical; epigastric; incisional; para-umbilical; femoral; and finally other types e.g. spigelian. This contrasts with hernia incidence figures quoted in common reference books. PMID:21286228

Dabbas, Natalie; Adams, K; Pearson, K; Royle, GT

2011-01-01

282

Delayed Failure after Endoscopic Staple Repair of an Anterior Spine Surgery Related Pharyngeal Diverticulum  

PubMed Central

We present a rare complication of endoscopic staple repair of a pharyngeal diverticulum related to prior anterior cervical spine surgery. A 70-year-old male developed a symptomatic pharyngeal diverticulum 2 years after an anterior cervical fusion that was repaired via endoscopic stapler-assisted diverticulectomy. He initially had improvement of his symptoms after the stapler-assisted approach. Three years later, the patient presented with dysphagia and was found to have erosion of the cervical hardware into the pharyngeal lumen at the site of the prior repair. We present the first reported case of late hardware erosion into a pharyngeal diverticulum after endoscopic stapler repair. PMID:24454395

Al-Khudari, Samer; Succar, Eric; Ghanem, Tamer; Gardner, Glendon M.

2013-01-01

283

Emergency Open Incarcerated Hernia Repair with a Biological Mesh in a Patient with Colorectal Liver Metastasis Receiving Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab Uncomplicated Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), often used in combinational chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastases. However adverse events have been attributed to the use of bevacizumab including gastrointestinal perforations, thrombotic events, hypertension, bleeding, and wound healing complications. 53-year-old male, with a history of colorectal cancer with liver metastasis, receiving a combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy (FOLFIRI, irinotecan with fluorouracil and folinic acid) with bevacizumab presented as an emergency with an incarcerated incisional hernia. The last administration of chemotherapy and bevacizumab had taken place 2 weeks prior to this presentation. As the risk of strangulation of the bowel was increased, a decision was made to take the patient to theatre, although the hazard with respect to wound healing, haemorrhage, and infection risk was high due to the recent administration of chemotherapy with bevacizumab. The patient underwent an open repair of the incarcerated recurrent incisional hernia with placement of a biological mesh, and the postoperative recovery was uncomplicated with no wound healing or bleeding problems. PMID:25614840

Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Morrison, Dawn; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios

2014-01-01

284

Emergency open incarcerated hernia repair with a biological mesh in a patient with colorectal liver metastasis receiving chemotherapy and bevacizumab uncomplicated wound healing.  

PubMed

Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), often used in combinational chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastases. However adverse events have been attributed to the use of bevacizumab including gastrointestinal perforations, thrombotic events, hypertension, bleeding, and wound healing complications. 53-year-old male, with a history of colorectal cancer with liver metastasis, receiving a combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy (FOLFIRI, irinotecan with fluorouracil and folinic acid) with bevacizumab presented as an emergency with an incarcerated incisional hernia. The last administration of chemotherapy and bevacizumab had taken place 2 weeks prior to this presentation. As the risk of strangulation of the bowel was increased, a decision was made to take the patient to theatre, although the hazard with respect to wound healing, haemorrhage, and infection risk was high due to the recent administration of chemotherapy with bevacizumab. The patient underwent an open repair of the incarcerated recurrent incisional hernia with placement of a biological mesh, and the postoperative recovery was uncomplicated with no wound healing or bleeding problems. PMID:25614840

Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Morrison, Dawn; Neofytou, Kyriakos; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios; Mudan, Satvinder

2014-01-01

285

[Diaphragmatic hernia complicated with diaphragmatic resection by automatic stapling device].  

PubMed

Nowadays, a diaphragmatic lesion is sometimes resected with use of an automatic stapling device, especially through video-assisted thoracoscopic procedure. We herein report 2 patients with a diaphragmatic hernia after diaphragmatic resection by automatic stapling devices. Etiology and cause of postoperative diaphragmatic hernia are discussed. Diaphragmatic resection by mechanical stapler was performed for thymic epithelial tumor recurring at the diaphragmatic pleura in both patients: 48-year-old man and 72-year-old woman. The former patient underwent a right diaphragmatic resection (3×4 cm in size) with a cartridge of mechanical stapler. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed asymptomatic right diaphragmatic hernia 2 months after surgery. No symptom and progression occurred 8 years later. The latter patient underwent a right diaphragmatic resection (6×7 cm in size) with 2 cartridges of mechanical stapler. Diaphragmatic hernia advanced 7 months after surgery and required surgical intervention. Diaphragmatic repair was successful with the use of 8×6 cm expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch. Surgical stump after diaphragmatic resection with automatic stapling device is easy to rupture during diaphragmatic movement synchronized with respiratory movement. Diaphragmatic resection with use of stapling device, which is a simple procedure, should be contraindicated. PMID:25292370

Minegishi, Kentaro; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Shibano, Tomoki; Maki, Mitsuru; Mitsuda, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Tetsuka, Kenji; Tsubochi, Hiroyoshi; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Shunsuke

2014-10-01

286

In children undergoing umbilical hernia repair is rectus sheath block effective at reducing post-operative pain? Best evidence topic (bet).  

PubMed

A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: In children undergoing umbilical hernia repair is a rectus sheath block (RSB) better than local anaesthetic infiltration of the surgical site, at reducing post-operative pain? From a total of 34 papers, three studies provided the best available evidence on this topic. One randomised clinical trial showed RSB had a better analgesic effect in the immediate post-operative period. In another randomised trial opioid consumption in the peri-operative period was found to be significantly lower in patients administered RSB. These improvements in pain and analgesia consumption need to be balanced against the expertise, training, equipment required, time implications and complications of performing a RSB. PMID:25463042

Rajwani, Kapil M; Butler, Sarah; Mahomed, Anies

2014-12-01

287

Plastic surgery repair of abdominal wall and pelvic floor defects.  

PubMed

Urologists often encounter large perineal and abdominal wall defects, the treatment of which may require close collaboration with the plastic surgeon. These complex defects can be successfully treated using a variety of techniques. Ventral hernias or freshly created abdominal wall defects can be treated with the basic principles of tension-free closure using abdominal wall components separation, synthetic mesh reconstruction, and, more recently, biosynthetic acellular dermis reconstruction. Pelvic floor defects often require flap reconstruction using gracilis flaps, vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps, or local fasciocutaneous flap. In this article, we seek to familiarize the urologists with the most common techniques used by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the treatment of these complicated pelvic floor and abdominal wall defects. PMID:17349533

Buck, Donald W; Khalifeh, Marwan; Redett, Richard J

2007-01-01

288

Laparoscopic bridging vs. anatomic open reconstruction for midline abdominal hernia mesh repair [LABOR]: single-blinded, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial on long-term functional results  

PubMed Central

Background Re-approximation of the rectal muscles along the midline is recommended by some groups as a rule for incisional and ventral hernia repairs. The introduction of laparoscopic repair has generated a debate because it is not aimed at restoring abdominal wall integrity but instead aims just to bridge the defect. Whether restoration of the abdominal integrity has a real impact on patient mobility is questionable, and the available literature provides no definitive answer. The present study aims to compare the functional results of laparoscopic bridging with those of re-approximation of the rectal muscle in the midline as a mesh repair for ventral and incisional abdominal defect through an “open” access. We hypothesized that, for the type of defect suitable for a laparoscopic bridging, the effect of an anatomical reconstruction is near negligible, thus not a fixed rule. Methods and design The LABOR trial is a multicenter, prospective, two-arm, single-blinded, randomized trial. Patients of more than 60 years of age with a defect of less than 10 cm at its greatest diameter will be randomly submitted to open Rives or laparoscopic defect repair. All the participating patients will have a preoperative evaluation of their abdominal wall strength and mobility along with volumetry, respiratory function test, intraabdominal pressure and quality of life assessment. The primary outcome will be the difference in abdominal wall strength as measured by a double leg-lowering test performed at 12 months postoperatively. The secondary outcomes will be the rate of recurrence and changes in baseline abdominal mobility, respiratory function tests, intraabdominal pressure, CT volumetry and quality of life at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Discussion The study will help to define the most suitable treatment for small-medium incisional and primary hernias in patients older than 60 years. Given a similar mid-term recurrence rate in both groups, if the trial shows no differences among treatments (acceptance of the null-hypothesis), then the choice of whether to submit a patient to one intervention will be made on the basis of cost and the surgeon’s experience. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN93729016 PMID:24165473

2013-01-01

289

A rare variant of inguinal hernia: Cryptorchid testis at the age of 50 years. Etiopathogenicity, prognosis and management  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Cryptorchidism is characterized by the extra-scrotal position of the testis. The surgical community has little to no knowledge of cryptorchid testis in adults apart from of pediatric surgeons. Therefore, we sought to describe this unusual cause of inguinal hernia. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 50-year-old man was referred with a inguinal hernia. Diagnosis of cryptorchidism was made during surgery, as the patient underwent an operation for repair of his left inguinal hernia. The testicle was non-viable and a left testicle was resected. Histopathology report confirmed a atrophic testis without testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). DISCUSSION This is an extremely rare case of cryptorchidism revealed in an adult. The patient remained asymptomatic for 50 years. Most studies have concluded that there is a direct correlation between how long the testis was subjected to a cryptorchid position and TGCT incidence. The recommended age of surgical correction is before the age of 2 years. In our case, we did not find correlation between the time of surgery and risk of TGCT. Histopathology report confirmed the presence of leydig cells, seminiferous tubule and Sertoli cells without TGCT. Very little is known about link between cryptorchidism and TGCT. The correct diagnosis of inguinal hernia is usually made during an inguinal hernia repair. CONCLUSION The surgeon must always be alert to the possibility of cryptorchid testis during a surgical exploration of an inguinal hernia. In suspected cases, laparoscopy ultrasonographic, CT scan and laparoscopy evaluation may be helpful in diagnosing of this atypical inguinal hernia before surgery. PMID:24892247

Kassir, Radwan; Dubois, Joelle; Berremila, Sid-Ali; Baccot, Sylviane; Boueil-Bourlier, Alexia; Tiffet, Olivier

2014-01-01

290

Laparoscopic trans-peritoneal hernioplasty (TAPP) is useful for obturator hernias: report of a case.  

PubMed

A 71-year-old female presented to our hospital due to pain from the right hip joint to the lower abdomen. The pain had suddenly appeared and spontaneously disappeared more than 10 times during the past 2 years. She had visited many hospitals, but remained undiagnosed. The patient underwent a computed tomography (CT) scan of the pelvis, and a soft tissue shadow was seen between the external obturator and pectineal muscles. She was diagnosed with a right obturator hernia and underwent elective repair by laparoscopic trans-peritoneal hernioplasty (TAPP). 1 year has passed since the surgery, without any recurrence of the abdominal pain. Obturator hernias are rare, and most cases are found as incarcerated hernias. It is rare to find an obturator hernia without intestinal obstruction, or with the recurrent pain as in our case. We herein report a case in which an obturator hernia was undiagnosed and intermittent pain was experienced for 2 years prior to TAPP, which appears to have successfully treated the hernia. PMID:23975587

Otowa, Yasunori; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Sumi, Yasuo; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

2014-11-01

291

Laparoscopic treatment of type III and IV hiatal hernia – authors’ experience  

PubMed Central

Introduction There are four types of hiatal hernias, and diagnosis is established on the basis of gastroscopy in the majority of cases. Type III represents a mixed type in which the abdominal esophagus as well as the gastric cardia and fundus protrude into the thorax through the pathologically widened esophageal hiatus. Type IV, the so-called upside down stomach, can be considered an evolutionary form of type III, and refers to herniation of nearly the whole stomach (except for the cardia and pylorus) into the thorax. Types III and IV of hiatal hernias represent a group of rare diaphragmatic defects; thus, most centers do not possess considerable experience in their treatment. Frequently, laparoscopic treatment is implemented, although, according to some authors, conversion to laparotomy, thoracotomy, or thoracolaparotomy is necessary in selected cases. Aim To analyze the outcomes of laparoscopic treatment of the largest hiatal hernias, i.e. type III and IV hernias. Material and methods A total of 25 patients diagnosed with type III and IV hiatal hernia were included in further analysis. Results As many as 19 out of 25 patients (76%) assessed the outcome of the surgery as evidently positive and reported marked improvement in the quality of life. Conclusions The laparoscopic technique constitutes an excellent and safe method of repair of even the most complex defects in the esophageal hiatus. Therefore, the minimally invasive technique combined with an anti-reflux procedure should be the method of choice in patients with type III and IV hernia. PMID:25097681

Grzesiak-Kuik, Agata; P?dziwiatr, Micha?; Budzy?ski, Andrzej

2014-01-01

292

Surgical treatment of parastomal hernia complicating sigmoid colostomies  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: Parastomal hernia is a common late complication of colostomy. Surgical approach to the repair of parastomal hernia is controversial. Results of surgical treatment are disappointing. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of surgical treatment of parastomal hernia. METHOD: This article reports a retrospective review of those patients who had undergone a surgical treatment of parastomal

Moon-Tong Cheung; Nam-Hung Chia; Wai-Yip Chiu

2001-01-01

293

Incisional hernia around the suprapubic catheter: an unusual complication.  

PubMed

Hernia through the suprapubic catheterization (SPC) site is rare. Attention is required for such hernias as they get obstructed due to the narrow neck. We report this rare presentation in an elderly gentleman with obstructed incisional hernia through the SPC site, which was reduced and subsequently had a successful mesh repair. PMID:16943998

Rao, Amrith Raj; Hanchanale, Vishwanath S; Sharma, Mohit; Gordon, Andrew; Motiwala, Hanif

2007-02-01

294

Management of a complex recurrent perineal hernia  

PubMed Central

Symptomatic perineal hernias following abdomino-perineal excision of rectum have been reported to occur uncommonly. We present the case of a 79-year-old gentleman who developed a perineal hernia after laparoscopic-assisted extralevator abdomino-perineal excision (ELAPE) of the rectum. Despite initial myocutaneous flap repair, there was further symptomatic recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated non-compromised bowel extending beneath the gracilis flap with extension into the adductor compartment of the left thigh. Given the recurrent nature, a rectus flap repair was performed and after 15 months, he remains hernia free. There is currently no consensus as to the optimal operative technique in the prevention and management of these hernias; however, primary reconstruction at the time of ELAPE may be preferable. Symptomatic perineal hernias can be severely debilitating and require operative repair. We suggest that surgical options should be discussed and carried out with the input of a Plastic surgeon. PMID:24964466

Patel, Rikesh K.; Sayers, Adele E.; Gunn, James

2013-01-01

295

Management of a complex recurrent perineal hernia.  

PubMed

Symptomatic perineal hernias following abdomino-perineal excision of rectum have been reported to occur uncommonly. We present the case of a 79-year-old gentleman who developed a perineal hernia after laparoscopic-assisted extralevator abdomino-perineal excision (ELAPE) of the rectum. Despite initial myocutaneous flap repair, there was further symptomatic recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated non-compromised bowel extending beneath the gracilis flap with extension into the adductor compartment of the left thigh. Given the recurrent nature, a rectus flap repair was performed and after 15 months, he remains hernia free. There is currently no consensus as to the optimal operative technique in the prevention and management of these hernias; however, primary reconstruction at the time of ELAPE may be preferable. Symptomatic perineal hernias can be severely debilitating and require operative repair. We suggest that surgical options should be discussed and carried out with the input of a Plastic surgeon. PMID:24964466

Patel, Rikesh K; Sayers, Adele E; Gunn, James

2013-01-01

296

Sixty-month follow-up after endoscopic inguinal hernia repair with three types of mesh: a prospective randomized trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  This prospective, clinical, randomized, double-blind study was intended to investigate the impact of the structure and the\\u000a amount of polypropylene (PP) mesh used in laparoscopic transabdominal preperitoneal hernioplastic (TAPP) on physical function\\u000a and life quality.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  180 male patients with primary inguinal hernia undergoing TAPP were randomized for using a heavyweight (108 g\\/m2), double-filament PP mesh (Prolene, 10 × 15 cm, group A, n = 60), a

Mike Ralf Langenbach; Johannes Schmidt; Burkhard Ubrig; Hubert Zirngibl

2008-01-01

297

The Intra-Umbilical Approach in Umbilical Hernia  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the “intra-umbilical incision”, a smaller incision compared to classic incisions, in cases of umbilical hernia, and which we believe will contribute to patient satisfaction in aesthetic terms, and also the practicability of such operations. Materials and Methods: The umbilical margins of eight patients with an umbilical hernia were marked between the levels of 6 and 12 o’clock, and a median intra-umbilical skin incision was performed between these two points. In some cases, where exploration could not be performed sufficiently, the incision was extended horizontally from 6 or 12 o’clock. Hernia repair and mesh placement was then performed using an intra-umbilical approach. Results: Patients were investigated according to the defect size and requirement for intra-umbilical incision extension. No requirement for intra-umbilical incision was encountered in six patients with a facial defect diameter smaller than 4 cm, while the incision had to be extended in two patients with defects greater than 4 cm. Conclusion: The intra-umbilical approach in umbilical hernia surgery is aesthetically superior to classical approaches and is a practicable technique. PMID:25610291

Arslan, Sukru; Korkut, Ercan

2014-01-01

298

Umbilical paracentesis for acute hernia reduction in cirrhotic patients.  

PubMed

Emergent repair of umbilical hernias in cirrhotic patients is associated with a high risk for morbidity and mortality. We propose a new technique, umbilical paracentesis, for reduction of incarcerated hernias in the patient with ascites. Under ultrasound guidance, removal of ascitic fluid from the umbilical hernia sac can reduce the local pressure and thereby allow for easy hernia reduction, thus avoiding the need for an emergent operation. PMID:24132449

Russell, Katie W; Mone, Mary C; Scaife, Courtney L

2013-01-01

299

Internal obturator muscle transposition for treatment of perineal hernia in dogs: 34 cases (1998-2012).  

PubMed

Objective-To evaluate the outcome of dogs with perineal hernia treated with transposition of the internal obturator muscle. Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-34 dogs. Procedures-Medical records of dogs with perineal hernia surgically treated from 1998 to 2012 were reviewed. Diagnostic methods and surgical techniques were recorded. Dogs were assigned preoperative and postoperative clinical sign scores. Complication and recurrence rates were evaluated over time. Risk factors were determined. Results-Median follow-up time was 345 days (range, 22 to 1,423 days). Complications were observed in 10 dogs. Tenesmus (n = 9), dyschezia (7), fecal impaction (3), stranguria (4), hematochezia (2), urinary incontinence (2), diarrhea (1), urinary tract infection (1), and megacolon (1) occurred following surgery. Bladder retroflexion at the time of initial evaluation or surgery was not a risk factor for complication (hazard ratio, 1.72). One year after surgery, 51.2% dogs were free of complications. Three dogs developed a perineal hernia on the contralateral side between 35 and 95 days after surgery. The 1-year recurrence rate was 27.4%. Median time for recurrence was 28 days after surgery (range, 2 to 364 days). Postoperative tenesmus was a risk factor for the development of recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.29). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Internal obturator muscle transposition was used for primary repair of perineal hernia in dogs. Recurrence was recorded as long as 1 year after surgery. Tenesmus was a risk factor for the development of recurrence after treatment of perineal hernia with internal obturator muscle transposition. PMID:25587732

Shaughnessy, Magen; Monnet, Eric

2015-02-01

300

Abdominal closure reinforcement by using polypropylene mesh functionalized with poly-?-caprolactone nanofibers and growth factors for prevention of incisional hernia formation.  

PubMed

Incisional hernia affects up to 20% of patients after abdominal surgery. Unlike other types of hernia, its prognosis is poor, and patients suffer from recurrence within 10 years of the operation. Currently used hernia-repair meshes do not guarantee success, but only extend the recurrence-free period by about 5 years. Most of them are nonresorbable, and these implants can lead to many complications that are in some cases life-threatening. Electrospun nanofibers of various polymers have been used as tissue scaffolds and have been explored extensively in the last decade, due to their low cost and good biocompatibility. Their architecture mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We tested a biodegradable polyester poly-?-caprolactone in the form of nanofibers as a scaffold for fascia healing in an abdominal closure-reinforcement model for prevention of incisional hernia formation. Both in vitro tests and an experiment on a rabbit model showed promising results. PMID:25031534

Plencner, Martin; East, Barbora; Tonar, Zbyn?k; Otáhal, Martin; Prosecká, Eva; Rampichová, Michala; Krej?í, Tomáš; Litvinec, Andrej; Buzgo, Matej; Mí?ková, Andrea; Ne?as, Alois; Hoch, Ji?í; Amler, Evžen

2014-01-01

301

An updated traditional classification of inguinal hernias.  

PubMed

The traditional classification of inguinal hernias is the most widely used system today; however, it does not categorize all inguinal hernias nor their levels of complexity. The named systems of Gilbert, Nyhus, and Schumpelick are reviewed, and their common features are analyzed. A simple updating of the traditional classification along with the use of common modifiers creates a system that is all-inclusive and easy to use for data registries. The traditional classification of inguinal hernias (indirect, direct, and femoral) has withstood the test of time for almost 150 years. In this interval, inguinal hernia repairs have experienced significant evolution from simple ligation of the sac or suturing of the muscular defect to improved primary tissue repairs (e.g., Bassini, McVay, Shouldice) based upon better anatomic principles. Also during the past 30 years, two major revolutions in operative repairs have occurred. First, there is the use of mesh and, second, its placement laparoscopically. As a consequence, hernia surgeons today must choose among multiple competing operative techniques. No one operative technique has proven to be best for all inguinal hernias. Also different levels of complexity and severity exist among inguinal hernias, and thus it is essential that we accurately classify the various inguinal hernias, such that we surgeons can provide the best operative solution for each patient. As Fitzgibbons [1] states, "The primary purpose of a classification for any disease is to stratify for severity so that reasonable comparisons can be made between various treatment strategies." PMID:15221644

Zollinger, Robert M

2004-12-01

302

Unilateral inguinal hernia in girls: Is routine contralateral exploration justified?  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the incidence of contralateral hernia development after unilateral inguinal hernia repair in girls, collected case series from two large hospitals were analyzed retrospectively. Among the 294 girls who had undergone repair of a unilateral inguinal hernia (during a 15-year period), 245 could be traced; the mean follow-up period was 8.4 years. In 25 (10.2%) of the patients, contralateral

? Ulman; M Demircan; A Arikan; A Avano?lu; O Ergün; G Özok; A Erdener

1995-01-01

303

Risk of continuing planned surgery after endovascular repair of subclavian artery injury: a case report  

PubMed Central

Endovascular repair with covered stents has been widely used to treat subclavian and axillary artery injuries and has produced promising early results. The possibility of a thromboembolism occurring in cerebral arteries during an endovascular procedure should be a cause for concern. In the case of endovascular management of arterial traumas, a prompt and sufficient period for check-up of the patient's neurological signs is needed, even if it requires postponing elective intervention for the patient's safety. We report a rare case of liver transplantation immediately after endovascular repair of an iatrogenic subclavian arterial injury to describe the risk of continuing planned surgery without neurologic assessment. PMID:25237452

Kwon, O-Sun; Kim, Won-Sung; Hong, Jung-Min; Cho, Hyun-Jun

2014-01-01

304

One surgeon experiences in childhood inguinal hernias  

PubMed Central

Purpose In this manuscript we report one pediatric surgeon's experience in childhood inguinal hernia repair. Methods From 2005 to 2008, 402 children with inguinal hernias were operated on by one surgeon. A retrospective survey of their charts was carried out to evaluate the demographics and clinical aspects of these patients. Results The ages ranged from 20 days to 16 years with a male-to-female ratio of 2.5:1. 64.9% right, 27.1% left, and 7.9% bilateral hernias. Hydroceles were present in 6.2% assosiated hernias. Incarceration occurred in 8.7% of children. An opposite-side hernia developed in 5.7%. 5.3 percent of patients with a hernia repair on the right side later developed a hernia on the left side, and 8.2% of patients with a hernia repair on the left side later developed one on the right side. 4.5 percent of all male patients in this series and 8.6% of female patients developed an opposite-side hernia. While overall recurrence rate was 1.2%, our recurrence rate was 0.25%. There was a 0.24% wound infection rate, and 1 (0.24%) testicle was atrophic at follow-up. Conclusion In this study, in the recurrence of childhood hernia, the general surgeon's intervention was the prominent cause. It is suggested by the study that inguinal hernias on the contralateral side becomes symptomatic within the first six months following initial operation.Therefor, close observation is needed in that time. PMID:22066100

2011-01-01

305

Team Training (Training at Own Facility) versus Individual Surgeon's Training (Training at Trainer's Facility) When Implementing a New Surgical Technique: Example from the ONSTEP Inguinal Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Background. When implementing a new surgical technique, the best method for didactic learning has not been settled. There are basically two scenarios: the trainee goes to the teacher's clinic and learns the new technique hands-on, or the teacher goes to the trainee's clinic and performs the teaching there. Methods. An informal literature review was conducted to provide a basis for discussing pros and cons. We also wanted to discuss how many surgeons can be trained in a day and the importance of the demand for a new surgical procedure to ensure a high adoption rate and finally to apply these issues on a discussion of barriers for adoption of the new ONSTEP technique for inguinal hernia repair after initial training. Results and Conclusions. The optimal training method would include moving the teacher to the trainee's department to obtain team-training effects simultaneous with surgical technical training of the trainee surgeon. The training should also include a theoretical presentation and discussion along with the practical training. Importantly, the training visit should probably be followed by a scheduled visit to clear misunderstandings and fine-tune the technique after an initial self-learning period. PMID:25506078

Laursen, Jannie

2014-01-01

306

Tertiary surgery for complicated repair of esophageal atresia.  

PubMed

Aim?The ideal repair of esophageal atresia (EA) is primary anastomosis with closure of the fistula if present. Long gap or local circumstances prompt other procedures that occasionally lead to disastrous complications. The aim of this study was to analyze the management of these complications in a tertiary referral center. Patients and Methods?A retrospective review of patients treated for EA between 1993 and 2013 was conducted. Both the patients were primarily treated by us, and referrals from elsewhere after two or more failed operations were included. Results?In total, 23 patients were included (3/176 cases of EA treated primarily by us and 20 referrals). Of the 23 patients, 6 had type I EA, 15 type III (four long gaps), 1 type IV, and 1 type V. Cardiac anomalies were associated in seven cases, duodenal atresia in three, and Down syndrome in two patients. Primary anastomosis was initially achieved in 12 patients. Primary or secondary Foker lengthening was used in seven cases. The causes of the failure were anastomotic leaks in nine, unmanageable strictures in seven, and refistulization in five patients. These patients required 66 reoperations (median of 3 [2-7]) before inclusion in the study. Radical tertiary treatment consisted of 15 esophageal replacements (11 colonic grafts and 4 gastric pull-ups), and 1 esophageal-gastric disconnection. Five patients previously treated with esophageal replacement and referred for graft problems required 13 interventions. Two families did not give consent for one replacement and one disconnection. Complications appeared in 12 patients, and 9 additional operations were required in 7 patients. With a follow-up of 31 months (range, 4-139 months) 15 patients take all their meals per os, 5 occasionally use the gastrostomy, and 2 and 1 are fed exclusively via gastrostomy or jejunostomy. All tracheoesophageal fistulas were closed, but 15 cases are below p3 for weight and 12 for height. Three patients (13%) ultimately died 32 months (range, 9-56 months) after the first operation (due to aspiration in one, and for causes unrelated to it in the other two [tracheostomy obstruction and Guillain-Barré syndrome]). Conclusions?When repeated complications appear after EA repair, radical surgical attitudes may be justified. If esophageal continuity cannot be reestablished, the native esophagus may have to be discarded and replaced. Many complications should be expected, but the end result can be good. These patients should be referred to centers with large experience in the management of this complex condition. PMID:25144352

Ortiz, Ruben; Galán, Alba Sánchez; Martinez, Leopoldo; Dominguez, Eva; Hernández, Francisco; Santamaria, Manuel Lopez; Tovar, Juan Antonio

2015-02-01

307

Efficacy of tramadol as a preincisional infiltration anesthetic in children undergoing inguinal hernia repair: a prospective randomized study  

PubMed Central

Background Preincisional local anesthetic infiltration at the surgical site is a therapeutic option for postoperative pain relief for pediatric inguinal hernia. Additionally, tramadol has been used as an analgesic for postoperative pain in children. Recently, the local anesthetic effects of tramadol have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine both the systemic analgesic and the local anesthetic effects of tramadol and to determine how it differs from bupivacaine when administered preincisionally. Methods Fifty-two healthy children, aged 2–7 years, who were scheduled for elective herniorrhaphy were randomly allocated to receive either preincisional infiltration at the surgical site with 2 mg/kg tramadol (Group T, n=26) or 0.25 mL/kg 0.5% bupivacaine (Group B, n=26). At the time of anesthetic administration, perioperative hemodynamic parameters were recorded. The pain assessments were performed 10 minutes after the end of anesthesia and during the first 6-hour period, using pain scores. The time of first dose of analgesia and need for additional analgesia were recorded. Results Between T and B groups, the anesthesia time, perioperative hemodynamic changes, and pain scores were not statistically different. However, in group B, the postoperative analgesic requirement was higher than in group T. Conclusion Tramadol shows equal analgesic effect to bupivacaine and decreases additional analgesic requirement, when used for preincisional infiltration anesthesia in children undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy. PMID:25285011

Numano?lu, Kemal Var?m; Ayo?lu, Hilal; Er, Duygu Tatl?Ebubekir

2014-01-01

308

Muscle hernias of the leg: A case report and comprehensive review of the literature  

PubMed Central

A case involving a retired, elderly male war veteran with a symptomatic peroneus brevis muscle hernia causing superficial peroneal nerve compression with chosen surgical management is presented. Symptomatic muscle hernias of the extremities occur most commonly in the leg and are a rare cause of chronic leg pain. Historically, treating military surgeons pioneered the early documentation of leg hernias observed in active military recruits. A focal fascial defect can cause a muscle to herniate, forming a variable palpable subcutaneous mass, and causing pain and potentially neuropathic symptoms with nerve involvement. While the true incidence is not known, the etiology has been classified as secondary to a congenital (or constitutional) fascial weakness, or acquired fascial defect, usually secondary to direct or indirect trauma. The highest occurrence is believed to be in young, physically active males. Involvement of the tibialis anterior is most common, although other muscles have been reported. Dynamic ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging is often used to confirm diagnosis and guide treatment. Most symptomatic cases respond successfully to conservative treatment, with surgery reserved for refractory cases. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from fasciotomy to anatomical repair of the fascial defect, with no consensus on optimal treatment. Clinicians must remember to consider muscle hernias in their repertoire of differential diagnoses for chronic leg pain or neuropathy. A comprehensive review of muscle hernias of the leg is presented to highlight their history, occurrence, presentation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24497767

Nguyen, Jesse T; Nguyen, Jenny L; Wheatley, Michael J; Nguyen, Tuan A

2013-01-01

309

Cooperative hernia study. Pain in the postrepair patient.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The Cooperative Hernia Study assessed postoperative pain in a prospective trial as part of a larger study looking at the recurrence rate and other morbidity of the Bassini, McVay, and Shouldice repairs. METHODS: Patients were randomized to one of three surgical hernia repairs. Patients were seen in follow-up at 6, 12, and 24 months and were assessed for the presence of pain, numbness, paresthesia, and recurrence. RESULTS: Three hundred fifteen patients were seen in follow-up, with 276 seen at the 2-year mark. At 1 year, 62.9% of patients had groin or inguinal pain and 11.9% of patients had moderate to severe pain; 53.6% had pain and 10.6% of patients continued to report moderate to severe pain 2 years postoperatively. The predictors for long-term postoperative pain were as follows: absence of a visible bulge before the operation (p < 0.001); presence of numbness in the surgical area postoperatively (p < 0.05); and patient requirement of more than 4 weeks out of work postoperatively (p < 0.004). Three distinct chronic pains were identified. The most common and most severe pain was somatic, localized to the common ligamentous insertion to the public tubercle. The second was neuropathic and was referable to the ilioinguinal or genitofemoral nerve distribution. This was likely because of injury to the genitofemoral nerves, either at surgery or subsequently by encroachment of scar. The third pain was visceral, ejaculatory pain. Twenty-four percent of patients had postoperative numbness at 2 years, independent of the type of repair. Numbness was most common in the distribution of cutaneous branches of the ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves. CONCLUSION: Pain or numbness are common late sequelae of traditional external surgical hernia repairs. Strategies need to be developed to reduce the risk of these complications. PMID:8916874

Cunningham, J; Temple, W J; Mitchell, P; Nixon, J A; Preshaw, R M; Hagen, N A

1996-01-01

310

Inguinal hernia recurrence: Classification and approach  

PubMed Central

The authors reviewed the records of 2,468 operations of groin hernia in 2,350 patients, including 277 recurrent hernias updated to January 2005. The data obtained - evaluating technique, results and complications - were used to propose a simple anatomo-clinical classification into three types which could be used to plan the surgical strategy: Type R1: first recurrence ‘high,’ oblique external, reducible hernia with small (<2 cm) defect in non-obese patients, after pure tissue or mesh repairType R2: first recurrence ‘low,’ direct, reducible hernia with small (<2 cm) defect in non-obese patients, after pure tissue or mesh repairType R3: all the other recurrences - including femoral recurrences; recurrent groin hernia with big defect (inguinal eventration); multirecurrent hernias; nonreducible, linked with a controlateral primitive or recurrent hernia; and situations compromised from aggravating factors (for example obesity) or anyway not easily included in R1 or R2, after pure tissue or mesh repair. PMID:21187986

Campanelli, Giampiero; Pettinari, Diego; Cavalli, Marta; Avesani, Ettore Contessini

2006-01-01

311

Laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair without suprapubic port: comparison with conventional totally extraperitoneal repair  

PubMed Central

Purpose We have treated 24 patients through laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) repair without suprapubic port by using reliability and reducing the invasiveness of two surgery. This study is aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of the TEP repair without suprapubic port compared to conventional TEP repair. Methods From September 2007 to 11 May 2010, we compared two groups that suffer from inguinal hernias. One is comprised of 24 patients who were treated without suprapubic port laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair (Group A), and the other is comprised of 100 patients who were treated with conventional laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair (Group B). Data regarding patient demographics (sex, age, site of hernia, and the type of hernia), operating time, postoperative hospital stay, the use of analgesics, and complications were prospectively collected. Results There was no significant difference noted between two groups in relation to sex, age, site, and the type of hernia. The mean operating time and postoperative hospital stay was longer for the Group B (62.9 minutes, 3.55 days) than for the Group A (59.0 minutes, 2.54 days) (P = 0.389, P < 0.001). Postoperative urinary retention, seroma, wound infection were respectively 4.2%, 8.3%, 0% in Group A, and 12.0%, 8.0%, 7% in group B. There was difference between the two groups, but not statistical significance. Group B used more analgesics than Group A (0.33 vs. 0.48), but it wasn't significant statistically (P = 0.234). Conclusion Although prospective randomized studies with long-term follow-up evaluation are needed to confirm our study between laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair without suprapubic-port and conventional laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal repair, our method have some advantages in postoperative pain, urinary retention, operating time, postoperative hospital stay, and cosmetic effect. PMID:22066055

Kwon, Ki-Hwak; Han, Won-Kon

2011-01-01

312

Hernia, Mesh, and Topical Antibiotics, Especially Gentamycin: Seeking the Evidence for the Perfect Outcome…  

PubMed Central

Inguinal hernia repair is a clean surgical procedure and surgical site infection (SSI) rate is generally below 2%. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not routinely recommended, but it may be a good choice for institutions with high rates of wound infection (>5%). Typical prophylaxis is the intravenous application of first or second-generation cephalosporins before the skin incision. However, SSI rate remains more than 2% in many centers in spite of intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis. Even a 1% SSI rate may be unacceptable for the surgeons who specifically deal with hernia surgery. A hernia center targets to be a center of excellence not only in respect of recurrence rate but also for other postoperative outcomes, therefore a further measure is required for an excellent result regarding infection control. Topical gentamycin application in combination with preoperative single-dose intravenous antibiotic may be a useful to obtain this perfect outcome. Data about this subject are not complete and high-grade evidence has not been cumulated yet. Prospective randomized controlled trials can make our knowledge more solid about this subject and help the surgeons who seek perfect outcome regarding infection control in inguinal hernia surgery.

Kulacoglu, Hakan

2015-01-01

313

Management of groin hernias in patients with ascites.  

PubMed Central

The records of 18 cirrhotic patients with ascites and groin hernias (20 inguinal and one femoral) were retrospectively reviewed. Eleven patients underwent repair of their groin hernias (total of 13 repairs). Ten herniorrhaphies were performed electively, two were performed urgently because of recent difficult reduction, and one was performed emergently for incarceration without strangulation. No major and four minor postoperative complications occurred. There were no perioperative deaths or ascites leaks. Of the 13 hernias in 11 patients undergoing repair, 12 (92%) were available for follow-up. In this group, the 12 groin hernia repairs were followed for a mean of 25 months. One recurrence (8%) occurred 11 months after repair. In this same group of patients, five umbilical hernias were repaired, with three recurrences (60%). From this retrospective study, it appears that serious complications from groin hernias in cirrhotics are not common, and elective repair can usually await control of ascites. Additionally, for appropriately selected patients with ascites, elective inguinal hernia repair can be performed safely, with an acceptable rate of recurrence. PMID:1466624

Hurst, R D; Butler, B N; Soybel, D I; Wright, H K

1992-01-01

314

Novel in Vitro Model for Assessing Susceptibility of Synthetic Hernia Repair Meshes to Staphylococcus aureus Infection Using Green Fluorescent Protein-Labeled Bacteria and Modern Imaging Techniques  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Mesh infection complicating hernia repair is a major cause of patient morbidity and results in substantial healthcare expenditures. The various constructs of prosthetic mesh may alter the ability of bacteria to attach and form a biofilm. Few data exist evaluating biofilm formation. Using the Maestro in-Vivo Imaging System (CRi, Inc., Woburn, MA) to detect green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Staphylococcus aureus, we studied the ability of synthetic mesh to withstand bacterial biofilm formation in an in vitro model. Methods We included four meshes: Polypropylene (PP), polypropylene/expanded PTFE (PX), compressed PTFE (cPTFE), and polyester/polyethylene glycol and collagen hydrogel (PE). Five samples of each mesh were exposed to GFP-expressing S. aureus for 18?h at 37°C. Next, green fluorescence was measured using the Maestro Imaging System, with the results expressed in relative fluorescence units (RFU), subtracting the fluorescence of uninfected mesh (control). Each mesh subsequently underwent sonication and quantitative culture of the released bacteria, with the results expressed in colony-forming units (CFU). Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean values for the different meshes. Results There was a statistically significant difference in bacterial fluorescence for the four meshes: PE (49.9?±?25.5 [standard deviation] RFU), PX (30.8?±?9.4 RFU), cPTFE (10.1?±?4.0 RFU), and PP (5.8?±?7.5 RFU)(p?=?0.001). Bacterial counts also were significantly different: PE (2.2?×?108 CFU), PX (8.6?×?107 CFU), cPTFE (3.7?×?107 CFU), and PP (9.1?×?107 CFU)(p?

Halaweish, Ihab; Harth, Karem; Broome, Ann-Marie; Voskerician, Gabriela; Jacobs, Michael R.

2010-01-01

315

Concomitant tricuspid valve repair in patients with minimally invasive mitral valve surgery  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to investigate the 10-year Leipzig experience with minimally invasive mitral valve (MIMV) surgery in combination with tricuspid valve (TV) surgery. Methods Between January 2002 and December 2011, a total of 441 patients with mitral valve (MV) dysfunction and concomitant TV regurgitation (TR) underwent MIMV surgery at the Leipzig Heart Center. The mean age was 68.7±10.0 years, mean LVEF was 56.7%±13.1% and 184 patients (41.7%) were male. The Average logEuroSCORE was 8.3%±7.2%, and patients had an average follow-up of 3.4±2.4 years. Results Pre-discharge echocardiography showed no or mild mitral regurgitation (MR) in 95.1% and no or mild TR in 84.1%. Overall 30-day mortality was 4.3% with nineteen deaths. Five-year survival was 77.2%±2.5%. Five-year freedom from TV-related reoperation was 91.0%±1.8%. Conclusions Our 10-year experience show that MIMV surgery in combination with TV surgery can be performed routinely with good peri- and post-operative results. Our observations support current recommendations to perform concomitant TV repair, particularly if tricuspid annular dilation is present. PMID:24349978

Pfannmüller, Bettina; Davierwala, Piroze; Hirnle, Gregor; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Garbade, Jens; Seeburger, Joerg; Mohr, Friedrich W.

2013-01-01

316

Surgery for left ventricular aneurysm: is there still any role for simple linear repair?  

PubMed

The aim of left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) surgery is to eliminate the diskinetic portion of the left ventricle and to restore the patient's clinical condition. This can be obtained with two surgical procedures: linear repair and endoventricular patch technique. We investigated early- and long-term results in patients who underwent both procedures. From January 1980 to December 2004, 158 patients underwent surgical repair of LVA: 86 had linear repair and 72 patch repair. Operative mortality was 6.9%, with no differences between the two groups. Logistic regression revealed older age, higher left ventricular end-diastolic volume, and an ejection fraction (EF) less than 30% as independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality; the type of operation "per se" did not influence the early mortality. At the follow-up extending up to 25 years, there was no statistically significant difference in survival between the two study groups, as well as in New York Heart Association and Canadian Cardiovascular Society classes. Cox regression revealed older age, EF less than 30%, urgent operation, and a history of cerebrovascular accident as independent risk factors for late mortality: the type of operation did not influence mortality at follow-up. We conclude that aneurysm resection associated with myocardial revascularization is the best treatment for LVA. The choice of the technique should be tailored on an individual basis, according to aneurism location, extension, residual ventricular function, and septal involvement. PMID:19267824

Monaco, Mario; Stassano, Paolo; Di Tommaso, Luigi; Pepino, Paolo; Iannelli, Gabriele; Spampinato, Nicola

2009-01-01

317

A rare nonincisional lateral abdominal wall hernia  

PubMed Central

A 68-year-old woman presented a rare lateral abdominal wall hernia. Three month before admission to Chungbuk National University Hospital, she found a large protruding mass measuring 8 cm in diameter in the midaxillary line just below the costal margin upon heavy coughing. She had no history of abdominal trauma, infection, or operation previously. The mass was easily reduced manually or by position change to left lateral decubitus. CT scan showed a defect of the right transversus abdominis muscle and internal oblique muscle at the right flank with omental herniation. Its location is different from that of spigelian hernia or lumbar hernia. The peritoneal lining of the hernia sac was smooth and there was no evidence of inflammation or adhesion. The hernia was successfully repaired laparoscopically using Parietex composite mesh with an intraperitoneal onlay mesh technique. The patient was discharged uneventfully and did not show any evidence of recurrence at follow-up visits.

Kim, Dong-Ju

2015-01-01

318

Epigastric and Umbilical Hernia; Work Relatedness and Return to Work  

PubMed Central

Abdominal wall hernia is common but reliable scientific data about its work relatedness is very limited and inconsistent. In this paper, a less common type of abdominal wall hernia in a 30 year old male worker is presented with recurrence after first surgery when he returned to work. In contrast with almost all kinds of hernia, a lifelong limitation for heavy lifting was recommended. It seems that contrary to popular belief, work relatedness of abdominal wall hernia is seriously doubtful, although conclusive evidences are not enough. It is preferable to make decisions cautiously for return to heavy duties of work after surgery of large umbilical, umbilical & epigastric or incisional hernia, while avoiding recommendations for long days off work after surgery of any hernia. PMID:23641412

MEHRDAD, Ramin; SADEGHNIIAT HAGHIGHI, Khosro; NASERI ESFAHANI, Amir Hossein

2013-01-01

319

Hernia recurrence through a composite mesh secondary to transfascial suture holes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair is an accepted method for incisional hernia repair. Although techniques vary, transfascial\\u000a suturing of the mesh to the abdominal wall has been proposed as a viable way to fixate the mesh and reduce recurrence rates.\\u000a We report a 54-year-old woman who had previously undergone a laparoscopic ventral hernia repair following a laparoscopic tubal\\u000a ligation using a

D. Barzana; K. Johnson; T. V. Clancy; W. W. Hope

320

[Historical evolution of inguinal hernia treatment].  

PubMed

Hernia (know breuk in Dutch, rompure in French, keal in Greek and rupture in English) has plagued humans throughout recorded history and descriptions of hernia reduction date back to the Ebers papyrus in Egypt. In medicine it is difficult to find historical periods, but we found two eras of uneven time: pre-technique and technique. The first was distinguished by a blend of empiricism and magic, and the second for greater comprehension of the human body; however much of modern surgical techniques result from contributions of early surgeons. Nonetheless, it was not until the late 19th century that hernia surgeon Eduardo Bassini published his work Nuovo Metodo per la Cura Radiacale dell"Ernia Inguinale (in 1889). Among the most notable contemporany classic hernia repairs are the Bassini, Halsted, Shouldice, and Tension-free repair techniques. PMID:14617414

Rodríguez-Ortega, M Fernando; Cárdenas-Martínez, Guadalupe; López-Castañeda, Hugo

2003-01-01

321

Subxiphoid incisional hernias after median sternotomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Subxiphoid incisional hernias are notoriously difficult to repair and are prone to recurrence. The few reports on subxiphoid\\u000a hernia published over the last two decades have not fully addressed the etiology, pathology, treatment, and outcome of this\\u000a problem. This review was performed to analyze the published experience and increase the understanding of these difficult hernias.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We reviewed the extensive literature,

J. E. Losanoff; M. D. Basson; S. Laker; M. Weiner; J. D. Webber; S. A. Gruber

2007-01-01

322

Success in Esophageal Perforation Repair with open-wound Management after Revision Cervical Spine Surgery - A Case Report.  

PubMed

Study Design. Case report.Objective. To share our successful experience in treating one case of esophageal perforation following anterior revision cervical spine surgery with open-wound managementSummary of Background Data. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment is widely adopted in the management of esophageal complications after anterior cervical spine surgery, but the management of wound after surgical repair of esophageal perforation is rarely discussed.Methods. One patient underwent revision anterior cervical spine surgery because of displaced hardware and poor alignment of cervical spine. Esophageal perforation was incurred intraoperatively and found on the first postoperative day. Repair surgery was carried out immediately afterwards. During the surgery, esophageal perforation was closed with a suture, and reinforced with a sternocleidomastoid muscle flap. The wound was loosely closed with aspirating drainage. Two days after the surgery, the patient began to show signs of recurrent esophageal leakage and severe secondary wound infection. The wound was then re-opened completely before a continuous irrigation and drainage system was positioned in place.Result. In twelve weeks, the esophageal perforation healed without complications or loosening of instrumentation.Conclusion. Open-wound management succeeded in this patient after surgical repair of esophageal perforation caused by revision anterior cervical spine surgery. PMID:25398037

Ji, Hongquan; Liu, Dandan; You, Weitao; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Zhongjun

2014-11-13

323

The Role of Laparoscopy in the Management of Groin Hernia  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The advantage of using minimally invasive techniques over open techniques in the repair of groin hernias is still debated. Despite its more widespread use, an apparent dichotomy exists. While some surgeons continue to believe that no advantage is gained using the laparoscopic technique, others argue laparoscopic hernia repair (LHR) offers a quicker recovery with the use of a tensionfree repair. Methods: A mailing to the general surgeon members of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, an international multidisciplinary laparoendoscopic society, was performed (mailing size=l680). Results: Nine hundred and ninety-three surgeons responded (60%). Across all demographic variables, 60% of respondents performed approximately 27% of their hernia repairs laparoscopically (40% of respondents did not perform LHR). Surgeon age less than 45 was the only demographic characteristic that predicted the likelihood to perform LHR (p<0.0001) and the percentage of hernias repaired laparoscopically (p<0.005). Most respondents felt that the presence of bilateral hernias (73%) or a recurrent hernia (74%) were indications for LHR. Eighty-nine percent of respondents felt that LHR would still be performed 20 years from now. Surgeons expressed concerns regarding increased cost, the need for more anesthesia, and a lack of long-term follow-up for LHR. Conclusions: Only surgeon age predicted the likelihood of a surgeon performing LHR or the percentage of hernias that would be repaired laparoscopically. PMID:9876732

Ahmad, Syed; Lettsome, Lydell

1998-01-01

324

The economic analysis of two treatment procedures for incisional hernias - alloplastic versus tissular  

PubMed Central

Incisional hernias are a common complication of abdominal surgery. Research shows that their incidence reaches 10%-11% of the total number of patients subject to laparotomy. Recurrent hernias are the main complication of eventrations and its rate ranges from 5 to 54%, depending on both the surgical procedure used and the follow-up methods. The goal of this study is the comparative cost analysis of two procedures used in the treatment of event rations, tissular versus alloplastic, the former, leading very often to recurrence requiring a new surgical intervention. The analysis comprised 156 cases of surgeries performed for incisional hernia in 2007 in the clinic of Surgery III, SUUB (Bucharest University Emergency Hospital). Tissular procedures were used in 42 cases and prosthetic procedures in 114 cases. The medium-term postoperative follow-up has revealed 17 relapses (40.4%) in the tissular batch and no relapse in the batch where parietal prosthesis was used. If the short-term costs of the tissular procedures are low as compared with the prosthetic procedures, on the medium-term the costs increase by 24.35% due to the high rate of relapses of tissular procedures. Therefore, the tissular procedure must be abandoned due to the high rate of relapse, as this drives additional costs required for the alloplastic repair of the abdominal parietal defects in a subsequent surgical intervention. PMID:24653765

Mavrodin, C; Pariza, G; Ion, D; Ciurea, M

2014-01-01

325

Inguinal Hernia  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... will help you decide when you will go back to work and under what restrictions. Make sure to contact your doctor in case of any new symptoms, such as fever, severe abdominal pain, weakness, swelling, or infection. Summary Hernias are a ...

326

Incisional Hernia  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... will help you decide when you will go back to work and under what restrictions. Make sure to contact your doctor in case of any new symptoms, such as fever, severe abdominal pain, weakness, swelling, or infection. Summary Hernias are a ...

327

Biomechanical evaluation of three fixation modalities for preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: a 24-hour postoperative study in pigs  

PubMed Central

Purpose Tacks and sutures ensure a strong fixation of meshes, but they can be associated with pain and discomfort. Less invasive methods are now available. Three fixation modalities were compared: the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh; the fibrin glue Tisseel™ with Bard™ Soft Mesh; and the SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system with Bard™ Soft Mesh. Materials and methods Meshes (6 cm ×6 cm) were implanted in the preperitoneal space of swine. Samples were explanted 24 hours after surgery. Centered defects were created, and samples (either ten or eleven per fixation type) were loaded in a pressure chamber. For each sample, the pressure, the mesh displacement through the defect, and the measurements of the contact area were recorded. Results At all pressures tested, the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh both exhibited a significantly lower displacement through the defect and retained a significantly higher percentage of its initial contact area than either the Bard™ Soft Mesh with Tisseel™ system or the Bard™ Soft Mesh with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system. Dislocations occurred with the Bard™ Soft Mesh with Tisseel™ system and with the Bard™ Soft Mesh with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system at physiological pressure (,225 mmHg). No dislocation was recorded for the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh. Conclusion At 24 hours after implantation, the mechanical fixation of the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh was found to be significantly better than the fixation of the Tisseel™ system or the SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system. PMID:25525396

Guérin, Gaëtan; Bourges, Xavier; Turquier, Frédéric

2014-01-01

328

Perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia after iliac crest bone graft - a case report  

PubMed Central

Background The combination of perforated diverticulitis in a lumbar hernia constitutes an extremely rare condition. Case presentation We report a case of a 66 year old Caucasian woman presenting with perforated sigmoid diverticulitis localized in a lumbar hernia following iliac crest bone graft performed 18 years ago. Emergency treatment consisted of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage. Elective sigmoid resection was scheduled four months later. At the same time a laparoscopic hernia repair with a biologic mesh graft was performed. Conclusion This case shows a very seldom clinical presentation of lumbar hernia. Secondary colonic resection and concurrent hernia repair with a biologic implant have proven useful in treating this rare condition. PMID:25051974

2014-01-01

329

Transmesosigmoid hernia: case report and review of literature.  

PubMed

Transmesosigmoid hernia has previously been considered as a rare condition. The clinical symptoms can be nonspecific. Here, we report a case of acute intestinal obstruction because of transmesosigmoid hernia. In addition, after a comprehensive review of PubMed and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, we present a review of 22 cases of transmesosigmoid hernia. We summarize several valuable clinical features that help early recognition of transmesosigmoid hernia. As a result of easy strangulation, in patients without a history of surgery or abdominal inflammation who present with symptoms of progressive or persistent small bowel obstruction (SBO), surgeons should consider the possibility of transmesosigmoid hernia. In addition, based on our data, in patients with SBO because of transmesosigmoid hernia, the defect is usually 2-5 cm in diameter. Furthermore, because of the high risk of strangulation with transmesosigmoid hernia, it is mandatory to reassess the condition timely and periodically when patients receive conservative treatment. PMID:24914355

Li, Bin; Assaf, Akram; Gong, Yun-Guo; Feng, Lian-Zhong; Zheng, Xue-Yong; Wu, Chao-Neng

2014-05-21

330

Transmesosigmoid hernia: Case report and review of literature  

PubMed Central

Transmesosigmoid hernia has previously been considered as a rare condition. The clinical symptoms can be nonspecific. Here, we report a case of acute intestinal obstruction because of transmesosigmoid hernia. In addition, after a comprehensive review of PubMed and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, we present a review of 22 cases of transmesosigmoid hernia. We summarize several valuable clinical features that help early recognition of transmesosigmoid hernia. As a result of easy strangulation, in patients without a history of surgery or abdominal inflammation who present with symptoms of progressive or persistent small bowel obstruction (SBO), surgeons should consider the possibility of transmesosigmoid hernia. In addition, based on our data, in patients with SBO because of transmesosigmoid hernia, the defect is usually 2-5 cm in diameter. Furthermore, because of the high risk of strangulation with transmesosigmoid hernia, it is mandatory to reassess the condition timely and periodically when patients receive conservative treatment. PMID:24914355

Li, Bin; Assaf, Akram; Gong, Yun-Guo; Feng, Lian-Zhong; Zheng, Xue-Yong; Wu, Chao-Neng

2014-01-01

331

Fibrin sealant for mesh fixation in Lichtenstein repair: biomechanical analysis of different techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Mesh fixation using sealants is becoming increasingly popular in hernia surgery. Fibrin sealant is an atraumatic alternative\\u000a to suture or stapler fixation and is currently the most frequently used sealant. There are currently no biomechanical data\\u000a available for evaluation of the quality of adhesion achieved with fibrin sealant during Lichtenstein hernia repair.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Five different suture and sealant techniques were evaluated

R. Schwab; O. Schumacher; K. Junge; M. Binnebösel; U. Klinge; V. Schumpelick

2007-01-01

332

Mucinous ovarian tumour presenting as a ruptured incisional hernia  

PubMed Central

We describe an ovarian borderline tumour that presented as an acute deterioration in an incisional hernia secondary to intraperitoneal mucin accumulation. The differential diagnosis associated with hernial sac contents and options for opportunistic diagnosis are discussed. This case raises awareness of potential serious diagnoses that may be overlooked during emergent hernia repair. PMID:23031756

Toomey, D; McNamara, D

2012-01-01

333

[The transrectus sheath preperitoneal procedure: a safe, effective and cheap surgical approach to inguinal hernia?].  

PubMed

The main complication of surgery for inguinal hernia is chronic postoperative pain. This is often reported following the Lichtenstein procedure. A new, open surgical technique for the repair of inguinal hernia has been developed. This procedure is called the transrectus sheath preperitoneal procedure (TREPP). At TREPP a lightweight mesh with a ring made of memory metal is introduced into the preperitoneal space through the transrectus sheath. The first results of this operative technique are very promising: short operation time, short learning curve and not many patients with chronic postoperative pain. In a randomised, multi-centre study which will start mid-2013 (ISRCTN18591339), the TREPP procedure is compared with the transinguinal preperitoneal procedure. The primary outcome measure of this study is chronic postoperative pain. PMID:23890168

Prins, M W Wiesje; Voropai, D A Dasha; van Laarhoven, C J H M Kees; Akkersdijk, Willem L

2013-01-01

334

Neurofibroma invading into urinary bladder presenting with symptoms of obstructed defecation and a large perineal hernia  

PubMed Central

Background Pelvic floor hernias pose a diagnostic and a treatment challange. Neurofibromatosis is a rare systemic disease, and urinary tract involvement is rare. Case presentation Here we report a case of a 54-year-old female with multiple neurofibromatosis who presented with features of obstructed defecation and was found to have a large perineal hernia. At surgery, we found an unusual herniation of a large neuropathic bladder and rectum through a perineal defect. She underwent reduction cystoplasty and repair of the pelvic floor using a prolene mesh. Subsequent histopathological examination confirmed a large neurofibroma infiltrating the urinary bladder. Conclusion Neurofibromatosis of the bladder is rare it should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with symptoms of obstructed defecation. PMID:24739734

2014-01-01

335

Stomach in a parastomal hernia: uncommon presentation  

PubMed Central

Parastomal herniae are among the most common complications of stoma formation. The authors present an unusual case of a 41-year-old lady who presented with frequent early postprandial vomiting devoid of bile, upper abdominal distension and weight loss in the preceding 4 weeks losing weight for the last 4 weeks. Barium meal revealed herniation of the stomach through the gastric wall causing gastric outlet obstruction. Intraoperatively she was found to have a subcutaneous incarcerated parastomal hernia containing viable stomach and small bowel loops. The hernial contents were reduced back into the peritoneum and the abdominal wall defect repaired using the open sombrero repair technique. PMID:22605584

Bota, Emil; Shaikh, Irshad; Fernandes, Roland; Doughan, Sameer

2012-01-01

336

The evaluation of the peak flow velocity and cross-sectional area of the femoral artery and vein following totally extraperitoneal vs preperitoneal open repair of inguinal hernias  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Both totally extraperitoneal (TEP) and preperitoneal (PPOR) approaches involve the placement of prosthetic material preperitoneally. As the prosthetic material overlies the femoral artery and vein, we aimed to assess its effect on the velocity and the diameter of the artery and vein, using colour Doppler ultrasonography in both approaches. Methods: Eighty patients with unilateral groin hernia were prospectively randomised

M. M. Ozmen; N. Ozalp; B. Zulfikaroglu; P. Soydinc; I. Ziraman; S. Hengirmen

2004-01-01

337

Conservative management of an infected laparoscopic hernia mesh: A case study?  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION A dreaded complication of laparoscopic hernia repair is infection of the mesh. Traditionally mesh infection is managed by surgical removal of the mesh, an extensive procedure resulting in high re-herniation rates. A technique to treat such infections whilst salvaging the mesh is sorely needed. We describe a case in which a laparoscopic mesh infection was treated solely with drainage, parenteral antibiotics and antibiotic irrigation of the mesh. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 65 year old gentleman presented 11 months post laparoscopic repair of an inguinal hernia with malaise and an uncomfortable groin swelling. Computed tomography scanning revealed a collection surrounding the mesh which was drained and cultured to show heavy growth of Staphylococcus aureus. A pigtail drain on continuous drainage was inserted and kept in situ for 7 weeks. The patient received one week of intravenous flucloxacillin and two gentamycin irrigations through the drain as an inpatient. He then received 6 weeks of oral flucloxacillin and bi-weekly saline flushes through the drain in the community. By 12 weeks an ultrasound scan showed resolution of the collection. At 7 months he remains clinically free from recurrence. DISCUSSION Here we report a novel conservative method used to treat a hernia mesh infection, preserve the mesh and avoid major surgery. Other reports exist suggesting variations in conservative methods to treat mesh infections, however ours is by far the most conservative. CONCLUSION Clearly, further research is required to identify which method is most effective and in which patients it is likely to be successful. PMID:24099982

Alston, Duncan; Parnell, Stephanie; Hoonjan, Bhupinder; Sebastian, Arun; Howard, Adam

2013-01-01

338

A large incarcerated Meckel's diverticulum in an inguinal hernia  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Littre's hernia is a rare finding consisting of a Meckel's diverticulum inside of a hernia sac. Clinically, it is indistinguishable from a hernia involving small bowel and therefore may be difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of an inguinal hernia involving an unusually large Meckel's diverticulum measuring 15 cm in length. The diverticulum was resected using a linear GI stapler and the hernia was repaired without complication. DISCUSSION Meckel's diverticulum is an embryologic remnant of the vitelline duct occurring in 1–3% of the adult population with an estimated 4% becoming complicated and presenting with intestinal obstruction, infection, bleeding or herniation. Surgical resection is the recommended treatment for any Meckel's diverticulum causing symptoms. In the case of a Littre's hernia, resection of the diverticulum should be followed by repair of the fascial defect in a standard fashion. CONCLUSION Littre's hernia, although rare, should be a consideration at the time of repair for any abdominal hernia involving small bowel as resection of the Meckel's diverticulum is critical in avoiding recurrent complications. PMID:25460431

Horkoff, Michael J.; Smyth, Nathan G. Chan; Hunter, James M.

2014-01-01

339

Spontaneous Rupture of Umbilical Hernia in Pregnancy: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

A 28 year old woman presented with a spontaneous rupture of an umbilical hernia in her seventh month of pregnancy. She had four previous unsupervised normal deliveries. There was no history of trauma or application of herbal medicine on the hernia. The hernia sac ruptured at the inferior surface where it was attached to the ulcerated and damaged overlying skin. There was a gangrenous eviscerated small bowel. The patient was resuscitated and the gangrenous small bowel was resected and end to end anastomosis done. The hernia sac was excised and the 12 cm defect repaired. Six weeks later, she had spontaneous vaginal delivery of a live baby. We advocate that large umbilical hernias should be routinely repaired when seen in women of child bearing age. PMID:22043438

Ahmed, Adamu; Stephen, Garba; Ukwenya, Yahaya

2011-01-01

340

Acute direct inguinal hernia resulting from blunt abdominal trauma: Case Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a case of traumatic inguinal hernia following blunt abdominal trauma after a road traffic accident and describe the circumstances and technique of repair. The patient suffered multiple upper limb fractures and developed acute swelling of the right groin and scrotum. CT scan confirmed the acute formation of a traumatic inguinal hernia. Surgical repair was deferred until resolution of

Seema Biswas; Maria Vedanayagam; Gabrielle Hipkins; Andrew Leather

2010-01-01

341

[Morgagni hernia. A rare form of diaphragmatic hernia].  

PubMed

The Morgagni hernia is the rarest form of diaphragmatic hernias. Knowledge has been accumulated over time of combinations with other congenital malformations, familial occurrence, and traumatic genesis. Morgagni hernia has been more often recordable from women, along with rising age and usually located on the right hand side. Embryonic disorder of diaphragmatic differentiation is believed to be the major aetiological factor. Vitamin deficit as well as some chemical substances, primarily active in the foetal period, have become known as additional factors of predisposition. Intensive diagnosis to rule out malignancy is absolutely essential because of the variability of symptoms of this type of hernia. Colon fragments and large omentum were found to be most often contained in the hernial sac. Contrast medium X-ray checks of the gastrointestinal tract and pneumoperitoneum are preferential methods of examination. Exploratory laparotomy is generally considered the optional therapeutic approach because of possible saving of liver veins, safe removal of the hernial sac, and the possibility of abdominal exploration. Preoperative wide-range sterile covering of the patient's body around the site of surgery is recommended to allow for possible thoractomy, as may be required. PMID:3063017

Winde, G; Blum, M; Pelster, F; Pfisterer, M; Krings, W

1988-01-01

342

Hip fracture surgery  

MedlinePLUS

... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery ... You may receive general anesthesia before this surgery. This means ... spinal anesthesia. With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

343

PXL01 in Sodium Hyaluronate for Improvement of Hand Recovery after Flexor Tendon Repair Surgery: Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Postoperative adhesions constitute a substantial clinical problem in hand surgery. Fexor tendon injury and repair result in adhesion formation around the tendon, which restricts the gliding function of the tendon, leading to decreased digit mobility and impaired hand recovery. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the peptide PXL01 in preventing adhesions, and correspondingly improving hand function, in flexor tendon repair surgery. Methods This prospective, randomised, double-blind trial included 138 patients admitted for flexor tendon repair surgery. PXL01 in carrier sodium hyaluronate or placebo was administered around the repaired tendon. Efficacy was assessed by total active motion of the injured finger, tip-to-crease distance, sensory function, tenolysis rate and grip strength, and safety parameters were followed, for 12 months post-surgery. Results The most pronounced difference between the treatment groups was observed at 6 months post-surgery. At this timepoint, the total active motion of the distal finger joint was improved in the PXL01 group (60 vs. 41 degrees for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p?=?0.016 in PPAS). The proportion of patients with excellent/good digit mobility was higher in the PXL01 group (61% vs. 38%, p?=?0.0499 in PPAS). Consistently, the PXL01 group presented improved tip-to-crease distance (5.0 vs. 15.5 mm for PXL01 vs. placebo group, p?=?0.048 in PPAS). Sensory evaluation showed that more patients in the PXL01 group felt the thinnest monofilaments (FAS: 74% vs. 35%, p?=?0.021; PPAS: 76% vs. 35%, p?=?0.016). At 12 months post-surgery, more patients in the placebo group were considered to benefit from tenolysis (30% vs. 12%, p?=?0.086 in PPAS). The treatment was safe, well tolerated, and did not increase the rate of tendon rupture. Conclusions Treatment with PXL01 in sodium hyaluronate improves hand recovery after flexor tendon repair surgery. Further clinical trials are warranted to determine the most efficient dose and health economic benefits. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01022242; EU Clinical Trials 2009-012703-25. PMID:25340801

Wiig, Monica E.; Dahlin, Lars B.; Fridén, Jan; Hagberg, Lars; Larsen, Sören E.; Wiklund, Kerstin; Mahlapuu, Margit

2014-01-01

344

Recurrent inguinal hernia: preferred operative approach.  

PubMed

Inguinal herniorrhaphy remains one of the most common general surgical operations, with approximately 10 to 20 per cent performed for recurrence. Subsequent repairs provide considerable technical challenge, as well as substantially greater risk of developing further recurrence. Mesh repair is advocated by several specialized hernia centers, demonstrating re-recurrence rates less than 2 per cent. Detractors of this repair include cost, technical difficulty, and risk for infection. The purpose of this study was to compare results of mesh and nonmesh repairs for recurrent inguinal hernia, either using an anterior or posterior approach, at a large teaching institution. From January 1, 1985, to December 31, 1994, 146 patients underwent repair for recurrent inguinal hernia at the Veterans Administration Hospital at Memphis, Tennessee. Patients were stratified by type of repair: Lichtenstein (Mesh), open anterior (OA), Bassini, Marcy, McVay, Shouldice, and preperitoneal with or without mesh. Patient ages and weights were similar between groups. Mean operative time for Mesh repair (104 +/- 4 minutes) was longer than that for OA repairs (80 +/- 5 minutes, P < 0.05) or preperitoneal without mesh repairs (92 +/- 5 minutes, P < 0.05). Mesh-based posterior repairs had the longest operative times (116 +/- 5 minutes). Hospital stay averaged 2.8 +/- 0.3 days, similar among all groups. One wound infection (1.0%) occurred in patients undergoing Mesh repair, which required operative drainage. No patient required removal of mesh. Two patients in the Mesh group (5.9%) developed recurrence compared with four recurrences (18.0%) in patients undergoing OA repairs. Only one patient with a mesh-based posterior repair recurred (1.9%) compared to eight without mesh (21.6%, P < 0.01). Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 years. Repair of recurrent inguinal hernia using either an anterior or posterior mesh repair technique, performed at a teaching facility, provides superior recurrence rates without increasing risk for infection or length of stay. Preperitoneal mesh based repair is the preferred technique. PMID:9619180

Janu, P G; Sellers, K D; Mangiante, E C

1998-06-01

345

Pediatric heart surgery - discharge  

MedlinePLUS

Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - discharge; Tetralogy of Fallot repair - discharge; Coarctation of the aorta repair - discharge; ...

346

[Pulmonary complications of large, type 4 hiatal hernias].  

PubMed

Three patients, 63, 76 and 56-years-old, presented with pulmonary symptoms caused by a large, type 4 hiatal hernia. A woman was examined for dyspnoea, and CT scan revealed an intrathoracically herniated stomach and colon. A man with progressive dyspnoea and a lung function disorder seen during spirometry was found to have herniation of the stomach, omentum and transverse colon. The third patient, a man, was hospitalised with bilateral pneumonia and found to have a herniated stomach, transverse colon, and pancreas. Repair by laparoscopy was successful in the second patient, but was not possible and required conversion to laparotomy in the other two patients. In addition, re-laparotomy for gastric ischaemia was necessary in the first patient, and for significant stenosis of the distal oesophagus in the third patient. After surgery, pulmonary symptoms and lung function improved in all three patients. Although surgical reduction of large hiatal hernias improves pulmonary symptoms, this can be at the cost of substantial morbidity. PMID:20482901

Furnée, Edgar J B; Oosterhuis, J W A Wolter

2010-01-01

347

Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients occurring more than 1 year after successful univentricular (Fontan surgery) and biventricular repair (complete repair of tetralogy of Fallot).  

PubMed

The outcome of children born with cyanotic congenital heart disease has markedly improved over the years. Follow up is recommended for most post-operated cases as complications may occur over long term. One of the complications is the development of ventricular dysfunction, often seen after a successful Fontan surgery (or one of its modifications) for single ventricle. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in the ventricular myocardium of asymptomatic patients, older than 8 years of age, who had earlier undergone either a univentricular palliation (modified Fontan procedure) or a biventricular repair for tetralogy of Fallot, more than a year ago. All eligible patients underwent screening electrocardiogram (to rule out rhythm disturbance) and echocardiography. Patients with ventricular ejection fraction of more than 50 % by echocardiography were included. Enrolled patients were subjected to gated stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging using Technitium-99m tetrofosmin single photon emission-computerized tomography (SPECT). Ventricular ejection fraction was also calculated from gated rest study. For the Fontan group, we also analyzed data to see if the morphology of the systemic ventricle would make a difference as far as myocardial perfusion was concerned. Twenty-six patients were enrolled (11 had undergone Fontan surgery and 15 had complete repair of tetralogy of Fallot). Seven of 11 patients in the Fontan group had myocardial perfusion defects (63.6 %) as against none in the repaired tetralogy of Fallot group (p < 0.001). The ejection fraction was within normal range in both the groups; it was statistically higher in the post tetralogy of Fallot repair group (p < 0.04). There were two subgroups in the post Fontan group depending on the morphology of systemic ventricle-left (4 patients) and non-left (7 patients). Higher number and larger size of perfusion defects were present in the non-left ventricular systemic ventricle morphology as compared with left ventricular morphology, but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Myocardial perfusion defects are common in patients who have undergone univentricular repair more than one year ago in contrast to patients who had a biventricular repair for tetralogy of Fallot. In the Fontan group, the morphology of the systemic ventricle was not predictive of prevalence of perfusion defect. PMID:23064840

Priyadarshini, A; Saxena, Anita; Patel, Chetan; Paul, Vinod K; Lodha, Rakesh; Airan, Balram

2013-04-01

348

Acquired Abdominal Intercostal Hernia: A Case Report and Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Acquired abdominal intercostal hernia (AAIH) is a rare disease phenomenon where intra-abdominal contents reach the intercostal space directly from the peritoneal cavity through an acquired defect in the abdominal wall musculature and fascia. We discuss a case of a 51-year-old obese female who arrived to the emergency room with a painful swelling between her left 10th rib and 11th rib. She gave a history of a stab wound to the area 15 years earlier. A CT scan revealed a fat containing intercostal hernia with no diaphragmatic defect. An open operative approach with a hernia patch was used to repair this hernia. These hernias are difficult to diagnose, so a high clinical suspicion and thorough history and physical exam are important. This review discusses pathogenesis, clinical presentation, complications, and appropriate treatment strategies of AAIH. PMID:25197605

Tripodi, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

349

First experience for the laparoscopic treatment of parastomal hernia with the use of Parietex composite mesh.  

PubMed

Parastomal herniation is a postoperative complication after colostomy or ileostomy with an incidence rate of 0-48.1% [1]. Its repair is indicated in approximately 10-15% of cases [3]; however, this surgery has been associated with a significant degree of morbidity and recurrence. We describe, for the first time in literature, an experience using a new technique, and a new type of mesh. This new type of laparoscopic parastomal hernia repair appears to be easier and faster. The follow-up was about 240 days. Our preliminary experience in using this technique and mesh appears to be possibly leading to a reduction of recurrences and complications. Randomized multicenter studies are required to assess the true effectiveness of the technique. PMID:21052895

Ripetti, Valter; Capolupo, Gabriella; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Valeri, Sergio; Coppola, Roberto

2010-12-01

350

Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by an Incarcerated Hernia after Iliac Crest Bone Harvest  

PubMed Central

The iliac crest has become an often used site for autogenous bone graft, because of the easy access it affords. One of the less common complications that can occur after removal is a graft-site hernia. It was first reported in 1945 (see the work by Oldfield, 1945). We report a case of iliac crest bone hernia in a 53-year-old male who was admitted for elective resection of a pseudarthrosis and reconstruction of the left femur with iliac crest bone from the right side. One and a half months after initial surgery, the patient presented with increasing abdominal pain and signs of bowel obstruction. A CT scan of the abdominal cavity showed an obstruction of the small bowel caused by the bone defect of the right iliac crest. A laparoscopy showed a herniation of the small bowel. Due to collateral vessels of the peritoneum caused by portal hypertension, an IPOM (intraperitoneal onlay-mesh) occlusion could not be performed. We performed a conventional ventral hernia repair with an onlay mesh. The recovery was uneventful. PMID:22084778

d'Hondt, Steven; Soysal, Savas; Kirchhoff, Philipp; Oertli, Daniel; Heizmann, Oleg

2011-01-01

351

Inguinoscrotal hernia of the ureter combined with renal pelvic carcinoma.  

PubMed

Inguinoscrotal herniation of the ureter is a rare finding, with the potential for serious surgical complications. Here we report an extremely rare case of inguinoscrotal hernia of the ureter combined with renal pelvic carcinoma. This 61-year-old man was diagnosed with right renal pelvic tumor, bilateral hydronephrosis with inguinoscrotal hernia of the right ureter, and left ureteral calculus. He was successfully treated with right nephroureterectomy, inguinoscrotal hernia repair, and left ureterolithotomy. Pathologic examinations revealed a high-grade transitional cell carcinoma. PMID:23806411

Tan, Fu-Qing; Yang, Kai; Zheng, Jian-Hong; Chen, Shan-Wen; Xie, Li-Ping

2013-07-01

352

Strangulated umbilical hernia in a peritoneal dialysis patient.  

PubMed

Hernia is one of the commonest complications of peritoneal dialysis. It is recommended that patients undergo surgical repair of hernias immediately after the diagnosis. We report a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis presenting with strangulated umbilical hernia. He underwent resection of the gangrenous ileum and end-to-end anastomosis. He was shifted to hemodialysis on second postoperative day and was continued on hemodialysis for 2 weeks. In the third week, he was initiated on low volume PD exchanges and by the fourth week, he returned to normal CAPD exchanges. PMID:23326052

Swarnalatha, G; Rapur, R; Pai, Santhosh; Dakshinamurty, K V

2012-09-01

353

Strangulated umbilical hernia in a peritoneal dialysis patient  

PubMed Central

Hernia is one of the commonest complications of peritoneal dialysis. It is recommended that patients undergo surgical repair of hernias immediately after the diagnosis. We report a patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis presenting with strangulated umbilical hernia. He underwent resection of the gangrenous ileum and end-to-end anastomosis. He was shifted to hemodialysis on second postoperative day and was continued on hemodialysis for 2 weeks. In the third week, he was initiated on low volume PD exchanges and by the fourth week, he returned to normal CAPD exchanges. PMID:23326052

Swarnalatha, G.; Rapur, R.; Pai, Santhosh; Dakshinamurty, K. V.

2012-01-01

354

Lifting the Myth Off Hernias  

MedlinePLUS

... hernia. But is there really a link between lifting or straining and hernias or is it just ... and Association It's understandable how the connection between lifting and hernias got started, but just because it's ...

355

Non-traumatic lateral abdominal wall hernia.  

PubMed

A rare lateral abdominal wall hernia is described in an adult patient. This was diagnosed in a patient with a prominent right lateral abdominal wall deformity. The patient had been experiencing pain that increased progressively in severity over time. A computerized tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed the location of the lateral abdominal wall defect. The hernia defect was through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique, with the inferior aspect of the 11th rib forming part of the superior border of the defect. A 4-cm bony spur from the inferior aspect of the rib formed part of the lateral margin of the defect. The hernia sac was contained within a space underneath the external oblique muscle. The association of the hernia defect with a bony spur was highly suggestive of a congenital etiology. The hernia was successfully repaired laparoscopically with Parietex mesh (Sofradim, Lyons, France), and the patient had resolution of the symptoms on discharge and follow-up visits. PMID:18949442

Castillo-Sang, M; Gociman, B; Almaroof, B; Fath, J; Cason, F

2009-06-01

356

Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine  

E-print Network

Orthopaedic Surgery Sports Medicine How Does Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair Surgery Work? Rev. 2 Surgical Illustrations (Pages 2-4) · Preparing for Rotator Cuff Surgery (Pages 5-6) · General Post Surgery to embark on the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair journey. The goal of rotator cuff repair surgery is create

Kim, Duck O.

357

Impact of Chemoradiotherapy on CSF Leak Repair after Skull Base Surgery.  

PubMed

Background?Transnasal endoscopic resection (TER) has become the treatment of choice for many skull base tumors. A major limitation of TER is the management of large dural defects and the need for repair of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, particularly among patients who are treated with chemotherapy (CTX) or radiotherapy (RT). The objective of this study is to determine the impact of CTX and RT on the success of CSF leak repair after TER. Methods?We performed a retrospective chart review of a single-institution experience of TER from 1992 to 2011. Results?We identified 28 patients who had endoscopic CSF leak repair after resection of malignant skull base tumors. Preoperative RT was utilized in 18 patients, and 9 had undergone CTX. All patients required CSF leak repair with rotational flaps after cribriform and/or dural resection. CSF leak repair failed in three patients (11%). A history of RT or CTX was not associated with failed CSF leak repair. Conclusion?Adjuvant or neoadjuvant CTX or RT is not associated with failed CSF leak repair. Successful CSF leak repair can be performed in patients with malignant skull base tumors with an acceptable risk profile. PMID:25276601

Alves, Marcus V Ortega; Roberts, Dianna; Levine, Nicholas B; DeMonte, Franco; Hanna, Ehab Y; Kupferman, Michael E

2014-10-01

358

Paraesophageal hiatus hernia, which has progressed for 8 years: report of a case.  

PubMed

We report a case of a paraesophageal hernia, which was successfully treated with laparoscopic surgery after a natural history of eight years. Eight years before surgery only the fundus of the stomach was included in the hernia sac. At surgery, although the gastroesophageal junction and fundus were found in their normal positions, the distal half of the stomach and the omentum were pulled into the thorax, which demonstrated an organoaxial gastric volvulus. As the omentum tightly adhered to the top of the hernia sac and there was no tight adhesion between the stomach and hernia sac, the omentum could serve as the lead point for the gastric volvulus. This patient was successfully treated with laparoscopic surgery and is presently in good condition without any recurrence of the hernia. PMID:12143261

Tsuboi, Kaori; Tsukada, Katsuhiko; Nakabayashi, Toshihiro; Kato, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Masuda, Norihiro; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

2002-01-01

359

Palliative stent graft placement combined with subsequent open surgery for retrograde ascending dissection intra-thoracic endovascular aortic repair  

PubMed Central

Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is an effective strategy for type B dissection. Retrograde ascending dissection (RAD) intra-TEVAR is a rare complication on clinic. In this case, a 48-year-old Chinese man with Stanford type B aortic dissection suffered acute RAD during the TEVAR. And palliative stent grafts placement was performed in a local hospital, which earned the time for transfer and subsequent total arch replacement surgery in Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University. This report suggests that the palliative strategy may be an option for RAD in some specific situation.

Zhu, Kai; Guo, Changfa; Li, Jun

2014-01-01

360

Hiatal Hernia  

MedlinePLUS

... symptoms, eating small meals, avoiding certain foods, not smoking or drinking alcohol, and losing weight may help. Your doctor may recommend antacids or other medicines. If these don't help, you may need surgery. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

361

Parastomal hernia: incidence, prevention and treatment strategies.  

PubMed

Parastomal hernia continues to be a common and distressing problem for patients with stomas, and research investigating prevention strategies is scant. In March 2005 Thompson and Trainor reported that the introduction of a prevention programme for 1-year post-stoma surgery formation had significantly reduced the incidence of development of parastomal hernia. This was further supported by a follow-up study in 2007, strengthening the reliability and validity of the first findings by confirming a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of parastomal hernias through the introduction of a simple non-invasive prevention programme. This article reviews the current literature on incidence, prevention and treatment, together with a step-by-step guide for stoma care nurses to implement the prevention programme and/or study within their area. PMID:18418932

Thompson, Mary Jo

362

Case report: loss of hernia mesh after simultaneous laparoscopic extraperitoneal lymphadenectomy, radical prostatectomy, and hernioplasty.  

PubMed

We present a case of prosthetic mesh hernia repair of a unilateral inguinal hernia following laparoscopic extraperitoneal pelvic lymph node dissection and radical prostatectomy. After an uneventful intraoperative and early postoperative period, the patient developed a lymphocele. This resulted in the detachment of the mesh from the abdominal wall, which necessitated its removal. PMID:19187012

Häcker, Axel; Janetschek, Gunter

2009-02-01

363

Hypospadias Repair: A Single Centre Experience  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To determine the demographics and analyze the management and factors influencing the postoperative complications of hypospadias repair. Settings. Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar, Pakistan, from January 2007 to December 2011. Material and Methods. All male patients presenting with hypospadias irrespective of their ages were included in the study. The data were acquired from the hospital's database and analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Results. A total of 428 patients with mean age of 8.12 ± 5.04 SD presented for hypospadias repair. Midpenile hypospadias were the most common. Chordee, meatal abnormalities, cryptorchidism, and inguinal hernias were observed in 74.3%, 9.6%, 2.8%, and 2.1% cases, respectively. Two-stage (Bracka) and TIP (tubularized incised urethral plate) repairs were performed in 76.2% and 20.8% of cases, respectively. The most common complications were edema and urethrocutaneous fistula (UCF). The complications were significantly lower in the hands of specialists than residents (P-value = 0.0086). The two-stage hypospadias repair resulted in higher complications frequency than single-stage repair (P value = 0.0001). Conclusion. Hypospadias surgery has a long learning curve because it requires a great deal of temperament, surgical skill and acquaintance with magnifications. Single-stage repair should be encouraged wherever applicable due to its lower postoperative complications. PMID:24579043

Majeed, Abdul; Ullah, Hidayat; Naz, Shazia; Shah, Syed Asif; Tahmeed, Tahmeedullah; Yousaf, Kanwal; Tahir, Muhammad

2014-01-01

364

Eye muscle repair - discharge  

MedlinePLUS

... Resection and recession - discharge; Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... eyes. The medical term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children usually receive general anesthesia for this surgery. ...

365

Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.  

PubMed

Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption. PMID:25541927

Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

2014-11-01

366

Characterization of the Mechanical Strength, Resorption Properties, and Histologic Characteristics of a Fully Absorbable Material (Poly-4-hydroxybutyrate—PHASIX Mesh) in a Porcine Model of Hernia Repair  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Poly-4-hydroxybutyrate (P4HB) is a naturally derived, absorbable polymer. P4HB has been manufactured into PHASIX Mesh and P4HB Plug designs for soft tissue repair. The objective of this study was to evaluate mechanical strength, resorption properties, and histologic characteristics in a porcine model. Methods. Bilateral defects were created in the abdominal wall of n = 20 Yucatan minipigs and repaired in a bridged fashion with PHASIX Mesh or P4HB Plug fixated with SorbaFix or permanent suture, respectively. Mechanical strength, resorption properties, and histologic characteristics were evaluated at 6, 12, 26, and 52 weeks (n = 5 each). Results. PHASIX Mesh and P4HB Plug repairs exhibited similar burst strength, stiffness, and molecular weight at all time points, with no significant differences detected between the two devices (P > 0.05). PHASIX Mesh and P4HB Plug repairs also demonstrated significantly greater burst strength and stiffness than native abdominal wall at all time points (P < 0.05), and material resorption increased significantly over time (P < 0.001). Inflammatory infiltrates were mononuclear, and both devices exhibited mild to moderate granulation tissue/vascularization. Conclusions. PHASIX Mesh and P4HB Plug demonstrated significant mechanical strength compared to native abdominal wall, despite significant material resorption over time. Histological assessment revealed a comparable mild inflammatory response and mild to moderate granulation tissue/vascularization. PMID:23781348

Deeken, Corey R.; Matthews, Brent D.

2013-01-01

367

Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?  

PubMed Central

Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are applicable on most clinical 1.5?T and 3?T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair. PMID:24877139

Jungmann, Pia M.; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Link, Thomas M.; Li, Xiaojuan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Welsch, Goetz H.

2014-01-01

368

Biocompatibility and tissue integration of a novel shape memory surgical mesh for ventral hernia: In vivo animal studies  

PubMed Central

Approximately 400,000 ventral hernia repair surgeries are performed each year in the United States. Many of these procedures are performed using laparoscopic minimally invasive techniques and employ the use of surgical mesh. The use of surgical mesh has been shown to reduce recurrence rates compared to standard suture repairs. The placement of surgical mesh in a ventral hernia repair procedure can be challenging, and may even complicate the procedure. Others have attempted to provide commercial solutions to the problems of mesh placement, but these have not been well accepted by the clinical community. In this article, two versions of shape memory polymer (SMP)-modified surgical mesh, and unmodified surgical mesh, were compared by performing laparoscopic manipulation in an acute porcine model. Also, SMP-integrated polyester surgical meshes were implanted in four rats for 30–33 days to evaluate chronic biocompatibility and capacity for tissue integration. Porcine results show that the modified mesh provides a controlled, temperature-activated, automated deployment when compared to an unmodified mesh. In rats, results indicate that implanted SMP-modified meshes exhibit exceptional biocompatibility and excellent integration with surrounding tissue with no noticeable differences from the unmodified counterpart. This article provides further evidence that an SMP-modified surgical mesh promises reduction in surgical placement time and that such a mesh is not substantially different from unmodified meshes in chronic biocompatibility. PMID:24327401

Zimkowski, Michael M.; Rentschler, Mark E.; Schoen, Jonathan A.; Mandava, Nageswara; Shandas, Robin

2014-01-01

369

Biocompatibility and tissue integration of a novel shape memory surgical mesh for ventral hernia: in vivo animal studies.  

PubMed

Approximately 400,000 ventral hernia repair surgeries are performed each year in the United States. Many of these procedures are performed using laparoscopic minimally invasive techniques and employ the use of surgical mesh. The use of surgical mesh has been shown to reduce recurrence rates compared to standard suture repairs. The placement of surgical mesh in a ventral hernia repair procedure can be challenging, and may even complicate the procedure. Others have attempted to provide commercial solutions to the problems of mesh placement, but these have not been well accepted by the clinical community. In this article, two versions of shape memory polymer (SMP)-modified surgical mesh, and unmodified surgical mesh, were compared by performing laparoscopic manipulation in an acute porcine model. Also, SMP-integrated polyester surgical meshes were implanted in four rats for 30-33 days to evaluate chronic biocompatibility and capacity for tissue integration. Porcine results show that the modified mesh provides a controlled, temperature-activated, automated deployment when compared to an unmodified mesh. In rats, results indicate that implanted SMP-modified meshes exhibit exceptional biocompatibility and excellent integration with surrounding tissue with no noticeable differences from the unmodified counterpart. This article provides further evidence that an SMP-modified surgical mesh promises reduction in surgical placement time and that such a mesh is not substantially different from unmodified meshes in chronic biocompatibility. PMID:24327401

Zimkowski, Michael M; Rentschler, Mark E; Schoen, Jonathan A; Mandava, Nageswara; Shandas, Robin

2014-07-01

370

Surgery  

MedlinePLUS

... for ENews Home > Lung Disease > COPD > Treating COPD Surgery Some COPD patients with very severe symptoms may ... lung surgery. Are You a Candidate for Lung Surgery? Some people with COPD have improved lung function ...

371

Frozen Elephant Trunk Repair for Descending Thoracic Aortic Dissection in a Man with a Hostile Left Pleural Cavity  

PubMed Central

The frozen elephant trunk procedure is a hybrid, single-staged alternative to conventional surgery for repairing diffuse pathologic conditions of the thoracic aorta. This approach is particularly advantageous in patients who have pathologic conditions of the left side of the chest, because the descending thoracic aorta can be repaired without entering a hostile pleural cavity. We present the case of a 67-year-old man who had undergone repair of acute type A aortic dissection. He presented with aneurysmal dilation of the descending thoracic aorta secondary to chronic dissection, a large acute dissection of the proximal ascending aorta, and a large paraesophageal hernia that made him a poor candidate for conventional, 2-staged open aortic repair. We describe the hybrid frozen elephant trunk technique that we used to repair the aorta, and its broader advantages. PMID:24955060

Kent, William D.T.; Manjunath, Adarsh

2014-01-01

372

Irreducible inguinal hernia with appendices epiploicae in the sac  

PubMed Central

Inguinal hernia has a nature to surprise surgeons with its unexpected contents. Appendix epiploicae alone in the hernial sac is a rare entity and that too if hypertrophied and presenting as irreducible hernia is still more uncommon. We report a 52-year-old male with complains of irreducible inguinal mass with little pain on Left side for seven days. A diagnosis of irreducible inguinal hernia was made and the patient was treated laparoscopically by Trans-Abdominal Pre-Peritoneal Mesh Hernioplasty (TAPP). As a surprise, content of the hernial sac was enlarged / hypertrophied appendix epiploicae of sigmoid colon with appendigitis. Patient also had and incidental hernia on the other side, which was repaired in the same sitting. Postoperative recovery of the patient was excellent. PMID:19547689

Jain, Mayank; Khanna, Shashi; Sen, Bimalendu; Tantia, Om

2008-01-01

373

Inguinal hernia in the new millennium.  

PubMed

Since 1884, when Edoardo Bassini started the modern era of surgical correction of inguinal hernia (today the most common procedure performed by the general surgeon), many techniques have been introduced, some short-lived, others with proven long-term results. At the start of the new millennium, the surgeon has three clear alternatives: tension repairs, tension-free repairs, and laparoscopic procedures. This paper analyzes these three options and offers an update regarding the pros and cons of the most commonly performed operations in surgical centers around the world. PMID:15022018

Cervantes, Jorge

2004-04-01

374

Obturator Hernia, a Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction: Case Report  

PubMed Central

Obturator hernia is a rare hernia in the world, diagnosed late since it has no specific symptoms and findings and generally occur in thin and old women with comorbidity.For this reason obturator hernia has high morbidity and mortality rates. In this study, we present an obturator hernia case that Howship-Romberg sign is positive and has typical appearance in computerized tomography. Laparotomy was performed on 89 years old female patient with body mass index 18.08 kg/m2 by low middle line incision. Following the segmentectomy to the strangulated small bowel loop, obturator canal is repaired by retroperitoneal application. No complication occurred in the postoperative period. Obturator hernia should be taken into consideration in old and thin female patients with intestinal obstruction. Computerized tomography should be performed for early diagnosis of the obturator hernia. PMID:25610330

Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Ozogul, Bunyami; Yuce, Ihsan; Bayramoglu, Atif; Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk

2014-01-01

375

Surgery Insight: current advances in percutaneous heart valve replacement and repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several advances have been made in interventional cardiology, particularly in the field of valvular heart disease. Among the procedures for which technologies are available, percutaneous replacement of the pulmonary and aortic valves, and percutaneous repair of the mitral valve, via annuloplasty or the Alfieri method, are the best known. Along with the excitement generated by these new subspecialties, however, there

Vasilis Babaliaros; Carla Agatiello; Alain Cribier

2006-01-01

376

A rare case of acute abdomen: Garengeot hernia.  

PubMed

The association of acute appendicitis with femoral hernia,strangulated or incarcerated, represents a rare but well documented pathology in the specialized medical literature,also known as Garengeot hernia. The development of an acute appendicitis in the femoral hernia sac becomes a surgical emergency of acute abdomen. The diagnosis is always mistaken for the one of incarcerated or strangled hernia, the correct diagnosis being established intraoperatively, occasion which exposes the cecal appendix by opening the herniary bag, found in different morphological stages of inflammation that can go as far as gangrene or even perforation. In this paper, we have reported the case of a 76 year-old female that presented with femoral tumours, incarcerated, painful and initially considered as an incarcerated femoral hernia, the final diagnosis being made intraoperatively. The treatment for these "hernias" is generally simple, when there are no complications of acute appendicitis as the presence of pus in the hernia sac, and consists in appendectomy and herniorrhaphy. The absence of symptoms for an acute appendicitis often delays the surgery which leads to frequent complications and increased rate of morbidity. PMID:24331333

Ardeleanu, V; Chicos, S; Tutunaru, D; Georgescu, C

2013-01-01

377

Hemostasis and other benefits of fibrin sealants/glues in spine surgery beyond cerebrospinal fluid leak repairs  

PubMed Central

Background: Fibrin sealants (FS)/glues (FG) are primarily utilized in spinal surgery to either strengthen repairs of elective (e.g., intradural tumors/pathology) or traumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas. Here, additional roles/benefits of FS/FG in spine surgery are explored; these include increased hemostasis, reduction of scar, reduction of the risk of infection if impregnated with antibiotics, and its application to restrict diffusion and limit some of the major complications attributed to the controversial “off-label” use of bone morphogeneitc protein (rhBMP-2/INFUSE). Methods: We reviewed multiple studies, focusing not just on the utility of FS/FG in the treatment of CSF fistulas, but on its other applications. Results: FS/FG have been primarily used to supplement elective/traumatic dural closure in spinal surgery. However, FS/FG also contribute to; hemostasis, reducing intraoperative/postoperative bleeding/transfusion requirements, length of stay (LOS)/costs, reduced postoperative scar/radiculitis, and infection when impregnated with antibiotics. Nevertheless, one should seriously question whether FS/FG should be applied to prevent diffusion and limit major complications attributed to the “off-label” use of BMP/INFUSE (e.g., limit/prevent heterotopic ossification, dysphagia/respiratory decompensation, and new neurological deficits). Conclusions: FS/FG successfully supplement watertight dural closure following elective (e.g., intradural tumor) or traumatic CSF fistulas occurring during spinal surgery. Additional benefits include: intraoperative hemostasis with reduced postoperative drainage, reduced transfusion requirements, reduced LOS, cost, scar, and prophylaxis against infection (e.g., impregnated with antibiotics). However, one should seriously question whether FS/FG should be used to contain the diffusion of BMP/INFUSE and limit its complications when utilized “off-label”. PMID:25289150

Epstein, Nancy E.

2014-01-01

378

From surgery to neurosurgery: our experience on the efficacy of fleece-bound sealing (TachoSil®) for dural repair.  

PubMed

Aim. To report on our routine use of TachoSil® for dural repair in neurosurgical practice. Method. TachoSil® has been applied in different fields of surgery thus far. When using TachoSil®, fibrinogen and thrombin is provided locally at the site of the dural defects. Upon contact with fluid, the clotting factors of TachoSil® dissolve and form a fibrin network, which glues the collagen sponge to the wound surface. Results. In our experience, TachoSil® was found to be effective as support for the suture of the dura in patients undergoing spinal and cranial neurosurgical operations. Two illustrative examples are shown. Conclusions. Our procedure showed that closing the dural defect with TachoSil® is a technically simple, reliable and safe method for patients. Indeed, no post-operative cerebrospinal fluid leakage was observed. Nonetheless, further studies with larger sample size are warranted to confirm the efficacy of TachoSil® patches for dural repair. PMID:25174296

Ulivieri, S; Peri, G; Tiezzi, G; Mileo, E; Giorgio, A; Oliveri, G

2014-01-01

379

Chylopericardium After Mitral Valve Repair for Rheumatic Valve Disease Treated with Surgery  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Chylopericardium is a rare disorder that may be primary (idiopathic) or secondary to injury of the thoracic duct or thymus gland. Pediatric cardiac operations are more commonly related to this complication because thymus gland is very active in this population and atrophies in the adult patients. We present a case of chylopericardium after mitral valve repair for rheumatic disease, due to thymus gland tributaries injury. PMID:24783919

Likaj, Ermal; Kacani, Andi; Dumani, Selman; Dibra, Laureta; Refatllari, Ali

2014-01-01

380

Pseudomyxoma peritonei presenting with inguinal hernia.  

PubMed

Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is rare being characterized by intraperitoneal accumulation of mucinous ascites produced by neoplastic cells, mostly originating from a perforated appendiceal adenoma. The clinical signs of the disease are variable, and preoperative diagnosis is often difficult. We describe the clinical case of a 67-year-old patient referred to our unit one month after a left inguinal hernia repair, presenting clinical signs compliant with PMP. Surgical cytoreduction, peritonectomy, appendectomy, and greater omentectomy with perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy were performed. The patient was disease free for a 15 month period when he died apparently due to a cardiac event. We advocate that in all cases of gelatinous fluid in a hernia sac PMP must be suspected, thus histological investigation is mandatory as well as abdominal computed tomography (CT) in order to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:21991881

Ghidirim, Gh; Mishin, I; Zastavnitsky, Gh

2011-01-01

381

[Traumatic lung hernia].  

PubMed

Traumatic lung herniation is an unusual clinical problem. We present a case of a large left post-traumatic lung hernia on the left, anterior, second intercostal space following blunt chest trauma. An important factor in the etiology of these lesions is the relative lack of muscular support of the anterior part of the chest. This report describes the diagnosis and management of a post-traumatic lung hernia. PMID:21537748

Marsico, Giovanni Antonio; Boasquevisque, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Loureiro, Gustavo Lucas; Marques, Rodrigo Felipe; Clemente, Antonio Miraldi

2011-01-01

382

Personalized identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes on computed tomography.  

PubMed

An abdominal wall hernia is a protrusion of the intestine through an opening or area of weakness in the abdominal wall. Correct pre-operative identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes could help surgeons adjust the surgical plan to meet the expected difficulty and morbidity of operating through or removing the previous mesh. First, we present herein for the first time the application of image analysis for automated identification of hernia meshes. Second, we discuss the novel development of a new entropy-based image texture feature using geostatistics and indicator kriging. Third, we seek to enhance the hernia mesh identification by combining the new texture feature with the gray-level co-occurrence matrix feature of the image. The two features can characterize complementary information of anatomic details of the abdominal hernia wall and its mesh on computed tomography. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed study. The new computational tool has potential for personalized mesh identification which can assist surgeons in the diagnosis and repair of complex abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24184112

Pham, Tuan D; Le, Dinh T P; Xu, Jinwei; Nguyen, Duc T; Martindale, Robert G; Deveney, Clifford W

2014-01-01

383

Watchful waiting for ventral hernias: a longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Ventral hernias are a common clinical problem. Immediate repair is recommended for most ventral hernias despite significant recurrence rates. This practice may be related to a lack of understanding of the natural history of ventral hernias. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural history of ventral hernias and to determine if watchful waiting is an acceptable and safe option. Forty-one patients with ventral hernias were enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study of watchful waiting. Primary outcomes were functional impairment resulting from hernia disease as measured by the Activities Assessment Scale (AAS) and changes from baseline to two years in the physical and mental component score of the SF-36 Health Survey. Secondary outcomes included complications such as incarceration. Mixed-effects model for repeated measures and Student's t tests were used to evaluate scale performance. The mean age of enrollees was 64 years, and the mean hernia size was 239 cm(2). Eleven patients were lost to follow-up, and seven patients died of other causes. All remaining patients were followed for two years. There was one incarceration during the follow-up period. There was no deterioration in the AAS score (baseline vs 24 months = 28 vs 25, P = 0.60). There was deterioration of the physical functioning dimension of the SF-36 (baseline vs 24 months = 40 vs 32, P < 0.01), but the mental functioning dimension was improved (45 vs 51; P = 0.01). Watchful waiting was a safe option for patients in this study with ventral hernias. PMID:24666865

Bellows, Charles F; Robinson, Celia; Fitzgibbons, Robert J; Webber, Larry S; Berger, David H

2014-03-01

384

Fetal Surgery: The Ochsner Experience with In Utero Spina Bifida Repair  

PubMed Central

Background Myelomeningocele is the most common form of congenital central nervous system defect that is compatible with life. Most patients with myelomeningocele have significant functional impairment of ambulation and bowel and bladder function, require permanent cerebrospinal fluid diversion with shunting, and have significant morbidity and mortality from hindbrain herniation (Chiari II malformation). The advent of intrauterine surgery has provided new opportunities to better address this lifelong debilitating disease. Case Report The patient was a 19-year-old gravida 2 para 1 at 22-6/7 weeks whose fetus was diagnosed with an open neural tube defect and further demonstrated to have ventriculomegaly and hindbrain herniation. Amniocentesis confirmed normal karyotype and the presence of acetylcholinesterase. After an intrauterine procedure, the patient underwent cesarean section at 35-5/7 weeks and delivered a male infant. His spinal incision was well healed at birth without any evidence of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and his extremities were normal in appearance, range of motion, and movement. The infant also has maintained relatively normal, age-appropriate bowel and bladder function and has no obvious neurologic deficit. Conclusion As the benefit of fetal surgery becomes more widely accepted, quality of care and patient safety must be at the forefront of any institution's effort to offer fetal surgery. Given the current prevalence of spina bifida and the amount of resources required to treat this disease effectively either in utero or postnatally, it is our opinion that the treatment of spina bifida should be regionalized to tertiary referral centers with the interdisciplinary expertise to offer comprehensive treatment for all aspects of the disease and all phases of care for the patients. PMID:24688343

Kahn, Lora; Mbabuike, Nnenna; Valle-Giler, Edison P.; Garces, Juanita; Moore, R. Clifton; Hilaire, Hugo St.; Bui, Cuong J.

2014-01-01

385

[Aortic disease in Marfan syndrome: current role of surgery and thoracic endovascular aortic repair].  

PubMed

Aortic disease is the most life-threatening complication of Marfan syndrome. Over the last decades, improved medical management and surgical results of prophylactic aortic interventions on the aortic root have dramatically increased expectancy of life in Marfan syndrome patients. As a result, the number of Marfan syndrome patients requiring secondary interventions on the thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aorta due to development of aortic disease or new type B dissection, has substantially increased. In this setting, open surgical interventions represent the treatment of choice. Nevertheless, the available literature, although restricted to small case series, indicates that endovascular repair is a feasible treatment option leading to satisfactory short-term results and may provide a bridging role to definitive open reconstruction. The aim of this paper was to review surgical and endovascular outcomes of aortic disease in Marfan syndrome. PMID:23877551

Di Eusanio, Marco; Berretta, Paolo; Folesani, Gianluca; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

2013-01-01

386

Emergent Endovascular vs. Open Surgery Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Objectives To systematically review studies comparing peri-operative mortality and length of hospital stay in patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs) who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to patients who underwent open surgical repair (OSR). Methods The Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until Apr 30, 2013 using keywords such as abdominal aortic aneurysm, emergent, emergency, rupture, leaking, acute, endovascular, stent, graft, and endoscopic. The primary outcome was peri-operative mortality and the secondary outcome was length of hospital stay. Results A total of 18 studies (2 randomized controlled trials, 5 prospective studies, and 11 retrospective studies) with a total of 135,734 rAAA patients were included. rAAA patients who underwent EVAR had significantly lower peri-operative mortality compared to those who underwent OSR (overall OR?=?0.62, 95% CI?=?0.58 to 0.67, P<0.001). rAAA patients with EVAR also had a significantly shorter mean length of hospital stay compared to those with OSR (difference in mean length of stay ranged from ?2.00 to ?19.10 days, with the overall estimate being ?5.25 days (95% CI?=??9.23 to ?1.26, P?=?0.010). There was no publication bias and sensitivity analysis showed good reliability. Conclusions EVAR confers significant benefits in terms of peri-operative mortality and length of hospital stay. There is a need for more randomized controlled trials to compare outcomes of EVAR and OSR for rAAA. PMID:24498112

Qin, Chuan; Chen, Lin; Xiao, Ying-bin

2014-01-01

387

The Fluid Mechanics of Scleral Buckling Surgery for the Repair of Retinal Detachment  

PubMed Central

Background Scleral buckling is a common surgical technique used to treat retinal detachments that involves suturing a radial or circumferential silicone element on the sclera. Although this procedure has been performed since the 1960’s, and there is a reasonable experimental model of retinal detachment, there is still debate as to how this surgery facilitates the re-attachment of the retina. Methods Finite element calculations using the COMSOL Multiphysics® system are utilized to explain the influence of the scleral buckle on the flow of sub-retinal fluid in a physical model of retinal detachment. Results We found that, by coupling fluid mechanics with structural mechanics, laminar fluid flow and the Bernoulli effect are necessary for a physically consistent explanation of retinal reattachment. Improved fluid outflow and retinal reattachment are found with low fluid viscosity and rapid eye movements. A simulation of saccadic eye movements was more effective in removing sub-retinal fluid than slower, reading speed, eye movements in removing subretinal fluid. Conclusions The results of our simulations allow us to explain the physical principles behind scleral buckling surgery and provide insight that can be utilized clinically. In particular, we find that rapid eye movements facilitate more rapid retinal reattachment. This is contradictory to the conventional wisdom of attempting to minimize eye movements. PMID:19809830

Foster, William J.; Dowla, Nadia; Joshi, Saurabh Y.; Nikolaou, Michael

2009-01-01

388

Development of an Optimal Diaphragmatic Hernia Rabbit Model for Pediatric Thoracoscopic Training  

PubMed Central

Our objectives were to standarize the procedure needed to reproduce a similar surgical scene which a pediatric surgeon would face on repairing a Bochdalek hernia in newborns and to define the optimal time period for hernia development that achieve a realistic surgical scenario with minimimal animal suffering. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits weighing 3–3.5 kg were divided into four groups depending on the time frame since hernia creation to thoracoscopic repair: 48 h, 72 h, 96 h and 30 days. Bochdalek trigono was identified and procedures for hernia creation and thoracoscopic repair were standarized. Blood was collected for hematology (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, hemoglobin and hematocrit), biochemistry (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase) and gas analysis (arterial blood pH, partial pressure of oxygen, partial pressure of carbón dioxide, oxygen saturation and bicarbonate) at baseline and before the surgial repairment. Glucocorticoid metabolites concentration in faeces was measured. Thoracoscopy video recordings were evaluated by six pediatric surgeons and rated from 0 to 10 according to similarities with congenital diaphragmatic hernia in newborn and with its thoracoscopic approach. Statistical methods included the analysis of variance, and comparisons between groups were followed by a post-hoc Tukey’s test. Fourty -eight h showed to be the optimal time frame to obtain a diaphragmatic hernia similar to newborn scenario from a surgical point of view with minimal stress for the animals. PMID:24521868

Pérez-Merino, Eva M.; Usón-Casaús, Jesús M.; Zaragoza-Bayle, Concepción; Rivera-Barreno, Ramón; Rodríguez-Alarcón, Carlos A.; Palme, Rupert; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.

2014-01-01

389

A cost–utility analysis of treatment options for inguinal hernia in 1,513,008 adult patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

  Background: The controversial issue of the cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is examined, employing\\u000a a decision analytic method. Materials and methods: The NSAS, NHDS (National Center for Health Statistics), HCUP-NIS (Agency\\u000a for Healthcare Research and Quality) databases and 51 randomized controlled trials were analyzed. The study group constituted\\u000a of a total of 1,513,008 hernia repairs. Projection of the clinical,

N. Stylopoulos; G. S. Gazelle; D. W. Rattner

2003-01-01

390

Meckel's diverticulum incarcerated in a transmesocolic internal hernia  

PubMed Central

Intestinal obstruction is a common complication associated with Meckel’s diverticulum in adults. The diverticulum itself or its fibrous band can lead to an intestinal volvulus, intussusceptions, or closed-loop obstructions, which require surgery. The incarceration of Meckel’s diverticulum in either inguinal or femoral hernia sacs (Littre’s hernia) is another, less common, etiology underlying intestinal obstruction. This case report describes a 45-year-old man who had an obstruction associated with a Meckel’s diverticulum that passed through a congenital defect in the mesocolon into the right subphrenic space. The patient, who had not undergone abdominal surgery previously, came to the emergency room with acute onset of intermittent epigastric pain and abdominal distention. Computed tomography images showed the presence of a segment of the small bowel and a diverticulum in the right subphrenic space and paracolic gutter. The twisted mesentery and the dilated loops of the proximal small bowel were indicative of an intestinal volvulus and obstruction. Meckel’s diverticulum complicated by a transmesocolic internal hernia was diagnosed, and this condition was confirmed during emergency surgery. The patient’s postoperative recovery was uneventful. This case report highlights another presentation of Meckel’s diverticulum, that is, in combination with a transmesocolic internal hernia. This etiology may lead to an intestinal volvulus and necessitate early surgery. PMID:25309093

Wu, Si-Yuan; Ho, Meng-Hsing; Hsu, Sheng-Der

2014-01-01

391

Meckel's diverticulum incarcerated in a transmesocolic internal hernia.  

PubMed

Intestinal obstruction is a common complication associated with Meckel's diverticulum in adults. The diverticulum itself or its fibrous band can lead to an intestinal volvulus, intussusceptions, or closed-loop obstructions, which require surgery. The incarceration of Meckel's diverticulum in either inguinal or femoral hernia sacs (Littre's hernia) is another, less common, etiology underlying intestinal obstruction. This case report describes a 45-year-old man who had an obstruction associated with a Meckel's diverticulum that passed through a congenital defect in the mesocolon into the right subphrenic space. The patient, who had not undergone abdominal surgery previously, came to the emergency room with acute onset of intermittent epigastric pain and abdominal distention. Computed tomography images showed the presence of a segment of the small bowel and a diverticulum in the right subphrenic space and paracolic gutter. The twisted mesentery and the dilated loops of the proximal small bowel were indicative of an intestinal volvulus and obstruction. Meckel's diverticulum complicated by a transmesocolic internal hernia was diagnosed, and this condition was confirmed during emergency surgery. The patient's postoperative recovery was uneventful. This case report highlights another presentation of Meckel's diverticulum, that is, in combination with a transmesocolic internal hernia. This etiology may lead to an intestinal volvulus and necessitate early surgery. PMID:25309093

Wu, Si-Yuan; Ho, Meng-Hsing; Hsu, Sheng-Der

2014-10-01

392

The mesh plug technique for recurrent groin herniorrhaphy: A nine-year experience of 407 repairs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Recurrent inguinal hernias can be repaired efficaciously by mesh plug techniques, which have had better results than traditional tissue-based repairs in several small studies. This report provides a detailed description and assessment of the anterior, tension-free, “umbrella” mesh plug method for recurrent groin herniorrhaphy. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 407 patients with recurrent inguinal and femoral hernias

Ira M. Rutkow; Alan W. Robbins

1998-01-01

393

Retinal detachment repair  

MedlinePLUS

Retinal detachment repair is eye surgery to place a detached retina back into its normal position. A detached ... layers. This article describes the repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments -- retinal detachments that occur due to a hole ...

394

Abdominal hernias: Radiological features  

PubMed Central

Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

2011-01-01

395

Pulmonary Hernia in a Two-Year-Old Child  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary hernia, also known as lung herniation or intercostal herniation, is best explained as the lung parenchyma protruding beyond the confines of the thoracic wall. This rare finding can be classified as congenital or acquired. Acquired pulmonary herniations are often the complication of blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest wall. This report describes a two-year-old male who fell onto a rigid post, striking his left lower chest. Imaging studies demonstrated a small pneumothorax as well as pulmonary herniation. The patient underwent a diagnostic thoracoscopy and repair of a pulmonary hernia within the 7th intercostal space without complication. In this case report, we aim to add to the limited body of existing literature on the surgical management of pulmonary hernias. PMID:25328752

Walters, Bryan S.; Agnoni, Alysia A.; Coppola, Christopher P.; Scorpio, Ronald J.; Kennedy, Alfred P.

2014-01-01

396

Systematic Review of the Use of a Mesh to Prevent Parastomal Hernia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Parastomal hernia is a major complication after stoma placement. Surgical procedures for repairing parastomal hernia are difficult\\u000a and their failure rate is high. The use of a mesh implanted at the primary operation has shown promising results. Therefore,\\u000a we performed a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the results of the placement of mesh at the time of stoma

Ka-Wai Tam; Po-Li Wei; Li-Jen Kuo; Chih-Hsiung Wu

2010-01-01

397

Incarceration of umbilical hernia after radiological insertion of a Denver peritoneovenous shunt.  

PubMed

We report a rare complication of incarceration of an umbilical hernia after Denver peritoneovenous shunt placement. A 50-year-old man presented with refractory ascites from liver cirrhosis. He also had an umbilical hernia. Because the ascites became uncontrollable, Denver peritoneovenous shunting was performed. The operation was successful and the ascites decreased. Ten days later, however, incarceration of the umbilical hernia occurred. A surgical repair was performed, but he died 2 days later. The cause of death was considered to be sepsis. PMID:23196823

Ohta, Kengo; Shimohira, Masashi; Hashizume, Takuya; Kawai, Tatsuya; Kurosaka, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Kazushi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Shibamoto, Yuta

2013-03-01

398

Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to an Incarcerated Paraoesophageal Hernia: A Rare Cause for a Common Problem  

PubMed Central

This is a rare case report of acute pancreatitis secondary to a massive incarcerated paraoesophageal hernia. The pathogenesis resulted from obstruction of the distal pancreatic duct after displacement of the pancreatic head and body into the thorax as part of a Type IV paraoesophageal hernia. Although this condition is rare, the patient made steady progress following laparotomy and open repair of hernia. She made a good recovery after prompt therapy, therefore, this report can be a guide to the diagnosis and treatment of similar conditions. PMID:24653652

Boyce, Kathryn; Campbell, William; Taylor, Mark

2014-01-01

399

An irreducible left scrotal hernia containing a sigmoid colon tumor (adenocarcinoma) – Case report  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION In relation to all inguinal hernias, large irreducible scrotal hernias are quite rare, while such hernias containing colon tumors in the sac have so far been described in fewer than 30 cases. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 61-year-old patient was admitted for a planned surgery because of a large irreducible left-sided scrotal hernia. Intraoperatively, a large tumor of the sigmoid colon was found in the hernial sac. In a histopathological examination it was diagnosed as adenocarcinoma. A palliative operation was performed and he was referred to further systemic and palliative treatment (because of numerous coexisting liver metastases). DISCUSSION Until now, only about 30 cases of colon tumor in inguinal hernia sac have been reported. CONCLUSION It should be remembered that even the most obvious preoperative diagnosis may be verified intraoperatively. PMID:24988210

Gna?, Jaros?aw; Bulsa, Marek; Czaja-Bulsa, Gra?yna

2014-01-01

400

[Voluminous inguinal hernias can also be treated under local anesthesia].  

PubMed

In patients with a large inguinal hernia, surgeons are usually reluctant to use a local anesthesia as described in the Shouldice technique. The purpose of this study was to appreciate the efficiency of such a technique. Routine local anesthesia used 200 cc of 0.5% lidocaine injected subcutaneously in the groin area and more deeply, near the anterior superior iliac spine in order to achieve a nerve block of the genital branches of the ilioinguinal and genitofemoral nerves. If necessary, the peritoneal sac is injected with lidocaine: it is usually not opened, just pushed back into the abdomen. At the end of the procedure, the estimated size of the peritoneal sac, the presence of pain, the necessity of converting the local anesthetic technique into an other procedure and the use of a prosthesis were recorded in the patient's charts. From January 1986 to December 1992, all patients with an inguinal hernia more than 6 cm in diameter, were included in the study. 111 consecutive patients were defined as having a large hernia and were operated by one of the authors. 3 patients were excluded, following general anesthesia as the first approach, males leaving 108 cases. The mean age was 59.8 years (range: