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1

Herniated nucleus pulposus as a result of emesis in a 20-yr-old man.  

PubMed

The causes of herniated disc in vivo vary, and recent studies stress the role of intradiscal pressure as an important factor. Identifying causes of increased intradiscal pressure is difficult. This case report describes the diagnosis of a herniated nucleus pulposus in a 20-yr-old healthy man, with sudden onset of emesis. The diagnosis was made by a complete history, physical examination, electrodiagnostic studies, and magnetic resonance imaging. This etiology of herniated nucleus pulposus has not been described in the medical literature, and the severity of the symptoms, clinical examination, electrodiagnostic findings, and radiologic findings are discussed. Intradiscal pressures and their role in herniated nucleus pulposus are discussed, with a review of the medical literature on the measurement of intradiscal pressure. The amount of force required to produce a herniated nucleus pulposus is also discussed. PMID:15024336

Pecha, Marc D

2004-04-01

2

Nucleus pulposus cells derived IGF-1 and MCP-1 enhance osteoclastogenesis and vertebrae disruption in lumbar disc herniation  

PubMed Central

Study design: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation (LDH) cases were classified into bulging LDH, herniated LDH and prolapse LDH types according to imaging examination, and vertebrae disruptions were evaluated. Cytokines derived from the nucleus pulposus cells were detected, and their effects on osteoclastogenesis, as well as the mechanisms involved, were studied via an in vitro osteoclast differentiation system. Objective: To clarify the mechanisms of lumbar vertebrae resorption induced by lumbar herniation. Summary and background data: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation induced vertebrae erosion exacerbates quality of patients’ life and clinical outcome. Although nucleus pulposus cells derived cytokines were reported to play an important role in this pathogenesis, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process are still unclear. Methods: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation patients were diagnosed with CT scan and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. RNA was extracted from 192 surgical specimens of the herniated lumbar disc and 29 surgical excisions of the lumbar disc from spinal injury patients. The expressions of osteoclastogenesis related cytokines and chemokines were examined using real time PCR. Monocytes were induced into osteoclast with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro, while the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were added into the differentiation procedure in order to evaluate the effects and explore the molecular mechanisms. Results: Vertebrae erosion had a positive relationship with lumbar disc herniation severity types. In all of the osteoclastogenesis related cytokines, the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were the most highly expressed in the nucleus pulposus cells. IGF-1 enhances activation of NF-kB signaling directly, but MCP-1 upregulated the expression of RANK, so that enhanced cellular sensitivity to RANKL resulted in increasing osteoclastogenesis and activity. Conclusion: Lumbar herniation induced overexpression of IGF-1 and MCP-1 in nucleus pulposus cells aggravated vertebral erosions. Hence, this study suggests that targeting osteoclastogenesis related cytokines has potential clinical significance in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation patients. PMID:25674216

Zhu, Zhongjiao; Huang, Peng; Chong, Yanxue; George, Suraj K; Wen, Bingtao; Han, Na; Liu, Zhiqiang; Kang, Lixin; Lin, Nie

2014-01-01

3

Towards a functional radiopaque hydrogel for nucleus pulposus replacement.  

PubMed

Patients with severe back pain, attributed to a herniation of the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc, can benefit from a replacement of only the nucleus pulposus, provided the annulus fibrosus is still functional. This study investigated four intrinsically radiopaque hydrogel biomaterials, which were designed specifically to replace the herniated nucleus pulposus. The important characteristic of these hydrogels is that they can be visualized entirely with both MRI and X-rays. The materials are based on copolymers of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NVP) or 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and a radiopacity introducing monomer, 2-(4'-iodobenzoyl)-oxo-ethyl methacrylate (4IEMA). Two of the formulations also contain the chemical crosslinker allyl methacrylate (AMA). Physical-mechanical properties like the water-uptake, biocompatibility, stiffness, and fatigue and creep behavior were studied, while keeping an eye on the intended application. All four materials were designed with 5-6 mass % of iodine to ensure sufficient X-ray visibility between two vertebrae. It was found that the materials display appropriate stiffness and biocompatibility. The crosslinked materials hold most promise as a functional nucleus prosthesis, as they combine these properties also with high water content, fatigue resistance, and recovery after loading. PMID:17415776

Boelen, Erik J H; Koole, Leo H; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W; van Hooy-Corstjens, Catharina S J

2007-11-01

4

Composite hydrogels for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering.  

PubMed

Tissue engineering offers a paradigm shift in the treatment of back pain. Engineered intervertebral discs could replace degenerated tissue and overcome the limitations of current treatments, which substantially alter the biomechanical properties of the spine. The centre of the disc, the nucleus pulposus, is an amorphous gel with a large bound water content and it can resist substantial compressive loads. Due to similarities in their compositions, hydrogels have frequently been considered as substitutes for the nucleus pulposus. However, there has been limited work characterising the time-dependent mechanical behaviour of hydrogel scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering. Poroelastic behaviour, which plays a key role in nutrient transport, is of particular importance. Here, we investigate the time-dependent mechanical properties of gelatin and agar hydrogels and of gelatin-agar composites. The time-dependent properties of these hydrogels are explored using viscoelastic and poroelastic frameworks. Several gel formulations demonstrate comparable equilibrium elastic behaviour to the nucleus pulposus under unconfined compression, but permeability values that are much greater than those of the native tissue. A range of time-dependent responses are observed in the composite gels examined, presenting the opportunity for targeted design of custom hydrogels with combinations of mechanical properties optimized for tissue engineering applications. PMID:22658151

Strange, Daniel G T; Oyen, Michelle L

2012-07-01

5

A Combinatorial Relative Mass Value Evaluation of Endogenous Bioactive Proteins in Three-Dimensional Cultured Nucleus Pulposus Cells of Herniated Intervertebral Discs: Identification of Potential Target Proteins for Gene Therapeutic Approaches  

PubMed Central

Painful degenerative disc diseases have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells play a central role in intervertebral disc (IVD) maintenance by orchestrating catabolic, anabolic and inflammatory factors that affect the extracellular matrix. IVD degeneration is associated with imbalances of these factors, resulting in a catabolic inflammatory metabolism. Therefore, accurate knowledge about their quantity and quality with regard to matrix synthesis is vital for a rational gene therapeutic approach. NP cells were isolated from 63 patients operated due to lumbar disc herniation (mean age 56 / range 29 - 84 years). Then, three-dimensional culture with low-glucose was completed in a collagen type I scaffold for four weeks. Subsequently cell proliferation evaluation was performed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and intracellular concentration of 28 endogenously expressed anabolic, catabolic, inflammatory factors and relevant matrix proteins was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Specimen-related grades of degeneration were confirmed by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Independent from gender, age and grade of degeneration proliferation rates remained similar in all groups of NP cells. Progressive grades of degeneration, however, showed a significant influence on accumulation of selective groups of factors such as disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5, matrix metalloproteinase 3, metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 and 2, interleukin-1? and interleukin-1 receptor. Along with these changes, the key NP matrix proteins aggrecan and collagen II decreased significantly. The concentration of anabolic factors bone morphogenetic proteins 2, 4, 6 and 7, insulin-like growth factor 1, transforming growth factor beta 1 and 3, however, remained below the minimal detectable quantities. These findings indicate that progressive degenerative changes in NP may be problematic with regard to biologic treatment strategies. Hence, gene therapeutic interventions regulating relevant bioactive factors identified in this work might contribute to the development of regenerative treatment approaches for degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24278441

Mern, Demissew S.; Fontana, Johann; Beierfuß, Anja; Thomé, Claudius; Hegewald, Aldemar A.

2013-01-01

6

Identification of novel nucleus pulposus markers  

PubMed Central

Mesenchymal stem-cell based therapies have been proposed as novel treatments for intervertebral disc degeneration, a prevalent and disabling condition associated with back pain. The development of these treatment strategies, however, has been hindered by the incomplete understanding of the human nucleus pulposus phenotype and by an inaccurate interpretation and translation of animal to human research. This review summarises recent work characterising the nucleus pulposus phenotype in different animal models and in humans and integrates their findings with the anatomical and physiological differences between these species. Understanding this phenotype is paramount to guarantee that implanted cells restore the native functions of the intervertebral disc. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:169–78. PMID:23958792

Rodrigues-Pinto, R.; Richardson, S. M.; Hoyland, J. A.

2013-01-01

7

Spinal cord infarction secondary to nucleus pulposus embolization in pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nucleus pulposus (NP) embolism is an extremely rare cause of spinal cord infarction. To our knowledge, it has not been reported in pregnancy in the English literature. A 41-year-old pregnant woman presented with clinical symptoms initially attributed to a transverse myelitis. After a complicated clinical course, she expired, and was found at autopsy to have NP embolism to the spinal

Shweta Uppal; Subasini Dash; Leroy Sharer; William Clark Lambert; Debra S Heller; Patrick Pullicino

2004-01-01

8

Numerical analysis of the influence of nucleus pulposus removal on the biomechanical behavior of a lumbar motion segment.  

PubMed

Nucleus replacement was deemed to have therapeutic potential for patients with intervertebral disc herniation. However, whether a patient would benefit from nucleus replacement is technically unclear. This study aimed to investigate the influence of nucleus pulposus (NP) removal on the biomechanical behavior of a lumbar motion segment and to further explore a computational method of biomechanical characteristics of NP removal, which can evaluate the mechanical stability of pulposus replacement. We, respectively, reconstructed three types of models for a mildly herniated disc and three types of models for a severely herniated disc based on a L4-L5 segment finite element model with computed tomography image data from a healthy adult. First, the NP was removed from the herniated disc models, and the biomechanical behavior of NP removal was simulated. Second, the NP cavities were filled with an experimental material (Poisson's ratio = 0.3; elastic modulus = 3 MPa), and the biomechanical behavior of pulposus replacement was simulated. The simulations were carried out under the five loadings of axial compression, flexion, lateral bending, extension, and axial rotation. The changes of the four biomechanical characteristics, i.e. the rotation degree, the maximum stress in the annulus fibrosus (AF), joint facet contact forces, and the maximum disc deformation, were computed for all models. Experimental results showed that the rotation range, the maximum AF stress, and joint facet contact forces increased, and the maximum disc deformation decreased after NP removal, while they changed in the opposite way after the nucleus cavities were filled with the experimental material. PMID:24893132

Huang, Juying; Yan, Huagang; Jian, Fengzeng; Wang, Xingwen; Li, Haiyun

2015-01-01

9

Development of injectable hydrogels for nucleus pulposus replacement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intervertebral disc degeneration has been reported as the underlying cause for 75% of cases of lower back pain and is marked by dehydration of the nucleus pulposus within the intervertebral disc. There have been many implant designs to replace the nucleus pulposus. Some researchers have proposed the replacement of the nucleus pulposus with hydrogel materials. The insertion of devices made from these materials further compromises the annulus of the disc. An ideal nucleus replacement could be injected into the disc space and form a solid in vivo. However, injectable replacements using curing elastomers and thermoplastic materials are not ideal because of the potentially harmful exothermic heat evolved from their reactions and the toxicity of the reactants used. We propose a hydrogel system that can be injected as a liquid at 25°C and solidified to yield a hydrogel within the intervertebral disc at 37°C. In aqueous solutions, these polymers have Lower Critical Solution Temperatures (LCST) between 25-37°C, making them unique candidate materials for this application. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) is the most widely studied LCST polymer due to its drastic transition near body temperature. However, by itself, pure PNIPAAm forms a hydrogel that has low water content and can readily undergo plastic deformation. To increase the water content and impart elasticity to PNIPAAm hydrogels, grafted and branched hydrogel systems were created that incorporated the thermogelling PNIPAAm and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). In this research, the effects of polymer composition and monomer to initiator ratio, which controls polymer MW, on the in vitro swelling properties (mass, chemical, and compressive mechanical stability) of hydrogels formed from aqueous solutions of these polymers were evaluated. Immersion studies were also conducted in solutions to simulate the osmotic environment of the nucleus pulposus. The effects of repeated compression and unloading cycles on the water content and dimensional recovery of hydrogels made from three candidate polymer formulations were also determined. Unlike PNIPAAm and PEG grafted PNIPAAm hydrogels, PEG branched hydrogels have covalently linked networks. Addition of 7 mol% PEG branches to PNIPAAm resulted in a hydrogel with a higher water content and better elastic recovery than hydrogels made from pure PNIPAAm. PEG branched PNIPAAm hydrogels were shown to have mass, chemical, and compressive mechanical stability in vitro. Furthermore, these hydrogels showed superior dimensional recovery after compressive cycling than pure PNIPAAm and PEG grafted PNIPAAm hydrogels. The 7 mol% PEG branched PNIPAAm hydrogels have suitable swelling and mechanical properties to potentially serve as a nucleus pulposus replacement.

Thomas, Jonathan D.

10

Physical analysis of collagen-GAG composite scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue regeneration  

E-print Network

In this study biomaterial scaffolds for regeneration of nucleus pulposus were developed by freeze drying slurries with different proportions of collagen II (CII), chondroitin-6-sulfate (CS), and hyaluronic acid (HA). The ...

Simson, Jacob A

2008-01-01

11

Environmental regulation of notochordal gene expression in nucleus pulposus cells.  

PubMed

Cells of the nucleus pulposus (NP) in the intervertebral disc are derived directly from the embryonic notochord. In humans, a shift in NP cell population coincides with the beginning of age-related changes in the extracellular matrix that can lead to spinal disorders. To begin identifying the bases of these changes, the manner by which relevant environmental factors impact cell function must be understood. This study investigated the roles of biochemical, nutritional, and physical factors in regulating immature NP cells. Specifically, we examined cell morphology, attachment, proliferation, and expression of genes associated with the notochord and immature NP (Sox9, CD24, and type IIA procollagen). Primary cells isolated from rat caudal discs were exposed to different media formulations and physical culture configurations either in 21% (ambient) or 2% (hypoxic) O2. As expected, cells in alginate beads retained a vacuolated morphology similar to chordocytes, with little change in gene expression. Interestingly, NP tissues not enzymatically digested were more profoundly influenced by oxygen. In monolayer, alpha-MEM preserved vacuolated morphology, produced the highest efficiency of attachment, and best maintained gene expression. DMEM and Opti-MEM cultures resulted in high levels of proliferation, but these appeared to involve small non-vacuolated cells. Gene expression patterns for cells in DMEM monolayer cultures were consistent with chondrocyte de-differentiation, with the response being delayed by hypoxia. Overall, results indicate that certain environmental conditions induce cellular changes that compromise the notochordal phenotype in immature NP. These results form the foundation on which the mechanisms of such changes can be elucidated. PMID:19472213

Rastogi, Anshu; Thakore, Pratiksha; Leung, Aileen; Benavides, Magda; Machado, Monica; Morschauser, Michael A; Hsieh, Adam H

2009-09-01

12

The effects of oxygen tension and antiaging factor Klotho on Wnt signaling in nucleus pulposus cells  

PubMed Central

Introduction The goals of this study were to examine the oxemic regulation of Wnt signaling to explore whether Wnt signaling accelerates the age-related degeneration of nucleus pulposus cells, and if so, to define the mechanism underlying this effect. We investigated the expression of Klotho, a newly identified antiaging gene, and whether its regulation is attributable to the suppression of Wnt signaling. Methods Rat nucleus pulposus cells were cultured under normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxic (2% O2) conditions, and the expression and promoter activity of Wnt signaling and Klotho were evaluated. The effect of Klotho protein was examined with transfection experiments, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, senescence-associated ?-galactosidase staining, and cell-cycle analysis. To determine the methylation status of the Klotho promoter region, bisulfite genomic sequencing analysis was performed. Its relation with the activation of Wnt signaling was assessed. We also examined whether the expression of Klotho could block the effects of pathological Wnt expression in nucleus pulposus cells. Results Nucleus pulposus cells exhibited increased ?-catenin mRNA and protein under the hypoxic condition. Klotho protein was expressed in vivo, and protein and messenger RNA expression decreased under the hypoxic condition. Klotho treatment decreased cell proliferation and induced the quiescence of nucleus pulposus cells. In addition, Klotho treatment inhibited expression of ?-catenin gene and protein compared with untreated control cells. Conclusions These data indicate that Wnt signaling and Klotho form a negative-feedback loop in nucleus pulposus cells. These results suggest that the expression of Klotho is regulated by the balance between upregulation and downregulation of Wnt signaling. PMID:22551380

2012-01-01

13

In vitro measurement of nucleus pulposus swelling pressure: A new technique for studies of spinal adaptation to gravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Swelling of the intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus is altered by posture and gravity. We have designed and tested a new osmometer for in vitro determination of nucleus pulposus swelling pressure. The functional principle of the osmometer involves compressing a sample of nucleus pulposus with nitrogen gas until saline pressure gradients across a 0.45 microns Millipore filter are eliminated. Swelling pressure of both pooled dog and pooled pig lumbar disc nucleus pulposus were measured on the new osmometer and compared to swelling pressures determined using the equilibrium dialysis technique. The osmometer measured swelling pressures comparable to those obtained by the dialysis technique. This osmometer provides a rapid, direct, and accurate measurement of swelling pressure of the nucleus pulposus.

Hargens, A. R.; Glover, M. G.; Mahmood, M. M.; Gott, S.; Garfin, S. R.; Ballard, R.; Murthy, G.; Brown, M. D.

1992-01-01

14

miR-21 Promotes Human Nucleus Pulposus Cell Proliferation through PTEN/AKT Signaling  

PubMed Central

The precise role of nucleus pulposus cell proliferation in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration remains to be elucidated. Recent findings have revealed that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, may regulate cell proliferation in many pathological conditions. Here, we showed that miR-21 was significantly upregulated in degenerative nucleus pulposus tissues when compared with nucleus pulposus tissues that were isolated from patients with idiopathic scoliosis and that miR-10b levels were associated with disc degeneration grade. Moreover, bioinformatics target prediction identified PTEN as a putative target of miR-21. miR-21 inhibited PTEN expression by directly targeting the 3?UTR, and this inhibition was abolished through miR-21 binding site mutations. miR-21 overexpression stimulated cell proliferation and AKT signaling pathway activation, which led to cyclin D1 translation. Additionally, the increase in proliferation and cyclin D1 expression induced by miR-21 overexpression was almost completely blocked by Ly294002, an AKT inhibitor. Taken together, aberrant miR-21 upregulation in intervertebral disc degeneration could target PTEN, which would contribute to abnormal nucleus pulposus cell proliferation through derepressing the Akt pathway. Our study also underscores the potential of miR-21 and the PTEN/Akt pathway as novel therapeutic targets in intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:24603539

Liu, Hongzhe; Huang, Xiangwang; Liu, Xiangyang; Xiao, Sheng; Zhang, Yi; Xiang, Tiecheng; Shen, Xiongjie; Wang, Guoping; Sheng, Bin

2014-01-01

15

Exhaustion of nucleus pulposus progenitor cells with ageing and degeneration of the intervertebral disc  

PubMed Central

Despite the high prevalence of intervertebral disc disease, little is known about changes in intervertebral disc cells and their regenerative potential with ageing and intervertebral disc degeneration. Here we identify populations of progenitor cells that are Tie2 positive (Tie2+) and disialoganglioside 2 positive (GD2+), in the nucleus pulposus from mice and humans. These cells form spheroid colonies that express type II collagen and aggrecan. They are clonally multipotent and differentiated into mesenchymal lineages and induced reorganization of nucleus pulposus tissue when transplanted into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. The frequency of Tie2+ cells in tissues from patients decreases markedly with age and degeneration of the intervertebral disc, suggesting exhaustion of their capacity for regeneration. However, progenitor cells (Tie2+GD2+) can be induced from their precursor cells (Tie2+GD2?) under simple culture conditions. Moreover, angiopoietin-1, a ligand of Tie2, is crucial for the survival of nucleus pulposus cells. Our results offer insights for regenerative therapy and a new diagnostic standard. PMID:23232394

Sakai, Daisuke; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nakai, Tomoko; Mishima, Taishi; Kato, Shunichi; Grad, Sibylle; Alini, Mauro; Risbud, Makarand V.; Chan, Danny; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Masuda, Koichi; Okano, Hideyuki; Ando, Kiyoshi; Mochida, Joji

2012-01-01

16

Percutaneous Treatment of Intervertebral Disc Herniation  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Disc herniation is defined as rupture of the fibrocartilagenous annulus fibrosus that surrounds the intervertebral disc, associated\\u000a with the release of the central gelatinous nucleus pulposus. Most herniations take place in the lumbar area of the spine.\\u000a They occur more frequently in middle aged and older men, especially those involved in strenuous physical activity. They cause\\u000a physical disability with significant

Xavier Buy; Afshin Gangi; Stéphane Guth; Ali Guermazi

17

Percutaneous Disc Decompression with Nucleoplasty–Volumetry of the Nucleus Pulposus Using Ultrahigh-Field MRI  

PubMed Central

Purpose To evaluate changes in nucleus pulposus volume as a potential parameter for the effects of disc decompression. Methods Fifty-two discs (T8 to L1) were extracted from 26 pigs and separated into thoracic (T8 to T11) and thoracolumbar discs (T12 to L1). The discs were imaged using 7.1 Tesla ultrahigh-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with acquisition of axial T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences for determination of baseline and postinterventional nucleus pulposus volumes. Volumes were calculated using OsiriX® (http://www.osirix-viewer.com). After randomization, one group was treated with nucleoplasty, while the placebo group was treated with an identical procedure but without coblation current. The readers analyzing the MR images were blinded to the kind of procedure performed. Baseline and postinterventional volumes were compared between the nucleoplasty and placebo group. Results Average preinterventional nucleus volume was 0.799 (SD: 0.212) ml. Postinterventional volume reduction in the nucleoplasty group was significant at 0.052 (SD: 0.035) ml or 6.30% (p<0.0001) (thoracic discs) and 0.082 (SD: 0.042) ml or 7.25% (p?=?0.0078) (thoracolumbar discs). Nucleoplasty achieved volume reductions of 0.114 (SD: 0.054) ml or 14.72% (thoracic) and 0.093 (SD: 0.081) ml or 11.61% (thoracolumbar) compared with the placebo group. Conclusions Nucleoplasty significantly reduces thoracic and thoracolumbar nucleus pulposus volumes in porcine discs. PMID:22848512

Kasch, Richard; Mensel, Birger; Schmidt, Florian; Drescher, Wolf; Pfuhl, Ralf; Ruetten, Sebastian; Merk, Harry R.; Kayser, Ralph

2012-01-01

18

TNF-? and IL-1? Dependent Induction of CCL3 Expression by Nucleus Pulposus Cells Promotes Macrophage Migration through CCR1  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate TNF-? and IL-1? regulation of CCL3 expression in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells and in macrophage migration. Methods qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to measure CCL3 expression in NP cells. Transfections were used to determine the role of NF-?B, C/EBP-? and MAPK on cytokine mediated CCL3 promoter activity. Effect of NP-conditioned medium on macrophage migration was measured using a transwell system. Results An increase in CCL3 expression and promoter activity was observed in NP cells after TNF-? or IL-1? treatment. Treatment of cells with NF-?B and MAPK inhibitors abolished the effect of the cytokines on CCL3 expression. The inductive effect of p65 and C/EBP-? on CCL3 promoter was confirmed through gain- and loss-of-function studies. Noteworthy, co-transfection of p50 completely blocked cytokine and p65 dependent induction. In contrast, c-Rel and RelB had little effect on promoter activity. Lentiviral transduction with Sh-p65 and Sh-Ikk? significantly decreased TNF-? dependent increase in CCL3 expression. Analysis of degenerate human NP tissues showed that CCL3, but not CCL4 expression correlated positively with the grade of tissue degeneration. Importantly, treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium of NP cells treated with TNF-? or IL-1? promoted their migration; pretreatment of macrophages with antagonist to CCR1, primary receptor for CCL3 and CCL4, blocked cytokine mediated migration. Conclusions By controlling the activation of MAPK, NF-?B and C/EBP? signaling, TNF-? and IL-1? modulate the expression of CCL3 in NP cells. The CCL3-CCR1 axis may play an important role in promoting macrophage infiltration in degenerate, herniated discs. PMID:23233369

Wang, Jianru; Tian, Ye; Phillips, Kate L.E.; Chiverton, Neil; Haddock, Gail; Bunning, Rowena A.; Cross, Alison K.; Shapiro, Irving M.; LeMaitre, Christine L.; Risbud, Makarand V.

2012-01-01

19

HIF Regulation of ANK Expression in Nucleus Pulposus Cells: Possible Implications in Controlling Dystrophic Mineralization in the Intervertebral Disc  

PubMed Central

Objective Since nucleus pulposus cells reside in hypoxia, we determined if expression of ANK, a pyrophosphate transporter, is regulated by the HIF proteins. Methods Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot were used to measure ANK expression in nucleus pulposus cells. Transfections were performed to determine the effect of HIF-1/-2 on ANK promoter activity. Results ANK was expressed in embryonic and mature rat disc. Oxygen dependent changes in ANK expression in nucleus pulposus cells were minimal. However, silencing of HIF-1? and HIF-2? resulted in increased ANK expression and upregulation of promoter activity. HIF mediated suppression of ANK was validated by measuring promoter activity in HIF-1? null embryonic fibroblasts. Compared with wild type cells, in hypoxia, there was induction of promoter activity in the null cells. We overexpressed HIF-1? and HIF-2? in nucleus pulposus cells and noted a significant suppression in ANK promoter activity. Since the ANK promoter contains two hypoxia response elements (HRE), we performed site-directed mutagenesis and measured promoter activity. We found that HIF-1 can bind to either of the HRE and suppress promoter activity. In contrast, HIF-2 was required to bind to both HRE to suppress activity. Finally, analysis of human nucleus pulposus tissue showed that while ANK was expressed in normal tissue, there was increased expression of ANK along with alkaline phosphatase in the degenerate state. Conclusion Both HIF-1 and HIF-2 serve as negative regulators of ANK expression in the disc. We propose that baseline ANK expression in the disc serves to prevent mineral formation under physiological conditions. PMID:20496369

Skubutyte, Renata; Markova, Dessislava; Freeman, Theresa A.; Anderson, D. Greg; Dion, Arnold S.; Williams, Charlene J.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

2011-01-01

20

MicroRNA-10b Promotes Nucleus Pulposus Cell Proliferation through RhoC-Akt Pathway by Targeting HOXD10 in Intervetebral Disc Degeneration  

PubMed Central

Aberrant proliferation of nucleus pulposus cell is implicated in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration. Recent findings revealed that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, could regulate cell proliferation in many pathological conditions. Here, we showed that miR-10b was dramatically upregulated in degenerative nucleus pulposus tissues when compared with nucleus pulposus tissues isolated from patients with idiopathic scoliosis. Moreover, miR-10b levels were associated with disc degeneration grade and downregulation of HOXD10. In cultured nucleus pulposus cells, miR-10b overexpression stimulated cell proliferation with concomitant translational inhibition of HOXD10 whereas restored expression of HOXD10 reversed the mitogenic effect of miR-10b. MiR-10b-mediated downregulation of HOXD10 led to increased RhoC expression and Akt phosphorylation. Either knockdown of RhoC or inhibition of Akt abolished the effect of miR-10b on nucleus pulposus cell proliferation. Taken together, aberrant miR-10b upregulation in intervertebral disc degeneration could contribute to abnormal nucleus pulposus cell proliferation through derepressing the RhoC-Akt pathway by targeting HOXD10. Our study also underscores the potential of miR-10b and the RhoC-Akt pathway as novel therapeutic targets in intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:24376640

Shen, Jianxiong; Wu, William K. K.; Liang, Jinqian; Weng, Xisheng; Qiu, Guixing

2013-01-01

21

Material properties in unconfined compression of human nucleus pulposus, injectable hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels and tissue engineering scaffolds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surgical treatment for lower back pain related to degenerative disc disease commonly includes discectomy and spinal fusion.\\u000a While surgical intervention may provide short-term pain relief, it results in altered biomechanics of the spine and may lead\\u000a to further degenerative changes in adjacent segments. One non-fusion technique currently being investigated is nucleus pulposus\\u000a (NP) support via either an injectable hydrogel or

Jordan M. Cloyd; Neil R. Malhotra; Lihui Weng; Weiliam Chen; Robert L. Mauck; Dawn M. Elliott

2007-01-01

22

Expression of neural and neurotrophic markers in nucleus pulposus cells isolated from degenerated intervertebral disc.  

PubMed

Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common disorder of the lower spine. Since it is caused by loss of cellularity, there is interest in the comprehension of the cellular phenotypes. This study aimed to verify if stem cells isolated from nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs (NPs-IVD), which may express neurogenic properties, may be implicated in IVD disease. NPs-IVD isolated from 14 human pathological discs were cultured under mesenchymal and neural differentiation. An induction of the neural markers GFAP, NF, MAP2, O4, and a decrement of the expression of the immature neural markers ?-tubulin III, Nestin, NG2, occurred within the neural differentiation. The expression of TrkA and p75NGFR, the receptors of NGF, was not correlated with neural induction; in contrast, TrkB, the BDNF receptor, increased and was co-expressed with acid sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3). In the same condition, neuroinflammatory markers were over-expressed. We confirm our hypothesis that stem cells within IVD degeneration acquire neurogenic phenotype, causing the induction of markers related to inflammatory condition. These cells could promote the enrolment of neurotrophines in adaptation to the acidic microenvironment in degenerative conditions. These data could improve our knowledge about IVD cellularity and eventually lead to the development of pharmacological therapies. PMID:22374745

Navone, Stefania E; Marfia, Giovanni; Canzi, Laura; Ciusani, Emilio; Canazza, Alessandra; Visintini, Sergio; Campanella, Rolando; Parati, Eugenio A

2012-09-01

23

Modulating Notochordal Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Natural Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Matrix  

PubMed Central

Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can differentiate into notochordal cell (NC)-like cells when cultured in the presence of natural porcine nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue matrix. The method promises massive production of high-quality, functional cells to treat degenerative intervertebral discs (IVDs). Based on our previous work, we further examined the effect of cell-NP matrix contact and culture medium on the differentiation, and further assessed the functional differentiation ability of the generated NC-like. The study showed that direct contact between hiPSCs and NP matrix can promote the differentiation yield, whilst both the contact and non-contact cultures can generate functional NC-like cells. The generated NC-like cells are highly homogenous regarding the expression of notochordal marker genes. A culture medium containing a cocktail of growth factors (FGF, EGF, VEGF and IGF-1) also supported the notochordal differentiation in the presence of NP matrix. The NC-like cells showed excellent functional differentiation ability to generate NP-like tissue which was rich in aggrecan and collagen type II; and particularly, the proteoglycan to collagen content ratio was as high as 12.5–17.5 which represents a phenotype close to NP rather than hyaline cartilage. Collectively, the present study confirmed the effectiveness and flexibility of using natural NP tissue matrix to direct notochordal differentiation of hiPSCs, and the potential of using the generated NC-like cells for treating IVD degeneration. PMID:25054208

Liu, Yongxing; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Bal, B. Sonny

2014-01-01

24

Biocomposite hydrogels with carboxymethylated, nanofibrillated cellulose powder for replacement of the nucleus pulposus.  

PubMed

Biocomposite hydrogels with carboxymethylated, nanofibrillated cellulose (c-NFC) powder were prepared by UV polymerization of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone with Tween 20 trimethacrylate as a cross-linking agent for replacement of the native, human nucleus pulposus (NP) in intervertebral disks. The swelling ratios and the moduli of elasticity in compression of neat and biocomposite hydrogels were evaluated in dependence of c-NFC concentration (ranging from 0 to 1.6% v/v) and degree of substitution (DS, ranging from 0 to 0.23). The viscoelastic properties in shear and the material relaxation behavior in compression were measured for neat and biocomposite hydrogels containing 0.4% v/v of fibrils (DS ranging from 0 to 0.23), and their morphologies were characterized by cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). The obtained results show that the biocomposite hydrogels can successfully mimic the mechanical and swelling behavior of the NP. In addition, the presence of the c-NFC shows lower strain values after cyclic compression tests and consequently creates improved material relaxation properties compared with neat hydrogels. Among the tested samples, the biocomposite hydrogel containing 0.4% v/v of c-NFC with a DS of 0.17 shows the closest behavior to native NP. Further investigation should focus on evaluation and improvement of the long-term relaxation behavior. PMID:21405099

Eyholzer, C; de Couraça, A Borges; Duc, F; Bourban, P E; Tingaut, P; Zimmermann, T; Månson, J A E; Oksman, K

2011-05-01

25

Rheological characterization of hyaluronic acid derivatives as injectable materials toward nucleus pulposus regeneration.  

PubMed

Nucleus pulposus (NP) is the soft center of the intervertebral disc (IVD), able to resist compressive loads, while the annulus fibrosus withstands tension and gives mechanical strength. NP function may be altered as consequence of several pathologies or injury and when a damaged IVD does not properly play its role. In the past years, a great effort has been devoted to the design of injectable systems as NP substitutes. The different synthetic- and natural hydrogel-based materials proposed, present many drawbacks and, in particular, they do not seem to mimic the required behavior. In the search for natural-based systems a dodecylamide of hyaluronic acid (HA), HYADD3®, has been proved as bioactive and suitable vehicle to carry cells for NP tissue engineering, while a crosslinked HA ester, HYAFF120® showed interesting results if used as injectable acellular material. Even though these derivatives showed appropriate biological behavior up to now, data on mechanical behavior of these derivatives are still missing. In this frame, the aim of this study was to provide a rheological characterization of these HA derivatives to asses their biomechanical compatibility with the NP tissue. To this, the rheological properties of these derivatives were studied through dynamic shear tests before and after injection through needles used in the current surgical procedure. Both HA derivatives showed a 'gel-like' rheological behavior similar to the native NP tissue and this behavior was not altered by injection. PMID:21123283

Gloria, Antonio; Borzacchiello, Assunta; Causa, Filippo; Ambrosio, Luigi

2012-02-01

26

Augmentation and repair tissue formation of the nucleus pulposus after partial nucleotomy in a rabbit model.  

PubMed

Disc degeneration alters disc height and mechanics of the spinal column and is associated with lower back pain. In preclinical studies gel-like materials or resorbable polymer-based implants are frequently used to rebuild the nucleus pulposus, aiming at tissue regeneration and restoration of tissue function. To compare the outcome of tissue repair, freeze-dried resorbable polyglycolic acid-hyaluronan (PGA/HA) implants without any bioactive components or bioactivated fibrin (fibrin-serum) was used in a degenerated disc disease model in New Zealand white rabbits. Animals with partial nucleotomy only served as controls. The T2-weighted/fat suppression sequence signal intensity in the nuclear region of operated discs as assessed by magnet resonance imaging was reduced in operated compared to healthy discs, indicating loss of water and did not change from week 1 to month 6 after surgery. Quantification of histological and immunohistochemical staining indicated that the implantation of PGA/HA leads to significantly more repair tissue compared to nucleotomy only. Type II collagen content of the repair tissue formed after PGA/HA or fibrin-serum treatment is significantly increased compared to controls with nucleotomy only. The data indicate that intervertebral disc augmentation after nucleotomy has a positive effect on repair tissue formation and type II collagen deposition as shown in the rabbit model. PMID:25287887

Endres, M; Zenclussen, M L; Casalis, P A; Freymann, U; Gil Garcia, S; Krueger, J P; Thomale, U-W; Woiciechowsky, C; Kaps, C

2014-12-01

27

Matrix stiffness determines the fate of nucleus pulposus-derived stem cells.  

PubMed

Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and consequent low-back pain present a major medical challenge. Nucleus pulposus-derived stem cells (NP-SCs) may lead to a novel therapy for this severe disease. It was recently shown that survival and function of mature NP cells are regulated in part by tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that modification of matrix stiffness will influence the ability of cultured NP-SCs to proliferate, survive, and differentiate into mature NP cells. NP-SCs were subcultured in three-dimensional matrices of varying degrees of stiffness as measured by the material's shear storage modulus. Cell survival, activity, and rate of differentiation toward the chondrogenic or osteogenic lineage were analyzed. NP-SCs were found to proliferate and differentiate in all matrices, irrespective of matrix stiffness. However, matrices with a low shear storage modulus (G' = 1 kPa) promoted significantly more proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation, whereas matrices with a high modulus (G' = 2 kPa) promoted osteogenic differentiation. Imaging performed via confocal and scanning electron microscopes validated cell survival and highlighted stiffness-dependent cell-matrix interactions. These results underscore the effect of the matrix modulus on the fate of NP-SCs. This research may facilitate elucidation of the complex cross-talk between NP-SCs and their surrounding matrix in healthy as well as pathological conditions. PMID:25725556

Navaro, Yosi; Bleich-Kimelman, Nadav; Hazanov, Lena; Mironi-Harpaz, Iris; Shachaf, Yonatan; Garty, Shai; Smith, Yoav; Pelled, Gadi; Gazit, Dan; Seliktar, Dror; Gazit, Zulma

2015-05-01

28

Histologic findings of disc, end plate and neural elements after coblation of nucleus pulposus: an experimental nucleoplasty study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background contextPartial removal of the nucleus has been shown to decompress herniated discs, relieving pressure on nerve roots and, in some cases, offering relief from disc pain. The nucleoplasty technique builds on earlier surgical approaches that helped validate the strategy of intranuclear tissue removal. Nucleoplasty, a new minimally invasive procedure using patented coblation technology, combines coagulation and ablation for partial

Yung C Chen; Sang-Heon Lee; Yamil Saenz; Norman L Lehman

2003-01-01

29

Influence of preoperative nucleus pulposus status and radiculopathy on outcomes in mono-segmental lumbar total disc replacement: results from a nationwide registry  

PubMed Central

Background Currently, herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) with radiculopathy and other preconditions are regarded as relative or absolute contraindications for lumbar total disc replacement (TDR). In Switzerland it is left to the surgeon's discretion when to operate. The present study is based on the dataset of SWISSspine, a governmentally mandated health technology assessment registry. We hypothesized that preoperative nucleus pulposus status and presence or absence of radiculopathy has an influence on clinical outcomes in patients treated with mono-segmental lumbar TDR. Methods Between March 2005 and April 2009, 416 patients underwent mono-segmental lumbar TDR, which was documented in a prospective observational multicenter mode. The data collection consisted of perioperative and follow-up data (physician based) and clinical outcomes (NASS, EQ-5D). Patients were divided into four groups according to their preoperative status: 1) group degenerative disc disease ("DDD"): 160 patients without HNP and no radiculopathy, classic precondition for TDR; 2) group "HNP-No radiculopathy": 68 patients with HNP but without radiculopathy; 3) group "Stenosis": 73 patients without HNP but with radiculopathy, and 4) group "HNP-Radiculopathy": 132 patients with HNP and radiculopathy. The groups were compared regarding preoperative patient characteristics and pre- and postoperative VAS and EQ-5D scores using general linear modeling. Results Demographics in all four groups were comparable. Regarding the improvement of quality of life (EQ-5D) there were no differences across the four groups. For the two main groups DDD and HNP-Radiculopathy no differences were found in the adjusted postoperative back- and leg pain alleviation levels, in the stenosis group back- and leg pain relief were lower. Conclusions Despite higher preoperative leg pain levels, outcomes in lumbar TDR patients with HNP and radiculopathy were similar to outcomes in patients with the classic indication; this because patients with higher preoperative leg pain levels benefit from a relatively greater leg pain alleviation. The group with absence of HNP but presence of radiculopathy showed considerably less benefits from the operation, which is probably related to ongoing degenerative processes of the posterior segmental structures. This observational multicenter study suggests that the diagnoses HNP and radiculopathy, combined or alone, may not have to be considered as absolute or relative contraindications for mono-segmental lumbar TDR anymore, whereas patients without HNP but with radiculopathy seem to be suboptimal candidates for the procedure. PMID:22136141

2011-01-01

30

An Injectable Nucleus Pulposus Implant Restores Compressive Range of Motion in the Ovine Disc  

PubMed Central

Study Design Investigation of injectable nucleus pulposus (NP) implant. Objective To assess the ability of a recently developed injectable hydrogel implant to restore non-degenerative disc mechanics through support of NP functional mechanics. Summary of Background Data While surgical intervention for low back pain is effective for some patients, treated discs undergo altered biomechanics and adjacent levels are at increased risk for accelerated degeneration. One potential treatment as an alternative to surgery for degenerated disc includes the percutaneous delivery of agents to support NP functional mechanics. The implants are delivered in a minimally invasive fashion, potentially on an outpatient basis, and do not preclude later surgical options. One of the challenges in designing such implants include the need to match key NP mechanical behavior and mimic the role of native non-degenerate NP in spinal motion. Methods The oxidized hyaluronic acid gelatin implant material was prepared. In vitro mechanical testing was performed in mature ovine bone-disc-bone units in three stages: intact, discectomy, and implantation vs. sham. Tested samples were cut axially for qualitative structural observations. Results Discectomy increased axial range of motion (ROM) significantly compared to intact. Hydrogel implantation reduced ROM 17% (p < 0.05) compared to discectomy and returned ROM to intact levels (ROM intact 0.71 mm, discectomy 0.87 mm, post-implantation 0.72 mm). While ROM for the hydrogel implant group was statistically unchanged compared to the intact disc, ROM for sham discs, which received a discectomy and no implant, was significant increase compared to intact. The compression and tension stiffness were decreased with discectomy and remained unchanged for both implant and sham groups, as expected because the annulus fibrosus was not repaired. Gross morphology images confirmed no ejection of NP implant. Conclusion An injectable implant that mimics non-degenerate NP has the potential to return motion segment ROM to normal subsequent to injury. PMID:22588378

Malhotra, Neil R.; Han, Woojin M.; Beckstein, Jesse; Cloyd, Jordan; Chen, Weiliam; Elliott, Dawn M.

2013-01-01

31

Effect of High Glucose on Stress-Induced Senescence of Nucleus Pulposus Cells of Adult Rats  

PubMed Central

Study Design In vitro cell culture model. Purpose We investigated the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) on senescence of adult nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Overview of Literature DM is a major public health issue worldwide, especially adult-onset (type 2) DM. DM is also thought to be an important etiological factor in disc degeneration. Hyperglycemia is considered to be a major causative factor in the development of DM-associated diseases through senescence. However, little is known about the effects of DM on senescence in adult NP cells. Methods Adult NP cells were isolated from 24-week-old rats, cultured, and placed in either 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS, normal control) and 10% FBS plus two different high glucose concentrations (0.1 M or 0.2 M; experimental conditions) for 1 or 3 days. We identified and quantified the occurrence of senescence in adult rat NP cells using senescence-associated-beta-galactosidase (SA-?-Gal) staining. We also investigated the expression of proteins related to the replicative senescence (p53-p21-pRB) and stress-induced premature senescence (p16-pRB) pathways. Results The mean SA-?-Gal-positive percentage was increased in adult rat NP cells treated with high glucose in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Both high glucose levels increased the expression of p16 and pRB proteins in adult rat NP cells. However, the levels of p53 and p21 proteins were decreased in adult rat NP cells treated with both high glucose concentrations. Conclusions The current study demonstrated that high glucose accelerated stress-induced senescence in adult rat NP cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Accelerated stress-induced senescence in adult NP cells could be an emerging risk factor for intervertebral disc degeneration in older patients with DM. These results suggest that strict blood glucose control is important in prevent or delaying intervertebral disc degeneration in older patients with DM.

Kong, Jae-Gwan; Lee, Donghwan; Park, Eun-Young

2015-01-01

32

Protective effect of carboxymethylated chitosan on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in nucleus pulposus cells  

PubMed Central

Although the etiology of intervertebral disc degeneration is poorly understood, one approach to prevent this process may be to inhibit apoptosis. In the current study, the anti-apoptotic effects of carboxymethylated chitosan (CMCS) in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were investigated with the aim to enhance disc cell survival. Rat NP cells were isolated and cultured in vitro, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used to build the NP cell apoptosis model. Cell viability was assessed with a cell counting kit-8 assay. The ratio of apoptotic cells was surveyed by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and propidium iodide (PI) double staining analysis, and the morphology was observed by Hoechst 33342 staining. The mitochondrial membrane potential of NP cells was evaluated by rhodamine 123 fluorescence staining. Reverse transcription (RT)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to measure mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, type II collagen and aggrecan. Western blot analysis was performed to detect protein levels of iNOS and Bcl-2. The annexin V-FITC/PI and Hoechst 33342 staining results indicated that CMCS was able to prevent NP cells from apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Rhodamine 123 staining clarified that CMCS reduced the impairment of the mitochondrial membrane potential in H2O2-treated NP cells. Reduced caspase-3 and increased Bcl-2 activity were detected in CMCS-treated NP cells by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. CMCS also promoted the proliferation and secretion of type II collagen and aggrecan in H2O2-treated NP cells. CMCS was indicated to be effective in preventing apoptotic cell death in vitro, demonstrating the potential advantages of this therapeutic approach in regulating disc degeneration. PMID:25394560

HE, BIN; TAO, HAIYING; LIU, SHIQING; WEI, AILIN

2015-01-01

33

Bony spinal canal changes that differentiate conjoined nerve roots from herniated nucleus pulposus  

SciTech Connect

CT examinations of the lumbar spine in 12 consecutive patients with conjoined nerve roots were reviewed. Asymmetry of the bony spinal canal, seen as slight dilatation of the ipsilateral lateral recess, was present in all cases. This finding, which is not typically associated with extruded free intervertebral disk fragments, should serve to distinguish these two entities.

Hoddick, W.K.; Helms, C.A.

1985-01-01

34

3D segmentation of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computational medicine aims at employing personalised computational models in diagnosis and treatment planning. The use of such models to help physicians in finding the best treatment for low back pain (LBP) is becoming popular. One of the challenges of creating such models is to derive patient-specific anatomical and tissue models of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs), as a prior step. This article presents a segmentation scheme that obtains accurate results irrespective of the degree of IVD degeneration, including pathological discs with protrusion or herniation. The segmentation algorithm, employing a novel feature selector, iteratively deforms an initial shape, which is projected into a statistical shape model space at first and then, into a B-Spline space to improve accuracy. The method was tested on a MR dataset of 59 patients suffering from LBP. The images follow a standard T2-weighted protocol in coronal and sagittal acquisitions. These two image volumes were fused in order to overcome large inter-slice spacing. The agreement between expert-delineated structures, used here as gold-standard, and our automatic segmentation was evaluated using Dice Similarity Index and surface-to-surface distances, obtaining a mean error of 0.68 mm in the annulus segmentation and 1.88 mm in the nucleus, which are the best results with respect to the image resolution in the current literature.

Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Eltes, Peter E.; Del Rio, Luis; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

2014-12-01

35

Regeneration of nucleus pulposus tissue in an ovine intervertebral disc degeneration model by cell-free resorbable polymer scaffolds.  

PubMed

Degeneration of intervertebral discs (IVDs) occurs frequently and is often associated with lower back pain. Recent treatment options are limited and treat the symptoms rather than regenerate the degenerated disc. Cell-free, freeze-dried resorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA)-hyaluronan implants were used in an ovine IVD degeneration model. The nucleus pulposus of the IVD was partially removed, endoscopically. PGA-hyaluronan implants were immersed in autologous sheep serum and implanted into the disc defect. Animals with nucleotomy only served as controls. The T2-weighted/fat suppression sequence signal intensity index of the operated discs, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), showed that implantation of the PGA-hyaluronan implant improved (p = 0.0066) the MRI signal compared to controls at 6 months after surgery. Histological analysis by haematoxylin and eosin and safranin O staining showed the ingrowth of cells with typical chondrocytic morphology, even cell distribution, and extracellular matrix rich in proteoglycan. Histomorphometric analyses confirmed that the implantation of the PGA-hyaluronan scaffolds improved (p = 0.027) the formation of regenerated tissue after nucleotomy. Disc heights remained stable in discs with nucleotomy only as well as after implantation of the implant. In conclusion, implantation of cell-free polymer-based implants after nucleotomy induces nucleus pulposus tissue regeneration and improves disc water content in the ovine model. PMID:22865642

Woiciechowsky, Christian; Abbushi, Alexander; Zenclussen, Maria L; Casalis, Pablo; Krüger, Jan Philipp; Freymann, Undine; Endres, Michaela; Kaps, Christian

2014-10-01

36

PKC? Signalling Activates ERK1/2, and Regulates Aggrecan, ADAMTS5, and miR377 Gene Expression in Human Nucleus Pulposus Cells  

PubMed Central

The protein kinase C (PKC) signaling, a major regulator of chondrocytic differentiation, has been also implicated in pathological extracellular matrix remodeling, and here we investigate the mechanism of PKC?-dependent regulation of the chondrocytic phenotype in human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells derived from herniated disks. NP cells from each donor were successfully propagated for 25+ culture passages, with remarkable tolerance to repeated freeze-and-thaw cycles throughout long-term culturing. More specifically, after an initial downregulation of COL2A1, a stable chondrocytic phenotype was attested by the levels of mRNA expression for aggrecan, biglycan, fibromodulin, and lumican, while higher expression of SOX-trio and Patched-1 witnessed further differentiation potential. NP cells in culture also exhibited a stable molecular profile of PKC isoforms: throughout patient samples and passages, mRNAs for PKC ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, and µ were steadily detected, whereas ?, ?, and ? were not. Focusing on the signalling of PKC?, an isoform that may confer protection against degeneration, we found that activation with the PKC?-specific activator small peptide ??RACK led sequentially to a prolonged activation of ERK1/2, increased abundance of the early gene products ATF, CREB1, and Fos with concurrent silencing of transcription for Ki67, and increases in mRNA expression for aggrecan. More importantly, ??RACK induced upregulation of hsa-miR-377 expression, coupled to decreases in ADAMTS5 and cleaved aggrecan. Therefore, PKC? activation in late passage NP cells may represent a molecular basis for aggrecan availability, as part of an PKC?/ERK/CREB/AP-1-dependent transcriptional program that includes upregulation of both chondrogenic genes and microRNAs. Moreover, this pathway should be considered as a target for understanding the molecular mechanism of IVD degeneration and for therapeutic restoration of degenerated disks. PMID:24312401

Pneumaticos, Spiros G.; Tragas, Adamantios A.; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Mangoura, Dimitra

2013-01-01

37

Production of tumor necrosis factor-? from porcine nucleus pulposus cells at various time points in cell culture under conditions of nutritional deficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nucleus pulposus (NP) in the epidural space induces spinal nerve damage not only by mechanical but also chemical mechanism. NP has been shown to be capable of producing tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF). TNF may play key roles in the NP-induced chemical damage. One of the main pathways to reach the avascular NP is diffusion from the blood supply of the

Yasuaki Murata; Kjell Olmarker; Karin Larsson; Kazuhisa Takahashi; Björn Rydevik

2006-01-01

38

Osthole, a herbal compound, alleviates nucleus pulposus-evoked nociceptive responses through the suppression of overexpression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in rat dorsal root ganglion  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Osthole (Ost), a natural coumarin derivative, has been shown to inhibit many pro-inflammatory mediators and block voltage-gated Na+ channels. During inflammation, acidosis is an important pain inducer which activates nociceptors by gating depolarizing cationic channels, such as acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ost on nucleus pulposus-evoked nociceptive responses and ASIC3 over-expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion, and to investigate the possible mechanism. Material/Methods Radicular pain was generated with application of nucleus pulposus (NP) to nerve root. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated using von Frey filaments with logarithmically incremental rigidity to calculate the 50% probability thresholds for mechanical paw withdrawal. ASIC3 protein expression in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) was assessed with Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Membrane potential (MP) shift of DRG neurons induced by ASIC3-sensitive acid (pH6.5) was determined by DiBAC4 (3) fluorescence intensity (F.I.). Results The NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia model showed allodynia for 3 weeks, and ASIC3 expression was up-regulated in DRG neurons, reaching peak on Day 7. Epidural administration of Ost induced a remarkable and prolonged antinociceptive effect, accompanied by an inhibition of over-expressed ASIC3 protein and of abnormal shift of MP. Amiloride (Ami), an antagonist of ASIC3, strengthened the antinociceptive effect of Ost. Conclusions Up-regulation of ASIC3 expression may be associated with NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia. A single epidural injection of Ost decreased ASIC3 expression in DGR neurons and the pain in the NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia model. Osthole may be of great benefit for preventing chronic pain status often seen in lumbar disc herniation (LDH). PMID:22648244

He, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Yuling; Qin, Jian; Mo, Sui-Lin; Wei, Ming; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Li, Mei-Na; Zou, Xue-Nong; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Sun, Lai-Bao

2012-01-01

39

[Cervical disc herniation].  

PubMed

The cervical disc herniation is characterized by prolapsed nucleus pulposus material through the annulus into the spinal canal. The local mechanical or chemical irritation of neural structures typically leads to symptoms of radiculopathy, cervicocephalgia or myelopathy. Pronounced sensorimotor deficits or intractable pain constitute surgical treatment. In all other cases conservative treatment is indicated, including pain medication, active and passive physiotherapy, and local injections, respectively. Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is still the surgical treatment of choice. Predominantly, cages with or without plates are in use to obtain solid fusion. The implantation of a total disc replacement is a viable alternative, if no contraindications exist. Other surgical techniques may be performed in proper selected cases. The overall clinical and radiological results of both surgical and conservative treatment are good. PMID:23296562

Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, C-H; Kandziora, F

2012-12-01

40

Brain herniation  

MedlinePLUS

... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

41

Target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis in the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation  

PubMed Central

Both target radiofrequency thermocoagulation and collagenase chemonucleolysis are effective micro-invasive therapy means for lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. In order to analyze the clinical effects of target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis on lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, the contents of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan were measured and the histological changes of nucleus pulposus was detected in the vitro experiments. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation reduced the hydrolyzation of herniated nucleus pulposus caused by collagenase, as well as the content of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan. Furthermore, 236 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were treated by target radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis. The efficiency was evaluated according to Macnab criteria, and the index of lumbar disc herniation (IDH) was compared pre-operation with 3 months post-operation. The post-operative good rate was 66.5% (157/236) at 2 weeks post-operation, and 88.1% (208/236) at 3 months post-operation. In the post-operative follow-up exam, 86.8% of the re-examined cases demonstrated smaller or ablated protrusion, with reduced IDH values from pre-operation, which was statistically significant. No serious complications were detected intra-operatively and post-operatively. In conclusion, target radiofrequency combined with collagenase chemonucleolysis was an effective and safe method for treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:25785026

Zhang, Daying; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xuexue; Sheng, Mulan

2015-01-01

42

Reconstruction of an In Vitro Niche for the Transition from Intervertebral Disc Development to Nucleus Pulposus Regeneration  

PubMed Central

The nucleus pulposus (NP) plays a prominent role in both the onset and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration. While autologous repair strategies have demonstrated some success, their in vitro culture system is outdated and insufficient for maintaining optimally functioning cells through the required extensive passaging. Consequently, the final population of cells may be unsuitable for the overwhelming task of repairing tissue in vivo and could result in subpar clinical outcomes. Recent work has identified synovium-derived stem cells (SDSCs) as a potentially important new candidate. This population of precursors can promote matrix regeneration and additionally restore the balance of catabolic and anabolic metabolism of surrounding cells. Another promising application is their ability to produce an extracellular matrix in vitro that can be modified via decellularization to produce a tissue-specific substrate for efficient cell expansion, while retaining chondrogenic potential. When combined with hypoxia, soluble factors, and other environmental regulators, the resultant complex microenvironment will more closely resemble the in vivo niche, which further improves the cell capacity, even after extensive passaging. In this review, the adaptive mechanisms NP cells utilize in vivo are considered for insight into what factors are important for constructing a tissue-specific in vitro niche. Evidence for the use of SDSCs for NP regeneration is also discussed. Many aspects of NP behavior are still unknown, which could lead to future work yielding key information on producing sufficient numbers of a high-quality NP-specific population that is able to regenerate deteriorated NP in vivo. PMID:23259403

Shoukry, Mark; Li, Jingting

2013-01-01

43

Effect of pore sizes of PLGA scaffolds on mechanical properties and cell behaviour for nucleus pulposus regeneration in vivo.  

PubMed

This study investigated the influence of pore sizes of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds on the compressive strength of tissue-engineered biodiscs and selection of the best suitable pore size for cells to grow in vivo. PLGA scaffolds were fabricated by solvent casting/salt-leaching with pore sizes of 90-180, 180-250, 250-355 and 355-425 µm. Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were seeded on PLGA scaffolds with various pore sizes. Each sample was harvested at each time point, after retrieval of PLGA scaffolds seeded with NP cells, which were implanted into subcutaneous spaces in nude mice at 4 and 6 weeks. MTT assay, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assay, haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, safranin O staining and immunohistochemistry (for collagen type II) were performed at each time point. As the pores became smaller, the value of the compressive strength of the scaffold was increased. The group of scaffolds with pore sizes of 90-250 µm showed better cell proliferation and ECM production. These results demonstrated that the compressive strength of the scaffold was improved while the scaffold had pore sizes in the range 90-250 µm and good cell interconnectivity. Suitable space in the scaffold for cell viability is a key factor for cell metabolism. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24619952

Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Ha Neul; Lee, So Jin; Song, Jeong Eun; Kwon, Soon Yong; Chung, Jin Wha; Lee, Dongwon; Khang, Gilson

2014-03-11

44

In situ forming hydrogels composed of oxidized high molecular weight hyaluronic acid and gelatin for nucleus pulposus regeneration.  

PubMed

Encapsulation of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells within in situ forming hydrogels is a novel biological treatment for early stage intervertebral disc degeneration. The procedure aims to prolong the life of the degenerating discs and to regenerate damaged tissue. In this study we developed an injectable oxidized hyaluronic acid-gelatin-adipic acid dihydrazide (oxi-HAG-ADH) hydrogel. High molecular weight (1900 kDa) hyaluronic acid was crosslinked with various concentrations of gelatin to synthesize the hydrogels and their viscoelastic properties were analyzed. Interactions between the hydrogels, NP cells, and the extracellular matrix (ECM) were also evaluated, as were the effects of the hydrogels on NP cell gene expression. The hydrogels possess several clinical advantages, including sterilizability, low viscosity for injection, and ease of use. The viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels were similar to native tissue, as reflected in the complex shear modulus (?11-14 kPa for hydrogels, 11.3 kPa for native NP). Cultured NP cells not only attached to the hydrogels but also survived, proliferated, and maintained their round morphology. Importantly, we found that hydrogels increased NP cell expression of several crucial ECM-related genes, such as COL2A1, AGN, SOX-9, and HIF-1A. PMID:23041783

Chen, Yu-Chun; Su, Wen-Yu; Yang, Shu-Hua; Gefen, Amit; Lin, Feng-Huei

2013-02-01

45

Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

2005-07-01

46

The cytokine and chemokine expression profile of nucleus pulposus cells: implications for degeneration and regeneration of the intervertebral disc  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aims of these studies were to identify the cytokine and chemokine expression profile of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells and to determine the relationships between NP cell cytokine and chemokine production and the characteristic tissue changes seen during intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Methods Real-time q-PCR cDNA Low Density Array (LDA) was used to investigate the expression of 91 cytokine and chemokine associated genes in NP cells from degenerate human IVDs. Further real-time q-PCR was used to investigate 30 selected cytokine and chemokine associated genes in NP cells from non-degenerate and degenerate IVDs and those from IVDs with immune cell infiltrates (‘infiltrated’). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed for four selected cytokines and chemokines to confirm and localize protein expression in human NP tissue samples. Results LDA identified the expression of numerous cytokine and chemokine associated genes including 15 novel cytokines and chemokines. Further q-PCR gene expression studies identified differential expression patterns in NP cells derived from non-degenerate, degenerate and infiltrated IVDs. IHC confirmed NP cells as a source of IL-16, CCL2, CCL7 and CXCL8 and that protein expression of CCL2, CCL7 and CXCL8 increases concordant with histological degenerative tissue changes. Conclusions Our data indicates that NP cells are a source of cytokines and chemokines within the IVD and that these expression patterns are altered in IVD pathology. These findings may be important for the correct assessment of the ‘degenerate niche’ prior to autologous or allogeneic cell transplantation for biological therapy of the degenerate IVD. PMID:24325988

2013-01-01

47

Phenotypic stability, matrix elaboration and functional maturation of nucleus pulposus cells encapsulated in photocrosslinkable hyaluronic acid hydrogels.  

PubMed

Degradation of the nucleus pulposus (NP) is an early hallmark of intervertebral disc degeneration. The capacity for endogenous regeneration in the NP is limited due to the low cellularity and poor nutrient and vascular supply. Towards restoring the NP, a number of biomaterials have been explored for cell delivery. These materials must support the NP cell phenotype while promoting the elaboration of an NP-like extracellular matrix in the shortest possible time. Our previous work with chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that hydrogels based on hyaluronic acid (HA) are effective at promoting matrix production and the development of functional material properties. However, this material has not been evaluated in the context of NP cells. Therefore, to test this material for NP regeneration, bovine NP cells were encapsulated in 1%w/vol HA hydrogels at either a low seeding density (20×10(6)cellsml(-1)) or a high seeding density (60×10(6)cellsml(-1)), and constructs were cultured over an 8week period. These NP cell-laden HA hydrogels showed functional matrix accumulation, with increasing matrix content and mechanical properties with time in culture at both seeding densities. Furthermore, encapsulated cells showed NP-specific gene expression profiles that were significantly higher than expanded NP cells prior to encapsulation, suggesting a restoration of phenotype. Interestingly, these levels were higher at the lower seeding density compared to the higher seeding density. These findings support the use of HA-based hydrogels for NP tissue engineering and cellular therapies directed at restoration or replacement of the endogenous NP. PMID:25448344

Kim, Dong Hwa; Martin, John T; Elliott, Dawn M; Smith, Lachlan J; Mauck, Robert L

2015-01-01

48

Expression of Laminin Isoforms, Receptors and Binding Proteins Unique to Nucleus Pulposus Cells of Immature Intervertebral Disc  

PubMed Central

Intervertebral disc (IVD) disorders are believed to be related to aging-related cell loss and phenotypic changes, as well as biochemical and structural changes in the extracellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus (NP) region. Previously, we found that the laminin ?1 chain was more highly expressed in immature NP porcine tissues, in parallel with the expression pattern for a laminin receptor, integrin ?6 subunit, as compared to adjacent anulus fibrosus region; suggesting that cell-matrix interactions may be unique to the immature NP. However, the identity of laminin isoforms specific to immature or mature NP tissues, their associated receptors and functional significance are still poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the zonal-specific expression of the laminin chains, receptors (i.e. integrins) and other binding proteins in immature tissue and isolated cells of rat, porcine and human intervertebral disc, towards the goal of revealing features of cellular environment and cell-matrix interactions in the immature NP. Results from both immuno-histochemical staining and flow cytometry analysis found that NP cells expressed higher levels of the laminin ?5 chain, laminin receptors (integrin ?3, ?6, ?4 subunit and CD239) and related binding proteins (CD151), as compared to cells from adjacent anulus fibrosus. These differences suggest that laminin interactions with NP cells are distinct from that of the anulus fibrosus, and that laminins may be important contributors to region-specific IVD biology. The revealed laminin isoforms, their receptors and related binding proteins may be used as distinguishing features of these immature NP cells in the intervertebral disc. PMID:19863388

Chen, Jun; Jing, Liufang; Gilchrist, Christopher L; Richardson, William J; Fitch, Robert D; Setton, Lori A

2010-01-01

49

Co-culture of Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Nucleus Pulposus Cells in Bilaminar Pellets for Intervertebral Disc Regeneration  

PubMed Central

Background Our goal is to optimize stem cell-based tissue engineering strategies in the context of the intervertebral disc environment. We explored the benefits of co-culturing nucleus pulposus cells (NPC) and adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) using a novel spherical bilaminar pellet culture system where one cell type is enclosed in a sphere of the other cell type. Our 3D system provides a structure that exploits embryonic processes such as tissue induction and condensation. We observed a unique phenomenon: the budding of co-culture pellets and the formation of satellite pellets that separate from the main pellet. Methods MSC and NPC co-culture pellets were formed with three different structural organizations. The first had random organization. The other two had bilaminar organization with either MSC inside and NPC outside or NPC inside and MSC outside. Results By 14 days, all co-culture pellets exhibited budding and spontaneously generated satellite pellets. The satellite pellets were composed of both cell types and, surprisingly, all had the same bilaminar organization with MSC on the inside and NPC on the outside. This organization was independent of the structure of the main pellet that the satellites stemmed from. Conclusion The main pellets generated satellite pellets that spontaneously organized into a bilaminar structure. This implies that structural organization occurs naturally in this cell culture system and may be inherently favorable for cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The occurrence of budding and the organization of satellite pellets may have important implications for the use of co-culture pellets in cell-based therapies for disc regeneration. Clinical Relevance From a therapeutic point of view, the generation of satellite pellets may be a beneficial feature that would serve to spread donor cells throughout the host matrix and restore normal matrix composition in a sustainable way, ultimately renewing tissue function.

Allon, Aliza A.; Schneider, Richard A.

2009-01-01

50

Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF)-1? and CCN2 Form a Regulatory Circuit in Hypoxic Nucleus Pulposus Cells  

PubMed Central

The objective of the study was to investigate if hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1? and connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) form a regulatory network in hypoxic nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. A decrease in CCN2 expression and proximal promoter activity was observed in NP cells after hypoxic culture. Analysis of both human and mouse CCN2 promoters using the JASPAR core database revealed the presence of putative hypoxia response elements. Transfection experiments showed that both promoter activities and CCN2 expression decreases in hypoxia in a HIF-1?-dependent fashion. Interestingly, deletion analysis and mutation of the hypoxia responsive elements individually or in combination resulted in no change in promoter activity in response to hypoxia or in response to HIF-1?, suggesting an indirect mode of regulation. Notably, silencing of endogenous CCN2 increased HIF-1? levels and its target gene expression, suggesting a role for CCN2 in controlling basal HIF-1? levels. On the other hand, treatment of cells with rCCN2 resulted in a decrease in the ability of HIF-1? transactivating domain to recruit co-activators and diminished target gene expression. Last, knockdown of CCN2 in NP cells results in a significant decrease in GAG synthesis and expression of AGGRECAN and COLLAGEN II. Immunohistochemical staining of intervertebral discs of Ccn2 null embryos shows a decrease in aggrecan. These findings reveal a negative feedback loop between CCN2 and HIF-1? in NP cells and demonstrate a role for CCN2 in maintaining matrix homeostasis in this tissue. PMID:23530034

Tran, Cassie M.; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Huang, Bau-Lin; Ong, Jessica R.; Lyons, Karen M.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

2013-01-01

51

Expression of acid-sensing ion channels in nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disk is regulated by non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs.  

PubMed

Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are generally used in the treatment of inflammation and pain through cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. Mounting evidence has indicated additional COX-independent targets for NSAIDs including acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) 1a and 3. However, detailed function and mechanism of ASICs still remain largely elusive. In this study, the impact of NSAIDs on ASICs in nucleus pulposus cells of the human intervertebral disk was investigated. Nucleus pulposus cells were isolated and cultured from protruded disk tissues of 40 patients. It was shown that ASIC1a and ASIC3 were expressed and functional in these cells by analyzing proton-gated currents after ASIC inhibition. We further investigated the neuroprotective capacity of ibuprofen (a COX inhibitor), psalmotoxin-1 (PcTX1, a tarantula toxin specific for homomeric ASIC1a), and amiloride (a classic inhibitor of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC/DEG family to which ASICs belong). PcTX1-containing venom has been shown to be comparable with amiloride in its neuroprotective features in rodent models of ischemia. Taken together, our data showed that amiloride, PcTX1, and ibuprofen decreased ASIC protein expression and thereby exerted protective effects from ASIC inhibition-mediated cell damage. PMID:25079679

Sun, Xue; Jin, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Qi, Lin; Braun, Frank Karl; Zhang, Xing-Ding; Xu, Feng

2014-09-01

52

Evaluation of Behavior and Expression of Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Ligand in Dorsal Root Ganglia after Sciatic Nerve Compression and Application of Nucleus Pulposus in Rats  

PubMed Central

Study Design Experimental animal study. Purpose To evaluate pain-related behavior and changes in nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB), receptor activator of NF-kB (RANK), and ligand (RANKL) in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after combined sciatic nerve compression and nucleus pulposus (NP) application in rats. Overview of Literature The pathological mechanisms underlying pain from lumbar-disc herniation have not been fully elucidated. RANKL are transcriptional regulators of inflammatory cytokines. Our aim was to evaluate pain-related behavior and RANKL expression in DRG after sciatic-nerve compression and application of NP in rats. Methods Mechanical hyperalgesia and RANKL expression were assessed in three groups of rats: NP+sciatic nerve compression (2 seconds), sham-operated, and controls (n=20 each). Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured every other day for 3 weeks using von Frey filaments. RANKL expression in L5 DRGs was examined at five and ten days after surgery using immunohistochemistry. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was observed over the 12-day observation period in the NP+nerve compression group, but not in the control and sham-operated animal groups (p<0.05). RANKL immunoreactivity was seen in the nuclei of L5 DRG neurons, and its expression was significantly upregulated in NP+nerve compression rats compared with control and sham-operated rats (p<0.01). Conclusions The exposure of sciatic nerves to mechanical compression and NP produces pain-related behavior and up-regulation of RANKL in DRG neurons. RANKL may play an important role in mediating pain after sciatic nerve injury with exposure to NP. PMID:25346807

Matsuyama, Yoshiyuki; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Miyako; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Inoue, Gen; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Kubota, Gou; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Nakamura, Junichi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

2014-01-01

53

The Potential of N-Rich Plasma-Polymerized Ethylene (PPE:N) Films for Regulating the Phenotype of the Nucleus Pulposus  

PubMed Central

We recently developed a nitrogen-rich plasma-polymerized biomaterial, designated “PPE:N” (N-doped plasma-polymerized ethylene) that is capable of suppressing cellular hypertrophy while promoting type I collagen and aggrecan expression in mesenchymal stem cells from osteoarthritis patients. We then hypothesized that these surfaces would form an ideal substrate on which the nucleus pulposus (NP) phenotype would be maintained. Recent evidence using microarrays showed that in young rats, the relative mRNA levels of glypican-3 (GPC3) and pleiotrophin binding factor (PTN) were significantly higher in nucleus pulposus (NP) compared to annulus fibrosus (AF) and articular cartilage. Furthermore, vimentin (VIM) mRNA levels were higher in NP versus articular cartilage. In contrast, the levels of expression of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and matrix gla protein precursor (MGP) were lower in NP compared to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to compare the expression profiles of these genes in NP cells from fetal bovine lumbar discs when cultured on either commercial polystyrene (PS) tissue culture dishes or on PPE:N with time. We found that the expression of these genes varies with the concentration of N ([N]). More specifically, the expression of several genes of NP was sensitive to [N], with a decrease of GPC3, VIM, PTN, and MGP in function of decreasing [N]. The expression of aggrecan, collagen type I, and collagen type II was also studied: no significant differences were observed in the cells on different surfaces with different culture time. The results support the concept that PPE:N may be a suitable scaffold for the culture of NP cells. Further studies are however necessary to better understand their effects on cellular phenotypes. PMID:19478889

Mwale, Fackson; Petit, Alain; Tian Wang, Hong; Epure, Laura M; Girard-Lauriault, Pierre-Luc; Ouellet, Jean A; Wertheimer, Michael R; Antoniou, John

2008-01-01

54

Changes in disc herniation after CT-guided Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD): MR findings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD) is to vaporize a small portion of the nucleus pulposus. Clinical efficacy of this technique is largely proven. However, time-evolution of intervertebral disc and its hernia after PLDD is not known. This study analyses changes in disc herniation and its native intervertebral disc at a mean follow-up of 7.5 months after PLDD in asymptomatic patients. Main observations at MRI are appearance of a high signal on T2WI in the hernia in 59%, shrinking of the hernia in 66% and overall stability of disc height.

Brat, Hugues G.; Bouziane, Tarik; Lambert, Jean; Divano, Luisa

2004-09-01

55

Characterization of injectable hydrogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-g-chondroitin sulfate with adhesive properties for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering.  

PubMed

The goal of this work is to develop an injectable nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue engineering scaffold with the ability to form an adhesive interface with surrounding disc tissue. A family of in situ forming hydrogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-graft-chondroitin sulfate (PNIPAAm-g-CS) were evaluated for their mechanical properties, bioadhesive strength, and cytocompatibility. It was shown experimentally and computationally with the Neo-hookean hyperelastic model that increasing the crosslink density and decreasing the CS concentration increased mechanical properties at 37 °C, generating several hydrogel formulations with unconfined compressive modulus values similar to what has been reported for the native NP. The adhesive tensile strength of PNIPAAm increased significantly with CS incorporation (p < 0.05), ranging from 0.4 to 1 kPa. Live/Dead and XTT assay results indicate that the copolymer is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Taken together, these data indicate the potential of PNIPAAm-g-CS to function as a scaffold for NP regeneration. PMID:23371764

Wiltsey, Craig; Kubinski, Pamela; Christiani, Thomas; Toomer, Katelynn; Sheehan, Joseph; Branda, Amanda; Kadlowec, Jennifer; Iftode, Cristina; Vernengo, Jennifer

2013-04-01

56

In vitro characterization of a stem-cell-seeded triple-interpenetrating-network hydrogel for functional regeneration of the nucleus pulposus.  

PubMed

Intervertebral disc degeneration is implicated as a major cause of low-back pain. There is a pressing need for new regenerative therapies for disc degeneration that restore native tissue structure and mechanical function. To that end we investigated the therapeutic potential of an injectable, triple-interpenetrating-network hydrogel comprised of dextran, chitosan, and teleostean, for functional regeneration of the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the intervertebral disc in a series of biomechanical, cytotoxicity, and tissue engineering studies. Biomechanical properties were evaluated as a function of gelation time, with the hydrogel reaching ?90% of steady-state aggregate modulus within 10?h. Hydrogel mechanical properties evaluated in confined and unconfined compression were comparable to native human NP properties. To confirm containment within the disc under physiological loading, toluidine-blue-labeled hydrogel was injected into human cadaveric spine segments after creation of a nucleotomy defect, and the segments were subjected to 10,000 cycles of loading. Gross analysis demonstrated no implant extrusion, and further, that the hydrogel interdigitated well with native NP. Constructs were next surface-seeded with NP cells and cultured for 14 days, confirming lack of hydrogel cytotoxicity, with the hydrogel maintaining NP cell viability and promoting proliferation. Next, to evaluate the potential of the hydrogel to support cell-mediated matrix production, constructs were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cultured under prochondrogenic conditions for up to 42 days. Importantly, the hydrogel maintained MSC viability and promoted proliferation, as evidenced by increasing DNA content with culture duration. MSCs differentiated along a chondrogenic lineage, evidenced by upregulation of aggrecan and collagen II mRNA, and increased GAG and collagen content, and mechanical properties with increasing culture duration. Collectively, these results establish the therapeutic potential of this novel hydrogel for functional regeneration of the NP. Future work will confirm the ability of this hydrogel to normalize the mechanical stability of cadaveric human motion segments, and advance the material toward human translation using preclinical large-animal models. PMID:24410394

Smith, Lachlan J; Gorth, Deborah J; Showalter, Brent L; Chiaro, Joseph A; Beattie, Elizabeth E; Elliott, Dawn M; Mauck, Robert L; Chen, Weiliam; Malhotra, Neil R

2014-07-01

57

Functional nucleus pulposus-like matrix assembly by human mesenchymal stromal cells is directed by macromer concentration in photocrosslinked carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels.  

PubMed

Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is associated with several pathophysiologic changes of the IVD, including dehydration of the nucleus pulposus (NP). Tissue engineering strategies may be used to restore both biological and mechanical function of the IVD following removal of NP tissue during surgical intervention. Recently, photocrosslinked carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrogels were shown to support chondrogenic, NP-like extracellular matrix (ECM) elaboration by human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) when supplemented with TGF-?3; however, mechanical properties of these constructs did not reach native values. Fabrication parameters (i.e., composition, crosslinking density) can influence the bulk mechanical properties of hydrogel scaffolds, as well as cellular behavior and differentiation patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of CMC macromer concentration (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 % weight/volume) on bulk hydrogel properties and NP-like matrix elaboration by hMSCs. The lowest macromer concentration of 1.5 % exhibited the highest gene expression levels of aggrecan and collagen II at day 7, corresponding with the largest accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II by day 42. The ECM elaboration in the 1.5 % constructs was more homogeneously distributed compared to primarily pericellular localization in 3.5 % gels. The 1.5 % gels also displayed significant improvements in mechanical functionality by day 42 compared to earlier time points, which was not seen in the other groups. The effects of macromer concentration on matrix accumulation and organization are likely attributed to quantifiable differences in polymer crosslinking density and diffusive properties between the various hydrogel formulations. Taken together, these results demonstrate that macromer concentration of CMC hydrogels can direct hMSC matrix elaboration, such that a lower polymer concentration allows for greater NP-like ECM assembly and improvement of mechanical properties over time. PMID:25092545

Gupta, Michelle S; Nicoll, Steven B

2014-11-01

58

Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Domain Protein 2 Controls NF-?B/p65 Transactivation and Enhances the Catabolic Effects of Inflammatory Cytokines on Cells of the Nucleus Pulposus.  

PubMed

Prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD) proteins are key in sensing tissue hypoxia. In nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, our previous work demonstrated that PHD isoforms have a differential contribution in controlling hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-? degradation and activity. Recently we have shown that a regulatory relationship exists between PHD3 and inflammatory cytokines in NP cells. With respect to PHD2, the most abundant PHD isoform in NP cells, very little is known concerning its function and regulation under inflammatory conditions that characterize intervertebral disc degeneration. Here, we show that PHD2 is a potent regulator of the catabolic activities of TNF-?; silencing of PHD2 significantly decreased TNF-?-induced expression of catabolic markers including SDC4, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS5, as well as several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, while partially restoring aggrecan and collagen II expression. Use of NF-?B reporters with ShPHD2, SiHIF-1?, as well as p65(-/-), PHD2(-/-), and PHD3(-/-) cells, shows that PHD2 serves as a co-activator of NF-?B/p65 signaling in HIF-1-independent fashion. Immunoprecipitation of endogenous and exogenously expressed tagged proteins, as well as fluorescence microscopy, indicates that following TNF-? treatment, PHD2 interacts and co-localizes with p65. Conversely, loss of function experiments using lentivirally delivered Sh-p65, Sh-IKK?, and NF-?B inhibitor confirmed that cytokine-dependent PHD2 expression in NP cells requires NF-?B signaling. These findings clearly demonstrate that PHD2 forms a regulatory circuit with TNF-? via NF-?B and thereby plays an important role in enhancing activity of this cytokine. We propose that during disc degeneration PHD2 may offer a therapeutic target to mitigate the deleterious actions of TNF-?, a key proinflammatory cytokine. PMID:25635047

Li, Jun; Yuan, Wen; Jiang, Shuai; Ye, Wei; Yang, Hao; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

2015-03-13

59

LIM mineralization protein-1 suppresses TNF-? induced intervertebral disc degeneration by maintaining nucleus pulposus extracellular matrix production and inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases expression.  

PubMed

Imbalanced metabolism of Nucleus pulposus (NP) extracellular matrix (ECM) is closely correlated to Intervertebral Disc Degenerative Disease. LIM mineralization protein-1 (LMP-1) has been proven to induce sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production in NP and have an anti-inflammatory effect in pre-osteoclast. However, whether it has any effect on the NP ECM production and degradation under inflammatory stimulation has not been studied. In the current study, a TNF-? induced cell model was established in vitro. Lentivirus encoding LMP-1 (LV-LMP-1) and short heparin LMP-1 (LV-shLMP-1) were constructed to overexpress and knockdown LMP-1 expression in NP cells. LMP-1 mRNA level was regulated in a dose-dependent manner after transfection. LV-LMP-1 increased whereas LV-shLMP-1 decreased collagen II, aggrecan, versican expression, and sGAG production. LV-LMP-1 abolished while LV-shLMP-1 aggravated TNF-? mediated down-regulation of the above matrix genes via ERK1/2 activation. Moreover, LV-LMP-1 abrogated TNF-? induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 expression via inhibiting p65 translocation and MMP-3 and MMP-13 promoter activity. These results indicated that LMP-1 had an ECM production maintenance effect under inflammatory stimulation. This effect was via up-regulation of matrix genes expression at least partially through ERK1/2 activation, and down-regulation of MMPs expression through NF-?B inhibition. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:???-???, 2015. PMID:25336289

Liu, Hui; Pan, Hehai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Jianru; Zhang, Kuibo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hua; Ding, Wenbin; Li, Bingxue; Zheng, Zhaomin

2015-03-01

60

CT of lumbar spine disk herniation: correlation with surgical findings  

SciTech Connect

Computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine was performed with selectively positioned 5-mm-thick axial cross sections to examine each disk level from the top of the neural foramen to the pedicle of the next caudad vertebra. One hundred consecutive patients with 116 surgical disk explorations were reviewed. There was agreement between the CT and surgical findings in 89 patients (104 explorations) in determination of presence or absence of a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP). Discrepancy occurred in 12 instances (11 patients): two because of incorrect interpretations, five in previously operated patients, three in spondylolisthesis, and two in spinal stenosis. There were 97 true-positives, eight false-negatives, seven true-negatives, and four false-positives. If nine previously operated patients are excluded from the study, then CT was accurate in detection of presence or absence of an HNP in 93% of the disk explorations.

Firooznia, H.; Benjamin, V.; Kricheff, I.I.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.

1984-03-01

61

Growth differentiation factor 6 and transforming growth factor-beta differentially mediate mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, composition, and micromechanical properties of nucleus pulposus constructs  

PubMed Central

Introduction Currently, there is huge research focus on the development of novel cell-based regeneration and tissue-engineering therapies for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration and the associated back pain. Both bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and adipose-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) are proposed as suitable cells for such therapies. However, currently no consensus exists as to the optimum growth factor needed to drive differentiation to a nucleus pulposus (NP)-like phenotype. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of growth differentiation factor-6 (GDF6), compared with other transforming growth factor (TGF) superfamily members, on discogenic differentiation of MSCs, the matrix composition, and micromechanics of engineered NP tissue constructs. Methods Patient-matched human AD-MSCs and BM-MSCs were seeded into type I collagen hydrogels and cultured in differentiating media supplemented with TGF-?3, GDF5, or GDF6. After 14 days, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of chondrogenic and novel NP marker genes and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content of the construct and media components were measured. Additionally, construct micromechanics were analyzed by using scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). Results GDF6 stimulation of BM-MSCs and AD-MSCs resulted in a significant increase in expression of novel NP marker genes, a higher aggrecan-to-type II collagen gene expression ratio, and higher sGAG production compared with TGF-? or GDF5 stimulation. These effects were greater in AD-MSCs than in BM-MSCs. Furthermore, the acoustic-wave speed measured by using SAM, and therefore tissue stiffness, was lowest in GDF6-stiumlated AD-MSC constructs. Conclusions The data suggest that GDF6 stimulation of AD-MSCs induces differentiation to an NP-like phenotype and results in a more proteoglycan-rich matrix. Micromechanical analysis shows that the GDF6-treated AD-MSCs have a less-stiff matrix composition, suggesting that the growth factor is inducing a matrix that is more akin to the native NP-like tissue. Thus, this cell and growth-factor combination may be the ideal choice for cell-based intervertebral disc (IVD)-regeneration therapies. PMID:24618041

2014-01-01

62

Gene therapy for nucleus pulposus regeneration by heme oxygenase-1 plasmid DNA carried by mixed polyplex micelles with thermo-responsive heterogeneous coronas.  

PubMed

Safe and high-efficiency gene therapy for nucleus pulposus (NP) regeneration was urgently desired to treat disc degeneration-associated diseases. In this work, an efficient nonviral cationic block copolymer gene delivery system was used to deliver therapeutic plasmid DNA (pDNA), which was prepared via complexation between the mixed cationic block copolymers, poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly{N-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoehtyl]aspartamide} [PEG-b-PAsp(DET)] and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-PAsp(DET) [PNIPAM-b-PAsp(DET)], and pDNA at 25 °C. The mixed polyplex micelles (MPMs) containing heterogeneous coronas with hydrophobic and hydrophilic microdomains coexisting could be obtained upon heating from 25 to 37 °C, which showed high tolerability against nuclease and strong resistance towards protein adsorption. The gene transfection efficiency of MPMs in NP cells was significantly higher than that of regular polyplex micelles prepared from sole block copolymer of PEG-b-PAsp(DET) (SPMs) in in vitro and in vivo evaluation due to the synergistic effect of improved colloidal stability and low cytotoxicity. High expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in NP cells transfected by MPMs loading HO-1 pDNA significantly decreased the expression activity of matrix metalloproteinases 3 (MMP-3) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by interleukin-1? (IL-1?), and simultaneously increased the NP phenotype-associated genes such as aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX-9. Moreover, the therapeutic effects of MPMs loading pDNA were tested to treat disc degeneration induced by stab injury. The results demonstrated that administration of HO-1 pDNA carried by MPMs in rat tail discs apparently reduced inflammatory responses induced by need stab and increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, finally achieving better therapeutic efficacy as compared with SPMs. Consequently, MPMs loading HO-1 pDNA were demonstrated to be potential as a safe and high-efficiency nonviral gene delivery system for retarding or regenerating the degenerative discs. PMID:25818409

Feng, Ganjun; Chen, Hongying; Li, Junjie; Huang, Qiang; Gupte, Melanie J; Liu, Hao; Song, Yueming; Ge, Zhishen

2015-06-01

63

Transforming growth factor-beta 3 stimulates cartilage matrix elaboration by human marrow-derived stromal cells encapsulated in photocrosslinked carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels: potential for nucleus pulposus replacement.  

PubMed

Degeneration of the nucleus pulposus (NP) has been implicated as a major cause of low back pain. Tissue engineering strategies using marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs) have been used to develop cartilaginous tissue constructs, which may serve as viable NP replacements. Supplementation with growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-?3), has been shown to enhance the differentiation of MSCs and promote functional tissue development of such constructs. A potential candidate material that may be useful as a scaffold for NP tissue engineering is carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), a biocompatible, cost-effective derivative of cellulose. Photocrosslinked CMC hydrogels have been shown to support NP cell viability and promote phenotypic matrix deposition capable of maintaining mechanical properties when cultured in serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM) supplemented with TGF-?3. However, MSCs have not been characterized using this hydrogel system. In this study, human MSCs (hMSCs) were encapsulated in photocrosslinked CMC hydrogels and cultured in CDM with and without TGF-?3 to determine the effect of the growth factor on the differentiation of hMSCs toward an NP-like phenotype. Constructs were evaluated for matrix elaboration and functional properties consistent with native NP tissue. CDM supplemented with TGF-?3 resulted in significantly higher glycosaminoglycan content (762.69±220.79 ng/mg wet weight) and type II collagen (COL II) content (6.25±1.64 ng/mg wet weight) at day 21 compared with untreated samples. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed uniform, pericellular, and interterritorial staining for chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and COL II in growth factor-supplemented constructs compared with faint, strictly pericellular staining in untreated constructs at 21 days. Consistent with matrix deposition, mechanical properties of hydrogels treated with TGF-?3 increased over time and exhibited the highest peak stress in stress-relaxation (?(pk)=1.489±0.389 kPa) at day 21 among all groups. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hMSCs encapsulated in photocrosslinked CMC hydrogels supplemented with TGF-?3 are capable of elaborating functional extracellular matrix consistent with the NP phenotype. Such MSC-laden hydrogels may have application in NP replacement therapies. PMID:21707438

Gupta, Michelle S; Cooper, Elana S; Nicoll, Steven B

2011-12-01

64

Tumor necrosis factor-?- and interleukin-1?-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression in nucleus pulposus cells requires cooperative signaling via syndecan 4 and mitogen-activated protein kinase-NF-?B axis: implications in inflammatory disc disease.  

PubMed

Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays an important role in intervertebral disc degeneration, a ubiquitous condition closely linked to low back pain and disability. Elevated expression of syndecan 4, a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, actively controls disc matrix catabolism. However, the relationship between MMP-3 expression and syndecan 4 in the context of inflammatory disc disease has not been clearly defined. We investigated the mechanisms by which cytokines control MMP-3 expression in rat and human nucleus pulposus cells. Cytokine treatment increased MMP-3 expression and promoter activity. Stable silencing of syndecan 4 blocked cytokine-mediated MMP-3 expression; more important, syndecan 4 did not mediate its effects through NF-?B or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. However, treatment with MAPK and NF-?B inhibitors resulted in partial blocking of the inductive effect of cytokines on MMP-3 expression. Loss-of-function studies confirmed that NF-?B, p38?/?2/?/?, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 2, but not ERK1, contributed to cytokine-dependent induction of MMP3 promoter activity. Similarly, inhibitor treatments, lentiviral short hairpin-p65, and short hairpin-I?B kinase ? significantly decreased cytokine-dependent up-regulation in MMP-3 expression. Finally, we show that transforming growth factor-? can block the up-regulation of MMP-3 induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? by counteracting the NF-?B pathway and syndecan 4 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that cooperative signaling through syndecan 4 and the TNF receptor 1-MAPK-NF-?B axis is required for TNF-?-dependent expression of MMP-3 in nucleus pulposus cells. Controlling these pathways may slow the progression of intervertebral disc degeneration and matrix catabolism. PMID:25063530

Wang, Xin; Wang, Hua; Yang, Hao; Li, Jun; Cai, Qiqing; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

2014-09-01

65

The implantation of non-cell-based materials to prevent the recurrent disc herniation: an in vivo porcine model using quantitative discomanometry examination  

PubMed Central

Recurrent disc herniation is frequently observed due to leakage of nucleus pulposus through injured anulus fibrosus. There is no effective treatment to prevent recurrent disc herniation yet. In this study, we proposed to implant non-cell-based materials into the porcine disc to stimulate the growth of fibrous tissue and thereby increase the disc functional integrity. The disc herniation was simulated by anular punctures using the spinal needles. Four clinically used implantation materials, i.e., gelfoam, platinum coil, bone cement and tissue glue, were delivered into the discs via percutaneous spinal needles. Two months after the surgery, the swine were killed. The degree of disc integrity of intact, naturally healed and implanted discs, was examined by quantitative discomanometry apparatus. We found the disc injury could not recover after 2 months of healing, and the disc implantation affected the degree of disc integrity. The disc integrity of gelfoam-implanted discs was better than that of coil-, bone cement-, and glue-implanted discs. The implantation of non-cell-based material was proved to be a potentially clinically applicable method to recover the integrity of injured discs and to prevent recurrent disc herniation. PMID:17252217

Wang, Yao-Hung; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

2007-01-01

66

Fluoroscopy Assisted Minimally Invasive Transplantation of Allogenic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Embedded in HyStem Reduces the Progression of Nucleus Pulposus Degeneration in the Damaged Interverbal Disc: A Preliminary Study in Rabbits  

PubMed Central

This study was conducted to develop a technique for minimally invasive and accurate delivery of stem cells to augment nucleus pulposus (NP) in damaged intervertebral discs (IVD). IVD damage was created in noncontiguous discs at L4-L5 level; rabbits (N = 12) were randomly divided into three groups: group I treated with MSCs in HyStem hydrogel, group II treated with HyStem alone, and group III received no intervention. MSCs and hydrogel were administered to the damaged disc under guidance of fluoroscopy. Augmentation of NP was assessed through histological and MRI T2 mapping of the NP after eight weeks of transplantation. T2 weighted signal intensity was higher in group I than in groups II and III (P < 0.05). Disc height index showed maximum disc height in group I compared to groups II and III. Histological score of the degenerative index was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in group I (8.6 ± 1.8) than that in groups II (11.6 ± 2.3) and III (18.0 ± 5.7). Immunohistochemistry staining for collagen type II and aggrecan staining were higher in group I as compared to other groups. Our results demonstrate that the minimally invasive administration of MSCs in hyaluronan hydrogel (HyStem) augments the repair of NP in damaged IVD. PMID:24983002

Puvanan, Karunanithi; Murali, Malliga Raman; Balaji Raghavendran, Hanumantha Rao; Shani, Samuel; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Amir Abbas, Azlina; Mohamed, Jamal Azmi; Kamarul, Tunku

2014-01-01

67

Fluoroscopy assisted minimally invasive transplantation of allogenic mesenchymal stromal cells embedded in HyStem reduces the progression of nucleus pulposus degeneration in the damaged interverbal disc: a preliminary study in rabbits.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to develop a technique for minimally invasive and accurate delivery of stem cells to augment nucleus pulposus (NP) in damaged intervertebral discs (IVD). IVD damage was created in noncontiguous discs at L4-L5 level; rabbits (N = 12) were randomly divided into three groups: group I treated with MSCs in HyStem hydrogel, group II treated with HyStem alone, and group III received no intervention. MSCs and hydrogel were administered to the damaged disc under guidance of fluoroscopy. Augmentation of NP was assessed through histological and MRI T2 mapping of the NP after eight weeks of transplantation. T2 weighted signal intensity was higher in group I than in groups II and III (P < 0.05). Disc height index showed maximum disc height in group I compared to groups II and III. Histological score of the degenerative index was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in group I (8.6 ± 1.8) than that in groups II (11.6 ± 2.3) and III (18.0 ± 5.7). Immunohistochemistry staining for collagen type II and aggrecan staining were higher in group I as compared to other groups. Our results demonstrate that the minimally invasive administration of MSCs in hyaluronan hydrogel (HyStem) augments the repair of NP in damaged IVD. PMID:24983002

Subhan, Rifa Aquidah; Puvanan, Karunanithi; Murali, Malliga Raman; Raghavendran, Hanumantha Rao Balaji; Shani, Samuel; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Abbas, Azlina Amir; Mohamed, Jamal Azmi; Kamarul, Tunku

2014-01-01

68

Cytotoxic Effects of the Radiocontrast Agent Iotrolan and Anesthetic Agents Bupivacaine and Lidocaine in Three-Dimensional Cultures of Human Intervertebral Disc Nucleus Pulposus Cells: Identification of the Apoptotic Pathways  

PubMed Central

Background Discography and discoblock are imaging procedures used to diagnose discogenic low back pain. Although needle puncture of the intervertebral disc (IVD) itself induces disc degeneration, the agents used in these procedures may also have harmful effects on IVD cells. The purpose of this study was to analyze whether radiocontrast agents and local anesthetic agents have detrimental effects on human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Methods Healthy human NP cells were cultured for 7 days in three-dimensional (3D) cell–alginate bead composites, and were then exposed to clinically relevant doses of a radiocontrast agent (iotrolan) or local anesthetic (lidocaine or bupivacaine). Cell viability and apoptosis were measured by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. On the basis of caspase expression profiles, the apoptotic pathways activated by the agents were identified by Western blot analysis. Results The radiocontrast agent iotrolan did not affect NP cell viability or induce apoptosis. In contrast, both the anesthetic agents significantly decreased cell viability and increased the apoptotic cell number in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After 120 min, 2% lidocaine and 0.5% bupivacaine decreased percent live cells to 13% and 10%, respectively (p<0.05). The number of apoptotic cells was doubled by increasing lidocaine dosage from 1% to 2% (23% and 42%) and bupivacaine from 0.25% to 0.50% (25% and 48%) (p<0.05). Western blot analysis revealed that both anesthetic agents upregulated cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-8, whereas only bupivacaine upregulated cleaved caspase-9. Conclusions/Significance The present study demonstrates that iotrolan does not affect the viability of healthy human NP cells. In contrast, the two anesthetic agents commonly used in discography or discoblock may cause extensive damage to IVDs by inducing apoptotic cell death. PMID:24642945

Iwasaki, Koji; Sudo, Hideki; Yamada, Katsuhisa; Ito, Manabu; Iwasaki, Norimasa

2014-01-01

69

A History of Lumbar Disc Herniation From Hippocrates to the 1990s.  

PubMed

In ancient times, a supernatural understanding of the syndrome of lumbar radiculopathy often involved demonic forces vexing the individual with often crippling pain. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians began to take a more naturalistic view and, critically, suspected a relationship between lumbar spinal pathology and leg symptoms. Relatively little then changed for those with sciatica until the classic works by Cotugno and Kocher arrived in the late 18th century. Early lumbar canal explorations were performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s by MacEwen, Horsley, Krause, Taylor, Dandy, and Cushing, among others. In these cases, when compressive pathologies were found and removed, the lesions typically were (mis-)identified as enchondromas or osteochondritis dissecans. To better understand the history, learn more about the first treatments of lumbar disc herniation, and evaluate the impact of the early influences on modern spine practice, searches of PubMed and Embase were performed using the search terms discectomy, medical history, lumbar spine surgery, herniated disc, herniated nucleus pulposus, sciatica, and lumbar radiculopathy. Additional sources were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed papers. Many older and ancient sources including De Ischiade Nervosa are available in English translations and were used. When full texts were not available, English abstracts were used. The first true, intentional discectomy surgery was performed by Mixter and Barr in 1932. Early on, a transdural approach was favored. In 1938, Love described the intralaminar, extradural approach. His technique, although modified with improved lighting, magnification, and retractors, remains a staple approach to disc herniations today. Other modalities such as chymopapain have been investigated. Some remain a part of the therapeutic armamentarium, whereas others have disappeared. By the 1970s, CT scanning after myelography markedly improved the clinical evaluation of patients with lumbar disc herniation. In this era, use of discectomy surgery increased rapidly. Even patients with very early symptoms were offered surgery. Later work, especially by Weber and Hakelius, showed that many patients with lumbar disc herniation would improve without surgical intervention. In the ensuing decades, the debate over operative indications and timing continued, reaching another pivotal moment with the 2006 publication of the initial results of Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial. PMID:24752913

Truumees, Eeric

2014-04-22

70

The clinical study of percutaneous disc decompression of treating herniation of cervical disc with Nd:YAG laser  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objective: The possibility of PLDD (percutaneous laser disc decompression) and an ideal non-operative method which is long everlasting effect for PLDD was investigated. Methods: 159 patients of Cervical Disc Herniation with PLDD were studied. All the herniated discs were irradiated with 10­15J/S Nd:YAG laser quantum through optical-fiber under the supervision of C-arm X-ray. Results: All the patients were followed and reexamined CT or MRI after one to six months of PLDD. The result of cured (67.92%), excellent (24.53%), moderation (5.66%), non-effect (1.88%) was got. The excellent rate was 88.24%. The effective rate was 97.65%. Non-effective rate was 2.35%. Conclusion: When irradiated with Nd:YAG laser, the nucleus pulposus was vapouring, charring and coagulating. The volume and inner-pressure of the disc decreased. So the symptoms and signs improved. The main value of this methods were micro-damage, non-operation, no bleeding, no bone injury, good therapy effect, quick recovery, lesser pain, safety and excellent long everlasting effect. It is an ideal non-operative method of treating PLDD.

Zhang, Dianxue; Cheng, Hefu; Wang, Jindong

2005-07-01

71

Degenerative disc disease of herniated intervertebral discs is associated with extracellular matrix remodeling, vimentin-positive cells and cell death.  

PubMed

We studied patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) to demonstrate that i) remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the intervertebral disc (IVD), particularly the elastic fiber system, of subjects with herniated discs is dysregulated and that ii) it is accompanied by accelerated elastin degradation due to increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9). Moreover we wanted to obtain a deeper insight into the pathogenesis of DDD through the study of ECM calcification, DNA fragmentation using TUNEL analysis, BAX, bcl-2 and vimentin immunopositive cells. We studied herniated discs from patients of three age groups (group 1=30-40 years; group 2=40-50 years; and group 3=50-65 years) to evaluate the oxytalan fiber systemMMP-9, apoptosis and vimentin immunopositive cells. The results demonstrated the presence of oxytalan fibers in the annulus fibrosus (AF) and the nucleus pulposus (NP) of herniated discs. In the AF oxytalan fibers replaced disrupted mature elastic fibers in calcified areas, while in the NP they were mostly found in nests at the periphery of chondrocytes. MMP-9 was prevalently observed in NP nests above all in group 1 and group 3 discs while group 2 exhibited a lower MMP-9 immunostaining. Activation of the apoptotic process was demonstrated by upregulated BAX expression in group 3. BAX immunopositivity was inversely mirrored by a significant decrease in bcl-2 expression. Intermediate filament protein vimentin was strongly expressed only in group 1 samples. A large number of apoptotic TUNEL+ cells was observed in group 3 specimens. The presence of oxytalan fibers may be the result of a process of incomplete elastogenesis, or a response to mechanical stress trying to functionally replace the lack of elastic fibers. MMP-9 expression seems to relate to disc damage, while chondrocyte BAX upregulation and TUNEL+ cell staining revealed apoptosis activation regardless of patient age. Vimentin immunopositivity was clearly detected in group 1 annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus cells. In conclusion, as demonstrated by the vimentin-positive cells, the injured IVD has endogenous resources that can stem the DDD damage, including substitution of damaged elastic fibers by oxytalan fibers. In addition, induction of apoptosis suggests an increased cell turnover in response to repair needs. PMID:21330123

Loreto, Carla; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castorina, Alessandro; Loreto, Corrado; Martinez, Giuseppa

2011-03-01

72

Assessing the Effect of Spaceflight on the Propensity for Astronauts to Develop Disc Herniation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A previous study reported that the instantaneous risk of developing a Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (HNP) was higher in astronauts who had flown at least one mission, as compared with those in the corps who had not yet flown. However, the study only analyzed time to HNP after the first mission (if any) and did not account for the possible effects of multiple missions. While many HNPs occurred well into astronauts' careers or in somecases years after retirement, the higher incidence of HNPs relatively soon after completion of space missions appears to indicate that spaceflight may lead to an increased risk of HNP. In addition, when an HNP occurs after spaceflight, is it related to previous spaceflight exposure? The purpose of this study was to investigate whether multiple missions, sex, age, vehicle landing dynamics, and flight duration affect the risk of developing an HNP usinga competing risks model. The outcome of the study will inform the Human System Risk Board assessment of back pain, inform the risk of injury due to dynamic loads, and update the previous dataset, which contained events up to December 31, 2006.

Feiveson, A.; Mendez, C.; Somers, J.

2015-01-01

73

Herniated Lumbar Disc  

MedlinePLUS

... be treated with nonprescription medications such as aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen or acetaminophen. If you have severe persistent ... a result of disc herniation. These include asprin, ibuprofen, naproxen and a variety of prescription drugs. If ...

74

Traumatic extrathoracic lung herniation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traumatic extrathoracic lung herniation is an exceptional complication of blunt chest trauma. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who was involved in a motorcycle accident and who suffered a left clavicle fracture-dislocation associated with multiple rib fractures and massive herniation of the left upper lobe through an upper anterior chest wall defect. Immediate surgical repair through an atypical

Pierre-Mathieu Bonnet; François Pons; Louis Brinquin; René Jancovici

2002-01-01

75

Traumatic extrathoracic lung herniation.  

PubMed

Traumatic extrathoracic lung herniation is an exceptional complication of blunt chest trauma. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who was involved in a motorcycle accident and who suffered a left clavicle fracture-dislocation associated with multiple rib fractures and massive herniation of the left upper lobe through an upper anterior chest wall defect. Immediate surgical repair through an atypical transcostal vertical thoracotomy resulted in full recovery of pulmonary function at 1 year. PMID:12238872

Lang-Lazdunski, Loïc; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; Pons, François; Brinquin, Louis; Jancovici, René

2002-09-01

76

Nucleus Implant Parameters Significantly Change the Compressive  

E-print Network

.1115/1.1894369 Keywords: Lumbar Spine, Intervertebral Disc, Nucleus Pulposus, Hydrogel Nucleus Implant, CompressiveNucleus Implant Parameters Significantly Change the Compressive Stiffness of the Human Lumbar- eter. Human lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs) were tested in compression for intact, denucleated

Karduna, Andrew

77

Lumbar Disc Herniation in Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lumbar disc herniation very rarely occurs in adolescence. The aim of this study was to assess the radiological, clinical and surgical features and case outcomes for adolescents with lumbar disc herniation, and to compare with adult cases. The cases of 17 adolescents (7 girls and 10 boys, age range 13–17 years) who were surgically treated for lumbar disc herniation in

Serdar Ozgen; Deniz Konya; O. Zafer Toktas; Adnan Dagcinar; M. Memet Ozek

2007-01-01

78

Cytokine expression in the epidural space: a model of non-compressive disc herniation-induced inflammation  

PubMed Central

Study Design Animal study Objective Development of an animal model for the study of biochemical changes that occur in the epidural space after intervertebral disc herniation. Summary of Background Data Although strong evidence for an inflammatory component exists, the biochemical processes underlying pain following disc herniation remain unknown. Methods Epidural lavage was performed in 48 rats after L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) exposure at baseline and 3, 6, or 24 hours after placement of autologous nucleus pulposus (NP) (N = 15), saline (N = 15), or NP + an interferon-gamma antibody (anti-IFN?; N = 18) directly onto the DRG. Multiplex assays quantifying interleukin (IL-)-1-?, IL-1?, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF?, IFN? and GM-CSF were performed. NP (N = 7) was also analyzed for these cytokines by placing NP into saline and measuring the relative concentration. Results Cytokines measured low at baseline (0–100pg/ml) in all groups. Compared to saline, NP application caused IL-6 elevation, peaking at T=3hr, that was prevented by anti-IFN?. NP induced elevation of TNF?, peaking at T=24hr and was prevented by anti-IFN?. IFN? was elevated after NP at T=3hr and T=24hr. IL-1? was similar after saline versus NP. The concentrations of IL-1? and IL-10 were elevated at T=3hr, 6hr and 24hr in all groups without between-groups difference. The level of IL-4 peaked at T=3hr in the NP group and was different than saline and NP +anti-IFN? groups but the time effect was insignificant. There was no change for GM-CSF. The concentration of cytokines measured in normal NP was < 2pg/ml for all cytokines except TNF?. Conclusion In this model of acute non-compressive disc herniation, NP caused the elevation of epidural IL-6, TNF? and IFN?; all attenuated by IFN? blockade. IL-1? and IL-10 were both significantly elevated by saline alone and their response was not prevented by IFN? blockade. This model may prove useful for the study of the biochemical processes by which NP induces inflammation-induced nerve root irritation and radiculopathic pain. PMID:22648034

Cuellar, Jason M.; Borges, Paula M.; Cuéllar, Vanessa Gabrovsky; Yoo, Andrew; Scuderi, Gaetano J.; Yeomans, David C.

2012-01-01

79

The Combined Use of a Posterior Dynamic Transpedicular Stabilization System and a Prosthetic Disc Nucleus Device in Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease With Disc Herniations  

PubMed Central

Background Prosthetic replacement of spinal discs is emerging as a treatment option for degenerative disc disease. Posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization (PDTS) and prosthetic disc nucleus (PDN) devices have been used sporadically in spinal surgery. Methods This was a prospective study of 13 patients averaging 40.9 years of age with degenerative disc disease who underwent posterior placement of a PDN with a PDTS. The Oswestry low-back pain disability questionnaire and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain were used to assess patient outcomes at the 3rd, 6th, and 12th postoperative months. Lumbar range of motion was evaluated using a bubble inclinometer preoperatively and at 12 months postoperatively. Radiological parameters including lumbar lordosis angle (LL), segmental lordosis angle (?), disc height at the operated level (DHo), and disc height of the adjacent level (DHu) were evaluated. A typical midline posterior approach for complete discectomy was followed by the simultaneous placement of the PDN with PDTS. Results Both the Oswestry and VAS scores showed significant improvement postoperatively (P < .05). There were no significant differences in LL, ?, DHo, and DHu parameters. We observed complications in 3 patients including 2 patients who had the PDN device embedded into the adjacent corpus; 1 had massive endplate degeneration, and the other experienced interbody space infection. In 1 patient, the PDN device migrated to one side in the vertebral space. Conclusion The use of a PDN in combination with posterior dynamic instrumentation can help to restore the physiologic motion of the anterior and posterior column and could help to establish posterior dynamic instrumentation as an important treatment of degenerative disc disease. Theoretically this concept is superior, but practically we need more advanced technology to replace disc material. Because this study examined the combination of the PDN and stabilization instrumention, the results cannot be compared with those reported in the literature for either PDN alone or dynamic screws alone. Level of Evidence Prospective cohort study with good follow-up (level 1b).

Aydin, Ahmet Levent; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Cosar, Murat; Ataker, Yaprak; Kaner, Tuncay; Ozer, Ali Fahir

2008-01-01

80

Can Prevention of a Reherniation Be Investigated? Establishment of a Herniation Model and Experiments With an Anular Closure Device  

PubMed Central

Study Design. Biomechanical in vitro study. Objective. To establish a reliable in vitro herniation model with human cadaver spines that enables evaluation of anular closure devices. Summary of Background Data. Biomechanically, it is desirable to close anulus defects after disc herniation to preserve as much nucleus as possible. Multiple anular closure options exist to prevent reherniation. A reliable test procedure is needed to evaluate the efficacy and reliability of these implants. Methods. Two groups of human lumbar segments (n = 6 per group) were tested under cyclic loading until herniation occurred or 100,000 load cycles were applied. One group contained moderate/severe degenerated discs. A second group had mild degenerated discs. Intradiscal pressure was measured in the intact state to confirm disc quality. If herniation occurred, the extruded material was reinserted into the disc and the anulus defect was treated with the Barricaid anular closure device (Intrinsic Therapeutics, Inc., Woburn, MA). Disc height and 3-dimensional flexibility of the specimens in the intact, defect, and implanted states were measured under pure moments in each principal motion plane. Afterwards, provocation of reherniation was attempted with additional 100,000 load cycles. Results. Likelihood of herniation was strongly linked to disc degeneration and supported by the magnitude of intradiscal pressure. In moderate/severe degenerated discs, only 1 herniation was created. In mild degenerated discs, herniations were reliably created in all specimens. Using this worst-case model, herniation caused a significant reduction of disc height, which was nearly restored with the implant. In no case was reherniation or implant migration visible after 100,000 load cycles after Barricaid implantation. Conclusion. We established a human herniation model that reliably produced nucleus extrusion during cyclic loading by selecting specimens with low disc degeneration. The Barricaid seems to prevent nucleus from reherniating. The reliability of this method suggests the opportunity to investigate other anulus closure devices and nucleus replacement techniques critically. PMID:23429676

Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Ressel, Lena; Heuer, Frank; Graf, Nicolas; Rath, Stefan

2013-01-01

81

Autotraction in lumbar disc herniation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autotraction is a method of diminishing lower back pain and sciatica in which the patient stretches himself on a specially designed traction table. The pulling force ranges between 400–800 N. Clinical results are encouraging and the method can be recommended as a temporary treatment especially in lumbago with sciatica. The influence on a herniated disc is discussed with respect to

P. Gillström; K. Ericson; T. Hindmarsh

1985-01-01

82

Paraduodenal herniation: An internal herniation in a virgin abdomen  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION A paraduodenal hernia is an uncommon hernia that results from an abnormal rotation of the midgut. Commonly, these hernias are congenital in nature, and are reported to cause 1.5–5.8% of intestinal obstructions. These hernias occur when a part of the jejunum herniates through the posterior portion of the ligament of Treitz. Diagnosing these hernias preoperatively has been shown to be difficult, despite the studies that are available. Early diagnosis is imperative to the patient in order to avoid strangulation of the bowel, which is associated with a high mortality. PRESENTATION OF CASE In this case, we present a case of a left-sided paraduodenal hernia in a virgin abdomen in a 38-year-old African American male with a herniation of a loop of jejunum through a defect of the posterior portion of the ligament of Treitz. The patient also had a volvulized segment of the proximal jejunum, and part of this bowel was found to be ischemic. DISCUSSION Acute intestinal obstruction caused by a left paraduodenal hernia is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction. A literary search of PubMed between 1980 and 2012 indicated only 44 cases of intestinal obstruction secondary to a left paraduodenal hernia. CONCLUSION The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, and the herniated bowel was found to be ischemic. The hernia was reduced, and the ischemic bowel resected. The defect was closed, and the patient had a non-complicated recovery. PMID:25437660

Kabbani, Dana; Salem, Ayman; Holloway, Daniel K.

2014-01-01

83

[Traumatic recurrence of idiopathic spinal cord herniation].  

PubMed

Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare cause of thoracic myelopathy and its recurrence is even more infrequent. Cord herniation is through an anterior dural defect in thoracic spine with unknown causes. Symptomatic cases must be surgically treated to reduce the hernia and seal the defect to prevent recurrences. We report a patient presenting a Brown-Séquard syndrome secondary to a D5 spinal cord herniation treated successfully and its posterior traumatic recurrence. PMID:23453309

Lorente-Muñoz, Asís; Cortés-Franco, Severiano; Moles-Herbera, Jesús; Casado-Pellejero, Juan; Rivero-Celada, David; Alberdi-Viñas, Juan

2013-01-01

84

Lumbar disk herniation with contralateral symptoms.  

PubMed

The aim of the study is to determine if leg pain can be caused by contralateral lumbar disk herniation and if intervention from only the herniation side would suffice in these patients. Five patients who had lumbar disk herniations with predominantly contralateral symptoms were operated from the side of disk herniation without exploring or decompressing the symptomatic side. Patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first reported series of such patients who were operated only from the herniation side. The possible mechanisms of how contralateral symptoms predominate in these patients are also discussed. In all patients, the shape of disk herniations on imaging studies were quite similar: a broad-based posterior central-paracentral herniated disk with the apex deviated away from the side of the symptoms. The symptoms and signs resolved in the immediate postoperative period. Our data clears that sciatica can be caused by contralateral lumbar disk herniation. When operation is considered, intervention only from the herniation side is sufficient. It is probable that traction rather than direct compression is responsible from the emergence of contralateral symptoms. PMID:16231173

Sucu, Hasan Kamil; Gelal, Fazil

2006-05-01

85

Assessing the Effect of Spaceflight on the Propensity for Astronauts to Develop Disk Herniation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BACKGROUND: A previous study [1] reported that the instantaneous risk of developing a Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (HNP) was higher in astronauts who had flown at least one mission, as compared with those in the corps who had not yet flown. However, the study only analyzed time to HNP after the first mission (if any) and did not account for the possible effects of multiple missions. While many HNP's occurred well into astronauts' careers or in some cases years after retirement, the higher incidence of HNPs relatively soon after completion of space missions appears to indicate that spaceflight may lead to an increased risk of HNP. The purpose of this study was to support the Human System Risk Board assessment of back pain, evaluate the risk of injury due to dynamic loads, and update the previous dataset which contained events up to December 31, 2006. METHODS: Data was queried from the electronic medical record and provided by the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health. The data included all 330 United States astronauts from 1959 through February 2014. Cases were confirmed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computerized Tomography, Myelography, operative findings, or through clinical confirmation with a neurologist or neurosurgeon. In this analysis, astronauts who had an HNP at selection into the corps or had an HNP diagnosis prior to their first flight were excluded. The statistical challenges in using the available data to separate effects of spaceflight from those associated with general astronaut training and lifestyle on propensity to develop HNPs are many. The primary outcome is reported date of first HNP (if any), which at best is only an approximation to the actual time of occurrence. To properly analyze this data with a survival analysis model, one must also know the "exposure" time - i.e. how long each astronaut has been at risk for developing an HNP. If an HNP is reported soon after a mission, is it mission caused or general? If the former, exposure time should be counted from the time of landing (assuming the risk of HNP occurring during a mission is zero). If the latter, exposure time should be counted from the time of selection; however we can't directly know which one to use. In our analysis we take both of these possibilities into account with a competing risks model, wherein two distinct stochastic processes are going on: TG = time to HNP (general) and TS = time to HNP (spaceflight). Under this type of model, whichever of these occurs first is what we observe; in other words we don't observe TG or TS, only min(TG, TS). Here, we parameterized the model in terms of separate Weibull hazard functions for each process and estimated all parameters using maximum likelihood. In addition, we allowed for a "cured fraction" - i.e. the possibility that some astronauts may never develop an HNP. RESULTS: Results will include a depiction of the competing hazard functions as well as a probability curve for the relative likelihood that an HNP reported at a given time after a mission is actually mission caused. Other factors, such as dwell time in microgravity and vehicle landing environment will be explored. An overall assessment as to whether spaceflight truly exacerbates HNP risk will be made.

Feiveson, A. H.; Mendez, C. M.; Somers, J. T.

2014-01-01

86

Herniation of the upper lumbar discs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary On the basis of investigations involving 134 patients operated on at the National Institute of Neurosurgery, Budapest, the authors point out that herniations of the intervertebral discs at L 1\\/2, L 2\\/3, L 3\\/4 levels are characterized by more severe neurological changes. Paresis and autonomic disorders occur much more frequently than in lower lumbar disc herniations: paresis was found

E. Pásztor; I. Szarvas

1981-01-01

87

Cerebral herniation during bacterial meningitis in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To see whether the incidence of cerebral herniation is increased immediately after lumbar puncture in children with bacterial meningitis and whether any children with herniation have normal results on cranial computed tomography. DESIGN--Retrospective review of case notes; computed tomograms were read again. SETTING--Large paediatric teaching hospital. SUBJECTS--445 children over 30 days old admitted to hospital with bacterial meningitis. MAIN OUTCOME

G Rennick; F Shann; J de Campo

1993-01-01

88

Thoracoabdominal herniation--but not as you know it.  

PubMed

Thoracoabdominal hernias are uncommon following blunt trauma. If diaphragmatic rupture does occur, the abdominal viscera can herniate into the thorax through the diaphragm. We report a rare case of thoracoabdominal herniation in which the bowel herniated through the lateral abdominal wall, migrating cranially and entering the thorax through an intercostal defect. This case highlights the need for early and definitive surgical repair. PMID:24992399

Wigley, J; Noble, F; King, A

2014-07-01

89

Scrotal Herniation of Bladder: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Inguinal bladder hernia is a rare clinical condition, with 1–3% of all inguinal hernias involving the bladder. Any portion of the bladder may herniate, from a small portion or a diverticulum to most of the bladder. We present a 55-year-old male with an intermittent right scrotal mass of 6 months’ duration. The mass lesion protruded through the right inguinal canal before voiding and reduced after that. Scrotal sonography revealed a hypoechoic lesion in the scrotum that stretched cranially to the intra-abdominal portion of the bladder. Excretory urography showed a duplicated system in the left kidney and deviation of the left orifice to the right side of the trigon. Finally, cystography illustrated herniation of the bladder to the right scrotum. Surgical repair of the hernia was done with mesh. Follow-up cystography one month postoperatively revealed no herniation. PMID:23645960

Hamidi Madani, Ali; Mohammadi Nikouei, Hossein; Baghani Aval, Hamidreza; Enshaei, Ahmad; Asadollahzade, Ahmad; Esmaeili, Samaneh

2013-01-01

90

Lumbar disc nucleoplasty using coblation technology: clinical outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purposeAlthough the standard treatment for lumbar disc herniation is lumbar microdiscectomy, nucleoplasty offers a new technique with encouraging results in well selected cases. Nucleoplasty is a minimally invasive technique that manages intradiscal herniation through energy based removal of part of the nucleus pulposus. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and clinical outcome of the

Alaa Azzazi; Sherif AlMekawi; Mostafa Zein

2010-01-01

91

Intercostal lung herniation - The role of imaging  

PubMed Central

Extrathoracic lung hernias can be congenital or acquired. Acquired hernias may be classified by etiology into traumatic, spontaneous, and pathologic. We present a case of a 40-year-old male with a history of bronchial asthma and a blunt chest trauma who presented complaining of sharp chest pain of acute onset that began after five consecutive days of vigorous coughing. Upon physical examination a well-demarcated deformity overlying the third intercostal space of the left upper anterior hemithorax was revealed. Thoracic CT scan showed that a portion of the anterior bronchopulmonary segment of the left upper lobe had herniated through a chest wall defect. The role of imaging, especially chest computed tomography with multiplanar image reconstructions and maximum (MIP) and minimum intensity projection (MinIP) reformats can clearly confirm the presence of the herniated lung, the hernial sac, the hernial orifice in the chest wall, and exclude possible complications such as lung tissue strangulation. PMID:24967031

Detorakis, Efstathios E.; Androulidakis, Emmanuel

2014-01-01

92

Cecal bascule herniation into the lesser sac.  

PubMed

Cecal bascule is a rare cause of bowel obstruction in which a mobile cecum folds anteriorly and superiorly over the ascending colon. Herein, we present the first case of internal herniation of a cecal bascule into the lesser sac through the foramen of winslow, aiming at discussing radiological findings, differential diagnosis, and surgical management of this uncommon condition. A 75-year-old female presented to the emergency room with an 18-h history of sudden onset sharp, progressively worsening abdominal pain associated with vomiting. Physical exam revealed abdominal distention and epigastric tenderness while initial laboratory tests were unremarkable. Computed tomography of her abdomen and pelvis showed a loop of distended colon within lesser sac without signs of bowel ischemia or perforation. On exploratory laparotomy, a cecal bascule was found herniating into lesser sac via foramen of winslow. Upon reduction, the cecum appeared viable therefore a cecopexy was performed without bowel resection. Unlike cecal volvulus, cecal bascule consists of no axial rotation of the bowel with no mesenteric vascular compromise and therefore ischemia would only occur from intraluminal tension or extraluminal compression from the borders of foramen of winslow. The management of internal herniation of a cecal bascule is always surgical including anatomic resection or cecopexy. PMID:25516868

Makarawo, Tafadzwa; Macedo, Francisco Igor; Jacobs, Michael J

2014-12-16

93

Cecal bascule herniation into the lesser sac  

PubMed Central

Cecal bascule is a rare cause of bowel obstruction in which a mobile cecum folds anteriorly and superiorly over the ascending colon. Herein, we present the first case of internal herniation of a cecal bascule into the lesser sac through the foramen of winslow, aiming at discussing radiological findings, differential diagnosis, and surgical management of this uncommon condition. A 75-year-old female presented to the emergency room with an 18-h history of sudden onset sharp, progressively worsening abdominal pain associated with vomiting. Physical exam revealed abdominal distention and epigastric tenderness while initial laboratory tests were unremarkable. Computed tomography of her abdomen and pelvis showed a loop of distended colon within lesser sac without signs of bowel ischemia or perforation. On exploratory laparotomy, a cecal bascule was found herniating into lesser sac via foramen of winslow. Upon reduction, the cecum appeared viable therefore a cecopexy was performed without bowel resection. Unlike cecal volvulus, cecal bascule consists of no axial rotation of the bowel with no mesenteric vascular compromise and therefore ischemia would only occur from intraluminal tension or extraluminal compression from the borders of foramen of winslow. The management of internal herniation of a cecal bascule is always surgical including anatomic resection or cecopexy. PMID:25516868

Makarawo, Tafadzwa; Macedo, Francisco Igor; Jacobs, Michael J

2014-01-01

94

Acupuncture and Spontaneous Regression of a Radiculopathic Cervical Herniated Disc  

PubMed Central

The spontaneous regression of herniated cervical discs is not a well-established phenomenon. However, we encountered a case of a spontaneous regression of a severe radiculopathic herniated cervical disc that was treated with acupuncture, pharmacopuncture, and herb medicine. The symptoms were improved within 12 months of treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conducted at that time revealed marked regression of the herniated disc. This case provides an additional example of spontaneous regression of a herniated cervical disc documented by MRI following non-surgical treatment. PMID:25780641

Kim, Sung-Ha; Park, Man-Young; Lee, Sang-Mi; Jung, Ho-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Kyoun; Lee, Jong-Deok; Kim, Dong-Woung; Yeom, Seung-Ryong; Lim, Jin-Young; Park, Min-Jung; Park, Se-Woon; Kim, Sung-Chul

2012-01-01

95

Lumbar Disk Herniation Surgery: Outcome and Predictors  

PubMed Central

Study Design?A retrospective cohort study. Objectives?To determine the outcome and any differences in the clinical results of three different surgical methods for lumbar disk herniation and to assess the effect of factors that could predict the outcome of surgery. Methods?We evaluated 148 patients who had operations for lumbar disk herniation from March 2006 to March 2011 using three different surgical techniques (laminectomy, microscopically assisted percutaneous nucleotomy, and spinous process osteotomy) by using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire, Resumption of Activities of Daily Living scale and changes of visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and radicular pain. Our study questionnaire addressed patient subjective satisfaction with the operation, residual complaints, and job resumption. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, United States). Statistical significance was set at 0.05. For statistical analysis, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and repeated measure analysis were performed. For determining the confounding factors, univariate analysis by chi-square test was used and followed by logistic regression analysis. Results?Ninety-four percent of our patients were satisfied with the results of their surgeries. VAS documented an overall 93.3% success rate for reduction of radicular pain. Laminectomy resulted in better outcome in terms of JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire. The outcome of surgery did not significantly differ by age, sex, level of education, preoperative VAS for back, preoperative VAS for radicular pain, return to previous job, or level of herniation. Conclusion?Surgery for lumbar disk herniation is effective in reducing radicular pain (93.4%). All three surgical approaches resulted in significant decrease in preoperative radicular pain and low back pain, but intergroup variation in the outcome was not achieved. As indicated by JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire–Low Back Pain (JOABPQ-LBP) and lumbar function functional scores, laminectomy achieved significantly better outcome compared with other methods. It is worth mentioning that relief of radicular pain was associated with subjective satisfaction with the surgery among our study population. Predictive factors for ineffective surgical treatment for lumbar disk herniation were female sex and negative preoperative straight leg raising. Age, level of education, and preoperative VAS for low back pain were other factors that showed prediction power. PMID:25396104

Sedighi, Mahsa; Haghnegahdar, Ali

2014-01-01

96

Lumbar disk herniation surgery: outcome and predictors.  

PubMed

Study Design?A retrospective cohort study. Objectives?To determine the outcome and any differences in the clinical results of three different surgical methods for lumbar disk herniation and to assess the effect of factors that could predict the outcome of surgery. Methods?We evaluated 148 patients who had operations for lumbar disk herniation from March 2006 to March 2011 using three different surgical techniques (laminectomy, microscopically assisted percutaneous nucleotomy, and spinous process osteotomy) by using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire, Resumption of Activities of Daily Living scale and changes of visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and radicular pain. Our study questionnaire addressed patient subjective satisfaction with the operation, residual complaints, and job resumption. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, United States). Statistical significance was set at 0.05. For statistical analysis, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and repeated measure analysis were performed. For determining the confounding factors, univariate analysis by chi-square test was used and followed by logistic regression analysis. Results?Ninety-four percent of our patients were satisfied with the results of their surgeries. VAS documented an overall 93.3% success rate for reduction of radicular pain. Laminectomy resulted in better outcome in terms of JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire. The outcome of surgery did not significantly differ by age, sex, level of education, preoperative VAS for back, preoperative VAS for radicular pain, return to previous job, or level of herniation. Conclusion?Surgery for lumbar disk herniation is effective in reducing radicular pain (93.4%). All three surgical approaches resulted in significant decrease in preoperative radicular pain and low back pain, but intergroup variation in the outcome was not achieved. As indicated by JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire-Low Back Pain (JOABPQ-LBP) and lumbar function functional scores, laminectomy achieved significantly better outcome compared with other methods. It is worth mentioning that relief of radicular pain was associated with subjective satisfaction with the surgery among our study population. Predictive factors for ineffective surgical treatment for lumbar disk herniation were female sex and negative preoperative straight leg raising. Age, level of education, and preoperative VAS for low back pain were other factors that showed prediction power. PMID:25396104

Sedighi, Mahsa; Haghnegahdar, Ali

2014-12-01

97

SIRT1 protects against apoptosis by promoting autophagy in degenerative human disc nucleus pulposus cells.  

PubMed

SIRT1 could protect degenerative human NP cells against apoptosis, and there were extensive and intimate connection between apoptosis and autophagy. Up to now, the role of autophagy in the process of human IVD degeneration is unclear. We sought to explore the relationship between autophagy and human IVD degeneration and to understand whether autophagy is involved in the protective effect of SIRT1 against apoptosis in NP cells. Our results showed that the autophagosomes number, the mRNA level of LC3 and Beclin-1, the protein expression of LC3-II/I and Beclin-1, decreased in NP from DDD. Resveratrol could increase the protein expression of LC3-II/I and Beclin-1, and reduce apoptosis in degenerative NP cells. In contrast, the protein levels of LC3-II/I and Beclin-1 were down-regulated and apoptosis level was significantly up-regulated in treatment with nicotinamide or SIRT1-siRNA transfection. Further analysis identified that the expression of cleaved Caspase3 and apoptosis incidence significantly increased with the pretreatment of bafilomycin A, whether resveratrol was added or not. These suggested that autophagy may play an important role in IVD degeneration, and SIRT1 protected degenerative human NP cells against apoptosis via promoting autophagy. These findings would aid in the development of novel therapeutic approaches for degenerative disc disease treatment. PMID:25503852

Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Xuemei; Hao, Jie; Shen, Jieliang; Fang, Ji; Dong, Wen; Wang, Dawu; Zhang, Xiaojun; Shui, Wei; Luo, Yi; Lin, Liangbo; Qiu, Quanhe; Liu, Bin; Hu, Zhenming

2014-01-01

98

Biologic Response of Degenerative Living Human Nucleus Pulposus Cells to Treatment with Cytokines  

PubMed Central

Purpose To investigate the molecular responses of various genes and proteins related to disc degeneration upon treatment with cytokines that affect disc-cell proliferation and phenotype in living human intervertebral discs (IVDs). Responsiveness to these cytokines according to the degree of disc degeneration was also evaluated. Materials and Methods The disc specimens were classified into two groups: group 1 (6 patients) showed mild degeneration of IVDs and group 2 (6 patients) exhibited severe degeneration of IVDs. Gene expression was analyzed after treatment with four cytokines: recombinant human bone morphogenic protein (rhBMP-2), transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?). Molecular responses were assessed after exposure of cells from the IVD specimens to these cytokines via real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining. Results mRNA gene expression was significantly greater for aggrecan, type I collagen, type II collagen, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and Sox9 in group 1 than mRNA gene expression in group 2, when the samples were not treated with cytokines. Analysis of mRNA levels for these molecules after morphogen treatment revealed significant increases in both groups, which were much higher in group 1 than in group 2. The average number of IVD cells that were immunofluorescence stained positive for alkaline phosphatase increased after treatment with rhBMP-2 and TGF-? in group 1. Conclusion The biologic responsiveness to treatment of rhBMP-2, TGF-?, TNF-?, and IL-1? in the degenerative living human IVD can be different according to the degree of degeneration of the IVD. PMID:25510775

Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Keung Nyun; Park, Jeong Yoon; Cho, Ki Hong; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

2015-01-01

99

Curing kinetics and mechanical properties of a composite hydrogel for the replacement of the nucleus pulposus  

E-print Network

and viscoelastic properties in shear have been previ- ously reported [8,9], as well as mechanical requirementsCuring kinetics and mechanical properties of a composite hydrogel for the replacement the time of curing but increases the final mechanical performance of the hydrogels for a same chemical

Guerraoui, Rachid

100

Nucleus-nucleus potentials  

SciTech Connect

The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

Satchler, G.R.

1983-01-01

101

Low-Back Pain Following Surgery for Lumbar Disc Herniation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Lumbar disc herniation often causes sciatica. Although surgery may provide relief of sciatic pain, it is uncertain how surgery affects the relief of low-back pain. The purpose of the present prospective study was to assess the efficacy of discectomy in the treatment of low-back pain associated with lumbar disc herniation. Methods: Between 1998 and 2001, forty consecutive patients with

TOMOAKI TOYONE; TADASHI TANAKA; DAISUKE KATO; RYUTAKU KANEYAMA

102

Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations  

PubMed Central

The most common complication after lumbar discectomy is reherniation. As the first step in reducing the rate of recurrence, many studies have been conducted to find out the factors that may increase the reherniation risk. Some reported factors are age, sex, the type of lumbar disc herniation, the amount of fragments removed, smoking, alcohol consumption and the length of restricted activities. In this review, the factors studied thus far are summarized, excepting factors which cannot be chosen or changed, such as age or sex. Apart from the factors shown here, many other risk factors such as diabetes, family history, history of external injury, duration of illness and body mass index are considered. Few are agreed upon by all. The reason for the diverse opinions may be that many clinical and biomechanical variables are involved in the prognosis following operation. For the investigation of risk factors in recurrent lumbar disc herniation, large-scale multicenter prospective studies will be required in the future. PMID:24761206

2014-01-01

103

A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation  

PubMed Central

Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC) is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression.

Kadono, Yoshinori; Yuguchi, Takamichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

2015-01-01

104

Cervical pulmonary herniation due to blunt chest trauma.  

PubMed

Traumatic lung herniation through the superior thoracic aperture rarely occurs. In this case report we present a motor vehicle accident of a 40 year old male victim with cervical lung herniation. After an enormous blunt trauma to the chest, the disrupted and lacerated lung tissue left the thoracic cavity and was pushed into the laryngeal and oral cavity. Extrathoracic post-traumatic lung herniation through the thoracic inlet and connective tissue spaces of the neck into the oral cavity is a unique complication of blunt trauma to the chest, and the post-mortem medico-legal investigations may collect more information about this phenomenon. PMID:22000908

Töro, Klára; Halász, Judit; Marcsa, Boglárka; Biczó, Dávid; Nemeskéri, Agnes

2011-11-01

105

[Lumbar disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].  

PubMed

A lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a condition frequently encountered in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of one or more nerve roots, which can lead to a nerve root irritation, a so-called radiculopathy, with or without a sensorimotor deficit. The majority of LDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment consisting of physical therapy, ergotherapy, analgetics, anti-inflammatory therapy or corticosteroids, which may be eventually administered by infiltrations. If a clinico-radiological correlation is present and moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during four to six months, surgery is then recommended. PMID:25632633

Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

2014-12-10

106

Sacral Perineural Cyst Accompanying Disc Herniation  

PubMed Central

Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Hyeun Sung

2009-01-01

107

Migratory Intradural Disk Herniation and a Strategy for Intraoperative Localization  

PubMed Central

Study Design?Case report. Objective?Describe a case of intradural disk herniation and a method for intraoperative localization. Methods?Intradural disk herniations are uncommon but well described. The diagnosis of these lesions is often difficult, and sometimes they may be diagnosed only through an intradural exploration after an expected disk fragment cannot be located. We report the case of an intradural disk herniation with an additional diagnostic difficulty—a migrated intradural disk. Results?We present the first intraoperative imaging evidence of disk migration and propose a strategy to locate intradural disk fragments prior to durotomy. Conclusion?Intradural disk herniations should be suspected when intraoperative findings are not congruent with imaging findings. An intraoperative myelogram may be helpful. PMID:25648315

Daffner, Scott D.; Sedney, Cara L.; Rosen, Charles L.

2014-01-01

108

Thoracic Disc Herniation Presenting with Transient Anterior Spinal Artery Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Summary This report is a clinical and radiologic correlation of anterior spinal arterial distribution ischemia with a thoracic disc herniation affecting the artery of Adamkiewicz. We could only find one other similar reported case. A 38-year-old woman developed sudden onset of severe back pain and radiculopathy, followed by rapidly evolving paraparesis. The neurological examination was consistent with a deficit caused by anterior spinal artery ischemia. MRI revealed T2 signal change in the thoracolumbar spinal cord and a laterally placed, non-calcified disc herniation. Selective spinal angiography performed 30 hours after onset revealed displacement of the left T9 radicular feeding artery by the disc herniation; at this time the artery was patent. The patient experienced some resolution of symptoms within the first 24 hours and was managed conservatively and made a significant recovery within two weeks. Appropriately located thoracic disc herniations can disturb the blood supply to the thoracolumbar spinal cord. PMID:20667212

Guest, J.D.; Griesdale, D.E.; Marotta, T.

2000-01-01

109

Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous\\u000a discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results\\u000a of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN\\u000a in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of

Jian Li; Deng-lu Yan; Zai-Heng Zhang

2008-01-01

110

Percutaneous treatment of cervical and lumbar herniated disc.  

PubMed

Therapeutic armamentarium for symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation includes conservative therapy, epidural infiltrations (interlaminar or trans-foraminal), percutaneous therapeutic techniques and surgical options. Percutaneous, therapeutic techniques are imaging-guided, minimally invasive treatments for intervertebral disc herniation which can be performed as outpatient procedures. They can be classified in 4 main categories: mechanical, thermal, chemical decompression and biomaterials implantation. Strict sterility measures are a prerequisite and should include extensive local sterility and antibiotic prophylaxis. Indications include the presence of a symptomatic, small to medium sized contained intervertebral disc herniation non-responding to a 4-6 weeks course of conservative therapy. Contraindications include sequestration, infection, segmental instability (spondylolisthesis), uncorrected coagulopathy or a patient unwilling to provide informed consent. Decompression techniques are feasible and reproducible, efficient (75-94% success rate) and safe (>0.5% mean complications rate) therapies for the treatment of symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation. Percutaneous, imaging guided, intervertebral disc therapeutic techniques can be proposed either as an initial treatment or as an attractive alternative prior to surgery for the therapy of symptomatic herniation in both cervical and lumbar spine. This article will describe the mechanism of action for different therapeutic techniques applied to intervertebral discs of cervical and lumbar spine, summarize the data concerning safety and effectiveness of these treatments, and provide a rational approach for the therapy of symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation in cervical and lumbar spine. PMID:24673977

Kelekis, A; Filippiadis, D K

2015-05-01

111

Assessing the Effect of Spaceflight on the Propensity for Astronauts to Develop Disk Herniation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A previous study [1] reported the instantaneous risk of developing a Herniated Nucleus Pulosus (HNP) was higher in astronauts who had flown at least one mission, as compared with those in the corps who had not yet flown. However, the study only analyzed time to HNP after the first mission (if any) and did not account for the possible effects of multiple missions. While many HNP's occurred well into astronauts' careers or in some cases years after retirement, the higher incidence of HNPs relatively soon after completion of space missions appears to indicate that spaceflight may lead to an increased risk of HNP. The purpose of this study was to support the Human System Risk Boards assessment of back pain, assess the risk of injury due to dynamic loads, and update the dataset analyzed which contained data through December 31, 2006.

Feiveson, Alan H.; Mendez, C. M.; Somers, J. T.

2015-01-01

112

Relationship between physical work load and lumbar disc herniation.  

PubMed

Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a disabling problem. This retrospective case control study was done to evaluate the possible relevance of physical work load with Lumbar Disc Herniation. We have performed this study in the Spinal Surgery Unit of Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at BSMMU, Dhaka from July 2007 to June 2010 where 200 cases with Lumbar Disc Herniation and 200 control subjects matched by age, gender and area of residence were taken and analyzed. Chi-square test was computed for sex, area of residence, type of physical work and effort at work, whereas Odds ratio was computed for physical work load, stress at work and daily working period. The highest odds ratio (OR) was with the physical work load (OR: 03.48, CI: 01.84-06.59), hard work (OR: 03.14, CI: 01.74-05.65) and working period of >8 hours (OR: 01.34, CI: 0.75-02.38). Odds ratio for heavy load carrying at work was 03.48 and less job satisfaction or stress at work was 02.45. There was a statistically significant positive association between cumulative exposure of physical work load and lumbar disc herniation indicating an increased occurrence of herniation in heavy physical work load and occupation requiring harder efforts. PMID:23982545

Ahsan, M K; Matin, T; Ali, M I; Ali, M Y; Awwal, M A; Sakeb, N

2013-07-01

113

Treatment of a symptomatic forearm muscle herniation with a mesh graft.  

PubMed

Symptomatic muscle herniations are an unusual cause of upper extremity pain in the athlete that is rarely reported in the literature. Out of 18 reported cases of upper extremity herniations, only 3 were caused by strenuous exertion. This article describes a successful repair of a 21-year-old rock climber's ventral forearm herniation with polypropylene mesh. PMID:23016006

Sanders, Brett S; Bruce, Jeremy; Robertson, Jason

2011-03-01

114

Intraspinal Extradural Cysts Communicating with Adjacent Herniated Disks: Imaging Characteristics and Possible Pathogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: We report two cases of intraspinal extradural cysts communicating with an adjacent herniated disk that we term ''disk cysts.'' These cysts were well defined and homogeneous, and were present in the ventrolateral ex- tradural space adjacent to a lumbar herniated disk. They had rim enhancement on contrast-enhanced MR images, and communication with a herniated disk was revealed by diskography.

Kinuko Kono; Hiroaki Nakamura; Yuichi Inoue; Terue Okamura; Miyuki Shakudo; Ryusaku Yamada

115

Traumatic Intradural Lumbar Disc Herniation without Bone Injury  

PubMed Central

Intradural lumbar disc herniation is a rare disease. According to the reports of intradural lumbar disc herniations, most cases have developed as a chronic degenerative disc diseases. Traumatic intradural lumbar disc herniations are even rarer. A 52-year-old man visited our emergency center with numbness in his left calf and ankle after falling accident. Initial impression by radiologic findings was a spinal subdural hematoma at the L1 level. A follow up image two weeks later, however, did not demonstrate any interval change. The patient was decided to have an operation. In operative findings, a ruptured disc particle penetrating the ventral and dorsal dura was indentified after laminectomy. It was assumed to be a traumatic outcome not a degenerative change. PMID:24757484

Lee, Hyun-Woo

2013-01-01

116

Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Secondary to Lumbar Disc Herniation  

PubMed Central

Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is often idiopathic. We report on a patient presenting with symptomatic intracranial hypotension and pain radiating to the right leg caused by a transdural lumbar disc herniation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain revealed classic signs of intracranial hypotension, and an additional spinal MR confirmed a lumbar transdural herniated disc as the cause. The patient was treated with a partial hemilaminectomy and discectomy. We were able to find the source of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and packed it with epidural glue and gelfoam. Postoperatively, the patient's headache and log radiating pain resolved and there was no neurological deficit. Thus, in this case, lumbar disc herniation may have been a cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. PMID:20157378

Kim, Kyoung-Tae

2010-01-01

117

Back extensor muscle fatigue in patients with lumbar disc herniation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated back muscle fatigue and endurance in patients with lumbar disc herniation before and after surgery, and established the degree of association between perceived fatigue and objectively measured fatigue. Additionally, the relationships between muscle fatigue and endurance time on the one hand, and activity, participation, self-efficacy and health on the other, were investigated to clarify the grades of association

Åsa Dedering; Karin Harms-Ringdahl; Gunnar Nèmeth

2006-01-01

118

Upper Lumbar Disc Herniation Presenting as Acute Abdomen  

Microsoft Academic Search

A woman presenting with severe right lower quadrant (RLQ) abdominal pain is presented here. She was evaluated for all usual cause of such pain. Laboratory tests and abdominal and pelvic sonograp hy was normal. MRI revealed L1-L2 disc herniation.

Mahmoud Reza Khalatbari; Seyed Taha Yahyavi; Hamid Borghei

119

Lumbar Spine Disc Herniation Diagnosis with a Joint Shape Model  

E-print Network

Lumbar Spine Disc Herniation Diagnosis with a Joint Shape Model Raja S Alomari1 , Jason J Corso1 diagnosis of the DDD for lumbar spine. We design a classifier to automatically detect degenerated disc (also. Keywords: Lumbar Spine Diagnosis, MRI, Disc Degenerative Disease 1 Introduction Low Back Pain has a major

Corso, Jason J.

120

Structural Brain Alterations in Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Preliminary Study  

PubMed Central

Chronic pain is one of the most common health complaints in industrial nations. For example, chronic low back pain (cLBP) disables millions of people across the world and generates a tremendous economic burden. While previous studies provided evidence of widespread functional as well as structural brain alterations in chronic pain, little is known about cortical changes in patients suffering from lumbar disc herniation. We investigated morphometric alterations of the gray and white matter of the brain in patients suffering from LDH. The volumes of the gray and white matter of 12 LDH patients were determined in a prospective study and compared to the volumes of healthy controls to distinguish local differences. High-resolution MRI brain images of all participants were performed using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate local differences in gray and white matter volume between patients suffering from LDH and healthy controls. LDH patients showed significantly reduced gray matter volume in the right anterolateral prefrontal cortex, the right temporal lobe, the left premotor cortex, the right caudate nucleus, and the right cerebellum as compared to healthy controls. Increased gray matter volume, however, was found in the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the left precuneal cortex, the left fusiform gyrus, and the right brainstem. Additionally, small subcortical decreases of the white matter were found adjacent to the left prefrontal cortex, the right premotor cortex and in the anterior limb of the left internal capsule. We conclude that the lumbar disk herniation can lead to specific local alterations of the gray and white matter in the human brain. The investigation of LDH-induced brain alterations could provide further insight into the underlying nature of the chronification processes and could possibly identify prognostic factors that may improve the conservative as well as the operative treatment of the LDH. PMID:24595036

Luchtmann, Michael; Steinecke, Yvonne; Baecke, Sebastian; Lützkendorf, Ralf; Bernarding, Johannes; Kohl, Jana; Jöllenbeck, Boris; Tempelmann, Claus; Ragert, Patrick; Firsching, Raimund

2014-01-01

121

Childhood intervertebral disc calcification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two cases of intervertebral disc calcification in children are reported. A 13-year-old boy presented with right subscapular pain radiating into the axilla with radiographic demonstration of multiple calcified intervertebral discs and a herniated fragment of calcified nucleus pulposus at T2–3. His condition improved with conservative therapy, and follow-up radiographic evaluation revealed resolution of the herniated calcified disc material. A second

B. Theo Mellion; John P. Laurent; William C. Watters

1993-01-01

122

Intercostal lung herniation--the role of imaging.  

PubMed

Extrathoracic lung hernias can be congenital or acquired. Acquired hernias may be classified by etiology into traumatic, spontaneous, and pathologic. We present a case of a 40-year-old male with a history of bronchial asthma and a blunt chest trauma who presented complaining of sharp chest pain of acute onset that began after five consecutive days of vigorous coughing. Upon physical examination a well-demarcated deformity overlying the third intercostal space of the left upper anterior hemithorax was revealed. Thoracic CT scan showed that a portion of the anterior bronchopulmonary segment of the left upper lobe had herniated through a chest wall defect. The role of imaging, especially chest computed tomography with multiplanar image reconstructions and maximum (MIP) and minimum intensity projection (MinIP) reformats can clearly confirm the presence of the herniated lung, the hernial sac, the hernial orifice in the chest wall, and exclude possible complications such as lung tissue strangulation. PMID:24967031

Detorakis, Efstathios E; Androulidakis, Emmanuel

2014-04-01

123

Herniation of a pulmonary emphysematous bulla to contralateral hemithorax.  

PubMed

Herniation of an emphysematous bulla is extremely rare. A 55-year-old male patient presented with complains of shortness of breath and cough for the last 10 years which had exacerbated in the last two days. The patient was a diagnosed case of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chest x-ray showed bilateral hyperinflated lung fields along with loss of lung markings in left upper lobe and a thin white line in right upper lobe suggestive of wall of bulla. High resolution computed tomography of the chest revealed anterior herniation of a pulmonary bulla from left to right side across midline. Patient was put on antibiotics, hydrocortisone and aminophylline by intravenous route and nebulization of steroid and bronchodilator. However, the patient expired after 5 days following admission. PMID:25191377

Akhtar, Jamal; Shameem, Mohammad; Baneen, Ummul; Khan, Nafees Ahmad; Siddiqui, Mohammed Azfar

2011-01-01

124

Herniation of a Pulmonary Emphysematous Bulla to Contralateral Hemithorax  

PubMed Central

Herniation of an emphysematous bulla is extremely rare. A 55-year-old male patient presented with complains of shortness of breath and cough for the last 10 years which had exacerbated in the last two days. The patient was a diagnosed case of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chest x-ray showed bilateral hyperinflated lung fields along with loss of lung markings in left upper lobe and a thin white line in right upper lobe suggestive of wall of bulla. High resolution computed tomography of the chest revealed anterior herniation of a pulmonary bulla from left to right side across midline. Patient was put on antibiotics, hydrocortisone and aminophylline by intravenous route and nebulization of steroid and bronchodilator. However, the patient expired after 5 days following admission. PMID:25191377

Shameem, Mohammad; Baneen, Ummul; Khan, Nafees Ahmad; Siddiqui, Mohammed Azfar

2011-01-01

125

Standards of Practice: Quality Assurance Guidelines for Percutaneous Treatments of Intervertebral Discs  

SciTech Connect

Percutaneous treatments are used in the therapy of small- to medium-sized hernias of intervertebral discs to reduce the intradiscal pressure in the nucleus and theoretically create space for the herniated fragment to implode inward, thus reducing pain and improving mobility and quality of life. These techniques involve the percutaneous removal of the nucleus pulposus by using a variety of chemical, thermal, or mechanical techniques and consist of removal of all or part of nucleus pulposus to induce more rapid healing of the abnormal lumbar disc. These guidelines are written to be used in quality improvement programs for assessing fluoroscopy- and/or computed tomography-guided percutaneous intervertebral disc ablative techniques.

Kelekis, Alexis D., E-mail: akelekis@med.uoa.gr; Filippiadis, Dimitris K., E-mail: dfilippiadis@yahoo.g [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department (Greece); Martin, Jean-Baptiste, E-mail: jbmartin@cird.c [Geneva University Hospital, Service d'Imagerie Medicale (Switzerland); Brountzos, Elias, E-mail: ebrountz@med.uoa.g [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department (Greece)

2010-10-15

126

Brain herniations into the dural venous sinuses or calvarium: MRI of a recently recognized entity.  

PubMed

Brain herniations into dural venous sinuses (DVS) are rare findings recently described and their etiology and clinical significance are controversial. We describe five patients with brain herniations into the DVS or calvarium identified on MRI, and discuss their imaging findings, possible causes, and relationship to the patient's symptoms. All patients were examined with MRI including high resolution pre- and post-contrast T1- and T2-weighted sequences. With respect to brain herniations we documented their locations, signal intensities in different sequences, and size. We then reviewed clinical records in an attempt to establish if any symptoms were related to the presence of these herniations. Three males and two females were examined (age range, 11-68 years). Three patients had unilateral temporal lobe herniations into transverse sinuses, one had a cerebellar herniation into the skull, and one had bilateral temporal lobe herniations into the transverse sinuses as well as a cerebellar herniation into the sigmoid sinus. In all, the herniated brain and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had normal signal intensity on all MRI sequences. When correlated with clinical symptoms, brain herniations were thought to be incidental and asymptomatic in three patients and two patients had histories of headaches. Brain herniations with surrounding CSF into the DVS/skull should be considered potential sources of filling defects in the DVS. We believe that they are probably incidental findings that may be more common than previously recognized and should be not confused with the more common arachnoid granulations, clots, or tumors. Two patients had headaches, but their relation to the presence of herniated brain was uncertain. PMID:24571834

Battal, Bilal; Castillo, Mauricio

2014-02-01

127

Herniation of the spinal cord 38 years after childhood trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report an unusual post-traumatic spinal cord herniation, which became symptomatic 38 years after the trauma. A 44-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of increasing impotence, neuropathic bladder dysfunction and dissociated sensory loss below the level of T6. At the age of 6 years he had a severe blunt spinal injury with transient paraparesis. MRI revealed right lateral and

H. Urbach; B. Kaden; U. Pechstein; L. Solymosi

1996-01-01

128

Brown-Sequard syndrome revealing intradural thoracic disc herniation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brown-Sequard syndrome (BSS) is a rare form of severe myelopathy characterised by a clinical picture reflecting hemisection\\u000a of the spinal cord. This syndrome is mostly due to a penetrating injury to the spine but many other non-traumatic causes have\\u000a been described. Intradural thoracic disc herniation (TDH) is one of the rare aetiologies of this syndrome. Despite progress\\u000a in imaging techniques,

S. Diabira; P.-L. Henaux; L. Riffaud; A. Hamlat; G. Brassier; X. Morandi

2011-01-01

129

The Far Lateral Approach to Lumbar Disc Herniations  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The diagnosis of extreme lateral lumbar disc herniation (ELLDH) as a cause of lumbar radiculopathy was first described by\\u000a Abdullah in 1974 [1]. This discal pathology has been recognized for many years as an occasional cause of negative disc exploration and immediate\\u000a failure of classical disc surgery in sciatica [1,18, 24, 25, 29, 31, 30, 31, 33, 35, 41]. Only

F. Porchet; H. Fankhauser; N. DE TRIBOLET

130

Herniated Thoracic Discs Mimic Cardiac Disease: Three Case Reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  ?The authors report three patients (two males and one female) with herniated thoracic discs whose symptoms mimicked cardiac\\u000a disease (severe intense stabbing pain beginning in the back and radiating to the lateral wall of the chest). They were evaluated\\u000a for cardiac disease and angina, but the workup of the heart was negative. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography\\u000a myelography revealed

M. A. Eleraky; P. J. Apostolides; C. A. Dickman; V. K. H. Sonntag

1998-01-01

131

High degree of kinesiophobia after lumbar disc herniation surgery  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose Several studies have investigated outcomes after disc surgery. However, the occurrence of kinesiophobia has not been investigated previously in patients after disc herniation surgery. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated kinesiophobia in patients who had been treated surgically for lumbar disc herniation, and we related the results to established outcome measures. Patients and methods 10–34 months after surgery, questionnaires were sent to 97 patients who had undergone standardized open discectomy. Outcome measures included Tampa scale for kinesiophobia (TSK); Oswestry disability index (ODI); European quality of life in 5 dimensions (EQ-5D); visual analog scale (VAS) for leg and back pain, work disability, and patient satisfaction; Zung self-rating depression scale (ZDS); pain catastrophizing scale (PCS); and a self-efficacy scale (SES). Results 36 of 80 patients reported having kinesiophobia. There were statistically significant differences in ODI, EQ-5D, VAS leg and back pain, ZDS, PCS, and SES between patients with and without kinesiophobia. Interpretation Half of the patients suffered from kinesiophobia 10–34 months after surgery for disc herniation. These patients were more disabled, had more pain, more catastrophizing thoughts, more symptoms of depression, lower self-efficacy, and poorer health-related quality of life than patients without kinesiophobia. PMID:22066555

2011-01-01

132

Cervical lung lobe herniation in dogs identified by fluoroscopy  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to determine the frequency of cervical lung lobe herniation (CLLH) in dogs evaluated fluoroscopically and to identify associated characteristics. Reports of diagnostic procedures and patient summaries from 2008 to 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Signalment, body weight, duration of cough, presence of heart murmur and airway collapse, and radiographic findings were compared between dogs with and without CLLH. Of the 121 dogs that were examined, CLLH occurred in 85 (70%). The extra-thoracic trachea kinked during herniation in 33 (39%) dogs with CLLH. Collapse of the intra-thoracic trachea (assessed fluoroscopically or bronchoscopically) and collapse of major bronchi (assessed fluoroscopically) were strongly associated with CLLH. Although redundant dorsal tracheal membrane on radiographs was associated with CLLH, extra-thoracic tracheal collapse, assessed fluoroscopically or bronchoscopically, was not. No other associations were found. Cervical lung lobe herniation was present in most dogs evaluated during cough and was associated with intra-thoracic large airway collapse, but not duration of cough. PMID:24155415

Nafe, Laura A.; Robertson, Ian D.; Hawkins, Eleanor C.

2013-01-01

133

Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Identify Outcome Predictors of Caudal Epidural Steroid Injections for Lower Lumbar Radicular Pain Caused by a Herniated Disc  

PubMed Central

Objective We used lumbar magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings to determine possible outcome predictors of a caudal epidural steroid injection (CESI) for radicular pain caused by a herniated lumbar disc (HLD). Methods Ninety-one patients with radicular pain whose MRI indicated a HLD were enrolled between September 2010 and July 2013. The CESIs were performed using ultrasound (US). A responder was defined as having complete relief or at least a 50% reduction of pain as assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS) and functional status on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ); responder (VAS n=61, RMDQ n=51), and non-responder (VAS n=30, RMDQ n=40). MRI findings were analyzed and compared between the two groups with regard to HLD level, HLD type (protrusion or exclusion), HLD zone (central, subarticular, foraminal, and extraforaminal), HLD volume (mild, moderate, or severe), relationship between HLD and nerve root (no contact, contact, displaced, or compressed), disc height loss (none, less than half, or more than half ), and disc degeneration grade (homogeneous disc structure or inhomogeneous disc structure-clear nucleus and height of intervertebral disc). Results A centrally located herniated disc was more common in the responder group than that in the non-responder group. Treatment of centrally located herniated discs showed satisfactory results. (VAS p=0.025, RMDQ p=0.040). Other factors, such as HLD level, HLD type, HLD volume, relationship to nerve root, disc height loss, and disc degeneration grade, were not critical. Conclusion The HLD zone was significant for pain reduction after CESI. A centrally located herniated disc was a predictor of a good clinical outcome. PMID:25566478

Cha, Sung Oh; Jang, Chul Hoon; Hong, Jin Oh; Park, Joon Sang

2014-01-01

134

Intermittent cervical traction for cervical radiculopathy caused by large-volume herniated disks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the use of intermittent cervical traction in managing 4 patients with cervical radiculopathy and large-volume herniated disks. Clinical Features: Four patients had neck pain radiating to the arm. The clinical examination was typical in all cases for radiculopathy of cervical origin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine revealed large-volume herniated disks in all patients. Intervention

Constantine Constantoyannis; Demetres Konstantinou; Harry Kourtopoulos; Nicolas Papadakis

2002-01-01

135

Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care clinicians use patient history and physical examination to evaluate the likelihood of disc herniation and select patients

D. A. W. M. van der Windt; E. Simons; I. I. Riphagen; C. Ammendolia; A. P. Verhangen; M. Laslett; W. Devillé; R. A. Deyo; L. M. Bouter; H. C. W. de Vet; B. Aertgeerts

2010-01-01

136

Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care clinicians use patient history and physical examination to evaluate the likelihood of disc herniation and select patients

Windt van der D. A. W. M; E. Simons; I. I. Riphagen; C. Ammendolia; A. P. Verhagen; M. Laslett; W. Devillé; R. A. Deyo; L. M. Bouter; Vet de H. C. W; B. Aertgeerts

2010-01-01

137

Uncal herniation in a fully conscious patient-The sliding uncus syndrome.  

PubMed

Uncal herniation is accompanied by a decreased level of consciousness. We describe a patient who remained fully alert despite the uncal herniation. The computed tomography (CT) scans allowed us to visualize the uncus and its spatial relation to the cerebral peduncle. We describe the sliding uncus syndrome. PMID:25375327

Katzir, Miki; Attia, Moshe; Sviri, Gill E; Zaaroor, Menashe

2015-04-01

138

Composite Features for Automatic Diagnosis of Intervertebral Disc Herniation from Lumbar MRI  

E-print Network

of the spinal column that provide body flexi- bility. Discs in the lumbar spine (lower-back) are composed% of herniation occurs in the lumbar and lumbosacral regions of the spine [2]; hence we are motivated to developComposite Features for Automatic Diagnosis of Intervertebral Disc Herniation from Lumbar MRI

Chaudhary, Vipin

139

Incarcerated tubal herniation, an unusual complication of operative laparoscopy and an odd cause of pelvic pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tubal herniation after laparoscopic surgery to relieve pelvic pain and adhesions was associated with long-term, chronic pelvic pain in the left lower quadrant. Laparoscopy was performed to diagnose and reduce the herniation. Review of the literature revealed no previous report of this complication.

Donald L. Chatman

2000-01-01

140

Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation  

PubMed Central

Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors’ clinic and treated by PCN. The patients’ gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 ± 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3–4, 30 cases at C4–5, 40 cases at C5–6, and 35 cases at C6–7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) ?11° or horizontal displacement (HD) ?3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P < 0.01). There were no cases of instability following the PCN procedure. There was no significant difference in stability either preoperatively or postoperatively (P > 0.05). Our findings confirm that PCN for the treatment of cervical disc herniation results in a good outcome without any tampering of the stability of the cervical spine. Hence, PCN as a procedure is safe, minimally invasive, less traumatic, requiring less time with an excellent clinical outcome. PCN should be performed for those patients who fail conservative medical management including medication, physical therapy, behavioral management, psychotherapy, and who are unwilling to undergo a more invasive technique such as spinal surgery. PMID:18830638

Li, Jian; Zhang, Zai-Heng

2008-01-01

141

Plasma disc decompression for contained cervical disc herniation: a randomized, controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Prospective case series studies have shown that plasma disc decompression (PDD) using the COBLATION SpineWand device (ArthroCare Corporation, Austin, TX) is effective for decompressing the disc nucleus in symptomatic contained cervical disc herniations. This prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of percutaneous PDD as compared to conservative care (CC) through 1 year. Patients (n = 115) had neck/arm pain >50 on the visual analog scale (VAS) pain scale and had failed at least 30 days of failed CC. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either PDD (n = 62) or CC (n = 58). Clinical outcome was determined by VAS pain score, neck disability index (NDI) score, and SF-36 health survey, collected at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. The PDD group had significantly lower VAS pain scores at all follow-up time points (PDD vs. CC: 6 weeks, ?46.87 ± 2.71 vs. ?15.26 ± 1.97; 3 months, ?53.16 ± 2.74 vs. ?30.45 ± 2.59; 6 months, ?56.22 ± 2.63 vs. ?40.26 ± 2.56; 1 year, ?65.73 ± 2.24 vs. ?36.45 ± 2.86; GEE, P < 0.0001). PDD patients also had significant NDI score improvement over baseline when compared to CC patients at the 6 weeks (PDD vs. CC: ?9.15 ± 1.06 vs. ?4.61 ± 0.53, P < 0.0001) and 1 year (PDD vs. CC: ?16.70 ± 0.29 vs. ?12.40 ± 1.26, P = 0.005) follow-ups. PDD patients showed statistically significant improvement over baseline in SF-36 physical component summary scores when compared to CC patients at 6 weeks and 1 year (PDD vs. CC: 8.86 + 8.04 vs. 4.24 ± 3.79, P = 0.0004; 17.64 ± 10.37 vs. 10.50 ± 10.6, P = 0.0003, respectively). In patients who had neck/arm pain due to a contained cervical disc herniation, PDD was associated with significantly better clinical outcomes than a CC regimen. At 1 year, CC patients appeared to suffer a “relapse, showing signs of decline in most measurements, whereas PDD patients showed continued stable improvement. PMID:19902277

Nardi, Pier Vittorio

2009-01-01

142

Adolescent lumbar disc herniation in a Tae Kwon Do martial artist: a case report  

PubMed Central

Lumbar disc herniations are rare in children. The etiology and clinical picture may be different in children than in adults. Conservative management is the treatment of choice. Tae Kwon Do is a Korean martial art which is notorious for its high fast kicks. Tae Kwon Do will be an official Olympic sport in the year 2000. Low back pain is occasionally reported by Tae Kwon Do athletes but there are no reported cases in the literature on disc herniation in a Tae Kwon Do athlete. A case report is presented to illustrate clinical presentation, diagnosis, radiological assessment and conservative management of lumbar disc herniation in children. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

Kazemi, Mohsen

1999-01-01

143

Herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus: an accidental finding on magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrum  

PubMed Central

Idiopathic herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus into the ambient cistern is a very rare entity, which could be mistaken for other pathology such as tumor. To the best of our knowledge, two prior cases of this kind of herniation have been described. One of these cases was with associated symptomatology and other abnormalities, and the other was characterized as idiopathic. In this case report, we report a case of accidental finding of a herniation of uncus and parahippocampal gyrus into the ambient cistern, without any other accompanying abnormalities, well depicted by magnetic resonance imaging without further necessity for surgical brain intervention. PMID:25610616

Bayat, Michael; Brøndum Frøkjær, Jens

2015-01-01

144

Traumatic Acute Brain Herniation through the Ear in a Child  

PubMed Central

A seven-year-old girl presented to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman, with a history of having been hit by a motor vehicle. After this, she had right-sided cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and a week later, brain matter extruded through the right ear. A computed tomography scan of the brain demonstrated a tegmen fracture communicating with the external auditory canal. There was no hearing or facial nerve impairment and an otoscopic examination showed an intact tympanic membrane. She underwent a transcranial repair of the middle cranial fossa base, which revealed a wide dural and bony defect of the tegmen with herniation of the temporal lobe. Repair was made with an intradural patch of artificial dura. The rarity of this type of presentation of temporal bone fracture and its management are discussed. PMID:22912929

Kariyattil, Rajeev; Muthukuttiparambil, Unnikrishnan

2012-01-01

145

Repeated microendoscopic discectomy for recurrent lumbar disk herniation  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To explore the microendoscopic discectomy technique and inclusion criteria for the treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation and to supply feasible criteria and technical notes to avoid complications and to increase the therapeutic effect. METHODS: A consecutive series of 25 patients who underwent posterior microendoscopic discectomy for recurrent lumbar disc herniation were included. The inclusion criteria were as follows: no severe pain in the lumbar region, no lumbar instability observed by flexion-extension radiography and no intervertebral discitis or endplate damage observed by magnetic resonance imaging. All patients were diagnosed by clinical manifestations and imaging examinations. RESULTS: Follow-up visits were carried out in all cases. Complications, such as nerve injuries, were not observed. The follow-up outcomes were graded using the MacNab criteria. A grade of excellent was given to 12 patients, good to 12 patients and fair to 1 patient. A grade of excellent or good occurred in 96% of cases. One patient relapsed 3 months after surgery and then underwent lumbar interbody fusion and inner fixation. The numerical rating scale of preoperative leg pain was 7.4± 1.5, whereas it decreased to 2.1±0.8 at 7 days after surgery. The preoperative Oswestry disability index of lumbar function was 57.5±10.0, whereas it was 26.0±8.5 at 7 days after surgery. CONCLUSION: In these cases, microendoscopic discectomy was able to achieve satisfactory clinical results. Furthermore, it has advantages over other methods because of its smaller incision, reduced bleeding and more efficient recovery. PMID:25789521

Hou, Tianyong; Zhou, Qiang; Dai, Fei; Luo, Fei; He, Qingyi; Zhang, Jinsong; Xu, Jianzhong

2015-01-01

146

Lumbar disc herniation with contralateral radiculopathy: do we neglect the epidural fat?  

PubMed

Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is the most common cause of radiculopathy, whose pathological entity underlying nerve root compression is usually on the same side as the symptoms. However, LDH causing contralateral radiculopathy are sometimes encountered by pain physicians. There have been tremendous developmens in the treatment options for LDH; the situation of LDH causing contralateral radiculopathy is indeed a dilemma for some pain physicians. We will report a case of a patient with a L4-5 disc herniation whose left herniated disc caused radiculopathy on the right side. After a percutaneous lumbar endoscopic discectomy via the side ipsilateral to the symptomatic side, this case obtained a significant symptom remission. The migrated epidural fat is discussed as a cause of associated contralateral neurological deficit. Only via a surgical approach ipsilateral to the herniated side, could there be a clinical improvement postoperatively. PMID:25794228

Yang, Jun-Song; Zhang, Dong-Jie; Hao, Ding-Jun

2015-01-01

147

A Case of Spontaneous Temporomandibular Joint Herniation into the External Auditory Canal with Clicking Sound  

PubMed Central

A bony defect of the external auditory canal (EAC) and herniation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be caused by tumorous conditions, inflammation, trauma, and otologic procedures. Spontaneous TMJ herniation into the EAC can be caused by a congenital bony defect known as patent Huschke's foramen, which is a very rare condition. In our case, an objective clicking sound was produced when the patient opened his mouth. A protruding mass was found in the anterior wall of the EAC during mouth closing, and herniation of the TMJ was confirmed with computed tomography. Therefore, we thought the clicking sound of our case could have resulted from spontaneous TMJ herniation through the patent foramen of Huschke. PMID:24653913

Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Sun Kyu; Kim, Su Jin

2013-01-01

148

Intrathoracic omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus in a young patient.  

PubMed

We herein present a case of intrathoracic omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus in a young patient. A 21-year-old obese man was asymptomatic, and his chest X-ray demonstrated a large, sharply defined mass. A computed tomography scan of the thorax indicated a large retrocardial mediastinal mass in which the density indicated the presence of fatty tissue judging from the Hounsfield unit range. A thoracotomy was performed under a diagnosis of either mediastinal lipoma or liposarcoma with an encapsulated fatty mass, measuring 17 x 12 x 8 cm in size. The mass, however, proved to be an omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus. It is generally assumed that the major contributing factors leading an individual to develop an omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus include aging and obesity. This is the first report of omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus in a patient still in his twenties. PMID:16164260

Maruyama, Riichiroh; Miyamoto, Tetsuya; Shoji, Fumihiro; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Miyake, Tetsuro; Ichinose, Yukito

2005-08-01

149

A unique perineal herniation of large bladder diverticulum: successful surgical repair through posterior sagittal approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a case of symptomatic perineal herniation of a massive posterior bladder diverticulum following abdominoperineal resection in a 75-year-old man with Crohn's disease and renal failure. Presentation, evaluation, and management issues are discussed.

Michael Gong; Muta M. Issa

1996-01-01

150

Lumbar Disc Herniations 'To Operate or Not' Patient Selection and Timing of Surgery  

PubMed Central

At times lumbar disc herniations present a quandary to the spine surgeon in regards to the most appropriate intervention and a need to optimize medical and surgical therapies. We discuss a case of ours and our experience in treating this common spinal pathology, along with a commentary on the article published by Kim et al. entitled 'Spontaneous regression of extruded lumbar disc herniation: three cases report in Korean J Spine. 2013 Jun;10(2):78-81.' PMID:25620990

Kamian, Kambiz

2014-01-01

151

Surgery versus conservative management of sciatica due to a lumbar herniated disc: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of surgery in patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniations is not without dispute. The goal of\\u000a this study was to assess the effects of surgery versus conservative therapy (including epidural injections) for patients with\\u000a sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation. A comprehensive search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and PEDro\\u000a up to October 2009.

Wilco C. H. JacobsMaurits; Maurits van Tulder; Mark Arts; Sidney M. Rubinstein; Marienke van Middelkoop; Raymond Ostelo; Arianne Verhagen; Bart Koes; Wilco C. Peul

2011-01-01

152

Simultaneous occurrence of herniated disc and mesothelial cyst in a 16-year-old male  

Microsoft Academic Search

The unusual, simultaneous occurrence of both a herniated disc and an intraspinal mesothelial cyst in an adolescent is reported. The patient was a 16-year-old white male who presented with sciatic pain in his left lower extremity. Myelography revealed evidence of a left L4–5 discal herniation, and a L5–S3 midline sacral lesion that proved to be a mesothelial cyst.

Nancy E. Epstein; Joseph A. Epstein; Robert Gould; Roger Hyman

1986-01-01

153

Transmastoid approach to repair meningoencephalic herniation in the middle ear.  

PubMed

Meningoencephalic herniation (MEH) in the middle ear and mastoid is a rare pathological entity with possible life-threatening complications. We treated 24 patients with a trans-mastoid approach, and the bony defect was closed by heterologous materials positioned in a multilayer fashion. The cause of the bony defect were chronic otitis media with cholesteatoma, iatrogenic, spontaneous and post-traumatic. The major presenting symptoms were meningitis, headache, conductive hearing loss, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leak), neurologic deficit and pneumoencephalus, and stenosis of a canal wall down cavity. During follow-up, no patient developed complications due to surgery or related to the pathology, and imaging showed a stable occlusion of the bony defect. Different surgical treatments have been proposed to repair MEH, and the choice is based on the localization and size of the bony defect, preoperative auditory function and the presence of a coexisting pathology. We propose the use of collagenous membranes and bone substitutes for reconstruction of the floor of the middle fossa. PMID:23853399

Sergi, B; Passali, G C; Picciotti, P M; De Corso, E; Paludetti, G

2013-04-01

154

Intrathoracic omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus: report of a case.  

PubMed

We report herein an extremely rare case of intrathoracic omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus. In fact, according to our review of the literature, only eight other cases have been reported, most of which were misdiagnosed as mediastinal lipoma after being identified as an intrathoracic mass. We report herein the ninth case of intrathoracic omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus. A 54-year-old obese woman was admitted to our hospital for investigation of a chest roentgenographic abnormality. She was asymptomatic, and her physical examination and laboratory data were all within normal limits. Her chest X-ray demonstrated a large, sharply-defined mass, and a computed tomography scan of the thorax indicated a large mediastinal mass with fat density. A thoracotomy was performed under the diagnosis of a mediastinal lipoma which revealed an encapsulated fatty mass, 10x7.5x6 cm in size, that proved to be an omental herniation through the esophageal hiatus. There was no herniation of the stomach or intestines into the thorax. The esophageal hiatus was repaired after the omental mass and hernia sac had been resected. This case report serves to demonstrate that whenever a mass of fat density is recognized in the lower thorax, an omental herniation should be borne in mind as a possible differential diagnosis. PMID:10211566

Kato, N; Iwasaki, H; Rino, Y; Imada, T; Amano, T; Kondo, J

1999-01-01

155

Effect of ligamenta flava hypertrophy on lumbar disc herniation with contralateral symptoms and signs: a clinical and morphometric study  

PubMed Central

Introduction The purpose of this study was to determine whether ligamentum flavum hypertrophy among disc herniated patients causes contralateral pain symptoms. For this reason we measured the thickness of the ligament in disc herniated patients with ipsilateral or contralateral symptoms. Material and methods Two hundred disc herniated patients with ipsilateral symptoms as group I were compared with five disc herniated patients with only contralateral symptoms as group II. Ligamenta flava thicknesses and spinal canal diameters of both groups were measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a micro-caliper. Results Both groups underwent surgery only on the disc herniated side. The total thicknesses of the ligamenta flava in group II was thicker than in group I. There was no spinal stenosis in either group and no significance difference between the groups. Statistically significant differences were found for both ipsilateral and contralateral thickness of the ligament flava in both groups. We also compared thickness of the ligamenta flava for each level of disc herniation in group I; ligamenta flava hypertrophy was more common at L3-L4 and L4-L5 levels of vertebrae in females. Conclusions Aetiology of contralateral sciatica among disc herniated patients may be related to hypertrophy of the ligamenta flava, especially on the opposite side. Surgical approaches of the disc herniated side alone may be sufficient for a good outcome. PMID:22371809

Yildizhan, Ahmet; Atar, Elmas K.; Yaycioglu, Soner; Gocmen-Mas, Nuket; Yazici, Canan

2010-01-01

156

[A case of thoracic disc herniation with sudden onset paraplegia on toilet straining: case report].  

PubMed

Thoracic disc herniation is less common rather than cervical or lumbar herniation. Cases of sudden onset without trauma are especially rare. Generally, the neurological onset of disc herniation is caused by mechanical cord compression due to a protruded disc, and its onset is usually gradual. Ischemia is also considered as a factor of neurological onset. We report a case of a 78-year-old male with sudden paraplegia while straining at the toilet. T2 weighted MR image on admission showed mild disc protrusion at the level of Th8-9 and intramedullary high signal intensity below the Th8-9 level. We speculate that Valsalva-like maneuver had led to the congestion of vertebral venous plexus or compression of the anterior spinal artery, and spinal ischemia occurred. PMID:14719443

Yano, Shunsuke; Hida, Kazutoshi; Seki, Toshitaka; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Saitou, Hisatoshi

2003-12-01

157

Spontaneous Remission of a Big Subligamentous Extruded Disc Herniation: Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Spontaneous Regression of a Big Subligamentous Extruded Disc Herniation: Case Report And Review of The Literature The most efficient method for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation is still controversial. The most important aspect is the application of the suitable conservative or surgical treatment to the right patient at the right time. In lumbar disc herniation patients, one must not precipitate except for cases that require surgical indications as in cauda equina syndrome, evolutive motor deficit and persistence of pain in spite of the narcotics. However, the spontaneous regression mechanism has not been completely determined yet. The proposed hypotheses are; dehydration, retraction of the disc to the hernia in the annulus fibrosis, enzymatic catabolism and phagocytosis. In this study, the case of a patient with huge lumbar disc hernia regressing by itself has been presented and the potential mechanisms of disc regression have been discussed.

?brahimo?lu, Muhammet

2015-01-01

158

A ventral incisional hernia with herniation of the left hepatic lobe and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Ventral incisional hernias with hepatic herniation are extremely rare. Only six cases have been reported so far in the literature. We report a case of a ventral incisional hernia with hepatic herniation along with a review of the literature. A 70-year-old female patient with a history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery 6?months earlier, was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of epigastric swelling and discomfort for 3?months. On examination, she had a mild tender 5?cm×5?cm epigastric lump and was diagnosed as ventral incisional hernia. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen revealed a ventral hernia with herniation of omentum and left hepatic lobe. The patient underwent onlay mesh repair and is asymptomatic at 1-month follow-up. There is a need for evaluation of risk factors for this type of ventral incisional hernia and to recognise it as a special entity. PMID:25631758

Neelamraju Lakshmi, Harish; Saini, Devendra; Om, Prabha; Bagree, Rajendra

2015-01-01

159

Five and Ten Year Follow-up on Intradiscal Ozone Injection for Disc Herniation  

PubMed Central

Background Disc herniation is the most common cause for spinal surgery and many clinicians employ epidural steroid injections with limited success. Intradiscal injection of ozone gas has been used as an alternative to epidural steroids and surgical discectomy. Early results are positive but long-term data are limited. Methods One hundred and eight patients with confirmed contiguous disc herniation were treated with intradiscal injection of ozone in 2002-2003. One-hundred seven patients were available for telephone follow-up at 5 years. Sixty patients were available for a similar telephone follow-up at ten years. Patients were asked to describe their clinical outcome since the injection. Surgical events were documented. MRI images were reviewed to assess the reduction in disc herniation at six months. Results MRI films demonstrated a consistent reduction in the size of the disc herniation. Seventy-nine percent of patients had a reduction in herniation volume and the average reduction was 56%. There were 19 patients that ultimately had surgery and 12 of them occurred in the first six months after injection. One of these 12 was due to surgery at another level. Two surgeries involved an interspinous spacer indicated by stenosis or DDD. All other surgeries were discectomies. Of the patients that avoided surgery 82% were improved at 5 years and 88% were improved at 10 years. Other than subsequent surgeries, no spine-related complications were experienced. Conclusions/Level of Evidence We conclude that ozone is safe and effective in approximately 75% of patients with disc herniation and the benefit is maintained through ten years. This is a retrospective review and randomized trials are needed. Clinical Relevance Intradiscal ozone injection may enable patients to address their pain without multiple epidural injections and surgery. The benefit of ozone is durable and does not preclude future surgical options. The risk reward profile for this treatment is favorable. PMID:25694935

Buric, Josip; Rigobello, Luca; Hooper, David

2014-01-01

160

Complications of fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar epidural injections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Botwin KP, Gruber RD, Bouchlas CG, Torres-Ramos FM, Freeman TL, Slaten WK. Complications of fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar epidural injections. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2000;81:1045-50. Objectives: To assess the incidence of complications of fluoroscopically guided lumbar transforaminal epidural injections. Design: A retrospective cohort design study. Patients presenting with radiculopathy, caused by either lumbar spinal stenosis or herniated nucleus pulposus confirmed

Kenneth P. Botwin; Robert D. Gruber; Constantine G. Bouchlas; Francisco M. Torres-Ramos; Ted L. Freeman; Warren K. Slaten

2000-01-01

161

Lumbar intraspinal extradural ganglion cyst  

PubMed Central

A case is presented of an intraspinal extradural ganglion cyst at the L4–5 level. The clinical picture suggested a herniated nucleus pulposus at this level. A myelogram revealed a round lesion almost completely obstructing the flow of Pantopaque at the L4–5 level. A ganglion cyst with a haemorrhage into it and the surrounding tissue was removed, and surgery was followed by complete recovery. Images PMID:4647850

Brish, Adam; Payan, Hushong M.

1972-01-01

162

Diagnosis of disc herniation based on classifiers and features generated from spine MR images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years the demand for an automated method for diagnosis of disc abnormalities has grown as more patients suffer from lumbar disorders and radiologists have to treat more patients reliably in a limited amount of time. In this paper, we propose and compare several classifiers that diagnose disc herniation, one of the common problems of the lumbar spine, based on lumbar MR images. Experimental results on a limited data set of 68 clinical cases with 340 lumbar discs show that our classifiers can diagnose disc herniation with 97% accuracy.

Koh, Jaehan; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

2010-03-01

163

Endoscopic transforaminal thoracic foraminotomy and discectomy for the treatment of thoracic disc herniation.  

PubMed

Thoracic disc herniation is a relatively rare yet challenging-to-diagnose condition. Currently there is no universally accepted optimal surgical treatment for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation. Previously reported surgical approaches are often associated with high complication rates. Here we describe our minimally invasive technique of removing thoracic disc herniation, and report the primary results of a series of cases. Between January 2009 and March 2012, 13 patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniation were treated with endoscopic thoracic foraminotomy and discectomy under local anesthesia. A bone shaver was used to undercut the facet and rib head for foraminotomy. Discectomy was achieved by using grasper, radiofrequency, and the Holmium-YAG laser. We analyzed the clinical outcomes of the patients using the visual analogue scale (VAS), MacNab classification, and Oswestry disability index (ODI). At the final follow up (mean: 17 months; range: 6-41 months), patient self-reported satisfactory rate was 76.9%. The mean VAS for mid back pain was improved from 9.1 to 4.2, and the mean ODI was improved from 61.0 to 43.8. One complication of postoperative spinal headache occurred during the surgery and the patient was successfully treated with epidural blood patch. No other complications were observed or reported during and after the surgery. PMID:24455232

Nie, Hong-Fei; Liu, Kai-Xuan

2013-01-01

164

Abnormal anatomy of inferior orbital fissure and herniation of buccal fat pad.  

PubMed

The anatomy of the inferior orbital fissure has been well studied, and its reported dimensions vary little. It is encountered during exploration of the orbital floor and when possible is not disturbed. We describe a case of herniation of buccal fat through the inferior orbital fissure that was found during exploration and repair of the orbital floor. PMID:25451070

Aldridge, T; Thomson, A; Ilankovan, V

2015-01-01

165

Six cases of inguinal urinary bladder herniation in entire male domestic rabbits.  

PubMed

Six entire male rabbits, between four and eight years old, were presented with a fluctuant scrotal and/or inguinal swelling resulting from inguinal herniation of the urinary bladder. Concurrent problems included urinary sediment (two rabbits), multiple uroliths (one rabbit) and testicular tumour (one rabbit). All rabbits underwent herniorrhaphy surgery. There was a successful outcome in four of the six cases. PMID:23909767

Thas, I; Harcourt-Brown, F

2013-12-01

166

Does Duration of Preoperative Sciatica Impact Surgical Outcomes in Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation?  

PubMed Central

Background. In lumbar disc herniation, most authors recommend nonoperative treatment for the first few weeks of presentation, but what about the upper limit of this golden period? The aim of this study is to assess the effect of preoperative sciatica duration on surgical outcome of lumbar disc herniation. Methods. We retrospectively evaluated 240 patients (124 males and 116 females) with a mean age of 36.4 ± 5.9 years (range 16 to 63) surgically treated due to primary stable L4-L5 disc herniation. The patients were placed into two groups: with more and less than 12-month duration of preoperative sciatalgia. Disability and pain were measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for statistical analysis. Results. Total mean duration of preoperative sciatalgia and follow-up period were 13.3 months (range 2 to 65) and 33.7 ± 5.1 months (range 24 to 72), respectively. Comparison between the groups showed that duration of preoperative sciatalgia either less or more than 12 months did not affect the surgical outcomes significantly. Conclusions. More or less than 12-month duration of preoperative sciatalgia may not affect the surgical outcomes of simple lumbar disc herniation in the patients undergoing discectomy. PMID:24616807

Ghayem Hasankhani, Ebrahim; Khanzadeh, Reza

2014-01-01

167

Genotypic and Antimicrobial Characterisation of Propionibacterium acnes Isolates from Surgically Excised Lumbar Disc Herniations  

PubMed Central

The anaerobic skin commensal Propionibacterium acnes is an underestimated cause of human infections and clinical conditions. Previous studies have suggested a role for the bacterium in lumbar disc herniation and infection. To further investigate this, five biopsy samples were surgically excised from each of 64 patients with lumbar disc herniation. P. acnes and other bacteria were detected by anaerobic culture, followed by biochemical and PCR-based identification. In total, 24/64 (38%) patients had evidence of P. acnes in their excised herniated disc tissue. Using recA and mAb typing methods, 52% of the isolates were type II (50% of culture-positive patients), while type IA strains accounted for 28% of isolates (42% patients). Type III (11% isolates; 21% patients) and type IB strains (9% isolates; 17% patients) were detected less frequently. The MIC values for all isolates were lowest for amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, rifampicin, tetracycline, and vancomycin (?1mg/L). The MIC for fusidic acid was 1-2 mg/L. The MIC for trimethoprim and gentamicin was 2 to ?4?mg/L. The demonstration that type II and III strains, which are not frequently recovered from skin, predominated within our isolate collection (63%) suggests that the role of P. acnes in lumbar disc herniation should not be readily dismissed. PMID:24066290

Rollason, Jess; Albert, Hanne B.; Barnard, Emma; Worthington, Tony; Hilton, Anthony C.; Vernallis, Ann; Patrick, Sheila; Elliott, Tom

2013-01-01

168

Diagnosis of Disc Herniation Based on Classifiers and Features Generated from Spine MR Images  

E-print Network

, one of the common problems of the lumbar spine, based on lumbar MR images. Experimental resultsDiagnosis of Disc Herniation Based on Classifiers and Features Generated from Spine MR Images patients suffer from lumbar disorders and radiologists have to treat more patients reliably in a limited

Chaudhary, Vipin

169

Clinical outcomes after posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization with limited lumbar discectomy: Carragee classification system for lumbar disc herniations  

PubMed Central

Background The observed rate of recurrent disc herniation after limited posterior lumbar discectomy is highest in patients with posterior wide annular defects, according to the Carragee classification of type II (fragment-defect) disc hernia. Although the recurrent herniation rate is lower in both type III (fragment-contained) and type IV (no fragment-contained) patients, recurrent persistent sciatica is observed in both groups. A higher rate of recurrent disc herniation and sciatica was observed in all 3 groups in comparison to patients with type I (fragment-fissure) disc hernia. Methods In total, 40 single-level lumbar disc herniation cases were treated with limited posterior lumbar microdiscectomy and posterior dynamic stabilization. The mean follow-up period was 32.75 months. Cases were selected after preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative observation. We used the Carragee classification system in this study and excluded Carragee type I (fragment-fissure) disc herniations. Clinical results were evaluated with visual analog scale scores and Oswestry scores. Patients’ reherniation rates and clinical results were evaluated and recorded at 3, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Results The most common herniation type in our study was type III (fragment-contained), with 45% frequency. The frequency of fragment-defects was 25%, and the frequency of no fragment-contained defects was 30%. The perioperative complications observed were as follows: 1 patient had bladder retention that required catheterization, 1 patient had a superficial wound infection, and 1 patient had a malpositioned transpedicular screw. The malpositioned screw was corrected with a second operation, performed 1 month after the first. Recurrent disc herniation was not observed during the follow-up period. Conclusions We observed that performing discectomy with posterior dynamic stabilization decreased the risk of recurrent disc herniations in Carragee type II, III, and IV groups, which had increased reherniation and persistent/continuous sciatica after limited lumbar microdiscectomy. Moreover, after 2 years’ follow-up, we obtained improved clinical results.

Kaner, Tuncay; Sasani, Mehdi; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Cosar, Murat; Ozer, Ali Fahir

2010-01-01

170

Catabolic cytokine expression in degenerate and herniated human intervertebral discs: IL-1? and TNF? expression profile  

PubMed Central

Low back pain is a common and debilitating disorder. Current evidence implicates intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and herniation as major causes, although the pathogenesis is poorly understood. While several cytokines have been implicated in the process of IVD degeneration and herniation, investigations have predominately focused on Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?). However, to date no studies have investigated the expression of these cytokines simultaneously in IVD degeneration or herniation, or determined which may be the predominant cytokine associated with these disease states. Using quantitative real time PCR and immunohistochemistry we investigated gene and protein expression for IL-1?, TNF? and their receptors in non-degenerate, degenerate and herniated human IVDs. IL-1? gene expression was observed in a greater proportion of IVDs than TNF? (79% versus 59%). Degenerate and herniated IVDs displayed higher levels of both cytokines than non-degenerate IVDs, although in degenerate IVDs higher levels of IL-1? gene expression (1,300 copies/100 ng cDNA) were observed compared to those of TNF? (250 copies of TNF?/100 ng cDNA). Degenerate IVDs showed ten-fold higher IL-1 receptor gene expression compared to non-degenerate IVDs. In addition, 80% of degenerate IVD cells displayed IL-1 receptor immunopositivity compared to only 30% of cells in non-degenerate IVDs. However, no increase in TNF receptor I gene or protein expression was observed in degenerate or herniated IVDs compared to non-degenerate IVDs. We have demonstrated that although both cytokines are produced by human IVD cells, IL-1? is expressed at higher levels and in more IVDs, particularly in more degenerate IVDs (grades 4 to 12). Importantly, this study has highlighted an increase in gene and protein production for the IL-1 receptor type I but not the TNF receptor type I in degenerate IVDs. The data thus suggest that although both cytokines may be involved in the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration, IL-1 may have a more significant role than TNF?, and thus may be a better target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:17688691

Le Maitre, Christine Lyn; Hoyland, Judith Alison; Freemont, Anthony J

2007-01-01

171

The timing of surgery in lumbar disc prolapse: A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Herniation of nucleus pulposus leading to leg pain is the commonest indication for lumbar spine surgery. However, there is no consensus when to stop conservative treatment and when to consider for surgery. A systematic review of literature was done to find a consensus on the issue of when should surgery be performed for herniation of nucleus pulposus in lumbar spine was conducted. Electronic database searches of Medline, Embase and Pubmed Central were performed to find articles relating to optimum time to operate in patients with herniation of nucleus pulposus in lumbar spine, published between January 1975 and 10 December 2012. The studies were independently screened by two reviewers. Disagreements between reviewers were settled at a consensus meeting. A scoring system based on research design, number of patients at final followup, percentage of patients at final followup, duration of followup, journal impact factor and annual citation index was devised to give weightage to Categorize (A, B or C) each of the articles. Twenty one studies fulfilled the criteria. Six studies were of retrospective design, 13 studies were of Prospective design and two studies were randomized controlled trials. The studies were categorized as: Two articles in category A (highest level of evidence), 12 articles in category B (moderate level of evidence) while seven articles in Category C (poor level of evidence). Category A studies conclude that duration of sciatica prior to surgery made no difference to the outcome of surgery in patients with herniation of nucleus pulposus in the lumbar spine. Ten out of 12 studies in Category B revealed that longer duration of sciatica before surgery leads to poor results while 2 studies conclude that duration of sciatica makes no difference to outcome. In category C, five studies conclude that longer duration of sciatica before surgery leads to poor outcome while two studies find no difference in outcome with regards to duration of sciatica. A qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed which favoured the consensus that longer duration of sciatica leads to poorer outcome. A systematic and critical review of literature revealed that long duration of preoperative leg pain lead to poor outcome for herniation of nucleus pulposus. Only a broad time frame (2-12 months) could be derived from the review of literature due to lack of high quality studies and variable and contrasting results of the existing studies. While surgery performed within six months was most commonly found to lead to good outcome of surgery, further studies are needed to prove this more conclusively. At this stage it is felt that time alone should not be the basis of recommending surgery and multiple other variables should be considered in a shared decision making process between the surgeon and the patient. PMID:24741132

Sabnis, Ashutosh B; Diwan, Ashish D

2014-01-01

172

Percutaneous discectomy on lumbar radiculopathy related to disk herniation: why under CT guidance? An open study of 100 consecutive patients.  

PubMed

The primary objective of this study conducted on 100 patients is to demonstrate that performing CT-guided percutaneous discectomy for herniated disks results in a significant improvement in pain symptoms at several times (D1, D2, D7, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months). This objective assesses the effectiveness and feasibility of this technique under CT guidance in patients presenting documented lower back pain related to disk herniation that has not improved with appropriate medical treatment. The impact of various factors on the effectiveness of discectomy will also be evaluated. At 1 week, we notes a decrease in average VAS respectively of 71% and 67% in patients treated for posterolateral and foraminal herniated disks; the result for posteromedian herniated disks is only 45% in average decrease. At 6 months post op, 79% of lateralized herniated disks have a satisfactory result (? 70% decrease in pain as compared to initial pain), whereas post median herniated disks had a satisfactory result in only 50% of cases. Percutaneous fine needle discectomy probe under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance is a minimally invasive spine surgery which should be considered as an alternative to surgery. This technique presents several advantages: the small diameter of the probe used (maximum 16 G or 1.5mm) allows a cutaneous incision of only a few millimeters, and a trans-canal approach can be possible; it also decreases the risk of ligamentary lesion and does not cause an osseous lesion of the posterior arc or of the adjacent muscular structures. PMID:21444169

Amoretti, Nicolas; Hauger, Olivier; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Amoretti, Marie-Eve; Lesbats, Virginie; Yvonne, Maratos; Ianessi, Antoine; Boileau, Pascal

2012-06-01

173

Spinal cord herniation into pseudomeningocele after traumatic nerve root avulsion: case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

We present an extremely rare case of traumatic spinal cord herniation due to a brachial plexus avulsion injury and provide a review of the literature of spinal cord herniation. Spinal cord herniation is an uncommon condition that can occur spontaneously or as a result of surgery or trauma. This condition often presents with symptoms and signs as Brown-Séquard syndrome. Traumatic pseudomeningoceles after a brachial plexus avulsion injury have been reported. But transdural herniation of the spinal cord into this pseudomeningocele is an extremely rare and poorly documented condition. There is only two reports of this condition in a thoracic case. The authors report the case of a 22-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of quadriplegia. He was involved in a motorcycle accident, 3 years prior to his presentation. Four years after the initial right brachial plexus injury, he was not able to walk independently. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) myelography revealed a lateral pseudomeningocele arising from the right C6–7 and C7–T1 intervetebral foramen and cervical spinal cord herniation into this pseudomeningocele. The patient underwent primary closure of pseudomeningocele to prevent spinal cord reherniation. He can walk with cane and use left arm unrestrictedly at the 2-year follow-up examination. Spinal cord herniation following traumatic nerve root avulsion is extremely rare but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with delayed myelopathy or Brown-Séquard syndrome. PMID:17987326

Ikuma, Hisanori; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Misawa, Haruo; Takigawa, Tomoaki; Ozaki, Toshifumi

2007-01-01

174

A Novel Approach to the Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniations: Indications of Simple Discectomy and Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization Based on Carragee Classification  

PubMed Central

Surgery of lumbar disc herniation is still a problem since Mixter and Barr. Main trouble is dissatisfaction after the operation. Today there is a debate on surgical or conservative treatment despite spending great effort to provide patients with satisfaction. The main problem is segmental instability, and the minimally invasive approach via microscope or endoscope is not necessarily appropriate solution for all cases. Microsurgery or endoscopy would be appropriate for the treatment of Carragee type I and type III herniations. On the other hand in Carragee type II and type IV herniations that are prone to develop recurrent disc herniation and segmental instability, the minimal invasive techniques might be insufficient to achieve satisfactory results. The posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization method might be a good solution to prevent or diminish the recurrent disc herniation and development of segmental instability. In this study we present our experience in the surgical treatment of disc herniations. PMID:23653862

Ozer, A. F.; Keskin, F.; Oktenoglu, T.; Suzer, T.; Ataker, Y.; Gomleksiz, C.; Sasani, M.

2013-01-01

175

Acute gastric incarceration from thoracic herniation in pregnancy following laparoscopic antireflux surgery  

PubMed Central

Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication in pregnancy which due to misdiagnosis or management delays may be life-threatening. We report a case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who presented with sudden onset of severe epigastric and thoracic pain radiating to the back. Earlier in the index pregnancy, she had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery (ARS) for a hiatus hernia because of severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. Owing to increasing epigastric pain a CT scan was carried out which diagnosed wrap disruption with gastric herniation into the thoracic cavity and threatened incarceration. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of severe adverse outcome after ARS during pregnancy, with acute intrathoracic gastric herniation. We recommend the avoidance of ARS in pregnancy, and the need to advise women undergoing ARS of the postoperative risks if pregnancy occurs within a few years of ARS. PMID:23378556

Brygger, Louise; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Harbo, Frederik Severin Gråe; Jørgensen, Jan Stener

2013-01-01

176

Fournier's gangrene secondary to an acutely inflamed appendix herniating into the deep inguinal ring  

PubMed Central

Fournier's gangrene (FG) requires prompt recognition and management. We report the case of a 68-year-old man who presented with extensive pain and purple discolouration from the right iliac fossa to perineum. Computed tomography demonstrated gas within the right hemiscrotum extending into the inguinal canal and right buttock, with a right pelvic fluid and air collection. At debridement necrotic fluid was arising from the superficial inguinal ring so laparotomy was performed, revealing a grossly inflamed appendix herniating into the inguinal canal; a right hemicolectomy was performed. Unfortunately, the patient went into cardiac arrest and passed away on the operating table. Histological analysis demonstrated acute-on-chronic inflammation involving the appendix. The condition where appendicitis is implicated in FG is usually due to retroperitoneal rupture and tracking into the perineal spaces. This is the first case reported of an inflamed appendix herniating into the inguinal canal and thus causing FG. PMID:25829533

Sarmah, Piyush B.; Khan, Mashuk; Zilvetti, Miguel

2015-01-01

177

Higher risk of dural tears and recurrent herniation with lumbar micro-endoscopic discectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing studies on micro-endoscopic lumbar discectomy report similar outcomes to those of open and microdiscectomy and conflicting\\u000a results on complications. We designed a randomised controlled trial to investigate the hypothesis of different outcomes and\\u000a complications obtainable with the three techniques. 240 patients aged 18–65 years affected by posterior lumbar disc herniation\\u000a and symptoms lasting over 6 weeks of conservative management were randomised

Marco Teli; Alessio Lovi; Marco Brayda-Bruno; Antonino Zagra; Andrea Corriero; Fabrizio Giudici; Leone Minoia

2010-01-01

178

[New aspects in the treatment of disc herniation in the dog].  

PubMed

Disc herniation is one of the main research topics at the Tierspital Berne. In this review article about canine disc disease, results from recent clinical research are presented and integrated to the actual knowledge about the disease. These new results deal mainly with neurosurgery/neuroradiology and especially focus on therapeutic value of commonly used treatment methods (hemilaminectomy, fenestration, durotomy, lateral corpectomy) in order to further improve therapeutical results in future. PMID:20235010

Forterre, F; Lang, J

2010-03-01

179

Swyer–James–MacLeod syndrome with ipsilateral herniation of hyperinflated hyperlucent lung  

Microsoft Academic Search

Swyer–James–MacLeod syndrome is characterised by unilateral hyperlucency on chest radiograph with small or normal-sized lung on the affected side and compensatory hyperinflation of opposite lung. Hyperinflation of the affected lung is a very rarely reported entity. An adult female patient, who presented with exertional breathlessness and diagnosed to have hypoplastic left pulmonary artery with hyperlucent, hyperinflated and herniated left lung

Rajiv Garg; Pallavi Aga; S Saheer; Jabeed P; Abhijeet Singh; Ghulam Hassan; Rajendra Prasad

2011-01-01

180

Swyer–James–MacLeod syndrome with ipsilateral herniation of hyperinflated hyperlucent lung  

PubMed Central

Swyer–James–MacLeod syndrome is characterised by unilateral hyperlucency on chest radiograph with small or normal-sized lung on the affected side and compensatory hyperinflation of opposite lung. Hyperinflation of the affected lung is a very rarely reported entity. An adult female patient, who presented with exertional breathlessness and diagnosed to have hypoplastic left pulmonary artery with hyperlucent, hyperinflated and herniated left lung is described. PMID:22679043

Garg, Rajiv; Aga, Pallavi; Saheer, S; P, Jabeed; Singh, Abhijeet; Hassan, Ghulam; Prasad, Rajendra

2011-01-01

181

Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome with ipsilateral herniation of hyperinflated hyperlucent lung.  

PubMed

Swyer-James-MacLeod syndrome is characterised by unilateral hyperlucency on chest radiograph with small or normal-sized lung on the affected side and compensatory hyperinflation of opposite lung. Hyperinflation of the affected lung is a very rarely reported entity. An adult female patient, who presented with exertional breathlessness and diagnosed to have hypoplastic left pulmonary artery with hyperlucent, hyperinflated and herniated left lung is described. PMID:22679043

Garg, Rajiv; Aga, Pallavi; Saheer, S; Jabeed, P; Singh, Abhijeet; Hassan, Ghulam; Prasad, Rajendra

2011-01-01

182

A review of current treatment for lumbar disc herniation in children and adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common disorder among adults with degenerated lumbar intervertebral discs. However, its\\u000a occurrence in childhood and adolescence is much less frequent mostly because children and adolescents tend to have a healthier\\u000a lumbar spine as compared with adults. This difference indicates that children and adolescents are far from being just little\\u000a adults. Over the years, there

Lei Dang; Zhongjun Liu

2010-01-01

183

Treatment of a symptomatic forearm muscle herniation with a wrap-around fascia lata graft  

Microsoft Academic Search

Muscle herniation in the extremity is a well-recognized cause of symptomatic pain on exertion. Only 17 cases involving the\\u000a upper limb has been previously described, 11 of them involving the anterior compartment of the forearm and only 2 were caused\\u000a by strenuous exertion. Treatment for this condition ranged from nonsurgical, primary closure with palmaris longus interweave,\\u000a formal fasciotomy, to closure

Kamarul A. Khalid; Edward T. Mah

2009-01-01

184

Using geographical information system for spatial evaluation of canine extruded disc herniation.  

PubMed

Disc herniation is one of the most common pathologies of the vertebral column in dogs. The aim of this study was to develop a geographical information system (GIS)-based vertebral canal (VC) map useful for spatial evaluation of extruded disc herniation (EDH) in dogs. ArcGIS® was used to create two-dimensional and three-dimensional maps, in which the VC surface is divided into polygons by lines representing latitude and longitude. Actual locations and directions of the herniated disc material were assessed by a series of 142 computer tomographies of dogs collected between 2005 and 2013. Most EDHs were located on the cervical and transitional regions (thoraco-lumbar and lumbo-sacral) and shown at the level of the ventro- cranial and ventro-central polygons created. Choropleth maps, highlighting the distribution and the location/direction patterns of the EDHs throughout the VC, were produced based on the frequency of the ailment. GIS proved to be a valuable tool in analysing EDH in dogs. Further studies are required for biomechanical analysis of EDH patterns. PMID:25545938

Daraban, Constantin; Murino, Carla; Marzatico, Giuseppe; Mennonna, Giuseppina; Fatone, Gerardo; Auletta, Luigi; Miceli, Fabiana; Vulpe, Vasile; Meomartino, Leonardo

2014-11-01

185

Outcome of nucleoplasty in patients with radicular pain due to lumbar intervertebral disc herniation  

PubMed Central

Background: Nucleoplasty (percutaneous lumbar disc decompression) is a minimally invasive procedure that utilizes radiofrequency energy as a treatment for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation, against open microdiscectomy, which would be the mainstay treatment modality. The literature reports a favorable outcome in up to 77% of patients at 6 months. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of nucleoplasty in the management of discogenic radicular pain. Materials and Methods: The medical notes of 33 patients, admitted for nucleoplasty between June 2006 and September 2007, were reviewed retrospectively. All had radicular pain, and contained herniated disc as seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbosacral spine. Patients were followed up at 1 and 3 months post-procedure. The outcome measures employed in this study were satisfaction with symptoms and self-reported improvement. Results: Thirty-three cases were examined (18 males and 15 females). Twenty-seven procedures were performed with no complications and six were abandoned due to anatomical reasons. There were 18 and 15 cases of disc herniation at L5/S1 and L4/5 levels, respectively. Four weeks following the procedure, 13 patients reported improvement in symptoms, and 14 remained symptomatically the same and subsequently had open microdiscectomy. Conclusion: Nucleoplasty has been shown to be a safe and minimal-access procedure. Less than half of our selected cohort of patients reported symptomatic improvement at 1-month follow-up. We no longer offer this procedure to our patients. Possible reasons are discussed. PMID:23633860

Ogbonnaya, Sunny; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Qassim, Abdulla; O’Sullivan, Michael

2013-01-01

186

Comparison of Two Methods of Epidural Steroid Injection in the Treatment of Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation  

PubMed Central

Study Design Prospective study. Purpose We compared the effects of two methods of epidural steroid injection in patients with recurrent disc herniation. Overview of Literature To our knowledge, there is no previous report of such a comparison in these patients. Methods The study was performed with 30 patients with relapsed lumbar disc herniation whose pain was not relieved by conservative remedies. The patients were divided into two groups, each of 15 patients, and entered the study for caudal or transforaminal injections. The degree of pain, ability to stand and walk, and the Prolo function score were evaluated in both groups before the injection and 2 months and 6 months after the injection. Results The degrees of pain reduction in the caudal injection group in the second and sixth months were 0.6 and 1.63, respectively, and in the transforaminal injection group were 1.33 and 1.56, respectively. The difference between the two methods was not statistically significant. Similarly, no other evaluated criterion showed a significant difference between the methods. Conclusions In the current study, the caudal and transforaminal steroid injection methods showed similar outcomes in the treatment of relapsed lumbar disc herniation. However, more detailed patient categorizing may help in finding possible subgroups with differences. PMID:25346818

Ebrahimi-Nejad, Ali; Shahsavarani, Shahram; Keikhosravi, Ehsan; Shahba, Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Farzaneh

2014-01-01

187

Comparison of Discectomy versus Sequestrectomy in Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Studies  

PubMed Central

Background Lumbar disc removal is currently the standard treatment for lumbar disc herniation. No consensus has been achieved whether aggressive disc resection with curettage (discectomy) versus conservative removal of the offending disc fragment alone (sequestrectomy) provides better outcomes. This study aims to compare the reherniation rate and clinical outcomes between discectomy and sequestrectomy by literature review and a meta-analysis. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library was performed up to June 1, 2014. Outcomes of interest assessing the two techniques included demographic and clinical baseline characteristics, perioperative variables, complications, recurrent herniation rate and post-operative functional outcomes. Results Twelve eligible trials evaluating discectomy vs sequestrectomy were identified including one randomized controlled study, five prospective and six retrospective comparative studies. By contrast to discectomy, sequestrectomy was associated with significantly less operative time (p<0.001), lower visual analogue scale (VAS) for low back pain (p<0.05), less post-operative analgesic usage (p<0.05) and better patients’ satisfaction (p<0.05). Recurrent herniation rate, reoperation rate, intraoperative blood loss, hospitalization duration and VAS for sciatica were without significant difference. Conclusions According to our pooled data, sequestrectomy entails equivalent reherniation rate and complications compared with discectomy but maintains a lower incidence of recurrent low back pain and higher satisfactory rate. High-quality prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to firmly assess these two procedures. PMID:25815514

Ran, Jisheng; Hu, Yejun; Zheng, Zefeng; Zhu, Ting; Zheng, Huawei; Jing, Yibiao; Xu, Kan

2015-01-01

188

Retrolisthesis and lumbar disc herniation: a postoperative assessment of patient function  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND CONTEXT The presence of retrolisthesis has been associated with the degenerative changes of the lumbar spine. However, retrolisthesis in patients with L5–S1 disc herniation has not been shown to have a significant relationship with worse baseline pain or function. Whether it can affect the outcomes after discectomy, is yet to be established. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between retrolisthesis (alone or in combination with other degenerative conditions) and postoperative low back pain, physical function, and quality of life. This study was intended to be a follow-up to a previous investigation that looked at the preoperative assessment of patient function in those with retrolisthesis and lumbar disc herniation. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. PATIENT SAMPLE Patients enrolled in SPORT (Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial) who had undergone L5–S1 discectomy and had a complete magnetic resonance imaging scan available for review (n=125). Individuals with anterolisthesis were excluded. OUTCOME MEASURES Time-weighted averages over 4 years for the Short Form (SF)-36 bodily pain scale, SF-36 physical function scale, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (SBI). METHODS Retrolisthesis was defined as a posterior subluxation of 8% or more. Disc degeneration was defined as any loss of disc signal on T2 imaging. Modic changes were graded 1 to 3 and collectively classified as vertebral end plate degenerative changes. The presence of facet arthropathy and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy was classified jointly as posterior degenerative changes. Longitudinal regression models were used to compare the time-weighted outcomes over 4 years. RESULTS Patients with retrolisthesis did significantly worse with regard to bodily pain and physical function over 4 years. However, there were no significant differences in terms of ODI or SBI. Similarly, retrolisthesis was not a significant factor in the operative time, blood loss, lengths of stay, complications, rate of additional spine surgeries, or recurrent disc herniations. Disc degeneration, modic changes, and posterior degenerative changes did not affect the outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Although retrolisthesis in patients with L5–S1 disc herniation did not affect the baseline pain or function, postoperative outcomes appeared to be somewhat worse. It is possible that the contribution of pain or dysfunction related to retrolisthesis became more evident after removal of the disc herniation. PMID:23201024

Kang, Kevin K.; Shen, Michael S.; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon D.; Razi, Afshin E.

2013-01-01

189

Nucleus, Cytoplasm, Membrane  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Explore the form and function of three of the most important cell parts -- the nucleus, cytoplasm, and membrane -- in this video segment adapted from Carolina Biological Supply's An Introduction to the Living Cell.

WGBH Educational Foundation

2003-09-26

190

Projections from the Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus to the Cochlear Nucleus  

E-print Network

Projections from the Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus to the Cochlear Nucleus in the Rat CHARLES to the granule cell domain (GCD) of the cochlear nucleus have been shown to arise from somatosensory brain stem study, we labeled spinal trigeminal neurons projecting to the cochlear nucleus using the retrograde

Ryugo, David K.

191

The Cochlear NucleusThe Cochlear Nucleus Maria E. Rubio  

E-print Network

6/1/2010 1 The Cochlear NucleusThe Cochlear Nucleus Salamanca June 2010 Cajal Maria E. Rubio University of Pittsburgh The cochlear nucleus (CN) contains the circuits through which information about sound is coupled to the brain. The Cochlear Nucleus In the CN, fibers of the auditory nerve contact

Oliver, Douglas L.

192

Biomechanical Behavior of a New Nucleus Prosthesis Made of Knitted Titanium Filaments  

PubMed Central

Background One of the greatest challenges in the development of a nucleus prosthesis is to minimize the risk of implant expulsion. At the same time, the physiological flexibility, compressive behavior, and height of the disc should be restored. In this biomechanical in vitro study we investigated the ability of a new nucleus prosthesis made of knitted titanium filaments to meet these challenges. Methods Flexibility, axial deformation, and height of six bovine lumbar spine segments were measured in the intact condition, after implantation of the new prosthesis, and during and after complex cyclic loading (100,000 cycles). For this purpose, six new prostheses preformed according to the shape of the bovine nucleus pulposus were manufactured. Flexibility was tested in the three main planes under pure moment loads of 7.5 Nm. Axial deformation was measured under application of an axial force of 1000 N. Radiographs taken before and after cyclic testing were used to assess implant migration and expulsion. Results In lateral bending, the intact range of motion (RoM) could almost be restored after implantation. However, in axial rotation, the RoM increased slightly with the implant. This was also the case in extension, with an increase from -2.9° to -6.4°, whereas in flexion, RoM decreased from 4.3° to 3.2°. In all loading planes, cyclic loading caused the RoM to increase asymptotically by 0.1° to 1.8°. The axial deformation of the specimens was nearly equivalent in all tested states, as was their height. Cyclic loading did not cause implant expulsion. Conclusions In this feasibility study, the new knitted nucleus prosthesis showed promising results in segmental flexibility, axial deformability, height, and implant expulsion. However, further study is needed for other factors, such as wear and fatigue behavior.

Kettler, Annette; Kaps, Hans-Peter; Haegele, Bodo

2007-01-01

193

Assessment of sexual dysfunction before and after surgery for lumbar disc herniation.  

PubMed

Object Sexuality is an important aspect of human life. Sexual activity may be affected in lumbar disc herniation through different mechanisms. The aim of this study is to evaluate patients' sexual problems and sexual behavior patterns before and after surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Methods Forty-three patients were included in the study (mean age 41.4 years). A visual analog scale, the Oswestry Disability Index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and a sexuality assessment questionnaire developed for this study were administered to the patients to evaluate pain and sexual dysfunction. Results Fifty-five percent of the men and 84% of the women reported experiencing sexual problems after the onset of low-back pain. The most common sexual problems were decreased sexual desire (18%) and premature ejaculation together with erectile dysfunction (18%) for the male patients, and decreased sexual desire (47%) for the female patients. The frequency of sexual intercourse before the operation was reduced in 78% of cases compared with the pain-free period. Postoperatively, the patients first attempted sexual intercourse a mean of 26.5 days after surgery. The frequency of intercourse was found to have increased (p = 0.01), while description of any type of sexual problem had decreased (p = 0.005) significantly. Conclusions Lumbar disc herniation has negative effects on sexual life, and not enough attention is given to the patients' sexual problems by the physicians. Decreased sexual desire and decreased sexual intercourse are the most commonly reported problems. Taking time during examination and giving simple recommendations may improve sexuality and life quality of the patients. PMID:21039147

Akba?, Naz B; Dalbayrak, Sedat; Külcü, Duygu G; Yilmaz, Mesut; Yilmaz, Tevfik; Naderi, Sait

2010-11-01

194

Marathon related death due to brainstem herniation in rehydration-related hyponatraemia: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Identifying marathon runners at risk of neurological deterioration at the end of the race (within a large cohort complaining of exhaustion, dehydration, nausea, headache, dizziness, etc.) is challenging. Here we report a case of rehydration-related hyponatraemia with ensuing brain herniation. Case presentation We report the death of runner in his 30's who collapsed in the recovery area following a marathon. Following rehydration he developed a respiratory arrest in the emergency room. He was found to be hyponatraemic (130 mM). A CT brain scan showed severe hydrocephalus and brain stem herniation. Despite emergency insertion of an extraventricular drain, he was tested for brainstem death the following morning. Funduscopy demonstrated an acute-on-chronic papilledema; CSF spectrophotometry did not reveal any trace of oxyhemoglobin or bilirubin, but ferritin levels were considerably raised (530 ng/mL, upper reference value 12 ng/mL), consistent with a previous bleed. Retrospectively it emerged that the patient had suffered from a thunderclap headache some months earlier. Subsequently he developed morning headaches and nausea. This suggests that he may have suffered from a subarachnoid haemorrhage complicated by secondary hydrocephalus. This would explain why in this case the relatively mild rehydration-related hyponatremia may have caused brain swelling sufficient for herniation. Conclusion Given the frequency of hyponatraemia in marathon runners (serum Na <135 mM in about 13%), and the non-specific symptoms, we discuss how a simple screening test such as funduscopy may help to identify those who require urgent neuroimaging. PMID:18163909

Petzold, Axel; Keir, Geoffrey; Appleby, Ian

2007-01-01

195

[Herniation of the cecum and ascending colon through the Winslowi foramen in the bursa omentalis].  

PubMed

Herniation through the foramen of Winslow (HFW) is exceedingly rare, the ileum, coecum or ascending colon is involved mostly. One new case is presented here to illustrate the clinical findings, which are often discreet, and the characteristical radiographic features, which can lead to definitive preoperative diagnosis. Treatment is by surgical reduction of the hernia, resection of non-viable bowel or fixation of coecum and ascending colon. Closure of the foramen is generally considered unnecessary. Without delay in diagnosis and treatment, the former high letality rate of the condition is now nearly zero. PMID:7876025

Villiger, A; Fartab, M; Mayer, M

1994-12-01

196

Gastric outlet obstruction secondary to paraesophageal herniation of gastric antrum after laparoscopic fundoplication.  

PubMed

The most common causes of acute gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) are duodenal and type 3 gastric ulcers. However, mechanical or functional causes may also lead to this pathology. Acute GOO is characterized by delayed gastric emptying, anorexia, or nausea accompanied by vomiting. Herein we report a 56-year-old man diagnosed with GOO secondary to paraesophageal hiatal herniation of gastric antrum after laparoscopic fundoplication. Because of the rarity of this disease, common gastrointestinal complaints may mislead the emergency physician to diagnose a nonsurgical gastrointestinal disease if a detailed history and physical examinations are not obtained. PMID:25813602

Coskun, Selcuk; Soylu, Lutfi; Sahin, Mahir; Demiray, Taylan

2015-04-01

197

Management of Cerebellar Tonsillar Herniation following Lumbar Puncture in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension  

PubMed Central

Lumbar puncture is performed routinely for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in idiopathic intracranial hypertension, despite lumbar puncture being classically contraindicated in the setting of raised intracranial pressure. We report the case of a 30-year-old female with known idiopathic intracranial hypertension who had cerebellar tonsillar herniation following therapeutic lumbar puncture. Management followed guidelines regarding treatment of traumatic intracranial hypertension, including rescue decompressive craniectomy. We hypothesize that the changes in brain compliance that are thought to occur in the setting of idiopathic intracranial hypertension are protective against further neuronal injury due to axonal stretch following decompressive craniectomy. PMID:25685562

Hoffman, Kenneth R.; Chan, Sean W.; Hughes, Andrew R.; Halcrow, Stephen J.

2015-01-01

198

Convergence of the nucleus-nucleus Glauber multiple scattering series  

SciTech Connect

The Glauber {ital S}-matrix operator for nucleus-nucleus scattering is expressed as a finite series of matrix elements involving Bell's polynomials. Analyzing {alpha}{sup 4}He elastic-scattering data at the incident momentum of 4.32 GeV/{ital c}, we infer that our expansion is appreciably converging. Further, by applying closure over target and projectile states and neglecting a certain class of terms involving intermediate excitations, we arrive at a recurrence relation for nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series terms, which invites further study as it seems to provide a simple method for calculating the nucleus-nucleus elastic-scattering cross section.

Usmani, A.A.; Ahmad, I. (Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002, Uttar Pradesh, India (IN))

1991-05-01

199

The Etiologies of Low Back Pain in Patients With Lumbar Disk Herniation  

PubMed Central

Background: Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint in population that lowers the quality of life. The main etiology of LBP is recognized in about 20% of patients while it is attributed to lumbar disk herniation (LDH) in 80% of cases and causes some unnecessary lumbar surgeries without realizing the definite cause. Objectives: This study was planned to evaluate the etiologies of LBP in patients who had LDH to clarify whether the disc herniation is the main cause of patients` pain or other diseases were responsible for this kind of pain. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we analyzed the medical profiles of the patients with proven LDH in a private clinic in Mashhad City, Iran, between 2005 and 2012, for demographic and the etiologies of LBP with clinical and paraclinical studies. We also calculated the incidence of each etiology by SPSS 13. Results: In our study, among 1250 patients with proven LDH by MRI, 500 patients (40%) had chronic LBP and the most common causes of LBP were heavy constant working (40.2%), osteoporosis (35.6%), and sacroiliac joint pain (34.6%), consecutively. Interestingly, LDH had the ninth rank among the common cause of LBP. Conclusions: In this study, we found that in spite of previous beliefs, discopathies were not common etiologies of LBP. Thus, even in patients with proven LDH by imaging studies, the physician should perform a thorough evaluation for other causes of LBP to avoid unnecessary lumbar surgeries.

Samini, Fariborz; Gharedaghi, Mohammad; Khajavi, Mahdi; Samini, Mohammad

2014-01-01

200

Differentiation of idiopathic spinal cord herniation from CSF-isointense intraspinal extramedullary lesions displacing the cord.  

PubMed

Focal spinal cord displacement can be caused by idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH), in which the cord protrudes through a dural defect into the epidural space, causing cord displacement and tethering. ISCH is uncommon and often is misdiagnosed initially, which results in delayed management. ISCH can be mimicked by space-occupying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-isointense intraspinal extramedullary lesions, such as epidermoid cysts or teratomas, intradural arachnoid cysts, epidural hematomas or abscesses, cystic nerve sheath tumors, synovial or Tarlov cysts, meningoceles, and pseudomeningoceles. Initial computed tomography (CT) and unenhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies may depict focal cord displacement and a widened CSF space but often are not sufficient to identify the underlying cause. High-resolution thin-section MR imaging can delineate the exact location of the dural defect and the protrusion of the herniated cord through this defect into the epidural space. At imaging, unimpeded CSF pulsation artifacts seen within a widened CSF space exclude a space-occupying lesion. A filling defect seen at conventional or CT myelography can help confirm a CSF-isointense space-occupying lesion; intravenous contrast agent administration can help exclude a rim-enhancing cystic extramedullary lesion. The clinical presentation usually is nonspecific, but symptom acuity, fever, and trauma can guide the imaging evaluation and help narrow the differential diagnosis. A multimodality imaging approach is essential to differentiate ISCH from space-occupying CSF-isointense intraspinal extramedullary lesions. PMID:24617681

Haber, Marc D; Nguyen, Dustin D; Li, Shan

2014-01-01

201

Composite features for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc herniation from lumbar MRI.  

PubMed

Lower back pain is widely prevalent in the world today, and the situation is aggravated due to a shortage of radiologists. Intervertebral disc disorders like desiccation, degeneration and herniation are some of the major causes of lower back pain. In this paper, we propose a robust computer-aided herniation diagnosis system for lumbar MRI by first extracting an approximate Region Of Interest (ROI) for each disc and then using a combination of viable features to produce a highly accurate classifier. We describe the extraction of raw, LBP (Local Binary Patterns), Gabor, GLCM (Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix), shape, and intensity features from lumbar SPIR T2-weighted MRI and also present a thorough performance comparison of individual and combined features. We perform 5-fold cross validation experiments on 35 cases and report a very high accuracy of 98.29% using a combination of features. Also, combining the desired features and reducing the dimensionality using LDA, we achieve a high sensitivity (true positive rate) of 98.11%. PMID:22255478

Ghosh, Subarna; Alomari, Raja' S; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

2011-01-01

202

[Coma and transtentorial herniation syndrome due to acute non-expansive hemispheric lesion].  

PubMed

An 81-year-old woman developed left hemiplegia and coma due to a right hemisphere infarct and died 6 days later. When first seen in coma she had the classical signs of descending central herniation in the diencephalic stage. The CT scan of the third day showed a large hypodense area occupying the superficial and deep territories of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries on the left as well as a frontal cortico-subcortical hypodense area indicative of an older infarct on the opposite hemisphere. No mass effects were apparent. She followed a downhill course with signs of brainstem deterioration. A second CT scan a few hours before death revealed the expected pattern of brain shift and herniations. This case adds to the available evidence showing that the clinical signs of encroachment of supratentorial structures upon the basal forebrain can be reproduced by an acute mono-hemispheral lesion without visible mass effects. It indicates, further, that the role of intracranial displacements in the genesis and short-term prognosis of coma remains an unsettled matter. In at least a few number of cases, diaschisis might play a major role. PMID:8729780

De Oliveira-Souza, R; Benchimol, M

1995-12-01

203

Cervical lung herniation complicating a case of acute asphyxial asthma in a child.  

PubMed

The abrupt onset of respiratory failure secondary to asthma, known as acute asphyxial asthma (AAA) in adults, is uncommonly reported in children. Here, we report a case of a child with the acute onset of respiratory failure consistent with AAA complicated by the finding of a neck mass during resuscitation. This 11-year-old boy with a history of asthma initially presented in respiratory failure with altered mental status after the complaint of difficulty in breathing minutes before collapsing at home. Initially, his respiratory failure was thought to be secondary to status asthmaticus, and treatment was initiated accordingly. However, a neck mass noted during the resuscitation was cause for concern, and other etiologies for his respiratory failure were considered, including an airway obstructing neck mass. After pediatric surgery and anesthesia consultation for intubation and possible tracheostomy placement, general anesthesia was induced in the operating room with an inhaled anesthetic, with prompt resolution of the bronchspasm and decompression of the neck mass. Review of the imaging and clinical course ultimately yielded a diagnosis of cervical lung herniation as the etiology of his neck mass. We report this case of AAA and cervical lung herniation and a review of the literature of these 2 uncommon phenomena in children. PMID:25831031

Martchek, Melissa A; Padilla, Benjamin E; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Friedlaender, Eron Y

2015-04-01

204

Use of cervical spine manipulation under anesthesia for management of cervical disk herniation, cervical radiculopathy, and associated cervicogenic headache syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To demonstrate the benefits of cervical spine manipulation with the patient under anesthesia as an approach to treating a patient with chronic cervical disk herniation, associated cervical radiculopathy, and cervicogenic headache syndrome. Clinical Features: The patient had neck pain with radiating paresthesia into the right upper extremity and incapacitating headaches and had no response to 6 months of conservative

James Herzog

1999-01-01

205

Nonmedical methods to relieve low back pain caused by lumbar disc herniation: a descriptive study in northeastern Turkey.  

PubMed

Low back pain due to the effects of lumbar disc herniation is a common complaint of patients who often subsequently seek help from medical professionals. It is also a significant health problem which is quite difficult to treat. This descriptive study was conducted to determine nonmedical methods used by patients with lumbar disc herniation to relieve low back pain; the patients' intensity of low back pain when they were admitted to the hospital was also explored. Ninety-two patients with lumbar disc herniation participated in this study, which was carried out at a university hospital in northeastern Turkey. Data were collected using a patient information form and the visual analog scale (VAS). When the patients were admitted to hospital, their mean VAS score was 6.56 ± 2.45. The study results showed that as a first choice nearly all of the patients (94.6%) with lumbar disc herniation preferred consulting with their physicians before to obtain relief for low back pain. However, in addition to seeing their physician, more than one-half of these patients (57.6%) also used nonmedical methods. The primary nonmedical methods were hot/cold compresses, wrapping various substances on the back, and herbal preparations. An increase in pain was noted by 17.0% of patients after using nonmedical methods. Findings indicated that more than two-thirds of patients experienced either no change or an increase in pain after using nonmedical methods to find relief. PMID:24882024

Cilingir, Dilek; Hintistan, Sevilay; Yigitbas, Cagla; Nural, Nesrin

2014-06-01

206

Vertebral axial decompression therapy for pain associated with herniated or degenerated discs or facet syndrome: An outcome study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The outcomes of vertebral axial decompression (DECOMPRESSION) therapy for patients with low back pain from various causes are reported. Data was collected from twenty-two medical centers for patients who received DECOMPRESSION therapy for low back pain, which was sometimes accompanied by referred leg pain. Only patients who received at least ten sessions and had a diagnosis of herniated disc, degenerative

Earl E. Gose; William K. Naguszewski; Robert K. Naguszewski

207

Intrathoracic major duodenal papilla with transhiatal herniation of the pancreas and duodenum: A case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Transhiatal herniation of the pancreas is an extremely rare condition. In the published literature we found only eleven cases reported in the period of 1958 to 2011. A coincidental hiatal herniation of the duodenum is described in two cases only. To our knowledge, we report the first case with a hiatal herniation of the complete duodenum and proximal pancreas presenting an intrathoracic major duodenal papilla with consecutive intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis. A 72-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our department with a hiatal hernia grade IV for further evaluation. According to our recommendation of surgical hernia repair soon after the diagnosis of a transhiatal herniation of the proximal pancreas and entire duodenum, we had to respect the declared intention of the patient for a conservative procedure. So we were forced to wait for surgical repair within an emergency situation complicated by a myocardial infarction and reduced general condition. We discuss the therapeutic decision making process and a complete literature review of this rare entity. PMID:23805366

Jäger, Tarkan; Neureiter, Daniel; Nawara, Clemens; Dinnewitzer, Adam; Öfner, Dietmar; Lamadé, Wolfram

2013-01-01

208

Intrathoracic major duodenal papilla with transhiatal herniation of the pancreas and duodenum: A case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Transhiatal herniation of the pancreas is an extremely rare condition. In the published literature we found only eleven cases reported in the period of 1958 to 2011. A coincidental hiatal herniation of the duodenum is described in two cases only. To our knowledge, we report the first case with a hiatal herniation of the complete duodenum and proximal pancreas presenting an intrathoracic major duodenal papilla with consecutive intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholestasis. A 72-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our department with a hiatal hernia grade IV for further evaluation. According to our recommendation of surgical hernia repair soon after the diagnosis of a transhiatal herniation of the proximal pancreas and entire duodenum, we had to respect the declared intention of the patient for a conservative procedure. So we were forced to wait for surgical repair within an emergency situation complicated by a myocardial infarction and reduced general condition. We discuss the therapeutic decision making process and a complete literature review of this rare entity. PMID:23805366

Jäger, Tarkan; Neureiter, Daniel; Nawara, Clemens; Dinnewitzer, Adam; Ofner, Dietmar; Lamadé, Wolfram

2013-06-27

209

Treatment of contained lumbar disc herniations using radiofrequency assisted micro-tubular decompression and nucleotomy: four year prospective study results  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with radiculopathy caused by contained disc herniations are less likely to have good outcomes following discectomy surgery than patients with disc herniations that are not contained. The author presents his 4-year results from a prospective trial regarding the efficacy and safety of a tubular transforaminal radiofrequency-assisted manual decompression and annulus modulation of contained disc herniations in 58 patients. Methods Fifty-eight patients with lumbar radiculopathy due to a contained disc herniation were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. Visual analog scores (VAS) for back pain and leg pain, quality of life assessment, Macnab criteria, and SF-12 were collected from patients before treatment, at 2-years and 4-years post-treatment. Results At 4 years, results were obtained from 47 (81%) of patients. Compared to mean pre- treatment assessments, mean 4-year VAS for back pain improved from 8.6 to 2.3 points, and mean VAS for leg pain improved from 7.8 to 2.3. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported that they were “satisfied” or “very satisifed” with their quality of life at 4-years as per SF-12. At 4 years, recurrence was noted in 3 (6.4%) of respondents and no complications were reported. Conclusions The 2-year and 4-year study results are nearly identical, suggesting durable benefit out to 4 years. These results also suggest that in carefully selected patients with sustained contained disc herniations who have failed conservative treatments, manual decompression combined with radiofrequency-assisted decompression and annulus modulation are very likely to have good outcomes 4 years post-treatment. PMID:25694932

2014-01-01

210

Matrix metalloproteinase expression levels suggest distinct enzyme roles during lumbar disc herniation and degeneration  

PubMed Central

The disruption of the extracellular disc matrix is a major hallmark of disc degeneration. This has previously been shown to be associated with an up-regulation of major matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity. However, until now hardly any data are available for MMP/TIMP regulation and thereby no concept exists as to which MMP/TIMP plays a major role in disc degeneration. The objective of this study was, therefore, to identify and quantify the putative up-regulation of MMPs/TIMPs on the mRNA and protein level and their activity in disc material in relation to clinical data and histological evidence for disc degeneration. A quantitative molecular analysis of the mRNA expression levels for the MMPs (MMPs-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -13) and the MMP inhibitors (TIMPs-1 and -2) was performed on 37 disc specimens obtained from symptomatic disc herniation or degeneration. In addition, disc specimens from patients without disc degeneration/herniation (=controls) were analyzed. Expression of MMPs-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -13 and TIMPs-1, -2 was analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR, normalized to the expression level of a house keeping gene (GAPDH). Gene expression patterns were correlated with MMP activity (in situ zymography), protein expression patterns (immunohistochemistry), degeneration score (routine histology) and clinical data. MMP-3 mRNA levels were consistently and substantially up-regulated in samples with histological evidence for disc degeneration. A similar but less pronounced up-regulation was observed for MMP-8. This up-regulation was paralleled by the expression of TIMP-1 and to a lesser extent TIMP-2. In general, these findings could be confirmed with regard to protein expression and enzyme activity. This study provides data on the gene and protein level, which highlights the key role of MMP-3 in the degenerative cascade leading to symptomatic disc degeneration and herniation. Control of the proteolytic activity of MMP-3 may, therefore, come into the focus when aiming to develop new treatment options for early disc degeneration. PMID:19466462

Bachmeier, Beatrice E.; Nerlich, Andreas; Mittermaier, Norbert; Weiler, Christoph; Lumenta, Christianto; Wuertz, Karin

2009-01-01

211

Herniated Disk  

MedlinePLUS

... With treatment, most people recover. Treatments include rest, pain and anti-inflammatory medicines, physical therapy, and sometimes surgery. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

212

Acute Paraplegia Secondary to Thoracic Disc Herniation of the Adjacent Segment Following Thoracolumbar Fusion and Instrumentation  

PubMed Central

Proximal junctional disease is a well-recognized postoperative phenomenon in adults who are undergoing long thoracolumbar fusion and instrumentation, and is attributed to increased a junctional stress concentration. In general, the onset of symptoms in these patients is insidious and the disease progresses slowly. We report on a contrary case of rapidly progressing paraplegia secondary to acute disc herniation at the proximal adjacent segment after long posterior thoracolumbar fusion with cement augmentation at the upper instrumented vertebra and the supra-adjacent vertebra. The patient was treated with a discectomy through the costo-transverse approach combined with extension of the posterior instrumentation. The patient's neurological status improved markedly. Stress concentration at the proximal junction disc space may have caused accelerated disc degeneration which in turn lead to this complication. PMID:23508671

Assaker, Richard; Musharrafieh, Ramzi Sharif

2013-01-01

213

Incidence of basilar invagination in patients with tonsillar herniation? A case control craniometrical study.  

PubMed

A retrospective case-control study based on craniometrical evaluation was performed to evaluate the incidence of basilar invagination (BI). Patients with symptomatic tonsillar herniation treated surgically had craniometrical parameters evaluated based on CT scan reconstructions before surgery. BI was diagnosed when the tip of the odontoid trespassed the Chamberlain's line in three different thresholds found in the literature: 2, 5 or 6.6 mm. In the surgical group (SU), the mean distance of the tip of the odontoid process above the Chamberlain's line was 12 mm versus 1.2 mm in the control (CO) group (p<0.0001). The number of patients with BI according to the threshold used (2, 5 or 6.6 mm) in the SU group was respectively 19 (95%), 16 (80%) and 15 (75%) and in the CO group it was 15 (37%), 4 (10%) and 2 (5%). PMID:25252235

Joaquim, Andrei F; Fernandes, Yvens Barbosa; Mathias, Roger N; Batista, Ulysses C; Ghizoni, Enrico; Tedeschi, Helder; Patel, Alpesh A

2014-09-01

214

Traumatic Acute Brain Herniation through the Ear in a Child: Concealed compound fracture.  

PubMed

A seven-year-old girl presented to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman, with a history of having been hit by a motor vehicle. After this, she had right-sided cerebrospinal fluid otorrhoea, and a week later, brain matter extruded through the right ear. A computed tomography scan of the brain demonstrated a tegmen fracture communicating with the external auditory canal. There was no hearing or facial nerve impairment and an otoscopic examination showed an intact tympanic membrane. She underwent a transcranial repair of the middle cranial fossa base, which revealed a wide dural and bony defect of the tegmen with herniation of the temporal lobe. Repair was made with an intradural patch of artificial dura. The rarity of this type of presentation of temporal bone fracture and its management are discussed. PMID:22912929

Kariyattil, Rajeev; Muthukuttiparambil, Unnikrishnan

2012-08-01

215

Air Bubbles Mimic Disc Herniation in MRI after Cervical Epidural Block  

PubMed Central

Magnetic resonance image (MRI) is the most sensitive imaging test of the spine in routine clinical practice. Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography scans, high-quality magnetic resonance images can be assured only if patients are able to remain perfectly still. However, some patients find it uncomfortable to remain still because of pain. In that condition, interlaminar cervical epidural injections can reduce pain and allow the procedure. When using air with the "loss of resistance" technique in epidural injections to identify the epidural space, there is the possibility of injected excessive air epidurally to mimic a herniated disc. We describe a case report of epidural air artifact in a cervical MRI after cervical epidural injections. PMID:20830267

Shin, Sung Sik; Kim, Jung Ryul; Kim, Dal Yong

2010-01-01

216

Subgaleal hemorrhage with dural tear and parietal-lobe herniation in association with a vacuum extraction.  

PubMed

Use of the vacuum for operative vaginal deliveries has become more favorable with fewer obstetricians and family practitioners trained in the use of forceps. When compared with forcep-assisted deliveries, the vacuum has been associated with a higher incidence of subgaleal hemorrhage (SGH), cephalhematomas, skull and clavicular fractures, Erb's Palsy, intracranial hemorrhage and need for ICN admission. We report the case of an infant who developed a large SGH with midline dural tear and herniation of the medial aspect of the parietal lobes bilaterally in association with a vacuum extraction (VE) delivery. Counseling of families prior to instrumented delivery as to the potential complications, adherence to recommendations for abandoning operative vaginal delivery in favor of a cesarean section and close observation of those infants delivered by VE is warranted. PMID:18034165

Kicklighter, S D; Wolfe, D; Perciaccante, J V

2007-12-01

217

Spinal cord injury secondary to cervical disc herniation in ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy.  

PubMed

Early onset of degeneration of the cervical spine and instability due to sustained abnormal tonicity or abnormal movement of the neck are found in patients with cerebral palsy. An unexplained change or deterioration of neurological function in patients with cerebral palsy should merit the consideration of the possibility of cervical myelopathy due to early degeneration or instability of the cervical spine. We describe two patients who had a spinal cord injury due to a cervical disc herniation, one patient was athetoid and the second had spastic diplegia, they both had cerebral palsy. It is not easy to determine whether new neurological symptoms are as a result of the cervical spinal cord disorder. These cases suggest that consideration of a cervical spine disorder with myelopathy is required in the evaluation of patients with cerebral palsy who develop deterioration of neurological function or activities over a short period of time. PMID:9589531

Ko, H Y; Park-Ko, I

1998-04-01

218

Nucleus-nucleus potential with shell-correction contribution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The full relaxed-density potential between spherical nuclei is considered as a sum of the macroscopic and shell-correction contributions. The macroscopic part of the potential is related to a nucleus-nucleus potential obtained in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi approach with the Skyrme and Coulomb forces and the relaxed-density ansatz for evaluation of proton and neutron densities of interacting nuclei. A simple prescription for the shell-correction part of the total potential is discussed. The parameters of the shell-correction and macroscopic parts of the relaxed-density potential are found by fitting the empirical barrier heights of the 89 nucleus-nucleus systems as well as macroscopic potentials evaluated for 1485 nucleus-nucleus systems at 12 distances around touching points.

Denisov, V. Yu.

2015-02-01

219

Nuclear rainbow scattering and nucleus-nucleus potential  

E-print Network

Elastic scattering of alpha-particle and some tightly-bound light nuclei has shown the pattern of rainbow scattering at medium energies, which is due to the refraction of the incident wave by a strongly attractive nucleus-nucleus potential. This review gives an introduction to the physics of the nuclear rainbow based essentially on the optical model description of the elastic scattering. Since the realistic nucleus-nucleus optical potential (OP) is the key to explore this interesting process, an overview of the main methods used to determine the nucleus-nucleus OP is presented. The refractive rainbow-like structures observed in other quasi-elastic scattering reactions have also been discussed. Some evidences for the refractive effect in the elastic scattering of unstable nuclei are presented and perspectives for the future studies are discussed.

Dao T. Khoa; W. von Oertzen; H. G. Bohlen; S. Ohkubo

2006-12-21

220

Leukocyte nucleus segmentation and nucleus lobe counting  

PubMed Central

Background Leukocytes play an important role in the human immune system. The family of leukocytes is comprised of lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils. Any infection or acute stress may increase or decrease the number of leukocytes. An increased percentage of neutrophils may be caused by an acute infection, while an increased percentage of lymphocytes can be caused by a chronic bacterial infection. It is important to realize an abnormal variation in the leukocytes. The five types of leukocytes can be distinguished by their cytoplasmic granules, staining properties of the granules, size of cell, the proportion of the nuclear to the cytoplasmic material, and the type of nucleolar lobes. The number of lobes increased when leukemia, chronic nephritis, liver disease, cancer, sepsis, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency occurred. Clinical neutrophil hypersegmentation has been widely used as an indicator of B12 or folate deficiency.Biomedical technologists can currently recognize abnormal leukocytes using human eyes. However, the quality and efficiency of diagnosis may be compromised due to the limitations of the biomedical technologists' eyesight, strength, and medical knowledge. Therefore, the development of an automatic leukocyte recognition system is feasible and necessary. It is essential to extract the leukocyte region from a blood smear image in order to develop an automatic leukocyte recognition system. The number of lobes increased when leukemia, chronic nephritis, liver disease, cancer, sepsis, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency occurred. Clinical neutrophil hypersegmentation has been widely used as an indicator of B12 or folate deficiency. Results The purpose of this paper is to contribute an automatic leukocyte nuclei image segmentation method for such recognition technology. The other goal of this paper is to develop the method of counting the number of lobes in a cell nucleus. The experimental results demonstrated impressive segmentation accuracy. Conclusions Insensitive to the variance of images, the LNS (Leukocyte Nuclei Segmentation) method functioned well to isolate the leukocyte nuclei from a blood smear image with much better UR (Under Segmentation Rate), ER (Overall Error Rate), and RDE (Relative Distance Error). The presented LC (Lobe Counting) method is capable of splitting leukocyte nuclei into lobes. The experimental results illuminated that both methods can give expressive performances. In addition, three advanced image processing techniques were proposed as weighted Sobel operator, GDW (Gradient Direction Weight), and GBPD (Genetic-based Parameter Detector). PMID:21073711

2010-01-01

221

Neutrino-nucleus interactions  

SciTech Connect

The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

Gallagher, H.; /Tufts U.; Garvey, G.; /Los Alamos; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

2011-01-01

222

Nucleus from String Theory  

E-print Network

In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass number (A) dependence r A^{1/3} for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multi-baryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1) x A^{1/3} [fm], which is consistent with experiments.

Koji Hashimoto; Takeshi Morita

2011-05-24

223

Gatekeepers of the Nucleus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) form the site for entry and exit from the nucleus. A convergence of studies have defined the physical framework for the nuclear transport mechanism. This includes definition of the soluble transport machinery required for protein and RNA movement, x-ray structure analysis of transport factors, definitive compositional analysis of yeast NPCs, and documentation of the relative steady state arrangement of NPC components within the portal. With this information, researchers are now in the exciting position to examine the dynamic interplay between shuttling transport factors and the static pore complex.

Susan Wente (Washington University School of Medicine; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology)

2000-05-26

224

Brown–Sequard syndrome produced by cervical disc herniation with complete neurologic recovery: report of three cases and review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study design:Case report.Objective:To report three cases of Brown–Sequard syndrome (BSS) associated with cervical disc herniation.Method:We describe clinical and radiographic review of three patients who presented with BSS caused by cervical disc herniation. Three patients presented with ipsilateral motor weakness and diminished sensation to pain and temperature on the contralateral side. Magnetic resonance images of the cervical spine in all cases,

J-K Lee; Y-S Kim; S-H Kim; Jung-Kil Lee

2007-01-01

225

Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

1990-01-01

226

Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

Norbury, John W.

1992-01-01

227

Enhancing tissue repair in annulus fibrosus defects of the intervertebral disc: analysis of a bio-integrative annulus implant in an in-vivo ovine model.  

PubMed

Annulus fibrosus repair techniques for the intervertebral disc (IVD) address the unsolved problem of reherniation after IVD herniation and might facilitate the development of nucleus pulposus replacement techniques for IVD diseases. This study investigates the suitability of a bio-integrative annulus implant.Standardized box defects were applied to the annulus L3/4 and L4/5 of 16 sheep, followed by randomized insertion of the textile polyglycolic acid/polyvinylidene fluoride annulus implant in one of the defects. Explantation was conducted after 2, 6 and 12 weeks, followed by provocative pressure testing and histological analysis. At 2 weeks' follow-up, all specimens of the control defect group demonstrated uncontained herniated nucleus pulposus tissue in the annulus defects. For the treated specimens, the annulus implant consistently provided an effective barrier for herniating nucleus pulposus tissue, with no implant dislocation at all time-points. After 2 weeks, a homogeneous cell infiltration of the annulus implant was observed, leading to a progressive directional matrix build-up. Repair tissue thickness was significantly stronger with the annulus implant at all follow-ups (p < 0.01). No pronounced foreign body reaction and no difference in the amount of supra-annular scar tissue over the defect sites were observed. The implantation procedure inflicted annulus damage adjacent to the defect. At later time-points, however, no difference in comparison with the control defect group was evident. The investigated biointegrative annulus implant showed promising results with regard to biointegration, enhancement of repair tissue and function as a mechanical barrier in an ovine model. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24227682

Hegewald, Aldemar Andres; Medved, Fabian; Feng, Daxiong; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Beierfuß, Anja; Schindler, Genevieve Ama Kyremaa; Trunk, Marcus; Kaps, Christian; Mern, Demissew Shenegelegn; Thomé, Claudius

2015-04-01

228

Unilateral pupillary mydriasis from nebulized ipratropium bromide: A false sign of brain herniation in the intensive care unit.  

PubMed

Although there are many causes of anisocoria in the intensive care setting, the development of unilateral mydriasis in patients with intracranial hemorrhage or tumor is a neurological emergency, as it may herald the onset of uncal herniation. We describe two patients with a hemiparesis from neurosurgical disorder who subsequently developed a fixed and dilated pupil. The pupillary abnormality was caused by nebulized ipratropium bromide in both cases, and resolved when the medication was discontinued. Nebulized ipratropium may leak from the mask into ipsilateral eye and cause mydriasis in patients with facial weakness. This benign cause of anisocoria in the intensive care setting is distinguished from uncal herniation by the laterality of neurologic findings, and lack of mental status change, ptosis, and extraocular movement impairment. PMID:24701070

Chaudhry, Priyanka; Friedman, Deborah I; Yu, Wengui

2014-03-01

229

[The apparent parallelism of L5-S1 as an early radiologic sign of lumbo-sacral disk herniation].  

PubMed

The purpose of ths study was to confirm the authors' impression of parallel margins between the lower vertebral plate of the last lumbar vertebra and the upper plate of the first sacral vertebra in patients suffering from herniation of the last disc. The study involved 3 groups of patients: the first comprised patients with sciatica due to compression of the S1 nerve root, the second group consisted of normal subjects and the third included patients suffering from low back pain without disc pathology. The results show that a parallel appearance between the L5 ad S1 vertebral bodies was apparent for angles of lambda less than or equal to 10 degrees. The authors have found these parallel margins only in patients suffering from disc herniation between L5 and S1. PMID:6453424

Radi, I; Balagué, F

1981-04-18

230

Intravenous contrast-enhanced CT of the postoperative lumbar spine: improved identification of recurrent disk herniation, scar, arachnoiditis, and diskitis  

SciTech Connect

Unsuccessful relief of symptoms after back surgery is usually attributable to hypertrophic extradural scar or recurrent herniated disk. Their clinical and myelographic differentiation is difficult, yet important because reoperation is not always beneficial for scar removal. This article examines the usefulness of intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography for this problem. Forty-five postsurgical patients were studied; eight had subsequent surgery. In the four with hypertrophic scars, intravenous contrast enhancement of the scar allowed its recognition in each case; in the four with hypertrophic scars, intravenous contrast enhancement of the scar allowed its recognition in each case; in the four with recurrent disk herniation, nonenhancement of the extruded disk allowed its recognition in three. In the other 37 patients who were not reoperated, 33 were believed to have scar on the basis of contrast enhancement. The method seems promising for more accurate evaluation of failed back surgery, including the recognition of diskitis.

Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

1984-10-01

231

Delayed repair in a case of forearm fascial muscle herniation using non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix.  

PubMed

The options for treatment of symptomatic muscle herniation in the limbs traditionally include fasciotomy, direct repair, tendon weave graft (palmaris longus), fascial graft (tensor fascia lata), and synthetic mesh (prolene). A recent case report has described the use of acellular cadaveric dermal matrix to reconstruct fascial defects in 2 cases. We describe the use of Strattice, a non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix, as a fascial underlay graft in a case of symptomatic upper limb muscle herniation. We propose that Strattice has the advantages over cadaveric dermal matrices in terms of avoiding the use of human donor tissue. It has suitable tensile properties to be used for reconstructing fascial defects. PMID:22913999

Hartmann, Christoph E A; Branford, Olivier A; Floyd, David

2012-09-01

232

Momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An optical model description, based on multiple scattering theory, of longitudinal momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The crucial role of the imaginary component of the nucleon-nucleon transition matrix in accounting for longitudinal momentum transfer is demonstrated. Results obtained with this model are compared with Intranuclear Cascade (INC) calculations, as well as with predictions from Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. Comparisons are also made with experimental data where available. These indicate that the present model is adequate to account for longitudinal momentum transfer in both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies.

Khan, Ferdous; Townsend, Lawrence W.

1993-01-01

233

Eight Year Outcome after Surgery for Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Comparison of Reoperated and not Reoperated Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  ?A retrospective study of 211 patients with unilateral sciatica operated on for lumbar disc herniation during 1988 and 1989\\u000a was performed in order to compare the results of reoperated patients with the results of patients operated on only once. The\\u000a patients completed a standardized questionnaire in 1997 which included questions about reoperations, back and leg pain, functional\\u000a status and disability

A. Vik; J. A. Zwart; G. Hulleberg; Ø. P. Nygaard

2001-01-01

234

Case report: The operation for the lumbar disk herniation just after cesarean delivery in the third trimester of pregnancy  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Low back pain is common during pregnancy. However, the incidence of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation during pregnancy is very rare. We report a case of lumbar disc herniation underwent discectomy just after cesarean delivery in the third trimester of pregnancy. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 33-year-old woman presented at 32 weeks gestation. She had a low back pain and the left-sided leg pain below the knee. At 34 weeks gestation, she had severe weakness of the left extension halluces longus, left ankle dorsiflexion. MRI showed a large disc herniation at L4/5 expanded to the spinal canal more. The cesarean delivery was performed in the supine position. The patient was then turned to a prone position, and a left L4/5 discectomy was performed. But the day after surgery, she had a severe low back pain and the right leg pain below the knee. MRI showed a disc herniation at L4/5 on the right side of the spinal canal. At 6 days after the first surgery, a right L4/5 discectomy was performed. In the immediate postoperative period, the patient experienced complete relief of the right leg pain. DISCUSSION It is necessary to cooperate with a pediatrician, an obstetrician, and an anethesiologists. For obtaining the best outcome on mother and child, it is important to discuss in advance to be able to respond quickly for changeable situation. CONCLUSION It is necessary to conduct the operation under pregnancy in consideration of the great influence on mother and child. PMID:25437670

Ochi, Hironori; Ohno, Ryuichi; Kubota, Mitsuaki; Hanyu, Ryo; Sakai, Kensuke; Sugawara, Yu; Mukasa, Fumihiro; Kaneko, Kazuo

2014-01-01

235

Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness  

PubMed Central

Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD) in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW) Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was counteracted by a trend toward disturbed sexual function. Further researches are needed to explore the extent of this problem. PMID:25558144

Akca, Nezih; Ozdemir, Bulent; Kanat, Ayhan; Batcik, Osman Ersagun; Yazar, Ugur; Zorba, Orhan Unal

2014-01-01

236

Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Factors Which May Predict the Need for Surgery in Lumbar Disc Herniation  

PubMed Central

Study Design Case-control. Purpose Evaluate clinical and imaging factors which may predict the risk of failure of medical therapy in patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Overview of Literature LDH is a common cause of low back pain and radicular leg pain, with a generally favorable natural course. At present, however, it is not possible to identify patients who may be candidates for surgery in an early stage of their disease by means of clinical signs or diagnostic imaging criteria. Methods We designed a study investigating patients with untreated low back pain to assess the predictive value of demographic, clinical or imaging findings in identifying patients who finally would meet the classic current criteria for surgery. Results Among 134 patients, 80.6% were successfully treated with conservative therapy and 19.4% finally underwent surgery. Sex, occupation, involved root level, presence of Modic changes, osteophytes or annular tears were not significantly different between the 2 groups, while cerebrospinal fluid block, Pfirrmann's grade, location of herniation with regard to the midline, and type of herniation were significantly different. Anteroposterior fragment size was significantly higher and intervertebral foramen height and thecal sac diameters were significantly lower in the surgical group. Conclusions Although it is strongly recommended to practice conservative management at first for patients with LDH symptoms, the results of this study shows that higher Pfirrmann's grade, more laterally located discs, extrusion and protrusion herniation types, and larger fragments could predict the risk of conservative treatment failure. This way, unnecessarily prolonged conservative management (beyond 4-8 weeks) may be precluded. PMID:25187861

Motiei-Langroudi, Rouzbeh; Sadeghian, Homa

2014-01-01

237

Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Surgery for Adjacent Segment Degeneration and Recurrent Disc Herniation  

PubMed Central

Objective. The goal of the present study was to examine the clinical results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar surgery for patients with adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and recurrence of disc herniation. Methods. From December 2011 to November 2013, we collected forty-three patients who underwent repeated lumbar surgery. These patients, either received PELD (18 patients) or repeated open lumbar surgery (25 patients), due to ASD or recurrence of disc herniation at L3-4, L4-5, or L5-S1 level, were assigned to different groups according to the surgical approaches. Clinical data were assessed and compared. Results. Mean blood loss was significantly less in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Hospital stay and mean operating time were shorter significantly in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Immediate postoperative pain improvement in VAS was 3.5 in the PELD group and ?0.56 in the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. For ASD and recurrent lumbar disc herniation, PELD had more advantages over open lumbar surgery in terms of reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, operating time, fewer complications, and less postoperative discomfort. PMID:25861474

Chen, Huan-Chieh; Lee, Chih-Hsun; Wei, Li; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Lin, Tien-Jen

2015-01-01

238

Pure traumatic upper cervical disc herniation causing spinal cord injury: a case report and review of literature  

PubMed Central

Abstract: One third of all spinal injuries involve cervical vertebrae, and the impact of injury to the cervical spinal cord is profound and requires systemic treatment. The role and timing of surgical decompression after an acute spinal cord injury (SCI) remains one of the most controversial topics pertaining to spinal surgery. Lack of controlled, prospective, multicenter clinical studies has contributed to confusion in optimal treatment methods for patients with injuries of the cervical spinal cord. Clinically, the question of whether surgical decompression improves motor recovery following SCI remains surrounded by controversy. Case: Two cases with a 32-year-old man who developed right -sided Brown-Séquard Syndrome Following a motor to car accident with the large right paramedian C3–C4 disc herniation, and ipsilateral spinal cord compression and a 30-year-old man with the syndrome of acute central cervical spinal cord injury with motor impairment involving only upper extremities due to central C2–C3 disc herniation following a pedestrian accident are reported. Discectomy and anterior cervical fusion with the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage were performed. A complete motor deficit recovery and a marked sensitive deficit improvement were obtained. The need for and timing of surgical decompression in post traumatic spinal cord injury is controversial. Surgery may expedite neurological recovery in some patients and may provide additional neurological recovery when clinical improvement has plateaued or worsened. In our patient a complete motor deficit recovery was observed. Keywords: Cervical, Disc herniation, Spinal cord injury

Sharifi, Guive; Mosavi, Seyed Ali; Shafieezad, Misagh; Asgari Nosari, Massoud

2012-01-01

239

Feasibility and Efficacy of Percutaneous Lateral Lumbar Discectomy in the Treatment of Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Preliminary Experience  

PubMed Central

Objective. This study was aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous lateral lumbar discectomy (PLLD) in treating patients with lumber disc herniation. Methods. A total of 183 patients with lumbar disc herniation were recruited to receive PLLD surgery from April 2006 to October 2011. All the adverse effects were recorded during the follow-up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after PLLD. The clinical outcomes were determined by visual analog scale and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score. Results. The surgery was performed successfully in all patients (102 males and 81 females aged from 21 to 66 years) with a mean 16.6-month follow-up (range from 26 to 65 months). No postoperative complications, including intestinal and vascular complications, nerve injuries, and postoperative infections, were associated with PLLD. At one month after surgery, visual analog scale (3.12±1.44 versus 6.76±2.31, P<0.05) was significantly lower than the baseline and was sustained until 24 months after surgery (3.25 ± 1.78 versus 6.76±2.31, P<0.05). Besides that, Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (25.25±3.21 versus 11.78±2.38, P<0.05) was increased when compared to the baseline. Conclusions. PLLD was a promising, mini-invasive, and effective treatment for lumber disc herniation. PMID:25695066

Jiang, Wenjin; Sun, Bolin; Sheng, Qirui; Song, Xuepeng; Zheng, Yanbo; Wang, Ligang

2015-01-01

240

Minimally Invasive Endourological Techniques may Provide a Novel Method for Relieving Urinary Obstruction due to Ureterosciatic Herniation  

PubMed Central

Ureterosciatic herniation, the protrusion of the hernia sac through the sciatic foramen, is an extremely rare cause of ureteral obstruction. We describe a case revealed by severe left back pain in a 72-year-old female. She was referred to our hospital for urological assessment of left hydronephrosis observed by ultrasonography. Intravenous ureterography (IVU) showed findings compatible with a left sciatic ureter, a dilated ureter with a fixed kinking, which is known as the ‘curlicue’ sign. We decided to attempt recovery of the herniated ureter using a retrograde approach. Ureteral stent placement was performed to decompress the dilated upper urinary tract. The ureterosciatic hernia was relieved with the passage of a flexible guide wire and a double-pigtail stent. Three months after ureteral stenting, she refused continuing to have an indwelling stent and the stent was removed. Thereafter, IVU revealed recurrent ureterosciatic hernia; however, there was no hydroureter or hydronephrosis. The patient is currently being under observation for 6 years after stenting and continues to be without hydronephrosis or symptoms. Placement of an internal stent possibly provides the rigidity to the ureter, thereby reducing the hernia and urinary obstruction. In the previous reports, most symptomatic patients have been treated surgically, with conservative therapy reserved for asymptomatic patients. For the patient who is elderly or a poor surgical candidate, retrograde stenting may provide safe reduction and efficacious treatment. This endourological approach provides a minimally invasive means for the management of urinary obstruction caused by ureterosciatic herniation.

Kato, Tomonori; Komiya, Akira; Ikeda, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Akakura, Koichiro

2015-01-01

241

Minimally Invasive Endourological Techniques may Provide a Novel Method for Relieving Urinary Obstruction due to Ureterosciatic Herniation.  

PubMed

Ureterosciatic herniation, the protrusion of the hernia sac through the sciatic foramen, is an extremely rare cause of ureteral obstruction. We describe a case revealed by severe left back pain in a 72-year-old female. She was referred to our hospital for urological assessment of left hydronephrosis observed by ultrasonography. Intravenous ureterography (IVU) showed findings compatible with a left sciatic ureter, a dilated ureter with a fixed kinking, which is known as the 'curlicue' sign. We decided to attempt recovery of the herniated ureter using a retrograde approach. Ureteral stent placement was performed to decompress the dilated upper urinary tract. The ureterosciatic hernia was relieved with the passage of a flexible guide wire and a double-pigtail stent. Three months after ureteral stenting, she refused continuing to have an indwelling stent and the stent was removed. Thereafter, IVU revealed recurrent ureterosciatic hernia; however, there was no hydroureter or hydronephrosis. The patient is currently being under observation for 6 years after stenting and continues to be without hydronephrosis or symptoms. Placement of an internal stent possibly provides the rigidity to the ureter, thereby reducing the hernia and urinary obstruction. In the previous reports, most symptomatic patients have been treated surgically, with conservative therapy reserved for asymptomatic patients. For the patient who is elderly or a poor surgical candidate, retrograde stenting may provide safe reduction and efficacious treatment. This endourological approach provides a minimally invasive means for the management of urinary obstruction caused by ureterosciatic herniation. PMID:25849669

Kato, Tomonori; Komiya, Akira; Ikeda, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Akakura, Koichiro

2015-01-01

242

Transcalvarial brain herniation volume after decompressive craniectomy is the difference between two spherical caps.  

PubMed

Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a surgical procedure used to relieve severely increased intracranial pressure (ICP) by removing a portion of the skull. Following DC, the brain expands through the skull defect created by DC, resulting in transcalvarial herniation (TCH). Traditionally, people measure only changes in the ICP but not in the intracranial volume (ICV), which is equivalent to the volume of TCH (VTCH), in patients undergoing DC. We constructed a simple model of the cerebral hemispheres, assuming the shape of the upper half of a sphere with a radius of 8cm. We hypothesized that the herniated brain following DC also conforms to the shape of a spherical cap. Considering that a circular piece of the skull with a radius of a was removed, VTCH is the volume difference between 2 spherical caps at the operated side and the corresponding non-operated side, which represents the pre-DC volume underneath the removed skull due to the bilateral symmetry of the skull and the brain. Subsequently, we hypothesized that the maximal extent of TCH depends on a because of the biomechanical limitations imposed by the inelastic scalp. The maximum value of VTCH is 365.0mL when a is 7.05cm and the height difference between the spherical caps (?h) at its maximum is 2.83cm. To facilitate rapid calculation of VTCH, we proposed a simplified estimation formula, VˆTCH=12A(2)?h, where A=2a. With the a value ranging between 0 and 7cm, the ratio between VˆTCH and VTCH ranges between 0.77 and 1.27, with different ?h values. For elliptical skull defects with base diameters of A and C, the formula changes to VˆTCH=12AC?h. If our hypothesis is correct, surgeons can accurately calculate VTCH after DC. Furthermore, this can facilitate volumetric comparisons between the effects of DCs in skulls of varying sizes, allowing quantitative comparisons between ICVs in addition to ICPs. PMID:25583637

Liao, Chun-Chih; Tsai, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Long; Huang, Ke-Chun; Chiang, I-Jen; Wong, Jau-Min; Xiao, Furen

2015-03-01

243

Nucleus accumbens and impulsivity.  

PubMed

The multifaceted concept of impulsivity implies that different impulsivity aspects, mediated by different neural processes, influence behavior at different levels. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is a key component of the neural processes regulating impulsivity. In this review, we discuss the findings of lesion studies in animals and functional imaging studies in humans focusing on the role of the NAc in impulsivity. Evidence supports that the extent and pattern of involvement of the NAc, and its subregions, the core and the shell, vary among different facets of impulsivity. Data from imaging studies reviewed in this article suggest the involvement of the ventral striatum/NAc in impulsive choice. Findings of animal studies indicate that lesions of the NAc core subregion facilitated impulsivity in tasks involving intertemporal choice, and promoted a risk-averse, less impulsive, tendency in tasks involving options with probability differences. Modification of neurotransmitter activity, especially of dopamine, which is proposed to underlie the changes observed in functional imaging studies, has been shown to influence afferent input pattern in the NAc and the generation of the behavioral output. Parameters of behavioral tasks reflecting response inhibition function are altered by neurochemical interventions and local electrical stimulation in both the core and the shell subregions. In toto, NAc's pattern of neuronal activity, either genetically determined or acquired, has a critical impact on the interindividual variation in the expression of impulsivity. Nevertheless, the NAc is not the only substrate responsible for impulsivity and it is not involved in each facet of impulsivity to the same extent. PMID:20831892

Basar, Koray; Sesia, Thibaut; Groenewegen, Henk; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Temel, Yasin

2010-12-01

244

Comparison of potential models of nucleus-nucleus bremsstrahlung  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At low photon energies, the potential models of nucleus-nucleus bremsstrahlung are based on electric transition multipole operators, which are derived either only from the nuclear current or only from the charge density by making the long-wavelength approximation and using the Siegert theorem. In the latter case, the bremsstrahlung matrix elements are divergent and some regularization techniques are used to obtain finite values for the bremsstrahlung cross sections. From an extension of the Siegert theorem, which is not based on the long-wavelength approximation, a new potential model of nucleus-nucleus bremsstrahlung is developed. Only convergent integrals are included in this approach. Formal links between bremsstrahlung cross sections obtained in these different models are made. Furthermore, three different ways to calculate the regularized matrix elements are discussed and criticized. Some prescriptions for a proper implementation of the regularization are deduced. A numerical comparison between the different models is done by applying them to the ? +? bremsstrahlung.

Dohet-Eraly, J.; Baye, D.

2014-09-01

245

Comparison of potential models of nucleus-nucleus bremsstrahlung  

E-print Network

At low photon energies, the potential models of nucleus-nucleus bremsstrahlung are based on electric transition multipole operators, which are derived either only from the nuclear current or only from the charge density by making the long-wavelength approximation and using the Siegert theorem. In the latter case, the bremsstrahlung matrix elements are divergent and some regularization techniques are used to obtain finite values for the bremsstrahlung cross sections. From an extension of the Siegert theorem, which is not based on the long-wavelength approximation, a new potential model of nucleus-nucleus bremsstrahlung is developed. Only convergent integrals are included in this approach. Formal links between bremsstrahlung cross sections obtained in these different models are made. Furthermore, three different ways to calculate the regularized matrix elements are discussed and criticized. Some prescriptions for a proper implementation of the regularization are deduced. A numerical comparison between the different models is done by applying them to the $\\alpha+\\alpha$ bremsstrahlung.

Jérémy Dohet-Eraly; Daniel Baye

2014-05-23

246

Subthreshold Antiproton Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions  

E-print Network

]. In both calculations [19,20], antiproton annihilation was treated schematically and the propagation as well as the elastic rescattering of antiprotons in the medium were neglected. The underestimation of the antiproton yield in nucleus- nucleus... constants of the nu- cleon to the sigma and omega mesons are denoted, re- spectively, by g and g . The 0.3 and o4 terms represent the scalar meson self-interaction. For a quasihomogeneous and weakly interacting nu- clear system, one can derive a...

LI, GQ; Ko, Che Ming; Fang, X. S.; Zheng, Y. M.

1994-01-01

247

Spinal cord herniation as a complication of en bloc, multilevel, anterior thoracic vertebrectomy for a giant cell tumor: success of posterior cord reduction and dural repair.  

PubMed

Iatrogenic spinal cord herniation is a rare complication following spinal stabilization surgery. The authors present a case of circumferential thoracic tumor decompression and fixation by anterior instrumentation complicated by delayed anterior spinal cord herniation. This complication resulted in progressive paraparesis 5 years after the original procedure. The patient underwent reexploration and repair of the dural defect, resulting in the reduction of the spinal cord to its normal position. The patient's paraparesis improved significantly after dural repair. Although progression of neurological deficit can be very slow, repair of the dural defect can restore normal spinal cord alignment and improve neurological deficit. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of spinal cord herniation following an anterior thoracic vertebrectomy. PMID:25237844

Kawsar, Khandkar A; Bhatia, Robin; Casey, Adrian C T H

2014-12-01

248

Assessing the Risk of Disc Heniation Related to Landing Impact Following Long-duration Spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Previous research has shown that crewmembers returning on the Space Shuttle have an increased incidence of herniated nucleus pulposus after spaceflight. This increased risk is thought to be related to disc volume expansion due to unloading and prolonged exposure to microgravity. Although there is an increased risk of disc herniation in Space Shuttle astronauts, it is unknown if dynamic landing loads further contribute to the risk of herniation. To determine if dynamic loads increase the risk of incidence, data from crewmembers (excluding cosmonauts) returning on the Soyuz spacecraft will be compared to Space Shuttle astronauts. These data will be obtained from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) Project at NASA. Severity and incidence after spaceflight will be mined from the data, and statistical analyses will be used to determine if Soyuz crewmembers have a higher incidence of disc herniation than Space Shuttle crewmembers. The results are expected to show no difference between Space Shuttle and Soyuz crewmembers, indicating that higher dynamic loads on landing and long-duration spaceflight do not significantly increase the risk of disc herniation. If no difference is shown between the two crewmember populations, then disc volume expansion due to microgravity does not significantly increase the risk of injury due to dynamic loads for deconditioned crewmembers. Any risk associated with deconditioning would be primarily due to bone structure changes and resulting bone strength changes. This study is an important first step in determining whether the spinal disc plays a role in injury due to dynamic loads.

Somers, J. T.; Newby, N..; Wells, J.

2014-01-01

249

Clinical Outcomes of Percutaneous Plasma Disc Coagulation Therapy for Lumbar Herniated Disc Diseases  

PubMed Central

Objective This is prospective study of clinical outcomes of percutaneous plasma disc coagulation Therapy (PDCT) in patients with herniated lumbar disc disease (HLD) to evaluate the safety and efficacy in its clinical application and usefulness as a reliable alternative to microscopic discectomy. Methods Forty-six patients were enrolled in this study from April 2006 to June 2010. All patients had one-level HLD. Disc degeneration was graded on routine T2-weighted magnetic resonance Image (MRI) using the Pfirrmann's grading system and all index levels were grade 3 and grade 4. Indications for surgery were radiculopathy caused by disc protrusion with soft consistency. MRI was done at one month after the procedure in all patients to check post-PDCT change. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using Visual Analog Scales (VAS) score and MacNab's criteria. Results This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our institution. The age of the study population ranged from 16 to 59 years with a mean age of 37.2 years. There were 29 males and 17 females in this study. The mean period of clinical follow-up was 21 months. The average preoperative VAS score for radiculopathy was 7.4±1.4, while the final follow-up VAS score was 1.4±0.7 (p<0.001). In MacNab's criteria, 41 patients (89.1%) had achieved favorable improvement (excellent and good) until later follow-up. There were one patient from infection and two patients who needed to convert to open discectomy. Conclusion PDCT is a safe and efficient treatment modality in a selective patient with HLD. PMID:22396836

Kim, Sung Chul; Cho, Ki Hong

2012-01-01

250

Correlative analyses of isolated upper lumbar disc herniation and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae  

PubMed Central

Background: Upper lumbar disc herniation (ULDH) is easy to be misdiagnosed due to its special anatomical and atypical clinical features. Few studies have identified the relationship between ULDH and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae (WSV). Hypothesis: WSV may have some indicative relations withULDH. Patients and methods: Between January 2003 and October 2013, 47 patients (27 males and 20 females; mean age, 41.2 years) with single-level ULDH (as study group) and 47 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers (as control group) were studied by radiograph. The two groups were compared with respect to age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), kyphotic angle, and the proportion of WSV. Also, correlative analyses were conducted in the study group to investigate the relation between the kyphotic angle of target vertebrae and other factors including age, BMI, Cobb angle, JOA score and bone mineral density (BMD). Results: The average kyphotic angle in the study group was 11° (4°-22°), while the average kyphotic angle in the control group was 2° (0°-7°). Obviously, the mean kyphotic angle in the study group was statistically larger than that in the control group (t=13.797, P<0.001). The proportion of WSV in the study group was significantly larger than that in the control group (x2=36.380, P<0.0001). The correlations between kyphotic angles and other items (i.e., age, BMI, BMD, Cobb angle and JOA score) in the study group and the control group were low or uncorrelated. Conclusions: WSV are indicatively associated with adjacent ULDH. Thus, ULDH should be alerted when WSV are first found in radiograph and accompanied by clinical symptoms. PMID:25785106

Xu, Jia-Xin; Yang, Si-Dong; Wang, Bao-Lin; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong

2015-01-01

251

A PHASED REHABILITATION PROTOCOL FOR ATHLETES WITH LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC HERNIATION  

PubMed Central

Conservative non-surgical management of a herniated lumbar intervertebral disc (HLD) in athletes is a complex task due to the dramatic forces imparted on the spine during sport participation. The demands placed upon the athlete during rehabilitation and return to sport are unique not only from a sport specific perspective, but also regarding return to the sport strength and conditioning programs utilized for sport preparation. Many prescriptions fail to address postural and motor control faults specific to athletic development, which may prevent full return to sport after suffering a HLD or predispose the athlete to future exacerbations of a HLD. Strength exercises involving squatting, deadlifting, and Olympic power lifts are large components of the typical athlete's conditioning program, therefore some progressions are provided to address potential underlying problems in the athlete's technique that may have contributed to their HLD in the first place. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to propose a framework for rehabilitation that is built around the phases of healing of the disc. Phase I: Non-Rotational/Non-Flexion Phase (Acute Inflammatory Phase), Phase II: Counter rotation/Flexion Phase (Repair Phase), Phase III: Rotational Phase/Power development (Remodeling Phase), and Phase IV: Full return to sport. This clinical commentary provides a theoretical basis for these phases based on available literature as well as reviewing many popular current practice trends in the management of an HLD. The authors recognize the limits of any general exercise rehabilitation recommendation with regard to return to sport, as well as any general strength and conditioning program. It is vital that an individual assessment and prescription is made for every athlete which reviews and addresses movement in all planes of motion under all necessary extrinsic and intrinsic demands to that athlete. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175134

VanGelder, Leonard H.; Vaughn, Daniel W.

2013-01-01

252

Sensitivity of Cross Sections for Elastic Nucleus-Nucleus Scattering to Halo Nucleus Density Distributions  

E-print Network

In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions of exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the $^6$He and $^{11}$Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in $^6$He and $^{11}$Li.

G. D. Alkhazov; V. V. Sarantsev

2011-07-04

253

Toward a systematic nucleus-nucleus potential for peripheral collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A systematic nucleus-nucleus potential is proposed based on an optical model analysis of angular distributions of differential cross sections of 6Li and 7Li elastic scattering from targets with A?40 with incident energies between 5 and 40 MeV/nucleon. A single-folding model based on the Bruyères Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux (JLMB) model nucleon-nucleus potentials was used. Systematics in energy dependence of the potential parameters were obtained. This systematics was found to give reasonable account for both elastic scattering and total reaction cross sections for projectiles with mass numbers up to A˜40, including both stable and unstable nuclei, for incident energies from the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier to about 100 MeV/nucleon.

Xu, Y. P.; Pang, D. Y.

2013-04-01

254

A finite element analysis of the influence of surgical herniation on the viscoelastic properties of the intervertebral disc.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper was to study the influence of surgical herniation on the viscoelastic properties of the intervertebral disc. The work was broken down into two phases: experimentation and analysis. In the first step of experimentation, five specimens were excised from the L1-L2 level of young adult rhesus monkeys. The prepared specimen consisted of the intervertebral joint and the two adjacent vertebral centrums without either the posterior elements or associated soft tissue. The specimens were subjected to a constant compressive load for eight hours followed by a sixteen hour relaxation time. During all the load cycles, displacement of the specimens was measured with an LVDT. After the first compressive test, the specimens were herniated and then the compressive test repeated. In the second phase of the work, a viscoelastic axisymmetric finite element model was used to quantify the experimental data. A three parameter Kelvin solid was employed in the finite element model. The results of this paper will be used to construct a dynamic model for the vertebral column. PMID:6643516

Furlong, D R; Palazotto, A N

1983-01-01

255

Cometary nucleus and active regions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

Whipple, F. L.

1984-01-01

256

Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor  

DOEpatents

A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

2003-11-25

257

Formin’ actin in the nucleus  

PubMed Central

Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner. PMID:24637338

Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

2014-01-01

258

Full-endoscopic interlaminar removal of chronic lumbar epidural hematoma after spinal manipulation  

PubMed Central

Background: Spinal manipulation is widely used for low back pain treatments. Complications associated with spinal manipulation are seen. Lumbar epidural hematoma (EDH) is one of the complications reported in the literature. If lumbar chronic EDH symptoms are present, which are similar to those of a herniated nucleus pulposus, surgery may be considered if medical treatment fails. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy utilizing an interlaminar approach can be successfully applied to those with herniated nucleus pulposus. We use the same technique to remove the lumbar chronic EDH, which is the first documented report in the related literature. Methods: We present a case with chronic lumbar EDH associated with spinal manipulation. Neurologic deficits were noted on physical examination. We arranged for a full-endoscopic interlaminar approach to remove the hematoma for the patient with the rigid endoscopy (Vertebris system; Richard Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany). Results: After surgery, the patient's radiculopathy immediately began to disappear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up 10 days after the surgery revealed no residual hematoma. No complications were noted during the outpatient department follow up. Conclusions: Lumbar EDH is a possible complication of spinal manipulation. Patient experiencing rapidly progressive neurologic deficit require early surgical evacuation, while conservative treatment may only be applied to those with mild symptoms. A percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar approach may be a viable alternative for the treatment of those with chronic EDH with progressive neurologic deficits. PMID:24872917

Cheng, Yen-Po; Lee, Kwo-Whei; Lin, Ping-Yi; Huang, Abel Po-Hao; Cheng, Chun-Yuan; Ma, Hsin-I; Chen, Chien-Min; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

2014-01-01

259

A scaling relation between proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is recently discovered that at high multiplicity, the proton-nucleus (pA) collisions give rise to two particle correlations that are strikingly similar to those of nucleus-nucleus (AA) collisions at the same multiplicity, although the system size is smaller in pA. Using an independent cluster model and a simple conformal scaling argument, where the ratio of the mean free path to the system size stays constant at fixed multiplicity, we argue that flow in pA emerges as a collective response to the fluctuations in the position of clusters, just like in AA collisions. With several physically motivated and parameter free rescalings of the recent LHC data, we show that this simple model captures the essential physics of elliptic and triangular flow in pA collisions.

Ba?ar, Gökçe; Teaney, Derek

2014-11-01

260

Lumbar disc herniation associated with separation of the posterior ring apophysis: analysis of five surgical cases and review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary¶Background. Separation of the posterior ring apophysis of an adjacent vertebral body can sometimes accompany lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. The condition can be both difficult to detect in conventional radiographs and is somewhat controversial to treat. Although there is general agreement on the frequent need for surgery, there is no consensus on the choice of operation. One procedure, posterior lumbar

T. Asazuma; M. Nobuta; M. Sato; M. Yamagishi; K. Fujikawa

2003-01-01

261

Reliability of the Path of the Sciatic Nerve, Congruence between Patients' History and Medical Imaging Evidence of Disc Herniation and Its Role in Surgical Decision Making  

PubMed Central

Study Design The prevalence of disc herniation is estimated to be about 100,000 new cases per year in France and disc herniation accounts for 25% to 30% of surgical activity in Departments of Neurosurgery. Classically, sciatica is expected to follow its specific dermatome-L5 or S1-. In clinical practice, we regularly encounter patients showing discrepancy between clinical sciatica and imaging findings. Purpose The aim of this paper is to review the medical concept and management of sciatica pain in patients showing this discrepancy. Overview of Literature To the best of our knowledge, this subject has not yet been discussed in the medical literature. Methods The medical records of 241 patients who were operated on for L5 or S1 sciatica caused by disc herniation were reviewed. Results We found an apparent clinicoradiological discrepancy between sciatica described by patients on one side and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding on the other side in 27 (11.20%) patients. We did not find any other abnormalities in the preoperative and postoperative period. All of these patients underwent lumbar discectomy via posterior interlaminar approach. Three months after surgery, 25 patients (92.59%) had been totally relieved of sciatica pain. Two patients (7.41%) continued to experience sciatica in spite of the surgery. Conclusions The discrepancy between clinical sciatica and disc herniation level on MRI is not rare. Management of this discrepancy requires further investigation in order to avoid missing the diagnosis and treatment failure. PMID:25901230

Karimi Khouzani, Reza

2015-01-01

262

Acute spontaneous cervical disc herniation causing rapidly progressive myelopathy in a patient with comorbid ossified posterior longitudinal ligament: Case report and literature review  

PubMed Central

Background: Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and cervical disc herniation are commonly encountered neurosurgical conditions. Here we present an unusual case of nontraumatic rapidly progressive myelopathy due to cervical disc herniation with comorbid OPLL and conduct a literature review focusing on the frequency and management of disc herniations with OPLL. Case Description: A 52-year-old healthy female presented with a 72-h history of rapid progression of dense quadriparesis with sensory deficits, with a precedent 4-week history of nontraumatic midline neck pain. Clinical examination revealed profound motor deficits below the C5 myotome. Spinal neuroimaging revealed OPLL (computed tomography [CT]) and a cervical disc herniation spanning from C4/5 to C5/6 with significant retrovertebral disease (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). Operative management involved an anterior cervical corpectomy and instrumented fusion, with removal of both the sequestered disc material and the locally compressive OPLL. The patient recovered full motor function and independent ambulation with no residual signs or symptoms of myelopathy at the time of discharge. Conclusion: This unique case of a spontaneous cervical disc herniation in the context of OPLL causing rapidly progressive myelopathy illustrates the complementarity of CT and MRI in diagnosing the underlying cause of a rapidly progressive neurologic deficit in the absence of antecedent trauma. Though the optimal surgical management of such pathology remains uncertain; in this case, the anterior approach was motivated by the significant retrovertebral ventrally compressive sequestrum, and provided for excellent neurologic outcome. This article also reviews the occurrence/management of such acute cervical discs with OPLL. PMID:25289163

Westwick, Harrison J.; Goldstein, Christina L.; Shamji, Mohammed F.

2014-01-01

263

Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

Mcguire, Stephen C.

1987-01-01

264

Subthreshold ? meson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Part of emission of the negatively charged kaons from the nucleus-nucleus collisions appears to originate from decays of ?(1020) mesons into the K+K- channel. We report on the measurement of the emission yield of ? mesons in the collisions of Ni+Ni at the beam kinetic energy of 1.91A GeV. The experiment was done with the FOPI spectrometer at the SIS 18 accelerator at GSI, Darmstadt. The total yield of ? was found to be (4.5 ± 0.7-1.2+1.8) · 10-4 per triggered event. Ratio of ?/K- emission yields was estimated at 0.42±0.13-0.11+0.17, meaning that about 20% of negatively charged kaons emitted from the collision originate from decays of ? mesons. The results are in agreement with similar HADES results done for the collisions of Ar+KCl.

Piasecki, K.

2014-04-01

265

Transverse Energy in nucleus-nucleus collisions: A review  

SciTech Connect

The status of Transverse Energy (E/sub T/) in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS is reviewed. The definition of E/sub T/ and its physical significance are discussed. The basic techniques and limitations of the experimental measurements are presented. The acceptances of the major experiments to be discussed are shown, along with remarks about their idiosyncrasies. The data demonstrate that the nuclear geometry of colliding spheres primarily determines the shapes of the observed spectra. Careful account of the acceptances is crucial to comparing and interpreting results. It is concluded that nuclear stopping power is high, and that the amount of energy deposited into the interaction volume is increasing with beam energy even at SPS energies. The energy densities believed to be obtained at the SPS are close to the critical values predicted for the onset of a quark-gluon plasma. 25 refs., 8 figs.

Tincknell, M.

1988-11-15

266

The nucleus of M31  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We calculate the broad-band spectrum expected of a 10 exp 7 solar mass black hole accreting from an ambient galactic wind in the nucleus of M31, and we discuss several testable predictions of this model: (1) when resolved, this source will probably be elongated, perhaps in the direction of the semistellar nucleus BD +40 148 deg; (2) its radio spectral index is expected to be about 0.4; (3) the radio component should steepen sharply between about 10 exp 10 and 10 exp 11 Hz; (4) if an association between this radio source and a nearby Einstein X-ray source is confirmed, its radio luminosity should be variable on a time of less than about 1 yr; and (5) the variability of its radio and X-ray fluxes should be anticorrelated.

Melia, Fulvio

1992-01-01

267

Foramen of Huschke (tympanicum) in a Nigerian male with articular soft-tissue herniation into the external auditory meatus.  

PubMed

The protrusion of articular soft-tissue from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) into the external ear in the absence of trauma, neoplasm or inflammation is rare. We present below a Nigerian adult male with retrodiscal herniation of soft-tissues of the TMJ into the external auditory meatus through a persistent foramen of Huschke. We are not aware of any reports of this developmental defect or its prevalence in the Nigerian medical literature. Therefore, this case is presented to heighten the index of suspicion of physicians when managing patients with otorrhea and otalgia; which is often primarily diagnosed or misdiagnosed as otitis externa. This will help avoid complications associated with the anomaly, some of which could be very serious. PMID:25287039

Olarinoye-Akorede, S A; Olanrewaju, I S; Suleiman, A O

2014-01-01

268

Clinical factors of importance for outcome after lumbar disc herniation surgery: long-term follow-up  

PubMed Central

Factors as age, sex, smoking, duration of leg pain, working status, type/level of disc herniation and psychosocial factors have been demonstrated to be of importance for short-term results after lumbar discectomy. There are few studies with long-term follow-up. In this prospective study of lumbar disc herniation patients undergoing surgery, the result was evaluated at 2 and 5–10 (mean 7.3) years after surgery. Predictive factors for satisfaction with treatment and objective outcome were investigated. Out of the included 171 patients undergoing lumbar discectomy, 154 (90%) patients completed the 2-year follow-up and 140 (81%) completed the long-term follow-up. Baseline data and questionnaires about leg- and back pain intensity (VAS), duration of leg pain, disability (Oswestry Disability Index), depression (Zung Depression Scale), sick leave and employment status were obtained preoperatively, at 2-year- and long-term follow-up. Primary outcome included patient satisfaction with treatment (at both time points) and assessment of an independent observer at the 2-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes at 2-year follow-up were improvement of leg and back pain, working capacity and the need for analgesics or sleeping pills. In about 70% of the patients excellent or good overall result was reported at both follow-ups, with subjective outcome measurements. The objective evaluation after 2 years was in agreement with this result. Time on sick leave was found to be a clinically important predictor of the primary outcomes, with a potential of changing the probability of a satisfactory outcome (both objective and subjective) from around 50% (sick leave >3 months) to 80% (sick leave <2 months). Time on sick leave was also an important predictor for several of the secondary outcomes; e.g. working capacity and the need for analgesics. PMID:20512513

Lind, B.; Zoëga, B.; Halldin, K.; Gellerstedt, M.; Brisby, H.; Rutberg, L.

2010-01-01

269

Does disk space degeneration according to Los Angeles and Modic scales have relation with recurrent disk herniation?  

PubMed Central

Background: After single disk herniation operation, about 5–20% recurrences may occur. Different etiology may affect the prevalence of recurrence. Disk degeneration according to Modic and Los Angles scales could affect recurrence rate. This study wants to show the relationship between disk space degeneration according to these scales on severity, time, and prevalence of disk herniation recurrence. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients presented with radicular pain (with or without back pain) and history of lumbar disk surgery was included in this prospective study. Pre- and postoperative T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared for Modic and Los Angeles disk degeneration grading, then, data analysis on SPSS (version 20) software, paired t-test, and others. Results: The result of study shows for first operation that grade (II) Los Angeles is the most common, but, for second procedure grade (IV) was less common and the mostly decreased (from 14.7 to 9.2%). In addition, Wilcoxon test shows no change of Los Angeles grading for both first and second surgery (P = 0.06). Whereas; based on Modic criteria grading was different from first operation, in other words, grade (I) (41.2%) in first operation was changed to 20.6% in second operation (P = 0.007). Conclusion: Our study showed that the Los Angeles criterion is more practical and useful for prediction of recurrence and in the patients with Los Angles grade III and IV and grade II and III on Modic scale, the chance of recurrence is less than patients with lower grades. PMID:25538906

Abrishamkar, Saied; Mahmoudkhani, Mehdi; Aminmansour, Bahram; Mahabadi, Amir; Jafari, Shohreh

2014-01-01

270

The Surgical Treatment of Single Level Multi-Focal Subarticular and Paracentral and/or Far-Lateral Lumbar Disc Herniations: The Single Incision Full Endoscopic Approach  

PubMed Central

Background Surgery for same level multi-focal extruded lumbar disc herniations is technically challenging and the optimal method controversial. The subarticular disc herniation may pose the most challenging subtype requiring partial or complete facetectomy with or without fusion. The far-lateral disc herniation, often treated using a Wiltse approach, can also be difficult to access especially in the obese patient. When both the subarticular and far-lateral subtypes are simultaneously present at the same level with or without a paracentral disc herniation, a total facetectomy and interbody fusion (TLIF) or a total disc replacement (TDR) may be necessary. Endoscopic surgical techniques may reduce the need for these more invasive methods. Methods Fifteen patients (6 male and 9 female) who had same level multi-focal (subarticular as well as far-lateral and/or paracentral) extruded disc herniations underwent single incision unilateral endoscopic disc excision by the same surgeon at a single institution. Patients were prospectively followed for an average of 15.3 months (range 14-18 months) and outcomes were evaluated radiographically and clinically (Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results The mean operative time was 52 minutes with minimal blood loss in all cases. Fourteen of the 15 patients were discharged to home on the day of their surgery. The mean ODI and leg VAS scores improved from 22.9 ± 3.2 to 12.9 ± 2.7 (p < 0.005), and from 8.6 ± 1.6 to 2.1 + 0.4 (p < 0.005), respectively. Conclusions After an average of 15.3 months of follow-up, the clinical and radiographic results of full endoscopic surgical treatment of single level multi-focal (subarticular as well as far-lateral and/or paracentral) disc herniations are excellent. This study is a case series with mid-term follow-up (Level IV). Clinical Relevance Foraminal and extra-foraminal full endoscopic decompression appears to offer a safe minimally invasive solution to a complex pathologic problem. PMID:25694941

Scott, David L.; Han, Xiao; Yacob, Alem

2014-01-01

271

Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies  

SciTech Connect

In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica (Brazil)

2013-03-25

272

Strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions: An experimental review  

SciTech Connect

In experiments with oxygen (60 and 200 GeV/N) and sulphur (200 GeV/N) ions at CERNSPS, large energy densities of the order of 2--3 GeV/fm{sub 3} have been observed, which according to QCD calculations, satisfy necessary conditions for the formation of a quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase. Under such conditions, colour would no longer be confined to hadronic dimensions, and quarks and gluons will propagate freely throughout an extended volume. Somehow lower energy densities, of the order of 0.7--1 GeV/fm{sub 3}, were observed in AGS experiments with 15 GeV/N silicon beams and heavy targets. These energy densities might be adequate for investigations of the pre-equilibrium stage, during which the momentum space distribution has been degradated from its initial value but is not yet thermal. First experimental results, available now, show promise of seeing signs of a new phase of matter. In this review the current status of the selective experimental results on strange-particle production, which are relevant to equilibration and QGP formation in nucleus-nucleus collisions, is presented.

Odyniec, G.

1990-12-01

273

Heavy dilepton in nucleus nucleus collision at LHC energy  

E-print Network

We present a study of $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ lepton pair production in Pb + Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.5 TeV. The larger mass of tau lepton compared to electron and muon leads to considerably small hadronic contribution to the $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ pair invariant mass (M) distribution relative to the production from thermal partonic sources. The quark-antiquark annihilation processes via intermediary virtual photon, Z and Higgs bosons have been considered for the tau lepton production. The contribution from Drell-Yan process is found to dominate over thermal yield for $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ pair mass from 4 to 20 GeV at the LHC energy. We also present the ratio of $\\tau$ lepton pair yields for nucleus-nucleus collisions relative to yields from p + p collisions scaled by number of binary collisions at LHC energies as a function $\\tau$ lepton pair inavariant mass. The ratio is found to be significantly above unity for the mass range 4 to 6 GeV. This indicates the possibility of detecting $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ pair from quark g...

Majumder, Sarbani

2013-01-01

274

Exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus  

SciTech Connect

Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies. 30 references.

Margon, B.; Anderson, S.F.; Mateo, M.; Fich, M.; Massey, P.

1988-11-01

275

Nucleus morphology of Comet Halley  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera were used to determine the projected size and shape of the nucleus. The location of the terminator and numerous surface features were determined. There is good correlation between the brightest surface features and the dust jets; however, many bright features are seen which are not associated with jets. Most of the observed features are circular and appear to be related to surface elevation. The angularity of the terminator gives an indication of the three-dimensional structure of the face which was observed.

Reitsema, H. J.; Delamere, W. A.; Huebner, W. F.; Keller, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Wilhelm, K.; Schmidt, H. U.; Whipple, Fred L.

1986-01-01

276

Comparison of the Efficacy of Caudal, Interlaminar, and Transforaminal Epidural Injections in Managing Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is One Method Superior to the Other?  

PubMed Central

Background Epidural injections are performed utilizing 3 approaches in the lumbar spine: caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal. The literature on the efficacy of epidural injections has been sporadic. There are few high-quality randomized trials performed under fluoroscopy in managing disc herniation that have a long-term follow-up and appropriate outcome parameters. There is also a lack of literature comparing the efficacy of these 3 approaches. Methods This manuscript analyzes data from 3 randomized controlled trials that assessed a total of 360 patients with lumbar disc herniation. There were 120 patients per trial either receiving local anesthetic alone (60 patients) or local anesthetic with steroids (60 patients). Results Analysis showed similar efficacy for caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal approaches in managing chronic pain and disability from disc herniation. The analysis of caudal epidural injections showed the potential superiority of steroids compared with local anesthetic alone a 2-year follow-up, based on the average relief per procedure. In the interlaminar group, results were somewhat superior for pain relief in the steroid group at 6 months and functional status at 12 months. Interlaminar epidurals provided improvement in a significantly higher proportion of patients. The proportion of patients nonresponsive to initial injections was also lower in the group for local anesthetic with steroid in the interlaminar trial. Conclusions The results of this assessment show significant improvement in patients suffering from chronic lumbar disc herniation with 3 lumbar epidural approaches with local anesthetic alone, or using steroids with long-term follow-up of up to 2 years, in a contemporary interventional pain management setting. PMID:25589942

Singh, Vijay; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Falco, Frank JE; Hirsch, Joshua A.

2015-01-01

277

Comet nucleus sample return mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A comet nucleus sample return mission in terms of its relevant science objectives, candidate mission concepts, key design/technology requirements, and programmatic issues is discussed. The primary objective was to collect a sample of undisturbed comet material from beneath the surface of an active comet and to preserve its chemical and, if possible, its physical integrity and return it to Earth in a minimally altered state. The secondary objectives are to: (1) characterize the comet to a level consistent with a rendezvous mission; (2) monitor the comet dynamics through perihelion and aphelion with a long lived lander; and (3) determine the subsurface properties of the nucleus in an area local to the sampled core. A set of candidate comets is discussed. The hazards which the spacecraft would encounter in the vicinity of the comet are also discussed. The encounter strategy, the sampling hardware, the thermal control of the pristine comet material during the return to Earth, and the flight performance of various spacecraft systems and the cost estimates of such a mission are presented.

1983-01-01

278

A Minimally Invasive Treatment for Lumbar Disc Herniation: DiscoGel® Chemonucleolysis in Patients Unresponsive to Chemonucleolysis with Oxygen-Ozone  

PubMed Central

Summary A multitude of therapies is available to treat disc herniation, ranging from conservative methods (medication and physical therapy) to minimally invasive (percutaneous) treatments and surgery. O2-O3 chemonucleolysis (O2-O3 therapy) is one of the minimally invasive treatments with the best cost/benefit ratio and lowest complication rate. Another substance recently made available exploiting the chemical properties of pure ethanol is DiscoGel®, a radiopaque gelified ethanol more viscous than absolute alcohol8,9. The present study aimed to assess the therapeutic outcome of DiscoGel® chemonucleolysis in patients with lumbar disc herniation unresponsive to O2-O3 therapy. Thirty-two patients aged between 20 and 79 years were treated by DiscoGel® chemonucleolysis between December 2008 and January 2010. The treatment was successful (improvement in pain) in 24 out of 32 patients. DiscoGel® is safe and easy to handle and there were no complications related to product diffusivity outside the treatment site. The therapeutic success rate of DiscoGel® chemonucleolysis in patients unresponsive to O2-O3 therapy was satisfactory. Among other methods used to treat lumbar disc herniation, DiscoGel® chemonucleolysis can be deemed an intermediate procedure bridging conservative medical treatments and surgery. PMID:22440607

Stagni, S.; de Santis, F.; Cirillo, L.; Dall’Olio, M.; Princiotta, C.; Simonetti, L.; Stafa, A.; Leonardi, M.

2012-01-01

279

Application of Percutaneous Cervical Nucleoplasty Using the Navigable Disc Decompression Device in Patient of Cervical Herniated Intervertebral Disc: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Recent years, various percutaneous procedures including cervical nucleoplasty have been developed for disc decompressions to relieve radicular pains caused by disc herniations. We report the application of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) by using the navigable disc decompression device in two patients of cervical herniated intervertebral discs (HIVD). A 38-year-old female diagnosed with C4-C5 disc extrusion with bilateral C5 roots impingement received nucleoplasty twice at C4-C5 disc level. After second procedure, her pain was improved from 6-7/10 to 1-2/10 by visual analog scale (VAS). The second case, a 51-year-male was diagnosed with C6-C7 disc extrusion with right C7 roots impingement and received the procedure at C6-C7 disc level. The pain improved from 8/10 to 3-4/10 by VAS. Successfully, we decompressed cervical herniated discs in 2 HIVD patients without major complications. The PCN with the navigable device will be recommended as an alternative treatment method for cervical HIVD. PMID:24236264

Lim, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Hye-Jin

2013-01-01

280

“Spontaneous” CSF Fistula due to Transtegmental Brain Herniation in Combination with Signs of Increased Intracranial Pressure and Petrous Bone Hyperpneumatization: An Illustrative Case Report  

PubMed Central

Background and Importance?Transtegmental brain herniation into the petrous bone is a rare cause of rhinoliquorrhea. Our case presents a combination of several typical clinical and imaging findings illustrating the ongoing etiologic discussion of such cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas. Clinical Presentation?A 53-year-old man presented with nasal discharge after a strong effort to suppress coughing. Imaging revealed a transtegmental herniation of parts of the inferior temporal gyrus into the petrous bone and in addition a combination of signs of chronically increased intracranial pressure and a hyperpneumatization of the petrous bone. The fistula was closed by a middle cranial fossa approach. Conclusion?The case illustrates the two main predisposing factors for development of petrous bone CSF fistulas: increased intracranial pressure and thinning of the tegmental roof due to extensive development of air cells. Because the CSF leakage repair does not change the underlying cause, patients have to be informed about the possibility of developing increased intracranial pressure and recurrences of brain herniations at other sites. PMID:25485224

Rivera, Diones; Fermin-Delgado, Rafael; Stoeter, Peter

2014-01-01

281

Integrated Azimuthal Correlations in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at CERN SPS  

E-print Network

Azimuthal correlations of particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN SPS are discussed. The correlations quantified by the integral measure Phi are shown to be dominated by effects of collective flow.

Katarzyna Grebieszkow; Stanislaw Mrowczynski

2011-10-21

282

Projections From the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus to the Dorsal Cochlear  

E-print Network

Projections From the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus to the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus in Rats JOHN R. DOUCET interactions between the dorsal and ventral divisions of the cochlear nucleus are known to influence the evoked in the ventral cochlear nucleus to the dorsal cochlear nucleus by using retrograde transport of biotinylated

Ryugo, David K.

283

The nature of the cometary nucleus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The basic properties of the cometary nucleus are reviewed. Consideration is given to the absence of depth differentiation, the icy conglomerate nature, the possible existence of a halo of icy grains around the nuclear region, the nucleus size and albedo, the mass, the rotation rate, and the chemical composition (elemental and molecular).

Delsemme, A. H.

1985-01-01

284

Ice Nucleus Concentrations at the Ground  

Microsoft Academic Search

Daily observations of the surface concentration of ice nuclei have been made for three summers in Missouri as a part of Project Whitetop. The observations were taken with a nucleus counter of the expansion type. Ice nucleus counts varied considerably from day to day and from hour to hour; they were greater, on the average, during periods with southerly winds

A. Don Bourquard

1963-01-01

285

Comparative analysis of the influence of Fructus Ligustri Lucidi on a rat lumbar disc herniation model.  

PubMed

Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a term used for a group of conditions, including back pain, femoral nerve pain and sciatica. Currently available treatments and surgical options are insufficient for patients with LDH. Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) is a herb that is used for treating age?associated diseases. The results of the present study suggested that FLL may be used for treatment of patients with LDH. In the present study, matrix metalloproteinase?1, ?3, ?8 and ?9 (MMP?1, ?3, ?8 and ?9) protein and mRNA expression downregulation was observed in patients with LDH according to western blotting and reverse transcription?quantitative polymerase chain reaction. By contrast, upregulation of interleukin?2 (IL?2), IL?6, IL?8 and tumor necrosis factor?? (TNF??) expression was observed in patients with LDH, according to an enzyme?linked immunosorbent assay. Mechanical allodynia was observed in rats with LDH not treated with FLL; however, not in FLL?treated rats. IL?2, IL?6, IL?8 and TNF?? expression levels in the serum from untreated rats were significantly higher than that of the FLL?treated rat models. Protein expression levels of MMPs in FLL?treated rats were lower than those in untreated rats. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between FLL and protein expression levels require further investigation. PMID:25816023

Han, Ya-Xin; Liang, Dong; Han, Xiao-Rui; Liang, De-Yong

2015-07-01

286

Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus  

PubMed Central

The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

2014-01-01

287

Classical gluon production amplitude for nucleus-nucleus collisions: First saturation correction in the projectile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We calculate the classical single-gluon production amplitude in nucleus-nucleus collisions including the first saturation correction in one of the nuclei (the projectile) while keeping multiple-rescattering (saturation) corrections to all orders in the other nucleus (the target). In our approximation only two nucleons interact in the projectile nucleus: the single-gluon production amplitude we calculate is order- g 3 and is leading-order in the atomic number of the projectile, while resumming all order-one saturation corrections in the target nucleus. Our result is the first step towards obtaining an analytic expression for the first projectile saturation correction to the gluon production cross section in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

Chirilli, Giovanni A.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Wertepny, Douglas E.

2015-03-01

288

Clinical experience with percutaneous holmium:YAG laser discectomy in dogs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thirty-five clinical cases received laser disc ablation utilizing a uniplanar fluoroscopically guided percutaneous technique over a three year period. With the dog in right lateral recumbency, uniplanar fluoroscopy was utilized to guide the placement of 20-gauge, 2.5 inch spinal needles percutaneously through the left epaxial soft tissues into the nucleus pulposus with the dog in right lateral recumbency. The needle was advanced in increments following palpation and brief fluoroscopic observations to insure avoidance of the spinal cord and other vital structures. Entrance into the intervertebral disc was identified by a characteristic `gritty' feel of the needle passing through the annulus fibrosus. The dog was then placed in sternal recumbency, and the needles adjusted to place the tip approximately one-third of the distance into the disc. The laser fiber was then placed through the needle into the nucleus pulposus to ablate the nucleus with holmium laser energy. No detrimental side effects of this technique have been identified with the exception of one case. This single exception suggests that this procedure should not be performed on dogs with acute disc herniation. The technique appears safe given adherence to careful placement of the spinal needles and proper clinical criteria for patient selection.

Henry, George A.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Dickey, D. Thomas

1995-05-01

289

Music and the nucleus accumbens.  

PubMed

Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA. PMID:25102783

Mavridis, Ioannis N

2015-03-01

290

Surgical versus Non-Operative Treatment for Lumbar Disc Herniation: Four-Year Results for the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)  

PubMed Central

Study Design Concurrent prospective randomized and observational cohort study. Objectives To assess the 4-year outcomes of surgery vs. non-operative care. Background Although randomized trials have demonstrated small short-term differences in favor of surgery, long-term outcomes comparing surgical to non-operative treatment remain controversial. Methods Surgical candidates with imaging-confirmed lumbar intervertebral disc herniation meeting SPORT eligibility criteria enrolled into prospective randomized (501 participants) and observational cohorts (743 participants) at 13 spine clinics in 11 US states. Interventions were standard open discectomy versus usual non-operative care. Main outcome measures were changes from baseline in the SF-36 Bodily Pain (BP) and Physical Function (PF) scales and the modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI - AAOS/Modems version) assessed at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, and annually thereafter. Results Non-adherence to treatment assignment caused the intent-to-treat analyses to underestimate the treatment effects. In the 4-year combined as-treated analysis, those receiving surgery demonstrated significantly greater improvement in all the primary outcome measures (mean change Surgery vs. Non-operative; treatment effect; 95% CI): BP (45.6 vs. 30.7; 15.0; 11.8 to 18.1), PF (44.6 vs. 29.7; 14.9; 12.0 to 17.8) and ODI (?38.1 vs. ?24.9; ?13.2; ?15.6 to ?10.9). The percent working was similar between the surgery and non-operative groups, 84.4% vs. 78.4% respectively. Conclusion In a combined as-treated analysis at 4 years, patients who underwent surgery for a lumbar disc herniation achieved greater improvement than non-operatively treated patients in all primary and secondary outcomes except work status. Trial Registration Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT): Intervertebral Disc Herniation; #NCT00000410; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00000410?order=2 PMID:19018250

Weinstein, James N.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Blood, Emily; Abdu, William A.; Herkowitz, Harry; Hilibrand, Alan; Albert, Todd; Fischgrund, Jeffrey

2009-01-01

291

Responses from electric stimulation of cochlear nucleus  

E-print Network

Cochlear nucleus (CN), the exclusive destination of the auditory nerve, is the gateway for all central processing of auditory information. The CN comprises three major subdivisions: anteroventral, posteroventral and dorsal ...

Suzuki, Ryuji, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01

292

Herniation pits and cystic-appearing lesions at the anterior femoral neck: an anatomical study by MSCT and µCT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To determine distinguishing features between herniation pits (HPs) and other cystic-appearing lesions at the anterior femoral\\u000a neck in multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and micro-computed tomography (microCT) examinations.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Institutional review board approval was obtained to examine 37 proximal femora of 23 cadaveric specimens (mean age available\\u000a in 19 cadavers, 83 years; range 68–100 years; 9 female, 8 male, 6 unknown). All

Stephanie Panzer; Ulrich Esch; Ahmed Nabil Abdulazim; Peter Augat

2010-01-01

293

Photon-Nucleus Total Cross Sections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative predictions for the energy and A dependence of the cross sections for nuclear photoabsorption and inelastic electron-nucleus scattering are given. In general, the nucleons do not contribute equally to the total photon-nucleus cross section when coherent contributions of photoproduced hadrons are taken into account. At low energies (Egamma~1 BeV), the cross sections are proportional to nuclear number A, but

Stanley J. Brodsky; Jon Pumplin

1969-01-01

294

Testing string dynamics in lepton nucleus reactions  

SciTech Connect

The sensitivity of nuclear attenuation of 10-100 GeV lepton nucleus ({ell}A) reactions to space-time aspects of hadronization is investigated within the context of the Lund string model. We consider two mechanisms for attenuation in a nucleus: final state cascading and string flip excitations. Implications for the evolution of the energy density in nuclear collisions are discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs.

Gyulassy, M.; Pluemer, M.

1989-10-01

295

Functional architecture in the cell nucleus.  

PubMed Central

The major functions of the cell nucleus, including transcription, pre-mRNA splicing and ribosome assembly, have been studied extensively by biochemical, genetic and molecular methods. An overwhelming amount of information about their molecular mechanisms is available. In stark contrast, very little is known about how these processes are integrated into the structural framework of the cell nucleus and how they are spatially and temporally co-ordinated within the three-dimensional confines of the nucleus. It is also largely unknown how nuclear architecture affects gene expression. In order to understand how genomes are organized, and how they function, the basic principles that govern nuclear architecture and function must be uncovered. Recent work combining molecular, biochemical and cell biological methods is beginning to shed light on how the nucleus functions and how genes are expressed in vivo. It has become clear that the nucleus contains distinct compartments and that many nuclear components are highly dynamic. Here we describe the major structural compartments of the cell nucleus and discuss their established and proposed functions. We summarize recent observations regarding the dynamic properties of chromatin, mRNA and nuclear proteins, and we consider the implications these findings have for the organization of nuclear processes and gene expression. Finally, we speculate that self-organization might play a substantial role in establishing and maintaining nuclear organization. PMID:11368755

Dundr, M; Misteli, T

2001-01-01

296

Targeting the red nucleus for cerebellar tremor.  

PubMed

Deep brain stimulation of the thalamus (and especially the ventral intermediate nucleus) does not significantly improve a drug-resistant, disabling cerebellar tremor. The dentato-rubro-olivary tract (Guillain-Mollaret triangle, including the red nucleus) is a subcortical loop that is critically involved in tremor genesis. We report the case of a 48-year-old female patient presenting with generalized cerebellar tremor caused by alcohol-related cerebellar degeneration. Resistance to pharmacological treatment and the severity of the symptoms prompted us to investigate the effects of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the red nucleus. Intra-operative microrecordings of the red nucleus revealed intense, irregular, tonic background activity but no rhythmic components that were synchronous with upper limb tremor. The postural component of the cerebellar tremor disappeared during insertion of the macro-electrodes and for a few minutes after stimulation, with no changes in the intentional (kinetic) component. Stimulation per se did not reduce postural or intentional tremor and was associated with dysautonomic symptoms (the voltage threshold for which was inversed related to the stimulation frequency). Our observations suggest that the red nucleus is (1) an important centre for the genesis of cerebellar tremor and thus (2) a possible target for drug-refractory tremor. Future research must determine how neuromodulation of the red nucleus can best be implemented in patients with cerebellar degeneration. PMID:24415178

Lefranc, M; Manto, M; Merle, P; Tir, M; Montpellier, D; Constant, J-M; Le Gars, D; Macron, J-M; Krystkowiak, P

2014-06-01

297

BFKL Pomeron calculus: solution to equations for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the saturation domain  

E-print Network

In this paper we solve the equation for nucleus-nucleus scattering in the BFKL Pomeron calculus, suggested by Braun. We find these solutions analytically at high energies as well as numerically in the entire region of energies inside the saturation region. The semi-classical approximation is used to select out the infinite set of the parasite solutions. The nucleus-nucleus cross sections at high energy are estimated and compared with the Glauber-Gribov approach. It turns out that the exact formula gives the estimates that are very close to the ones based on Glauber-Gribov formula which is important for the practical applications

Carlos Contreras; Eugene Levin; Rodrigo Meneses

2013-02-01

298

Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main chamber at the inlet end. The inlet assembly is designed to offer improved (relative to prior such assemblies) laminar-flow performance within the main chamber. Dry aerosols are subjected to activation and growth in the supersaturation field. f) After aerosol activation, at the outlet end of the main chamber, a polished stainless-steel probe is used to sample droplets into a laser particle counter. The probe features an improved design for efficient sampling. The counter has six channels with size bins in the range of 0.5- to 5.0-micron diameter. g) To enable efficient sampling, the probe is scanned along the width axis of the main chamber (thereby effecting scanning along the temperature gradient and thereby, further, effecting scanning along the supersaturation gradient) by means of a computer-controlled translation stage.

Leu, Ming-Taun

2010-01-01

299

Influences of spinal decompression therapy and general traction therapy on the pain, disability, and straight leg raising of patients with intervertebral disc herniation.  

PubMed

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify how spinal decompression therapy and general traction therapy influence the pain, disability, and straight leg raise (SLR) ability of patients with intervertebral disc herniation. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic lumbar pain who were divided into a spinal decompression therapy group (SDTG, n=15), and a general traction therapy group (GTTG, n=15). [Methods] The SDTG used a spinal decompression device, and the GTTG used a lumbar traction device. Both groups received conservative physical therapy three times a week for four weeks. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to measure the degree of pain the patients with chronic lumbar pain. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to measure the degree of functional disability. A goniometer was used to measure the patients' SLR ability. [Results] Both SDTG and GTTG showed statistically significant decreases in VAS and ODI scores and a statistically significant increase in SLR angle. A comparison of the two groups found no statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] Spinal decompression therapy and general traction therapy are effective at improving the pain, disability, and SLR of patients with intervertebral disc herniation. Thus, selective treatment may be required. PMID:25729196

Choi, Jioun; Lee, Sangyong; Hwangbo, Gak

2015-02-01

300

A combined biomaterial and cellular approach for annulus fibrosus rupture repair.  

PubMed

Recurrent intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation and degenerative disc disease have been identified as the most important factors contributing to persistent pain and disability after surgical discectomy. An annulus fibrosus (AF) closure device that provides immediate closure of the AF rupture, restores disc height, reduces further disc degeneration and enhances self-repair capacities is an unmet clinical need. In this study, a poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) scaffold seeded with human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and covered with a poly(ester-urethane) (PU) membrane was assessed for AF rupture repair in a bovine organ culture annulotomy model under dynamic load for 14 days. PTMC scaffolds combined with the sutured PU membrane restored disc height of annulotomized discs and prevented herniation of nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue. Implanted MSCs showed an up-regulated gene expression of type V collagen, a potential AF marker, indicating in situ differentiation capability. Furthermore, MSCs delivered within PTMC scaffolds induced an up-regulation of anabolic gene expression and down-regulation of catabolic gene expression in adjacent native disc tissue. In conclusion, the combined biomaterial and cellular approach has the potential to hinder herniation of NP tissue, stabilize disc height, and positively modulate cell phenotype of native disc tissue. PMID:25542789

Pirvu, Tatiana; Blanquer, Sebastien B G; Benneker, Lorin M; Grijpma, Dirk W; Richards, Robert G; Alini, Mauro; Eglin, David; Grad, Sibylle; Li, Zhen

2015-02-01

301

Computer program for parameterization of nucleus-nucleus electromagnetic dissociation cross sections  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer subroutine parameterization of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented that is suitable for implementation in a heavy ion transport code. The only inputs required are the projectile kinetic energy and the projectile and target charge and mass numbers.

Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Badavi, Forooz F.

1988-01-01

302

mRNA stability in the nucleus*  

PubMed Central

Eukaryotic gene expression is controlled by different levels of biological events, such as transcription factors regulating the timing and strength of transcripts production, alteration of transcription rate by RNA processing, and mRNA stability during RNA processing and translation. RNAs, especially mRNAs, are relatively vulnerable molecules in living cells for ribonucleases (RNases). The maintenance of quality and quantity of transcripts is a key issue for many biological processes. Extensive studies draw the conclusion that the stability of RNAs is dedicated-regulated, occurring co- and post-transcriptionally, and translation-coupled as well, either in the nucleus or cytoplasm. Recently, RNA stability in the nucleus has aroused much research interest, especially the stability of newly-made transcripts. In this article, we summarize recent progresses on mRNA stability in the nucleus, especially focusing on quality control of newly-made RNA by RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes. PMID:24793762

Liu, Han; Luo, Min; Wen, Ji-kai

2014-01-01

303

Interpretive monitoring in the caudate nucleus  

PubMed Central

In a dynamic environment an organism has to constantly adjust ongoing behavior to adapt to a given context. This process requires continuous monitoring of ongoing behavior to provide its meaningful interpretation. The caudate nucleus is known to have a role in behavioral monitoring, but the nature of these signals during dynamic behavior is still unclear. We recorded neuronal activity in the caudate nucleus in monkeys during categorization behavior that changed rapidly across contexts. We found that neuronal activity maintained representation of the identity and context of a recently categorized stimulus, as well as interpreted the behavioral meaningfulness of the maintained trace. The accuracy of this cognitive monitoring signal was highest for behavior for which subjects were prone to make errors. Thus, the caudate nucleus provides interpretive monitoring of ongoing behavior, which is necessary for contextually specific decisions to adapt to rapidly changing conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03727.001 PMID:25415238

Yanike, Marianna; Ferrera, Vincent P

2014-01-01

304

Compound Nucleus Contributions to the Optical Potential  

SciTech Connect

An ab-initio calculation of the optical potential for neutron-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all the particle-hole (p-h) excitation states in the target. These p-h states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and (in the end) to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. The random-phase approximation (RPA) provides the linear combinations of p-h states that include the residual interactions within the target, and we show preliminary results for elastic flux loss using both p-h and RPA descriptions of target excitations.

Thompson, I J; Dietrich, F S; Escher, J E; Dupuis, M

2008-01-28

305

Nucleus model for periodic Comet Tempel 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Observational data obtained primarily during 1988 are analyzed and synthesized to develop a comprehensive physical model for the nucleus of Periodic Comet Tempel 2, one of the best studied members of Jupiter's family of short-period comets. It is confirmed that a previous investigation provided reliable information on the comet's spin-axis orientation, which implies and obliquity of 54 degrees of the orbit plane to the equatorial plane and which appears to have varied little - if at all - with time. This conclusion is critical for fitting a triaxial ellipsoid to approximate the figure of the nucleus.

Sekanina, Zdenek

1991-01-01

306

TWO-PHOTON PHYSICS IN NUCLEUS-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AT RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

NYSTRAND,J.

1998-09-10

307

Local Irrigation of the Surgical Field with Antibiotics in the End of Procedure Reduces the Infection Rate in Herniated Lumbar Disc Surgery  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Reported rate of infections after lumbar discectomy is 1%–15 %. This complication may result in disability or even the death. Aim The aim of the study is to assess the rate of infection associated with lumbar discectomies when combined systemic and local antibiotic prophylaxis was employed. Patients and methods: In this retrospective study we analyzed all patients operated for herniated lumbar disc from 2009 -2012 in our institute. Beside of receiving systemic prophylaxis with 2g of Cefazoline, all patients had their operative field irrigated at the end of operation with Amikacin sulfate injection. Wound was considered infected when local and systemic signs of infection were revealed and were associated with elevated ESR, leukocytosis and elevated CRP. Assessment of infection is done by neurosurgeon during the hospitalization and later at outpatient’s clinic along postoperative course of three months. Results: A total of 604 patients were operated, of those 285 patients (47.2 %) females and 319 males (52.8 %), 12 patients were operated on two levels (1.98 %). Average patient age was 32.5 years (range 20–65 years) Localization of herniated disc was: in L/2-L/3 20 patients or 3.3 %, the L/3-L/4 level 42 patients or 7 % , the L/4 -L /5 262 patients or 43.3 % at the level L/V- S/1 280 patients or 46.3 %. Three patients (0.49%) developed wound infection, two of them superficial infection only with local signs: local pain, redness and leakage. They were treated with oral antibiotics. One with deep wound infection. He presented with local and systemic signs and treated with i.v antibiotics. All the cultures from wound swab revealed staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion: Prophylaxis with systemic antibiotic (Cefazoline 2.0) intravenous administration 30 minutes before the incision and irrigation of operative field with local antibiotic Amikacine sulfate at the end of procedure reduces the infection rate in patients operated for herniated lumbar disc when compared with systemic antibiotic prophylaxis only. PMID:25685087

Kërveshi, Armend; Halili, Nehat; Kastrati, Bujar; Qosja, Faik; Kabashi, Serbeze; Muçaj, Sefedin

2014-01-01

308

Evaporation from a porous cometary nucleus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a porous cometary nucleus, ice sublimates from the volume of a surface layer rather than just from the upper boundary. Given a model for the porous medium, the equations of mass and heat transfer can be solved for any desired orbit. The temperature profile and the vapor flux as a function of depth in the upper layer of the nucleus may thus be obtained. Calculations are performed for a spherically symmetric icy nucleus in the orbit of Comet P/Halley, assuming different values of porosity and different models for the ice structure. The upper layer may be divided in two zones: in the uppermost zone, whose thickness ranges from 100 microns to about 1 mm, the vapor flux is directed outward, whereas in the lower zone, which is 1000 times thicker, the vapor flows in the opposite direction. The sublimation rate as a function of heliocentric distance depends strongly on the porosity of the nucleus and is little affected by other parameters related to the structure of the ice. This allows the determination of the porosity coefficient of a comet from observation of its water production rates at large heliocentric distances.

Mekler, Y.; Prialnik, D.; Podolak, M.

1990-06-01

309

Oral alprazolam acutely increases nucleus accumbens perfusion  

PubMed Central

Benzodiazepines treat anxiety, but can also produce euphoric effects, contributing to abuse. Using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, we provide the first direct evidence in humans that alprazolam (Xanax) acutely increases perfusion in the nucleus accumbens, a key reward-processing region linked to addiction. PMID:23070072

Wolf, Daniel H.; Pinkham, Amy E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Valdez, Jeffrey; Smith, Mark A.; Detre, John A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

2014-01-01

310

The nucleus accumbens in monkeys ( Macaca fascicularis )  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nucleus accumbens (NA), which receives inputs from limbic structures and projects to the motor system, may be important for the association of reinforcement with action. There are projections to the NA from the amygdala and hippocampus. Discrimination and reversal learning tasks which are known to be disrupted by lesions to these areas in monkeys were given to monkeys with

Chantal E. Stern; Richard E. Passingham

1995-01-01

311

Overview of neutrino-nucleus quasielastic scattering  

SciTech Connect

A review of quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering will be presented, with emphasis on bringing together the knowledge (and language) of neutrino physics, electron scattering, and nuclear structure communities. Assumptions commonly made which simplify the theoretical calculations will be examined. Finally, an attempt will be made to identify places where improvement from either theoretical or experimental sides would be more significant.

Herraiz, J. L.; Martinez, M. C.; Udias, J. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Caballero, J. A. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain)

2009-11-25

312

Eight nerve, root nucleus Dolores E. Lpez  

E-print Network

Reticulospinal bundle Trapezoid body Pn Dorsal acoustic stria #12;Labeled PnC reticulospinal neurons (in brown- cochlear nucleus response) Kainic acid lesion in the VIII nerve abolish the startle Mean startle amplitude elicited by three different noise burst intensities before and after bilateral Kainic acid lesioning

Oliver, Douglas L.

313

Structure and Function in the Nucleus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Current evidence suggests that the nucleus has a distinct substructure, albeit one that is dynamic rather than a rigid framework. Viral infection, oncogene expression, and inherited human disorders can each cause profound and specific changes in nuclear organization. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding nuclear organization, highlighting in particular the dynamic aspects of nuclear structure.

Angus Lamond (University of Dundee; Department of Biochemistry)

1998-04-24

314

Development of the Human Parvocellular Red Nucleus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Morphology of the human parvocellular red nucleus (RNp) was investigated in 14 fetuses aged from 12 to 39 weeks of gestation (WG). The brains were processed into celloidin-embedded serial sections. At 12 WG, the anlage of RNp was observed as an ovoid mass of immature neurons clustering into some groups. Lobular appearance in cross-sectional images was conspicuous during the early

Katsuyuki Yamaguchi; Noboru Goto

2008-01-01

315

Isotopic microanalysis of returned comet nucleus samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

If isotopic measurements of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and primitive meteorites can serve as a guide to the isotopic analysis of returned comet nucleus material, an essential requirement will be the capability for microanalysis. The reason is that in both types of extraterrestrial samples large isotopic heterogeneities on a small spatial scale have become apparent once it was possible to

Ernst Zinner

1989-01-01

316

Deep Impact mission target comet nucleus characterization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Comet 9P/Tempel 1 is the target of the 8th NASA Discovery Mission Deep Impact. The focus of the ground-based observing program has been to characterize the nucleus for mission planning. We have obtained data over a full apparition from 11/97 through the present on a total of over 200 nights using 16 telescopes worldwide. The nearly 2000 images represent over 250 hours of integration. We will present the nucleus size heliocentric light curve and Afrho values vs. time and report on the status of the analysis of the rotation period. We will report on the color of the nucleus and dust coma (using BVRI filters) as a function of heliocentric distance. We have analyzed the data as a function of phase angle to infer the nucleus surface scattering properties. The comet is quite phase darkened with a linear phase function of 0.07 mag/deg and a negative value of G-parameter suggestive of a low albedo rough surface. We will also present a series of enhanced images to search for evidence of features (e.g. jets and other structures) in the dust coma. Support provided by NASA Grants NAGW-4495 NAGW-5015 NAG-54080 and NAG-59006 and through Univ. of MD subcontract Z667702 (NASA contract NASW-00004).

Meech, Karen J.; Pittichova, Jana; Hsieh, Henry; Fernandez, Yan; Bauer, James M.; Belton, Michael J.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Hainaut, Olivier R.; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Tozzi, Gian-Paolo

2005-01-01

317

Herniated Cervical Disc  

MedlinePLUS

... collar, anti-inflammatory medications to reduce the swelling, analgesic drugs to control the pain, physical therapy, exercise ... management Medications used to control pain are called analgesics. Most pain can be treated with nonprescription medications ...

318

Fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Existing data on near-barrier fusion excitation functions of medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems have been analyzed by using a simple diffused-barrier formula derived assuming the Gaussian shape of the barrier-height distributions. The fusion cross section is obtained by folding the Gaussian barrier distribution with the classical expression for the fusion cross section for a fixed barrier. The energy dependence of the fusion cross section, thus obtained, provides good description to the existing data on near-barrier fusion and capture excitation functions for medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems. The theoretical values for the parameters of the barrier distribution are estimated which can be used for fusion or capture cross-section predictions that are especially important for planning experiments for synthesizing new superheavy elements.

Atta, Debasis; Basu, D. N.

2014-12-01

319

Parameter scaling test of a dynamic nucleus-nucleus collision theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new dynamic nucleus-nucleus interaction model due to Swiatecki is used to predict fusion excitation functions resulting from 35Cl bombardments of 62Ni, 116Sn, and 141Pr. Agreement supports the universal scaling parameter concept of the new model. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 35Cl+62Ni, 116Sn, 141Pr ?LAB=155-300 MeV. Measured evaporation residue and fissionlike cross sections. Compare with Swiatecki's dynamic fusion model.

Brunon Sikora; Jens Bisplinghoff; Marshall Blann; Wolfgang Scobel; Martin Beckerman; Franz Plasil; Robert L. Ferguson; John Birkelund; Winfried Wilcke

1982-01-01

320

Random Matrix Theory and Analysis of Nucleus-Nucleus Collision at High Energies  

E-print Network

We propose a novel method for analysis of experimental data obtained at relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method, based on the ideas of Random Matrix Theory, is applied to detect systematic errors that occur at measurements of momentum distributions of emitted particles. The unfolded momentum distribution is well described by the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices, when the uncertainty in the momentum distribution is maximal. The method is free from unwanted background contributions.

E. I. Shahaliev; R. G. Nazmitdinov; A. A. Kuznetsov; M. K. Suleymanov; O. V. Teryaev

2005-02-04

321

Results on ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions from balloon-borne emulsion chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of balloon-borne emulsion-chamber measurements on high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei (Burnett et al., 1983) are summarized in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Special consideration is given to seven nucleus-nucleus interaction events at energy in excess of 1 TeV/A with multiplicity greater than 400, and to Fe interactions (53 with CHO, 10 with emulsion, and 14 with Pb) at 20-60 GeV/A.

Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Meegan, C. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

1985-01-01

322

Subthalamic nucleus versus pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation in Parkinson disease: synergy or antagonism?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves the cardinal features of Parkinson disease (PD). However, its efficacy\\u000a on gait disorders is less satisfying in the long term. In recent years, the pedunculopontine (PPN) nucleus has emerged as\\u000a a possible promising deep brain stimulation target for gait disorders in PD. In this review, we examine whether STN and PPN\\u000a act synergistically

M. U. Ferraye; B. Debû; V. Fraix; P. Krack; S. Charbardès; E. Seigneuret; A.-L. Benabid; P. Pollak

323

Modeling the cochlear nucleus: A site for monaural echo suppression?  

E-print Network

Modeling the cochlear nucleus: A site for monaural echo suppression? Moritz Bürcka and J. Leo van suppression in the cochlear nucleus. The model's behavior has been verified by analytical calculations as well of the neuronal activity and opens after another 2 ms. Harris et al. suggested the cochlear nucleus as the site

van Hemmen, J. Leo

324

Projections From Auditory Cortex to Cochlear Nucleus: A Comparative  

E-print Network

Projections From Auditory Cortex to Cochlear Nucleus: A Comparative Analysis of Rat and Mouse NOAH were injected into AI. The cochlear nucleus was dissected and examined for terminal fibers by light cells of the cochlear nucleus. This report provides evidence for direct auditory cortex projections

Ryugo, David K.

325

Why do we have a caudate nucleus?  

PubMed

In order to understand the physiological role of the caudate nucleus, we combine here our laboratory data on cats with reports of patients with selective damage to this nucleus. Cats with bilateral removal of the caudate nuclei showed a stereotyped behavior consisting of persistently approaching and then following a person, another cat, or any object, and attempting to contact the target. Simultaneously, the animals exhibited a friendly disposition and persistent docility together with purring and forelimbs treading/kneading. The magnitude and duration of this behavior was proportional to the extent of the removal reaching a maximum after ablations of 65% or more of the caudate tissue. These cats were hyperactive but they had lost the feline elegance of movements. Additional features of acaudate cats were: (1) postural and accuracy deficits (plus perseveration) in paw usage tasks including bar pressing for food reward; (2) cognitive and perceptual impairments on a T-maze battery of tasks and on the bar pressing tasks; (3) blockage or blunting of the species-specific behavioral response to a single injection of morphine; Unilateral caudate nucleus removal did not produce global behavioral effects, but only deficit in the contralateral paw contact placing reaction and paw usage/bar pressing. Moreover and surprisingly, we found hypertrophy of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus following prenatal focal neocortical removal. The findings in human were also behavioral (not neurological) and also occurred with unilateral caudate damage. The main manifestations consisted of loss of drive (apathy), obsessive-compulsive behavior, cognitive deficits, stimulus-bound perseverative behavior, and hyperactivity. Based on all of the above data we propose that the specific function of the caudate nucleus is to control approach-attachment behavior, ranging from plain approach to a target, to romantic love. This putative function would account well for the caudate involvement in the pathophysiology of a number of clinical syndromes that we mention, all of which compromise approach-attachment- affect behaviors. In addition we conclude that the caudate nucleus contributes importantly to body and limbs posture as well as to the accuracy and speed of directed movements. PMID:20407491

Villablanca, Jaime R

2010-01-01

326

Use of the holmium yttrium aluminum garnet laser for percutaneous thoracolumbar intervertebral disk ablation in dogs.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE-To evaluate a laser ablation-technique for treatment of thoracolumbar intervertebral disk disease in dogs. DESIGN-Prospective case series. ANIMALS-33 dogs with signs of recurrent back pain associated with intervertebral disk disease after the initial episode had been managed conservatively for a minimum of 2 weeks. PROCEDURE-Spinal needles were placed percutaneously through the annulus fibroses to permit delivery of an optical fiber into the nucleus pulposes of thoracolumbar intervertebral disks T10-11 through L3-4. Fluoroscopy was used to guide needle placement. Holmium yttrium aluminum garnet laser energy then was used to ablate the contents of each selected intervertebral disk. Intervals from time of treatment to time of assessment ranged from 3 to 114 weeks. RESULTS-All dogs recovered without complication. Results of follow-up radiography and histologic evaluation indicated that percutaneous holmium yttrium aluminum garnet laser ablation reduces the volume of nucleus pulposus in treated disks. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS-Used as a clinical treatment and prophylactically, this minimally invasive procedure should prevent further extrusion of partially herniated disks and should reduce the chances of subsequent herniation of disks at other treatment sites. PMID:8635968

Dickey, D T; Bartels, K E; Henry, G A; Stair, E L; Schafer, S A; Fry, T R; Nordquist, R E

1996-04-15

327

Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter  

SciTech Connect

An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

2014-07-10

328

Comet nucleus impact probe feasibility study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A top level listing of the comet nucleus impact probe (CNIP) feasibility experiments requirements are presented. A conceptual configuration which shows that the feasibility of engineering the experiment is possible and describes the candidate hardware is discussed. The design studies required in order to design the operating experiment are outlined. An overview of a program plan used to estimate a rough order of magnitude cost for the CNIP experiment is given.

Castro, A. J.

1980-01-01

329

How to build a yeast nucleus  

PubMed Central

Biological functions including gene expression and DNA repair are affected by the 3D architecture of the genome, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Notably, it remains unclear to what extent nuclear architecture is driven by generic physical properties of polymers or by specific factors such as proteins binding particular DNA sequences. The budding yeast nucleus has been intensely studied by imaging and biochemical techniques, resulting in a large quantitative data set on locus positions and DNA contact frequencies. We recently described a quantitative model of the interphase yeast nucleus in which chromosomes are represented as passively moving polymer chains. This model ignores the DNA sequence information except for specific constraints at the centromeres, telomeres, and the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Despite its simplicity, the model accounts for a large majority of experimental data, including absolute and relative locus positions and contact frequency patterns at chromosomal and subchromosomal scales. Here, we also illustrate the model's ability to reproduce observed features of chromatin movements. Our results strongly suggest that the dynamic large-scale architecture of the yeast nucleus is dominated by statistical properties of randomly moving polymers with a few sequence-specific constraints, rather than by a large number of DNA-specific factors or epigenetic modifications. In addition, we show that our model accounts for recently measured variations in homologous recombination efficiency, illustrating its potential for quantitatively understanding functional consequences of nuclear architecture. PMID:23974728

Wong, Hua; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Zimmer, Christophe

2013-01-01

330

Protein Quality Control in the Nucleus  

PubMed Central

In their natural environment, cells are regularly exposed to various stress conditions that may lead to protein misfolding, but also in the absence of stress, misfolded proteins occur as the result of mutations or failures during protein synthesis. Since such partially denatured proteins are prone to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The degradation of misfolded proteins is clearly compartmentalized, so unique degradation pathways exist for misfolded proteins depending on whether their subcellular localization is ER/secretory, mitochondrial, cytosolic or nuclear. Recent studies, mainly in yeast, have shown that the nucleus appears to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation. PMID:25010148

Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben G.; Rebula, Caio A.; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

2014-01-01

331

Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

1992-01-01

332

Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.  

PubMed

In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

2013-02-01

333

Jefferson Lab's Journey into the Nucleus  

SciTech Connect

The year 1969 saw the publication of the first results indicating that hard scattering centres exist deep inside protons. A collaboration between the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was using SLAC's new high-energy electron LINAC to pioneer a rich new field in the study of the nucleus--deep inelastic scattering. Their measurements revealed that nucleons are made up of point-like particles, which Richard Feynman dubbed ''partons''. Thirty-five years on, studies of the parton-nature of the nucleus continue, not only at the traditional high-energy centres, but also at lower-energy laboratories, and in particular at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Virginia. Jefferson Lab is home to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Its main mission is to explore the atomic nucleus and the fundamental building-blocks of matter. As part of this mission, researchers there study the transition from the picture of the nucleus as a bound state of neutrons and protons to its deeper structure in terms of quarks and gluons--in other words, the transition from the hadronic degrees of freedom of nuclear physics to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom of high-energy physics. In exploring this transition, a wide range of experiments has been performed, from measurements of elastic form factors at large momentum transfers to studies of deep inelastic scattering. An array of spectrometers together with electron-beam energies of up to 5.7 GeV has allowed the laboratory to make significant contributions to this field. This article describes three experiments, each aimed at improving our understanding of a different aspect of the partonic nature of matter. The first, a classic deep inelastic scattering experiment, seeks to further our understanding of the composition of nucleon spin. The second experiment studies the concept of quark-hadron duality--a link between the deep inelastic region and the resonance region. The third experiment uses the atomic nucleus as a laboratory to improve understanding of the propagation and hadronization of quarks. Jefferson Lab's ability to perform this range of measurements is illustrated by the plot from the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) shown on the cover of this magazine, where the hadronic resonance peaks are seen to be washed out as one goes from the delta resonance around 1.2 GeV to higher invariant masses and into the deep inelastic scattering realm of quarks and gluons.

Douglas Higinbotham

2004-11-01

334

Nucleus-nucleus interactions between 20 and 65 GeV per nucleon  

SciTech Connect

A hybrid electronic-counter--emulsion-chamber instrument was exposed to high-energy cosmic rays on a balloon. The data on 105 nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 20--65 GeV/nucleon and for incident nuclear charges 22less than or equal toZ/sub p/less than or equal to28 are presented. Inclusive characteristics of particle production on different targets (plastic, emulsion, and lead) are shown and compared with models based on the superposition of nucleon-nucleus interactions. Features of a subset of the more central collisions with plastic target and some characteristics of individual events with the highest multiplicity of produced particles are described.

Burnett, T.H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J.H.; Fountain, W.F.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J.C.; Hayashi, T.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; and others

1987-02-01

335

Analysis of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies and Random Matrix Theory  

E-print Network

We propose a novel statistical approach to the analysis of experimental data obtained in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies which borrows from methods developed within the context of Random Matrix Theory. It is applied to the detection of correlations in momentum distributions of emitted particles. We find good agreement between the results obtained in this way and a standard analysis based on the method of effective mass spectra and two-pair correlation function often used in high energy physics. The method introduced here is free from unwanted background contributions.

R. G. Nazmitdinov; E. I. Shahaliev; M. K. Suleymanov; S. Tomsovic

2009-05-07

336

Study on chemical equilibrium in nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies  

E-print Network

We present a detailed study of chemical freeze-out in nucleus-nucleus collisions at beam energies of 11.6, 30, 40, 80 and 158A GeV. By analyzing hadronic multiplicities within the statistical hadronization approach, we have studied the chemical equilibration of the system as a function of center of mass energy and of the parameters of the source. Additionally, we have tested and compared different versions of the statistical model, with special emphasis on possible explanations of the observed strangeness hadronic phase space under-saturation.

Jaakko Manninen; Francesco Becattini; Antti Keranen; Marek Gazdzicki; Reinhard Stock

2004-05-06

337

Electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions relating to space radiation research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most of the papers within this report deal with electromagnetic processes in nucleus-nucleus collisions which are of concern in the space radiation program. In particular, the removal of one and two nucleons via both electromagnetic and strong interaction processes has been extensively investigated. The theory of relativistic Coulomb fission has also been developed. Several papers on quark models also appear. Finally, note that the theoretical methods developed in this work have been directly applied to the task of radiation protection of astronauts. This has been done by parameterizing the theoretical formalism in such a fashion that it can be used in cosmic ray transport codes.

Norbury, John W.

1992-01-01

338

Pion and Kaon Lab Frame Differential Cross Sections for Intermediate Energy Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space radiation transport codes require accurate models for hadron production in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. Codes require cross sections to be written in terms of lab frame variables and it is important to be able to verify models against experimental data in the lab frame. Several models are compared to lab frame data. It is found that models based on algebraic parameterizations are unable to describe intermediate energy differential cross section data. However, simple thermal model parameterizations, when appropriately transformed from the center of momentum to the lab frame, are able to account for the data.

Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

2008-01-01

339

Extraction of nucleus-nucleus potential and energy dissipation from dynamical mean-field theory  

SciTech Connect

Nucleus-nucleus interaction potentials in heavy-ion fusion reactions are extracted from the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. When the center-of-mass energy is much higher than the Coulomb barrier energy, extracted potentials identify with the frozen density approximation. As the center-of-mass energy decreases to the Coulomb barrier energy, potentials become energy dependent. This dependence indicates dynamical reorganization of internal degrees of freedom and leads to a reduction of the ''apparent'' barrier. Including this effect leads to the Coulomb barrier energy very close to experimental one. Aspects of one-body energy dissipation extracted from the mean-field theory are discussed.

Washiyama, Kouhei; Lacroix, Denis [GANIL, BP55027, 14076 Caen (France)

2009-03-04

340

Bare nucleus of comet Neujmin 1  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous visible and infrared observations of comet P/Neujmin 1 1984c are presented which show that the comet has a large (mean radius 10 km), dark (geometric albedo 2-3 percent) nucleus with a surface which is mostly inert material but which still shows a low level of gaseous activity. This is the first physical evidence that cometary nuclei can leave behind an inert body after the coma activity ceases. No asteroid or asteroid class has been found to match the reflectance and albedo of this comet except possibly some D asteroids. 57 references.

Campins, H.; A'hearn, M.F.; McFadden, L.A.

1987-05-01

341

Nucleus of comet P/Arend-Rigaux  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous broadband visual and infrared photometry of comet P/Arend-Rigaux is reported. Its VJHK colors are similar to other periodic comets and the class D asteroids. The visual flux decreased by 0.5 mag within 2 hr, while the thermal flux at 10 microns continued to decrease by 0.7 mag over 3 hr. These observations are consistent with thermal models of a nucleus with a geometric albedo of 0.03 and equivalent radii of 5.1 and 3.8 km. 32 references.

Veeder, G.J.; Hanner, M.S.; Tholen, D.J.

1987-07-01

342

Quasielastic Charged Current Neutrino-nucleus Scattering  

E-print Network

We provide integrated cross sections for quasielastic charged-current neutrino-nucleus scattering. Results evaluated using the phenomenological scaling function extracted from the analysis of experimental $(e,e')$ data are compared with those obtained within the framework of the relativistic impulse approximation. We show that very reasonable agreement is reached when a description of final-state interactions based on the relativistic mean field is included. This is consistent with previous studies of differential cross sections which are in accord with the universality property of the superscaling function.

J. E. Amaro; M. B. Barbaro; J. A. Caballero; T. W. Donnelly

2007-05-14

343

Angular distributions of neutron-nucleus collisions  

SciTech Connect

We derive the total and the differential cross sections with respect to angle for neutron-induced reactions from an analytical model having a simple functional form to demonstrate the quantitative agreement with the measured cross sections. The energy dependence of the neutron-nucleus interaction cross sections are estimated successfully for energies ranging from 5 to 600 MeV. In this work, the effect of the imaginary part of the nuclear potential is treated more appropriately compared to our earlier work. The angular distributions for neutron scattering also agree reasonably well with the experimental data at forward angles.

Mukhopadhyay, Tapan; Lahiri, Joydev; Basu, D. N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2011-06-15

344

Neutrino-nucleus scattering off 136Xe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Background: Theoretical estimates of the cross sections for the neutrino-nucleus scattering off relevant nuclei for supernova neutrinos are essential for many applications in neutrino physics and astrophysics. The double-? -decaying nucleus 136Xe nucleus is used by the EXO Collaboration in the search for neutrinoless double-? decay. A ton-scale experiment based on 136Xe could also be used for studies of supernova neutrinos and/or solar neutrinos. Purpose: The purpose of the present work is, thus, to perform a study of the charged-current and neutral-current nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos for 136Xe . Method: The cross sections are computed by using the well-established framework for studies of semileptonic processes in nuclei introduced by O'Connell, Donnelly, and Walecka [Phys. Rev. C 6, 719 (1972), 10.1103/PhysRevC.6.719]. The nuclear wave functions of the initial and the final nuclear states for the neutral-current neutrino-nucleus scattering in 136Xe are computed by using the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Similarly, the pnQRPA is adopted to construct the initial and final nuclear states which are relevant for the charged-current reactions. The nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos are subsequently computed by folding the cross sections with appropriate energy spectra for the incoming neutrinos. Results: We present results for the cross sections of the charged-current and neutral-current neutrino and antineutrino scatterings off 136Xe . Nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos are also given. For the considered scenario for the neutrino mixing we have found that neutrino interactions with matter and so-called collective neutrino oscillations enhance significantly the neutrino and antineutrino flux-averaged cross sections. Conclusions: We have found that for the charged-current and neutral-current neutrino scatterings off 136Xe transitions mediated by the 1+ multipole are the most important ones. However, for the charged-current antineutrino channel 0+ and 1+ transitions are largely suppressed due to the large neutron excess. Transitions to 1- and 2- final nuclear states are thus relatively more important for the charged-current antineutrino scattering.

Ydrefors, E.; Suhonen, J.; Zhao, Y. M.

2015-01-01

345

Dust activity of Comet Halley's nucleus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera using the clear filter with a pass band from 300 to 1000 nm were used to study dust activity in the comet nucleus. Comparisons with ground based observations confirm that dust production towards the Sun increases in activity relative to the southern background source while the Giotto spacecraft was approaching. This is in agreement with the assumption that the sunward activity becomes stronger when the source rotates towards the Sun. Estimated dust column density is 90 billion/sqm, with optical thickness less than or = 0.3. Surface reflectivity is less than 1%, indicating a very rough surface with large fractions of shadowed areas.

Keller, H. U.; Delamere, W. A.; Huebner, W. F.; Reitsema, H.; Schmidt, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Whipple, Fred L.; Wilhelm, K.

1986-01-01

346

BNL-65424-AB LIQUID TO LIQUID AND CRITICAL NUCLEUS TO CRITICAL NUCLEUS PHASE  

E-print Network

11973 Key words: Ammonium sulfate; single particle; phase transitions; critical nucleus I. LIQUID the properties of super-cooled/super-saturated electrolyte solutions of ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate changes its role from the solvent to the solute by tightly binding to the ammonium sulfate ions

347

Nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energies: Status and prospects  

SciTech Connect

This paper is based on three lectures presented at the Prague Seminar on Relativistic Heavy-Ion Physics in September 1994. The first lecture, following a general introduction, focuses on three different aspects of the CERN experiment WA80. The author first presents results on global event characteristics deduced primarily from measured distributions of transverse energy and of forward energy. The purpose is to introduce the main general features of nucleus-nucleus reactions at the highest energies currently available. He highlights the role of projectile-target geometry, discusses the degree of nuclear stopping, and estimates the energy densities attained in these reactions. This discussion is followed by a presentation of one of two topics that are unique to the WA80 experiment and which are not addressed by any of the other CERN collaborations that study nucleus-nucleus reactions: direct measurements of photons. The second topic unique to WA80, measurements of proton-proton correlations in the target-fragmentation region, is covered in the first part of the second lecture. The remainder of the second lecture is devoted to a selective overview of results obtained at the AGS accelerator of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The third lecture is devoted to a discussion of the two main experiments, STAR and PHENIX, planned for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, under construction at BNL.

Plasil, F.

1995-04-01

348

Direct projections from the central amygdaloid nucleus to the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.  

PubMed

The amygdala is activated by fear and plays an important role in the emotional response to life-threatening situations. When rats feel threatened, they respond by biting fiercely. Bite strength is regulated by the trigeminal motor nucleus and the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5). The Me5 relays proprioceptive signals from the masticatory muscles and the periodontal ligaments to the trigeminal motor and premotor nuclei. The amygdala projects to the trigeminal motor nucleus and the premotor reticular formation. However, it is unknown whether the amygdala projects directly to the Me5. In the present study, neurons of the central amygdaloid nucleus (ACe) were labeled following injection of a retrograde tracer, Fast Blue, into the caudal Me5, and fibers and terminal buttons from the ACe to the Me5 were examined after injections of an anterograde neuronal tracer, biotinylated dextran amine into the ACe. Furthermore, wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated to horseradish peroxidase was injected into the ACe, and labeled fibers and terminal buttons in the Me5 were examined by electron microscopy. Labeled terminal buttons on Me5 somata were more abundant in the caudal than the rostral Me5. Electron microscopic observation revealed that a part of these terminal buttons formed axo-somatic synapses. These results indicate that the ACe sends direct projections to the Me5, and suggest that the amygdala regulates bite strength by modifying neuronal activity in the Me5. PMID:21640334

Shirasu, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu; Itoh, Kazuo; Sato, Sadao; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

2011-07-11

349

Spinodal assisted growing dynamics of critical nucleus in polymer blends.  

PubMed

In metastable polymer blends, nonclassical critical nucleus is not a drop of stable phase in core wrapped with a sharp interface, but a diffuse structure depending on the metastability. Thus, forming a critical nucleus does not mean the birth of a new phase. In the present work, the nonclassical growing dynamics of the critical nucleus is addressed in the metastable polymer blends by incorporating self-consistent field theory and external potential dynamics theory, which leads to an intuitionistic description for the scattering experiments. The results suggest that the growth of nonclassical critical nucleus is controlled by the spinodal-decomposition which happens in the region surrounding the nucleus. This leads to forming the shell structures around the nucleus. PMID:23163390

Zhang, Xinghua; Qi, Shuanhu; Yan, Dadong

2012-11-14

350

Spinodal assisted growing dynamics of critical nucleus in polymer blends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In metastable polymer blends, nonclassical critical nucleus is not a drop of stable phase in core wrapped with a sharp interface, but a diffuse structure depending on the metastability. Thus, forming a critical nucleus does not mean the birth of a new phase. In the present work, the nonclassical growing dynamics of the critical nucleus is addressed in the metastable polymer blends by incorporating self-consistent field theory and external potential dynamics theory, which leads to an intuitionistic description for the scattering experiments. The results suggest that the growth of nonclassical critical nucleus is controlled by the spinodal-decomposition which happens in the region surrounding the nucleus. This leads to forming the shell structures around the nucleus.

Zhang, Xinghua; Qi, Shuanhu; Yan, Dadong

2012-11-01

351

On M31's Double Nucleus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The recent HST discovery of a double nucleus in M31 brings into prominence the question how long, a second core can survive within the nuclear regions of a galaxy. Physical conditions in the nuclear regions of a typical galaxy help a second core survive, so it can orbit for a long time. possibly for thousands of orbits. Given the nearly uniform mass density in a core, tidal forces within a core radius are compressive in all directions and help the core survive the buffeting it takes as it orbits near the center of the galaxy. We use numerical experiments to illustrate these physical principles. Our method allows the full power of the experiments to be concentrated on the nuclear regions. Spatial resolution of about 0.2 pc comfortably resolves detail within the 1.4 parsec core radius of the second, but brighter core (P1) in M31. We use these physical principles to discuss M31's double nucleus, but they apply to other galaxies as well. and in other astronomical situations such as dumbbell galaxies. galaxies orbiting near the center of a galaxy cluster, and subclustering in galaxy clusters. The experiments also illustrate that galaxy encounters and merging are quite sensitive to external tidal forces, such as those produced by the gravitational potential in a group or cluster of galaxies.

Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

1995-01-01

352

Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the 1991-92 academic year, the Pennsylvania State University has developed three sample return missions: one to the nucleus of comet Wild 2, one to the asteroid Eros, and one to three asteroids located in the Main Belt. The primary objective of the comet nucleus sample return mission is to rendezvous with a short period comet and acquire a 10 kg sample for return to Earth. Upon rendezvous with the comet, a tethered coring and sampler drill will contact the surface and extract a two-meter core sample from the target site. Before the spacecraft returns to Earth, a monitoring penetrator containing scientific instruments will be deployed for gathering long-term data about the comet. A single asteroid sample return mission to the asteroid 433 Eros (chosen for proximity and launch opportunities) will extract a sample from the asteroid surface for return to Earth. To limit overall mission cost, most of the mission design uses current technologies, except the sampler drill design. The multiple asteroid sample return mission could best be characterized through its use of future technology including an optical communications system, a nuclear power reactor, and a low-thrust propulsion system. A low-thrust trajectory optimization code (QuickTop 2) obtained from the NASA LeRC helped in planning the size of major subsystem components, as well as the trajectory between targets.

Melton, Robert G.; Thompson, Roger C.; Starchville, Thomas F., Jr.; Adams, C.; Aldo, A.; Dobson, K.; Flotta, C.; Gagliardino, J.; Lear, M.; Mcmillan, C.

1992-01-01

353

Neutronic Cross Section Calculations on Fluorine Nucleus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Certain light nuclei such as Lithium (Li), Beryllium (Be), Fluorine (F) (which are known as FL?BE) and its molten salt compounds (LiF, BeF2 and NaF) can serve as a coolant which can be used at high temperatures without reaching a high vapor pressure. These molten salt compounds are also a good neutron moderator. In this study, cross sections of neutron induced reactions have been calculated for fluorine target nucleus. The new calculations on the excitation functions of 19F( n, 2n), 19F( n, p), 19F( n, xn), 19F( n, xp) have been made. In these calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been investigated. The pre-equilibrium calculations involve the full exciton model and the cascade exciton model. The equilibrium effects are calculated according to the Weisskopf-Ewing model. Also in the present work, the ( n, 2n) and ( n, p) reaction cross sections have calculated by using evaluated empirical formulas developed by Tel et al. at 14-15 MeV energy. The multiple pre-equilibrium mean free path constant from internal transition have been investigated for 19F nucleus. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

Kara, A.; Tel, E.

2013-06-01

354

Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Thalamic Neuronal Activity  

PubMed Central

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective tool for the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which STN DBS elicits its beneficial effect, however, remains unclear. We previously reported STN stimulation increased the rate and produced a more regular and periodic pattern of neuronal activity in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Here we extend our observations to neurons in the pallidal (ventralis lateralis pars oralis (VLo) and ventralis anterior (VA)) and cerebellar (ventralis lateralis posterior pars oralis (VPLo)) receiving areas of the motor thalamus during STN DBS. Stimulation parameters that produced improvement in rigidity and bradykinesia resulted in changes in the pattern and power of oscillatory activity of neuronal activity that were similar in both regions of the motor thalamus. Neurons in both VA/VLo and VPLo tended to become more periodic and regular with a shift in oscillatory activity from low to high frequencies. Burst activity was reduced in VA/VLo, but was not significantly changed in VPLo. There was also a significant shift in the population of VA/VLo neurons that were inhibited during STN DBS, while VPLo neurons tended to be activated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that STN DBS increases output from the nucleus and produces a change in the pattern and periodicity of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamic network, and that these changes include cerebellar pathways likely via activation of adjacent cerebello-thalamic fiber bundles. PMID:19005057

Xu, Weidong; Russo, Gary S.; Hashimoto, Takao; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L.

2009-01-01

355

The nucleus N. trochlearis of the adult deer, Odocoileus virginianus  

E-print Network

, reticular formation, and decussation of the roots of the trochlear nerves. Comp. 2. The dorsal nucleus of the raphe extended from the floor of the fourth ventricle to a short distance below the NLP (figs. 2, 3). Only the lateral part of the decussation..., brachium of the inferior colliculi, reticular formation, interpeduncular nucleus, medial lemnlscus, tectospinal tract, rubrospinal tract, and a small part of the cephalic termination of the dorsal nucleus of the raphe were present. Comp. 28...

Sarkar, Tofayel Hossain

1964-01-01

356

In vitro and in silico investigations of disc nucleus replacement.  

PubMed

Currently, numerous hydrogels are under examination as potential nucleus replacements. The clinical success, however, depends on how well the mechanical function of the host structure is restored. This study aimed to evaluate the extent to and mechanisms by which surgery for nucleus replacements influence the mechanical behaviour of the disc. The effects of an annulus defect with and without nucleus replacement on disc height and nucleus pressure were measured using 24 ovine motion segments. The following cases were considered: intact; annulus incision repaired by suture and glue; annulus incision with removal and re-implantation of nucleus tissue repaired by suture and glue or plug. To identify the likely mechanisms observed in vitro, a finite-element model of a human disc (L4-L5) was employed. Both studies were subjected to physiological cycles of compression and recovery. A repaired annulus defect did not influence the disc behaviour in vitro, whereas additional nucleus removal and replacement substantially decreased disc stiffness and nucleus pressure. Model predictions demonstrated the substantial effects of reductions in replaced nucleus water content, bulk modulus and osmotic potential on disc height loss and pressure, similar to measurements. In these events, the compression load transfer in the disc markedly altered by substantially increasing the load on the annulus when compared with the nucleus. The success of hydrogels for nucleus replacements is not only dependent on the implant material itself but also on the restoration of the environment perturbed during surgery. The substantial effects on the disc response of disruptions owing to nucleus replacements can be simulated by reduced nucleus water content, elastic modulus and osmotic potential. PMID:22337630

Reitmaier, Sandra; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Bashkuev, Maxim; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Gloria, Antonio; Schmidt, Hendrik

2012-08-01

357

The critical complex in nucleation is not the nucleus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A theory of nucleation is presented which combines features of classical nucleation. In this theory, the nucleus is a cluster of finite size with a sharp interface and spinodal decomposition, in which a fluctuation in density or composition generates the critical complex and nucleus. Thus, the nucleus is a product of nucleation. Schematic models for the classical and the proposed routes to nucleation are compared, focusing on the relation between pressure and volume in the models. In the proposed model, the critical complex, or critical state, is between the parent state and the nucleus.

Rasmussen, Don H.; Esen, Etop; Appleby, Mary R.

1988-01-01

358

Transforaminal epidural steroid injections prevent the need for surgery in patients with sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation: a retrospective case series  

PubMed Central

Background The median orthopedic surgery wait time in Canada is 33.7 weeks, thus alternative treatments for pathologies such as lumbar disc herniations (LDH) are needed. We sought to determine whether transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) alleviate or merely delay the need for surgery. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients with LDH who received TFESIs between September 2006 and July 2008. Patient demographics, level and side of pathology, workers’ compensation status, levels injected, treatment outcome and time from referral to treatment were evaluated. The primary outcome measure was the need for versus the avoidance of surgery. Results We included 91 patients in our analysis. Time from family physician referral to injection was 123 (standard deviation [SD] 88) days; no significant differences in wait times were found between TFESI patients and those requiring surgery. In all, 51 patients (22 women, 29 men) with a mean age of 45.8 (SD 10.2) years avoided surgery following TFESI, whereas 40 patients (16 women, 24 mean) with a mean age of 43.1 (SD 12.0) years proceeded to surgery within 189 (SD 125) days postinjection. In all, 15 patients received multiple injections, and of these, 9 did not require surgical intervention. Age, sex and level/side of pathology did not influence the treatment outcome. Workers’ compensation status influenced outcome significantly; these patients demonstrated less benefit from TFESI. Conclusion Transforaminal epidural steroid injections are an important treatment tool, preventing the need for surgery in 56% of patients with LDH. PMID:23351495

Manson, Neil A.; McKeon, Melissa D.; Abraham, Edward P.

2013-01-01

359

Variation in eligibility criteria from studies of radiculopathy due to a herniated disc and of neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis: A structured literature review  

PubMed Central

Study Design A structured literature review. Summary of the Background Data Widely recognized classification criteria for rheumatologic disorders have resulted in well-defined patient populations for clinical investigation. Objectives We sought to determine whether similar criteria were needed for back pain disorders by examining variability in eligibility criteria in published studies Methods Studies involving radiculopathy due to lumbar herniated disc (HD) and for neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) were identified. Randomized controlled trials published between January 1, 2006 and October 1, 2008 in select peer reviewed journals were retrieved, their eligibility criteria were identified and categorized. Results Twelve eligible HD studies were identified. Thirteen unique categories of eligibility criteria were identified with a mean of 3.9 (+/?2.0) and a range from 0 to 8 categories per study. More categories were present for studies that included nonsurgical (5.6 +/? 2.5) treatment for studies with only surgical treatment (2.6 +/? 1.7) p= 0.04). Seven LSS studies met eligibility criteria, and 9 unique categories were identified. A mean of 5.0 (+/?2.2) categories with a range from 2 to 7 was used per study. Conclusion Wide variation in the number and type of eligibility criteria from randomized clinical trials of well defined back pain syndromes was identified. These results support the need for developing and disseminating international classification criteria for these clinical conditions. PMID:20228710

Genevay, S.; Atlas, S.J.; Katz, J.N.

2009-01-01

360

Investigation of high p$_{t}$ events in Nucleus-Nucleus collisions using the Hijing event generator  

E-print Network

In recent years lot of interest has been observed in the nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC energies in phenomena related to high $p_{t}$ physics \\cite{ref1}. The suppression of high $p_{t}$ particles and disappearance of back-to-back jets compared to the scaling with number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions indicates that a nearly perfect liquid is produced in these collisions. Results on self shadowing of high $p_{t}$ events are presented using hadron multiplicity associated to high $p_{t}$ and unbiased events in nucleus-nucleus collisions \\cite{ref2} obtained from the hijing event generator.

Natasha Sharma; Madan M. Aggarwal

2009-10-29

361

Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted by the Program Committee for presentation at the Workshop on Analysis of Returned Comet Nucleus Samples, held in Milpitas, California, January 16-18, 1989. Conveners are Sherwood Chang (NASA Ames Research Center) and Larry Nyquist (NASA Johnson Space Center). Program Committee members are Thomas Ahrens (ex-officio; California Institute of Technology), Lou Allamandola (NASA Ames Research Center), David Blake (NASA Ames Research Center), Donald Brownlee (University of Washington, Seattle), Theodore E. Bunch (NASA Ames Research Center), Humberto Campins (Planetary Science Institute), Jeff Cuzzi (NASA Ames Research Center), Eberhard Griin (Max-Plank-Institut fiir Kemphysik), Martha Hanner (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Alan Harris (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John Kerrid-e (University of Califomia, Los Angeles), Yves Langevin (University of Paris), Gerhard Schwehm (ESTEC), and Paul Weissman (Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Logistics and administrative support for the workshop were provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute Projects Office.

Chang, Sherwood (Compiler)

1997-01-01

362

Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium  

SciTech Connect

The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

1983-10-01

363

Parabrachial nucleus involvement in multiple system atrophy?  

PubMed Central

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is associated with respiratory dysfunction, including sleep apnea, respiratory dysrhythmia, and laryngeal stridor. Neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) control respiratory rhythmogenesis and airway resistance. Objectives The objective of this study is to determine whether there was involvement of putative respiratory regions of the PBN in MSA. Methods We examined the pons at autopsy in 10 cases with neuropathologically confirmed MSA and 8 age-matched controls. Sections obtained throughout the pons were processed for calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) and Nissl staining to identify the lateral crescent of the lateral PBN (LPB) and the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (K-F), which are involved in respiratory control. Cell counts were performed using stereology. Results There was loss of CGRP neurons in the PBN in MSA (total estimated cell counts for the external LPB cluster was 12,584 ± 1146 in controls and 5917 ± 389 in MSA, p < 0.0001); for the external medial PBN (MPB) cluster it was 15,081 ± 1758 in controls and 7842 ± 466 in MSA, p < 0.001. There was also neuronal loss in putative respiratory regions of the PBN, including the lateral crescent of the LPB (13,039 ± 1326 in controls and 4164 ± 872 in MSA, p < 0.0001); and K-F (5120 ± 495 in controls and 999 ± 308 in MSA, p < 0.0001). Conclusions There is involvement of both CGRP and putative respiratory cell groups in the PBN in MSA. Whereas the clinical implications of CGRP cell loss are still undetermined, involvement of the LPB and K-F may contribute to respiratory dysfunction in this disorder. PMID:23665165

Benarroch, E.E.; Schmeichel, A.M.; Low, P.A.; Parisi, J.E.

2014-01-01

364

Fluctuation analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsion chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytical technique was developed for identifying enhanced fluctuations in the angular distributions of secondary particles produced from relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The method is applied under the assumption that the masses of the produced particles are small compared to their linear momenta. The importance of particles rests in the fact that enhanced fluctuations in the rapidity distributions is considered to be an experimental signal for the creation of the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP), a state of nuclear matter predicted from the quantum chromodynamics theory (QCD). In the approach, Monte Carlo simulations are employed that make use of a portable random member generator that allow the calculations to be performed on a desk-top computer. The method is illustrated with data taken from high altitude emulsion exposures and is immediately applicable to similar data from accelerator-based emulsion exposures.

Mcguire, Stephen C.

1988-01-01

365

Nucleus-nucleus Bremsstrahlung from scattering angle selected Cl-Sn collisions  

SciTech Connect

Continuum X rays above the K lines of Sn were measured at 90 and 0/sup 0/ angle relative to the incident beam direction in coincidence with C1 projectiles scattered at very large laboratory angles between 8 and 164/sup 0/. By varying the isotope mass of the projectile ions (/sup 35/Cl and /sup 37/Cl) and of the target atoms (/sup 112/Sn and /sup 118/Sn) the radiation at scattering angles >10/sup 0/ could be clearly identified as Bremsstrahlung from the elementary scattering process of the two nuclei. The intensity of the radiation emitted at 0 and 90/sup 0/ relative to the beam direction can be reasonably well described by a quantum mechanical calculation of nucleus-nucleus Bremsstrahlung which includes the interference between dipole and quadrupole radiation amplitude. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Gaukler, G.; Nolte, G.; Schuch, R.

1986-01-01

366

Linear extrapolation of ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon scattering to nucleus-nucleus collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a Glauber-like approach to describe very energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions as a sequence of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. No free parameters are needed: All the information comes from simple parametrizations of nucleon-nucleon collision data. Produced mesons are assumed not to interact with each other or with the original baryons. Comparisons are made to published experimental measurements of baryon rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, negative hadron rapidity and transverse momentum distributions, average multiplicities of pions, kaons, hyperons, and antihyperons, and zero degree energy distributions for sulfur-sulfur collisions at 200 GeV/c per nucleon and for lead-lead collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon. Good agreement is found except that the number of strange particles produced, especially antihyperons, is too small compared with experiment. We call this model LEXUS: It is a base-line linear extrapolation of ultrarelativistic nucleon-nucleon scattering to heavy ion collisions.

Jeon, Sangyong; Kapusta, Joseph

1997-07-01

367

Strangeness Production in Light and Intermediate size Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions  

E-print Network

Within the statistical model, the net strangeness conservation and incomplete total strangeness equilibration lead to the suppression of strange particle multiplicities. Furthermore, suppression effects appear to be stronger in small systems. By treating the production of strangeness within the canonical ensemble formulation we developed a simple model which allows to predict the excitation function of $K^+/\\pi^+$ ratio in nucleus-nucleus collisions. In doing so we assumed that different values of $K^+/\\pi^+$, measured in p+p and Pb+Pb interactions at the same collision energy per nucleon, are driven by the finite size effects only. These predictions may serve as a baseline for experimental results from NA61/SHINE at the CERN SPS and the future CBM experiment at FAIR.

M. I. Gorenstein; W. Greiner; A. Rustamov

2014-05-08

368

Dielectron production in nucleus {plus} nucleus collisions at 1.05 GeV/nucleon  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions are valuable probes into the dynamics of the collision process. While the hadronic participants of the collision are subject to strong final state interactions, the coupling of the electron-positron pair to the collision medium is electromagnetic. Dielectrons, therefore suffer little rescattering leaving the interaction and can retain information about their production origins, probing even the early stages in the evolution of the collision. The DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) collaboration`s original measurements of dielectron production established the existence of the signal at Bevalac energies. The 1992- 93 DLS measurements in nucleus+Nucleus collisions at a kinetic beam energy of 1.05 {ital GeV/nucleon} are the subject of this presentation.

Porter, R.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Beedoe, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Bougteb, M. [Universite Blaise Pascal, Aubriere, (France); Hallman, T. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Z.F. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [and others

1996-06-28

369

The suprachiasmatic nucleus of the domestic chicken, Gallus domesticus  

E-print Network

THE SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS OF THE DOMESTIC CHICKEN, Gallus domesticus A Dissertation by ELIZABETH LAYNE CANTWELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2005 Major Subject: Zoology THE SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS OF THE DOMESTIC CHICKEN, Gallus domesticus A Dissertation by ELIZABETH LAYNE CANTWELL...

Cantwell, Elizabeth Layne

2007-04-25

370

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus  

E-print Network

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

Dai, Yang

371

Patterns of Cell Death in Mouse Anteroventral Cochlear Nucleus Neurons  

E-print Network

Patterns of Cell Death in Mouse Anteroventral Cochlear Nucleus Neurons After Unilateral Cochlea of afferent input on the survival of neurons of the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) of mice were for these developmental changes in susceptibility. We performed unilateral cochlear ablation on wild-type mice

Rubel, Edwin

372

Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters.  

PubMed

Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs. PMID:25250903

Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

2014-11-01

373

The Confined Hydrogen Atom with a Moving Nucleus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We study the hydrogen atom confined to a spherical box with impenetrable walls but, unlike earlier pedagogical articles on the subject, we assume that the nucleus also moves. We obtain the ground-state energy approximately by means of first-order perturbation theory and show that it is greater than that for the case in which the nucleus is clamped…

Fernandez, Francisco M.

2010-01-01

374

Nucleus modelling and segmentation in cell Jesus Angulo  

E-print Network

Nucleus modelling and segmentation in cell clusters Jes´us Angulo CMM-Centre de Morphologie Math jesus.angulo@ensmp.fr Summary. This paper deals with individual nucleus modelling and segmentation, from to be a very powerful tool in biomedical microscopy image analysis. Cell images #12;2 Jes´us Angulo used

Angulo,Jesús

375

Concept for a New Cloud Condensation Nucleus (CCN) Spectrometer  

E-print Network

1 Concept for a New Cloud Condensation Nucleus (CCN) Spectrometer Timothy M. VanReken1 , Athanasios Institute of Technology #12;2 ABSTRACT The design of a new cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectrometer modifications include introducing a trapezoidal geometry and orienting the chamber vertically. A series

Nenes, Athanasios

376

Modifications of Gustatory Nerve Synapses onto Nucleus of the Solitary  

E-print Network

Modifications of Gustatory Nerve Synapses onto Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Neurons Induced, Michigan 48109-1078 2 Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 a remarkable amount of expansion in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) as a result of early dietary sodium

Hill, David L.

377

The dorsal column nucleus in a reptile, Caiman crocodilus.  

PubMed

The dorsal column nucleus of Caiman crocodilus was identified by using standard orthograde techniques to trace the degeneration that resulted from dorsal rhizotomies in brachial and lumbar regions. Although the dorsal column nucleus was difficult to locate in Nissl and fiber preparations, it was easily identified in histochemical material because it stained intensely with succinate dehydrogenase and acetylcholinesterase. PMID:6633941

Pritz, M B

1983-08-29

378

Trend of Pharmacopuncture Therapy for Treating Cervical Disease in Korea  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The purpose of this study is to analyze trends in domestic studies on pharmacopuncture therapy for treating cervical disease. Methods: This study was carried out on original copies and abstracts of theses listed in databases or published until July 2014. The search was made on the Oriental medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System (OASIS) the National Digital Science Library (NDSL), and the Korean traditional knowledge portal. Search words were ‘pain on cervical spine’, ‘cervical pain’, ‘ruptured cervical disk’, ‘cervical disc disorder’, ‘stiffness of the neck’, ‘cervical disk’, ‘whiplash injury’, ‘cervicalgia’, ‘posterior cervical pain’, ‘neck disability’, ‘Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (HNP)’, and ‘Herniated Intervertebral Disc (HIVD)’. Results: Twenty-five clinical theses related to pharmacopuncture were selected and were analyzed by year according to the type of pharmacopuncture used, the academic journal in which the publication appeared, and the effect of pharmacopuncture therapy. Conclusion: The significant conclusions are as follows: (1) Pharmacopunctures used for cervical pain were Bee venom pharmacopuncture, Carthami-flos pharmacopuncture, Scolopendra pharmacopuncture, Ouhyul pharmacopuncturen, Hwangryun pharmacopuncture, Corpus pharmacopuncture, Soyeom pharmacopuncture, Hwangryunhaedoktang pharmacopuncture, Shinbaro phamacopuncture. (2) Randomized controlled trials showed that pharmacopuncture therapy combined with other methods was more effective. (3) In the past, studies oriented toward Bee venom pharmacopuncture were actively pursued, but the number of studies on various other types of pharmacopuncture gradually began to increase. (4) For treating a patient with cervical pain, the type of pharmacopuncture to be used should be selected based on the cause of the disease and the patient’s condition. PMID:25780714

Kim, Seok-Hee; Jung, Da-Jung; Choi, Yoo-Min; Kim, Jong-Uk; Yook, Tae-Han

2014-01-01

379

Fibrocartilaginous embolism of the spinal cord: a clinical and pathogenetic reconsideration.  

PubMed Central

A 16 year old girl did a handstand for fun, returned to her feet, experienced a sudden pain in her back, and became progressively paraplegic within 30 hours. MRI showed lumbar cord swelling, multiple Schmorl's nodes, a collapsed T11-T12 disc space, and intraspongious disc prolapse into the T12 vertebral body. These findings, related to the initial manoeuvre, suggested that an acute vertical disc herniation could have occurred as the first step in a process leading to spinal cord infarction due to fibrocartilaginous emboli from the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. The medical literature so far reports 32 cases of fibrocartilaginous embolism (FCE) of the spinal cord, all at necropsy, with the exception of one histologically demonstrated in a living patient. A clinical diagnosis of FCE would be desirable for many important reasons, but was never made. This causes severe limitations in the knowledge of the disease and precludes any therapeutic possibility. On the basis of the clinical features and findings in the present case, compared with data from the reported cases, a first attempt is made to identify the clinical context within which new information obtainable through MRI examination can lead to a reliable clinical diagnosis of FCE. The vexed question of the pathogenesis has been reviewed. An increased intraosseous pressure within the vertebral body, due to acute vertical disc herniation, seems to offer a consistent pathogenetic explanation and some therapeutic prospects. Images PMID:8558152

Tosi, L; Rigoli, G; Beltramello, A

1996-01-01

380

[Surgery of lumbar disk hernia: historical perspective].  

PubMed

Although the clinical picture of discogenic sciatica is well known already in the ancient world, it is not until 1933 that WJ Mixter and JS Barr provide the correct pathogenetic interpretation and suggest surgery as the treatment of choice. The work of the American Authors was however based on the knowledge acquired during the previous centuries starting with Domenico Cotugno, who first suggested the neurogenic nature of sciatica (1764) and later with the neurologists of the french school Valleix, Lasègue, Dejerine, Sicard who elucidated the semeiology and debated in detail the etiopathogenesis of the condition. The german pathologists Schmorl and Andrae (1927-29) are to be credited for their contribution to the pathology of intervertebral disc, recognizing the frequency and degenerative (not neoplastic) nature of nucleus pulposus herniation. Surgery of disc herniation starts with Oppenheim and Krause (1909). Mixter and Barr used laminectomy and a transdural route although a more limited approach to the spinal canal had already been proposed by the italian Bonomo (1902), unknown to many. Love, of the Mayo Clinic (1937-39) introduced the extradural/interlaminar approach while Caspar and Yasargil (1977) applied the concepts of microsurgery to the procedure. The latest advances are represented by percutaneous and endoscopic techniques. PMID:9835099

Brunori, A; De Caro, G M; Giuffrè, R

1998-01-01

381

Nucleon emission via electromagnetic excitation in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Re-analysis of the Weizsacker-Williams method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Previous analyses of the comparison of Weizsacker-Williams (WW) theory to experiment for nucleon emission via electromagnetic (EM) excitations in nucleus-nucleus collisions were not definitive because of different assumptions concerning the value of the minimum impact parameter. This situation is corrected by providing criteria that allows definitive statements to be made concerning agreement or disagreement between WW theory and experiment.

Norbury, John W.

1989-01-01

382

Opposite regulation of body temperature by cholinergic input to the paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypothalamic cholinergic system plays an important role in the regulation of body temperature and fluid balance. We have previously shown that cholinergic stimulation of the anterior hypothalamus and preoptic area was accompanied by a fall in body temperature, increased water intake, and increased Fos protein in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON). In the present study, to estimate

Akira Takahashi; Hirohisa Ishimaru; Yasushi Ikarashi; Eiko Kishi; Yuji Maruyama

2001-01-01

383

Modification of rat model of sciatica induced by lumber disc herniation and the anti-inflammatory effect of osthole given by epidural catheterization.  

PubMed

One of the most treatable causes of lower back pain and associated sciatica is lumbar disc herniation (LDH), which is characterized by rupture of the hard outer wall (annulus fibrosis) in a lumbar intervertebral disc. In the current study, we aimed to: (1) develop and characterize a rat model of sciatica induced by LDH, while introducing a novel method of epidural catheterization; (2) use this model to evaluate the effect of osthole on pain due to LDH, and (3) gain insight into the mechanisms through which osthole affects sciatica induced by LDH. The results indicate that our newly developed rat model maintained mechanical allodynia for 28 days without reduction. Moreover, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were overexpressed in the associated inflammatory response, which is consistent with clinical manifestations of the disease. We then used this model to study the effect and mechanisms through which osthole affected pain due to LDH. Our study suggests that osthole is capable of reversing hyperalgesia due to LDH, potentially through modulation of activity of COX-2 and NOS, two important proteins for the exacerbation of pain due to LDH. Finally, a molecular modeling simulation showed that osthole has unique binding capabilities to both NOS and COX-2. As the model-induced mechanical hyperalgesia response was consistent, and the position of the catheter tip and the extension/spreading of the drug in the epidural space were reliable, this study developed an improved model to study remedies for sciatic pain. Moreover, our studies demonstrate that osthole may be a feasible treatment for the reduction of pain due to hyperalgesia. PMID:23018204

Wei, Ming; Mo, Sui-Lin; Nabar, Neel R; Chen, Yuling; Zhang, Jin-Jun; He, Qiu-Lan; Zou, Xue-Nong; Liu, Xian-Guo; Sun, Lai-Bao; Zhou, Shu-Feng

2012-01-01

384

Comparison Of Percutaneous Laser Discectomy With Other Modalities For The Treatment Of Herniated Lumbar Discs And Cadaveric Studies Of Percutaneous Laser Discectomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current modalities for treating a herniated lumbar disc include standard open discectomy, microsurgical discectomy, chemonucleoysis and percutaneous discectomy. The Food and Drug Administration has not yet approved percutaneous laser discectomy for clinical investigation. The investigators believe that percutaneous laser discectomy combines the efficacy of both chemonucleoysis and percutaneous discectomy with the safety of both open standard discectomy and microsurgical discectomy. The investigators removed two lumbar discs from a cadaveric spine and weighed each of them. The two lumbar discs weighed in the range of 13.654 grams and 15.713 grams, respectively. The investigators initiated several series of 10 firing cycles from a surgical carbon dioxide laser system. In each firing cycle the surgical carbon dioxide laser system delivered a beam of light energy having an output power of 18.0 watts at pulse duration of 0.045 second at the rate of 15 pulses per second for a period of 6 seconds and vaporized approximately 325 milligrams of disc material. Based on the findings of other investigators reported in the literature relating to percutaneous discectomy the investigators postulated that 10 to 20 firing cycles are required to vaporize 30 to 40% (2.4 to 6.4 grams) of the disc material. The investigators initiated two series of 10 firing cycles in order to perform laser discectomy in a third lumbar disc of the cadaveric spine in situ. The investigators harvested and then bisected the laser-treated third lumbar disc for gross review. Their gross findings indicated a high probability of success For percutaneous laser discectomy.

Johansen, W. E.; Smith, Chadwick F.; Vangsness, Thomas; McEleney, Emmett T.; Yamaguchi, Ken; Bales, Peter

1987-03-01

385

Four-year follow-up results of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion as revision surgery for recurrent lumbar disc herniation after conventional discectomy.  

PubMed

This study investigated the safety, effectiveness, and clinical and radiological outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) following previous lumbar spine surgery. Seventy-three consecutive patients treated for rLDH between June 2005 and May 2012 were included in the study. The previous surgical procedures included percutaneous discectomy, discectomy with laminotomy, discectomy with unilateral laminectomy, and discectomy with bilateral laminectomy. The level of rLDH was L4-L5 in 51 patients, L5-S1 in 19 patients, and L3-L4 in three patients. All patients underwent reoperation using the TLIF technique. Outcomes were evaluated using the Oswestry disability index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for low back pain and leg pain, and the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, based on the results of physical examinations and questionnaires. The range of motion and disc height index of the operative segment were compared between preoperative and postoperative radiographs. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years. The VAS scores for low back pain and leg pain, ODI, and JOA score improved significantly between the preoperative and final follow-up evaluations. The mean recovery rate of the JOA score was 89.0%. The disc space height and stability at the fused level were significantly improved after surgery. The fusion rate at the final follow-up was 93.2%. There were no major complications. These results indicate that TLIF can be considered an effective, reliable, and safe alternative procedure for the treatment of rLDH. PMID:25443080

Li, Zhonghai; Tang, Jiaguang; Hou, Shuxun; Ren, Dongfeng; Li, Li; Lu, Xiang; Hou, Tiesheng

2015-02-01

386

The pathways connecting the hippocampal formation, the thalamic reuniens nucleus and the thalamic reticular nucleus in the rat  

PubMed Central

Most dorsal thalamic nuclei send axons to specific areas of the neocortex and to specific sectors of the thalamic reticular nucleus; the neocortex then sends reciprocal connections back to the same thalamic nucleus, directly as well indirectly through a relay in the thalamic reticular nucleus. This can be regarded as a ‘canonical’ circuit of the sensory thalamus. For the pathways that link the thalamus and the hippocampal formation, only a few comparable connections have been described. The reuniens nucleus of the thalamus sends some of its major cortical efferents to the hippocampal formation. The present study shows that cells of the hippocampal formation as well as cells in the reuniens nucleus are retrogradely labelled following injections of horseradish peroxidase or fluoro-gold into the rostral part of the thalamic reticular nucleus in the rat. Within the hippocampal formation, labelled neurons were localized in the subiculum, predominantly on the ipsilateral side, with fewer neurons labelled contralaterally. Labelled neurons were seen in the hippocampal formation and nucleus reuniens only after injections made in the rostral thalamic reticular nucleus (1.6–1.8 mm caudal to bregma). In addition, the present study confirmed the presence of afferent connections to the rostral thalamic reticular nucleus from cortical (cingulate, orbital and infralimbic, retrosplenial and frontal), midline thalamic (paraventricular, anteromedial, centromedial and mediodorsal thalamic nuclei) and brainstem structures (substantia nigra pars reticularis, ventral tegmental area, periaqueductal grey, superior vestibular and pontine reticular nuclei). These results demonstrate a potential for the thalamo-hippocampal circuitry to influence the functional roles of the thalamic reticular nucleus, and show that thalamo-hippocampal connections resemble the circuitry that links the sensory thalamus and neocortex. PMID:18221482

Çavdar, Safiye; Onat, Filiz Y; Çakmak, Yusuf Özgür; Yananli, Hasan R; Gülçebi, Medine; Aker, Rezzan

2008-01-01

387

Inputs to the ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.  

PubMed

The ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTvl) receives direct input from two specific subpopulations of neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). It is heavily innervated by aldosterone-sensitive NTS neurons, which are selectively activated by sodium depletion, and by the A2 noradrenergic neurons, which are activated by visceral and immune- and stress-related stimuli. Here, we used a retrograde neuronal tracer to identify other brain sites that innervate the BSTvl. Five general brain regions contained retrogradely labeled neurons: cerebral cortex (infralimbic and insular regions), rostral forebrain structures (subfornical organ, organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, taenia tecta, nucleus accumbens, lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, dorsal BST, substantia innominata, and, most prominently the amygdala--primarily its basomedial and central subnuclei), thalamus (central medial, intermediodorsal, reuniens, and, most prominently the paraventricular thalamic nucleus), hypothalamus (medial preoptic area, perifornical, arcuate, dorsomedial, parasubthalamic, and posterior hypothalamic nuclei), and brainstem (periaqueductal gray matter, dorsal and central superior raphe nuclei, parabrachial nucleus, pre-locus coeruleus region, NTS, and A1 noradrenergic neurons in the caudal ventrolateral medulla). In the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus, some retrogradely labeled neurons contained either agouti-related peptide or cocaine/amphetamine-regulated transcript. Of the numerous retrogradely labeled neurons in the perifornical hypothalamic area, few contained melanin-concentrating hormone or orexin. In the brainstem, many retrogradely labeled neurons were either serotoninergic or catecholaminergic. In summary, the BSTvl receives inputs from a variety of brain sites implicated in hunger, salt and water intake, stress, arousal, and reward. PMID:18853414

Shin, Jung-Won; Geerling, Joel C; Loewy, Arthur D

2008-12-10

388

Retrotrapezoid nucleus and parafacial respiratory group  

PubMed Central

The rat retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) contains about 2000 Phox2b-expressing glutamatergic neurons (ccRTN neurons; 800 in mice) with a well-understood developmental lineage. ccRTN neuron development fails in mice carrying a Phox2b mutation commonly present in the congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. In adulthood, ccRTN neurons regulate the breathing rate and intensity, and may regulate active expiration along with other neighboring respiratory neurons. Prenatally, ccRTN neurons form an autonomous oscillator (embryonic parafacial group, e-pF) that activates and possibly paces inspiration. The pacemaker properties of the ccRTN neurons probably vanish after birth to be replaced by synaptic drives. The neonatal parafacial respiratory group (pfRG) may represent a transitional phase during which ccRTN neurons lose their group pacemaker properties. ccRTN neurons are activated by acidification via an intrinsic mechanism or via ATP released by glia. In summary, throughout life, ccRTN neurons seem to be a critical hub for the regulation of CO2 via breathing. PMID:20188865

Guyenet, Patrice G.; Mulkey, Daniel K.

2010-01-01

389

Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

2011-06-01

390

Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.  

PubMed

The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function. PMID:24705203

Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

2014-08-01

391

Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

Keller, V. W. (compiler)

1986-01-01

392

Multiple pion and kaon production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: measurements versus specific models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The pion and kaon rapidity densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which modestly sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions are available to date. In the light of two sets of models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a modest degree of a dynamical basis - we try to examine the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

Guptaroy, P.; de, Bh.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, D. P.

393

Observation of the antimatter helium-4 nucleus.  

PubMed

High-energy nuclear collisions create an energy density similar to that of the Universe microseconds after the Big Bang; in both cases, matter and antimatter are formed with comparable abundance. However, the relatively short-lived expansion in nuclear collisions allows antimatter to decouple quickly from matter, and avoid annihilation. Thus, a high-energy accelerator of heavy nuclei provides an efficient means of producing and studying antimatter. The antimatter helium-4 nucleus (4He), also known as the anti-? (?), consists of two antiprotons and two antineutrons (baryon number B = -4). It has not been observed previously, although the ?-particle was identified a century ago by Rutherford and is present in cosmic radiation at the ten per cent level. Antimatter nuclei with B?

2011-05-19

394

Deconvolving the Nucleus of Centaurus A Using Chandra PSF Library  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is a giant early-type galaxy containing the nearest (at 3.5 Mpc) radio-bright Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Cen A was observed with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory on several occasions since the launch in July 1999. The high-angular resolution (less than 0.5 arcsecond) Chandra/HRC images reveal X ray multi-scale structures in this object with unprecedented detail and clarity, including the bright nucleus believed to be associated with a supermassive black hole. We explored the spatial extent of the Cen A nucleus using deconvolution techniques on the full resolution Chandra images. Model point spread functions (PSFs) were derived from the standard Chandra raytrace PSF library as well as unresolved point sources observed with Chandra. The deconvolved images show that the Cen A nucleus is resolved and asymmetric. We discuss several possible causes of this extended emission and of the asymmetries.

Karovska, Margarita

2000-01-01

395

PLANT SCIENCE: Signaling to the Nucleus with a Loaded GUN  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. Plant chloroplasts respond to environmental and developmental stress through a signaling pathway that controls gene expression in the nucleus.

Da-Peng Zhang (China Agricultural University; State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Biological Sciences)

2007-05-04

396

Cytotoxicity of nucleus-targeting fluorescent gold nanoclusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs.Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with ultra small sizes and unique fluorescence properties have shown promising potential for imaging the nuclei of living cells. However, little is known regarding the potential cytotoxicity of AuNCs after they enter the cell nucleus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how nucleus-targeting AuNCs affect the normal functioning of cells. Highly stable, water-soluble and bright fluorescent Au25NCs (the core of each nanocluster is composed of 25 gold atoms) were synthesized. Specific targeting of Au25NCs to the cell nucleus was achieved by conjugating the TAT peptide to the Au25NCs. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell apoptosis/necrosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and mitochondrial membrane potential examinations were performed on different cell lines exposed to the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs. We found that the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. A possible mechanism for the cytotoxicity of the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs was proposed as follows: the nucleus-targeting Au25NCs induce the production of ROS, resulting in the oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components, in turn leading to apoptosis via a mitochondrial damage pathway. This work facilitates a better understanding of the toxicity of AuNCs, especially nucleus-targeting AuNCs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04227a

Zhao, Jing-Ya; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Mingxi; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Pang, Dai-Wen

2014-10-01

397

Active diffusion positions the nucleus in mouse oocytes.  

PubMed

In somatic cells, the position of the cell centroid is dictated by the centrosome. The centrosome is instrumental in nucleus positioning, the two structures being physically connected. Mouse oocytes have no centrosomes, yet harbour centrally located nuclei. We demonstrate how oocytes define their geometric centre in the absence of centrosomes. Using live imaging of oocytes, knockout for the formin 2 actin nucleator, with off-centred nuclei, together with optical trapping and modelling, we discover an unprecedented mode of nucleus positioning. We document how active diffusion of actin-coated vesicles, driven by myosin Vb, generates a pressure gradient and a propulsion force sufficient to move the oocyte nucleus. It promotes fluidization of the cytoplasm, contributing to nucleus directional movement towards the centre. Our results highlight the potential of active diffusion, a prominent source of intracellular transport, able to move large organelles such as nuclei, providing in vivo evidence of its biological function. PMID:25774831

Almonacid, Maria; Ahmed, Wylie W; Bussonnier, Matthias; Mailly, Philippe; Betz, Timo; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

2015-04-01

398

Pituitary atrial natriuretic peptide of paraventricular nucleus origin.  

PubMed

Atrial natriuretic peptide-synthesizing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus constitute the major sources of ANP in the three lobes of the pituitary gland. Complete transection of the pituitary stalk eliminated 93% of ANP from the intermediate lobe, 47 and 77% from the anterior and the posterior lobes, respectively. Meantime, increased levels of immunoreactive ANP were measured in the median eminence, due to the accumulation of the peptide in the transected axons centrally to the transected stalk and in the paraventricular nucleus. It is likely that ANP neurons in the paraventricular nucleus innervate the pituitary, but those in the periventricular (median) preoptic nucleus and the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis may not contribute to the ANP innervation of the pituitary gland. PMID:17451047

Fodor, Mariann; Makara, Gábor B; Palkovits, Miklós

2007-03-30

399

PLANT SCIENCE: Nibbling at the Plant Cell Nucleus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. When plants recognize certain pathogens, an activated immune receptor moves to the nucleus where it affects transcription to initiate a successful response.

Jeffery L. Dangl (University of North Carolina; Department of Biology, the Curriculum in Genetics, and the Carolina Center for Genome Sciences)

2007-02-23

400

Chandra unveils a binary active galactic nucleus in Mrk 463  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyse Chandra, XMM-Newton and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data of the double-nucleus Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy (ULIRG), Mrk 463. The Chandra detection of two luminous (L2-10keV = 1.5 × 1043 and 3.8 × 1042 erg cm-2 s-1), unresolved nuclei in Mrk 463 indicates that this galaxy hosts a binary active galactic nucleus (AGN), with a projected separation of ~=3.8 kpc (3.83 +/- 0.01 arcsec). While the East nucleus was already known to be a type 2 Seyfert (and this is further confirmed by our Chandra detection of a neutral iron line), this is the first unambiguous evidence in favour of the AGN nature of the West nucleus. Mrk 463 is therefore the clearest case so far for a binary AGN, after NGC 6240.

Bianchi, Stefano; Chiaberge, Marco; Piconcelli, Enrico; Guainazzi, Matteo; Matt, Giorgio

2008-05-01

401

Pion production at 180/sup 0/ in nucleus-nucleus collisions  

SciTech Connect

A survey experiment of pion production at 180/sup 0/ in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. Beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 2.1 GeV/A protons, alphas, and carbon were used, as well as proton beams of 0.80 GeV, 3.5 GeV, and 4.89 GeV, and argon beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 1.83 GeV/A. This is the first such experiment to use the heavier beams. Targets used ranged from carbon to lead. An in-depth review of the literature, both experimental and theoretical, is also presented. The systematics of the data are discussed, and comparisons are made both with prior experiments and with the predictions of the models reviewed. The cross sections appear consistent with a simple single nucleon-nucleon collision picture, without the need for collective or other exotic effects. Suggestions for future work are made.

Chessin, S.A.

1983-05-01

402

Statistical analysis of secondary particle distributions in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use is described of several statistical techniques to characterize structure in the angular distributions of secondary particles from nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 24 to 61 GeV/nucleon. The objective of this work was to determine whether there are correlations between emitted particle intensity and angle that may be used to support the existence of the quark gluon plasma. The techniques include chi-square null hypothesis tests, the method of discrete Fourier transform analysis, and fluctuation analysis. We have also used the method of composite unit vectors to test for azimuthal asymmetry in a data set of 63 JACEE-3 events. Each method is presented in a manner that provides the reader with some practical detail regarding its application. Of those events with relatively high statistics, Fe approaches 0 at 55 GeV/nucleon was found to possess an azimuthal distribution with a highly non-random structure. No evidence of non-statistical fluctuations was found in the pseudo-rapidity distributions of the events studied. It is seen that the most effective application of these methods relies upon the availability of many events or single events that possess very high multiplicities.

Mcguire, Stephen C.

1987-01-01

403

Chemical equilibrium study in nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies  

E-print Network

We present a detailed study of chemical freeze-out in nucleus-nucleus collisions at beam energies of 11.6, 30, 40, 80 and 158A GeV. By analyzing hadronic multiplicities within the statistical hadronization approach, we have studied the strangeness production as a function of centre of mass energy and of the parameters of the source. We have tested and compared different versions of the statistical model, with special emphasis on possible explanations of the observed strangeness hadronic phase space under-saturation. We show that, in this energy range, the use of hadron yields at midrapidity instead of in full phase space artificially enhances strangeness production and could lead to incorrect conclusions as far as the occurrence of full chemical equilibrium is concerned. In addition to the basic model with an extra strange quark non-equilibrium parameter, we have tested three more schemes: a two-component model superimposing hadrons coming out of single nucleon-nucleon interactions to those emerging from large fireballs at equilibrium, a model with local strangeness neutrality and a model with strange and light quark non-equilibrium parameters. The behaviour of the source parameters as a function of colliding system and collision energy is studied. The description of strangeness production entails a non-monotonic energy dependence of strangeness saturation parameter gamma_S with a maximum around 30A GeV. We also present predictions of the production rates of still unmeasured hadrons including the newly discovered Theta^+(1540) pentaquark baryon.

F. Becattini; M. Gazdzicki; A. Keranen; J. Manninen; R. Stock

2004-03-26

404

Energy dependence of the nucleus-nucleus potential close to the Coulomb barrier  

SciTech Connect

The nucleus-nucleus interaction potentials in heavy-ion fusion reactions are extracted from the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory for the mass symmetric reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O, {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 48}Ca + {sup 48}Ca and the mass asymmetric reactions {sup 16}O + {sup 40,} {sup 48}Ca, {sup 40}Ca + {sup 48}Ca, {sup 16}O + {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 40}Ca + {sup 90}Zr. When the c.m. energy is much higher than the Coulomb barrier energy, potentials deduced with the microscopic theory identify with the frozen density approximation. As the c.m. energy decreases and approaches the Coulomb barrier, potentials become energy dependent. This dependence indicates dynamical reorganization of internal degrees of freedom and leads to a reduction of the 'apparent' barrier felt by the two nuclei during fusion of the order of 2-3% compared to the frozen density case. Several examples illustrate that the potential landscape changes rapidly when the c.m. energy is in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier energy. The energy dependence is expected to have a significant role on fusion around the Coulomb barrier.

Washiyama, Kouhei [GANIL, CEA and IN2P3, Boite Postale 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Lacroix, Denis [GANIL, CEA and IN2P3, Boite Postale 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2008-08-15

405

Heavy-flavor dynamics in nucleus-nucleus collisions: from the RHIC to the LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stochastic dynamics of c and b quarks in the fireball created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the RHIC and LHC is studied employing a relativistic Langevin equation, based on a picture of multiple uncorrelated random collisions with the medium. Heavy-quark transport coefficients are evaluated within a pQCD approach, with a proper HTL resummation of medium effects for soft scatterings. The Langevin equation is embedded in a multi-step setup developed to study heavy-flavor observables in pp and AA collisions, starting from a NLO pQCD calculation of initial heavy-quark yields, complemented in the nuclear case by shadowing corrections, kT-broadening and nuclear geometry effects. Then, only for AA collisions, the Langevin equation is solved numerically in a background medium described by relativistic hydrodynamics. Finally, the propagated heavy quarks are made hadronize and decay into electrons. Results for the nuclear modification factor RAA of heavy-flavor hadrons and electrons from their semi-leptonic decays are provided, both for RHIC and LHC beam energies.

Monteno, M.; Alberico, W. M.; Beraudo, A.; De Pace, A.; Molinari, A.; Nardi, M.; Prino, F.

2011-12-01

406

Energy-Dependence of Nucleus-Nucleus Potential and Friction Parameter in Fusion Reactions  

E-print Network

Applying a macroscopic reduction procedure on the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model, the energy dependences of the nucleus-nucleus potential, the friction parameter, and the random force characterizing a one-dimensional Langevin-type description of the heavy-ion fusion process are investigated. Systematic calculations with the ImQMD model show that the fluctuation-dissipation relation found in the symmetric head-on fusion reactions at energies just above the Coulomb barrier fades out when the incident energy increases. It turns out that this dynamical change with increasing incident energy is caused by a specific behavior of the friction parameter which directly depends on the microscopic dynamical process, i.e., on how the collective energy of the relative motion is transferred into the intrinsic excitation energy. It is shown microscopically that the energy dissipation in the fusion process is governed by two mechanisms: One is caused by the nucleon exchanges between two fusing nuclei, and the other is due to a rearrangement of nucleons in the intrinsic system. The former mechanism monotonically increases the dissipative energy and shows a weak dependence on the incident energy, while the latter depends on both the relative distance between two fusing nuclei and the incident energy. It is shown that the latter mechanism is responsible for the energy dependence of the fusion potential and explains the fading out of the fluctuation-dissipation relation.

Kai Wen; Fumihiko Sakata; Zhu-Xia Li; Xi-Zhen Wu; Ying-Xun Zhang; Shan-Gui Zhou

2014-11-08

407

Does the reticular thalamic nucleus project to the midbrain?  

PubMed

In this study, we investigated whether the reticular thalamic nucleus has a projection to major centres of the midbrain in rats, rabbits and cats. Various tracers (biotinylated dextran, cholera toxin B subunit, fluorescent latex beads) were injected either into the midbrain tectum (deep layers of the superior colliculus) or tegmentum (midbrain reticular and pedunculopontine nuclei). In other experiments, different coloured latex beads (red and green) were injected into the deep layers of the superior colliculus and into the midbrain reticular nucleus of the same animal (rabbits). Our major finding is that in rats, rabbits and cats, there are no retrogradely labelled cells in the reticular thalamic nucleus after tracer injections into the above mentioned midbrain centres. In rabbits and cats, however, there are retrogradely labelled cells lying close to the ventromedial edge of the reticular thalamic nucleus after such injections. We show, by means of immunocytochemical double-labelling, that these retrogradely labelled cells do not lie in the reticular thalamic nucleus as suggested by previous studies, but in the inner small-celled region, a group of small cells that forms part of the zona incerta. Although these appears to be no clear topography of projection of the inner small-celled region, our tracer double-labelling experiments show that separate cells in the inner small-celled region project to individual centres of the midbrain (i.e., there are very few double-labelled cells after double injections). In rats, unlike in rabbits and cats, there is no clearly defined inner small-celled region and there are no retrogradely labelled cells seen along the ventromedial edge of the reticular thalamic nucleus. Our results suggest that in rats, rabbits and cats, there is no projection of the reticular thalamic nucleus to major centres of the midbrain, suggesting that the nucleus may not have a very strong influence on midbrain function, as it does on dorsal thalamic function. PMID:9192288

Vaccaro, T; Mitrofanis, J

1997-04-01

408

Mission CaMKII?: shuttle calmodulin from membrane to nucleus.  

PubMed

Neuronal plasticity depends on plasma membrane Ca(2+) influx, resulting in activity-dependent gene transcription. Calmodulin (CaM) activated by Ca(2+) initiates the nuclear events, but how CaM makes its way to the nucleus has remained elusive. Ma et al. now show that CaMKII? transports CaM from cell surface Ca(2+) channels to the nucleus. PMID:25303520

Malik, Zulfiqar A; Stein, Ivar S; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

2014-10-01

409

Response properties of visual neurons in the turtle nucleus isthmi  

Microsoft Academic Search

The optic tectum holds a central position in the tectofugal pathway of non-mammalian species and is reciprocally connected\\u000a with the nucleus isthmi. Here, we recorded from individual nucleus isthmi pars parvocellularis (Ipc) neurons in the turtle\\u000a eye-attached whole-brain preparation in response to a range of computer-generated visual stimuli. Ipc neurons responded to\\u000a a variety of moving or flashing stimuli as

Debajit Saha; David Morton; Michael Ariel; Ralf Wessel

2011-01-01

410

Acts and knowledge management in the NUCLEUS hospital information system.  

PubMed Central

NUCLEUS is a project completed in June 1995 in the frame of the European Community programme AIM (Advanced Informatics in Medicine). The main result of NUCLEUS is a prototype of an integrated patient dossier. Together with this patient dossier, facilities have been developed for its customisation by the various categories of end-users. A semantic model has been designed to guide and control the exploitation of data, and ensures the overall integrity of the information system. PMID:8563297

Kanoui, H.; Joubert, M.; Favard, R.; Maury, G.; Pelletier, M.

1995-01-01

411

Neuronal subpopulations in a reptilian thalamic reticular nucleus.  

PubMed

In reptiles, Caiman crocodilus, some neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus are immunoreactive for parvalbumin. Utilizing double-labeling experiments with fluorescent tracers and indirect fluorescence immunocytochemistry, some of these parvalbumin immunoreactive neurons were found to project to the dorsal thalamus. Other thalamic reticular neurons not immunoreactive for parvalbumin were also found to terminate in the dorsal thalamus. These findings suggest that the thalamic reticular nucleus in Caiman contains at least two chemically, and perhaps functionally, distinct neuronal subpopulations. PMID:8347828

Pritz, M B; Stritzel, M E

1993-06-01

412

Reptilian dorsal column nucleus lacks GAD immunoreactive neurons.  

PubMed

Brains of reptiles, Caiman crocodilus, were processed by standard immunocytochemical methodology using a polyclonal antibody to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) as well as several monoclonal antibodies to GAD. No neurons immunoreactive for GAD, GAD(+), were observed in the dorsal column nucleus, although GAD(+) puncta were seen. These findings suggest that in Caiman, the dorsal column nucleus, like the dorsal thalamus, lacks local circuit neurons. PMID:2611654

Pritz, M B; Stritzel, M E

1989-11-27

413

Influence of the Nucleus on Anaerobic Breakdown of Adenosine Triphosphate  

Microsoft Academic Search

WE have shown earlier1 that non-nucleated fragments of Amoeba proteus maintain a normal oxygen consumption for as long as ten days; since the removal of the nucleus quickly reduces the uptake of phosphorus-32 by the cytoplasm2, we concluded that the nucleus plays a part in the coupling between oxidations and phosphorylations, possibly by the production of some co-enzyme. Later experiments3

J. Brachet

1954-01-01

414

Radiometric observations of the nucleus of Comet Halley  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Images obtained by the Halley multicolor camera (HMC) were used to determine the surface brightness of the nucleus. Radiometric values of jet-free areas of the surface are presented and a range of possible surface brightness values are derived. These direct measures are compared with brightnesses derived from the size of the nucleus, as determined from HMC images, and ground-based observations obtained before the onset of coma activity.

Delamere, W. A.; Reitsema, H. J.; Huebner, W. F.; Schmidt, H. U.; Keller, H. U.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Wilhelm, K.; Whipple, Fred L.

1986-01-01

415

Lineshapes of a Spin- {1}/{2} Nucleus with Scalar Coupling to a Quadrupolar Nucleus Subject to Random Field Relaxation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lineshapes in solution of a spin- {1}/{2} nucleus with scalar coupling to one quadrupolar nucleus which is subject to random-field relaxation have been calculated using a relaxation matrix treatment. For the case of the quadrupolar nucleus having I= 1, a lineshape expression has been derived. For I> 1, lineshapes have been calculated numerically. As an example of the use of these calculations, the 13C NMR spectra of the hexacyanocobaltate(III) anion in aqueous solution were recorded at various temperatures and these spectra were simulated invoking contributions from both quadrupolar relaxation and spin-rotation relaxation to the total spin-lattice relaxation rate of the 59Co nucleus. At 360 K, spin-rotation relaxation constitutes 28% of the total 59Co nuclear relaxation rate.

Kofod, Pauli

416

The long-term course of patients undergoing alternative and integrative therapy for lumbar disc herniation: 3-year results of a prospective observational study  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of an integrative complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approach in the management of lumbar herniated disc (LHD) with sciatic pain and investigate pain relapse, use of medical care and surgery rates in patients who actively chose non-surgical CAM treatment for LHD. Study design/Setting This prospective observational study was undertaken at a Korean medicine hospital outpatient setting in Korea. Participants A total of 128 consecutive patients with LHD with a numeric rating scale for leg pain of ?5 completed 6?months of CAM treatment after recruitment from November 2006, and 73/128 participants (57%) attended follow-up 3?years later. Interventions 6?months of CAM treatment (herbal medicine, acupuncture, bee venom pharmacopuncture, and Chuna manipulation). Primary outcome measures Visual analogue scale (VAS) for low back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey. Secondary outcome measures Neurological impairment (muscular weakness, sensory loss, Straight Leg Raise test), MRIs, recurrence of low back pain and/or radiating pain, and use of medical care. Results 92 patients could be assessed for surgical state, of whom 4 replied that they had received surgery. 73 patients attended the 3-year follow-up. The baseline VAS of back pain (4.37±2.70) decreased after treatment (0.90±1.01; p<0.001) and was maintained at 3?years (1.12±1.64; p=0.19). The baseline VAS of leg pain (7.57±1.40) also decreased on treatment (0.82±1.18; p<0.001) and was sustained at 3?years (0.99±1.58; p=0.34). ODI scores declined from 40.74±16.15 to 9.84±9.67 (p<0.001), then decreased further to 6.30±7.19 (p<0.01). SF-36 scores increased from 34.96±13.30 to 69.20±14.96 (p<0.001), reaching 76.19±14.45 (p<0.001) at 3?years. 37 patients reported recurrence of pain and most chose CAM treatment for management of relapse symptoms. Conclusions Although the absence of a control group prevents validation of effectiveness, many patients showed favourable long-term outcomes. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01989403.

Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-riong; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ha, In-Hyuk

2014-01-01

417

Psychometric properties of the Polish language version of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory-42 for patients treated surgically due to herniated lumbar discs and spondylotic changes  

PubMed Central

Background The development of a pain-management program tailored to the specific needs of patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) requires the proper assessment of psychosocial factors affecting each individual. The Chronic Pain Coping Inventory-42 (CPCI-42) refers to coping strategies, which are commonly defined as the cognitive and behavioral techniques an individual may resort to in stressful or demanding situations. Evidence from a number of sources suggests that differences in pain coping strategies may significantly affect how an individual deals with chronic pain. We aimed to adapt the CPCI-42 to Polish cultural conditions (PL-CPCI-42) and then verify its psychometric properties based on a group of patients treated surgically due to herniated lumbar discs and coexisting spondylotic changes. Material/Methods The average age of the study participants (n=90) was 43.47 years (SD 10.21). The average duration of chronic low back pain (CLBP) was 49.37 months (SD 64.71). Lumbosacral spine X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed and all patients completed the PL-CPCI-42 and the Polish versions of the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS-PL) twice. Internal consistency of the PL-CPCI-42, floor and ceiling effects, test-retest reliability, and criterion validity were analyzed. Results Resting, guarding, and coping self-statements were frequently used as coping strategies both in the test and in the retest, in contrast to relaxation and exercise/stretch. The NPRS-PL result was 5.70 cm in the test and 5.66 in the retest. Cronbach’s alpha values were recorded for the asking for assistance, coping self-statements, and seeking social support domains (0.83, 0.80, 0.83, respectively). Test-retest reliability of the PL-CPCI-42 varied from 0.53 (relaxation domain) to 0.84 (asking for assistance and coping self-statements domains). Conclusions The present study provides evidence of the validity of the PL-CPCI-42 and supports its usefulness in assessing chronic pain coping strategies, which are especially important to pain adjustment and in the creation of multidisciplinary pain management programs for patients with severe CLBP. PMID:24824781

Misterska, Ewa; Jankowski, Roman; G?owacki, Maciej

2014-01-01

418

Hormones in the nucleus. Immunologically demonstrable biogenic amines (serotonin, histamine) in the nucleus of rat peritoneal mast cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDAC) fixation and immunocytochemical confocal microscopic study, bright serotonin and histamine fluorescence appeared in the nucleus of rat peritoneal mast cells. In case of paraformaldehyde fixation, this was not observed. The phenomenon can be explained by the cross-linking effect of EDAC, which did not allow the efflux of biogenic amines from the nucleus. This means that biogenic amines

György Csaba; Péter Kovács; Éva Pállinger

2006-01-01

419

Subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus connections with median preoptic nucleus neurons: an electrophysiological study in the rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of pathways from the subfornical organ (SFO) to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) through the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) in regulating the activity of putative vasopressin (VP)-secreting neurons in the PVN was examined in urethane-anesthetized male rats. The activity of the majority (79%) of SFO neurons antidromically identified as projecting to the MnPO was excited by microiontophoretically (MIPh)

J. Tanaka; H. Saito; H. Kaba

1987-01-01

420

Stopping powers and cross sections due to two-photon processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of electromagnetic-production processes due to two-photon exchange in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. Feynman diagrams for two-photon exchange are evaluated using quantum electrodynamics. The total cross section and stopping power for projectile and target nuclei of identical charge are found to be significant for heavy nuclei above a few GeV per nucleon-incident energy.

Cheung, Wang K.; Norbury, John W.

1994-01-01

421

Formation of dense partonic matter in relativistic nucleus–nucleus collisions at RHIC: Experimental evaluation by the PHENIX Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extensive experimental data from high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions were recorded using the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comprehensive set of measurements from the first three years of RHIC operation includes charged particle multiplicities, transverse energy, yield ratios and spectra of identified hadrons in a wide range of transverse momenta (pT), elliptic flow, two-particle correlations, nonstatistical fluctuations,

K. Adcox; S. S. Adler; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; A. Al-Jamel; J. Alexander; R. Amirikas; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; Y. Arai; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; R. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; J. Barrette; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; F. G. Bellaiche; S. T. Belyaev; M. J. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; S. Bhagavatula; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; S. Borenstein; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; N. Bruner; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; X. Camard; T. A. Carey; J.-S. Chai; P. Chand; J. Chang; W. C. Chang; L. L. Chavez; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; T. Christ; M. S. Chung; P. Chung; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; J. P. Cussonneau; D. d'Enterria; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; F. Deák; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; A. Devismes; O. Dietzsch; B. V. Dinesh; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; R. du Rietz; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; K. Ebisu; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; K. El Chenawi; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; L. Ewell; T. Ferdousi; D. E. Fields; C. Finck; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; Y. Fukao; S.-Y. Fung; S. Gadrat; S. Garpman; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; T. K. Ghosh; A. Glenn; A. L. Godoi; G. Gogiberidze; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; S. K. Gupta; W. Guryn; H.-Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadjhenni; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; A. G. Hansen; H. Hara; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; N. Hayashi; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; J. M. Heuser; P. Hidas; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; D. S. Ho; R. Hobbs; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; A. Hoover; T. Horaguchi; H. M. Hur; T. Ichihara; V. V. Ikonnikov; K. Imai; M. Inaba; M. Inuzuka; M. S. Ippolitov; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; W. Y. Jang; J. Jia; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; S. C. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; M. Kann; S. S. Kapoor; K. Katou; T. Kawabata; T. Kawagishi; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; B. Khachaturov; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; D. W. Kim; E. Kim; G.-B. Kim; H. J. Kim; S. Y. Kim; Y. G. Kim; E. Kinney; W. W. Kinnison; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; K. Kiyoyama; C. Klein-Boesing; S. Klinksiek; H. Kobayashi; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; D. Koehler; T. Kohama; R. Kohara; B. Komkov; M. Konno; M. Kopytine; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; P. J. Kroon; C. H. Kuberg; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; Y. Kuroki; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; V. Ladygin; J. G. Lajoie; J. Lauret; Y. Le Bornec; A. Lebedev; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; S. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; X. H. Li; Z. Li; D. J. Lim; H. Lim; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; X. Liu; X. Liu; Z. Liu; C. F. Maguire; J. Mahon; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; S. K. Mark; S. Markacs; G. Martinez; M. D. Marx; A. Masaike; H. Masui; F. Matathias; T. Matsumoto; M. C. McCain; P. L. McGaughey; E. Melnikov; M. Merschmeyer; F. Messer; M. Messer; Y. Miake; J. Milan; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; R. E. Mischke; G. C. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; A. K. Mohanty; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; F. Mühlbacher; D. Mukhopadhyay; M. Muniruzzaman; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagasaka; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; Y. Nakada; T. Nakamura; B. K. Nandi; M. Nara; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; L. Nikkinen; P. Nilsson; S. Nishimura; B. Norman; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; H. Okada; K. Okada; O. O. Omiwade; M. Ono; V. Onuchin; A. Oskarsson; L. Österman; I. Otterlund; K. Oyama; L. Paffrath; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; W. J. Park; A. Parmar; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; V. Penev; J.-C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; A. N. Petridis; A. Pierson; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; F. Plasil; M. Pollack; K. Pope; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. M. Qualls; J. Rak; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; A. A. Rose; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; M. E. Sadler; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; A. Sakaguchi; T. Sakaguchi; M. Sakai; S. Sakai; H. Sako; T. Sakuma; V. Samsonov; L. Sanfratello; T. C. Sangster; R. Santo; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; B. R. Schlei; Y. Schutz; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; M. R. Shaw; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; T.-A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; T. Shiina

2005-01-01