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Sample records for herpese ja sclerosis

  1. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  2. Lichen Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lichen sclerosis is unknown. Scientists have different theories to try to explain the cause, including an overactive immune system, genetic traits, or changes in hormones. Since lichen sclerosis is not caused ...

  3. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple Sclerosis Information Page Condensed from Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Multiple Sclerosis? An unpredictable disease of the central nervous system, ...

  4. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the ... and your body, leading to the symptoms of MS. They can include Visual disturbances Muscle weakness Trouble ...

  5. Tuberous sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... sclerosis is a genetic disorder that affects the skin, brain/nervous system, kidneys, and heart. The condition can also cause tumors to grow in the brain. These tumors have a tuber- or root-shaped appearance.

  6. Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, S.A.; Jiwa, Theresa I.

    1991-01-01

    Successful management of patients with multiple sclerosis depends upon the involvement of the family physician. All contacts with either a multiple sclerosis clinic or a neurologist should be made at the instigation of the family practitioner. Constant contact with the family physician ensures that the individual receives proper care. While specialty care is needed for many of the symptoms, psychosocial problems are dealt with best by the individual's own family physician. PMID:21229090

  7. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  8. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Files, Daniel Kane; Jausurawong, Tani; Katrajian, Ruba; Danoff, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, debilitating disease that can have devastating effects. Presentation varies widely in symptoms, pace, and progression. In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, diagnostic tools required to diagnose MS and exclude other diagnoses include MRI, evoked potential testing, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Although the disease is not curable presently, quality of life can be improved by minimizing the frequency and severity of disease burden. Disease modification, symptom management, preservation of function, and treatment of psychosocial issues are paramount to enhance the quality of life for the patient affected with MS. PMID:25979578

  9. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000688.htm Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, is a disease of the nerve ...

  10. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    MedlinePlus

    Home - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area ... DIAGNOSED IN 2009 You Can Live Well with MS A healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management and ...

  11. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Fatigue - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area ... help* daily life for: positive-mom* The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More Information? ...

  12. Multiple sclerosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your doctor has told you that you have multiple sclerosis. This disease affects the brain and spinal cord ( ... your doctor may prescribe medicine. Some people with multiple sclerosis need to use a urinary catheter . This is ...

  13. [Systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Tamborrini, Giorgio; Distler, Meike; Distler, Oliver

    2008-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a severe fibrotic multiorgan connective tissue disease. Vascular abnormalities such as fingertip ulcers and Raynaud's syndrome as well as involvement of organs including the lungs, heart, kidney and the gastrointestinal tract are prominent features of the disease. There are currently no disease modifying drugs available that can modify the course of the disease. In this review we will discuss medications that have been found to be effective in improving specific organ involvement due to SSc. For the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), proton pump inhibitors are effective agents. In the setting of clinically significant gastrointestinal dysmotility, metoclopramide, erythromycin and octreotide may be beneficial. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth should be treated with oral antibiotics. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are the first-line agents for acute renal crisis. A variety of treatment options are available for Raynaud's phenomenon and include calcium channel blockers, iloprost (i. v.), losartan, fluoxetine and sildenafil. Fingertip ulcers can be prevented by using the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan. The therapeutic options for treatment of pulmonary hypertension associated with SSc include bosentan, sildenafil and various prostacyclin analogs (eg, epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost). Sitaxentan, ambrisentan and new phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors could be new options for therapy as well. Therapeutic options for interstitial lung fibrosis include cyclophosphamide, however, clinical effects are mild to moderate. Methotrexate has been used to treat skin fibrosis and can be beneficial when arthritis is present. PMID:18552072

  14. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Massimo; Preziosa, Paolo; Rocca, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    Due to its sensitivity to the different multiple sclerosis (MS)-related abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established tool to diagnose MS and to monitor its evolution. MRI has been included in the diagnostic workup of patients with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS, and ad hoc criteria have been proposed and are regularly updated. In patients with definite MS, the ability of conventional MRI techniques to explain patients' clinical status and progression of disability is still suboptimal. Several advanced MRI-based technologies have been applied to estimate overall MS burden in the different phases of the disease. Their use has allowed the heterogeneity of MS pathology in focal lesions, normal-appearing white matter and gray matter to be graded in vivo. Recently, additional features of MS pathology, including macrophage infiltration and abnormal iron deposition, have become quantifiable. All of this, combined with functional imaging techniques, is improving our understanding of the mechanisms associated with MS evolution. In the near future, the use of ultrahigh-field systems is likely to provide additional insight into disease pathophysiology. However, the utility of advanced MRI techniques in clinical trial monitoring and in assessing individual patients' response to treatment still needs to be assessed. PMID:27432676

  15. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Multiple sclerosis is a condition characterized by areas of damage ( ...

  16. Tuberous sclerosis complex coexistent with hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Min; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis and hippocampal sclerosis are both well-defined entities associated with medically intractable epilepsy. To our knowledge, there has been only one prior case of these two pathologies being co-existent. We report a 7-month-old boy who presented with intractable seizures at 2 months of age. MRI studies showed diffuse volume loss in the brain with bilateral, multiple cortical tubers and subcortical migration abnormalities. Subependymal nodules were noted without subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Genetic testing revealed TSC2 and PRD gene deletions. Histopathology of the hippocampus showed CA1 sclerosis marked by loss of neurons in the CA1 region. Sections from the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes showed multiple cortical tubers characterized by cortical architectural disorganization, gliosis, calcifications and increased number of large balloon cells. Focal white matter balloon cells and spongiform changes were also present. The patient underwent resection of the right fronto-parietal lobe and a subsequent resection of the right temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. The patient is free of seizures on anti-epileptic medication 69 months after surgery. Although hippocampal sclerosis is well documented to be associated with coexistent focal cortical dysplasia, the specific co-existence of cortical tubers and hippocampal sclerosis appears to be rare. PMID:26498091

  17. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a nervous system disease that attacks nerve cells called neurons in your ... people with ALS die from respiratory failure. The disease usually strikes between age 40 and 60. More ...

  18. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a nervous system disease that attacks nerve cells called neurons in your brain and spinal cord. These neurons ... breathing machine can help, but most people with ALS die from respiratory failure. The disease usually strikes ...

  19. Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... synthesizers, and wheelchairs ma help some people retain independence.. Speech therapy may be useful for those with ... prevent, and ultimately cure these devastating diseases. NIH Patient Recruitment for Primary Lateral Sclerosis Clinical Trials At ...

  20. Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Multiple Sclerosis Hope Through Research Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table ... that television journalist Neil Cavuto was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) more than 15 years ago. And that ...

  1. Multiple sclerosis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bodiguel, E; Bensa, C; Brassat, D; Laplaud, D; Le Page, E; Ouallet, J-C; Zephir, H; De Seze, J

    2014-04-01

    The question of pregnancy in patients with multiple sclerosis is regularly raised due to the prevalence of the disease in middle age women. The multiple sclerosis think tank (Groupe de Réflexion sur la Sclérose en Plaques [GRESEP]) decided to develop recommendations on this issue, with consideration to both the impact of multiple sclerosis on pregnancy, and that of pregnancy on the disease. As with topics of previous works, the formal expert consensus method was used. The working group was composed of hospital-based and private practice neurologists. The reading group was composed of neurologists, anaesthetists and obstetricians. Each recommendation is presented with the relevant level of consensus. PMID:24684929

  2. Immunopathology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dendrou, Calliope A; Fugger, Lars; Friese, Manuel A

    2015-09-15

    Two decades of clinical experience with immunomodulatory treatments for multiple sclerosis point to distinct immunological pathways that drive disease relapses and progression. In light of this, we discuss our current understanding of multiple sclerosis immunopathology, evaluate long-standing hypotheses regarding the role of the immune system in the disease and delineate key questions that are still unanswered. Recent and anticipated advances in the field of immunology, and the increasing recognition of inflammation as an important component of neurodegeneration, are shaping our conceptualization of disease pathophysiology, and we explore the potential implications for improved healthcare provision to patients in the future. PMID:26250739

  3. Pregnancy and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Airas, Laura; Kaaja, Risto

    2012-01-01

    The relapse rate of multiple sclerosis (MS) is typically reduced during late pregnancy but increases in the postpartum period. The reasons for the increased postpartum activity are not entirely clear, but factors such as the abrupt decrease in oestrogen levels immediately after the delivery and the loss of the immunosuppressive state of pregnancy are likely of importance. There is a general view that MS does not affect the course or outcome of pregnancy.

  4. Conjugal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dewitt, John D.; Kwon, Julia; Burton, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord. The incidence of sporadic ALS is 1.5 to 2.7 in 100,000, and the prevalence is 5.2 to 6.0 in 100,000. Conjugal ALS is even rarer than sporadic ALS. We report a case of conjugal ALS encountered in our outpatient neurology clinic. PMID:22275781

  5. Symptomatic therapy in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Teresa C.; Castro, Wanda; Shah, Anjali; Courtney, Ardith; Ortstadt, Jeffrey; Davis, Scott L.; Logan, Diana; Abraham, Thomas; Abraham, Jaspreet; Remington, Gina; Treadaway, Katherine; Graves, Donna; Hart, John; Stuve, Olaf; Lemack, Gary; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common disabling neurological disease of young adults. The ability to impact the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis should not only incorporate therapies that are disease modifying, but should also include a course of action for the global multidisciplinary management focused on quality of life and functional capabilities. PMID:21694806

  6. Multiple sclerosis and infections.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arun

    2015-01-01

    The intersection between infections and multiple sclerosis (MS) is complex and bidirectional. Numerous infectious agents have been posited to play a role in the initiation of MS, while emerging evidence suggests a potential relationship between established MS and the gut microbiome. As both systemic and CNS infections are major complications of MS, the clinical manifestations and evolving epidemiology of these infections over the lifespan of the MS patient are examined in this review. Data from animal models and human studies are discussed. PMID:26611265

  7. [Hypersomnia in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Schlüter, B; Aguigah, G; Andler, W

    1996-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl presented with hyersomnia and incontinence of urine. The clinical course was complicated by strabism, muscle weakness and coordination and balance disturbances. VEP recording were pathologic. Myelin basic protein in the cerebrospinal fluid was elevated. Nuclear resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple areas of demyelination. These findings supported the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. There was a marked disturbance of the sleep-waking-pattern during the acute phase of the illness. The hypnogram resembled the pattern of polysymptomatic narcolepsy. Regression of symptoms was noted with dexamethasone therapy. PMID:8676595

  8. Psychopathology in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Brüne, Martin; Juckel, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. Demyelinization of nerve fibres not only affects the motor and sensory systems functionally, but may also cause psychopathological signs and symptoms. In addition to the psychiatric manifestations of MS, many patients have reactive psychological problems that are often hard to distinguish from the ‘organic’ causation of psychopathology. In any event, psychiatric comorbidity in MS deserves greater clinical attention than has been previously paid, because the presence of psychopathology may have deleterious effects on the disease process and impair coping with disability. PMID:21180640

  9. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease. PMID:25732950

  10. Tuberous sclerosis, hypopigmented macule (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This area of decreased pigment (hypopigmentation) is referred to as an "ash leaf macule" and is seen with the inherited disorder, tuberous sclerosis. Another finding, "confetti hypopigmentation" is evident as scattered white spots around the ash leaf spot.

  11. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Bradley P.; Hulbert, John C.; Bissler, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Although not as common as other genetic renal diseases such as autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, patients with tuberous sclerosis complex frequently have significant renal involvement. Recent revelations in the cell biology of these renal disease manifestations as well as effective therapies for tuberous sclerosis complex-related renal issues have heralded hope of improved renal survival and improved quality of life for the TSC patient. This review specifically addresses some of the major renal manifestations of this disease. PMID:21071977

  12. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25732945

  13. Treatment of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Medsger, T A

    1991-01-01

    Proper classification of patients into diffuse cutaneous and limited cutaneous subsets and the anticipation of complications are the keys to the management of subjects with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Patients with early diffuse disease and rapidly progressive skin thickening are at highest risk of developing serious disease of the internal organs (intestine, lung, heart, kidney) and should be considered for disease modifying treatment. The targets of the disease and sites of possible intervention are vascular endothelium (vasoprotective agents), mononuclear cell subsets (immunosuppressive agents), and fibroblasts (colchicine, D-penicillamine). A number of new agents with sound scientific rationale are currently undergoing therapeutic trials. Much can be done to improve the lifestyle of those with scleroderma. The most dramatic recent development is the ability to reverse kidney disease by the prompt use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and modern methods of renal dialysis and transplantation. Scleroderma is not a hopeless disease. PMID:1750801

  14. Alemtuzumab for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Willis, Mark D; Robertson, Neil P

    2016-09-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanised anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody approved for use in active, relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Administration results in a rapid depletion of circulating lymphocytes with a subsequent beneficial immune reconstitution. Early open-label experience and recent clinical trials have demonstrated a dramatic effect on relapse rates as well as a positive effect on radiological disease outcomes and disability measures. Despite a mechanism of action that results in profound lymphopaenia, opportunistic infections are rarely seen and no excess association with malignancy has been identified. However, acquired autoimmune disease (AID) is a common adverse event following treatment, necessitating rigorous monitoring in order to facilitate prompt detection and management. Despite this issue, a unique dosing schedule and durability of effect make alemtuzumab a welcome addition to currently available treatment options for MS. PMID:27485945

  15. Metabolomics in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Pavan; Calabresi, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system with inflammatory and degenerative components. The cause of MS remains unknown although genetic and environmental factors appear to play a role in its etiopathogenesis. Metabolomics is a new "omics" technology that aims at measuring small molecules in various biological matrices and can provide information that is not readily obtained from genomics, transcriptomics, or proteomics. Currently, several different analytical platforms exist for metabolomics, and both untargeted and targeted approaches are being employed. Methods of analysis of metabolomics data are also being developed and no consensus currently exists on the optimal approach to analysis and interpretation of these data. Metabolomics has the potential to provide putative biomarkers, insights into the pathophysiology of the disease, and to aid in precision medicine for patients with MS. PMID:26754801

  16. Immunology of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, Mireia; Martin, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered a prototypic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). A complex genetic background with the HLA-DR15 haplotype as the main genetic risk factor and over 100 mostly immune-related minor risk alleles as well as several environmental factors contribute to the etiology of MS. With respect to pathomechanisms, autoimmune inflammation in early MS is primarily mediated by adaptive immune responses and involves autoreactive T cells, B cells, and antibodies, while the later, chronic stages of MS are characterized by a compartmentalized immune response in the CNS with activated microglia and macrophages. A host of immune cells and mediators can contribute to the autoimmune process, but CNS-related factors such as localization of lesions, vulnerability of oligodendrocytes, neurons/axons, and secondary metabolic changes all play a role in the heterogeneous expression of the disease, including different pathologic lesion patterns, neuroimaging findings, disease courses, and severity and response to treatment. PMID:27116718

  17. Aging and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Shaik Ahmed; Saini, Vasu; Benedict, Ralph Hb; Zivadinov, Robert; Teter, Barbara E; Ramanathan, Murali; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2016-05-01

    The life expectancy and average age of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have increased significantly during the last two decades. The introduction of disease-modifying therapies and a better delineation and understanding of the superimposed comorbidities often diagnosed in MS patients are probably the most important factors accountable for the increase in aging MS population worldwide. Healthcare teams must therefore address the problems arising due to advancing age superimposed on this chronic neurologic disease. In this review, we focus on the physiology of aging, its effects on MS disease course, and the pathological and immunological changes associated with aging and disease progression. Additionally, we discuss the common comorbidities that occur in aging persons with MS that may arise either as a result of the aging process or from relentless chronic MS disease progression as well as the challenges on differentiating the two processes for a more appropriate therapeutic approach. PMID:26895718

  18. Genetics Home Reference: tuberous sclerosis complex

    MedlinePlus

    ... phenotype in tuberous sclerosis. J Med Genet. 2004 Mar;41(3):203-7. Citation on PubMed or ... sclerosis complex: a review. Semin Pediatr Neurol. 2006 Mar;13(1):27-36. Review. Citation on PubMed ...

  19. Multiple sclerosis and Natalizumab.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Domenico

    2007-01-01

    Natalizumab (NTZ), defined as "the first of a new class of drugs known as elective adhesion molecule inhibitors" was developed at the beginning of 2003 to treat relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and was approved in the United States in November 2004. In February 2005, the production of NTZ was suspended by Producer Firms on account of the occurrence of two serious adverse events: two patients who had been taking NTZ manifested a progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy; the patients showed progressive neurologic deterioration, initially believed to be a worsening of the pre-existing condition of MS. In March 2006, the Advisory Panel of the Food and Drug Administration voted unanimously in favor of the return of NTZ on the market with the majority of the panel also recommending that NTZ be considered the first choice of treatment in MS. NTZ should only be administered to patients who are not taking other medicines for MS and only in highly specialized centers. Inhibiting the adhesion of the circulating immune-competent cells to the vascular endothelium and reducing the precipitation of the circulating immune complexes (CICs) into the central nervous system, NTZ causes the level of the CICs to rise to values that inhibit the production of the antibodies (above all of the immunoglobulin Ms); because of the relative lack of antibodies, the pertussis toxins, no longer complexed, attack the nerve epithelia directly. We must conclude that 1) in remittent MS, between one attack and another (successive re-infection of bordetella pertussis) there are no CICs that can precipitate into the central nervous system, and thus the treatment with NTZ is useless and superfluous; 2) in chronic-progressive MS, the final result of the treatment with NTZ will be that of transforming MS into lateral amyotrophic sclerosis or progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy; 3) in progressive MS, however, NTZ can be of considerable use in the first 2 months of antibiotic treatment to

  20. Disability in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chamot, Eric; Salter, Amber R.; Cutter, Gary R.; Bacon, Tamar E.; Herbert, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To create a reference table of disability outcomes in multiple sclerosis (MS) that would enable patients to rank their disability relative to others' with similar disease duration and to develop a cost-effective research tool for comparing MS severity across patient populations and time periods. Methods: The North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry collects disability data from patients with MS on a validated, 9-point Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) scale. We compiled the Disability Expectancy Table, which displays cumulative frequencies of PDDS scores for each year of disease duration, from 0 to 45 years. We also tabulated disease duration–adjusted mean ranks of PDDS scores, referred to as Patient-derived MS Severity Scores (P-MSSS). Results: The cohort consisted of 27,918 NARCOMS enrollees, 72.7% of whom were female and 90.1% of whom were white. Mean age at symptom onset was 30.1 ± 10.1 years, and age at enrollment was 47.1 ± 11.0 years. The Disability Expectancy Table and P-MSSS afford a detailed overview of disability outcomes in a large MS cohort over a 45-year period. In the first year of disease, 15% of patients reported need of ambulatory aid, and 4% needed bilateral assistance or worse; after 45 years of disease, 76% of patients required ambulatory aid, and 52% bilateral assistance or worse. Proportion of patients who reported minimal or no interference in daily activities (PDDS ≤ 1) declined from 63% in the first year to 8% after 45 years of disease. Conclusion: The Disability Expectancy Table allows individual patients to determine how their disability ranks relative to NARCOMS enrollees with the same disease duration. P-MSSS may be used to compare disability across patient populations and to track disease progression in patient cohorts. P-MSSS does not require a formal neurologic examination and may therefore find wide applicability as a practical and cost-effective outcome measure in

  1. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Gregory P.; Gilden, Don; Burgoon, Mark P.; Yu, Xiaoli; Bennett, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of unknown etiology, possibly caused by a virus or virus-triggered immunopathology. The virus might reactivate after years of latency and lyse oligodendrocytes, as in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or initiate immunopathological demyelination, as in animals infected with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus or coronaviruses. The argument for a viral cause of MS is supported by epidemiological analyses and studies of MS in identical twins, indicating that disease is acquired. However, the most important evidence is the presence of bands of oligoclonal IgG (OCBs) in MS brain and CSF that persist throughout the lifetime of the patient. OCBs are found almost exclusively in infectious CNS disorders, and antigenic targets of OCBs represent the agent that causes disease. Here, the authors review past attempts to identify an infectious agent in MS brain cells and discuss the promise of using recombinant antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in brain and CSF to identify disease-relevant antigens. They show how this strategy has been used successfully to analyze antigen specificity in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a chronic encephalitis caused by measles virus, and in neuromyelitis optica, a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease produced by antibodies directed against the aquaporin-4 water channel. PMID:22130640

  2. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth. PMID:27067000

  3. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Y; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory neurologic disease that is challenging to diagnose and treat. Although there are many clinical parallels between pediatric-onset MS and adult-onset MS, there is also accumulating evidence of distinguishing clinical features that may, in part, arise from development-specific, neuroimmune processes governing MS pathogenesis in children. Here the authors describe the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric MS, with a particular focus on describing clinical features and highlighting new developments that promise a better understanding of pediatric MS pathogenesis. An important task that lies ahead for pediatric neurologists is better understanding the early gene-environment interaction that precipitates the first demyelinating event in pediatric MS. This area is of particular importance for understanding the MS etiology and the natural history of pediatric MS. Such understanding should in turn inform new developments in diagnostic tools, long-term therapies, and much-needed biomarkers. Such biomarkers are not only valuable for defining the disease onset, but also for monitoring both the treatment response and a disease evolution that spans multiple decades in children with MS. PMID:27116721

  4. Pharmacotherapy of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwaite, Arnold E.; Harris, L. Jeff; Raza, Syed H.; Kodura, Swapna; Akhigbe, Titilola

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Systemic-sclerosis (SSc) is an uncommon autoimmune disease with variable degrees of fibroproliferation in blood vessels and certain organs of the body. Presently, there is no cure for SSc. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature regarding pathogenesis and treatment of complications of SSc. Areas covered in this review All available articles regarding research related to SSc pathogenesis and treatment listed in the PubMed.gov database were searched, relevant articles were then reviewed and used as sources of information for this review. What the reader will gain This review attempts for the reader to highlight some current thought regarding mechanisms of SSc pathogenesis and how autoimmunity relates to vascular changes and fibrogenesis of the disease plus provide a review of results of completed clinical trials and current on-going clinical trials that address organ specific or global therapies for this disease which can aid physicians who provide medical care for patients with SSc. Take home message SSc is a complex autoimmune disease, the pathogenesis of which although not completely understood is under active study, and new insights into pathogenesis are continuously being discovered. Although there is no effective disease modifying treatment for patients with SSc, quality of life, morbidity and mortality can be improved by using targeted therapy directed at affecting the consequences of damage to lungs, blood vessels, kidneys and the gastrointestinal tract. Innovative approaches to treating SSc are under intense investigation. PMID:20210685

  5. Astrocytes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ludwin, Samuel K; Rao, Vijayaraghava Ts; Moore, Craig S; Antel, Jack P

    2016-08-01

    Recent experimental and clinical studies on astrocytes are unraveling the capabilities of these multi-functional cells in normal homeostasis, and in central nervous system (CNS) disease. This review focuses on understanding their behavior in all aspects of the initiation, evolution, and resolution of the multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion. Astrocytes display remarkable flexibility and variability of their physical structure and biochemical output, each aspect finely tuned to the specific stage and location of the disease, participating in both pathogenic and beneficial changes seen in acute and progressive forms. As examples, chemo-attractive or repulsive molecules may facilitate the entry of destructive immune cells but may also aid in the recruitment of oligodendrocyte precursors, essential for repair. Pro-inflammatory cytokines may attack pathogenic cells and also destroy normal oligodendrocytes, myelin, and axons. Protective trophic factors may also open the blood-brain barrier and modulate the extracellular matrix to favor recruitment and persistence of CNS-specific immune cells. A chronic glial scar may confer structural support following tissue loss and inhibit ingress of further noxious insults and also inhibit migration of reparative cells and molecules into the damaged tissue. Continual study into these processes offers the therapeutic opportunities to enhance the beneficial capabilities of these cells while limiting their destructive effects. PMID:27207458

  6. Tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Henske, Elizabeth P; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Kingswood, J Christopher; Sampson, Julian R; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that affects multiple organ systems and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of two genes: TSC1 or TSC2. The disorder can affect both adults and children. First described in depth by Bourneville in 1880, it is now estimated that nearly 2 million people are affected by the disease worldwide. The clinical features of TSC are distinctive and can vary widely between individuals, even within one family. Major features of the disease include tumours of the brain, skin, heart, lungs and kidneys, seizures and TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which can include autism spectrum disorder and cognitive disability. TSC1 (also known as hamartin) and TSC2 (also known as tuberin) form the TSC protein complex that acts as an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway, which in turn plays a pivotal part in regulating cell growth, proliferation, autophagy and protein and lipid synthesis. Remarkable progress in basic and translational research, in addition to several randomized controlled trials worldwide, has led to regulatory approval of the use of mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of renal angiomyolipomas, brain subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, but further research is needed to establish full indications of therapeutic treatment. In this Primer, we review the state-of-the-art knowledge in the TSC field, including the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, medical management, major knowledge gaps and ongoing research towards a cure. PMID:27226234

  7. Viruses and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gregory P; Gilden, Don; Burgoon, Mark P; Yu, Xiaoli; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of unknown etiology, possibly caused by a virus or virus-triggered immunopathology. The virus might reactivate after years of latency and lyse oligodendrocytes, as in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or initiate immunopathological demyelination, as in animals infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus or coronaviruses. The argument for a viral cause of MS is supported by epidemiological analyses and studies of MS in identical twins, indicating that disease is acquired. However, the most important evidence is the presence of bands of oligoclonal IgG (OCBs) in MS brain and CSF that persist throughout the lifetime of the patient. OCBs are found almost exclusively in infectious CNS disorders, and antigenic targets of OCBs represent the agent that causes disease. Here, the authors review past attempts to identify an infectious agent in MS brain cells and discuss the promise of using recombinant antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in brain and CSF to identify disease-relevant antigens. They show how this strategy has been used successfully to analyze antigen specificity in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a chronic encephalitis caused by measles virus, and in neuromyelitis optica, a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease produced by antibodies directed against the aquaporin-4 water channel. PMID:22130640

  8. Thermoregulation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Thad E.; White, Andrea T.; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurological disorder that disrupts axonal myelin in the central nervous system. Demyelination produces alterations in saltatory conduction, slowed conduction velocity, and a predisposition to conduction block. An estimated 60–80% of MS patients experience temporary worsening of clinical signs and neurological symptoms with heat exposure. Additionally, MS may produce impaired neural control of autonomic and endocrine functions. This review focuses on five main themes regarding the current understanding of thermoregulatory dysfunction in MS: 1) heat sensitivity; 2) central regulation of body temperature; 3) thermoregulatory effector responses; 4) heat-induced fatigue; and 5) countermeasures to improve or maintain function during thermal stress. Heat sensitivity in MS is related to the detrimental effects of increased temperature on action potential propagation in demyelinated axons, resulting in conduction slowing and/or block, which can be quantitatively characterized using precise measurements of ocular movements. MS lesions can also occur in areas of the brain responsible for the control and regulation of body temperature and thermoregulatory effector responses, resulting in impaired neural control of sudomotor pathways or neural-induced changes in eccrine sweat glands, as evidenced by observations of reduced sweating responses in MS patients. Fatigue during thermal stress is common in MS and results in decreased motor function and increased symptomatology likely due to impairments in central conduction. Although not comprehensive, some evidence exists concerning treatments (cooling, precooling, and pharmacological) for the MS patient to preserve function and decrease symptom worsening during heat stress. PMID:20671034

  9. Neuroimaging in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert; Cox, Jennifer L

    2007-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has routinely been used to improve the accuracy of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and prognosis. Metrics derived from conventional MRI are now routinely used to detect therapeutic effects and extend clinical observations. However, conventional MRI measures, such as the use of lesion volume and count of gadolinium-enhancing and T2 lesions, have insufficient sensitivity and specificity to reveal the true degree of pathological changes occurring in MS. They cannot distinguish between inflammation, edema, demyelination, Wallerian degeneration, and axonal loss. In addition, they do not show a reliable correlation with clinical measures of disability and do not provide a complete assessment of therapeutic outcomes. Recent neuropathologic studies of typical chronic MS brains reveal macroscopic demyelination in cortical and deep gray matter (GM) that cannot be detected by currently available MRI techniques. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the development of newer MRI techniques to detect these lesions. Newer metrics of MRI analysis, including T1-weighted hypointense lesions, central nervous system atrophy measures, magnetization transfer imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging, are able to capture a more global picture of the range of tissue alterations caused by inflammation and neurodegeneration. At this time, they provide the only proof--albeit indirect--that important occult pathology is occurring in the GM. However, evidence is increasing that these nonconventional MRI measures correlate better with both existing and developing neurological impairment and disability when compared to conventional metrics. PMID:17531854

  10. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  11. Immunopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racke, Michael K

    2009-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a suspected autoimmune disease in which myelin-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells enter the central nervous system (CNS) and initiate an inflammatory response directed against myelin and other components of the CNS. Acute MS exacerbations are believed be the result of active inflammation, and progression of disability is generally believed to reflect accumulation of damage to the CNS, particularly axonal damage. Over the last several years, the pathophysiology of MS is being appreciated to be much more complex, and it appears that the development of the MS plaque involves a large number of cell populations, including CD8+ T lymphocytes, B cells, and Th17 cells (a population of helper T cells that secrete the inflammatory cytokine IL-17). The axonal transection and degeneration that is thought to represent the basis for progressive MS is now recognized to begin early in the disease process and to continue in the progressive forms of the disease. Molecules important for limiting aberrant neural connections in the CNS have been identified, which suppress axonal sprouting and regeneration of transected axons within the CNS. Pathways have also been identified that prevent remyelination of the MS lesion by oligodendrocyte precursors. Novel neuroimaging methodologies and potential biomarkers are being developed to monitor various aspects of the disease process in MS. As we identify the pathways responsible for the clinical phenomena of MS, we will be able to develop new therapeutic strategies for this disabling illness of young adults. PMID:20182567

  12. [Pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth J

    2006-06-30

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) can exhibit an exceptionally wide variety of symptoms. This is largely due to the semi-random distribution of the lesions in the central nervous system (CNS). Most lesions occur in apparently "silent" areas in the brain, and so cause no detectable symptoms. The disease is therefore much more active than a mere clinical monitoring would suggest. Most symptoms are related to a loss of function. During the relapses, this is due to a failure of axonal conduction at the site of the lesion(s). The conduction block is caused by the local demyelination which prevents the saltatory conduction but also seemingly, to some extend, by the inflammation per se. Remissions are related to a recovery of function of the affected axons owing to a spreading of sodium channels along the demyelinated axolemma but also to cerebral functional plasticity and remyelination. However, nerve conduction remains slower and less secure than normal, easily altered by physico-chemical changes such as the increase in body temperature (Uhthoff's phenomenon). Remission is incomplete when the lesion has led to axonal transaction and therefore axonal loss. Progression in MS is mainly related to "slow-burning" diffuse and chronic axonal loss in a toxic inflammatory milieu. Lastly, some symptoms in MS are so-called "positive" arising from an acquired hyperexcitability of demyelinated axons and occur either spontaneously (e.g. paresthesias) or mechanically (e.g. Lhermitte's sign). PMID:16948217

  13. Thermoregulation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott L; Wilson, Thad E; White, Andrea T; Frohman, Elliot M

    2010-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurological disorder that disrupts axonal myelin in the central nervous system. Demyelination produces alterations in saltatory conduction, slowed conduction velocity, and a predisposition to conduction block. An estimated 60-80% of MS patients experience temporary worsening of clinical signs and neurological symptoms with heat exposure. Additionally, MS may produce impaired neural control of autonomic and endocrine functions. This review focuses on five main themes regarding the current understanding of thermoregulatory dysfunction in MS: 1) heat sensitivity; 2) central regulation of body temperature; 3) thermoregulatory effector responses; 4) heat-induced fatigue; and 5) countermeasures to improve or maintain function during thermal stress. Heat sensitivity in MS is related to the detrimental effects of increased temperature on action potential propagation in demyelinated axons, resulting in conduction slowing and/or block, which can be quantitatively characterized using precise measurements of ocular movements. MS lesions can also occur in areas of the brain responsible for the control and regulation of body temperature and thermoregulatory effector responses, resulting in impaired neural control of sudomotor pathways or neural-induced changes in eccrine sweat glands, as evidenced by observations of reduced sweating responses in MS patients. Fatigue during thermal stress is common in MS and results in decreased motor function and increased symptomatology likely due to impairments in central conduction. Although not comprehensive, some evidence exists concerning treatments (cooling, precooling, and pharmacological) for the MS patient to preserve function and decrease symptom worsening during heat stress. PMID:20671034

  14. Tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, B. A.; Chamberlain, D. W.; Goldstein, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberous sclerosis produced interstitial disease in a woman with normal-sized lungs; numerous hemosiderin-laden macrophages were found in the fluid obtained through bronchoalveolar lavage. The pathological changes seen in the lungs were identical to those of pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis, in which the constellation of clinical signs usually found in tuberous sclerosis is absent. The two conditions are sufficiently similar in clinical presentation, pathological changes and prognosis to be considered variants of the same disease. The recent findings of progestin receptors in lung tissue from patients with pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis will likely direct future management towards hormonal manipulation. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6692213

  15. [Current description of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Río, Jordi; Montalbán, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a multifocal demyelinating disease leading to progressive neurodegeneration caused by an autoimmune response in genetically predisposed individuals. In the last few years, the knowledge and management of this disease has been revolutionized by a series of findings. The present article reviews pathological features of the disease, in which cortical involvement is increasingly implicated, and aspects related to novel pathogenic mechanisms, such as the role of the microbiota in the genesis of multiple sclerosis, as well as recent contributions from the fields of epidemiology and genetics. Also reviewed are the latest diagnostic criteria, which currently allow a much earlier diagnosis, with clear therapeutic implications. PMID:25732942

  16. Injectable Multiple Sclerosis Medications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Zung Vu

    2012-01-01

    Although injection-site reactions (ISRs) occur with US Food and Drug Administration–approved injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis, there are currently few reports of real-world data on ISR management strategies or possible correlations between ISRs and patient demographics, disease characteristics, and missed injections. Patient-reported data on the use of DMTs, patient demographic and disease characteristics, missed injections, and ISR reduction strategies were collected via e-mail, a patient registry (www.ms-cam.org), and a Web-based survey. Of the 1380 respondents, 1201 (87%) indicated that they had used injectable DMTs, of whom 377 (31%) had used intramuscular (IM) interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), 172 (14%) had used subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, 183 (15%) had used SC IFNβ-1b, and 469 (39%) had used glatiramer acetate (GA). The majority of respondents were older (73% were ≥40 years), female (79%), married or living with a partner (72%), white (94%), and nonsmoking (82%). Injection-site reaction incidence, grouped according to severity, varied among DMTs, with IM IFNβ-1a causing significantly (P < .001) fewer mild, moderate, or severe ISRs than the other therapies. Female sex and younger age were significantly (P < .05) associated with more moderate ISRs among users of IM IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, and GA. Nonwhites reported severe ISRs more often than whites. For all DMTs injection-site massage and avoidance of sensitive sites were the most frequently used strategies to minimize ISRs. These data may help identify patients with characteristics associated with a higher risk for ISRs, allowing health-care professionals to provide anticipatory guidance to patients at risk for decreased adherence or discontinuation. PMID:24453732

  17. Zinc in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2016-01-01

    In the last 35 years, zinc (Zn) has been examined for its potential role in the disease multiple sclerosis (MS). This review gives an overview of the possible role of Zn in the pathogenesis of MS as well as a meta-analysis of studies having measured Zn in serum or plasma in patients with MS. Searching the databases PubMed and EMBASE as well as going through reference lists in included articles 24 studies were found measuring Zn in patients with MS. Of these, 13 met inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The result of the meta-analysis shows a reduction in serum or plasma Zn levels in patients with MS with a 95% CI of [−3.66, −0.93] and a p value of .001 for the difference in Zn concentration in μM. One of six studies measuring cerebrospinal fluid, Zn levels found a significant increase in patients with MS with controls. The studies measuring whole blood and erythrocyte Zn levels found up to several times higher levels of Zn in patients with MS compared with healthy controls with decreasing levels during attacks in relapsing-remitting MS patients. Future studies measuring serum or plasma Zn are encouraged to analyze their data through homogenous MS patient subgroups on especially age, sex, and disease subtype since the difference in serum or plasma Zn in these subgroups have been found to be significantly different. It is hypothesized that local alterations of Zn may be actively involved in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:27282383

  18. Childhood Multiple Sclerosis: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, Amy; O'Connor, Erin; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that is increasingly recognized as a disease that affects children. Similar to adult-onset MS, children present with visual and sensory complaints, as well as weakness, spasticity, and ataxia. A lumbar puncture can be helpful in diagnosing MS when…

  19. Hippocampal Sclerosis: Causes and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Walker, Matthew Charles

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the commonest cause of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults, and is associated with alterations to structures and networks beyond the hippocampus.In addition to being a cause of epilepsy, the hippocampus is vulnerable to damage from seizure activity. In particular, prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) can result in hippocampal sclerosis. The hippocampus is also vulnerable to other insults including traumatic brain injury, and inflammation. Hippocampal sclerosis can occur in association with other brain lesions; the prevailing view is that it is probably a secondary consequence. In such instances, successful surgical treatment usually involves the resection of both the lesion and the involved hippocampus. Experimental data have pointed to numerous neuroprotective strategies to prevent hippocampal sclerosis. Initial neuroprotective strategies aimed at glutamate receptors may be effective, but later, metabolic pathways, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and inflammation are involved, perhaps necessitating the use of interventions aimed at multiple targets. Some of the therapies that we use to treat status epilepticus may neuroprotect. However, prevention of neuronal death does not necessarily prevent the later development of epilepsy or cognitive deficits. Perhaps, the most important intervention is the early, aggressive treatment of seizure activity, and the prevention of prolonged seizures. PMID:26060898

  20. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mimic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) misdiagnosis has many broad implications for the patient and the neurologist. Potentially curative treatments exist for certain ALS mimic syndromes, but delay in starting these therapies may have an unfavorable effect on outcome. Hence, it is important to exclude similar conditions. In this review, we discuss some of the important mimics of ALS. PMID:27326363

  1. Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorscheider, Johannes; Buzzard, Katherine; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Spelman, Tim; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Girard, Marc; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'Maison, François; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Alroughani, Raed; Sola, Patrizia; Boz, Cavit; Pucci, Eugenio; Lechner-Scott, Jeanette; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Iuliano, Gerardo; Van Pesch, Vincent; Granella, Franco; Ramo-Tello, Cristina; Spitaleri, Daniele; Petersen, Thor; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Ampapa, Radek; Amato, Maria Pia; McCombe, Pamela; Vucic, Steve; Sánchez Menoyo, José Luis; Cristiano, Edgardo; Barnett, Michael H; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Olascoaga, Javier; Saladino, Maria Laura; Gray, Orla; Shaw, Cameron; Moore, Fraser; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kalincik, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    A number of studies have been conducted with the onset of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis as an inclusion criterion or an outcome of interest. However, a standardized objective definition of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis has been lacking. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an objective definition for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, to enable comparability of future research studies. Using MSBase, a large, prospectively acquired, global cohort study, we analysed the accuracy of 576 data-derived onset definitions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and first compared these to a consensus opinion of three neurologists. All definitions were then evaluated against 5-year disease outcomes post-assignment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: sustained disability, subsequent sustained progression, positive disability trajectory, and accumulation of severe disability. The five best performing definitions were further investigated for their timeliness and overall disability burden. A total of 17 356 patients were analysed. The best definition included a 3-strata progression magnitude in the absence of a relapse, confirmed after 3 months within the leading Functional System and required an Expanded Disability Status Scale step ≥4 and pyramidal score ≥2. It reached an accuracy of 87% compared to the consensus diagnosis. Seventy-eight per cent of the identified patients showed a positive disability trajectory and 70% reached significant disability after 5 years. The time until half of all patients were diagnosed was 32.6 years (95% confidence interval 32-33.6) after disease onset compared with the physicians' diagnosis at 36 (35-39) years. The identified patients experienced a greater disease burden [median annualized area under the disability-time curve 4.7 (quartiles 3.6, 6.0)] versus non-progressive patients [1.8 (1.2, 1.9)]. This objective definition of secondary progressive multiple

  2. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekera, Lokesh C; Leigh, P Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by progressive muscular paralysis reflecting degeneration of motor neurones in the primary motor cortex, corticospinal tracts, brainstem and spinal cord. Incidence (average 1.89 per 100,000/year) and prevalence (average 5.2 per100,000) are relatively uniform in Western countries, although foci of higher frequency occur in the Western Pacific. The mean age of onset for sporadic ALS is about 60 years. Overall, there is a slight male prevalence (M:F ratio~1.5:1). Approximately two thirds of patients with typical ALS have a spinal form of the disease (limb onset) and present with symptoms related to focal muscle weakness and wasting, where the symptoms may start either distally or proximally in the upper and lower limbs. Gradually, spasticity may develop in the weakened atrophic limbs, affecting manual dexterity and gait. Patients with bulbar onset ALS usually present with dysarthria and dysphagia for solid or liquids, and limbs symptoms can develop almost simultaneously with bulbar symptoms, and in the vast majority of cases will occur within 1–2 years. Paralysis is progressive and leads to death due to respiratory failure within 2–3 years for bulbar onset cases and 3–5 years for limb onset ALS cases. Most ALS cases are sporadic but 5–10% of cases are familial, and of these 20% have a mutation of the SOD1 gene and about 2–5% have mutations of the TARDBP (TDP-43) gene. Two percent of apparently sporadic patients have SOD1 mutations, and TARDBP mutations also occur in sporadic cases. The diagnosis is based on clinical history, examination, electromyography, and exclusion of 'ALS-mimics' (e.g. cervical spondylotic myelopathies, multifocal motor neuropathy, Kennedy's disease) by appropriate investigations. The pathological hallmarks comprise loss of motor neurones with intraneuronal ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions in upper motor neurones and TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions in

  3. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leray, E; Moreau, T; Fromont, A; Edan, G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequently seen demyelinating disease, with a prevalence that varies considerably, from high levels in North America and Europe (>100/100,000 inhabitants) to low rates in Eastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa (2/100,000 population). Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the disease and its survival data, and a better understanding of the natural history of the disease, have improved our understanding of the respective roles of endogenous and exogenous causes of MS. Concerning mortality, in a large French cohort of 27,603 patients, there was no difference between MS patients and controls in the first 20 years of the disease, although life expectancy was reduced by 6-7 years in MS patients. In 2004, the prevalence of MS in France was 94.7/100,000 population, according to data from the French National Health Insurance Agency for Salaried Workers (Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie des travailleurs Salariés [CNAM-TS]), which insures 87% of the French population. This prevalence was higher in the North and East of France. In several countries, including France, the gender ratio for MS incidence (women/men) went from 2/1 to 3/1 from the 1950s to the 2000s, but only for the relapsing-remitting form. As for risk factors of MS, the most pertinent environmental factors are infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), especially if it arises after childhood and is symptomatic. The role of smoking in MS risk has been confirmed, but is modest. In contrast, vaccines, stress, traumatic events and allergies have not been identified as risk factors, while the involvement of vitamin D has yet to be confirmed. From a genetic point of view, the association between HLA-DRB1*15:01 and a high risk of MS has been known for decades. More recently, immunogenetic markers have been identified (IL2RA, IL7RA) and, in particular thanks to studies of genome-wide associations, more than 100 genetic variants have been reported. Most of these are involved in

  4. Multiple sclerosis - New treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, Caterina; Marini, Carmine; Carolei, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the introduction of the first disease modifying therapies, the concept of multiple sclerosis treatment algorithms developed ceaselessly. The increasing number of available drugs is paralleled by impelling issue of ensuring the most appropriate treatment to the right patient at the right time. The purpose of this review is to describe novel agents recently approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, namely teriflunomide, alemtuzumab and dimethylfumarate, focusing on mechanism of action, efficacy data in experimental setting, safety and tolerability. The place in therapy of newer treatment implies careful balancing of risk-benefit profile as well as accurate patient selection. Hence the widening of therapeutic arsenal provides greater opportunity for personalized therapy but also entails a complex trade-off between efficacy, tolerability, safety and eventually patient preference. PMID:26831413

  5. Genetic factors and systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Contatore, Miriam; Gulli, Rossella; Mandich, Paola; Puppo, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare connective tissue disease of unknown etiology characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrosis of the skin, vascular abnormalities, and variable involvement of organs including kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, heart, and lungs. SSc shows a complex etiology in which both environmental and genetic factors seem to influence the onset and outcome of the disease. We provide an extensive overview of the genetic factors and epigenetic modifications and what their knowledge has revealed in terms of etiopathogenesis of SSc. PMID:26826434

  6. Bipolar disorder and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ybarra, Mariana Inés; Moreira, Marcos Aurélio; Araújo, Carolina Reis; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurélio; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2007-12-01

    Bipolar disorder may be overrepresented in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Although research in this area is limited, studies assessing the nature of this association have focused on genetic aspects, adverse reaction to drugs and brain demyelinating lesions. Herein we report three patients with MS that also presented bipolar disorder. The coexistence of neurological and psychiatric symptoms in most MS relapses highlights the relevance of biological factors in the emergence of mood disorders in these patients. PMID:18345425

  7. [Special cases of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mendibe Bilbao, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease that usually occurs in young people and affects them for the rest of their lives. Patients and their families usually have a series of doubts and questions on everyday matters and all types of situations that occur during the distinct stages of life and which can influence the course of the disease. The aim of this review is to provide specific answers to these questions. PMID:25732948

  8. Coping with Multiple Sclerosis Scale

    PubMed Central

    Parkerson, Holly A.; Kehler, Melissa D.; Sharpe, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Coping with Multiple Sclerosis Scale (CMSS) was developed to assess coping strategies specific to multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite its wide application in MS research, psychometric support for the CMSS remains limited to the initial factor analytic investigation by Pakenham in 2001. Methods: The current investigation assessed the factor structure and construct validity of the CMSS. Participants with MS (N = 453) completed the CMSS, as well as measures of disability related to MS (Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief Scale), and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Results: The original factor structure reported by Pakenham was a poor fit to the data. An alternate seven-factor structure was identified using exploratory factor analysis. Although there were some similarities with the existing CMSS subscales, differences in factor content and item loadings were found. Relationships between the revised CMSS subscales and additional measures were assessed, and the findings were consistent with previous research. Conclusions: Refinement of the CMSS is suggested, especially for subscales related to acceptance and avoidance strategies. Until further research is conducted on the revised CMSS, it is recommended that the original CMSS continue to be administered. Clinicians and researchers should be mindful of lack of support for the acceptance and avoidance subscales and should seek additional scales to assess these areas. PMID:27551244

  9. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  10. Systemic Sclerosis: Commonly Asked Questions by Rheumatologists

    PubMed Central

    Young, Amber; Khanna, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare autoimmune disorder with significant morbidity and mortality due to multi-organ system involvement. Early diagnosis and screening for organ involvement is critical as earlier treatment appears to improve function and may impact mortality. The purpose of this article is to address some of the commonly asked questions by rheumatologists on systemic sclerosis. PMID:25807095

  11. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Pellar, Russell E; Tingey, Theresa M; Pope, Janet Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease that can damage multiple organs and reduce quality of life. Patient-reported outcome measures capture the patient's perspective. Some measures are specific to systemic sclerosis and others are general. Patient-reported outcomes in systemic sclerosis are important to aid in understanding the impact of systemic sclerosis on patients. PMID:27133491

  12. Endocannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous reports that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have for many years been self-medicating with illegal street cannabis or more recently medicinal cannabis to alleviate the symptoms associated with MS and also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These anecdotal reports have been confirmed by data from animal models and more recently clinical trials on the ability of cannabinoids to alleviate limb spasticity, a common feature of progressive MS (and also ALS) and neurodegeneration. Experimental studies into the biology of the endocannabinoid system have revealed that cannabinoids have efficacy, not only in symptom relief but also as neuroprotective agents which may slow disease progression and thus delay the onset of symptoms. This review discusses what we now know about the endocannabinoid system as it relates to MS and ALS and also the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid therapeutics as disease-modifying or symptom control agents, as well as future therapeutic strategies including the potential for slowing disease progression in MS and ALS. PMID:26408162

  13. [Driving ability with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Küst, J; Dettmers, C

    2014-07-01

    Driving is an important issue for young patients, especially for those whose walking capacity is impaired. Driving might support the patient's social and vocational participation. The question as to whether a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) is restricted in the ability to drive a car depends on neurological and neuropsychological deficits, self-awareness, insight into deficits and ability to compensate for loss of function. Because of the enormous variability of symptoms in MS the question is highly individualized. A practical driving test under supervision of a driving instructor (possibly accompanied by a neuropsychologist) might be helpful in providing both patient and relatives adequate feedback on driving abilities. PMID:24906536

  14. Newer therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coles, Alasdair

    2015-09-01

    The newer immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis (fingolimod, natalizumab, dimethyl fumarate, teriflunomide, alemtuzumab) offer advantages of efficacy or tolerability over the injectable therapies of the 1990s. But they also have greater risks. As further treatments emerge (daclizumab and ocrelizumab are likely to be licensed in the next two years), the physician needs to be able to place them within a complex landscape of drugs and a specific treatment strategy, which may be an "escalation" or "induction" approach. Whilst on treatment, neurologist and patient need to be vigilant to signs of disease breakthrough or adverse effects. PMID:26538846

  15. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS) and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment. PMID:26538847

  16. Estrogen Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Stefan M; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2009-01-01

    Currently available treatments for multiple sclerosis reduce inflammatory lesions on MRI and decrease clinical relapses but have limited effects on disability. Novel treatment options that target both the inflammatory as well as the neurodegenerative component of the disease are therefore needed. A growing body of evidence from basic science and clinical studies supports the therapeutic potential of estrogens in MS. Mechanisms of action include both immunomodulatory and directly neuroprotective pathways. A first pilot trial of oral estriol treatment showed encouraging results. There are now several phase II trials underway to further determine the efficacy of estrogen treatment in MS. PMID:19539954

  17. Systematic imaging review: Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Katdare, Aparna; Ursekar, Meher

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterised by immune-mediated demyelination, and is a leading cause of neurological disability worldwide. It has a wide spectrum of clinical presentations which overlap with other neurological conditions many times. Further, the radiological array of findings in MS can also be confused for multiple other conditions, leading to the need to look for the more typical findings, and interpret these in close conjunction with the clinical picture including temporal evolution. This review aims to revisit the MRI findings in MS, including recent innovations in imaging, and to help distinguish MS from its mimics. PMID:26538845

  18. Newer therapies for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    The newer immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis (fingolimod, natalizumab, dimethyl fumarate, teriflunomide, alemtuzumab) offer advantages of efficacy or tolerability over the injectable therapies of the 1990s. But they also have greater risks. As further treatments emerge (daclizumab and ocrelizumab are likely to be licensed in the next two years), the physician needs to be able to place them within a complex landscape of drugs and a specific treatment strategy, which may be an “escalation” or “induction” approach. Whilst on treatment, neurologist and patient need to be vigilant to signs of disease breakthrough or adverse effects. PMID:26538846

  19. Neurotherapeutic Strategies for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Frohman, Teresa C; Beh, Shin C; Kildebeck, Eric J; Narayan, Ram; Treadaway, Katherine; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurologic disease of young adults. There are now 16 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved disease-modifying therapies for MS as well as a cohort of other agents commonly used in practice when conventional therapies prove inadequate. This article discusses approved FDA therapies as well as commonly used practice-based therapies for MS, as well as those therapies that can be used in patients attempting to become pregnant, or in patients with an established pregnancy, who require concomitant treatment secondary to recalcitrant disease activity. PMID:27445239

  20. Musculoskeletal involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lóránd, Veronika; Czirják, László; Minier, Tünde

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) involvement is a very frequent manifestation of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). There are several reports about clinical trials assessing musculoskeletal involvement in SSc. However, only few controlled studies have been conducted. The prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, clinical and radiographic findings has been assessed. The most important articular (arthralgia, synovitis, contractures), tendon (tendon friction rubs, tenosynovitis) and muscular manifestations (myalgia, muscle weakness, myositis) should be carefully evaluated during the assessment of SSc patients, because these are not only common, but substantially influence the quality of life and some of them also have predictive value concerning disease activity and severity. PMID:25179276

  1. Gastrointestinal complications of systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by progressive skin thickening and tightness. Pulmonary interstitial fibrosis and kidney damage are the most important indicators for mortality; however, the gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly damaged system. Virtually all parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can be involved, although the esophagus is the most frequently reported. The mechanisms that cause such extensive damage are generally unclear, but vascular changes, immunological abnormalities, excessive accumulation of collagen in the submucosa, smooth muscle atrophy and neuropathy may participate because these are the most common histological findings in biopsies and autopsies. Most patients with GI tract involvement complain about dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal bloating/distension, and fecal incontinence. These symptoms are generally mild during the early stage of the disease and are likely ignored by physicians. As the disease becomes more advanced, however, patient quality of life is markedly influenced, whereby malnutrition and shortened survival are the usual consequences. The diagnosis for systemic sclerosis is based on manometry measurements and an endoscopy examination. Supportive and symptomatic treatment is the main therapeutic strategy; however, an early diagnosis is critical for successful management. PMID:24222949

  2. [Tuberous sclerosis and trigonoseptal tumors].

    PubMed

    Bret, P; Remond, J; Pialat, J; Lapras, C; Fischer, G

    1988-01-01

    A series of 9 patients having a tuberous sclerosis associated to a midline ventricular tumour is reported. Microscopically, the presence of giant cells within the lesion is a major characteristic of the disease. The origin of these subependymal giant cells tumours is questionable since astrocytic, neuronal and ependymal features have been noted by several authors providing various denominations. In the literature and in our series as well, the intra-ventricular tumour presented as the initial manifestation of the disease in most of cases, usually with increased intra-cranial pressure symptoms. On CT, the tumour arises in the area of the foramen of Monro and enhances after contrast injection while the other intracranial anomalies of the disease do not enhance. In 8 patients, a direct transcortical transventricular approach was used. 1 patient was treated by shunt only. The results were evaluated according to the degree of the preoperative neuropsychological impairement: there were 3 deaths, 3 "excellent", 2 "fair" and 1 "poor" results. The problem of the surgical indication raises mainly in patients in whom the diagnosis of the tuberous sclerosis is ascertained prior to the diagnosis of the tumour. Since acute C.S.F. blockage or intra-ventricular bleeding may occur during "conservative" treatment, direct approach seems preferable. PMID:3200364

  3. Association between polyneuritis and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, C; Lascelles, R G

    1979-01-01

    We report two cases in which multiple sclerosis and inflammatory polyneuritis occurred separately, and suggest that this association supports the idea that the two conditions may have an aetiological link. PMID:228012

  4. Multiple sclerosis: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, L.; Raine, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the experimental and clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis. Specifically discussed are - Association of Epstein Barr Virus with pathology of central nervous system; immunology of viruses; and immunosuppression.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... amytrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, regulates endosomal trafficking. Hum Mol Genet. 2014 Jul 1;23(13): ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  6. Multiple sclerosis and oral health: an update.

    PubMed

    Elemek, Eser; Almas, Khalid

    2013-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, neurodegenerative disease seen in 69.1 per 100,000 person-years in the world. As multiple sclerosis and periodontal disease both have an inflammatory origin, dental professionals should be aware of the link between these two diseases. In patients unable to carry out effective oral hygiene, dental treatment should be done by dental hygienists and/or dentists to prevent dental caries and periodontal disease. It is hoped that by identifying multiple sclerosis patients in dental clinics, the required support and treatment could be provided to these patients to improve their quality of life and that dental professionals would feel comfortable treating patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23767394

  7. Disease Modifying Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, U. E.; Oparah, S. K.; Philip-Ephraim, E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by inflammatory demyelination and axonal degeneration. It is the commonest cause of permanent disability in young adults. Environmental and genetic factors have been suggested in its etiology. Currently available disease modifying drugs are only effective in controlling inflammation but not prevention of neurodegeneration or accumulation of disability. Search for an effective neuroprotective therapy is at the forefront of multiple sclerosis research. PMID:27355035

  8. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  9. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  10. Gastrointestinal involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Furnari, Manuele; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bodini, Giorgia; Ghio, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2014-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune chronic disease characterised by microvascular, muscular and immunologic abnormalities that lead to progressive and systemic deposition of connective tissue in the skin and internal organs. The gastrointestinal tract is often overlooked by physicians but it is the most affected organ after the skin, from the mouth to the anus. Indeed, 80% of SSc patients may present with gastrointestinal involvement. Gastrointestinal manifestations range from bloating and heartburn to dysphagia and anorectal dysfunction to severe weight loss and malabsorption. However, the gastrointestinal involvement is rarely the direct cause of death, but has great impact on quality of life and leads to several comorbidities that subsequently affect patients' survival. Treatments, including nutritional support and prokinetics provide limited benefits and do not arrest the progressive course of the disease, but earlier detection of gastrointestinal involvement may reduce the risk of complications such as malnutrition. PMID:25179275

  11. Sleep Disorders in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Braley, Tiffany J; Boudreau, Eilis Ann

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) are at increased risk for sleep disturbances and that sleep disturbances contribute to fatigue and other chronic symptoms in MS. Although fatigue occurs commonly in people with MS, this symptom is often attributed to MS-specific pathology. Consequently, sleep disorders are often unrecognized and untreated in this population. Timely diagnosis and treatment of sleep problems in MS offer a new opportunity to ameliorate some of the daytime fatigue experienced by patients with MS. To increase this opportunity, the practitioner should be comfortable performing basic screening for common sleep complaints among patients with MS. The objectives of this review are to summarize the latest relevant data on sleep disorders in MS and offer a helpful approach to the identification and workup of the most common sleep problems in this population. Unexplored research avenues and opportunities to address important questions at the interface of sleep and MS are also discussed. PMID:27068547

  12. Personality aspects in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Diana, R; Grosz, A; Mancini, E

    1985-12-01

    To test the claim that peculiar personality bias is detectable in multiple sclerosis (MS) we used the Szondi test to investigate the psychodynamic aspects of 110 MS patients in comparison with 200 healthy subjects. MS patients appeared to have a greater need for love in a passive form than normal people, rigid defense mechanisms, difficulty in resolving their inner conflicts either by sublimation or by internalization of satisfactory new emotional experiences, feelings of autoaggressiveness, and many symptoms of depression. Some of these aspects correlate with the severity of the disease, others seem to date back to early childhood as peculiar personality patterns. An investigation of childhood events in 110 controls confirmed that MS patients had had many more unhappy experiences in childhood than might commonly be expected. Further, the oft-reported psychiatric troubles preceding MS clinical onset suggest that at least in some MS patients there are specific gaps in personality structure dating back to early phases of their development. PMID:4086262

  13. Multiple sclerosis genetics is dead.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Christopher H

    2013-07-01

    This review addresses several areas of contention related to the genetic theory for multiple sclerosis (MS). It is argued (a) that the concept of MS as a 'complex disease' has little value, (b) just because a disorder is found in multiple families, it is not necessarily genetically based, (c) although twin studies are claimed to show that MS is '30% genetically based' this concept derives from widely varying data, (d) although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest the presence of several MS related genes this has yet to be proven, (e) monozygotic twins discordant for MS should have a different genetic sequence if the disorder has a genetic basis but data so far suggest this may not be correct and (f) epigenetics or epistasis are contentious topics and may not provide the answer. It is concluded that the role of genetics in MS etiology may be overstated and that attention should now be devoted to environmental causes. PMID:25877721

  14. Oral agents in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Frau, J; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Disease-modifying drugs licensed for MS treatment have been developed to reduce relapse rates and halt disease progression. The majority of current MS drugs involve regular, parenteral administration, affecting long-term adherence and thus reducing treatment efficacy. Over the last two decades great progress has been made towards developing new MS therapies with different modes of action and biologic effects. In particular, oral drugs have generated much interest because of their convenience and positive impact on medication adherence. Fingolimod was the first launched oral treatment for relapsing-remitting MS; recently, Teriflunomide and Dimethyl fumarate have also been approved as oral disease-modifying agents. In this review, we summarize and discuss the history, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of oral agents that have been approved or are under development for the selective treatment of MS. PMID:25924620

  15. [Current immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Paul, F; Ruprecht, K

    2015-08-01

    Following the introduction of interferon beta 1b as the first immunomodulatory therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1993, there are currently nine substances or substance classes approved for the treatment of MS (i.e. alemtuzumab, azathioprine, dimethyl fumarate, fingolimod, glatiramer acetate, interferon beta, mitoxantrone, natalizumab and teriflunomide). Major developments during the last 5 years include the approval of orally administered medications (i.e. fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate), a monoclonal antibody (alemtuzumab), as well as glatiramer acetate with an administration frequency three times a week and a pegylated formulation of interferon beta 1a. The broadened therapeutic options enable a more differentiated and individualized therapy of MS; however, evidence-based data for therapeutic decision-making relevant in clinical practice are not always available. Rare but potentially severe and even life-threatening side effects of immunotherapies for MS require continuous pharmacovigilance and adherence to risk management plans. PMID:26253589

  16. [Vitamin D in Multiple Sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2015-11-01

    The geographic epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests that low vitamin D levels are a modifiable risk factor. Previous studies have shown that patients with MS have significantly lower vitamin D levels compared with healthy controls. Vitamin D is a potent immunomodulator important for immune function and development, and it offers potential benefits by reducing inflammation. Vitamin D has beneficial effects in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS. In summation, these studies suggest that vitamin D may have therapeutic potential for MS. This has not been established although preliminary clinical trials for vitamin D in MS look promising. Genetic studies suggest that genes associated with vitamin D are critical susceptible genes for MS. In this review, we discuss current research investigating the association between vitamin D and MS and the issues that need to be resolved. PMID:26560958

  17. Hughes syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uthman, I; Noureldine, M H A; Berjawi, A; Skaf, M; Haydar, A A; Merashli, M; Hughes, G R V

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) share common clinical, laboratory and radiological features. We reviewed all the English papers on MS and APS published in the literature from 1965 to 2014 using PubMed and Google Scholar. We found that APS can mimic antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL)-positive MS in many ways in its clinical presentation. Nevertheless, APS diagnosis, clinical manifestations and management differ from those of MS. aPL were found in MS patients with titers ranging from 2% to 88%. The distribution and volume of lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to differentiate MS from primary APS. In addition, atypical MS presentation can guide physicians toward an alternative diagnosis, especially when features of thrombosis and/or history of connective tissue disease are present. In that case, an anticoagulation trial could be worthwhile. PMID:25326228

  18. Immunological treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Martin; Derfuss, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been a challenge since its first description by Charcot. The advent of immunomodulatory drugs in the mid 1990s brought the first big change in the treatment of MS patients. During the last 10 years there has been an ongoing tremendous evolution of novel treatment options for relapsing-remitting MS. These options include monoclonal antibodies, which inhibit migration of lymphocytes (natalizumab), deplete lymphocytes (alemtuzumab), or block the cytokine receptor interleukin (IL)-2 (daclizumab), teriflunomide that inhibits proliferation of activated lymphocytes, fingolimod that modulates the sphingosine-receptor system, and dimethylfumarate that combines features of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs. The topic of this review is to discuss currently available treatments and provide an outlook into the near future. PMID:27312167

  19. Erectile Dysfunction in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Veronika K; Walker, Ulrich A

    2016-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major issue in systemic sclerosis (SSc) as it is observed in around 80 to 90 % of men with this connective tissue disease. ED greatly impacts the quality of life and should be actively addressed as a common complication. Whereas ED in the general population is usually associated with risk factors for atherosclerosis as well as cardiovascular disease, the main aetiology of ED in SSc is microangiopathic. In SSc, the blood flow is reduced in the small penile arteries due to corporal fibrosis and myointimal proliferation. There are no data on the prevention of ED in SSc. On-demand phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have little effect in improving erectile function, but daily or alternate day regimens of long-acting phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors provide a measurable, although often limited, benefit. When intracavernous prostaglandin E1 injections are also ineffective, the implantation of a penile prosthesis should be considered as an option. PMID:27402106

  20. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M.; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  1. Erosive Arthropathy in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Allali, Fadoua; Tahiri, Latifa; Senjari, Adil; Abouqal, Redouane; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2007-01-01

    Background To determine radiological features of arthropathy in systemic sclerosis patients with polyarthritis. Results Forty one women and 5 men were included in this study. The mean age was 41 + 14,2 years, the mean duration of disease was 10,5+ 6,5 years. Thirty seven patients (80%) had radiological abnormalities including joint space narrowing (37%) and erosions (43%). At presentation, the prevalence of radiological foot abnormalities was lower than that of hands (26% vs 79%, p < 0,001). There was no significant difference between patients with (n = 24) and without erosive arthropathy (Joint space narrowing and/or erosion) (n = 22) in terms of cutaneous subtype, organ involvement, calcinosis presence of rheumatoid factor, ANA, Anti-topoisomerase antibodies. Conclusion This study showed an high frequency of erosive arthropathy in our morroccan SSc patients with clinical synovitis. PMID:17888166

  2. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Olavarrieta, C; Cummings, J L; Velazquez, J; Garcia de la Cadena, C

    1999-01-01

    The range of neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS) has not been prospectively assessed. The authors, working at a tertiary medical center in Mexico City, used the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) to evaluate neuropsychiatric symptoms prospectively in 44 MS patients who were stable between relapses and 25 control subjects of similar age, education, and cognitive function. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were present in 95% of patients and 16% of control subjects. Changes present were depressive symptoms (79%), agitation (40%), anxiety (37%), irritability (35%), apathy (20%), euphoria (13%), disinhibition (13%), hallucinations (10%), aberrant motor behavior (9%), and delusions (7%). The only relationships with MRI were between euphoria and hallucinations and moderately severe MRI abnormalities. The authors conclude that diverse types of neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in MS; symptoms are present between exacerbations; and there are variable correlations with MRI abnormalities. PMID:9990556

  3. Cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Joana; Sá, Maria José

    2012-01-01

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS) prevalence studies of community and clinical samples, indicate that 45-60% of patients are cognitively impaired. These cognitive dysfunctions have been traditionally described as heterogeneous, but more recent studies suggest that there is a specific pattern of MS-related cognitive dysfunctions. With the advent of disease-modifying medications for MS and emphasis on early intervention and treatment, detection of cognitive impairment at its earliest stage becomes particularly important. In this review the authors address: the cognitive domains most commonly impaired in MS (memory, attention, executive functions, speed of information processing, and visual-spatial abilities); the pathophysiological mechanism implied in MS cognitive dysfunction and correlated brain MRI features; the importance of neuropsychological assessment of MS patients in different stages of the disease and the influence of its course on cognitive performance; the most used tests and batteries for neuropsychological assessment; therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive abilities. PMID:22654782

  4. [Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2016-04-01

    While cognitive impairment is a major symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is commonly overlooked. This may be explained by the fact that it is difficult to evaluate cognitive function in patients with MS using screening batteries for the detection of dementia such as the mini-mental state examination. Further more, cognitive impairment in MS typically involves domain-specific deficits such as imparement of sustained attention and information processing speed rather than global cognitive decline. Cognitive impairment may influence the daily living and social lines of affected patients. This review discusses the characteristics of cognitive impairment, appropreate tests to evaluate its symptoms, and the current status of clinical trials for the treatment of MS. PMID:27056855

  5. Care Partners and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Quig, Mary Elizabeth; Tyry, Tuula; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Cutter, Gary; Shearin, Edward; Johnson, Kamau; Simsarian, James

    2015-01-01

    Background: Caring for someone with multiple sclerosis (MS) can be a stressful experience that requires clinical attention. We investigated the impact of caregiver stress on the emotional well-being and physical health of the MS care partner using the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry. Methods: Care partners of NARCOMS participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire that captured demographic characteristics, health status, caregiver burden as measured by the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview, and impact of caregiving on employment. Results: Of 1446 care partners who agreed to participate, 1333 had complete data. Most were men (n = 825, 61.9%), with a mean (SD) age of 51.1 (11.2) years. The mean (SD) Zarit total score was 24.6 (15.1), placing the overall group in the mild caregiver burden range. Compared with male care partners, female care partners reported higher levels of burden and stress and more medication use for stress/anxiety and mood disorders. Male care partners were more likely to report physical concerns. Care partners of people with primary progressive MS reported greater perceived burden than did partners of people with secondary progressive MS and relapsing-remitting MS. More than 40% of care partners (559 of 1288) had missed work during the past year owing to caregiving responsibilities. Conclusions: Care partners of people with MS have substantial physical and psychological health concerns and experience an adverse impact on employment. Future research should evaluate how to mitigate the adverse effects of caregiving and evaluate positive aspects of the role. PMID:26664330

  6. Heavy Coffee Drinkers Show Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Heavy Coffee Drinkers Show Lower Risk of Multiple Sclerosis But the finding isn't reason enough to ... coffee may have a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), a new large study suggests. Researchers found ...

  7. Episodic Mood Changes Preceding an Exacerbation of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priya; Morrow, Sarah A.; Owen, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a neurologic inflammatory disease that can manifest with psychiatric symptoms. Although depression is the most common psychiatric diagnosis in patients with multiple sclerosis, how depression develops is not fully understood. We present the case of an individual who displayed episodic mood changes preceding an exacerbation of multiple sclerosis symptoms. The clinical and research implications of this association are discussed. PMID:26835163

  8. Adie's Tonic Pupil in Systemic Sclerosis: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Anusha; Panda, Bijnya Birajita; Sirka, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare association of Adie's tonic pupil in a patient with systemic sclerosis who was otherwise systemically stable. This paper is an effort to unravel whether the tonic pupil and systemic sclerosis are an association by chance (which may be the case) or systemic sclerosis is the source of the tonic pupil. PMID:26421204

  9. Coexistent arteriovenous malformation and hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A; O'Toole, Elizabeth E

    2016-06-01

    Cavernous angiomas or cavernomas have been occasionally described in patients presenting with medically intractable epilepsy. Reports of cavernomas associated with a second pathology potentially causative of seizures have rarely been documented; most commonly, the second pathology is focal cortical dysplasia or less frequently, hippocampal sclerosis. To our knowledge, cases of arteriovenous malformation arising in this clinical setting and associated with hippocampal sclerosis have not been previously described. We report a 56-year-old woman who initially presented at age 24years with staring spells. Imaging studies revealed an arteriovenous malformation in the right parietal lobe. At age 51years, she represented with signs and symptoms related to a hemorrhage from the malformation. The patient underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) of the lesion. She subsequently developed seizures, refractory to medical management. MRI studies showed atrophy in the right hippocampus. She underwent resection of the right parietal lobe and hippocampus. Histopathologic examination of the right parietal lesion revealed an arteriovenous malformation marked by focally prominent vascular sclerosis, calcification and adjacent hemosiderin deposition. The hippocampus was marked by prominent neuronal loss and gliosis in the CA1 region, consistent with CA1 sclerosis or hippocampal sclerosis International League Against Epilepsy type 2. PMID:26899356

  10. [Therapeutic strategy against multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Suzumura, Akio

    2008-11-01

    The pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains to be elucidated and there is no curative therapy against MS, though we have several disease modifying drugs. In this symposium. I introduce several new strategies against development of autoimmune processes and axonal degeneration in MS. Several mechanisms regulate immune system not to attack self components. One of the most potent regulatory cells is CD4 + CD25 + FoxP + regulatory T cells (Treg), which suppress development of both T helper 1 and 2. Thus, to increase the number and function of Treg is an approach to suppress autoimmune diseases. We have found recently that midkine suppresses the development of Treg. and that suppression of midkine by RNA aptamer alleviates symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyetitis, an animal model of MS. by expanding Treg. Another important strategy against MS is to suppress axonal degeneration which reportedly occurs from an early stage of MS. We have found that the most toxic agent from activated macrophages and microglia is glutamate that was produced by glutaminase and released through gap-junction. Thus, inhibitor for glutaminase and gap-junction may be other candidates to treat MS. Interferon-beta also effectively suppress glutamate production by these cells and subsequently suppress development of axonal degeneration. PMID:19198124

  11. Multiple sclerosis and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, P W; Mulla, Z D; Nesic, O

    2015-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and breast cancer (BC) share common features; most notably, both are more frequent in women than in men. In addition to the involvement of sex hormones, a number of genetic and pharmacological studies support a possible relationship between these two diseases. However, there are no conclusive epidemiological findings related to MS and BC worldwide, and there are no recent data for the US population. We conducted a case-control study using a hospital inpatient discharge dataset (21,536 cases and two control series totaling 59,581 controls) from the Texas Health Care Information Collection. We assessed occurrence of MS in BC cases and in two control series: diabetes mellitus type II, and open wounds. After controlling for age, race-ethnicity, and health insurance status, a statistically-significant protective association was detected: BC cases were 45% less likely than diabetic controls to have MS (OR=0.55, 95% CI=0.37-0.81), and 63% less likely than open wound controls to have MS (OR=0.37, 95% CI=0.21-0.66). Our study presented here is the only current assessment of the association between MS and BC in the USA and suggests a protective effect of MS on BC in the hospitalized population. PMID:26130448

  12. [Respiratory failure in disseminated sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Popova, L M; Avdiunina, I A; Alferova, V P

    2000-01-01

    The development and patterns of respiratory failure (RF) are analyzed in 9 patients with disseminated sclerosis (DS). Forced ventilation of the lungs was carried out with consideration for main location of the process. Relationship between patterns of respiratory disorders and neuroanatomy of respiratory regulation is discussed. Involvement of the corticospinal routes is paralleled by dissociation during functional pulmonary tests: spontaneous volumes are less than controlled inspirations. The most severe symptom complexes were observed in RF of predominantly bulbar localization: respiratory anarchy, blocking of airways caused by impaired swallowing, impaired mechanism of coughing reflex, loss of spontaneous respiration, sometimes apnea during sleeping. Involvement of the respiratory nuclei of medullary respiratory center and airways and of the corticonuclear routes of caudal cranial nerves causes the development of a triad of symptoms: glossopharyngolaryngeal paralysis, dysfunction of respiratory nuclei of medulla oblongata, and decreased sensitivity of respiratory center to CO2. Aspiration complications caused by dysphagia are characteristic of bulbar DS. Respiratory function in 5 patients without clinical picture of RF are specially discussed. The authors emphasize unfavorable prognostic significance of signs of extracorporeal obstruction indicating the probability of RF long before its manifestation. Special attention is paid to early diagnosis of symptoms of coming RF when evaluating the status of patients with DS during treatment. Timely use of respiratory resuscitation methods reduces the mortality and ensures a good chance for remissions with recovery of respiratory function, which are characteristic of RF. PMID:11014001

  13. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Perioperative Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Rabito, Matthew J.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), also known as Bourneville disease, is an inherited, progressive neurocutaneous disorder characterized by the potential for hamartoma formation throughout the body. TSC is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, but more than two-thirds of cases are sporadic. Methods Clinical manifestations and treatment options are discussed. Both surgical and anesthetic perioperative considerations are described in this review. Results Routine monitoring is appropriate for minor surgical procedures for patients with TSC who have mild disease manifestations. More extensive monitoring is indicated for major procedures that have the potential for significant blood loss and for patients with more severe pathology. Postoperatively, TSC patients should be admitted for monitoring and treatment after more extensive procedures or if significant organ dysfunction occurs. Postoperative complications, which may be related to either the surgery or the TSC pathology itself, may have origins in many different organs and may include seizures, severe hypertension, and bradyarrhythmias. Conclusion TSC is a rare disease with a highly variable clinical presentation and provides a multitude of challenges for the patient, the family, and the healthcare team. PMID:24940133

  14. Multiple sclerosis: Prospects and promise.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Stephen L; Chan, Jonah R; Oksenberg, Jorge R

    2013-09-01

    We have entered a golden era in multiple sclerosis (MS) research. Two decades ago, our understanding of the disease was largely descriptive and there were no approved therapies to modify the natural history of MS. Today, delineation of immune pathways relevant to MS have been clarified; a comprehensive map of genes that influence risk compiled; clues to environmental triggers identified; noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the MS disease process has been revolutionized by high-field MRI; and many effective therapies for the early, relapsing, component of MS now exist. However, major challenges remain. We still have no useful treatment for progressive MS (the holy grail of MS research), no means to repair injured axons or protect neurons, and extremely limited evidence to guide treatment decisions. Recent advances have set in place a foundation for development of increasingly selective immunotherapy for patients; application of genetic and genomic discoveries to improve therapeutic options; development of remyelination or neuroprotection therapies for progressive MS; and integrating clinical, imaging and genomic data for personalized medicine. MS has now advanced from the backwaters of autoimmune disease research to the front-line, and definitive answers, including cures, are now realistic goals for the next decade. Many of the breakthrough discoveries in MS have also resulted from meaningful interactions across disciplines, and especially from translational and basic scientists working closely with clinicians, highlighting that the clinical value of discoveries are most often revealed when ideas developed in the laboratory are tested at the bedside. PMID:23955638

  15. Natalizumab therapy of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest disabling neurological disease of young and middle-aged adults affecting 1 million persons world wide. The illness begins with a relapsing-remitting MS course in 85%–90% of patients; the other 10%–15% have a primary progressive onset MS. Our current understanding is that MS is an autoimmune disorder with an inflammatory T-cell attack on myelin or some component of the oligodendrocyte--myelin structure. Relapses of disease activity result in plaques of demyelination with destruction of myelin and, to a lesser, extent axons. Lymphocytes within the central nervous system tissue recruit more cells leading to an inflammatory cascade that causes myelin damage, axonal disruption, and neuronal death. If the plaque occurs in a vocal area of the central nervous system then symptoms relating to that area result. However, magnetic resonance imaging shows that approximately 10 times more lesions occur in asymptomatic areas of the brain. Recovery from an initial relapse may appear relatively complete but persistent inflammation results in axonal injury and residual disability results. With time and accumulated lesion load, secondary degeneration of denuded axons results in the phase of secondary progressive MS usually 15-20 years after onset. PMID:20874255

  16. Cardiovascular disease in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cannarile, Francesca; Valentini, Valentina; Mirabelli, Giulia; Alunno, Alessia; Terenzi, Riccardo; Luccioli, Filippo; Bartoloni, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) system involvement is a frequent complication of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It still remains unclear if a premature atherosclerosis (ATS) occurs even in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Although microvascular disease is a hallmark of SSc, in the last few years a number of studies highlighted a higher prevalence of macrovascular disease in SSc patients in comparison to healthy individuals and these data have been correlated with a poorer prognosis. The mechanisms promoting ATS in SSc are not fully understood, but it is believed to be secondary to multi-system organ inflammation, endothelial wall damage and vasculopathy. Both traditional risk factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to participate to the onset and progression of ATS in such patients. In particular, endothelial cell injury induced by anti-endothelial antibodies, ischemia/reperfusion damage, immune-mediated cytotoxicity represent the main causes of vascular injury together with an impaired vascular repair mechanism that determine a defective vasculogenesis. Aim of this review is to analyse both causes and clinical manifestations of macrovascular involvement and ATS in SSc. PMID:25705640

  17. The genetics of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rui; Charlesworth, Jac; van der Mei, Ingrid; Taylor, Bruce V

    2012-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Improved prevention and treatment will depend on a greater understanding of the causes and mechanisms involved in its onset and progression. MS is clearly driven by both environmental and genetic factors. Established contributory environmental factors include lower ultraviolet radiation exposure and lower vitamin D levels, Epstein-Barr virus and smoking. Our current understanding of MS genetics is undergoing a major upgrade as new genetic technologies are applied to large MS studies. In this article, we review the current literature describing a genetic contribution to MS susceptibility and review the methods to detect genetic variants that may underlie the genetic contribution to MS. We also consider how reporting of genetic discoveries in MS in the lay press has caused some confusion among patients and their families, who, not surprisingly, think that these discoveries can be translated into an available genetic test to diagnose MS or recognise family members at risk of developing MS. We review the current limited clinical use of genetics in the diagnosis and management of MS. PMID:22976058

  18. [Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hirofumi

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive impairment may occur in up to 70% of all patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Although MS can affect various sites within the central nervous system, a specific pattern of cognitive deficits tends to be seen, especially in the early stages of the disease. These deficits include problems with attention, information processing speed, and working memory. This constellation of deficits can occur with any disease course, and a minimal correlation has been found between physical disability assessed by EDSS and cognitive impairment. Many studies have shown that cognitive impairment is correlated with brain lesion volume, as well as brain atrophy. There are promising neuroimaging indicators that may be useful for identifying patients at risk for cognitive impairment, such as diffusion tensor imaging, the magnetization transfer ratio, and N-acetyl aspartate levels. Cognitive dysfunction is associated with adverse effects on quality of life, employment status, and social activities. Today, there are three avenues for treatment: disease modifying therapies, symptomatic treatments, and cognitive rehabilitation. Unfortunately, data linking therapeutic interventions are limited. A better understanding of cognitive function and its correlation with disease mechanisms will assist in providing a new comprehensive treatment strategy that begins immediately with the diagnosis of MS. PMID:25296874

  19. Endothelin-1 in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Mehrdad; Gharibdost, Farhad; Zayeni, Habib; Akhlaghi, Maryam; Sedighi, Sima; Rostamian, Abduo Rahman; Aghdami, Naser; Shojaa, Mahdieh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Scleroderma is a systemic disorder with unknown etiology most notably characterized by skin thickening and organ damage. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays a role in skin fibrosis. The aim of this study was survey and comparison of ET-1 level in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) patients with and without digital ulcer. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study conducted among the 95 patients with scleroderma in 2006 who were referred to the Rheumatology clinic in Shariati hospital of Tehran. The questionnaire was completed for every patient. Plasma level of endothelin-1 was also measured in all of them. The data was analyzed using SPSS software and statistical tests. Results: The result indicated, relationship among digital ulcers and digital pitting scars with plasma level of ET-1 were significant (P value < 0.05). We could not find any significant relationship between age and plasma level of ET-1. Conclusion: These data indicate plasma level of ET-1 in scleroderma patients with digital ulcer was higher than patients without digital ulcer. Thus, increase in plasma level of ET-1 could be effective in vascular damage, fibrosis, and skin thickness. PMID:23130253

  20. Rehabilitation challenges in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Burks, Jack S; Bigley, George Kim; Hill, Harry Haydon

    2009-10-01

    While current immunomodulating drugs aim to reduce multiple sclerosis (MS) exacerbations and slow disease progression, rehabilitation aims to improve and maintain the functional abilities of patients in the face of disease progression. An increasing number of journal articles are describing the value of the many rehabilitation interventions that can be used throughout the course of the disease, from the initial symptoms to the advanced stages. An integrated team of healthcare professionals is necessary to address a myriad of problems to reduce impairments, disabilities, and handicaps. The problems may be related to fatigue, weakness, spasticity, mobility, balance, pain, cognition, mood, relationships, bowel, bladder, sexual function, swallowing, speech, transportation, employment, recreation, and activities of daily living (ADL) such as dressing, eating, bathing, and household chores. The team can help prevent complications and secondary disabilities, while increasing patient safety. Improving neurologically related function, maintaining good relationships, and feeling productive and creative adds enormously to the quality of life of people with MS and their families. Rehabilitation is more than an 'extra' service that is given after medical therapies; it is an integral part of the management of the diverse set of problems encountered throughout the course of the disease. An interdisciplinary team may have many members, including physicians, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, psychotherapists, social workers, recreational therapists, vocational rehabilitation therapists, patients, families, and other caregivers. PMID:20182578

  1. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. PMID:25732946

  2. Remyelination Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Danielle E.; Honce, Justin M.; Miravalle, Augusto A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system that results in destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds axons and eventual neurodegeneration. Current treatments approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS target the aberrant immune response and successfully reduce the severity of attacks and frequency of relapses. Therapies are still needed that can repair damage particularly for the treatment of progressive forms of MS for which current therapies are relatively ineffective. Remyelination can restore neuronal function and prevent further neuronal loss and clinical disability. Recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating myelination, as well as the development of high-throughput screens to identify agents that enhance myelination, have lead to the identification of many potential remyelination therapies currently in preclinical and early clinical development. One problem that has plagued the development of treatments to promote remyelination is the difficulty in assessing remyelination in patients with current imaging techniques. Powerful new imaging technologies are making it easier to discern remyelination in patients, which is critical for the assessment of these new therapeutic strategies during clinical trials. This review will summarize what is currently known about remyelination failure in MS, strategies to overcome this failure, new therapeutic treatments in the pipeline for promoting remyelination in MS patients, and new imaging technologies for measuring remyelination in patients. PMID:26696956

  3. Parental Understanding of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Samia, Pauline; Donald, Kirsten A; Schlegel, Birgit; Wilmshurst, Jo M

    2015-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic disorder with multisystem involvement that poses significant challenges to the affected child and family. Caregiver knowledge in the South African population has not previously been reported. A prospective study of the parents of 21 children with tuberous sclerosis complex was undertaken. Median parental age was 38 (interquartile range 34.5-45) years. Parents were randomly allocated to receive written information about the condition, or to receive verbal counseling already established in clinic. A significant difference (P = .001) was observed in the change in the mean knowledge scores for the parent group that received written information (34.2 at baseline, 51.7 at the second visit. This impact was higher in parents with an education level of at least grade 8 (P = .003). Parental understanding of tuberous sclerosis complex can be improved by provision of written information and should be routinely available in a readily understandable format. PMID:25414235

  4. Emerging therapies for treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Corboy, John R; Miravalle, Augusto A

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, a new armamentarium of immune-based therapies have been developed and tested in patients with multiple sclerosis. Some of these therapies are showing a high level of efficacy, with an acceptable adverse effect profile. Because present therapies have significant limitations in slowing disease progression, require injections, are sometimes associated with significant side effects of immunosuppression, and do little to reverse disability, identifying more effective treatments is an important goal for clinical research in multiple sclerosis. However, in order to improve our current approach to disease-modifying therapies, it is imperative to promote the development of individualized therapy strategies. PMID:22096357

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Keith G; Keegan, B Mark

    2007-09-01

    There are relatively few case reports of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with multiple sclerosis. We present 3 such patients, all of whom received safe, effective ECT without evidence of acute neurological deterioration. We conclude that patients with multiple sclerosis being considered for ECT should have a thorough neurological evaluation, and the informed consent process should include discussion of the possibility of neurological deterioration. However, review of the literature and of our 3 cases does reveal that ECT can be used safely, at least in the short term. Long-term outcomes in such patients remain uncertain. PMID:17804994

  6. Tuberous sclerosis complex: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Soumyabrata; Khaitan, Tanya; Sinha, Rupam; Kabiraj, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an unusual autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by the development of benign tumors affecting different body systems affecting the brain, skin, retina, and viscera. It is characterized by cutaneous changes, neurologic conditions, and the formation of hamartomas in multiple organs leading to morbidity and mortality. The most common oral manifestations are fibromas, gingival hyperplasia, and enamel hypoplasia. The management of these patients is often multidisciplinary involving specialists from various fields. Here, we present a case report of a 26-old-year male patient with characteristic clinical, radiological, and histological features of tuberous sclerosis complex. PMID:27307675

  7. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Historical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan S; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    This article looks back in time to see where the foundational basis for the understanding of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis originated. This foundation was created primarily in France by Jean-Martin Charcot and his fellow countrymen and disciples, along with key contributions from early clinicians in England and Germany. The early work on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis provides a useful foundation for today's clinicians with respect to tying together genetic and biologic aspects of the disorder that have been discovered over the past few decades. PMID:26515617

  8. [Large vessels vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván

    2015-12-01

    Vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis is a severe, in many cases irreversible, manifestation that can lead to amputation. While the classical clinical manifestations of the disease have to do with the involvement of microcirculation, proximal vessels of upper and lower limbs can also be affected. This involvement of large vessels may be related to systemic sclerosis, vasculitis or atherosclerotic, and the differential diagnosis is not easy. To conduct a proper and early diagnosis, it is essential to start prompt appropriate treatment. In this review, we examine the involvement of large vessels in scleroderma, an understudied manifestation with important prognostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:25726305

  9. Defective immunoregulation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Hoffman, P M; Pryjma, J; Hogan, E L; Fudenberg, H H

    1980-11-01

    Imbalances in T cell subpopulations have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS). In the present study of 31 MS patients, the percentage of T cells with Fc receptors for IgG (Tg) was found to be increased in patients with chronic progressive disease, and another T cell subset binding to the Raji B lymphoid cell line was decreased. An inverse correlation (r = -0.675; < 95% confidence limit) was found between these two subsets, suggesting that they vary inversely in MS. The mitogenic responses of MS mononuclear cells, isolated T cells, and recombinet T and non-T cells to the lectins phytohemagglutinin and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) did not differ from those of normal cells. However, more immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing cells were generated in a PWM-driven system with cells from MS patients than with cells from age-matched controls (p < 0.05). Autologous recombination of separated T and non-T cells did not significantly modify these results. T cells from MS patients added to B cells from normal controls exerted an effect that was related to their percentage of Tg cells; that is, values above 15% were associated with a suppression of Ig production, whereas for Tg values below 12%, a helper effect or no modification was observed. These results suggest that changes in T cell subsets in MS are related to changes in functional ability to modulate Ig production by normal B cells. However, MS B cells partly escape regulation by their own T cells, suggesting an associated B cell hyperactivity. PMID:7436394

  10. Nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  11. Taste dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Doty, Richard L; Tourbier, Isabelle A; Pham, Dzung L; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Udupa, Jayaram K; Karacali, Bilge; Beals, Evan; Fabius, Laura; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Moonis, Gul; Kim, Taehoon; Mihama, Toru; Geckle, Rena J; Yousem, David M

    2016-04-01

    Empirical studies of taste function in multiple sclerosis (MS) are rare. Moreover, a detailed assessment of whether quantitative measures of taste function correlate with the punctate and patchy myelin-related lesions found throughout the CNS of MS patients has not been made. We administered a 96-trial test of sweet (sucrose), sour (citric acid), bitter (caffeine) and salty (NaCl) taste perception to the left and right anterior (CN VII) and posterior (CN IX) tongue regions of 73 MS patients and 73 matched controls. The number and volume of lesions were assessed using quantitative MRI in 52 brain regions of 63 of the MS patients. Taste identification scores were significantly lower in the MS patients for sucrose (p = 0.0002), citric acid (p = 0.0001), caffeine (p = 0.0372) and NaCl (p = 0.0004) and were present in both anterior and posterior tongue regions. The percent of MS patients with identification scores falling below the 5th percentile of controls was 15.07 % for caffeine, 21.9 % for citric acid, 24.66 % for sucrose, and 31.50 % for NaCl. Such scores were inversely correlated with lesion volumes in the temporal, medial frontal, and superior frontal lobes, and with the number of lesions in the left and right superior frontal lobes, right anterior cingulate gyrus, and left parietal operculum. Regardless of the subject group, women outperformed men on the taste measures. These findings indicate that a sizable number of MS patients exhibit taste deficits that are associated with MS-related lesions throughout the brain. PMID:26810729

  12. Hearing disorders in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Furst, Miriam; Levine, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that is both a focal inflammatory and a chronic neurodegenerative disease. The focal inflammatory component is characterized by destruction of central nervous system myelin, including the spinal cord; as such it can impair any central neural system, including the auditory system. While on the one hand auditory complaints in MS patients are rare compared to other senses, such as vision and proprioception, on the other hand auditory tests of precise neural timing are never "silent." Whenever focal MS lesions are detected involving the pontine auditory pathway, auditory tests requiring precise neural timing are always abnormal, while auditory functions not requiring such precise timing are often normal. Azimuth sound localization is accomplished by comparing the timing and loudness of the sound at the two ears. Hence tests of azimuth sound localization must obligatorily involve the central nervous system and particularly the brainstem. Whenever a focal lesion was localized to the pontine auditory pathway, timing tests were always abnormal, but loudness tests were not. Moreover, a timing test that included only high-frequency sounds was very often abnormal, even when there was no detectable focal MS lesion involving the pontine auditory pathway. This test may be a marker for the chronic neurodegenerative aspect of MS, and, as such could be used to complement the magnetic resonance imaging scan in monitoring the neurodegenerative aspect of MS. Studies of MS brainstem lesion location and auditory function have led to advances in understanding how the human brain processes sound. The brain processes binaural sounds independently for time and level in a two-stage process. The first stage is at the level of the superior olivary complex (SOC) and the second at a level rostral to the SOC. PMID:25726295

  13. Retroviruses and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alfahad, Tariq; Nath, Avindra

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, invariably fatal neurologic disorder resulting from upper and lower motor neuron degeneration, which typically develops during the sixth or seventh decade of life, and is diagnosed based on standard clinical criteria. Its underlying cause remains undetermined. The disease may occur with increased frequency within certain families, often in association with specific genomic mutations, while some sporadic cases have been linked to environmental toxins or trauma. Another possibility, first proposed in the 1970s, is that retroviruses play a role in pathogenesis. In this paper, we review the published literature for evidence that ALS is associated either with infection by an exogenous retrovirus or with the expression of human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequences in cells of the central nervous system. A small percentage of persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) or human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) develop ALS-like syndromes. While HTLV-1 associated ALS-like syndrome has several features that may distinguish it from classical ALS, HIV-infected patients may develop neurological manifestations that resemble classical ALS although it occurs at a younger age and they may show a dramatic improvement following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. However, most patients with probable or definite ALS show no evidence of HIV-1 or HTLV-1 infection. In contrast, recent reports have shown a stronger association with HERV, as analysis of serum samples, and postmortem brain tissue from a number of patients with a classical ALS has revealed significantly increased expression of HERV-K, compared to controls. These findings suggest that endogenous retroviral elements are involved in the pathophysiology of ALS, but there is no evidence that they are the primary cause of the syndrome. PMID:23707220

  14. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis (SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography (especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome. PMID:25276300

  15. [Treatments of progressive systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Vayssairat, M; Abdoucheli-Baudot, N; Gaitz, J P

    2001-10-01

    Progressive Systemic Sclerosis (PSS) is still an incurable disease but there are treatments for it, and the list of proposed treatments is long. The methodology of trials concerning PSS is complex, due to the low prevalence of the disease and therefore its financial interest for pharmaceutical companies, the lack of simple end points for efficacy, and the large number of clinical expressions with various prognoses. These causes explain why most open studies are fiercely positive, and why controlled studies are so rare. The progress made during the last 10 years concern 1) the diagnosis, which is now made earlier due to capillaroscopy and antibody assays, especially of anticentromere antibodies, 2) better knowledge of the prognosis, due to the classification of PSS into limited and the diffuse forms which have different prognoses, and 3) the recognition of a serious complication of the disease, ie. pulmonary hypertension, which can now be detected by non-invasive methods. All these improvements will also improve the methodology of future trials of drugs for treating PSS. In this ocean of uncertainties, some treatments have a valid background, and 3 visceral locations of PSS can be efficiently treated: renal involvement, with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, respiratory involvement, with D-penicillamine, and pulmonary hypertension, with prostacyclin derivatives. Corticosteroids are suspected to increase the risk of renal complications. Calcium blockers are considered a useful symptomatic treatment of the associated Raynaud's phenomenon and of the risk of digital necrosis, and may also constitute a treatment of PSS itself. A recent trial conducted by the French Microcirculation Society and its acrosyndrome Study Group considered the effects of an oral derivative of prostacyclin. Beneficial effects were: a reduction of the risk of digital necroses, improved overall wellbeing, less necessity for hospitalizations, fewer giant capillaries, and a dramatic fall in

  16. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  17. Double cortical stimulation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, T; Yoshino, A; Inaba, A; Saito, Y

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Transcranial double magnetic stimulation on the motor cortex was used to investigate central motor tract function in 16 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, five with spinal muscular atrophy, and 16 age matched normal controls. METHODS: Surface EMG responses were recorded from the relaxed abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle. RESULTS: Responses to test stimuli were markedly attenuated by a subthreshold conditioning stimulus given at a condition-test (C-T) interval of 1-4 ms in normal controls and patients with spinal muscular atrophy, but attenuation was mild in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In the normal controls this suppression was caused by activation of the intracortical inhibitory mechanism because responses to electrical test stimuli and the H wave were not suppressed by the same magnetic subthreshold conditioning stimulus. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis the effect of the conditioning cortical stimulus on the H wave was also in the normal range. CONCLUSION: The intracortical inhibitory mechanism may be impaired in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:8971106

  18. Magnetic resonance sees lesions of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziporyn, T.

    1985-02-15

    The value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and quantitation of the progression of multiple sclerosis is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging generates images that reflect differential density and velocity of hydrogen nuclei between cerebral gray and white matter, as well as between white matter and pathological lesions of the disease.

  19. Psychiatric disorders in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fazzito, Mirella Martins; Jordy, Sérgio Semeraro; Tilbery, Charles Peter

    2009-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease showing variable clinical presentation. Optic neuritis is the most common symptom, followed by motor and sensitive manifestations. It is known that this disease may be related to several psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In this study we will discribe 5 cases of MS patients harboring psychiatric disorder related or unchained by the disease itself. PMID:19722046

  20. Group Work for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Phyllis A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of group counseling strategies for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Aims to provide counselors with information about pertinent factors related to MS that require careful consideration when employing general group techniques. Looks at group effectiveness, forming the group, and various types of groups, and offers a case…

  1. [Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Godoy, J M; de Oliveira, M A; de Moraes Neto, J B; Balassiano, S L; Montagna, N; Pinto, J R; Skacel, M

    1993-06-01

    The authors report two cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) misdiagnosis (a craniocervical junction disorder, and a cervical spinal cord ependymoma). They review some causes of ALS-like syndrome and propose a protocol to be adopted for the study of all patients who present clinical abnormalities suggesting ALS. PMID:8274087

  2. An Unusual Case of Perinatal Tuberous Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Deeparaj Ganapati; Mondkar, Jayashree; Panchal, Harshad

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a neonate who presented to us with multiple rhabdomyomas of heart, cortical tubers in the brain and skeletal anomalies such as Pierre Robin sequence, bilateral clubfoot and lower small bowel obstruction. Though a diagnosis of neonatal tuberous sclerosis was made, the association of skeletal anomalies and intestinal obstruction was a rare and unusual finding. PMID:25024981

  3. Fructose Malabsorption in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Marie, Isabelle; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Levesque, Hervé; Ménard, Jean-François; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The deleterious effect of fructose, which is increasingly incorporated in many beverages, dairy products, and processed foods, has been described; fructose malabsorption has thus been reported in up to 2.4% of healthy subjects, leading to digestive clinical symptoms (eg, pain, distension, diarrhea). Because digestive involvement is frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we hypothesized that fructose malabsorption could be responsible for intestinal manifestations in these patients. The aims of this prospective study were to: determine the prevalence of fructose malabsorption, in SSc; predict which SSc patients are at risk of developing fructose malabsorption; and assess the outcome of digestive symptoms in SSc patients after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet. Eighty consecutive patients with SSc underwent fructose breath test. All SSc patients also completed a questionnaire on digestive symptoms, and a global symptom score (GSS) was calculated. The prevalence of fructose malabsorption was as high as 40% in SSc patients. We also observed a marked correlation between the presence of fructose malabsorption and: higher values of GSS score of digestive symptoms (P = 0.000004); and absence of delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.007). Furthermore, in SSc patients with fructose malabsorption, the median value of GSS score of digestive symptoms was lower after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet (4 before vs. 1 after; P = 0.0009). Our study underscores that fructose malabsorption often occurs in SSc patients. Our findings are thus relevant for clinical practice, highlighting that fructose breath test is a helpful, noninvasive method by: demonstrating fructose intolerance in patients with SSc; and identifying the group of SSc patients with fructose intolerance who may benefit from low-fructose diet. Interestingly, because the present series also shows that low-fructose diet resulted in a marked decrease of gastrointestinal clinical manifestations

  4. Environmental factors in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pantazou, Vasiliki; Schluep, Myriam; Du Pasquier, Renaud

    2015-04-01

    Although multiple sclerosis (MS) is recognized as a disorder involving the immune system, the interplay of environmental factors and individual genetic susceptibility seems to influence MS onset and clinical expression, as well as therapeutic responsiveness. Multiple human epidemiological and animal model studies have evaluated the effect of different environmental factors, such as viral infections, vitamin intake, sun exposure, or still dietary and life habits on MS prevalence. Previous Epstein-Barr virus infection, especially if this infection occurs in late childhood, and lack of vitamin D (VitD) currently appear to be the most robust environmental factors for the risk of MS, at least from an epidemiological standpoint. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) activates VitD production but there are also some elements supporting the fact that insufficient UVR exposure during childhood may represent a VitD-independent risk factor of MS development, as well as negative effect on the clinical and radiological course of MS. Recently, there has been a growing interest in the gut-brain axis, a bidirectional neuro-hormonal communication system between the intestinal microbiota and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, components of the intestinal microbiota may be pro-inflammatory, promote the migration of immune cells into the CNS, and thus be a key parameter for the development of autoimmune disorders such as MS. Interestingly most environmental factors seem to play a role during childhood. Thus, if childhood is the most fragile period to develop MS later in life, preventive measures should be applied early in life. For example, adopting a diet enriched in VitD, playing outdoor and avoiding passive smoking would be extremely simple measures of primary prevention for public health strategies. However, these hypotheses need to be confirmed by prospective evaluations, which are obviously difficult to conduct. In addition, it remains to be determined whether and how Vit

  5. Fructose Malabsorption in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Isabelle; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Levesque, Hervé; Ménard, Jean-François; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The deleterious effect of fructose, which is increasingly incorporated in many beverages, dairy products, and processed foods, has been described; fructose malabsorption has thus been reported in up to 2.4% of healthy subjects, leading to digestive clinical symptoms (eg, pain, distension, diarrhea). Because digestive involvement is frequent in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we hypothesized that fructose malabsorption could be responsible for intestinal manifestations in these patients. The aims of this prospective study were to: determine the prevalence of fructose malabsorption, in SSc; predict which SSc patients are at risk of developing fructose malabsorption; and assess the outcome of digestive symptoms in SSc patients after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet. Eighty consecutive patients with SSc underwent fructose breath test. All SSc patients also completed a questionnaire on digestive symptoms, and a global symptom score (GSS) was calculated. The prevalence of fructose malabsorption was as high as 40% in SSc patients. We also observed a marked correlation between the presence of fructose malabsorption and: higher values of GSS score of digestive symptoms (P = 0.000004); and absence of delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.007). Furthermore, in SSc patients with fructose malabsorption, the median value of GSS score of digestive symptoms was lower after initiation of standardized low-fructose diet (4 before vs. 1 after; P = 0.0009). Our study underscores that fructose malabsorption often occurs in SSc patients. Our findings are thus relevant for clinical practice, highlighting that fructose breath test is a helpful, noninvasive method by: demonstrating fructose intolerance in patients with SSc; and identifying the group of SSc patients with fructose intolerance who may benefit from low-fructose diet. Interestingly, because the present series also shows that low-fructose diet resulted in a marked decrease of gastrointestinal

  6. Lung Volume Recruitment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Srour, Nadim; LeBlanc, Carole; King, Judy; McKim, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC) and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF) is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. Objectives Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. Methods We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. Results There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9–190.3) and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72–311) over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001) and PCF (p = 0.042). Conclusion Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23383293

  7. Variables associated with patient activation in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goodworth, Marie-Christine R; Stepleman, Lara; Hibbard, Judith; Johns, Lisa; Wright, Dustin; Hughes, Mary D; Williams, Mitzi J

    2016-01-01

    Identifying variables associated with patient activation in the multiple sclerosis population could serve to facilitate better multiple sclerosis self-management behaviors. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 199 participants were recruited from a multiple sclerosis center in the Southeastern United States. Depression, multiple sclerosis quality of life, and multiple Sclerosis self-efficacy were all significantly correlated with patient activation. Results of a hierarchical regression indicated that patient activation was significantly related to educational attainment, depression, and self-efficacy but not to quality of life. The results suggest several possible targets for intervention to increase patient activation, including health literacy, depression symptoms, and self-efficacy for multiple sclerosis disease management. PMID:24591120

  8. Peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype and function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, P J; Compston, D A

    1988-01-01

    T suppressor cell function and phenotype are abnormal in patients with multiple sclerosis, especially during the chronic progressive phase but the sub-populations defined by mitogen stimulation and serological methods may not be identical. In this study, involving 45 patients with multiple sclerosis and 33 controls, there was no correlation between T suppressor function and CD8 cell phenotype in patients with multiple sclerosis or in controls. These phenotypic and functional studies cannot therefore be used interchangeably in the assessment of patients with multiple sclerosis since they provide different information about lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:2976082

  9. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis. PMID:26847090

  10. Multiple sclerosis--new treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, Caterina; Marini, Carmine; Carolei, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Ever since the introduction of the first disease modifying therapies, the concept of multiple sclerosis treatment algorithms developed ceaselessly. The increasing number of available drugs is paralleled by impelling issue of ensuring the most appropriate treatment to the right patient at the right time. The purpose of this review is to describe novel agents recently approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, namely teriflunomide, alemtuzumab and dimethylfumarate, focusing on mechanism of action, efficacy data in experimental setting, safety and tolerability. The place in therapy of newer treatment implies careful balancing of risk-benefit profile as well as accurate patient selection. Hence the widening of therapeutic arsenal provides greater opportunity for personalized therapy but also entails a complex trade-off between efficacy, tolerability, safety and eventually patient preference. PMID:26831413

  11. [Common German language nomenclature for systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Müller-Ladner, U; Burkhardt, H; Distler, J H W; Distler, O; Graninger, W B; Günther, C; Hunzelmann, N; Kiener, H; Sticherling, M; Sunderkötter, C; Walker, U A; Riemekasten, G

    2015-03-01

    Large data bases and the projects arising from them have led to a much improved understanding of systemic sclerosis over the last decade. Serology has developed further so that more autoantibodies are available for routine testing. Capillary microscopy has become standard and relevant progress has also been made in therapy. Many diagnostic terms found in medical documentation do not adequately reflect this progress. The nomenclature is inconsistent and, therefore, confusing. The international classification of diseases (ICD) nomenclature is, from our point of view, also in need of improvement. This article aims to reestablish a common German language standard for systemic sclerosis, which reflects current knowledge and is suitable for implementation in the clinical routine. PMID:25805510

  12. Depression among the Moroccan systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wafki, Fahd; Amine, Bouchra; Ibn Yacoub, Yousra; Laatiriss, Assia; Znat, Fatima; Abouqal, Redouane; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and predictors factors of depression in Moroccan patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), we conducted a cross-sectional study of 59 Moroccan patients with systemic sclerosis. Patients were assessed by using the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale "PHQ-9" and through extensive clinical histories and medical examinations. The Arabic version of HAQ and SF-36 was used to assess functional disability and health status, respectively. Forty-six patients (77.4%) presented symptoms of depression. Thirty six (61%) have a major depressive syndrome and 10 (16.4%) have a minor depressive syndrome. The PHQ-9 score was significantly higher in the patient with prolonged disease duration, severe joint pain, higher disease severity, and important acute-phase reactants. Also, depression had a negative impact on physical and mental scores. Systemic scleroderma is associated with a high prevalence of depression. Screening for depression among patients with SSc is recommended and it should be assessed for routinely. PMID:21629986

  13. Current frontiers in systemic sclerosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ciechomska, Marzena; van Laar, Jacob; O'Reilly, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterised by vascular dysfunction, impaired angiogenesis, inflammation and fibrosis. There is no currently accepted disease-modifying treatment with only autologous stem cell transplant showing clinically meaningful benefit. The lack of treatment options reflects our lack of understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms occurring in the disease. Recent investigations have begun to decipher the molecular pathways underpinning the different aspects of the disease and may provide a rational clinical target(s). Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of the disease is important in understanding systemic sclerosis treatment. The aim of this review was to examine the current thinking in SSc pathogenesis and will offer novel areas for research which may yield novel therapeutics. PMID:25712746

  14. Update in vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Fatimah M

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease, and its etiology remains unknown. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the possible association between MS and vitamin D deficiency. Here, we review the current literature between MS and vitamin D, showing clear evidence that vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for MS despite the lack of direct evidence for the effects of vitamin D in MS progression. PMID:26492110

  15. Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jill; Derk, Chris T.

    2011-01-01

    Gastric antral vascular ectasia is a not so well-understood, and more rare, gastrointestinal manifestation of Systemic Sclerosis which can lead to chronic anemia. A high suspicion and better understanding of this rare manifestation is needed for early detection and treatment. Therapeutic regiments include iron supplementation with acid suppressive therapy, while endoscopic intervention has been shown to be successful in most cases, with gastrectomy or antrectomy rarely needed. PMID:22121374

  16. Progressive multiple sclerosis: characteristics and management.

    PubMed

    Hawker, Kathleen

    2011-05-01

    Progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) consists of 3 phenotypic subtypes: secondary progressive MS, primary progressive MS, and progressive relapsing MS. There has been a paucity of approved treatments for these subtypes possibly driven by irreversible neurodegeneration within the central nervous system and not amenable to drugs that target inflammation. This article reviews magnetic resonance imaging and clinical data that show that progression may occur early in the course of MS and specific subsets of progressive patients may respond to disease modifying drugs. PMID:21439451

  17. Update in vitamin D and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Fatimah M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease, and its etiology remains unknown. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the possible association between MS and vitamin D deficiency. Here, we review the current literature between MS and vitamin D, showing clear evidence that vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for MS despite the lack of direct evidence for the effects of vitamin D in MS progression. PMID:26492110

  18. Current developments in pharmacogenomics of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Rebecca J; Doucette, J Ronald; Nazarali, Adil J

    2014-11-01

    Pharmacogenomics has a significant potential to impact how we treat diseases. It involves targeting genetically identifiable populations with therapeutic interventions that promises to yield immediate positive health outcomes with lower or no side effects. The 'trial and error' method of treatment will no longer be necessary with the successful implementation of personalized medicine. The following is an overview of some new developments in pharmacogenomics of multiple sclerosis, and how it has the potential to improve future treatment. PMID:25118615

  19. Diagnosis and management of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calabresi, Peter A

    2004-11-15

    Multiple sclerosis, an idiopathic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, is characterized pathologically by demyelination and subsequent axonal degeneration. The disease commonly presents in young adults and affects twice as many women as men. Common presenting symptoms include numbness, weakness, visual impairment, loss of balance, dizziness, urinary bladder urgency, fatigue, and depression. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis should be made by a physician with experience in identifying the disease. Diagnosis should be based on objective evidence of two or more neurologic signs that are localized to the brain or spinal cord and are disseminated in time and space (i.e., occur in different parts of the central nervous system at least three months apart). Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium contrast, especially during or following a first attack, can be helpful in providing evidence of lesions in other parts of the brain and spinal cord. A second magnetic resonance scan may be useful at least three months after the initial attack to identify new lesions and provide evidence of dissemination over time. It is critical to exclude other diseases that can mimic multiple sclerosis, including vascular disease, spinal cord compression, vitamin B12 deficiency, central nervous system infection (e.g., Lyme disease, syphilis), and other inflammatory conditions (e.g., sarcoidosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome). Symptom-specific drugs can relieve spasticity, bladder dysfunction, depression, and fatigue. Five disease-modifying treatments for multiple sclerosis have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These treatments are partially effective in reducing exacerbations and may slow progression of disability. PMID:15571060

  20. Recurrent bleeding of angiomyolipomas in tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, T; Heindel, W; Vorreuther, R; Engelmann, U; Lackner, K

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic problems of renal hamartomas are illustrated by a case of recurrence of bleeding angiomyolipomas associated with tuberous sclerosis. Ultrasound and computed tomography provide clear evidence of lipomatous formation while, in rare instances, angiography can demonstrate the existence of multiple vascular tumor compartments. In view of the risk of bleeding, multiple or very large angiomyolipomas should be treated by interventional radiology in the form of superselective tumor embolization or by the most conservative surgery possible. PMID:8903555

  1. Clustering of multiple sclerosis in Galion, Ohio, 1982-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, T.H. )

    1989-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that the outbreak of 30-40 cases of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating syndromes in Galion, Ohio, USA, during 1982-1985 was related to an excess concentration of heavy-metal wastes, especially of cadmium and chromium in sewage and river water. Both multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed by board-certified neurologists.

  2. Disconnection as a Mechanism for Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, R. A.; Vilisaar, J.; Hlinka, J.; Bradshaw, C. M.; Morgan, P. S.; Constantinescu, C. S.; Auer, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been…

  3. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  4. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: A Roadmap for Future Research.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Investigators from the NINDS and the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance sponsored a workshop in March 2015, which joined basic scientists and clinicians with expertise in various aspects of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), in order to assess the current state of TSC research and to set future goals. PMID:27617567

  5. Neuroepileptic Correlates of Autistic Symptomatology in Tuberous Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Patrick F.

    2004-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is a genetic condition that is strongly associated with the development of an autism spectrum disorder. However, there is marked variability in expression, and only a subset of children with tuberous sclerosis develop autism spectrum disorder. Clarification of the mechanisms that underlie the association and variability in…

  6. Temporal lobe lesions and psychosis in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, R; Zigmond, A S

    2010-01-01

    Lesions in the temporal lobe are associated with psychiatric manifestations in multiple sclerosis. The authors describe this case of a young man with multiple sclerosis who presented with first-episode psychosis and had acute lesions in the temporal lobe. He was successfully treated with olanzapine and β-interferon. PMID:22789690

  7. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-A Deadly Complication of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A; Epps, Matthew; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease with limited therapeutic options. Moreover, when PAH occurs in patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, worse outcomes are observed. The purpose of this review is to discuss the etiologies of PAH found in the systemic sclerosis patient, limitations of current medical therapies, and, finally, potential therapies for patients with this combination. PMID:23626904

  8. [Seizure and Bourneville tuberous sclerosis: think about insulinoma].

    PubMed

    Le Berre, J-P; Bey Boeglin, M; Duverger, V; Garcia, C; Bordier, L; Dupuy, O; Mayaudon, H; Bauduceau, B

    2009-02-01

    Bourneville tuberous sclerosis is a phacomatosis characterized by skin, neurological and ophthalmological lesions. At first, seizure can reveal cerebral lesions, but other causes may be suspected. We report a case of a Bourneville tuberous sclerosis in a 41-year-old-man with hypoglycemia leading to seizures, resulting from an insulinoma. PMID:18539363

  9. [The role of vitamin D in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kfoczyńska, Medea; Kucharska, Alicja; Sińska, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease which affects the central nervous system and is linked to autoimmune disorders. Although the precise causes of multiple sclerosis remain unknown, some evidence points towards hypovitaminosis D. Apart from the maintenance of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, vitamin D also plays a major role in other aspects of human health. It is caused by the vitamin D receptor, which is present in many human organs and tissues. Vitamin D is an immunomodulating factor and accordingly has a potential to be effective in both preventing and treating autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. The aim of this review was to present up-to-date knowledge about vitamin D, especially its impact on risk of multiple sclerosis onset, relapses, and potential to modify the immune response. A further objective was to describe the role of vitamin D supplementation and its provision in the everyday diet for both prevention and treatment of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25897104

  10. "Disease modifying nutricals" for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Katja; Barthelmes, Julia; Stolz, Leonie; Beyer, Susanne; Diehl, Olaf; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    The association between vitamin D and multiple sclerosis has (re)-opened new interest in nutrition and natural compounds in the prevention and treatment of this neuroinflammatory disease. The dietary amount and type of fat, probiotics and biologicals, salmon proteoglycans, phytoestrogens and protease inhibitor of soy, sodium chloride and trace elements, and fat soluble vitamins including D, A and E were all considered as disease-modifying nutraceuticals. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice suggest that poly-unsaturated fatty acids and their 'inflammation-resolving' metabolites and the gut microflora may reduce auto-aggressive immune cells and reduce progression or risk of relapse, and infection with whipworm eggs may positively change the gut-brain communication. Encouraged by the recent interest in multiple sclerosis-nutrition nature's pharmacy has been searched for novel compounds with anti-inflammatory, immune-modifying and antioxidative properties, the most interesting being the scorpion toxins that inhibit specific potassium channels of T cells and antioxidative compounds including the green tea flavonoid epigallocatechin-3-gallate, curcumin and the mustard oil glycoside from e.g. broccoli and sulforaphane. They mostly also inhibit pro-inflammatory signaling through NF-κB or toll-like receptors and stabilize the blood brain barrier. Disease modifying functions may also complement analgesic and anti-spastic effects of cannabis, its constituents, and of 'endocannabinoid enhancing' drugs or nutricals like inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase. Nutricals will not solve multiple sclerosis therapeutic challenges but possibly support pharmacological interventions or unearth novel structures. PMID:25435020

  11. Vascular involvement in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Debendra; Brown, Monica; Postlethwaite, Arnold E

    2011-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an acquired multiorgan connective tissue disease with variable mortality and morbidity dictated by clinical subset type. The etiology of the basic disease and pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmunity, fibrosis, and fibroproliferative vasculopathy are unknown and debated. In this review, the spectrum of vascular abnormalities and the options currently available to treat the vascular manifestations of SSc are discussed. Also discussed is how the hallmark pathologies (ie, how autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis of the disease) might be effected and interconnected with modulatory input from lysophospholipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate, and lysophosphatidic acid. PMID:22096374

  12. Quantifying Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Neil G; Turner, Martin R; Vucic, Steve; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shefner, Jeremy; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) exhibits characteristic variability of onset and rate of disease progression, with inherent clinical heterogeneity making disease quantitation difficult. Recent advances in understanding pathogenic mechanisms linked to the development of ALS impose an increasing need to develop strategies to predict and more objectively measure disease progression. This review explores phenotypic and genetic determinants of disease progression in ALS, and examines established and evolving biomarkers that may contribute to robust measurement in longitudinal clinical studies. With targeted neuroprotective strategies on the horizon, developing efficiencies in clinical trial design may facilitate timely entry of novel treatments into the clinic. PMID:25223628

  13. Improving reporting of multiple sclerosis relapse.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Megan; Lush, Tessa; Pohorely, John

    Many people with multiple sclerosis do not report a relapse. When it is reported, it is not always recorded in their notes. This can mean patients do not always have the most appropriate treatment. This article reviews some of the reasons why relapse reports are lacking and how the problem could be addressed. As a result, the decision was made to develop an app that patients could use to record their symptoms and wellbeing over time, to help identify and record relapses. Information could then be passed to their health professional via email, if desired. PMID:26775329

  14. MRI differential diagnosis of suspected multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, J J; Carletti, F; Young, V; Mckean, D; Quaghebeur, G

    2016-09-01

    Diagnosing multiple sclerosis (MS) can be very challenging owing to its variable clinical features and lack of a definitive test. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a core diagnostic tool in the detection of MS lesions and demonstration of spatial and temporal distribution of disease. Moreover, MRI plays a crucial role in the exclusion of alternative diagnoses of MS. The aim of this review is to describe the typical MRI features of MS and to present a series of common mimics of MS with emphasis on their distinguishing features from MS. PMID:27349475

  15. [Update on Current Care Guideline: Multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Remes, Anne; Airas, Laura; Atula, Sari; Färkkilä, Markus; Hartikainen, Päivi; Koivisto, Keijo; Mäenpää, Eliisa; Ruutiainen, Juhani; Sumelahti, Marja-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is initiated upon fulfillment of new McDonald 2010 criteria for RRMS. In addition, lumbar puncture is an essential diagnostic method. Interferon-β, dimethyl fumarate, glatiramer acetate and teriflunomide are the first-line immunomodulating drugs (IMD) for RRMS. If the disease is active according to clinical or MRI evaluation during the first-line IMD treatment, alemtuzumab, fingolimod or natalizumab may be considered as second-line therapies. IMD treatment is discontinued upon the transition of RRMS to secondary progressive phase. Rehabilitation should be considered at every phase of the disease. PMID:26237913

  16. Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Robyn M; Byrne, Scott N; Correale, Jorge; Ilschner, Susanne; Hart, Prue H

    2015-10-01

    There is compelling epidemiological evidence that the risk of developing multiple sclerosis is increased in association with low levels of sun exposure, possibly because this is associated with low vitamin D status. Recent work highlights both vitamin D and non-vitamin D effects on cellular immunity that suggests that higher levels of sun exposure and/or vitamin D status are beneficial for both MS risk and in ameliorating disease progression. Here we review this recent evidence, focusing on regulatory cells, dendritic cells, and chemokines and cytokines released from the skin following exposure to ultraviolet radiation. PMID:26477548

  17. Developing a community multiple sclerosis nursing service.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Debbie; Adams, John

    2014-05-20

    Reforms to the NHS following the passing of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 have created new purchaser organisations with responsibility for planning the configuration of healthcare services in their geographic areas. If a community multiple sclerosis (MS) nursing service is to survive in this environment, it must demonstrate its ability to contribute to achieving the purchaser organisations' objectives. Evaluation data, such as hospital admission avoidance and patient satisfaction, will be crucial in demonstrating the community MS nursing service's clinical and economic effectiveness. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis of the issues facing a community MS service in this environment is provided. PMID:24823591

  18. [Dissociated sensory loss syndrome in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Peres Serra, J; Martínez Yélamos, S; Ballabriga Planas, J; Basart Tarrats, E; Arbizu Urdiain, T

    1994-01-01

    Spatial and temporal dissemination of demyelinating lesions continue to provide the basis for diagnosing multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe 20 patients (from a series of 234 with MS) who experienced flare-ups consistent with sensory suspension syndrome (SSS). The presence of syringomyelic cavities (non communicating syringomyelia) was ruled out by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR). We discuss the possible locations of lesions responsible for this syndrome: the trigeminus, dorsal root entry zones, anterior medullary white matter, and the mid-lateral portion of the spinothalamic tract. MS should be included as a differential diagnosis in young patients presenting with SSS. PMID:8086185

  19. Multiple sclerosis with caudate lesions on MRI.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, S; Ogasawara, N; Mine, H; Kawachi, Y

    2001-04-01

    A 31-year-old woman displayed sleepiness and impairment of recent memory. T2-weighted MRI revealed high signal intensity lesions in the bilateral basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem. Although remission was achieved with corticosteroid therapy, she again displayed memory dysfunction and emotional disturbance one year later, at which time MRI disclosed new lesions in the right caudate nucleus and left frontal white matter. Corticosteroid therapy lead to improvement, and she suffered no recurrence on maintenance steroid therapy. These findings suggest that caudate lesions do occur in multiple sclerosis, the manifestations of which can be abulia and memory dysfunction, as in the present case. PMID:11334400

  20. Heterogeneity versus homogeneity of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Martinez, Nicholas E; Omura, Seiichi; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The 10th International Congress of Neuroimmunology, including the 10th European School of Neuroimmunology Course, was held by the International Society of Neuroimmunology in Sitges (Barcelona, Spain) on 26–30 October 2010. The conference covered a wide spectrum of issues and challenges in both basic science and clinical aspects of neuroimmunology. Data and ideas were shared through a variety of programs, including review talks and poster sessions. One of the topics of the congress was whether multiple sclerosis is a homogenous or heterogenous disease, clinically and pathologically, throughout its course. PMID:21426254

  1. Systemic Sclerosis with Multiple Pulmonary Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Parinita; Reddy, Venkata Siva Prasad; Sharma, Tarun; Salim, Nabil Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune multisystem disorder characterized by endothelial dysfunction and fibroblast dysfunction, which results in progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs more frequently the lungs and gastro intestinal tract. Pulmonary involvement is common in the course of SSc, with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) and Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) being the leading causes of death. Here we report, case of an elderly female patient presenting with Diffuse SSc with multiple uncommon pulmonary manifestations like ILD with Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) pattern (usually less common), PAH and right sided pleural effusion. PMID:27504339

  2. Monthly distribution of multiple sclerosis patients' births

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharanidharan, Padmanabhan

    As part of an integrated geographical and environmental epidemiological study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Budapest's Pesterzsébet district, many biometeorological variables were specifically examined. Also, the monthly distribution of birthdates of MS patients resident in the district was plotted. Patients reliably diagnosed with MS were found to have been born in greater numbers in the months of April and October, precisely 6 months apart. This finding indicates the presence of natural non-genetic factors in the creation of MS susceptibility, affecting the nervous system at the crucial time of myelination.

  3. Is there a pulse wave encephalopathy component to multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Juurlink, Bernhard H J

    2015-01-01

    The dominant hypothesis in multiple sclerosis is that it is an autoimmune disease; however, there is considerable evidence that the immune attack on myelin may be secondary to a cytodegenerative event. Furthermore, the immune modulating therapies longest in clinical use, although modulating the frequency and severity of exacerbation, do not affect long-term progression towards disability. Clearly alternative perspectives on the etiology of multiple sclerosis are warranted. In this paper I outline the commonalities between idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and multiple sclerosis. These include decreased intracranial compliance as evidenced by increased cerebrospinal fluid volume and velocity of cerebrospinal fluid flow through the cerebral aqueduct; increased ventricular volume; periventricular demyelination lesions; increase in size of Virchow-Robin spaces; presence of Hakim's triad comprised of locomotory disabilities, cognitive problems and bladder control problems. Furthermore, multiple sclerosis is associated with decreased arterial compliance. These are all suggestive that there is a pulse wave encephalopathy component to multiple sclerosis. There are enough resemblances between normal pressure hydrocephalus and multiple sclerosis to warrant further investigation. Whether decreases in intracranial compliance is a consequence of multiple sclerosis or is a causal factor is unknown. Effective therapies can only be developed when the etiology of the disease is understood. PMID:25760216

  4. The cost of multiple sclerosis in Norway.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, B; Myhr, K-M; Nyland, H; Aarseth, J H

    2012-02-01

    Health economic aspects have been increasingly important during introduction of new treatments for multiple sclerosis. As a partial response for Norway, a cost-of-illness study was carried out to estimate the yearly cost of the illness to society and relate costs and patients' quality of life to illness severity. Estimated cost to society was Euro 439 million in 2002 exclusive of the cost of reduced quality of life. The cost per patient was close to Euro 65,000. Account taken of methodological differences, the results compare to results for Sweden, Norway's closest neighboring country. The illness reduced patients' quality of life with 0.26. More patients were early retired because of their MS in Norway than in any of nine other European countries comprised by a recent European study, illustrating a liberal practice in Norway. The Norwegian cost of unpaid assistance was almost identical to the Swedish cost that was the lowest found across the countries in the European study. When related to illness severity, the cost per patient increased, and the patients' experienced quality of life decreased with increasing EDSS levels in line with what has been found for other countries. Cost-of-MS studies have been carried out for a number of countries. Together they contribute to our understanding of the economic consequences of multiple sclerosis and, if their results are related to illness severity, also provide valuable information for further economic analyses of treatment and medication. Our study adds to this. PMID:21080024

  5. Job satisfaction among multiple sclerosis certified nurses.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Elsie E; Halper, June; Costello, Kathleen

    2007-08-01

    Several studies document high levels of job satisfaction among certified nurses, but no study has examined job satisfaction and factors influencing job satisfaction of certified multiple sclerosis (MS) nurses. This study tested a theoretical model proposing that two organizational factors, colleague relationships and benefits, will predict job satisfaction. Job satisfaction was represented by four factors: autonomy, professional status, professional growth, and time efficiency. Participants included MS nurses certified for 6 months or more practicing mostly in three countries (Canada, Great Britain, and the United States) who anonymously completed the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale, an overall job satisfaction rating, and demographic information. Findings indicate that colleague relationships and benefits significantly estimated organization structure and that autonomy, professional status, professional growth, and time efficiency significantly estimated job satisfaction; furthermore, organization factors such as colleague relationships and benefits significantly predict job satisfaction. Among the countries, several statistically significant differences were observed between job satisfaction factors as well as items in both organization and job satisfaction subscales. Average factor scores among the countries were mostly rated satisfactory. The International Organization of Multiple Sclerosis Nurses Executive Board plans to use the study findings to see how it needs to focus efforts as an organization toward enhancing and standardizing MS care and develop MS nurse professionalism worldwide. PMID:17847673

  6. Update on treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Michel, Laure; Larochelle, Catherine; Prat, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    While there is no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS), numerous disease-modifying drugs are now available to treat MS patients. In fact, the therapeutic strategies are now more and more complex, directly impacting the management of patients. Despite the good safety profile of the first-line immunomodulatory drugs, the clinical response is often suboptimal. Important questions remain about the right timing to switch for a second-line agent and whether escalation therapy is an appropriate therapeutic strategy. In this review, we conducted a systematic search by PubMed using the terms: treatment, multiple sclerosis, therapeutic, DMT and treatment response. Randomized trials and reviews addressing MS, DMTs and management strategies were selected and included in this review. Herein, we present the currently approved and emerging drugs used for the treatment of MS with their relative benefit/risk profiles, and their respective positions in the therapeutic arsenal. We then focused on the different therapeutic strategies and criteria available to evaluate the response to disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). PMID:25813102

  7. [Spatial contrast sensitivity in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Vighetto, A; Grochowicki, M; Cousin, J

    1990-01-01

    Spatial contrast sensitivity was measured in 110 patients with multiple sclerosis (definite = 72, probable = 22, possible = 16) as part of a routine evaluation in a neuro-ophthalmological clinic. Results were compared with those of 37 normal controls matched for age. The test was abnormal in 71 p. 100 of patients. Contrast sensitivity was attenuated for 97 p. 100 of the eyes with optic neuritis and visual acuity drop, for 60 p. 100 of the eyes with recovered optic neuritis and for 36 p. 100 of the non affected eyes in the cases of unilateral optic neuritis. Among the 57 patients with normal visual acuity and no history of optic neuritis, 62 p. 100 had abnormal findings. Globally, contrast sensitivity was reduced on the whole spatial frequency range in cases of current optic neuritis, and mostly on the high or high and medium frequencies in the other cases. Our study confirms that spatial contrast sensitivity is the most sensitive of psychophysical methods to detect subclinical visual impairement in multiple sclerosis. Comparison with VEP's was performed in 66 patients. Both tests were roughly equally sensitive, but findings were concordant in only 63 p. 100 of the cases. The use of both VEP's and spatial contrast sensitivity increases the detection of latent optic neuritis. PMID:2359900

  8. Update on rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Donzé, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    Given that mobility impairment is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis, people with this disease are likely to benefit from rehabilitation therapy throughout the course of their illness. The review provides an update on rehabilitation focused on balance and walking impairment. Classical rehabilitation focusing on muscle rehabilitation, neurotherapeutic facilitation is effective and recommended. Other techniques did not prove their superiority: transcutaneal neurostimulation, repetitive magnetic stimulation, electromagnetic therapy, whole body vibration and robot-assisted gait rehabilitation and need more studies to conclude. Cooling therapy, hydrotherapy, orthoses and textured insoles could represent a complementary service to other techniques in specific conditions. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation program provides positive effects and high satisfaction for patients with multiple sclerosis but needs more evaluation. New technologies using serious game and telerehabilitation seem to be an interesting technique to promote physical activity, self-management and quality of life. Rehabilitation like other therapy needs regular clinical evaluation to adapt the program and propose appropriate techniques. Moreover, the objective of rehabilitation needs to be decided with the patient with realistic expectation. PMID:25746432

  9. The present efficacy of multiple sclerosis therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Klawiter, Eric C.; Cross, Anne H.; Naismith, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    A challenge for the clinician treating patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is to determine the most effective treatment while weighing the benefits and risks. Results of the phase 2 and phase 3 studies on natalizumab were received with great interest, in part due to the “improved” risk reduction for relapse rate, disease progression, and MRI metrics observed in comparison to results in trials of beta-interferon and glatiramer acetate. However, comparison across trials is invalid, in large part due to differences in the study populations. The increased efficacy observed in more recent trials has also been attributed to a fundamental change in subjects with MS enrolled in recent trials compared with the prior decade. In this article, we debate the relative efficacy of natalizumab vs the older injectable therapies. GLOSSARY ARR = absolute risk reduction; CIS = clinically isolated syndrome; DMT = disease-modulating therapy; EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; GA = glatiramer acetate; IFN = interferon; MS = multiple sclerosis; NNT = number needed to treat; PML = progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy; RRMS = relapsing-remitting MS; RRR = relative risk reduction. PMID:19770475

  10. Supporting work for people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Doogan, Catherine; Playford, E Diane

    2014-05-01

    People with multiple sclerosis experience some of the highest rates of unemployment among groups of individuals with severe and chronic disabilities. While unpredictable relapses, physical and cognitive symptoms all may play a role in job loss, it is more likely that job loss can be attributed to a complex interaction between disease-related factors and contextual factors, such as the working environment, and employer attitudes. This interaction leads to the concept of work instability, that is, the mismatch between work demands and the individual's capacity to meet these demands. Vocational rehabilitation services aim to provide people with multiple sclerosis vocational assessment, rehabilitation and support to enable them to find, regain or remain in work and access other occupational and educational opportunities. Such services consist of a multidisciplinary team with the ability to provide education around disclosure, and work-place accommodations, offer emotional support, maintain work performance, liaise with employers, and support to re-enter the workplace. Helpful interventions include early disclosure, proper workplace accommodation, education of employers, and government-funded initiatives to support disabled employees. Future research needs to agree on methods of recording outcomes and evaluate specific vocational rehabilitation interventions. PMID:24526662

  11. Pregnancy in Multiple Sclerosis: A Questionnaire Study

    PubMed Central

    Borisow, Nadja; Paul, Friedemann; Ohlraun, Stephanie; Pach, Daniel; Fischer, Felix; Dörr, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) preferentially affects females at childbearing age. For this reason patients and treating physicians were frequently confronted with questions concerning family planning, pregnancy and birth. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the expertise about pregnancy related topics in multiple sclerosis of neurologists in private practice. Methods We developed a survey with 16 multiple choice questions about pregnancy related topics and sent it to neurologists in private practice in Berlin, Germany. Results 56 completed questionnaires were sent back. 54% of all questions were answered correctly, 21% of the questions were answered with “I don’t know”. Correct answers were more often given by physicians who treat more than 400 MS patients per year (p = 0.001). Further positive associations were found for assumed relevance of the topic (p = 0.002) and the degree of counseling (p<0.001). Conclusion To provide a comprehensive counseling, MS patients with desire for children should be counseled by physicians with a lot of experience in MS treatment. PMID:24901447

  12. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: one or multiple causes?

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Aline Furtado; Orsini, Marco; Machado, Dionis; Mello, Mariana Pimentel; Nader, Sergio; Silva, Júlio Guilherme; da Silva Catharino, Antonio M.; de Freitas, Marcos R.G.; Pereira, Alessandra; Pessoa, Luciane Lacerda; Sztajnbok, Flavio R.; Leite, Marco Araújo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2011-01-01

    The Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common form of motor neuron disease in the adulthood, and it is characterized by rapid and progressive compromise of the upper and lower motor neurons. The majority of the cases of ALS are classified as sporadic and, until now, a specific cause for these cases still is unknown. To present the different hypotheses on the etiology of ALS. It was carried out a search in the databases: Bireme, Scielo and Pubmed, in the period of 1987 to 2011, using the following keywords: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, motor neuron disease, etiology, causes and epidemiology and its similar in Portuguese and Spanish. It did not have consensus as regards the etiology of ALS. Researches demonstrates evidences as regards intoxication by heavy metals, environmental and occupational causes, genetic mutations (superoxide dismutase 1), certain viral infections and the accomplishment of vigorous physical activity for the development of the disease. There is still no consensus regarding the involved factors in the etiology of ALS. In this way, new research about these etiologies are necessary, for a better approach of the patients, promoting preventive programs for the disease and improving the quality of life of the patients. PMID:21785676

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, S; Knorr, C; Geiger, H; Flachenecker, P

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed characteristics, motivation, and effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in a large sample of people with multiple sclerosis. A 53-item survey was mailed to the members of the German Multiple Sclerosis Society, chapter of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Surveys of 1573 patients (48.5 +/- 11.7 years, 74% women, duration of illness 18.1 +/- 10.5 years) were analyzed. In comparison with conventional medicine, more patients displayed a positive attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine (44% vs 38%, P < 0.05), with 70% reporting lifetime use of at least one method. Among a wide variety of complementary and alternative medicine, diet modification (41%), Omega-3 fatty acids (37%), removal of amalgam fillings (28%), vitamins E (28%), B (36%), and C (28%), homeopathy (26%), and selenium (24%) were cited most frequently. Most respondents (69%) were satisfied with the effects of complementary and alternative medicine. Use of complementary and alternative medicine was associated with religiosity, functional independence, female sex, white-collar job, and higher education (P < 0.05). Compared with conventional therapies, complementary and alternative medicine rarely showed unwanted side effects (9% vs 59%, P < 0.00001). A total of 52% stated that the initial consultation with their physician lasted less than 15 min. To conclude, main reasons for the use of complementary and alternative medicine include the high rate of side effects and low levels of satisfaction with conventional treatments and brief patients/physicians contacts. PMID:18632773

  14. Update on immunopathogenesis and immunotherapy in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Selter, Rebecca C; Hemmer, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Both genetic and environmental factors are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Histopathological findings suggest that multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated disease, involving both the cellular and humoral immune systems. Within the last 20 years, several disease-modifying therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis were established. Moreover, promising new substances are currently being tested in clinical trials and will likely broaden the therapeutic opportunities available within the upcoming years.

  15. A biopsychosocial model of resilience for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Black, Rebecca; Dorstyn, Diana

    2015-11-01

    The concept of resilience remains under-researched in the multiple sclerosis literature. Consequently, current understanding of the unique and joint contribution of disability-specific variables, cognitive-behavioural skills and social resources to this dynamic process is limited. A holistic model of resilience was therefore developed and tested. Results of an online survey completed by 196 adults with multiple sclerosis revealed both direct and indirect pathways to resilience, with positive affect and self-efficacy being the strongest predictors. The findings lend support to psychological interventions which focus on promoting the personal resources and assets needed to cope effectively with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24323335

  16. Temporal Lobe Sclerosis Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Neuropathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Maria; Eriksson, Sofia; Martinian, Lillian; Caboclo, Luis O.; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Duncan, John S.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2009-01-01

    Widespread changes involving neocortical as well as mesial temporal lobe structures can be present in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). The incidence, pathology and clinical significance of neocortical temporal lobe sclerosis (TLS) are not well characterized. We identified TLS in 30 out of 272 surgically treated cases of HS. TLS was defined by variable reduction of neurons from cortical layers II/III and laminar gliosis; it was typically accompanied by additional architectural abnormalities of layer II, i.e. abnormal neuronal orientation and aggregation. Quantitative analysis including tessellation methods for the distribution of layer II neurons supported these observations. In 40% of cases there was a gradient of TLS with more severe involvement towards the temporal pole, possibly signifying involvement of hippocampal projection pathways. There was a history of a febrile seizure as an initial precipitating injury in 73% of patients with TLS compared to 36% without TLS; no other clinical differences TLS and non-TLS cases were identified. TLS was not evident pre-operatively by neuroimaging. No obvious effect of TLS on seizure outcome was noted after temporal lobe resection; 73% became seizure-free at 2 year follow up. In conclusion, approximately 11% of surgically treated HS is accompanied by TLS. TLS is likely an acquired process with accompanying re-organizational dysplasia and an extension of mesial temporal sclerosis rather than a separate pathological entity. PMID:19606061

  17. Postsecondary Education for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Issues and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagodich, Nancy L.; Wolfe, Pamela S.; Boone, Rosalie S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes characteristics of multiple sclerosis and the implications of its manifestations for postsecondary education. Provides a checklist for students selecting a postsecondary institution regarding general considerations, academic accommodations, support and services, and self-assessment. (SK)

  18. Automatic memory processes in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Grafman, J; Rao, S; Bernardin, L; Leo, G J

    1991-10-01

    To better understand the nature of the memory deficit in patients with multiple sclerosis, we designed a study to compare automatic vs effortful memory processes. Forty-one patients with definite multiple sclerosis and 45 demographically matched normal control subjects were administered two tasks designed to assess both automatic (monitoring frequency and modality) and effortful (free and cued-recall) processing. Results indicated that patients with multiple sclerosis, as expected, were significantly impaired on memory measures requiring effort, but performed normally on automatic measures. Performance on the memory indexes did not correlate with self-reported depression. The implications of these findings for delineating the locus of the memory impairment in multiple sclerosis is discussed. PMID:1929900

  19. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  20. Autism Phenotypes in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Diagnostic and Treatment Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Tanjala T; Poretti, Andrea; Thomas, Emily A; Jenkins, Kosunique T; Desai, Sonal; Johnston, Michael V

    2015-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a multisystem, chronic genetic condition characterized by systemic growth of benign tumors and often accompanied by epilepsy, autism spectrum disorders, and intellectual disability. Nonetheless, the neurodevelopmental phenotype of these patients is not often detailed. The authors describe 3 individuals with tuberous sclerosis complex who share common characteristics that can help to identify a distinct profile of autism spectrum disorder. These findings include typical cognitive development, expressive and pragmatic language deficits, and anxiety. The authors also describe features specific to tuberous sclerosis complex that require consideration before diagnosing an autism spectrum disorder. Identifying distinct profiles of autism spectrum disorder in tuberous sclerosis complex can help optimize treatment across the life span. PMID:26303410

  1. Melatonin Contributes to the Seasonality of Multiple Sclerosis Relapses.

    PubMed

    Farez, Mauricio F; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Méndez-Huergo, Santiago P; Yeste, Ada; Murugaiyan, Gopal; Garo, Lucien P; Balbuena Aguirre, María E; Patel, Bonny; Ysrraelit, María C; Zhu, Chen; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Quintana, Francisco J; Correale, Jorge

    2015-09-10

    Seasonal changes in disease activity have been observed in multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder that affects the CNS. These epidemiological observations suggest that environmental factors influence the disease course. Here, we report that melatonin levels, whose production is modulated by seasonal variations in night length, negatively correlate with multiple sclerosis activity in humans. Treatment with melatonin ameliorates disease in an experimental model of multiple sclerosis and directly interferes with the differentiation of human and mouse T cells. Melatonin induces the expression of the repressor transcription factor Nfil3, blocking the differentiation of pathogenic Th17 cells and boosts the generation of protective Tr1 cells via Erk1/2 and the transactivation of the IL-10 promoter by ROR-α. These results suggest that melatonin is another example of how environmental-driven cues can impact T cell differentiation and have implications for autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26359987

  2. [Uncommon presentation of tuberous sclerosis in an infant].

    PubMed

    Denne, C; Gerstl, E-M; Mayer, K; Steinborn, M; Hahn, H; Burdach, S

    2011-06-01

    We report on an infant with an unusual presentation of tuberous sclerosis. After uncomplicated birth, a routine ultrasound was performed because the patient's brother had undergone nephrectomy at the age of four months due to multicystic renal dysplasia. All other family members were healthy. Multiple renal cysts were found in the boy's left kidney. The right kidney, which was normal initially, showed cysts after a few months. In a follow-up sonography at the age of 10 months, we found an aortic aneurysm measuring 4 × 7 cm. A brain NMR showed typical signs of tuberous sclerosis. Aortic aneurysm is very rarely associated with tuberous sclerosis. As a TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome was excluded, in this case the child probably has two different diseases, i.e. tuberous sclerosis in addition to phenotypically unusual multicystic renal dysplasia. PMID:21514802

  3. Axillary vein thrombosis in adolescent onset systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leak, A; Patel, K J; Tuddenham, E G; Pearson, J D; Woo, P

    1990-01-01

    A 16 year old girl with a two year history of systemic sclerosis developed left axillary vein thrombosis. Prolonged euglobulin clot lysis time, anti-endothelial cell antibodies, and raised von Willebrand factor antigen were shown. Images PMID:2383084

  4. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lowerPomcbut higherAgrpmRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic lateral

  5. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-01-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype. PMID:6787085

  6. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-06-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype. PMID:6787085

  7. Myelin regeneration in multiple sclerosis: targeting endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Fancy, Stephen P J; Zhao, Chao; Rowitch, David H; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J M

    2011-10-01

    Regeneration of myelin sheaths (remyelination) after central nervous system demyelination is important to restore saltatory conduction and to prevent axonal loss. In multiple sclerosis, the insufficiency of remyelination leads to the irreversible degeneration of axons and correlated clinical decline. Therefore, a regenerative strategy to encourage remyelination may protect axons and improve symptoms in multiple sclerosis. We highlight recent studies on factors that influence endogenous remyelination and potential promising pharmacological targets that may be considered for enhancing central nervous system remyelination. PMID:21904791

  8. Autoantibodies in Systemic Sclerosis: Unanswered Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Cristiane; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular abnormalities, and cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Serum autoantibodies directed to multiple intracellular antigens are present in more than 95% of patients and are considered a hallmark of SSc. They are helpful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of SSc and are associated with distinctive clinical manifestations. With the advent of more sensitive, multiplexed immunoassays, new and old questions about the relevance of autoantibodies in SSc are emerging. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in SSc emphasizing the more recently published data. Moreover, we will summarize recent advances regarding the stability of SSc autoantibodies over the course of disease, whether they are mutually exclusive and their potential roles in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:25926833

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, J.S.; Narayana, P.A.; Fenstermacher, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Regional in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides quantitative data on selected chemical constituents of brain. We imaged 16 volunteers with clinically definite multiple sclerosis on a 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanner to define plaque-containing volumes of interest, and obtained localized water-suppressed proton spectra using a stimulated echo sequence. Twenty-five of 40 plaque-containing regions provided spectra of adequate quality. Of these, 8 spectra from 6 subjects were consistent with the presence of cholesterol or fatty acids; the remainder were similar to those obtained from white matter of normal volunteers. This early experience with regional proton spectroscopy suggests that individual plaques are distinct. These differences likely reflect dynamic stages of the evolution of the demyelinative process not previously accessible to in vivo investigation.

  10. Multiple sclerosis in US minority populations

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mitzi J.; Amezcua, Lilyana; Javed, Adil; Larsen, Kristin E.; Smrtka, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The heterogeneity of multiple sclerosis (MS) characteristics among various ethnic minority populations is a topic of recent interest. However, these populations are consistently underrepresented in clinical trials, leading to limited data on the effectiveness of treatments in these groups of patients and lack of an evidence-based approach to treatment. In order to achieve optimal disease management in the ethnic minority MS populations, a better understanding of the regional, socioeconomic, and cultural influences that result in underrepresentation of these groups in clinical trials is needed. Furthermore, it would be beneficial to identify the genetic factors that influence disease disparity in these minority populations. Suggestions for the identification and implementation of best practices for fostering the trust of ethnic minority patients with MS and enhancing their participation in clinical trials are offered. PMID:26137421

  11. Neuroplasticity and functional recovery in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomassini, Valentina; Matthews, Paul M.; Thompson, Alan J.; Fuglø, Daniel; Geurts, Jeroen J.; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Jones, Derek K.; Rocca, Maria A.; Wise, Richard G.; Barkhof, Frederik; Palace, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies that promote functional recovery is a major goal of multiple sclerosis (MS) research. Neuroscientific and methodological advances have improved our understanding of the brain’s recovery from damage, generating novel hypotheses for potential targets or modes of intervention and laying the foundation for the development of scientifically informed strategies promoting recovery in interventional studies. This Review aims to encourage the transition from characterization of recovery mechanisms to the development of strategies that promote recovery in MS. We discuss current evidence for functional reorganization that underlies recovery and its implications for development of new recovery-oriented strategies in MS. Promotion of functional recovery requires an improved understanding of recovery mechanisms modulated by interventions and the development of reliable measures of therapeutic effects. As imaging methods can be used to measure functional and structural alterations associated with recovery, this Review discusses their use as reliable markers to measure the effects of interventions. PMID:22986429

  12. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  13. Promising treatments of tomorrow for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Daniel M.; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis are rapidly expanding. What was once seen as a disease with little hope for treatment is now a target of rapid drug development. Current therapies have demonstrated efficacy in limiting the impact of the disease, but none is fully effective in all patients. However, promising new treatments are on the horizon. In this review we will discuss potential novel immunomodulating drugs that are in advanced stages of investigation; these drugs include monoclonal antibodies, chimeric molecules, and oral therapies. The use of hematopoietic stem cells will also be discussed and, in addition, we will look farther ahead at possible novel targets for the development of new immunomodulatory or neuroprotective pharmaceuticals. PMID:20182576

  14. Benefits of Exercise Training in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Sandroff, Brian M

    2015-09-01

    Exercise training represents a behavioral approach for safely managing many of the functional, symptomatic, and quality of life consequences of multiple sclerosis (MS). This topical review paper summarizes evidence from literature reviews and meta-analyses, supplemented by recent individual studies, indicating that exercise training can yield small but important improvements in walking, balance, cognition, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in MS. The paper highlights limitations of research on exercise training and its consequences and future research directions and provides an overview for promotion of exercise training in MS based on recent prescriptive guidelines. Collectively, the evidence for the benefits of exercise training in MS suggests that the time is ripe for the promotion of exercise by healthcare providers, particularly neurologists as a central part of the clinical care and management of MS patients. PMID:26223831

  15. Gender issues in multiple sclerosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Jobin, Céline; Larochelle, Catherine; Parpal, Hélène; Coyle, Patricia K; Duquette, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Although multiple sclerosis (MS) affects both women and men, women are more susceptible to MS than men. Accumulating evidence indicates that the incidence and prevalence of MS is increasing, more so in women than in men. Owing to pregnancy, differing hormonal states and distinct social roles, the impact of MS differs between women and men. Since Patricia K Coyle published a review on gender issues in MS, multiple studies have added to the body of knowledge. This update will summarize the current thinking on gender-related issues in MS and we will address incidence and prevalence, hormonal factors, pregnancy and breastfeeding, genetics, course and prognosis, imaging, treatment and psychosocial aspects. Future progression within this field will help elucidate the cause of and define the treatment of MS. PMID:21118039

  16. Hypothenar hammer syndrome followed by systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M; Hatron, P Y; Hachulla, E; Devulder, B

    2000-10-01

    We describe the first case of bilateral hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS) followed by systemic sclerosis (SSc) that was associated with silica exposure (Erasmus syndrome). The patient was a woman smoothing tiles in an earthenware factory who presented with bilateral digital ischemia associated with Raynaud's phenomenon. HHS was diagnosed, based on an angiographic study showing aneurysm of the ulnar arteries and occlusions of multiple digital arteries. Pulmonary silicosis was also diagnosed on pulmonary tomodensitometry. Two years later digital swelling with acroosteolysis developed. The FANA test was positive (titer 1:640) and anticentromere antibody tests were also positive. Esophageal manometry showed dysmotility of the lower esophagus. These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of SSc. PMID:11036855

  17. [Multiple Sclerosis and Commensal Gut Flora].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Although a symbiotic relationship between commensal gut microbiota and host is widely appreciated, recent works have indicated that normal gut flora functions to prevent inflammatory bowel diseases and obesity in the host, indicating a more mutualistic relationship. Dysbiosis of the commensal flora may lead to development of these disorders. Studies using experimental auto immune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model for studying multiple sclerosis (MS), revealed that onset of MS may be triggered by dysbiosis in the gut. We recently revealed a significant reduction in certain clostridia strains, which probably function to induce regulatory T cells, in the gut microbiota of patients with MS. Results from this study should be consideved when designing strategies for the prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:27279159

  18. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Bozzoni, V; Pansarasa, Orietta; Diamanti, L; Nosari, G; Cereda, C; Ceroni, M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects central and peripheral motor neuron cells. Its etiology is unknown, although a relationship between genetic background and environmental factors may play a major role in triggering the neurodegeneration. In this review, we analyze the role of environmental factors in ALS: heavy metals, electromagnetic fields and electric shocks, pesticides, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, physical activity and the controversial role of sports. The literature on the single issues is analyzed in an attempt to clarify, as clearly as possible, whether each risk factor significantly contributes to the disease pathogenesis. After summarizing conflicting observations and data, the authors provide a final synthetic statement. PMID:27027889

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Allen C

    2010-10-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used by one-half to three-fourths of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite this widespread use, CAM may not be discussed in the course of a conventional medical visit. When considered in the context of MS, CAM therapies have a wide range of risk-benefit profiles. Some CAM therapies, such as acupuncture, cranberry, vitamin D, tai chi, and yoga, are low risk and possibly beneficial. Other CAM therapies, such as immune-stimulating supplements, bee venom, and hyperbaric oxygen, are ineffective, dangerous, or unstudied. Providing access to information about the risks and benefits of CAM therapies may increase the quality of care that is provided to patients with MS. PMID:22810599

  20. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  1. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, A; Sweeney, B J; Connolly, S

    2001-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common, progressive motor neurone disease but is rare in the obstetric population. Only 4 cases have been described in the English literature since 1975. We describe a 29 year old woman who presented with ataxia, lower limb weakness and dysarthria 4 weeks after the birth of her first child. The symptoms had onset during the pregnancy but had not been considered remarkable. There were clinical features of upper and lower motor neurone involvement without any sensory loss. MRI of brain and spine was normal. CSF analysis was negative. EMG studies confirmed the presence of widespread anterior horn cell dysfunction compatible with ALS. The patient was commenced on Riluzole and has progressed clinically, at 12 months post diagnosis. PMID:11799421

  2. Angiosarcoma complicating systemic sclerosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fonder, Margaret A; Douglas, Deborah K

    2008-06-01

    Cutaneous angiosarcoma is a rare malignant vascular tumor with a poor prognosis, most commonly affecting elderly white men. Diagnosis usually is delayed because the tumor has a highly variable and often innocuous presentation. Cutaneous angiosarcoma has been associated with a number of conditions and factors, including chronic lymphedema, prior radiation therapy, exposure to chemicals, and vascular malformations. We report the case of a 40-year-old black man with systemic sclerosis (SSc) who developed a cutaneous angiosarcoma in an area of sclerodermatous scalp. We propose that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) overexpression in sclerodermatous skin may predispose a patient to the development of vascular tumors, such as angiosarcoma. Because early diagnosis and treatment positively impact survival outcome in patients with angiosarcoma, it is essential that physicians recognize the association of angiosarcoma and SSc and maintain a low threshold for performing a biopsy when suspicious lesions are present on sclerodermatous skin. PMID:18666387

  3. Systemic sclerosis: An update in 2016.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Anne Claire; Cacoub, Patrice

    2016-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic immune disorder of unknown origin, dominated by excessive fibrosis responsible for cutaneous and pulmonary fibrosis, and by vascular endothelial dysfunction at the origin of skin ischemia, renal and pulmonary artery lesions. Renal and pulmonary complications are mainly responsible for the severity of the disease. Recent advances led to a better understanding of pathological mechanisms and a more accurate classification of patients according to clinical and biological (auto-antibodies) phenotype. Recent trials provided interesting data on different therapeutic strategies, depending on organ involvement. These data are of particular importance in such disease, still characterized by increased mortality and morbidity rates. In this review, we aim to synthetize recent advances in diagnosis and prognosis leading to better classification of SSc patients, and in therapeutic management. PMID:26802722

  4. Multiple sclerosis in men: management considerations.

    PubMed

    Bove, Riley; McHenry, Allison; Hellwig, Kerstin; Houtchens, Maria; Razaz, Neda; Smyth, Penelope; Tremlett, Helen; Sadovnick, A D; Rintell, D

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a lifelong disease typically affecting individuals in young to middle adulthood. There are recognized sex differences in MS onset and clinical course. MS affects approximately three times more women than men, thus resulting in less attention to the male experience (i.e. diagnosis, management, societal dimensions). Here, we review current scientific evidence on sex differences in MS risk and course, highlight potential sources of bias, and suggest avenues of further inquiry. We then describe what is known about male experiences with MS diagnosis, treatment, and symptom management (particularly mood and sexual function). Finally, we consider ways in which healthcare providers might engage male patients in the broader aspects of living with MS (e.g. familial and societal relationships) to influence their long-term quality of life (QOL). When possible, we draw from published sources to underscore our collective clinical and scientific experiences. PMID:26725085

  5. Defining the clinical course of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Reingold, Stephen C.; Cohen, Jeffrey A.; Cutter, Gary R.; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Thompson, Alan J.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Balcer, Laura J.; Banwell, Brenda; Barkhof, Frederik; Bebo, Bruce; Calabresi, Peter A.; Clanet, Michel; Comi, Giancarlo; Fox, Robert J.; Freedman, Mark S.; Goodman, Andrew D.; Inglese, Matilde; Kappos, Ludwig; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Lincoln, John A.; Lubetzki, Catherine; Miller, Aaron E.; Montalban, Xavier; O'Connor, Paul W.; Petkau, John; Pozzilli, Carlo; Rudick, Richard A.; Sormani, Maria Pia; Stüve, Olaf; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Polman, Chris H.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate clinical course descriptions (phenotypes) of multiple sclerosis (MS) are important for communication, prognostication, design and recruitment of clinical trials, and treatment decision-making. Standardized descriptions published in 1996 based on a survey of international MS experts provided purely clinical phenotypes based on data and consensus at that time, but imaging and biological correlates were lacking. Increased understanding of MS and its pathology, coupled with general concern that the original descriptors may not adequately reflect more recently identified clinical aspects of the disease, prompted a re-examination of MS disease phenotypes by the International Advisory Committee on Clinical Trials of MS. While imaging and biological markers that might provide objective criteria for separating clinical phenotypes are lacking, we propose refined descriptors that include consideration of disease activity (based on clinical relapse rate and imaging findings) and disease progression. Strategies for future research to better define phenotypes are also outlined. PMID:24871874

  6. Rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis patients in India.

    PubMed

    Surya, Nirmal

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease which is one of the leading causes of handicap in young subjects. The large range of symptoms associated with MS lead to continuing decline in neurologic status and quality of life. The coexistence of physical and cognitive impairments, together with the imprevisible evolution of the disease makes MS rehabilitation very challenging. The main objective of rehabilitation is, therefore, to ease the burden of symptoms by improving self-performance and independence. Inpatient, outpatient and Home rehabilitation with multidisciplinary team has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability. Individualized programs elaborated by a multidisciplinary team of experts are the key to success of rehabilitation. Family plays a big role and Family Based Rehabilitation will be important in long term rehab program in MS. PMID:26538848

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kimmy; Bourdette, Dennis; Forte, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has traditionally been considered an autoimmune inflammatory disorder leading to demyelination and clinical debilitation as evidenced by our current standard anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment regimens. While these approaches do control the frequency of clinical relapses, they do not prevent the progressive functional decline that plagues many people with MS. Many avenues of research indicate that a neurodegenerative process may also play a significant role in MS from the early stages of disease, and one of the current hypotheses identifies mitochondrial dysfunction as a key contributing mechanism. We have hypothesized that pathological permeability transition pore (PTP) opening mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium dysregulation is central to mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in MS. This focused review highlights recent evidence supporting this hypothesis, with particular emphasis on our in vitro and in vivo work with the mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA. PMID:23898299

  8. Toward precision medicine in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Yun; Che, Chun-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine is an innovative approach that uses emerging biomedical technologies to deliver optimally targeted and timed interventions, customized to the molecular drivers of an individual’s disease. This approach is only just beginning to be considered for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The clinical and biological complexities of ALS have hindered development of effective therapeutic strategies. In this review we consider applying the key elements of precision medicine to ALS: phenotypic classification, comprehensive risk assessment, presymptomatic period detection, potential molecular pathways, disease model development, biomarker discovery and molecularly tailored interventions. Together, these would embody a precision medicine approach, which may provide strategies for optimal targeting and timing of efforts to prevent, stop or slow progression of ALS. PMID:26889480

  9. Multiple sclerosis: methodological aspects of cognitive testing.

    PubMed

    Stenager, E; Knudsen, L; Jensen, K

    1994-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 94 patients (42 males, 52 females) with definite multiple sclerosis (MS) in the age range 25-55 years, the correlation of neuropsychological tests with the ability to read TV-subtitles and with the use of sedatives is examined. A logistic regression analysis reveals a significant correlation between results of an attention and perceptual motor speed test i.e. Symbol Digit Modalities test and the ability to read TV-subtitles, but no correlation was found with another attention and perceptual motor speed test, or verbal or visual memory. No correlation between the use of sedatives and results on neuropsychological tests was found. Anxiety was not correlated with the ability to read TV-subtitles. It is concluded that visual deficits but not the use of sedatives may be a confounding factor in neuropsychological testing in MS. PMID:8140888

  10. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, P S; Dudesek, A; Stüve, O; Zettl, UK

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab. PMID:24001305

  11. Assessing upper limb function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Ilse; Feys, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The need to fully assess upper limb function in multiple sclerosis (MS) has become increasingly clear with recent studies revealing a high prevalence of upper limb dysfunction in persons with MS leading to increased dependency and reduced quality of life. It is important that clinicians and researchers use tailored outcome measures to systematically describe upper limb (dys)function and evaluate potential deterioration or improvement on treatment. This topical review provides a comprehensive summary of currently used upper limb outcome measures in MS, classified according to the levels of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). The clinical utility, strengths, weaknesses and psychometric properties of common upper limb outcome measures are discussed. Based on this information, recommendations for selecting appropriate upper limb outcome measures are given. The current shortcomings in assessment which need to be addressed are identified. PMID:24664300

  12. MicroRNA dysregulation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jr, Omar de Faria; Moore, Craig S.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Antel, Jack P.; Bar-Or, Amit; Dhaunchak, Ajit S.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by central nervous system (CNS) demyelination and axonal degeneration. Although the cause of MS is still unknown, it is widely accepted that novel drug targets need to focus on both decreasing inflammation and promoting CNS repair. In MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, non-coding small microRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in the immune system and CNS. Since individual miRNAs are able to down-regulate multiple targeted mRNA transcripts, even minor changes in miRNA expression may lead to significant alterations in gene expression. Herein, we review miRNA signatures reported in CNS tissue and immune cells of MS patients and consider how altered miRNA expression may influence MS pathology. PMID:23346094

  13. A comprehensive review of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Sara; Carr, Karen; Reiley, Luz; Diaz, Kelvin; Guerra, Orleiquis; Altamirano, Pablo Fernandez; Pagani, Wilfredo; Lodin, Daud; Orozco, Gloria; Chinea, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons with an incidence of about 1/100,000. Most ALS cases are sporadic, but 5–10% of the cases are familial ALS. Both sporadic and familial ALS (FALS) are associated with degeneration of cortical and spinal motor neurons. The etiology of ALS remains unknown. However, mutations of superoxide dismutase 1 have been known as the most common cause of FALS. In this study, we provide a comprehensive review of ALS. We cover all aspects of the disease including epidemiology, comorbidities, environmental risk factor, molecular mechanism, genetic factors, symptoms, diagnostic, treatment, and even the available supplement and management of ALS. This will provide the reader with an advantage of receiving a broad range of information about the disease. PMID:26629397

  14. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Makino, Takamitsu; Jinnin, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a complicated autoimmune and connective tissue disease, of which the pathogenesis and treatment have not been fully elucidated. SSc patients may have a genetic predisposition, such as specific human leukocyte antigens and single nucleotide polymorphisms, but can also develop various clinical symptoms with individual differences. Epigenetics, such as DNA methylation, histone modification, long non-coding RNA and miRNA, could explain the crossroad between genetics and environmental factors. For instance, epigenetics is associated with environmental factors, which may cause the breakdown of immune tolerance and the development of SSc in patients with a particular genetic background. In the future, further investigations of the interplay between genetics and epigenetics will be beneficial to elucidate the complex molecular cross-talk and heterogeneity in the SSc pathogenesis. Furthermore, this research will lead to the discovery of new therapeutic approaches and biomarkers. PMID:26782002

  15. Multiple sclerosis in India: An overview.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Bhim S; Advani, Hemali

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is being increasingly diagnosed in India mainly due to increase in the number of practicing neurologists and easy and affordable availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical features and course are largely similar to those seen in the West. The term optico-spinal MS (Asian MS) was coined in the pre-MRI days. Many such patients turn out to be cases of neuromyelitis optica - a distinct disorder and not a variant of MS. Others have shown the classical features of MS on MRI scan. Several of the disease-modifying agents, not all, are now available in India. Their use, however, has been limited in view of the high cost. PMID:26538844

  16. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Czirják, L; Dankó, K; Sipka, S; Zeher, M; Szegedi, G

    1987-01-01

    In vitro functions of polymorphonuclear (PMN) neutrophils were studied in 20 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS). An increase in the basal chemiluminescence (CL) activity of peripheral blood PMNs was found, suggesting that these cells had been preactivated in vivo. Patients with more extensive skin disease or signs of disease progression tended to have higher basal CL values. Active oxygen products during the respiratory burst may increase the extent of inflammatory and fibrotic processes and could be involved in the endothelial injury in PSS. The stimulatory capacity of CL response was normal in our study. No alterations were found in the opsonised yeast phagocytic activity of granulocytes when compared with control values. The binding of erythrocyte-antibody particles was found also to be normal. A depressed chemotactic activity of PMN cells against zymosan activated serum was also shown. The cause of the decreased chemotaxis of PMNs remains to be elucidated. PMID:3592786

  17. Multiple sclerosis in India: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Bhim S.; Advani, Hemali

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is being increasingly diagnosed in India mainly due to increase in the number of practicing neurologists and easy and affordable availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical features and course are largely similar to those seen in the West. The term optico-spinal MS (Asian MS) was coined in the pre-MRI days. Many such patients turn out to be cases of neuromyelitis optica — a distinct disorder and not a variant of MS. Others have shown the classical features of MS on MRI scan. Several of the disease-modifying agents, not all, are now available in India. Their use, however, has been limited in view of the high cost. PMID:26538844

  18. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Bozzoni, Virginia; Pansarasa, Orietta; Diamanti, Luca; Nosari, Guido; Cereda, Cristina; Ceroni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects central and peripheral motor neuron cells. Its etiology is unknown, although a relationship between genetic background and environmental factors may play a major role in triggering the neurodegeneration. In this review, we analyze the role of environmental factors in ALS: heavy metals, electromagnetic fields and electric shocks, pesticides, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, physical activity and the controversial role of sports. The literature on the single issues is analyzed in an attempt to clarify, as clearly as possible, whether each risk factor significantly contributes to the disease pathogenesis. After summarizing conflicting observations and data, the authors provide a final synthetic statement. PMID:27027889

  19. Rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Surya, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease which is one of the leading causes of handicap in young subjects. The large range of symptoms associated with MS lead to continuing decline in neurologic status and quality of life. The coexistence of physical and cognitive impairments, together with the imprevisible evolution of the disease makes MS rehabilitation very challenging. The main objective of rehabilitation is, therefore, to ease the burden of symptoms by improving self-performance and independence. Inpatient, outpatient and Home rehabilitation with multidisciplinary team has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability. Individualized programs elaborated by a multidisciplinary team of experts are the key to success of rehabilitation. Family plays a big role and Family Based Rehabilitation will be important in long term rehab program in MS. PMID:26538848

  20. Deleterious versus protective autoimmunity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Milos; Stojanovic, Ivana; Marjanovic, Goran; Zivkovic, Nikola; Cvetanovic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorder of central nervous system, in which myelin specific CD4(+) T cells have a central role in orchestrating pathological events involved in disease pathogenesis. There is compelling evidence that Th1, Th9 and Th17 cells, separately or in cooperation, could mediate deleterious autoimmune response in MS. However, the phenotype differences between Th cell subpopulations initially employed in MS pathogenesis are mainly reflected in the different patterns of inflammation introduction, which results in the development of characteristic pathological features (blood-brain barrier disruption, demyelination and neurodegeneration), clinically presented with MS symptoms. Although, autoimmunity was traditionally seen as deleterious, some studies indicated that autoimmunity mediated by Th2 cells and T regulatory cells could be protective by nature. The concept of protective autoimmunity in MS pathogenesis is still poorly understood, but could be of great importance in better understanding of MS immunology and therefore, creating better therapeutic strategies. PMID:25944389

  1. [Treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms and exacerbations].

    PubMed

    Prieto González, José María

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an explosion of new drugs acting on the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) but less attention has been paid to better knowledge of the symptoms of this disease and their pathogenesis and treatment, which is essential to improve patients' quality of life. Because many patients have numerous concurrent symptoms during their clinical course, their management is complex and consequently it is important to know which symptoms are a direct result of the degenerative lesions of MS. The present article describes all the therapeutic options available for spasticity and its associated pain, paroxystic symptoms, fatigue, genitourinary disorders and sexual dysfunction, tremor, ataxia, gait disorder and cognitive impairment, with special emphasis on novel treatments. The article also defines exacerbations, how to recognize them and the available treatments, mainly oral administration of high-dose methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis. PMID:25732949

  2. Astrocytes in the tempest of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miljković, Djordje; Timotijević, Gordana; Mostarica Stojković, Marija

    2011-12-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell population within the CNS of mammals. Their glial role is perfectly performed in the healthy CNS as they support functions of neurons. The omnipresence of astrocytes throughout the white and grey matter and their intimate relation with blood vessels of the CNS, as well as numerous immunity-related actions that these cells are capable of, imply that astrocytes should have a prominent role in neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The role of astrocytes in MS is rather ambiguous, as they have the capacity to both stimulate and restrain neuroinflammation and tissue destruction. In this paper we present some of the proved and the proposed functions of astrocytes in neuroinflammation and discuss the effect of MS therapeutics on astrocytes. PMID:21443873

  3. Neurobehavioral burden of multiple sclerosis with nanotheranostics

    PubMed Central

    Sriramoju, Bhasker; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating neurological disorder affecting people worldwide; women are affected more than men. MS results in serious neurological deficits along with behavioral compromise, the mechanisms of which still remain unclear. Behavioral disturbances such as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment, psychosis, euphoria, sleep disturbances, and fatigue affect the quality of life in MS patients. Among these, depression and psychosis are more common than any other neurological disorders. In addition, depression is associated with other comorbidities. Although anxiety is often misdiagnosed in MS patients, it can induce suicidal ideation if it coexists with depression. An interrelation between sleep abnormalities and fatigue is also reported among MS patients. In addition, therapeutics for MS is always a challenge because of the presence of the blood–brain barrier, adding to the lack of detailed understanding of the disease pathology. In this review, we tried to summarize various behavioral pathologies and their association with MS, followed by its conventional treatment and nanotheranostics. PMID:26508863

  4. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis. PMID:27489387

  5. Clinical Usefulness of Aripiprazole and Lamotrigine in Schizoaffective Presentation of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, In Goo; Kim, Jung Jin

    2016-08-31

    Tuberous sclerosis is not as rare as once thought and has high psychiatric comorbidities. However, bipolar or psychotic features associated with tuberous sclerosis have been rarely reported. This report first presents a tuberous sclerosis patient, resembling a schizoaffective disorder of bipolar type. A patient with known tuberous sclerosis displayed mood fluctuation and psychotic features. Her symptoms did not remit along with several psychiatric medications. After hospitalization, the patient responded well with lamotrigine and aripiprazole without exacerbation. As demonstrated in this case, tuberous sclerosis may also encompass bipolar affective or psychotic features. We would like to point out the necessity to consider bipolarity in evaluating and treating tuberous sclerosis. PMID:27489387

  6. Co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and cancer in a BRCA1 positive family.

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Carsten; Bauer, Ingrid; Meyer, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is not known to be a risk factor for subsequent development of cancer. Recently, a multiple sclerosis locus was mapped adjacent to BRCA1 gene. We present a familial case affected by multiple sclerosis and cancer. We identified a c.5266dupC (5382insC) frameshift mutation in a 33-year-old woman with breast cancer, multiple malignant melanomas and multiple sclerosis. The patient's family history shows further cases of multiple sclerosis in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Therefore the presented family may carry a monogenic predisposition for multiple sclerosis nearby to BRCA1. PMID:23954390

  7. Malignancies after mitoxantrone for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seuffert, Linda; Mäder, Uwe; Toyka, Klaus V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the therapy-related risk of malignancies in mitoxantrone-treated patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods: This retrospective observational cohort study included all mitoxantrone-treated patients with multiple sclerosis seen at our department between 1994 and 2007. We collected follow-up information on medically confirmed malignancies, life status, and cause of death, as of 2010. Malignancy rates were compared to the German national cancer registry matched for sex, age, and year of occurrence. Results: Follow-up was completed in 676 of 677 identified patients. Median follow-up time was 8.7 years (interquartile range 6.8–11.2), corresponding to 6,220 person-years. Median cumulative mitoxantrone dose was 79.0 mg/m2 (interquartile range 50.8–102.4). Thirty-seven patients (5.5%) were diagnosed with a malignancy after mitoxantrone initiation, revealing a standardized incidence ratio of 1.50 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.08). Entities included breast cancer (n = 9), colorectal cancer (n = 7), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 4, 0.6%), and others (each entity n = 1 or 2). The standardized incidence ratio of colorectal cancer was 2.98 (95% CI 1.20–6.14) and of acute myeloid leukemia 10.44 (95% CI 3.39–24.36). It was not increased for other entities including breast cancer. Multivariate Cox regression identified higher age at treatment initiation but neither cumulative mitoxantrone dose (>75 vs ≤75 mg/m2) nor treatment with other immunosuppressive drugs or sex as a risk factor. Fifty-five patients had died, among them 12 of a malignancy and 43 reportedly of other causes. Conclusions: While the overall incidence of malignancies was only mildly increased, the risk of leukemia and colorectal cancer was heightened. If confirmed, posttherapy colonoscopy could become advisable. PMID:27170571

  8. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, C.K.; Vidaver, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Troiano, R.; Dowling, P.C.; Cook, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one.

  9. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balantrapu, Swathi; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Pula, John H.; Sandroff, Brian M.; Motl, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal) and 4 (contracted). Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW), timed 25 foot walk (T25FW), and timed up-and-go (TUG), and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc.) for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n = 44) of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P = 0.0001, d = −0.86), T25FW (P = 0.003, d = 0.72), TUG (P = 0.001, d = 0.84), MSWS-12 (P = 0.0001, d = 1.09), O2 cost of walking (P = 0.001, d = 0.75), average steps/day (P < 0.05, d = −0.45), and walking velocity (P < 0.05, d = −0.53) and cadence (P < 0.05, d = −0.46). Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking. PMID:24999434

  10. Managing Neuropsychological Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephanie; Penner, Iris; Heesen, Christoph; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system of potential autoimmune origin that is frequently associated with psychological disorders and cognitive deficits, as well as with fatigue, stress, and psychosocial burden. These factors often cause decreased quality of life, social withdrawal, and unemployment. We describe the development of a cognitive-behavioral group intervention based on the concept of metacognition and evaluation of the feasibility and acceptance of the program as a rehabilitation tool. Methods: Metacognitive Training in MS (MaTiMS) consists of six modules, each 90 minutes in duration. We tested acceptance and design of the program in six focus groups (entire sample, n = 27). Framework analysis of transcripts was used to identify key topics and categories. Program modules were revised in accordance with appropriate recommendations of focus group members. We subsequently evaluated MaTiMS in two groups (n = 5, n = 6) in a rehabilitation center. Neuropsychological functioning as well as coping self-efficacy, depression, stress, perceived cognitive deficit, fatigue, and quality of life were assessed. Acceptance of MaTiMS from the patient perspective was also studied. Results: The modules were highly accepted by patients. Pre-post assessments showed significant improvements in the Coping Self Efficacy Scale (P = .007), the Würzburger Fatigue Inventory for MS Score (P = .028), and the Hamburg Quality of Life Questionnaire in Multiple Sclerosis Mood subscale (P = .046). Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that MaTiMS represents a feasible psychological group training program that may foster improvements in self-efficacy, fatigue, and mood. The next step will be an evaluation of the program in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:26052258

  11. [Mesial temporal sclerosis syndrome in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Consalvo, D; Giobellina, R; Silva, W; Rugilo, C; Saidón, P; Schuster, G; Kochen, S; Sica, R

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential tool in the work-up of epilepsy. Since its appearance it has been possible to identify pathologies, such as hippocampal sclerosis (HS), that had previously only been detected by histopathological assays. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical manifestations, EEG and the outcome of patients with HS as shown by MRI. We revised the clinical histories of 384 outpatients from the Epilepsy Center, Ramos Mejía Hospital, who had been studied by MRI. Thirty five of them (15.5%) had a diagnosis of HS, based on the structural changes observed on the images. Six patients were excluded because of incomplete clinical data. Therefore, we studied 29 patients including 15 men. The mean age was 32.7 +/- 10.2 years (range: 19-58). All of them had partial seizures. Ten subjects had had febrile convulsions (34.5%) in childhood. Neurological examination was normal in all subjects. Interictal EEG showed focal abnormalities that were coincident in their location with the MRI abnormalities in 16 patients (55.1%). Fourteen patients (48.3%) showed right side hippocampal lesions on MRI, thirteen on the left side (44.9%) and 2 bilateral HS (6.8%). Twenty-seven patients (93.1%) had intractable epilepsy. Anterior temporal lobectomy was performed in 3 subjects with good outcome. The identification of these patients who present certain clinical and MRI characteristics, provides an opportunity to define the mesial temporal sclerosis syndrome. This could benefit patients in their prognosis and for specific treatments. PMID:10962804

  12. PSEUDOBULBAR AFFECT IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Viktor; Rovazdi, Merisanda Časar; Kraml, Oto; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to analyze the link between PBA and patient age, sex, clinical course of MS, disease duration and degree of disability. The study was conducted on 79 MS patients that underwent inpatient rehabilitation at the Lipik Special Hospital for Medical Rehabilitation in the period from August 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015. PBA is a term used for an emotional disinhibition syndrome characterized by sudden and involuntary episodes of crying or laughing which are not in proportion to the stimulus applied or occur without stimulus. The condition can be present in patients with various neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, patients having recovered from stroke, or following traumatic brain injury. The estimated prevalence in patients with MS ranges from 10% to 46.2%. As a measuring instrument in the study, we used the Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS), where a sum 17 denoted positive finding. The total number of respondents was 79, of which 33 (41.8%) met the CNS-LS criteria for the diagnosis of PBA. There was no statistically significant correlation between PBA, age and degree of disability, although PBA was more common in women and in patients with a secondary progressive form of the disease. We found that 42.4% of respondents with positive CNS-LS criteria for PBA did not inform their neurologist on the presence of sudden mood changes. The high frequency of PBA and the fact that a significant proportion of patients did not inform the neurologist on their affective disturbances call for an active approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26415311

  13. Disease-specific molecular events in cortical multiple sclerosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Isabella; Höftberger, Romana; Gerlach, Susanna; Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Mahad, Don; Binder, Christoph J.; Krumbholz, Markus; Bauer, Jan; Bradl, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Cortical lesions constitute an important part of multiple sclerosis pathology. Although inflammation appears to play a role in their formation, the mechanisms leading to demyelination and neurodegeneration are poorly understood. We aimed to identify some of these mechanisms by combining gene expression studies with neuropathological analysis. In our study, we showed that the combination of inflammation, plaque-like primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the cortex is specific for multiple sclerosis and is not seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases mediated by CD8-positive T cells (Rasmussen’s encephalitis), B cells (B cell lymphoma) or complex chronic inflammation (tuberculous meningitis, luetic meningitis or chronic purulent meningitis). In addition, we performed genome-wide microarray analysis comparing micro-dissected active cortical multiple sclerosis lesions with those of tuberculous meningitis (inflammatory control), Alzheimer’s disease (neurodegenerative control) and with cortices of age-matched controls. More than 80% of the identified multiple sclerosis-specific genes were related to T cell-mediated inflammation, microglia activation, oxidative injury, DNA damage and repair, remyelination and regenerative processes. Finally, we confirmed by immunohistochemistry that oxidative damage in cortical multiple sclerosis lesions is associated with oligodendrocyte and neuronal injury, the latter also affecting axons and dendrites. Our study provides new insights into the complex mechanisms of neurodegeneration and regeneration in the cortex of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23687122

  14. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  15. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was...

  16. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was...

  17. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was...

  18. 38 CFR 3.318 - Presumptive service connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... connection for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. 3.318 Section 3.318 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... sclerosis. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the development of amyotrophic lateral... under this section: (1) If there is affirmative evidence that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis was...

  19. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balcer, Laura J.; Miller, David H.; Reingold, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  20. "Abnormal" illness behaviour in chronic fatigue syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Trigwell, P.; Hatcher, S.; Johnson, M.; Stanley, P.; House, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the presence of abnormal illness behaviour in patients with a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome. DESIGN--A cross sectional descriptive study using the illness behaviour questionnaire to compare illness behaviour scores and illness behaviour profiles of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and patients with multiple sclerosis. SETTING--A multidisciplinary fatigue clinic and a teaching hospital neurology outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS--98 patients satisfying the Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome and 78 patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Responses to the 62 item illness behaviour questionnaire. RESULTS--90 (92%) patients in the chronic fatigue syndrome group and 70 (90%) in the multiple sclerosis group completed the illness behaviour questionnaire. Both groups had significantly high scores on the general hypochondriasis and disease conviction subscales and significantly low scores on the psychological versus somatic concern subscale, as measured in relation to normative data. There were, however, no significant differences in the subscale scores between the two groups and the two groups had identical illness behaviour profiles. CONCLUSION--Scores on the illness behaviour questionnaire cannot be taken as evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a variety of abnormal illness behaviour, because the same profile occurs in multiple sclerosis. Neither can they be taken as evidence that chronic fatigue and multiple sclerosis share an aetiology. More needs to be known about the origins of illness beliefs in chronic fatigue syndrome, especially as they are important in determining outcome. PMID:7613314

  1. Lockhart Clarke's contribution to the description of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Martin R; Swash, Michael; Ebers, George C

    2010-11-01

    The definition of the clinicopathological entity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis evolved over half a century. Although the definitive term amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that acknowledged both upper and lower motor neuron involvement was attributed to Jean-Martin Charcot in 1874, his initial case was published nearly a decade earlier; and it is accepted that, from at least the 1830s, several others (including Charles Bell, François-Amilcar Aran and Jean Cruveilhier) had already recognized a progressive lower motor neuron-only syndrome within a broader, clinically-defined group of disorders, termed progressive muscular atrophy. Although William Gowers first grouped the three phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, progressive muscular atrophy and progressive bulbar palsy together as part of the same syndrome, the term motor neuron disease, as an over-arching label, was not suggested until nearly a century later by W. Russell Brain. Augustus Jacob Lockhart Clarke (1817-80) is best known for his descriptions of spinal cord anatomy. However, in two detailed case reports from the 1860s, he carried out rigorous post-mortem neuropathological studies of what appear to be classical cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Furthermore, he recognized the additional involvement of the corticospinal tracts that distinguished this from progressive muscular atrophy. Several aspects of the exquisite clinical histories documented as part of both studies, one by Charles Bland Radcliffe, resonate with contemporary debates concerning the evolution of disease in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These 'past masters' still have much to teach us. PMID:20576696

  2. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  3. The male phenotype in osteopathia striata congenita with cranial sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Holman, Sarah K; Daniel, Phil; Jenkins, Zandra A; Herron, Rachel L; Morgan, Tim; Savarirayan, Ravi; Chow, C W; Bohring, Axel; Mosel, Annette; Lacombe, Didier; Steiner, Bernhard; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Schroter, Barbara; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Miñaur, Sixto Garcia; Porteous, Mary; Parker, Michael; Quarrell, Oliver; Tapon, Dagmar; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Mansour, Sahar; Nash, Ruth; Bindoff, Laurence A; Fiskerstrand, Torunn; Robertson, Stephen P

    2011-10-01

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OSCS) is an X-linked disease caused by truncating mutations in WTX. Females exhibit sclerotic striations on the long bones, cranial sclerosis, and craniofacial dysmorphism. Males with OSCS have significant skeletal sclerosis, do not have striations but do display a more severe phenotype commonly associated with gross structural malformations, patterning defects, and significant pre- and postnatal lethality. The recent description of mutations in WTX underlying OSCS has led to the identification of a milder, survivable phenotype in males. Individuals with this presentation can have, in addition to skeletal sclerosis, Hirschsprung disease, joint contractures, cardiomyopathy, and neuromuscular anomalies. A diagnosis of OSCS should be considered in males with macrocephaly, skeletal sclerosis that is most marked in the cranium and the absence of metaphyseal striations. The observation of striations in males may be indicative of a WTX mutation in a mosaic state supporting the contention that this sign in females is indicative of the differential lyonization of cells in the osteoblastic lineage. PMID:22043478

  4. Selective attention impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Chiara; Prats Sedano, Maria Angeles; Silvoni, Stefano; Segato, Nicoletta; Cavinato, Marianna; Merico, Antonio; Piccione, Francesco; Palmieri, Arianna; Birbaumer, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate attentional control mechanisms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using an auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) paradigm. Fifteen mild to moderate ALS patients and 15 healthy controls were administered a brief neuropsychological test battery and an ERPs paradigm assessing selective attention. Four types of auditory stimuli were presented in random order: short standard (200 Hz, 200 ms), long standard (200 Hz, 500 ms), short deviant (1000 Hz, 200 ms) and long deviant (1000 Hz, 500 ms). Participants had to respond to the long deviant stimuli only. During the task the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. The N200, P300 and re-orienting negativity (RON) ERP components were analysed. Compared to controls ALS patients showed reduced amplitudes and delayed latencies of N200, P300 and RON. These results could be attributable to both an alteration in change detection resulting in a reduction of the allocation and re-orientation of attentional resources or a general slowing or reduction of neural processing efficiency in the same system. The ERPs results support the hypothesis that ALS involves extramotor cognitive functions including auditory attentional processing at all processing stages, early (200 ms) and late (300-600 ms). These data prove the usefulness and sensitivity of the auditory ERPs in detection of cognitive functions in ALS patients. PMID:26889872

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ping; Gal, Jozsef; Kwinter, David M.; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Haining

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains to be better understood. Based on the studies from ALS patients and transgenic animal models, it is believed that ALS is likely to be a multifactorial and multisystem disease. Many mechanisms have been postulated to be involved in the pathology of ALS, such as oxidative stress, glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial damage, defective axonal transport, glia cell pathology and aberrant RNA metabolism. Mitochondria, which play crucial roles in excitotoxicity, apoptosis and cell survival, have shown to be an early target in ALS pathogenesis and contribute to the disease progression. Morphological and functional defects in mitochondria were found in both human patients and ALS mice overexpressing mutant SOD1. Mutant SOD1 was found to be preferentially associated with mitochondria and subsequently impair mitochondrial function. Recent studies suggest that axonal transport of mitochondria along microtubules and mitochondrial dynamics may also be disrupted in ALS. These results also illustrate the critical importance of maintaining proper mitochondrial function in axons and neuromuscular junctions, supporting the emerging “dying-back” axonopathy model of ALS. In this review, we will discuss how mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the ALS variants of SOD1 and the mechanisms by which mitochondrial damage contributes to the disease etiology. PMID:19715760

  6. Miro1 deficiency in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Wenzhang; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Liu, Yingchao; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Keji; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Wang, Xinglong

    2015-01-01

    Proper transportation of mitochondria to sites with high energy demands is critical for neuronal function and survival. Impaired mitochondrial movement has been repeatedly reported in motor neurons of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and indicated as an important mechanism contributing to motor neuron degeneration in ALS. Miro1, a RhoGTPase also referred to as Rhot1, is a key regulator of mitochondrial movement linking mitochondria and motor proteins. In this study, we investigated whether the expression of Miro1 was altered in ALS patients and ALS animal models. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Miro1 was significantly reduced in the spinal cord tissue of ALS patients. Consistently, the decreased expression of Miro1 was also noted only in the spinal cord, and not in the brain tissue of transgenic mice expressing ALS-associated SOD1 G93A or TDP-43 M337V. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS, and we found that excessive glutamate challenge lead to significant reduction of Miro1 expression in spinal cord motor neurons both in vitro and in mice. Taken together, these findings show Miro1 deficiency in ALS patients and ALS animal models and suggest glutamate excitotoxicity as a likely cause of Miro1 deficiency. PMID:26074815

  7. Husbands and wives living with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Courts, Nancy Fleming; Newton, Amanda N; McNeal, Linda J

    2005-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently is diagnosed in young adults. Coping with symptoms of MS is challenging not only for the person with the disease, but also for his or her spouse. The well spouse often assumes the caregiving role. The purpose of this qualitative research was to investigate the experiences of persons whose spouses have MS. Twelve people participated in a 2-hour focus group: 8 men and 4 women. The husbands were, on average, 50 years old, and the wives averaged 55 years old. The length of time since diagnosis ranged from 2 to 11 years for the husbands and from 3 to 13 years for the wives. The focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Participants talked freely. Four major themes emerged: caregiver roles, need for information, relationship changes, and barriers. Men attempted to protect their wives' energy, intervening for them. Wives encouraged independence in their husbands. Spouses need information about MS, complementary interventions, and support. They want increased public awareness of invisible symptoms and awareness in the workplace of continuing capabilities of persons with MS. Role reversals were challenging for the women who felt that "MS is the third person in a marriage." Spouses need help to maintain appropriate boundaries. Limitations of the study include the small, economically homogeneous sample and the single encounter with the subjects. A longitudinal intervention study is needed. PMID:15794441

  8. Tumefactive multiple sclerosis: an uncommon diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kaeser, Martha A.; Scali, Frank; Lanzisera, Frank P.; Bub, Glenn A.; Kettner, Norman W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This case report describes a rare presentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) that was initially diagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion in the emergency department. Clinical Features A 30-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic teaching clinic with a complaint of a sudden right foot drop. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a large mass in the left parietal lobe with additional white matter lesions. The mass and smaller lesions were consistent with a rare presentation of demyelinating disease, tumefactive MS. Intervention and Outcome The patient was referred to a neurologist for further evaluation and treatment. Her short-term clinical course was punctuated by recurrent myospasms and neurologic deficits. Conclusion Tumefactive MS may mimic the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of glioma or a cerebral abscess. The clinical presentation, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, role of diagnostic imaging, and treatment options of MS are described. This case report illustrates that the timely diagnosis and optimal treatment of MS require recognition of its varied, sometimes atypical, and often nonspecific clinical and imaging manifestations. PMID:22027206

  9. Uphill and Downhill Walking in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Samaei, Afshin; Hajihasani, Abdolhamid; Fatemi, Elham; Motaharinezhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various exercise protocols have been recommended for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the effects of uphill and downhill walking exercise on mobility, functional activities, and muscle strength in MS patients. Methods: Thirty-four MS patients were randomly allocated to either the downhill or uphill treadmill walking group for 12 sessions (3 times/wk) of 30 minutes' walking on a 10% negative slope (n = 17) or a 10% positive slope (n = 17), respectively. Measurements were taken before and after the intervention and after 4-week follow-up and included fatigue by Modified Fatigue Impact Scale; mobility by Modified Rivermead Mobility Index; disability by Guy's Neurological Disability Scale; functional activities by 2-Minute Walk Test, Timed 25-Foot Walk test, and Timed Up and Go test; balance indices by Biodex Balance System; and quadriceps and hamstring isometric muscles by torque of left and right knee joints. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to investigate the intervention effects on the measurements. Results: After the intervention, significant improvement was found in the downhill group versus the uphill group in terms of fatigue, mobility, and disability indices; functional activities; balance indices; and quadriceps isometric torque (P < .05). The results were stable at 4-week follow-up. Conclusions: Downhill walking on a treadmill may improve muscle performance, functional activity, and balance control in MS patients. These findings support the idea of using eccentric exercise training in MS rehabilitation protocols. PMID:26917996

  10. Controversies and priorities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Martin R; Hardiman, Orla; Benatar, Michael; Brooks, Benjamin R; Chio, Adriano; de Carvalho, Mamede; Ince, Paul G; Lin, Cindy; Miller, Robert G; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Nicholson, Garth; Ravits, John; Shaw, Pamela J; Swash, Michael; Talbot, Kevin; Traynor, Bryan J; den Berg, Leonard H Van; Veldink, Jan H; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two decades after the discovery that 20% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases were linked to mutations in the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene, a substantial proportion of the remainder of cases of familial ALS have now been traced to an expansion of the intronic hexanucleotide repeat sequence in C9orf72. This breakthrough provides an opportunity to re-evaluate longstanding concepts regarding the cause and natural history of ALS, coming soon after the pathological unification of ALS with frontotemporal dementia through a shared pathological signature of cytoplasmic inclusions of the ubiquitinated protein TDP-43. However, with profound clinical, prognostic, neuropathological, and now genetic heterogeneity, the concept of ALS as one disease appears increasingly untenable. This background calls for the development of a more sophisticated taxonomy, and an appreciation of ALS as the breakdown of a wider network rather than a discrete vulnerable population of specialised motor neurons. Identification of C9orf72 repeat expansions in patients without a family history of ALS challenges the traditional division between familial and sporadic disease. By contrast, the 90% of apparently sporadic cases and incomplete penetrance of several genes linked to familial cases suggest that at least some forms of ALS arise from the interplay of multiple genes, poorly understood developmental, environmental, and age-related factors, as well as stochastic events. PMID:23415570

  11. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: A Brave New World?

    PubMed Central

    Ess, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multiorgan genetic disease caused by mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes. TSC has been recognized for many years as an important cause of severe neurological disease with patients suffering from epilepsy, developmental delay, autism, and psychiatric problems. During the last year there has been enormous advances in basic and translational research pertaining to TSC. Recent findings In this review, I discuss the basic science findings that position the TSC1 and TSC2 genes as critical regulators of the mTOR kinase within mTORC1. In addition, I will discuss the development of new animal models, translational data, and recent clinical trials using mTORC1 inhibitors such as rapamycin. Summary The past few years have seen spectacular advances that have energized TSC related research and challenged existing symptomatic treatments. While it remains to be seen whether use of mTORC1 inhibitors will revolutionize the care of patients with TSC, the application of basic and translational research towards a specific clinical disorder emphasizes the potential and promise of molecular medicine. PMID:20087180

  12. Gait termination in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Roeing, Kathleen L; Wajda, Douglas A; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2015-09-01

    Despite the ubiquitous nature of gait impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information concerning the control of gait termination in individuals with MS. The purpose of this investigation was to examine planned gait termination in individuals with MS and healthy controls with and without cognitive distractors. Individuals with MS and age matched controls completed a series of gait termination tasks over a pressure sensitive walkway under non-distracting and cognitively distracting conditions. As expected the MS group had a lower velocity (89.9±33.3 cm/s) than controls (142.8±22.4 cm/s) and there was a significant reduction in velocity in both groups under the cognitive distracting conditions (MS: 73.9±30.7 cm/s; control: 120.0±25.9 cm/s). Although individuals with MS walked slower, there was no difference between groups in the rate a participant failed to stop at the target (i.e. failure rate). Overall failure rate had a 10-fold increase in the cognitively distracting condition across groups. Individuals with MS were more unstable during termination. Future research examining the neuromuscular mechanisms contributing to gait termination is warranted. PMID:26228021

  13. Environmental risk factors of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Marie, Isabelle; Gehanno, Jean-François

    2015-09-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) has a complex pathogenesis. Although, there is a growing evidence that environmental factors have an impact on alterations and modulation of epigenetic determinants, resulting in SSc onset and progression. A marked correlation has thus been found between SSc onset and occupational exposure to crystalline silica and the following organic solvents: white spirit, aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents, trichloroethylene, and ketones; the risk associated with high cumulative exposure to silica and organic solvents further appears to be strongly increased in SSc. Altogether, occupational exposure should be systematically checked in all SSc patients at diagnosis, as (1) exposed patients seem to develop more severe forms of SSc and (2) the identification of the occupational agents will allow its interruption, which may lead to potential improvement of SSc outcome. By contrast, based on current published data, there is insufficient evidence that exposure to other chemical agents (including notably pesticides as well as personal care such as silicone and hair dye), physical agents (ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation, electric and magnetic fields), and biological agents (infections and diet, foods, and dietary contaminants) is a causative factor of SSc. Further investigations are still warranted to identify other environmental factors that may be associated with SSc onset and progression. PMID:26141606

  14. Mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Scalfari, Antonio; Knappertz, Volker; Cutter, Gary; Goodin, Douglas S.; Ashton, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is significantly increased compared with the general population. Many questions concerning survival in MS are still unanswered due to the difficulty of comparing information collected at different times and in different geographic areas. The increasing incidence of MS, the improvement in care of the chronically disabled, and different methodologies may explain the lack of coherence among studies' results. Reported times to death from birth and from disease onset/diagnosis are highly variable. Patients older at onset or with primary progressive course have shorter survival; however, data on sex and mortality are contradictory. Changes in sex ratio in MS over time represent one possible explanation. MS is the main cause of death in ≥50% of patients and the incidence of deaths not due to MS varies among countries. Particularly, suicide is substantially increased in patients with MS, and, despite its varying incidence, mainly due to “cultural bias,” it should be considered an MS-related cause of death. Recent results of the long-term follow-up study of interferon-β-1b demonstrated a significant reduction of mortality among treated patients. Notwithstanding its long latency, mortality is therefore an unambiguously valid long-term outcome in randomized controlled trials. It usefully combines the net impact of treatment efficacy on longevity and adverse events, which may reduce it. PMID:23836941

  15. Mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scalfari, Antonio; Knappertz, Volker; Cutter, Gary; Goodin, Douglas S; Ashton, Raymond; Ebers, George C

    2013-07-01

    Mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is significantly increased compared with the general population. Many questions concerning survival in MS are still unanswered due to the difficulty of comparing information collected at different times and in different geographic areas. The increasing incidence of MS, the improvement in care of the chronically disabled, and different methodologies may explain the lack of coherence among studies' results. Reported times to death from birth and from disease onset/diagnosis are highly variable. Patients older at onset or with primary progressive course have shorter survival; however, data on sex and mortality are contradictory. Changes in sex ratio in MS over time represent one possible explanation. MS is the main cause of death in ≥50% of patients and the incidence of deaths not due to MS varies among countries. Particularly, suicide is substantially increased in patients with MS, and, despite its varying incidence, mainly due to "cultural bias," it should be considered an MS-related cause of death. Recent results of the long-term follow-up study of interferon-β-1b demonstrated a significant reduction of mortality among treated patients. Notwithstanding its long latency, mortality is therefore an unambiguously valid long-term outcome in randomized controlled trials. It usefully combines the net impact of treatment efficacy on longevity and adverse events, which may reduce it. PMID:23836941

  16. Multiple sclerosis care in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Victor M; Medina, Marco Tulio; Duron, Reyna M; Macias, Miguel Angel

    2014-05-01

    Before the advent of diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS), it was reported that the prevalence of MS in Mexico was "one of the lowest in the world" (1.6/100,000).(1) The notion that MS was a rare neurologic disease among those living in the tropics of the Americas and Southern latitudes was widely accepted. The geopolitical boundaries of the region identified as Latin America (LA) extend from the southern border of United States with Mexico (32° North latitude) to the Argentinian and Chilean Patagonia in South America (56° South latitude). The largest Spanish-speaking island countries in the Caribbean-Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico-are also traditionally considered part of LA. The continental mass includes 17 countries with a population of more than 550 million. Due to centuries of racial intermixing, it is a heterogeneous and genetically complex population. The blended cultures of native Amerindians with white Caucasian Europeans and black Africans has resulted in the predominant ethnic Latin American Mestizo. The influence of African genetics is notable in many areas of the subcontinent and the Caribbean. A common observation across LA is the absence of identification of MS in non-mixed Amerindians(2); the reason for this phenomenon is unclear. PMID:24799516

  17. [Immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis : review and update].

    PubMed

    Havla, J; Kümpfel, T; Hohlfeld, R

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, presumably autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. Early stages of the disease are characterized by conspicuous inflammation of the white and grey matter. During later stages, presumably secondary neurodegeneration leads to physical disability progression. Over the last decade increasingly effective therapeutic options have been approved. Currently 11 immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapies targeting relapse rate, disease progression and paraclinical disease activity are available, mostly for relapsing forms of MS. However, the ideal of "precision medicine" is still in the distant future since biomarkers for individualized treatment are lacking. For implementation of risk-management plans to minimize the risk of severe side effects, interdisciplinary collaboration between neurologists and internists is essential. In this review article we summarize practical aspects of the implemented risk-management plans, and discuss possible side effects and special caveats of the three new immunotherapies teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab. This article is based on, among others, the recently updated guidelines of the German Society of Neurology. Particular attention is given to the risks of new therapies, monitoring, and on special aspects needing attention when changing treatments. Teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab expand treatment options for relapsing-remitting MS. Treatment selection should take into consideration the safety profile of the substance, previous and concomitant diseases, and other individual factors. This requires in-depth consultation and individual assessment of current disease activity, the potential efficacy of the therapy, and the possible risks and side effects. PMID:25720530

  18. Induction and escalation therapies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fenu, G; Lorefice, L; Frau, F; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease affecting the central nervous system. Pharmacological therapy of MS includes symptomatic drugs, treatment for relapses (corticosteroid and intravenous immunoglobulin) and disease modifying drugs (DMDs) defined as pharmacological agents that have an impact on relapse rate, disability accumulation and radiological outcomes. Two different therapeutic approaches are widely used in MS: escalation and induction therapy. Escalation therapy consists of an early start with first line DMDs (beta interferon, glatiramer acetate, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate) and if DMDs are ineffective or partially effective, switching to second line drugs (mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod). Induction therapy consists of the early use of immunosuppressant drugs followed by long-term maintenance treatment, generally with immunomodulatory agents. While the use of natalizumab and fingolimod as first line drugs is indicated for aggressive forms of MS, the indication for mitoxantrone as an induction treatment arises from randomized studies demonstrating that induction therapy with mitoxantrone followed by DMD maintenance is more effective than monotherapy with beta interferon. However, the safety profile of induction drugs indicates this is not an acceptable therapeutic strategy for all MS patients in all phases of the disease. The upcoming challenge is to identify patients at high risk of disability development from their clinical characteristics, radiological findings or biomarkers. Furthermore, future studies to establish an individual safety profile stratification are needed. PMID:25938688

  19. Sustained-release fampridine in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, S; Baker, M D; Dobson, R

    2014-01-01

    Sustained-release fampridine, a slow release formulation of 4-aminopryridine, is a voltage-dependent potassium channel blocker licensed for the treatment of walking difficulties in multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies have demonstrated that approximately one-third of MS patients respond with a clear benefit to their walking speed. Sustained-release Fampridine is not currently available on the National Health Service (NHS), although it has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA and European Medicine Agency (EMA). It appears to have an acceptable adverse event profile, with data from open-label extension studies now becoming available. Concerns have been raised that the use of fampridine may increase the risk of seizures, which were seen at higher rates in patients treated with high doses of sustained-release fampridine. The rate of seizures in those patients on lower doses has not been found to be significantly increased. There are significant barriers at present to the widespread use of fampridine in the UK, which have limited its use in clinical practice to date. Patients with MS are in need of interventions to improve walking and many clinicians feel that this drug may have a role in the symptomatic management of MS. PMID:25877967

  20. Characteristics of pain in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hanisch, Frank; Skudlarek, Anika; Berndt, Janine; Kornhuber, Malte E

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain is an often underestimated and neglected symptom in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods In a cross-sectional survey, 46 patients with ALS, 46 age- and gender matched population-based controls, and 23 diseased controls with myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) were screened for occurrence, type, distribution, and treatment of pain and cramps. Data were collected with the use of the short form brief pain inventory (BPI). Results Pain was reported in 78% of ALS patients,79% of DM2 patients, and 54% of controls (P < 0.05). More ALS patients than controls reported moderate to severe pain (42% vs. 20%). Pain in ALS patients interfered significantly more with daily activities than in controls (median pain interference score: 3.0 vs. 1.2, P < 0.05), especially enjoyment of life (5.0 vs. 1.0) and mood (3.0 vs. 1.0). There was no correlation between the duration of the disease and the severity of pain. Movement-induced cramps were reported in 63% of ALS patients, mostly in the distal extremities. There was no difference in the duration of ALS disease between patients reporting cramps and those who did not. Discussion Our study showed that pain was a relatively frequent symptom which had an important impact on the quality of life. Pain that requires treatment can occur at every stage of ALS. PMID:25642388

  1. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Cognition and mood.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maria Pia; Krupp, Lauren B; Charvet, Leigh E; Penner, Iris; Till, Christine

    2016-08-30

    In comparison with the large body of evidence on cognitive functioning in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information on cognition in pediatric-onset MS (POMS). Unique vulnerabilities in POMS can derive from having a disease that occurs during key periods of age-expected brain growth, active myelination in the CNS, and maturation of neural networks during the learning curve and key formative years in the academic career of the patient. Therefore, the consequences of MS on developing cognitive faculties can be assessed only in the pediatric population and cannot be simply extrapolated from studies carried on in the adult population. Until the last decade, research in the pediatric population was mainly represented by small clinical series, often limited by the narrow scope of neuropsychological assessment and lack of adequate control groups. Over the last decade, however, cognitive functioning and mood-related difficulties have become an increasing concern as awareness of this population has grown. A few specialized MS centers have begun performing more systematic research in the field in order to assess the prevalence of cognitive impairments and mood-related difficulties in patients with POMS, to better characterize the neuropsychological pattern and determine the functional consequences of these problems. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of cognitive and mood-related difficulties in POMS and highlights perceived gaps in knowledge and priorities for future research. PMID:27572867

  2. Multiple sclerosis: a primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Saguil, Aaron; Kane, Shawn; Farnell, Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common permanently disabling disorder of the central nervous system in young adults. Relapsing remitting MS is the most common type, and typical symptoms include sensory disturbances, Lhermitte sign, motor weakness, optic neuritis, impaired coordination, and fatigue. The course of disease is highly variable. The diagnosis is clinical and involves two neurologic deficits or objective attacks separated in time and space. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful in confirming the diagnosis and excluding mimics. Symptom exacerbations affect 85% of patients with MS. Corticosteroids are the treatment of choice for patients with acute, significant symptoms. Disease-modifying agents should be initiated early in the treatment of MS to forestall disease and preserve function. Two immunomodulatory agents (interferon beta and glatiramer) and five immunosuppressive agents (fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, natalizumab, and mitoxantrone) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of MS, each with demonstrated effectiveness and unique adverse effect profiles. Symptom management constitutes a large part of care; neurogenic bladder and bowel, sexual dysfunction, pain, spasticity, and fatigue are best treated with a multidisciplinary approach to improve quality of life. PMID:25368924

  3. Immune system alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hovden, H; Frederiksen, J L; Pedersen, S W

    2013-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a disease of which the underlying cause and pathogenesis are unknown. Cumulatative data clearly indicates an active participation by the immune system in the disease. An increasingly recognized theory suggests a non-cell autonomous mechanism, meaning that multiple cells working together are necessary for the pathogenesis of the disease. Observed immune system alterations could indicate an active participation in this mechanism. Damaged motor neurons are able to activate microglia, astrocytes and the complement system, which further can influence each other and contribute to neurodegeneration. Infiltrating peripheral immune cells appears to correlate with disease progression, but their significance and composition is unclear. The deleterious effects of this collaborating system of cells appear to outweigh the protective aspects, and revealing this interplay might give more insight into the disease. Markers from the classical complement pathway are elevated where its initiator C1q appears to derive primarily from motor neurons. Activated microglia and astrocytes are found in close proximity to dying motor neurons. Their activation status and proliferation seemingly increases with disease progression. Infiltrating monocytes, macrophages and T cells are associated with these areas, although with mixed reports regarding T cell composition. This literature review will provide evidence supporting the immune system as an important part of ALS disease mechanism and present a hypothesis to direct the way for further studies. PMID:23550891

  4. Epidemiologic correlates of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Armon, C.; Kurland, L.T.; Daube, J.R.; O'Brien, P.C. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors evaluated 74 selected patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 201 matched controls for risk factors for ALS by a case-control design and a sequential questionnaire/interview technique to quantitate biographic data. They analyzed occupational and recreational data only for 47 male patients and 47 corresponding patient controls; data for women were insufficient. They used nonparametric analyses to evaluate five primary comparisons of ALS patients with controls: (1) more hard physical labor, p not significant (NS); (2) greater frequency of neurodegenerative disease in family members, p NS; (3) greater exposure to lead, p less than 0.05; (4) more years lived in a rural community, p NS; and (5) more trauma or major surgery, p NS. Men with ALS had worked more frequently at blue-collar jobs (although not a statistically significant difference, p = 0.10) and at welding or soldering (p less than 0.01). These results suggest that there may be an association between ALS in men and exposure to lead vapor. The limited nature of the association favors a multifactorial etiologic mechanism of ALS.

  5. Olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Min; Yang, Li-Na; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Fu, Ying; Li, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Da-Qi; Zhang, Ningnannan; Liu, Jingchun; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Association of changes in olfactory-related structures with olfactory function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. We used a T&T olfactometer test kit to evaluate olfactory function in 26 patients with MS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Then, Brain MRI were performed and olfactory-related structures were analyzed in these subjects. Olfactory detection and recognition threshold were significantly higher in the MS group, interestingly olfactory recognition threshold positively correlated with expanded disability status scale scores in these patients. Olfactory bulb (OB) volume reduced in patients with olfactory dysfunction (ODF). At the same time, reductions in gray matter (GM) volume were observed in the parahippocampal gyrus (PCG), amygdala, piriform cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus in patients with MS compared to HC. Atrophy of the PCG was more obvious in patients with ODF than patients without ODF and the PCG volume correlated with the olfactory recognition threshold, while no difference was found in fractional anisotropy values of tract-based spatial statistics analysis in the two groups. Olfactory function in patients with MS tends to become gradually more impaired with disability aggravation. Decreases in the volume of the OB and olfactory-related GM might provide valuable information about disease status in patients with MS with olfactory impairment. PMID:27206870

  6. Spinal Cord Ring Enhancement in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Klawiter, Eric C; Benzinger, Tammie; Roy, Abhik; Naismith, Robert T; Parks, Becky J; Cross, Anne H

    2010-01-01

    Objective Describe the clinical and imaging characteristics of spinal cord ring enhancement in multiple sclerosis (MS). Design Clinical case series. Setting Academic referral center. Patients Twenty MS subjects with spinal cord ring enhancement were retrospectively identified from 322 cervical and thoracic spinal cord MRI studies over a 3 year period. Main Outcome Measures Demographics, disability, pattern of enhancement on spinal cord imaging, and concomitant brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were determined. Results Ring enhancement was seen in 20 subjects with spinal cord enhancement, most commonly in the cervical cord. Incomplete or ‘open’ ring enhancement was the dominant pattern in 19 of 20 (95%) subjects. Concurrent ring enhancing brain lesions were present in 40% of subjects. At the time of the MRI, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) ranged from 1.0–7.0 (median 3.0). Conclusion Ring enhancement is not an uncommon pattern for MS spinal cord lesions, occurring with a prevalence of 6.2% (20/322). The most common pattern was incomplete ring enhancement in the cervical spinal cord. Recognition of this pattern may improve and expedite the diagnosis of MS and preclude need for invasive diagnostic interventions. PMID:21060017

  7. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: New Perpectives and Update

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Reis, Carlos Henrique Melo; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; de Souza, Jano Alves; Pupe, Camila; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Bastos, Victor Hugo; de Freitas, Marcos R.G.; Teixeira, Silmar; Bruno, Carlos; Davidovich, Eduardo; Smidt, Benny

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Charcot’s disease or Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a term used to cover the spetrum of syndromes caracterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons, a paralytic disorder caused by motor neuron degeneration. Currently, there are approximately 25,000 patients with ALS in the USA, with an average age of onset of 55 years. The incidence and prevalence of ALS are 1-2 and 4-6 per 100,000 each year, respectively, with a lifetime ALS risk of 1/600 to 1/1000. It causes progressive and cumulative physical disabilities, and leads to eventual death due to respiratory muscle failure. ALS is diverse in its presentation, course, and progression. We do not yet fully understand the causes of the disease, nor the mechanisms for its progression; thus, we lack effective means for treating this disease. In this chapter, we will discuss the diagnosis, treatment, and how to cope with impaired function and end of life based on of our experience, guidelines, and clinical trials. Nowadays ALS seems to be a more complex disease than it did two decades – or even one decade – ago, but new insights have been plentiful. Clinical trials should be seen more as experiments on pathogenic mechanisms. A medication or combination of medications that targets more than one pathogenic pathway may slow disease progression in an additive or synergistic fashion. PMID:26487927

  8. The link between multiple sclerosis and depression.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Anthony; Magalhaes, Sandra; Richard, Jean-Francois; Audet, Blair; Moore, Craig

    2014-09-01

    Depression--be it a formal diagnosis based on consensus clinical criteria, or a collection of symptoms revealed by a self-report rating scale--is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and adds substantially to the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. This Review discusses the prevalence and epidemiology of depression in patients with MS, before covering aetiological factors, including genetics, brain pathology, immunological changes, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and psychosocial influences. Treatment options such as antidepressant drugs, cognitive-behavioural therapy, mindfulness-based therapy, exercise and electroconvulsive therapy are also reviewed in the context of MS-related depression. Frequent comorbid conditions, namely pain, fatigue, anxiety, cognitive dysfunction and alcohol use, are also summarized. The article then explores three key challenges facing researchers and clinicians: what is the optimal way to define depression in the context of diseases such as MS, in which the psychiatric and neurological symptoms overlap; how can current knowledge about the biological and psychological underpinnings of MS-related depression be used to boost the validity of this construct; and can intervention be made more effective through use of combination therapies with additive or synergistic effects, which might exceed the modest benefits derived from their individual components? PMID:25112509

  9. Risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ingre, Caroline; Roos, Per M; Piehl, Fredrik; Kamel, Freya; Fang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common motor neuron disease. It is typically fatal within 2–5 years of symptom onset. The incidence of ALS is largely uniform across most parts of the world, but an increasing ALS incidence during the last decades has been suggested. Although recent genetic studies have substantially improved our understanding of the causes of ALS, especially familial ALS, an important role of non-genetic factors in ALS is recognized and needs further study. In this review, we briefly discuss several major genetic contributors to ALS identified to date, followed by a more focused discussion on the most commonly examined non-genetic risk factors for ALS. We first review factors related to lifestyle choices, including smoking, intake of antioxidants, physical fitness, body mass index, and physical exercise, followed by factors related to occupational and environmental exposures, including electromagnetic fields, metals, pesticides, β-methylamino-L-alanine, and viral infection. Potential links between ALS and other medical conditions, including head trauma, metabolic diseases, cancer, and inflammatory diseases, are also discussed. Finally, we outline several future directions aiming to more efficiently examine the role of non-genetic risk factors in ALS. PMID:25709501

  10. Female reproductive issues in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McCombe, Pamela A; Greer, Judith M

    2013-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is more common in females than males and frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Thus, issues surrounding pregnancy and reproduction are of concern to women with MS. This review documents studies that shed light on reproductive issues in women with MS. The available literature was searched for papers relating to pregnancy and MS. Pregnancy is protective in MS in the short term, perhaps due to modulation of the immune system in pregnancy. It also possible that changes in the brain in pregnancy could protect against the effects of inflammation. The long-term effects of pregnancy also seem to be beneficial to MS, perhaps due to long-term epigenetic changes or possibly due to the effects of fetal microchimerism. Obstetric outcomes in women with MS are similar to those in the general population. In addition, there have been no reports of severe fetal abnormalities in babies exposed to first-line MS therapies. There is no good evidence that breast-feeding is protective in MS. There is no evidence that oral contraceptive pill use predisposes to MS, nor influences the clinical course of MS. After menopause, there is possible deterioration of MS, but it's difficult to disentangle this from the effects of aging and the natural progressive history of MS. The strong biological effect of pregnancy on MS deserves further study, so that these mechanisms can possibly be replicated as therapies for MS. PMID:22733837

  11. Altered Cortical Communication in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Mashour, George A.; Lee, Heonsoo; Huggins, Jane E.; Lee, UnCheol

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder associated primarily with the degeneration of the motor system. More recently, functional connectivity studies have demonstrated potentially adaptive changes in ALS brain organization, but disease-related changes in cortical communication remain unknown. We recruited individuals with ALS and age-matched controls to operate a brain-computer interface while electroencephalography was recorded over three sessions. Using normalized symbolic transfer entropy, we measured directed functional connectivity from frontal to parietal (feedback connectivity) and parietal to frontal (feedforward connectivity) regions. Feedback connectivity was not significantly different between groups, but feedforward connectivity was significantly higher in individuals with ALS. This result was consistent across a broad electroencephalographic spectrum (4 – 35 Hz), and in theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Feedback connectivity has been associated with conscious state and was found to be independent of ALS symptom severity in this study, which may have significant implications for the detection of consciousness in individuals with advanced ALS. We suggest that increases in feedforward connectivity represent a compensatory response to the ALS-related loss of input such that sensory stimuli have sufficient strength to cross the threshold necessary for conscious processing in the global neuronal workspace. PMID:23567743

  12. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Escalation and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Boyko, Alexey; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pohl, Daniela

    2016-08-30

    Over the last 20 years, there have been significant advances in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapeutics, with regulatory approval for 13 therapies in adults by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration. However, there is only limited approval for interferon-β and glatiramer acetate use in children 12 years and older by the EMA. Availability of disease-modifying therapies to children and adolescents with MS is variable by region, and is extremely limited in some regions of the world. Up to 30% of children experience breakthrough disease requiring therapies beyond traditional first-line agents. Recent legislation in both the United States and Europe has mandated clinical studies for all new therapeutics applicable to children. Several clinical trials in children are underway that will provide important information regarding the efficacy and safety of newer drugs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of breakthrough disease, escalation, and induction treatment approaches in children with MS, especially pertaining to disease course and disability outcomes in this group of patients. In addition, ongoing clinical trials and approaches and challenges in conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population are discussed. PMID:27572854

  13. Altered cortical communication in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Mashour, George A; Lee, Heonsoo; Huggins, Jane E; Lee, Uncheol

    2013-05-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder associated primarily with the degeneration of the motor system. More recently, functional connectivity studies have demonstrated potentially adaptive changes in ALS brain organization, but disease-related changes in cortical communication remain unknown. We recruited individuals with ALS and age-matched controls to operate a brain-computer interface while electroencephalography was recorded over three sessions. Using normalized symbolic transfer entropy, we measured directed functional connectivity from frontal to parietal (feedback connectivity) and parietal to frontal (feedforward connectivity) regions. Feedback connectivity was not significantly different between groups, but feedforward connectivity was significantly higher in individuals with ALS. This result was consistent across a broad electroencephalographic spectrum (4-35 Hz), and in theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Feedback connectivity has been associated with conscious state and was found to be independent of ALS symptom severity in this study, which may have significant implications for the detection of consciousness in individuals with advanced ALS. We suggest that increases in feedforward connectivity represent a compensatory response to the ALS-related loss of input such that sensory stimuli have sufficient strength to cross the threshold necessary for conscious processing in the global neuronal workspace. PMID:23567743

  14. Infant health of mothers with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Elsie E; Johnson, Shanda

    2004-10-01

    Controversy surrounds whether mothers with multiple sclerosis (MS) who wish to breast-feed their infants should forego breast-feeding in order to resume immunomodulating therapy following birth even though breast-feeding has not been shown to have deleterious effects on these mothers. Knowledge of potential health benefits to infants through breast-feeding could influence health care providers to encourage mothers with MS who wish to breast-feed to do so. This study of 140 breast-feeding and 35 non-breast-feeding mothers with MS identifies the type and prevalence of illnesses experienced by their infants during the first 6 postpartum months and at 9 months and 12 months. Significantly more non-breast-fed than breast-fed infants experienced otitis media, lower respiratory illness, constipation, milk intolerance, and allergy during the 1st year. Study results support the need to encourage mothers with MS who wish to breast-feed their infants to do so and to delay immunomodulating therapy until breast-feeding cessation. PMID:15359075

  15. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kim A; MacDonald, Megan

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research. PMID:26270955

  16. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pröbstel, Anne-Katrin; Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Derfuss, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s) of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies. PMID:26197319

  17. Multiple Sclerosis: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Miljković, Djordje; Spasojević, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) involves several components: redox, inflammatory/autoimmune, vascular, and neurodegenerative. All of them are supported by the intertwined lines of evidence, and none of them should be written off. However, the exact mechanisms of MS initiation, its development, and progression are still elusive, despite the impressive pace by which the data on MS are accumulating. In this review, we will try to integrate the current facts and concepts, focusing on the role of redox changes and various reactive species in MS. Knowing the schedule of initial changes in pathogenic factors and the key turning points, as well as understanding the redox processes involved in MS pathogenesis is the way to enable MS prevention, early treatment, and the development of therapies that target specific pathophysiological components of the heterogeneous mechanisms of MS, which could alleviate the symptoms and hopefully stop MS. Pertinent to this, we will outline (i) redox processes involved in MS initiation; (ii) the role of reactive species in inflammation; (iii) prooxidative changes responsible for neurodegeneration; and (iv) the potential of antioxidative therapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2286–2334. PMID:23473637

  18. Attributional Style and Depression in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Several etiologic theories have been proposed to explain depression in the general population. Studying these models and modifying them for use in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population may allow us to better understand depression in MS. According to the reformulated learned helplessness (LH) theory, individuals who attribute negative events to internal, stable, and global causes are more vulnerable to depression. This study differentiated attributional style that was or was not related to MS in 52 patients with MS to test the LH theory in this population and to determine possible differences between illness-related and non-illness-related attributions. Patients were administered measures of attributional style, daily stressors, disability, and depressive symptoms. Participants were more likely to list non-MS-related than MS-related causes of negative events on the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ), and more-disabled participants listed significantly more MS-related causes than did less-disabled individuals. Non-MS-related attributional style correlated with stress and depressive symptoms, but MS-related attributional style did not correlate with disability or depressive symptoms. Stress mediated the effect of non-MS-related attributional style on depressive symptoms. These results suggest that, although attributional style appears to be an important construct in MS, it does not seem to be related directly to depressive symptoms; rather, it is related to more perceived stress, which in turn is related to increased depressive symptoms. PMID:24453767

  19. Multiple Sclerosis Affects Skeletal Muscle Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Wens, Inez; Dalgas, Ulrik; Vandenabeele, Frank; Krekels, Maartje; Grevendonk, Lotte; Eijnde, Bert O.

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of multiple sclerosis (MS) on skeletal muscle characteristics, such as muscle fiber cross sectional area (CSA), fiber type proportion, muscle strength and whole muscle mass, remains conflicting. Methods In this cross sectional study, body composition and muscle strength of the quadriceps were assessed in 34 MS (EDSS: 2.5±0.19) patients and 18 matched healthy controls (HC). Hereafter a muscle biopsy (m.vastus lateralis) was taken. Results Compared to HC, mean muscle fiber CSA of all fibers, as well as CSA of type I, II and IIa fibers were smaller and muscle strength of the quadriceps was lower in MS patients. Whole body composition was comparable between groups. However, compared to HC, the biopsied leg tended to have a higher fat percentage (p = 0.1) and a lower lean mass (p = 0.06) in MS patients. Conclusion MS seems to negatively influence skeletal muscle fiber CSA, muscle strength and muscle mass of the lower limbs of mildly affected MS patients. This emphasises the need for rehabilitation programs focusing on muscle preservation of the lower limb. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01845896 PMID:25264868

  20. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Clinical features and outcome.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Amy; Ness, Jayne; Pohl, Daniela; Simone, Isabella Laura; Anlar, Banu; Amato, Maria Pia; Ghezzi, Angelo

    2016-08-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) in children manifests with a relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) disease course. Acute relapses consist of new neurologic deficits persisting greater than 24 hours, in the absence of intercurrent illness, and occur with a higher frequency early in the disease as compared to adult-onset RRMS. Most pediatric patients with MS recover well from these early relapses, and cumulative physical disability is rare in the first 10 years of disease. Brainstem attacks, poor recovery from a single attack, and a higher frequency of attacks portend a greater likelihood of future disability. Although prospective pediatric-onset MS cohorts have been established in recent years, there remains very limited prospective data detailing the longer-term clinical outcome of pediatric-onset MS into adulthood. Whether the advent of MS therapies, and the largely off-label access to such therapies in pediatric MS, has improved prognosis is unknown. MS onset during the key formative academic years, concurrent with active cognitive maturation, is an important determinant of long-term outcome, and is discussed in detail in another article in this supplement. Finally, increasing recognition of pediatric MS worldwide, recent launch of phase III trials for new agents in the pediatric MS population, and the clear imperative to more fully appreciate health-related quality of life in pediatric MS through adulthood highlight the need for standardized, validated, and robust outcome measures. PMID:27572865

  1. [The Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System MSDS. Discussion of a documentation standard for multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pette, M; Eulitz, M

    2002-02-01

    The MSDS (multiple sclerosis documentation system) has been developed at the Department of Neurology, Technical University of Dresden, Germany, during the last 4 years. The first version of this database application has been in use since October 2000. The MSDS manages information on MS patients, their treating physicians, patient history (symptoms, other diseases, biographical history, family history, habits, medication), clinical signs, results of laboratory examinations (blood chemistry, autoantibodies, borrelia serology, evoked potentials, cranial and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging), clinical scores relevant for MS, and biosamples. In principle, MSDS allows online data input and semiautomatically generates reports to all general practitioners and neurologists treating the respective patient. Patient information sheets and internal treatment guidelines are part of the system. During a 3-month evaluation, the first version of MSDS was tested at eight university multiple sclerosis ambulatory care units and one general neurology hospital. The overall judgement was favorable. Suggestions for changes and improvements, as well as practical experiences, were considered when developing MSDS 2.0, which will be available by the end of 2001. PMID:11975090

  2. No evidence for shared genetic basis of common variants in multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Goris, An; van Setten, Jessica; Diekstra, Frank; Ripke, Stephan; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; van Es, Michael; Andersen, Peter M.; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Hardiman, Orla; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Shatunov, Aleksey; Leigh, Nigel; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Mora, Gabriele; Ophoff, Roel A.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Van Damme, Philip; Compston, Alastair; Robberecht, Wim; Dubois, Bénédicte; van den Berg, Leonard H.; De Jager, Philip L.; Veldink, Jan H.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying common variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. From these studies, it has emerged that there is substantial overlap in susceptibility loci between diseases. In line with those findings, we hypothesized that shared genetic pathways may exist between multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While both diseases may have inflammatory and neurodegenerative features, epidemiological studies have indicated an increased co-occurrence within individuals and families. To this purpose, we combined genome-wide data from 4088 MS patients, 3762 ALS patients and 12 030 healthy control individuals in whom 5 440 446 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were successfully genotyped or imputed. We tested these SNPs for the excess association shared between MS and ALS and also explored whether polygenic models of SNPs below genome-wide significance could explain some of the observed trait variance between diseases. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of SNPs as well as polygenic analyses fails to provide evidence in favor of an overlap in genetic susceptibility between MS and ALS. Hence, our findings do not support a shared genetic background of common risk variants in MS and ALS. PMID:24234648

  3. Movement disorders in multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Raja; Jankovic, Joseph

    2013-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by dissemination of the lesions in time and space. While tremor is frequently seen in patients with multiple sclerosis, other movement disorders such as parkinsonism, dystonia, chorea, ballism, paroxysmal dystonia, paroxysmal chorea, myoclonus, tourettism, restless leg syndrome and hemifacial spasm are less frequently reported. In this systematic review of the literature, we describe the different movement disorders reported in patients with multiple sclerosis and attempt to characterize their relation with the underlying demyelinating process. We also summarize the reports of movement disorders described in other demyelinating diseases such as neuromyelitis optica, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and central pontine myelinolysis. PMID:23522528

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Multiple Sclerosis in Children.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Mohammad Amin; Nasr, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates the safety and well toleration of treatment by Disease-modifying in children suffering multiple sclerosis (MS). The treatment is not straight forward in a great number of patients, thus patients with pediatric MS must be managed by experienced specialized centers. Common treatments of multiple sclerosis for adults are first-line therapies. These therapies (firstline) are safe for children. Failure in treatment that leads to therapy alteration is almost prevalent in pediatric MS. Toleration against current second-line therapies has been shown in multiple sclerosis children. Oral agents have not been assessed in children MS patients. Although clinical trials in children are insufficient, immunomodulating managed children, experience a side effect similar to the adult MS patients. However, further prospective clinical studies, with large sample size and long follow-up are needed to distinguish the benefits and probable side effects of pediatric MS therapies. PMID:27375751

  5. Mechanisms and pharmacology of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, T; Kerr, B J; Taylor, B K

    2014-01-01

    The neuropathic pain of multiple sclerosis is quite prevalent and severely impacts quality of life. A few randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trials suggest that cannabis- and anticonvulsant-based treatments provide partial pain relief, but at the expense of adverse events. An even smaller, but emerging, number of translational studies are using rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which exhibit pain-like behaviors resembling those of Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. These studies not only support the possible effectiveness of anticonvulsants, but also compel further clinical trials with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, or drugs which interfere with glutamatergic neurotransmission. Future behavioral studies in EAE models are essential toward a new pharmacotherapy of multiple sclerosis pain. PMID:24590824

  6. Clinically silent seizures in a neonate with tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Mitsuru; Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Hisata, Ken; Shoji, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Although seizures during infancy in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are common, seizures in neonates are infrequent. Here, we report the clinical course and electroencephalography (EEG) findings of a neonate with tuberous sclerosis complex associated with clinically silent seizures. The patient was a girl in whom cardiac tumors were detected on fetal ultrasonography. Brain magnetic resonance imaging during the neonatal period showed subependymal and cortical tubers. Routine EEG indicated unexpected ictal changes with no noticeable clinical symptoms. Ictal EEG was associated with a subtle increase in heart rate and a brief increase in chin electromyogram. These changes were difficult to identify clinically. The patient later developed focal seizures and epileptic spasms and had severe psychomotor delay. The present case suggests the occurrence of clinically silent seizures before the appearance of epileptic spasms in infants with tuberous sclerosis, and that EEG is an option for neonates with a prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26712128

  7. Disconnection as a mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dineen, R A; Vilisaar, J; Hlinka, J; Bradshaw, C M; Morgan, P S; Constantinescu, C S; Auer, D P

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been studied. We apply tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in a cohort of multiple sclerosis patients to identify loci where reduced white matter tract fractional anisotropy (FA) predicts impaired performance in cognitive testing. Thirty-seven multiple sclerosis patients in remission (median age 43.5 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale range 1.5-6.5; 35 relapsing remitting, two secondary-progressive) underwent 3 T MRI including high-resolution DTI. Multiple sclerosis patients underwent formal testing of performance in multiple cognitive domains. Normalized cognitive scores were used for voxel-wise statistical analysis using TBSS, while treating age as a covariate of no interest. Permutation-based inference on cluster size (t > 2, P <0.05 corrected) was used to correct for multiple comparisons. Statistical mapping revealed differential patterns of FA reduction for tests of sustained attention, working memory and processing speed, visual working memory and verbal learning and recall. FA was not associated with frontal lobe function or visuospatial perception. Cognitively relevant tract localizations only partially overlapped with areas of high FLAIR lesion probability, confirming the contribution of normal-appearing white matter abnormality to cognitive dysfunction. Of note, tract localizations showing significant associations with cognitive impairment were found to interconnect cortical regions thought to be involved in processing in these cognitive domains, or involve possible compensatory processing pathways. This suggests that TBSS reveals functionally relevant tract injury underlying

  8. Multiple sclerosis treatment and infectious issues: update 2013

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, A; Loebermann, M; Reisinger, E C; Zettl, U K

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulation and immunosuppression are generally linked to an increased risk of infection. In the growing field of new and potent drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS), we review the current data concerning infections and prevention of infectious diseases. This is of importance for recently licensed and future MS treatment options, but also for long-term established therapies for MS. Some of the disease-modifying therapies (DMT) go along with threats of specific severe infections or complications, which require a more intensive long-term monitoring and multi-disciplinary surveillance. We update the existing warning notices and infectious issues which have to be considered using drugs for multiple sclerosis. PMID:24134716

  9. HLA and multiple sclerosis in south east Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Swingler, R J; Kirk, P F; Darke, C; Compston, D A

    1987-01-01

    A stronger association has been found between multiple sclerosis and HLA-DR2 than -DQwl in south east Wales (prevalence c 113/10(5)) in contrast to recent observations in north east Scotland (prevalence 178/10(5). The complex relationship between the HLA system and multiple sclerosis, demonstrated in this and other studies, is explained more easily under a polygenic model of inheritance, in which environmental events and genes interact, than by the presence of a single susceptibility gene. PMID:3499485

  10. Renal Cell Carcinoma in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping; Cornejo, Kristine M.; Sadow, Peter M.; Cheng, Liang; Wang, Mingsheng; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Zhong; Oliva, Esther; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Feldman, Adam S.; Paul, Elahna; Thiele, Elizabeth A.; Yu, Jane J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Young, Robert H.; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) occurs in 2-4% of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Previous reports have noted a variety of histologic appearances in these cancers, but the full spectrum of morphologic and molecular features has not been fully elucidated. We encountered 46 renal epithelial neoplasms from 19 TSC patients and analyzed their clinical, pathological and molecular features, enabling separation of these 46 tumors into three groups. The largest subset of tumors (n=24) had a distinct morphological, immunological and molecular profile, including prominent papillary architecture and uniformly deficient SDHB expression prompting the novel term “TSC-associated papillary RCC.” The second group (n=15) was morphologically similar to a hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumor (HOCT) while the last 7 renal epithelial neoplasms of group 3 remained unclassifiable. The TSC-associated papillary RCCs (PRCC) had prominent papillary architecture lined by clear cells with delicate eosinophilic cytoplasmic thread-like strands that occasionally appeared more prominent and aggregated to form eosinophilic globules. All 24 (100%) of these tumors were the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) nucleolar grade 2 or 3 with mostly basally located nuclei. Tumor cells from 17 of 24 TSC-associated PRCC showed strong, diffuse labeling for CA-IX (100%), CK7 (94%), vimentin (88%), CD10 (83%), and were uniformly negative for succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB), TFE3 and AMACR. Gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 were found in 2 tumors, whereas chromosome 3p deletion and TFE3 translocations were not detected. In this study, we reported a sizable cohort of renal tumors seen in TSC and were able to identify them as different morphotypes which may help to expand the morphologic spectrum of TSC-associated RCC. PMID:24832166

  11. Role of Pathogens in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Libbey, Jane E.; Cusick, Matthew F.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Although the etiology of MS is unknown, genetic and environmental factors play a role. Infectious pathogens are the likely environmental factors involved in the development of MS. Pathogens associated with the development or exacerbation of MS include bacteria, such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae, the Staphylococcus aureus-produced enterotoxins that function as superantigens, viruses of the herpes virus (Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus 6) and human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) families and the protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii. Evidence, from studies with humans and animal models, supporting the association of these various pathogens with the development and/or exacerbation of MS will be discussed along with the potential mechanisms including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading and bystander activation. In contrast, infection with certain parasites such as helminthes (Schistosoma mansoni, Fasciola hepatica, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercolaris, Enterobius vermicularis) appears to protect against the development or exacerbation of MS. Evidence supporting the ability of parasitic infections to protect against disease will be discussed along with a brief summary of a recent Phase I clinical trial testing the ability of Trichuris suis ova treatment to improve the clinical course of MS. A complex interaction between the CNS (including the blood-brain barrier), multiple infections with various infectious agents (occurring in the periphery or within the CNS), and the immune response to those various infections may have to be deciphered before the etiology of MS can be fully understood. PMID:24266364

  12. Sleep-disordered breathing in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Benjamin M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to assess the prevalence and severity of sleep apnea in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) referred for overnight polysomnography (PSG) and to explore the radiographic and clinical features that might signal risk for undiagnosed sleep apnea. Methods: Apnea-hypopnea (AHI) and central apnea indices (CAI) from laboratory-based PSG among 48 patients with MS were compared with those of group A, 84 sleep laboratory−referred patients without MS matched for age, gender, and body mass index; and group B, a separate group of 48 randomly selected, referred patients. Results: Mean AHI was higher among patients with MS than among control groups A or B (2-way analysis of variance and multiple linear regression, p = 0.0011 and 0.0118, respectively). Median and mean CAI were also increased among patients with MS in comparison to control groups (Wilcoxon signed rank and multiple linear regression, p = 0.0064 and 0.0027, respectively). Among MS patients with available data, those with evidence of brainstem involvement, compared with groups A and B, showed particularly robust differences in AHI (p = 0.0060 and 0.0016) and CAI (p = 0.0215 and <0.0001). In contrast, MS patients without brainstem involvement, compared with groups A and B, showed diminished differences in AHI, and CAI did not significantly differ among groups. Conclusions: These data suggest a predisposition for obstructive sleep apnea and accompanying central apneas among patients with MS, particularly among those with brainstem involvement. PMID:22895593

  13. Fatigue and Comorbidities in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fiest, Kirsten M.; Fisk, John D.; Patten, Scott B.; Tremlett, Helen; Wolfson, Christina; Warren, Sharon; McKay, Kyla A.; Berrigan, Lindsay I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Fatigue is commonly reported by people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Comorbidity is also common in MS, but its association with the presence of fatigue or fatigue changes over time is poorly understood. Methods: Nine hundred forty-nine people with definite MS were recruited from four Canadian centers. The Fatigue Impact Scale for Daily Use and a validated comorbidity questionnaire were completed at three visits over 2 years. Participants were classified into groups with no fatigue versus any fatigue. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between fatigue and each comorbidity at baseline, year 1, year 2, and overall. Results: The incidence of fatigue during the study was 38.8%. The prevalence of fatigue was greater in those who were older (P = .0004), had a longer time since symptom onset (P = .005), and had greater disability (P < .0001). After adjustment, depression (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03–3.27), irritable bowel syndrome (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.18–2.48), migraine (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.27–2.27), and anxiety (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.15–2.16) were independently associated with fatigue that persisted during the study. There was also an individual-level effect of depression on worsening fatigue (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.08–2.07). Conclusions: Comorbidity is associated with fatigue in MS. Depression is associated with fatigue and with increased risk of worsening fatigue over 2 years. However, other comorbid conditions commonly associated with MS are also associated with persistent fatigue, even after accounting for depression. Further investigation is required to understand the mechanisms by which comorbidities influence fatigue. PMID:27134583

  14. Role of pathogens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Cusick, Matthew F; Fujinami, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Although the etiology of MS is unknown, genetic and environmental factors play a role. Infectious pathogens are the likely environmental factors involved in the development of MS. Pathogens associated with the development or exacerbation of MS include bacteria, such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae, the Staphylococcus aureus-produced enterotoxins that function as superantigens, viruses of the herpes virus (Epstein-Barr virus and human herpesvirus 6) and human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) families and the protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii. Evidence, from studies with humans and animal models, supporting the association of these various pathogens with the development and/or exacerbation of MS will be discussed along with the potential mechanisms including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading and bystander activation. In contrast, infection with certain parasites such as helminthes (Schistosoma mansoni, Fasciola hepatica, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercolaris, Enterobius vermicularis) appears to protect against the development or exacerbation of MS. Evidence supporting the ability of parasitic infections to protect against disease will be discussed along with a brief summary of a recent Phase I clinical trial testing the ability of Trichuris suis ova treatment to improve the clinical course of MS. A complex interaction between the CNS (including the blood-brain barrier), multiple infections with various infectious agents (occurring in the periphery or within the CNS), and the immune response to those various infections may have to be deciphered before the etiology of MS can be fully understood. PMID:24266364

  15. Serum Neurotrophin Profile in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lise, Marie-Claude; Sparsa, Agnès; Marie, Isabelle; Lalloué, Fabrice; Ly, Kim; Martel, Clothilde; Bezanahary, Holy; Gondran, Guillaume; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie; Vidal, Elisabeth; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Fauchais, Anne-Laure

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurotrophins (NTs) are able to activate lymphocytes and fibroblasts; they can modulate angiogenesis and sympathic vascular function. Thus, they can be implicated in the three pathogenic processes of systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aims of this study are to determine blood levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in SSc and to correlate them with clinical and biological data. Methods Serum samples were obtained from 55 SSc patients and 32 control subjects to measure NTs levels by ELISA and to determine their relationships with SSc profiles. Findings Serum NGF levels were higher in SSc patients (288.26±170.34 pg/mL) than in control subjects (170.34±50.8 pg/mL, p<0.001) and correlated with gammaglobulins levels and the presence of both anti-cardiolipin and anti-Scl-70 antibodies (p<0.05). In contrast, BDNF levels were lower in SSc patients than in controls (1121.9±158.1 vs 1372.9±190.9 pg/mL, p<0.0001), especially in pulmonary arterial hypertension and diffuse SSc as compared to limited forms (all p<0.05). NT-3 levels were similar in SSc and in the control group (2657.2±2296 vs 2959.3±2555 pg/mL, NS). BDNF levels correlated negatively with increased NGF levels in the SSc group (and not in controls). Conclusion Low BDNF serum levels were not previously documented in SSc, particularly in the diffuse SSc subset and in patients with pulmonary hypertension or anti-Scl-70 antibodies. The negative correlation between NGF and BDNF levels observed in SSc and not in healthy controls could be implicated in sympathic vascular dysfunction in SSc. PMID:21085492

  16. Macrophage subsets and microglia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Jeroen F J; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2014-08-01

    Along with microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, macrophages in the perivascular space, choroid plexus, and meninges are the principal effector cells in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. These phagocytes are highly heterogeneous cells displaying spatial- and temporal-dependent identities in the healthy, injured, and inflamed CNS. In the last decade, researchers have debated on whether phagocytes subtypes and phenotypes are pathogenic or protective in CNS pathologies. In the context of this dichotomy, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the spatiotemporal physiology of macrophage subsets and microglia in the healthy and diseased CNS, and elaborate on factors regulating their behavior. In addition, the impact of macrophages present in lymphoid organs on CNS pathologies is defined. The prime focus of this review is on multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, neurodegeneration, and CNS repair, and in which microglia and macrophages have been extensively scrutinized. On one hand, microglia and macrophages promote neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative events in MS by releasing inflammatory mediators and stimulating leukocyte activity and infiltration into the CNS. On the other hand, microglia and macrophages assist in CNS repair through the production of neurotrophic factors and clearance of inhibitory myelin debris. Finally, we define how microglia and macrophage physiology can be harnessed for new therapeutics aimed at suppressing neuroinflammatory and cytodegenerative events, as well as promoting CNS repair. We conclude that microglia and macrophages are highly dynamic cells displaying disease stage and location-specific fates in neurological disorders. Changing the physiology of divergent phagocyte subsets at particular disease stages holds promise for future therapeutics for CNS pathologies. PMID:24952885

  17. Rehabilitation interventions in multiple sclerosis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Beer, Serafin; Khan, Fary; Kesselring, Jürg

    2012-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex, heterogeneous disease associated with long-term disability. Despite the availability of advanced disease-modifying and symptomatic therapies that may decrease activity and progression of disease and alleviate complaints to a certain extent, there is still a need for comprehensive rehabilitation interventions in order to reduce sequels and symptoms of the disease on personal activities and social participation to achieve the highest possible independence and the best quality of life. Timing and setting of rehabilitation interventions should be selected individually depending on disease phase, functional deficits, personal requirements, as well as specific goals. In addition, limitations and disease-specific characteristics that may influence rehabilitation outcome should be noted. Rehabilitation interventions should be considered early for maintaining functional capacity and reducing risk for losing important abilities or independence. Due to gradual failure of adaptive compensatory mechanisms along the course of disease, benefits of rehabilitation interventions are generally higher in earlier phases of MS. Inpatient and outpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability, participation and quality of life despite progression of the disease. Good evidence exists for different specific interventions improving physical and cognitive performance. Other important issues responsible for beneficial effects of comprehensive rehabilitation in MS include education, instruction, and information of patients and caregivers. Comprehensive assessment of health domains in MS patients using standardized framework and common language for describing the impact of disease at different levels, using International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) core sets may increase the knowledge of needs of these patients for more efficient and adapted rehabilitation interventions meeting these

  18. Clutter Management for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although there is substantial anecdotal evidence that clutter is common among people with multiple sclerosis (MS), the literature contains no reports of studies on the actual prevalence of the problem or its impact on functional performance in this population. Clutter promotes confusion and places individuals in potentially dangerous situations by increasing their risks of falling, losing medications, and misplacing important documents. In addition, it may negatively affect activities of daily living (ADLs). Many common MS symptoms such as decreased mobility, visual or cognitive changes, fatigue, and depression can exacerbate clutter accumulation, which in turn can have detrimental effects on physical, financial, emotional, cognitive, and social functioning. It is critical for MS clinicians to address clutter management in order to improve patients' overall functional independence and participation. Methods: A clutter reduction protocol was developed and implemented at our institution for individuals with MS. Our group program addresses psychosocial issues preventing organization and offers practical strategies for clutter removal and management to improve performance in ADLs. A clutter questionnaire is administered to individuals before and after their participation in the group program. Results: Anecdotal reports indicate that the intervention helped to reduce clutter, promote a more realistic attitude toward “possessions,” and establish a sense of accomplishment in controlling one's environment. Participants also reported fewer falls, feeling less isolated, increased ease in finding their medications, and a general sense of cognitive clarity in accomplishing ADLs. Outcome assessments are now being developed to objectively measure these effects as well as the prevalence of clutter within the MS population. Conclusions: Clutter management is an important area for MS clinicians to address because it can significantly affect patients' functioning

  19. PESTICIDE EXPOSURE AND AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Freya; Umbach, David M; Bedlack, Richard S; Richards, Marie; Watson, Mary; Alavanja, Michael CR; Blair, Aaron; Hoppin, Jane A; Schmidt, Silke; Sandler, Dale P

    2012-01-01

    Our objectives were to summarize literature on the association of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with pesticides as a group and to evaluate associations of ALS with specific pesticides. We conducted a meta-analysis of published studies of ALS and pesticides as a group and investigated the association of ALS with specific pesticides, using data from the Agricultural Health Study (AHS), a cohort including 84,739 private pesticide applicators and spouses. AHS participants provided information on pesticide use at enrollment in 1993-1997. In mortality data collected through February, 2010, ALS was recorded on death certificates of 41 individuals whom we compared to the remaining cohort (controls), using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age and gender to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. In the meta-analysis, ALS was associated with use of pesticides as a group (1.9, 1.1-3.1). In the AHS, ALS was not associated with pesticides as a group, but was associated with use of organochlorine insecticides (OCs) (1.6, 0.8-3.5), pyrethroids (1.4, 0.6-3.4), herbicides (1.6, 0.7-3.7), and fumigants (1.8, 0.8-3.9). ORs were elevated for ever use of the specific OCs aldrin (2.1, 0.8-5.1), dieldrin (2.6, 0.9-7.3), DDT (2.1, 0.9-5.0), and toxaphene (2.0, 0.8-4.9). None of these associations was statistically significant. Similar results were observed in an analysis restricted to men. In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that ALS risk is associated with use of pesticides as a group, and our analysis of AHS data points to OC use in particular. The latter results are novel but based on a small number of cases and require replication in other populations. PMID:22521219

  20. Central hyperacusis with phonophobia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Pfadenhauer, K; Stöhr, M; Rösler, A

    2002-12-01

    Hearing disorders are a well-described symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Unilateral or bilateral hyperacusis or deafness in patients with normal sound audiometry is often attributed to demyelinating lesions in the central auditory pathway. Less known in MS is a central phonophobia, whereby acoustic stimuli provoke unpleasant and painful paresthesia and lead to the corresponding avoidance behaviour. In our comparison collective, patient 1 described acute shooting pain attacks in his right cheek each time set off by the ringing of the telephone. Patient 2 complained of intensified, unbearable noise sensations when hearing nonlanguage acoustic stimuli. Patient 3 noticed hearing unpleasant echoes and disorders of the directional hearing. All patients had a clinical brainstem syndrome. ENT inspection, sound audiometry and stapedius reflex were normal. All three patients had pathologically changed auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) with indications of a brainstem lesion, and in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demyelinating lesions in the ipsilateral pons and in the central auditory pathway. The origin we presume in case 1 is an abnormal impulse conduction from the leminiscus lateralis to the central trigeminus pathway and, in the other cases, a disturbance in the central sensory modulation. All patients developed in the further course a clinically definite MS. Having excluded peripheral causes for a hyperacusis, such as, e.g., an idiopathic facial nerve palsy or myasthenia gravis, one should always consider the possibility of MS in a case of central phonophobia. Therapeutic possibilities include the giving of serotonin reuptake inhibitors or acoustic lenses for clearly definable disturbing frequencies. PMID:12474992

  1. Rodent Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Thomas; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease affecting upper and lower motor neurons in the CNS. Patients with ALS develop extensive muscle wasting and atrophy leading to paralysis and death 3-5 years after disease onset. ALS may be familial (fALS 10%) or sporadic ALS (sALS, 90%). The large majority of fALS) cases are due to genetic mutations in the Superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1, 15% of fALS) and repeat nucleotide expansions in the gene encoding C9ORF72 (around 40-50% of fALS and ~10% of sALS). From a wide range of pathological studies the general conclusion is that ALS disease is mediated through aberrant protein homeostasis (ie ER stress and autophagy) and/or changes in RNA processing (as seen in all non-SOD1-mediated ALS). In all of these cases, animal models suggest that the disease is mediated non-cell-autonomously, i.e. not only motor neurons are involved, but glial cells including microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and other neuronal subpopulations are also implicated in disease pathogenesis. This overview will give a chronological overview of a wide range of different ALS rodent models generated so far with a thorough description of their intrinsic advantages and disadvantages. We will focus on their respective correlation with disease as seen in humans and their potential for understanding basic disease biology. As RNA processing has more recently come to the foreground of ALS research, we will mainly focus on a thorough description of the most recently generated ALS rodent models. PMID:26344214

  2. The Importance of NAD in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Penberthy, W. Todd; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown but it manifests as a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease in the central nervous system (CNS). During chronic CNS inflammation, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) concentrations are altered by (T helper) Th1-derived cytokines through the coordinated induction of both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and the ADP cyclase CD38 in pathogenic microglia and lymphocytes. While IDO activation may keep auto-reactive T cells in check, hyper-activation of IDO can leave neuronal CNS cells starving for extracellular sources of NAD. Existing data indicate that glia may serve critical functions as an essential supplier of NAD to neurons during times of stress. Administration of pharmacological doses of non-tryptophan NAD precursors ameliorates pathogenesis in animal models of MS. Animal models of MS involve artificially stimulated autoimmune attack of myelin by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or by viral-mediated demyelination using Thieler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). The WldS mouse dramatically resists razor axotomy mediated axonal degeneration. This resistance is due to increased efficiency of NAD biosynthesis that delays stress-induced depletion of axonal NAD and ATP. Although the WldS genotype protects against EAE pathogenesis, TMEV-mediated pathogenesis is exacerbated. In this review, we contrast the role of NAD in EAE versus TMEV demyelinating pathogenesis to increase our understanding of the pharmacotherapeutic potential of NAD signal transduction pathways. We speculate on the importance of increased SIRT1 activity in both PARP-1 inhibition and the potentially integral role of neuronal CD200 interactions through glial CD200R with induction of IDO in MS pathogenesis. A comprehensive review of immunomodulatory control of NAD biosynthesis and degradation in MS pathogenesis is presented. Distinctive pharmacological approaches designed for NAD-complementation or targeting NAD

  3. Managed care aspects of managing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gary M

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system usually diagnosed in the second or third decade of life; MS is more common among women than men by a ratio of 3 to 1. With its relatively early age of onset and symptoms that impair patients' quality of life, MS requires lifelong, dynamic treatment, and places a substantial economic burden on individuals, healthcare systems, and society. The costs associated with providing benefits for MS therapy are growing rapidly and the increasing complexity of the MS market is impacting disease management for payers. Employers are also increasingly aware of the costs associated with MS and are asking health plans to advise on the most appropriate and cost-effective ways to manage both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for MS. Health plans, by necessity, must therefore balance appropriate access to treatments for MS with the need to manage rising treatment costs. To meet this goal, payers require population-based solutions, guidelines, and treatment algorithms for the management of MS that can be used in clinical and formulary management decision making in the context of an evolving therapeutic landscape. Further, comparative studies are necessary for payers to determine which agents may work best on a population basis. Due to the current lack of appropriate clinical guidance and insufficient head-to-head data on disease-modifying drugs, strategies for health plans and clinical management have been designed using the best available evidence. Undoubtedly, management of this class will continue to evolve with the launch of newer agents. PMID:24494620

  4. Epigenetics of multiple sclerosis: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Küçükali, Cem İsmail; Kürtüncü, Murat; Çoban, Arzu; Çebi, Merve; Tüzün, Erdem

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease characterized with autoimmune response against myelin proteins and progressive axonal loss. The heterogeneity of the clinical course and low concordance rates in monozygotic twins have indicated the involvement of complex heritable and environmental factors in MS pathogenesis. MS is more often transmitted to the next generation by mothers than fathers suggesting an epigenetic influence. One of the possible reasons of this parent-of-origin effect might be the human leukocyte antigen-DRB1*15 allele, which is the major risk factor for MS and regulated by epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. Moreover, major environmental risk factors for MS, vitamin D deficiency, smoking and Ebstein-Barr virus are all known to exert epigenetic changes. In the last few decades, compelling evidence implicating the role of epigenetics in MS has accumulated. Increased or decreased acetylation, methylation and citrullination of genes regulating the expression of inflammation and myelination factors appear to be particularly involved in the epigenetics of MS. Although much less is known about epigenetic factors causing neurodegeneration, epigenetic mechanisms regulating axonal loss, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction in MS are in the process of identification. Additionally, expression levels of several microRNAs (miRNAs) (e.g., miR-155 and miR-326) are increased in MS brains and potential mechanisms by which these factors might influence MS pathogenesis have been described. Certain miRNAs may also be potentially used as diagnostic biomarkers in MS. Several reagents, especially histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to ameliorate the symptoms of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Ongoing efforts in this field are expected to result in characterization of epigenetic factors that can be used in prediction of treatment responsive MS patients, diagnostic screening panels

  5. Effects of diazoxide in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Arroyo, Rafael; Paul, Friedemann; Meca-Lallana, Virginia; Ramo, Cristina; Fernandez, Oscar; Saiz, Albert; Garcia-Merino, Antonio; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Casanova, Bonaventura; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Muñoz, Delicias; Martinez-Rodriguez, Jose Enrique; Lensch, Eckart; Prieto, Jose Maria; Meuth, Sven G.; Nuñez, Xavier; Campás, Clara; Pugliese, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to test the safety of diazoxide and to search for signs of efficacy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial (treatment allocation was concealed), 102 patients with RRMS were randomized to receive a daily oral dose of diazoxide (0.3 and 4 mg/d) or placebo for 24 weeks (NCT01428726). The primary endpoint was the cumulative number of new T1 gadolinium-enhancing lesions per patient, recorded every 4 weeks from week 4 to week 24. Secondary endpoints included brain MRI variables such as the number of new/enlarging T2 lesions and the percentage brain volume change (PBVC); clinical variables such as the percentage of relapse-free patients, relapse rate, and change in the Expanded Disability Status Scale score; and safety and tolerability. Results: Diazoxide was well-tolerated and it produced no serious adverse events other than 1 case of Hashimoto disease. At the 2 doses tested, diazoxide did not improve the primary endpoint or the MRI and clinical variables related to the presence of new lesions or relapses. Patients treated with diazoxide showed reduced PBVC compared with the placebo group, although such changes could be confounded by the higher disease activity of the treated group and the vascular effects of diazoxide. Conclusion: At the doses tested, oral diazoxide did not decrease the appearance of new lesions evident by MRI. The effects in slowing the progression of brain atrophy require further validation. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with RRMS, diazoxide (0.3 and 4 mg/d) does not significantly change the number of new MRI T1 gadolinium-enhancing lesions. PMID:26405686

  6. Pharmacogenomic study in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Morcillo-Suárez, Carlos; Malhotra, Sunny; Rio, Jordi; Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Zettl, Uwe K.; Killestein, Joep; Brassat, David; García-Merino, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio J.; Urcelay, Elena; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Villar, Lusia M.; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Farré, Xavier; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, Alfredo; Drulovic, Jelena S.; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Chan, Andrew; Oksenberg, Jorge; Navarro, Arcadi; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between polymorphisms located in type I interferon (IFN)-induced genes, genes belonging to the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, and genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors and the response to IFN-β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In a first or screening phase of the study, 384 polymorphisms were genotyped in 830 patients with MS classified into IFN-β responders (n = 416) and nonresponders (n = 414) according to clinical criteria. In a second or validation phase, the most significant polymorphisms associated with IFN-β response were genotyped in an independent validation cohort of 555 patients with MS (281 IFN-β responders and 274 nonresponders). Results: Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from the screening phase for further validation: rs832032 (GABRR3; p = 0.0006), rs6597 (STUB1; p = 0.019), rs3747517 (IFIH1; p = 0.010), rs2277302 (PELI3; p = 0.017), rs10958713 (IKBKB; p = 0.003), rs2834202 (IFNAR1; p = 0.030), and rs4422395 (CXCL1; p = 0.017). None of these SNPs were significantly associated with IFN-β response when genotyped in an independent cohort of patients. Combined analysis of these SNPs in all patients with MS (N = 1,385) revealed 2 polymorphisms associated with IFN-β response: rs2277302 (PELI3; p = 0.008) and rs832032 (GABRR3; p = 0.006). Conclusions: These findings do not support an association between polymorphisms located in genes related to the type I IFN or TLR pathways or genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors and the clinical response to IFN-β. Nevertheless, additional genetic and functional studies of PELI3 and GABRR3 are warranted. PMID:26445728

  7. Suicide among patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Fürst, Carl Johan; Hultman, Christina; Fall, Katja; Sparén, Pär; Ye, Weimin

    2008-10-01

    Studies on the suicide risk among patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in countries without legalized euthanasia or assisted suicide are important additions to data on the wish to die of these patients. We conducted a population-based cohort study in Sweden between 1965 and 2004, which comprised of 6,642 patients with incident ALS identified from the Swedish Inpatient Register. We calculated the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of suicide among the patients using the suicide rates of the general Swedish population as a reference. In total, 21 patients committed suicide during follow-up, compared to the predicted 3.6 suicides. Thus, we noted an almost 6-fold increased risk for suicide among ALS patients [SMR 5.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.6-8.8]. Patients who committed suicide were, on average, around 7 years younger at the time of their first period of hospitalization than patients who did not commit suicide. The highest relative risk for suicide was observed within the first year after the patient's first period of hospitalization (SMR 11.2, 95% CI 5.8-19.6). After that, the relative risks decreased with time after hospitalization (P-value for trend = 0.006), but remained elevated 3 years later. The relative risks of suicide among ALS patients did not show a clear trend over time in contrast to the decreasing trend of relative risks for suicide among patients with cancer during the same period. Patients with ALS are at excess risk of suicide in Sweden and the relative risk is higher during the earlier stage of the disease. PMID:18669498

  8. Renal cell carcinoma in tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Cornejo, Kristine M; Sadow, Peter M; Cheng, Liang; Wang, Mingsheng; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Zhong; Oliva, Esther; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Nussbaum, Robert L; Feldman, Adam S; Paul, Elahna; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Yu, Jane J; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Young, Robert H; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2014-07-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) occurs in 2% to 4% of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Previous reports have noted a variety of histologic appearances in these cancers, but the full spectrum of morphologic and molecular features has not been fully elucidated. We encountered 46 renal epithelial neoplasms from 19 TSC patients and analyzed their clinical, pathologic, and molecular features, enabling separation of these 46 tumors into 3 groups. The largest subset of tumors (n=24) had a distinct morphologic, immunologic, and molecular profile, including prominent papillary architecture and uniformly deficient succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) expression prompting the novel term "TSC-associated papillary RCC (PRCC)." The second group (n=15) were morphologically similar to a hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumor (HOCT), whereas the last 7 renal epithelial neoplasms of group 3 remained unclassifiable. The TSC-associated PRCCs had prominent papillary architecture lined by clear cells with delicate eosinophilic cytoplasmic thread-like strands that occasionally appeared more prominent and aggregated to form eosinophilic globules. All 24 (100%) of these tumors were International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) nucleolar grade 2 or 3 with mostly basally located nuclei. Tumor cells from 17 of 24 TSC-associated PRCCs showed strong, diffuse labeling for carbonic anhydrase IX (100%), CK7 (94%), vimentin (88%), and CD10 (83%) and were uniformly negative for SDHB, TFE3, and AMACR. Gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 were found in 2 tumors, whereas chromosome 3p deletion and TFE3 translocations were not detected. In this study, we reported a sizable cohort of renal tumors seen in TSC and were able to identify them as different morphotypes, which may help to expand the morphologic spectrum of TSC-associated RCC. PMID:24832166

  9. The genetic epidemiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Compston, A

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated an interplay between genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). There is a familial recurrence rate of approximately 15%. Meta-analysis of the recurrence risk shows that the rate is highest overall for siblings, then parents and children, with lower rates in second- and third-degree relatives. Recurrence is highest for monozygotic twins. Conversely, the frequency in adoptees is similar to the population lifetime risk. The age-adjusted risk for half siblings is also less than for full siblings. Recurrence is higher in the children of conjugal pairs with MS than the offspring of single affected. These classical genetic observations suggest that MS is a complex trait in which susceptibility is determined by several genes acting independently or epistatically. Comparisons between co-affected sibling pairs provide no evidence for correlation with age or year at onset and mode of presentation or disability. Thus far, the identification of susceptibility genes has proved elusive but genetic strategies are now in place which should illuminate the problem. The main dividend will be an improved understanding of the pathogenesis. To date, population studies have demonstrated an association between the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles DR15 and DQ6 and their corresponding genotypes. An association with DR4, with or without the primary DR15 link, is seen in some Mediterranean populations. Candidate gene approaches have otherwise proved unrewarding. Four groups of investigators have undertaken a systematic search of the genome. In common with most other complex traits, no major susceptibility gene has been identified but regions of interest have been provisionally identified. These genetic analyses are predicated on the assumption that MS is one disease. Genotypic and phenotypic analyses are beginning to question this assumption. A major part of future studies in the genetics of MS

  10. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  11. Late presentation of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis following renal transplantation and the potential under-reporting of the incidence and prevalence of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis is an infrequent but potentially devastating complication of peritoneal dialysis. The reported incidence and prevalence of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis vary markedly between countries. Currently, peritoneal dialysis vintage remains the major risk factor for encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis, and dialysis vintage differs between countries due to the relative competing risks of transplantation, availability of haemodialysis and peritonitis. However, the diagnosis of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis is often only established when patients have transferred modality to transplantation or haemodialysis. Switching treatment modality may potentially lead to an under-reporting of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis, as many countries which collect data on dialysis patients in national registries often have separate registries for dialysis and transplant patients, and this may potentially lead to under-reporting of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in patients presenting after renal transplantation. Secondly, the question arises as to how long former peritoneal dialysis patients should be followed before a diagnosis of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis can be confidently excluded. To highlight this point, we present four cases that developed symptomatic encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis more than 5 years, and in once case more than 10 years after the discontinuation of peritoneal dialysis. Delayed or late presentation may not only delay the diagnosis, but also risk surgical interventions by non-specialists. A more robust system is required to record cases of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis to determine the incidence and prevalence, and so provide accurate information to both patients and clinicians as to the risks of long-term peritoneal dialysis therapy. PMID:26063486

  12. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis symptoms: pathophysiology and assessment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Spasticity is a prevalent and troublesome symptom for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Common instruments to measure MS spasticity include the clinician-rated (modified) Ashworth scale and the patient-rated 0-10 spasticity Numerical Rating Scale (NRS). Current opinion is that measurement of MS spasticity should incorporate the patient's perspective. Other instruments to assess spasticity-associated symptoms such as the Penn spasms frequency scale, sleep quality NRS and pain NRS can assist in tracking MS spasticity evolution and inform management choices. Worsening spasticity reduces patient autonomy, impacts negatively on quality of life and increases health resource utilization and costs. Despite the wide range of issues associated with MS spasticity, undertreatment is common and standard treatment options (physiotherapy and classical oral therapies) often fail to provide adequate symptomatic control. PMID:26611266

  13. Balò's concentric sclerosis: still to be considered as a variant of multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Pietroboni, Anna M; Arighi, Andrea; De Riz, Milena A; Ghezzi, Laura; Calvi, Alberto; Avignone, Sabrina; Scola, Elisa; Galimberti, Daniela; Triulzi, Fabio; Scarpini, Elio

    2015-12-01

    Balò's concentric sclerosis (BCS) is considered a rare demyelinating disease and regarded as an aggressive variant of multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe three cases (one male and two females) with neuroimaging features suggestive of BCS and heterogeneous symptoms, with benign long-term clinical course upon treatment with natalizumab and fingolimod. Neurological examination, blood and cerebrospinal fluid analyses, brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed. At onset, patient #1 showed predominant cognitive impairment with consciousness disturbances; patient #2 presented with left hemiparesis; patient #3 demonstrated hesitance in speech and in written word production, along with right central facial palsy. All patients showed the typical MRI changes associated with BCS, such as concentric rings or a whorled appearance on T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. They were treated with high dosage i.v. steroid with clinical improvement and followed-up for 3 years with different clinical course. Two patients fulfilled the revised McDonald criteria for MS and received preventive therapy, natalizumab and fingolimod, respectively, whereas the third patient is still stable without clinical and radiological evolution. All of them did not have new exacerbations or MRI lesions over 2-4 year follow-up. Our descriptions demonstrate the heterogeneity of clinical presentation of BCS. Moreover, these case reports suggest that BCS may neither be rapidly progressive nor fatal and may be considered part of the MS spectrum. In line with this hypothesis, current treatments for MS were effective in our patients. PMID:26109007

  14. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping of the Motor Cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Liu, Tian; Gupta, Ajay; Zheng, Karen; Seedial, Stephen; Shtilbans, Alexander; Shahbazi, Mona; Lange, Dale; Wang, Yi; Tsiouris, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is often difficult due to absence of disease biomarkers. Our aim was to investigate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) of the motor cortex as a potential quantitative biomarker for the diagnosis of ALS and PLS. Materials and Methods Utilizing an institutional review board approved retrospective database, QSM images for 16 patients with upper motor neuron disease (12 with ALS and 4 with PLS; mean age 56.3; 56% male) and 23 control patients (mean age 56.6; 57% male) were reviewed. Two neuroradiologists, blinded to diagnosis, qualitatively assessed QSM, T2, T2*, and T2 FLAIR-weighted images. Relative motor cortex susceptibility (RMCS) was quantitatively calculated by subtracting adjacent white matter/CSF signal intensity from mean motor cortex susceptibility on the axial image most representative of the hand lobule, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. The Fisher’s exact and Student’s t tests were used to evaluate for statistical differences between the groups. Results Qualitatively, QSM had higher diagnostic accuracy than T2, T2*, or T2 FLAIR for the diagnosis of ALS/PLS. Quantitatively, RMCS was found to be significantly higher in patients with motor neuron disease than in control patients (46.0 and 35.0, respectively; p<0.001). ROC analysis demonstrated an area-under-the-curve of 0.88 (p<0.0001) and an optimal cutoff value of 40.5 ppb for distinguishing between control and ALS/PLS patients (sensitivity, 87.5%; specificity, 87.0%). Conclusions QSM is a sensitive and specific quantitative biomarker of iron deposition in the motor cortex in ALS and PLS. PMID:25905946

  15. Autism and the Cerebellum: Evidence from Tuberous Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Anna M.; Egelhoff, John C.; McKellop, J. Mark; Franz, David Neal

    2000-01-01

    A study examined the relationship between neuroimaging findings and the behavioral characteristics of 29 patients with tuberous sclerosis. Findings indicate a positive linear relationship between a patient's total number of tubers and degree of intellectual impairment. The number of tubers in the cerebellum was associated with more autistic…

  16. Multiple sclerosis presenting with acute remitting psychiatric symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, W B

    1979-01-01

    Two patients are described in whom acute symptoms of apparently primary psychiatric disease could be diagnosed in retrospect as due to multiple sclerosis. In both patients the initial symptoms recovered completely. In a third patient, also presenting with mental symptoms, this diagnosis would not have been suspected on clinical grounds but is suggested by the results of modern diagnostic techniques. Images PMID:501386

  17. The mystery of the origin of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, W I

    1986-01-01

    Our present understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis is discussed in relation to the views of Sir William Gowers. He perceived that both environmental and genetic factors might be implicated in the aetiology of the disease. Evidence for the former was first reported in 1903, but has become convincing only in the past 20 years; the nature of the environmental factor remains obscure. Evidence for a genetic influence on susceptibility has accumulated since the 1930s, the most compelling coming from the recent Canadian twin study. The number and mode of operation of the genetic factors is still uncertain, but there is evidence for the implication of genetically controlled cellular immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of the disease. The precise relationship between transient changes in immunological status and the development of new lesions has yet to be defined; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) promises to play a significant role in this analysis because of its sensitivity in detecting abnormalities in multiple sclerosis. MRI is not in itself specific; it is probable that the similar appearances in multiple sclerosis and cerebral vascular disease both derive at least in part from the influence of astrocytic gliosis on proton content and distribution. The significance of the gliosis is uncertain. Gowers believed that the primary defect in multiple sclerosis lay in the astrocyte. Recent observations on the immunological functions of this cell in vitro suggest that it could be involved early in the pathogenesis of the lesion. Images PMID:2936869

  18. Exercise and Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Dietrich, Frederick; Larson, Rebecca; White, Lesley J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of quality of life after a 4-month progressive resistance training program for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). A second purpose was to examine participants' views about factors that facilitated or impeded exercise behavior. Qualitative interviews were conducted with eight females…

  19. Bone end sclerosis in renal osteodystrophy simulating osteonecrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lewis, L.; Keats, T.E.

    1982-08-01

    Osteosclerosis of the bone ends is an unusual manifestation of renal osteodystrophy. In evaluating this finding one should be careful to exclude clinical and radiographic evidence for osteonecrosis. In the two known cases of this entity, bone end sclerosis has been found to develop over one to two years with symmetrical involvement of multiple bones.

  20. Evaluating Functional Decline in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Sara; Weiss, Patrice L.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease with a wide-ranging impact on functional status. The aim of the study was to examine the added value of simultaneously evaluating fatigue, personal ADL and handwriting performance as indicators for functional decline among patients with MS. Participants were 50 outpatients with MS and 26 matched healthy…

  1. Determinants of Employment Status among People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Fitzgerald, Shawn M.; Rumrill, Phillip D.; Koch, Lynn C.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies factors predicting employment or lack thereof among adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). Results included the following variables as the best predictors of employment: symptom persistence, severity of symptoms, educational attainment, and presence of cognitive limitations. The relevance of the findings for rehabilitation assessment and…

  2. Predictors of Employment Status for People with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Rumrill, Phillip D.; Fitzgerald, Shawn M.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relevance of the disease-and-demographics model for explaining the employment outcomes of adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participating in a national survey of their employment concerns, 1,310 adults with MS provided data for the study (274 men, 21%; 1,020 women, 78%; 16 participants did not identify their gender).…

  3. Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Presenting in a Premenopausal Patient with Tuberous Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. S.; Chambers, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Endometrial adenocarcinoma is very uncommon in women under 40 years of age. Case: A 39-year-old woman with tuberous sclerosis and severe intellectual disability presented with irregular bleeding unresponsive to oral contraceptive therapy. She was subsequently found to have a deeply invasive endometrial adenocarcinoma. Conclusion:…

  4. Proteomic strategies in multiple sclerosis and its animal models

    PubMed Central

    Elkabes, Stella; Li, Hong

    2009-01-01

    The early and precise diagnosis, the prognosis, and the clinical management of multiple sclerosis, remain a considerable challenge. In recent years, the development of novel and powerful proteomic techniques prompted the use of these approaches for the search of unique biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients. A few studies have also utilized proteomics to delineate the profile of differentially expressed proteins in animal models of the human disease in order to gain global insights into affected pathways. The identification of differentially expressed proteins may be an initial step in the discovery of novel targets and mechanisms that play critical roles in the pathology of multiple sclerosis. Based on these findings, future investigations may elucidate the events leading to demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration, providing better insights into mechanisms governing the onset and progression of the disease. Although these proteomic studies provide valuable information, they are also faced with a number of challenges. The present review discusses some of the strengths and limitations of proteomic investigations as applied to multiple sclerosis. PMID:19759847

  5. Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis: common or rare in peritoneal dialysis?

    PubMed

    Triga, Konstantina

    2013-03-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a serious and often fatal complication of long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) with severe malnutrition and poor prognosis. It causes progressive obstruction and encapsulation of the bowel loops. As EPS becomes more prevalent with longer duration of PD, large multicenter prospective studies are needed to establish its incidence and identify risk factors, therapeutic approach, and prognosis. PMID:23538342

  6. Characteristics of diadochokinesis in Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjaden, Kris; Watling, Elizabeth

    2002-05-01

    The current study applies a quantitative, acoustic analysis procedure for the study of rapid syllable productions outlined by Kent and colleagues [R. D. Kent et al., J. Med. Sp. Lang. Path. 7, 83-90 (1999)] to syllables produced by speakers with Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis. Neurologically healthy talkers will be studied for comparison purposes. Acoustic measures will be reported for syllable repetitions of /p schwa/, /t schwa/, and /k schwa/. Temporal measures will include syllable duration, syllable rate, and stop gap duration. The energy envelope of syllable repetitions will be quantified using measures of rms amplitude minima and maxima. Acoustic measures will be contrasted to determine the extent to which acoustic profiles of diadochokinesis distinguish hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's Disease, ataxic dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis, and spastic dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis. It also is of interest to determine whether speakers with Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis judged to be nondysarthric via perceptual analyses also demonstrate objective, acoustic profiles of diadochokinesis that are within normal limits. [Work supported by NIH.

  7. Emotional Changes with Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Stephen M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examines specific methodological issues associated with research in area of emotional disorders among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or Parkinson's disease (PD); describes range and severity of emotional disorders in MS and PD; and examines both endogenous and reactive explanations to account for increased prevalence of emotional…

  8. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: An Introduction to Psychosocial and Behavioral Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, R. Leigh; Decker, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    Defines amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as motor-neuron disease that is terminal. Discusses symptoms associated with ALS and identifies treatment options. Reviews psychological and behavioral adaptations in regard to ALS clients, their families, and professionals who work with them. Discusses support groups as method of reducing stress for ALS…

  9. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients' Perspectives on Use of Mechanical Ventilation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jenny M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Interviewed 13 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients. All believed that they alone should make decision regarding use of mechanical ventilation. Factors they considered important were quality of life, severity of disability, availability of ventilation by means of nasal mask, possible admission to long-term care facility, ability to discontinue…

  10. Decreased Postural Balance in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Low Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjeldstad, Cecilie; Pardo, Gabriel; Bemben, Debra; Bemben, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate balance in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have low disability and minimal clinical impairments as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and compare them with healthy age-matched controls. Patients were aged between 18 and 64 years; 67 individuals with MS (mu = 44.0 plus or minus 1.2 years) and 45 healthy…

  11. Spatiotemporal Coupling of the Tongue in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuruvilla, Mili S.; Green, Jordan R.; Yunusova, Yana; Hanford, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the investigation was to identify deficits in spatiotemporal coupling between tongue regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relations between disease-related changes in tongue movement patterns and speech intelligibility were also determined. Methods: The authors recorded word productions from 11…

  12. [Blue nevus syndrome: endoscopic treatment by sclerosis and banding ligation].

    PubMed

    Sala Felis, T; Urquijo Ponce, J J; López Viedma, B; Pertejo Pastor, V; Berenguer Lapuerta, J

    1999-03-01

    The blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome is a rare entity characterized by the presence of cavernous hemangiomas in the skin and gastrointestinal tract with frequent digestive hemorrhages. Different therapeutic modalities exist: medical treatment, surgical resection; and most recently, endoscopic therapy has been described. We present a patient with blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome treated with combined endoscopic therapy: sclerosis and band ligation. PMID:10228324

  13. Multiple sclerosis: symptom equivalent to delayed visual evoked potential latency.

    PubMed

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1990-10-01

    An investigation on the correlation between ability to read TV subtitles and the duration of visual evoked potential (VEP) latency in 14 patients with definite multiple sclerosis (MS), indicated that VEP latency in patients unable to read the TV subtitles was significantly delayed in comparison to that of patients who mastered this task. PMID:2275357

  14. Disability and Fatigue Can Be Objectively Measured in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Caterina; Palermo, Eduardo; Studer, Valeria; Germanotta, Marco; Germani, Giorgio; Centonze, Diego; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background The available clinical outcome measures of disability in multiple sclerosis are not adequately responsive or sensitive. Objective To investigate the feasibility of inertial sensor-based gait analysis in multiple sclerosis. Methods A cross-sectional study of 80 multiple sclerosis patients and 50 healthy controls was performed. Lower-limb kinematics was evaluated by using a commercially available magnetic inertial measurement unit system. Mean and standard deviation of range of motion (mROM, sROM) for each joint of lower limbs were calculated in one minute walking test. A motor performance index (E) defined as the sum of sROMs was proposed. Results We established two novel observer-independent measures of disability. Hip mROM was extremely sensitive in measuring lower limb motor impairment, being correlated with muscle strength and also altered in patients without clinically detectable disability. On the other hand, E index discriminated patients according to disability, being altered only in patients with moderate and severe disability, regardless of walking speed. It was strongly correlated with fatigue and patient-perceived health status. Conclusions Inertial sensor-based gait analysis is feasible and can detect clinical and subclinical disability in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26863109

  15. Systemic sclerosis: a rare cause of heart failure?

    PubMed

    González-Cambeiro, María Cristina; Abu-Assi, Emad; Abumuaileq, Rami Riziq-Yousef; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Rigueiro-Veloso, Pedro; Virgós-Lamela, Alejandro; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SS) is a chronic disease in which there may be multisystem involvement. It is rare (estimated prevalence: 0.5-2/10000) with high morbidity and mortality, and there is as yet no curative treatment. We report the case of a young woman newly diagnosed with SS, in whom decompensated heart failure was the main manifestation. PMID:26421376

  16. Standardized cannabis in multiple sclerosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A 52 year old female suffering from severe progressive multiple sclerosis was administered quantifiable amounts of standardized cannabis and monitored over the period of one year, while providing daily pain charts and records of her condition. An average daily intake of 500 mg of Tetrahydrocannabinol as cannabis was required to achieve a desired quality of life. PMID:20076809

  17. Design Documentation for JaWE2Openflow Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, N; Barter, R H

    2004-07-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has chosen CIGNEX Technologies, Inc. (CIGNEX) to design and develop the JaWE2Openflow conversion software. This document was created by CIGNEX as a project deliverable.

  18. Chapter 15 Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Orban, Paul; Devon, Rebecca S; Hayden, Michael R; Leavitt, Blair R

    2007-01-01

    Several forms of genetically defined juvenile amy-otrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have now been charac-terized and discussion of these conditions will form the basis for this chapter. ALS2 is an autosomal recessive form of ALS with a juvenile onset and very slow progression that mapped to chromosome 2q33. Nine different mutations have been identified in the ALS2 gene that result in premature stop codons, suggesting a loss of function in the gene product, alsin. The alsin protein is thought to function as a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for GTPases and may play a role in vesicle transport or membrane trafficking processes. ALS4 is an autosomal dominant form of juvenile onset ALS associated with slow progression, severe muscle weakness and pyramidal signs, in the absence of bulbar and sensory abnormalities. Mutations in the SETX gene cause ALS4, and the SETX gene product senataxin may have DNA and RNA helicase activity and play a role in the regulation of RNA and/or DNA in the cell. A third form of juvenile-onset ALS (ALS5) is associated with slowly progressing lower motor neuron signs (weak-ness and atrophy) initially of the hands and feet, with eventual bulbar involvement. Progressive upper motor neuron disease becomes more obvious with time. ALS5 has been linked to a 6 cM region of chromosome 15q15.1-q21.1, but the causative gene mutation for ALS5 has yet to be identified. The high degree of clin-ical and genetic heterogeneity in the various forms of juvenile ALS can make differential diagnosis difficult, other genetic disorders that must be considered include: spinal muscular atrophy, hereditary spastic paraplegia, SBMA, GM2 gangliosidosis and the hereditary motor neuronopathies/motor forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Acquired disorders that must also be consid-ered include heavy metal intoxications (especially lead), multifocal motor neuropathy, paraneoplastic syndromes, vitamin deficiencies (B12) and infections (HTLV-II, HIV and poliomyelitis). PMID

  19. Defining reliable disability outcomes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas; Cutter, Gary; Spelman, Tim; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Girard, Marc; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'Maison, Francois; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Pucci, Eugenio; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Alroughani, Raed; Van Pesch, Vincent; Iuliano, Gerardo; Fernandez-Bolaños, Ricardo; Ramo, Cristina; Terzi, Murat; Slee, Mark; Spitaleri, Daniele; Verheul, Freek; Cristiano, Edgardo; Sánchez-Menoyo, José Luis; Fiol, Marcela; Gray, Orla; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Barnett, Michael; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Prevention of irreversible disability is currently the most important goal of disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis. The disability outcomes used in most clinical trials rely on progression of Expanded Disability Status Scale score confirmed over 3 or 6 months. However, sensitivity and stability of this metric has not been extensively evaluated. Using the global MSBase cohort study, we evaluated 48 criteria of disability progression, testing three definitions of baseline disability, two definitions of progression magnitude, two definitions of long-term irreversibility and four definitions of event confirmation period. The study outcomes comprised the rates of detected progression events per 10 years and the proportions of the recorded events persistent at later time points. To evaluate the ratio of progression frequency and stability for each criterion, we calculated the proportion of events persistent over the five subsequent years once progression was achieved. Finally, we evaluated the clinical and demographic determinants characterising progression events and, for those that regressed back to baseline, determinants of their subsequent regression. The study population consisted of 16 636 patients with the minimum of three recorded disability scores, totalling 112 584 patient-years. The progression rates varied between 0.41 and 1.14 events per 10 years, with the length of required confirmation interval as the most important determinant of the observed variance. The concordance among all tested progression criteria was only 17.3%. Regression of disability occurred in 11-34% of the progression events over the five subsequent years. The most important determinant of progression stability was the length of the confirmation period. For the most accurate set of the progression criteria, the proportions of 3-, 6-, 12- or 24-month confirmed events persistent over 5 years reached 70%, 74%, 80% and 89%, respectively. Regression post progression was more common

  20. RuBPCase activase mediates growth-defense tradeoffs: Silencing RCA redirects JA flux from JA-Ile to MeJA to attenuate induced defense responses in Nicotiana attenuata

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sirsha; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary RuBPCase activase (RCA), an abundant photosynthetic protein is strongly down-regulated in response to Manduca sexta’s oral secretion (OS) in Nicotiana attenuata. RCA-silenced plants are impaired not only in photosynthetic capacity and growth, but also in jasmonic acid (JA)-isoleucine (Ile) signaling, and herbivore resistance mediated by JA-Ile dependent defense traits. These responses are consistent with a resource-based growth-defense trade-off. Since JA+Ile-supplementation of OS restored WT levels of JA-Ile, defenses and resistance to M. sexta, but OS supplemented individually with JA- or Ile did not, the JA-Ile deficiency of RCA-silenced plants could not be attributed to lower JA or Ile pools or JAR4/6 conjugating activity. Similar levels of JA-Ile derivatives after OS elicitation indicated unaltered JA-Ile turnover and lower levels of other JA-conjugates ruled out competition from other conjugation reactions. RCA-silenced plants accumulated more methyl jasmonate (MeJA) after OS elicitation, which corresponded with increased jasmonate methyltransferase (JMT) activity. RCA-silencing phenocopies JMT over-expression, wherein elevated JMT activity redirects OS-elicited JA flux towards inactive MeJA, creating a JA sink which depletes JA-Ile and its associated defense responses. Hence RCA plays an additional non-photosynthetic role in attenuating JA-mediated defenses and their associated costs potentially allowing plants to anticipate resource-based constraints on growth before they actually occur. PMID:24491116

  1. Evolving expectations around early management of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ralf; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Amato, Maria Pia; Comi, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. With prevention or at least delay of disease progression as a key target in the management of multiple sclerosis, current opinion on treatment encourages early intervention with well-tolerated disease-modifying treatments in order to optimize long-term clinical outcomes. Patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) may progress to clinically definite multiple sclerosis, and clinical trials have demonstrated that early treatment with interferon beta can reduce the conversion rate. Cognitive impairment may already be present in patients with CISs. Today there is evolving evidence that cognitive impairment may be relevant for prognosis and that early treatment with interferon beta may also have a protective effect on the cognitive function. As an accumulation of neuronal loss is now considered to underlie the development of persistent disability in multiple sclerosis, it is crucial that treatment can protect against neuronal damage. In addition to its anti-inflammatory activity, interferon beta may have direct and indirect neuroprotective effects, and several studies have explored the role of interferon beta in regulating neuroprotective factors. With over 15 years of clinical experience as evidence, the long-term safety and efficacy of interferon beta treatment is unquestionable. Results from the CIS studies have demonstrated the high percentage of patients converting to clinically definite multiple sclerosis without treatment and the short- and long-term benefits of an early use of disease-modifying treatments. These findings support starting disease-modifying treatment as soon as the diagnosis of MS is reasonably formulated. PMID:21179596

  2. Salt and Pepper Pigmentation - Skin Manifestation of Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraju, D; Prakash, G; Yoganandh, T; Subramanian, S R; Ramkumar, S

    2015-09-01

    A 50 year old male presented with progressive difficulty in swallowing both liquid and solid food with no history of Raynaud's phenomenon. A general examination revealed skin changes in the form of thickening, hyperpigmentation and tightening of skin of fingers, hand, forearm and legs. The patient had painless skin induration over the legs, forearm and hand. Salt and pepper pigmentation was seen on the upper back (Figure 1a), over mastoid process (Figure 1b) and the concha of pinna (Figure 1c). Anti-Scl 70 was positive. Anti-centromere antibodies were negative. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) revealed very severe restrictive lung disease. Barium swallow study was normal. Despite being advised to undergo oesophageal manometry test in view of dysphagia, patient was not willing for the same. Diagnosis of systemic sclerosis was made. Systemic sclerosis is a disease in which extensive fibrosis, vascular alterations and autoantibodies against various cellular antigens being the principal features with a female to male ratio of 4:1. Skin pigmentation changes among other features of skin involvement include a salt-and-pepper appearance due to diffuse hyperpigmentation with sparing of the perifollicular areas. This may be due to the richer capillary network that may warm the perifollicular skin and preserve melanogenesis producing the perifollicular pigment retention in systemic sclerosis.1,2 Both cellular and humoral immune factors in combination with external factors such as trauma or inflammation may trigger the destruction of melanocytes.3 Moreover, various physical factors like temperature changes as well as genetic, hormonal factors may influence pigment formation. Such changes in pigmentation is also seen during repigmentation around hair follicles in vitiligo. Clinically, both vitiligo and depigmented lesions of systemic sclerosis present as chalk-white macules with well-defined borders. However, mucosal involvement is commonly seen in vitiligo while depigmented

  3. Multiple Sclerosis in Malaysia: Demographics, Clinical Features, and Neuroimaging Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, S.; Rose, N.; Masita, A.; Dhaliwal, J. S.; Puvanarajah, S. D.; Rafia, M. H.; Muda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  4. Multiple sclerosis in malaysia: demographics, clinical features, and neuroimaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, S; Rose, N; Masita, A; Dhaliwal, J S; Puvanarajah, S D; Rafia, M H; Muda, S

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  5. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis. PMID:27021143

  6. Psychopathology in Tuberous Sclerosis: An Overview and Findings in a Population-Based Sample of Adults with Tuberous Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raznahan, A.; Joinson, C.; O'Callaghan, F.; Osborne, J. P.; Bolton, P. F.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is a multi- system disorder with complex genetics. The neurodevelopmental manifestations of TS are responsible for considerable morbidity. The prevalence of epilepsy and intellectual disabilities among individuals with TS have been well described. Ours is the first study that explores the prevalence and pattern…

  7. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis spasticity: multiple sclerosis spasticity guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ralf; Oreja-Guevara, Celia

    2013-12-01

    Symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS) is an important part of a comprehensive treatment plan that aims to improve patients' quality of life. In the current era of medical progress, several factors have led to the development of guidelines for MS management. There is continued need for an evidence-based approach supported by high-quality data from controlled clinical trials. Most healthcare systems require this approach and include it in the reimbursement process. Guidelines are usually committed by national or continental neurological societies. The Spanish Society of Neurology demyelinating diseases working group has developed a consensus document on spasticity in patients with MS. MS experts from the group used the metaplan method to sum up the most important recommendations about spasticity for inclusion in the guidance. Recommendations were classified according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network system and approved by all members of the group. In Germany, the guideline panel of the German Neurological Society endorsed the national competence network for multiple sclerosis (Krankheitsbezogenes Kompetenznetz Multiple Sklerose) to update the existing recommendations. The most recent fifth edition of the guidelines (dated April 2012) now also includes recommendations for treatment of key symptoms such as spasticity. More than 30 MS neurologists contributed to the new edition reflecting the need for broad expertise. After a first round in which key topics were defined, a web-based decision process was undertaken to further develop individual topics such as symptomatic therapy. The draft manuscript was reviewed once again by the group prior to submission to the official review process. The aims of spasticity treatment are to improve mobility and dexterity, achieve physiological movement patterns, reduce pain, facilitate nursing measures and avoid complications such as contractures. Representative antispasticity medications include baclofen

  8. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  9. Rhabdomyomas and Tuberous sclerosis complex: our experience in 33 cases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyomas are the most common type of cardiac tumors in children. Anatomically, they can be considered as hamartomas. They are usually randomly diagnosed antenatally or postnatally sometimes presenting in the neonatal period with haemodynamic compromise or severe arrhythmias although most neonatal cases remain asymptomatic. Typically rhabdomyomas are multiple lesions and usually regress spontaneously but are often associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder caused by mutations in either of the two genes, TSC1 or TSC2. Diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis is usually made on clinical grounds and eventually confirmed by a genetic test by searching for TSC genes mutations. Methods We report our experience on 33 cases affected with rhabdomyomas and diagnosed from January 1989 to December 2012, focusing on the cardiac outcome and on association with the signs of tuberous sclerosis complex. We performed echocardiography using initially a Philips Sonos 2500 with a 7,5/5 probe and in the last 4 years a Philips IE33 with a S12-4 probe. We investigated the family history, brain, skin, kidney and retinal lesions, development of seizures, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Results At diagnosis we detected 205 masses, mostly localized in interventricular septum, right ventricle and left ventricle. Only in 4 babies (12%) the presence of a mass caused a significant obstruction. A baby, with an enormous septal rhabdomyoma associated to multiple rhabdomyomas in both right and left ventricular walls died just after birth due to severe heart failure. During follow-up we observed a reduction of rhabdomyomas in terms of both number and size in all 32 surviving patients except in one child. Eight patients (24,2%) had an arrhythmia and in 2 of these cases rhabdomyomas led to Wolf-Parkinson-White Syndrome. For all patients the arrhythmia spontaneously totally disappeared or was reduced gradually. With regarding to association with

  10. Rituximab add-on therapy for breakthrough relapsing multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Naismith, R.T.; Piccio, L.; Lyons, J.A.; Lauber, J.; Tutlam, N.T.; Parks, B.J.; Trinkaus, K.; Song, S.K.; Cross, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: B cells and the humoral immune system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). This study sought to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of add-on therapy with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that depletes circulating B cells, in subjects with relapsing MS with breakthrough disease defined by clinical and MRI activity (Class III evidence). Methods: Thirty subjects with a relapse within the past 18 months despite use of an injectable disease-modifying agent, and with at least 1 gadolinium-enhancing (GdE) lesion on any of 3 pretreatment MRIs, received rituximab administered at 375 mg/m2 weekly × 4 doses. Three monthly posttreatment brain MRI scans were obtained beginning 12 weeks after the first infusion. Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were obtained at baseline and throughout the posttreatment follow-up. Results: GdE lesions were reduced after treatment with rituximab, with 74% of posttreatment MRI scans being free of GdE activity compared with 26% free of GdE activity at baseline (p < 0.0001). Median GdE lesions were reduced from 1.0 to 0, and mean number was reduced from 2.81 per month to 0.33 after treatment (88% reduction). MSFC improved as well (p = 0.02). EDSS remained stable. Conclusion: Rituximab add-on therapy was effective based upon blinded radiologic endpoints in this phase II study. In combination with standard injectable therapies, rituximab was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. B-cell–modulating therapy remains a potential option for treatment of patients with relapsing MS with an inadequate response to standard injectable therapies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that add-on rituximab reduces gadolinium-enhancing brain lesions in multiple sclerosis. GLOSSARY DMT = disease-modifying therapy; EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; FOV = field of view; GdE = gadolinium-enhancing; HACA = human

  11. Systemic sclerosis associated with cutaneous exposure to solvent: case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Brasington, R.D. Jr.; Thorpe-Swenson, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Sclerodermatous skin changes and systemic sclerosis have been reported to occur as a result of contact with several different organic solvents. We describe a 41-year-old man who developed systemic sclerosis after working for 15 years in a foundry, where he had extensive cutaneous contact with multiple organic solvents (trichloroethane, xylene, trimethylbenzene, and naphthalene). Cutaneous exposure to organic solvents may be a factor in the etiology of some cases of systemic sclerosis.15 references.

  12. Leptomeningeal enhancement in Susac's syndrome and multiple sclerosis: Time to expect the unexpected?

    PubMed

    Sastre-Garriga, Jaume

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging detection of leptomeningeal enhancement has long been considered a red flag for a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. However, recent studies seem to suggest that leptomeningeal enhancement can be detected in up to 25% of patients with multiple sclerosis. The case reported here suggest a distinct set of features of leptomeningeal enhancement in a patient with Susac's syndrome which may still be helpful in the differential diagnosis between Susac's syndrome and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27207451

  13. [Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite Measure (MSFC) standardized in the Brazilian population].

    PubMed

    Tilbery, Charles P; Mendes, Maria Fernanda; Thomaz, Rodrigo Barbosa; Oliveira, Bianca Etelvina Santos de; Kelian, Giorge Luiz Ribeiro; Busch, Roberta; Miranda, Patrícia Príncipe Carvalho; Caleffi, Paula

    2005-03-01

    The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite Measure (MSFC) is an outcome measure in multiple sclerosis developed by USA National Multiple Sclerosis Society (1994), a three-part composite clinical measure--9-Hole Peg Test, Timed 25-Foot Walk and PASAT. It should be multidimensional in order to reflect the principal ways MS affects an individual. The MSFC was applied in 91 Brazilian subjects and standardized to be use in MS centers. PMID:15830078

  14. Exercise and disease progression in multiple sclerosis: can exercise slow down the progression of multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Stenager, Egon

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that exercise (or physical activity) might have the potential to have an impact on multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and thereby slow down the disease process in MS patients. The objective of this literature review was to identify the literature linking physical exercise (or activity) and MS disease progression. A systematic literature search was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, SweMed+, Embase, Cochrane Library, PEDro, SPORTDiscus and ISI Web of Science. Different methodological approaches to the problem have been applied including (1) longitudinal exercise studies evaluating the effects on clinical outcome measures, (2) cross-sectional studies evaluating the relationship between fitness status and MRI findings, (3) cross-sectional and longitudinal studies evaluating the relationship between exercise/physical activity and disability/relapse rate and, finally, (4) longitudinal exercise studies applying the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model of MS. Data from intervention studies evaluating disease progression by clinical measures (1) do not support a disease-modifying effect of exercise; however, MRI data (2), patient-reported data (3) and data from the EAE model (4) indicate a possible disease-modifying effect of exercise, but the strength of the evidence limits definite conclusions. It was concluded that some evidence supports the possibility of a disease-modifying potential of exercise (or physical activity) in MS patients, but future studies using better methodologies are needed to confirm this. PMID:22435073

  15. Economic burden of multiple sclerosis and the role of managed sare organizations in multiple sclerosis management.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gary M

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is disease that has an early age of onset and may intensify and subside with disease relapses or exacerbations interrupted by periods of stability. Because of this, patients, their families and caregivers, employers, and the entire healthcare system carry substantial clinical and economic burdens associated with the disease over of a period of many years. Although most patients with MS are covered by health insurance, the management landscape has become increasingly complex over the past decade with the introduction and approval of several new disease-modifying therapies that, while remarkably effective and well tolerated, usually come with a very high cost. Whereas the main goal of treating patients with MS is to prevent disease progression and disability, healthcare and benefit providers are faced with an ever-tipping balance point between effectively managing the disease and maximizing the value of high-cost disease-modifying therapies in an already overburdened healthcare system. Treatment of MS should be individualized, and shared decision making between patients and healthcare providers must be preserved. Healthcare providers and payers need to collaborate to ensure that resources are used optimally and not wasted, reducing both the clinical and economic burdens related to this complex chronic disorder. PMID:27356024

  16. Managing psychological stress in the multiple sclerosis medical visit: Patient perspectives and unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Senders, Angela; Sando, Kelsi; Wahbeh, Helané; Peterson Hiller, Amie; Shinto, Lynne

    2016-08-01

    Psychological stress can negatively impact multiple sclerosis. To further understand how stress is addressed in the multiple sclerosis medical visit, 34 people with multiple sclerosis participated in focus groups. Transcripts were analyzed by inductive thematic analysis. The majority of participants did not discuss stress with their provider, citing barriers to communication such as lack of time, poor coordination between specialties, physician reliance on pharmaceutical prescription, and patient lack of self-advocacy. Participants recommended several ways to better manage psychological well-being in the clinical setting. These findings provide a foundation for future studies aimed at minimizing the detrimental effect of stress in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25527612

  17. Early-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Isfahan, Iran: Report of the Demographic and Clinical Features of 221 Patients.

    PubMed

    Etemadifar, Masoud; Nourian, Sayed-Mohammadamin; Nourian, Niloofaralsadat; Abtahi, Seyed-Hossein; Sayahi, Farnaz; Saraf, Zahra; Fereidan-Esfahani, Mahboobeh

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that early-onset multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis (early-onset multiple sclerosis) approximately incorporates 3-5% of the multiple sclerosis population. In this report on early-onset multiple sclerosis, the authors aimed to define demographic, clinical and imaging features in a case-series of true-childhood multiple sclerosis and to compare its characteristics with juvenile multiple sclerosis. The authors inspected the records of multiple sclerosis patients who were registered by Isfahan MS Society. Clinical and demographic data of children with less than 16 years of age were reviewed retrospectively. Out of 4536 multiple sclerosis patients referred to the authors' center, 221 patients (4.8%) had multiple sclerosis starting at the age of 16 or less (11 true-childhood multiple sclerosis vs 210 juvenile-onset multiple sclerosis); the female to male ratio was 4.81:1. In the mean follow-up period of 6.2 years, 22 patients (10.5%) had positive family history of multiple sclerosis, 196 (88.6%) patients were classified as relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, the mean (± SD Expanded Disability Status Scale) was 1.5 ± 1.1 at the last evaluation. The most common initial presentation was optic nerve involvement (36.1%) and cerebellar sign and symptoms (14.6%). In all, 13 patients (5.8%) had experienced seizure in the course of multiple sclerosis. This study indicated that early-onset multiple sclerosis is not rare condition and overwhelmingly affects girls even at prepubertal onset. Physicians should consider multiple sclerosis in suspicious pediatric cases. PMID:26979097

  18. [Novel autoantibodies in inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ribi, Camillo

    2015-01-14

    Acquired inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis are chronic autoimmune conditions. These diseases arise from sustained activation of the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in damage to blood vessels, muscles, connective tissues and internal organs. Auto-antibodies are found in a majority of cases, which makes the immune serology an important diagnostic tool. The immuno dot assays detect a variety of disease-specific-or-associated antibodies. A positive result should be correlated with the indirect immunofluorescence pattern of the antinuclear antibody screen. Some antibodies are associated with specific organ involvement, other may indicated an underlying neoplastic condition. The scope of this article is to review the diagnostic and prognostic value of antibodies in inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis. PMID:25799647

  19. Theranostic Implications of Nanotechnology in Multiple Sclerosis: A Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Khare, Manish; Gade, W. N.; Zamboni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis is a multifactorial disease with several pathogenic mechanisms and pathways. Successful MS management and medical care requires early accurate diagnosis along with specific treatment protocols based upon multifunctional nanotechnology approach. This paper highlights advances in nanotechnology that have enabled the clinician to target the brain and CNS in patient with multiple sclerosis with nanoparticles having therapeutic and imaging components. The multipartite theranostic (thera(py) + (diag)nostics) approach puts forth strong implications for medical care and cure in MS. The current nanotheranostics utilize tamed drug vehicles and contain cargo, targeting ligands, and imaging labels for delivery to specific tissues, cells, or subcellular components. A brief overview of nonsurgical nanorepair advances as future perspective is also described. Considering the potential inflammatory triggers in MS pathogenesis, a multifunctional nanotechnology approach will be needed for the prognosis. PMID:23346386

  20. Multiple sclerosis at menopause: Potential neuroprotective effects of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Mindy S; Mensah, Virginia A; Shen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating and neurodegenerative condition of the central nervous system that preferentially afflicts women more than men. Low estrogen states such as menopause and the postpartum period favor exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in women with the disease. Existing and emerging evidence suggests a role for estrogen in the alleviation of symptoms and reversal of pathology associated with MS. While clinical evidence is sparse regarding the benefit of estrogen therapy for women at risk for MS exacerbations, scientific data demonstrates that estrogen potentiates numerous neuroprotective effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Estrogens play a wide range of roles involved in MS disease pathophysiology, including increasing antiinflammatory cytokines, decreasing demyelination, and enhancing oxidative and energy producing processes in CNS cells. PMID:25544310

  1. The Role of PPAR Gamma in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Andréa Tavares; Pereira, Michelly Cristiny; de Melo Rego, Moacyr Jesus Barreto; da Rocha, Laurindo Ferreira; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Marques, Cláudia Diniz Lopes; Duarte, Angela Luzia Branco Pinto; Pitta, Maira Galdino da Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis is recognized as an important feature of many chronic diseases, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc), an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, characterized by immune dysregulation and vascular injury, followed by progressive fibrosis affecting the skin and multiple internal organs. SSc has a poor prognosis because no therapy has been shown to reverse or arrest the progression of fibrosis, representing a major unmet medical need. Recently, antifibrotic effects of PPARγ ligands have been studied in vitro and in vivo and some theories have emerged leading to new insights. Aberrant PPARγ function seems to be implicated in pathological fibrosis in the skin and lungs. This antifibrotic effect is mainly related to the inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signal transduction but other pathways can be involved. This review focused on recent studies that identified PPARγ as an important novel pathway with critical roles in regulating connective tissue homeostasis, with emphasis on skin and lung fibrosis and its role on systemic sclerosis. PMID:26064084

  2. Natural compounds used as therapies targeting to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed F; Daglia, Maria; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Talas, Zeliha S; Nabavi, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neuromuscular disease that occurs throughout the world with no racial, ethnic or socioeconomic boundaries. Despite its high morbidity and mortality, there are limited medications available for ALS that may increase survival in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by approximately 2-3 months. Inasmuch as negative effects of riluzole on muscle atrophy and wasting, weakness, muscle spasticity, dysarthria, dysphagia, and overall patient quality of life and its different adverse effects, much attention has been paid to natural products and herbal medicines. Overall scientific reports indicate that natural products have beneficial effects on patients with ALS low side effects and multiple targets. In the present paper, we review the scientific reports on beneficial role of natural polyphenolic compounds in treatment of ALS. PMID:25601606

  3. Mechanisms and Pharmacology of Neuropathic Pain in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, T; Kerr, B.J; Taylor, BK

    2015-01-01

    The neuropathic pain of multiple sclerosis is quite prevalent and severely impacts quality of life. A few randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trials suggest that cannabis- and anticonvulsant-based treatments provide partial pain relief, but at the expense of adverse events. An even smaller, but emerging, number of translational studies are using rodent models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which exhibit pain-like behaviors resembling those of MS patients. These studies not only support the possible effectiveness of anticonvulsants, but also compel further clinical trials with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, or drugs which interfere with glutamatergic neurotransmission. Future behavioral studies in EAE models are essential towards a new pharmacotherapy of multiple sclerosis pain. PMID:24590824

  4. Abnormalities of esophageal and gastric emptying in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Maddern, G.J.; Horowitz, M.; Jamieson, G.G.; Chatterton, B.E.; Collins, P.J.; Roberts-Thomson, P.

    1984-10-01

    Gastric and esophageal emptying were assessed using scintigraphic techniques in 12 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis and 22 normal volunteers. Esophageal emptying was significantly delayed in the patient group, with 7 of the 12 patients beyond the normal range. Gastric emptying was slower in patients than in controls, with 9 patients being outside the normal range for solid emptying and 7 patients outside the normal range for liquid emptying. Findings from gastric and esophageal emptying tests generally correlated well with symptoms of dysphagia and gastroesophageal reflux. However, 2 patients with normal emptying studies had symptomatic heartburn, and 2 patients with delay of both solid and liquid gastric emptying gave no history of gastroesophageal reflux. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the development of upper gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis.

  5. Infodemiology and Infoveillance of Multiple Sclerosis in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating disease of probable autoimmune inflammatory nature, whose aetiology is not fully understood, despite the many efforts and investigations. In this manuscript, we review the concept of “Multiple Sclerosis 2.0”, that is to say the Internet usage by MS patients, for seeking health and disease-related material for self-care and self-management purposes, and we introduce a Google Trends-based approach for monitoring MS-related Google queries and searches, called MS infodemiology and infoveillance. Google Trends has already proven to be reliable for infectious diseases monitoring, and here we extend its application and potentiality in the field of neurological disorders. PMID:24027636

  6. The Role of PPAR Gamma in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Andréa Tavares; Pereira, Michelly Cristiny; de Melo Rego, Moacyr Jesus Barreto; da Rocha, Laurindo Ferreira; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Marques, Cláudia Diniz Lopes; Duarte, Angela Luzia Branco Pinto; Pitta, Maira Galdino da Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis is recognized as an important feature of many chronic diseases, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc), an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, characterized by immune dysregulation and vascular injury, followed by progressive fibrosis affecting the skin and multiple internal organs. SSc has a poor prognosis because no therapy has been shown to reverse or arrest the progression of fibrosis, representing a major unmet medical need. Recently, antifibrotic effects of PPARγ ligands have been studied in vitro and in vivo and some theories have emerged leading to new insights. Aberrant PPARγ function seems to be implicated in pathological fibrosis in the skin and lungs. This antifibrotic effect is mainly related to the inhibition of TGF-β/Smad signal transduction but other pathways can be involved. This review focused on recent studies that identified PPARγ as an important novel pathway with critical roles in regulating connective tissue homeostasis, with emphasis on skin and lung fibrosis and its role on systemic sclerosis. PMID:26064084

  7. Purkinje Cell Pathology and Loss in Multiple Sclerosis Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Juliana; Kemp, Kevin; Hares, Kelly; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2015-11-01

    Cerebellar ataxia commonly occurs in multiple sclerosis, particularly in chronic progressive disease. Previous reports have highlighted both white matter and grey matter pathological changes within the cerebellum; and demyelination and inflammatory cell infiltrates appear commonly. As Purkinje cell axons are the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, understanding pathologic processes within these cells is crucial to develop strategies to prevent their loss and thus reduce ataxia. We studied pathologic changes occurring within Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Using immunohistochemic techniques, we found changes in neurofilament phosphorylation states within Purkinje cells, including loss of dephosphorylated neurofilament and increased phosphorylated and hyperphosphorylated neurofilament. We also found Purkinje axonal spheroids and Purkinje cell loss, both of which occurred predominantly within areas of leucocortical demyelination within the cerebellar cortex. These changes have important implications for the study of cerebellar involvement in multiple sclerosis and may help design therapies to reduce the burden of ataxia in the condition. PMID:25411024

  8. [A review of multiple sclerosis (1). Presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Altarriba, M C; Ramos-Campoy, O; Luna-Calcaño, I M; Arrieta-Antón, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a major demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It has a significant economic and social impact. Its etiology is unclear, although there are several hypotheses, such as infections or genetics. In its pathophysiology, it seems that immune activation attacks the myelin sheath, causing a progressive and irreversible axonal degeneration. The disease produces a variety of symptoms, and diagnosis requires fulfilling a number of criteria and the exclusion of other possible causes. The role of neuroimaging, especially MRI, is very important. Despite the availability of disease-modifying drugs, none of them are able to halt its progress, and the most useful drugs are those designed to alleviate the symptoms of outbreaks. Overall, multiple sclerosis requires a significant effort in research to clarify not only why and how it occurs, but also to develop of new measures to improve the life of affected patients. PMID:25241121

  9. [A review of multiple sclerosis (2). Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Altarriba, M C; Ramos-Campoy, O; Luna-Calcaño, I M; Arrieta-Antón, E

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a major demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It has a significant economic and social impact. Its etiology is unclear, although there are several hypotheses, such as infections or genetics. In its pathophysiology, it seems that immune activation attacks the myelin sheath, causing a progressive and irreversible axonal degeneration. The disease produces a variety of symptoms, and diagnosis requires fulfilling a number of criteria and the exclusion of other possible causes. The role of neuroimaging is very important, especially Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Despite the availability of disease-modifying drugs, none of them are able to halt its progress, and the most useful drugs are those designed to alleviate the symptoms of outbreaks. Overall, multiple sclerosis requires a significant effort in research to clarify not only why and how it occurs, as well as the development of new measures to improve quality of life of affected patients. PMID:25442466

  10. Co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaygannejad, Vahid; Shirmardi, Maryam; Dehghani, Leila; Maghzi, Helia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with the highest prevalence in adults over 60 years of age On the other hand multiple sclerosis (MS), which mostly affects individuals between 20 and 40 years of age, is another neurodegenerative and autoimmune disease of the CNS, however, less common than PD. Here we aim to report the case of a 39-year-old woman, who developed PD 18 years after diagnosis of MS. PMID:27195248

  11. Co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Shaygannejad, Vahid; Shirmardi, Maryam; Dehghani, Leila; Maghzi, Helia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with the highest prevalence in adults over 60 years of age On the other hand multiple sclerosis (MS), which mostly affects individuals between 20 and 40 years of age, is another neurodegenerative and autoimmune disease of the CNS, however, less common than PD. Here we aim to report the case of a 39-year-old woman, who developed PD 18 years after diagnosis of MS. PMID:27195248

  12. [Fatigue in multiple sclerosis relapsing-remitting form].

    PubMed

    Mendes, M F; Tilbery, H P; Balsimell, S; Felipe, E; Moreira, M A; Barão-Cruz, A M

    2000-06-01

    In 95 patients with the remitting-relapsing form of multiple sclerosis we investigated fatigue. All of them were evaluated with the Fatigue Severity Scale and we found it in 64 patients (67.4%). Gender, age, depression and fuctional incapacity was not predictive of fatigue occurrence, while anxiety and time of disease seems to be correlated with it. When we analysed the fatigue severity, a correlation between the EDSS and the increasing fatigue severity was found. PMID:10920409

  13. Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Preissner, Katharine; Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    This Evidence Connection describes a case report of a woman with an exacerbation of multiple sclerosis (MS), applying the evidence for intervention from the systematic reviews on MS that were conducted in conjunction with the American Occupational Therapy Association's (AOTA's) Evidence-Based Practice Project. The occupational therapy assessment and treatment processes for an inpatient rehabilitation setting are described. Evidence Connection articles provide a clinical application of systematic reviews developed in conjunction with the AOTA's Evidence-Based Practice Project. PMID:27089301

  14. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Perspectives from adolescents and their families.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Lauren B; Rintell, David; Charvet, Leigh E; Milazzo, Maria; Wassmer, Evangeline

    2016-08-30

    Supporting young people with pediatric multiple sclerosis can be challenging for families and health care providers. Adolescents may be more resilient than adults in reaction to the diagnosis but can have more difficulty planning for their futures. Appropriate, sensitive, and focused health provision should include consideration of the perspective of both the patient and parents. Multidisciplinary management strategies are often effective, as are referrals to programs that enhance individual and family coping and strengthen a sense of community. PMID:27572860

  15. Expression of DNA methylation genes in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Mangano, Katia; Di Marco, Roberto; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia; Chikovan, Tinatin; Signorelli, Santo; Lombardo, Giuseppe A G; Patti, Francesco; Mammana, Santa; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2016-01-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immunoinflammatory disease of the central nervous system that seems to be influenced by DNA methylation. We sought to explore the expression pattern of genes involved in the control of DNA methylation in Secondary Progressive (SP) MS patients' PBMCs. We have found that SP MS is characterized by a significant upregulation of two genes belonging to the MBD family genes, MBD2 and MBD4, and by a downregulation of TDG and TET3. PMID:26711572

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in Optic Neuritis and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lamirel, Cédric; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique routinely used in ophthalmology to visualize and quantify the layers of the retina. It also provides information on optic nerve head topography, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and macular volume which correlate with axonal loss. These measurements are of particular interest in optic neuropathies and in multiple sclerosis, and OCT parameters are now used as endpoints in neurologic clinical trials. PMID:20605617

  17. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Diagnostic Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Singh, Navjeeven; Sharma, Sonal; Rohatgi, Jolly; Oberai, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Kingshuk

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a well-known clinical entity, characterized by facial angio-fibroma, shagreen patch, and hypo-melanotic, and confetti-like skin lesions. An exquisite fresh case is being narrated, emphasizing its microscopic pathology. The role of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, in particular, is highlighted to define the large variety of neurological abrasions for determining its future progression. PMID:26288435

  18. Management of neurogenic bladder in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Phé, Véronique; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2016-05-01

    Lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is common in patients with multiple sclerosis and is a major negative influence on the quality of life of these patients. The most commonly reported symptoms are those of the storage phase, of which detrusor overactivity is the most frequently reported urodynamic abnormality. The clinical evaluation of patients' LUT symptoms should include a bladder diary, uroflowmetry followed by measurement of post-void residual urine volume, urinalysis, ultrasonography, assessment of renal function, quality-of-life assessments and sometimes urodynamic investigations and/or cystoscopy. The management of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. Intermittent self-catheterization is the preferred option for management of incomplete bladder emptying and urinary retention. Antimuscarinics are the first-line treatment for patients with storage symptoms. If antimuscarinics are ineffective, or poorly tolerated, a range of other approaches, such as intradetrusor botulinum toxin A injections, tibial nerve stimulation and sacral neuromodulation are available, with varying levels of evidence in patients with multiple sclerosis. Surgical procedures should be performed only after careful selection of patients. Stress urinary incontinence owing to sphincter deficiency remains a therapeutic challenge, and is only managed surgically if conservative measures have failed. Multiple sclerosis has a progressive course, therefore, patients' LUT symptoms require regular, long-term follow-up monitoring. PMID:27030526

  19. Hyaline protoplasmic astrocytopathy in the setting of tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    Hyaline protoplasmic astrocytopathy is a rare disorder marked by an accumulation of protein material in the cytoplasm of astrocytic cells, mostly in the cortex. The finding has been described in Aicardi syndrome (agenesis of the corpus callosum, chorioretinal lacunae and infantile spasms) as well as in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy and in association with focal cortical dysplasia, polymicrogyria and nodular heterotopia. This report describes the first case of this entity described in a patient with tuberous sclerosis. The patient was a 3-year-old boy who presented at age 2months with medically intractable seizures. Has mother has a tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC 2) gene abnormality and a diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis. On imaging, he was noted to have multiple lesions in the left parietal and temporal lobes consistent with focal cortical dysplasia and a subependymal nodule. He additionally had two hypopigmented lesions on the skin. He underwent resection of the left parietal lobe 32months after seizure onset. Histopathologic examination showed eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions within astrocytes in the cortex and superficial white matter focally accompanied by a disordered cortical architecture with dysmorphic neurons and balloon cells, consistent with focal cortical dysplasia classified as type IIb according to International League Against Epilepsy classification criteria (ILAE type IIb). At the time of most recent follow-up, 93months postoperatively, he is still experiencing seizures with overall worthwhile improvement while on seizure medication. PMID:27174083

  20. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sosnoff, J. J.; Sandroff, B. M.; Pula, J. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Motl, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry) in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample) reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P < .05). However, when controlling for disability status there was no statistically significant difference between fallers and nonfallers (4092 versus 4373 steps/day; P > .05). Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis. PMID:22966459

  1. Hepatoportal sclerosis in childhood: descriptive analysis of 12 patients.

    PubMed

    Cantez, Mustafa Serdar; Gerenli, Nelgin; Ertekin, Vildan; Güllüoğlu, Mine; Durmaz, Özlem

    2013-10-01

    Hepatoportal sclerosis (HPS) is defined as sclerosis of portal areas in the absence of cirrhosis. There is little information about HPS in children in the literature. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation, associated disorders, laboratory characteristics and outcome of children who were diagnosed as HPS. This study included 12 children diagnosed as HPS by the Pathology Department between 2005 and 2011. Data were collected from the gastroenterology clinic charts retrospectively, including demographics, presentation characteristics, laboratory data and recent status of patients. Twelve patients were enrolled (6 girls, 6 boys). The median age of patients was 13.5 yr. Median age at the time of biopsy was 11 yr. Four patients had splenomegaly, 3 had esophageal varices, one had hepatopulmonary syndrome and had been transplanted. Smooth muscle antibody was found positive in 4 patients, without autoimmune hepatitis findings in liver biopsy. One patient had celiac disease and another patient had positive celiac disease serology but pathology findings. Another patient had Turner's syndrome. Mean follow-up time was 39 months (3.3 yr) after biopsy. Hepatoportal sclerosis does not necessarily present with portal hypertension in children. PMID:24133357

  2. Spontaneous Compartment Syndrome of the Hand in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tanagho, Andy; Hatab, Sameh; Youssef, Sally; Ansara, Sameh

    2015-09-01

    Compartment syndrome refers to a condition of compromised circulation within a limited space due to increased pressure within that space. The reduced tissue perfusion results in reduced venous drainage, leading to increased interstitial tissue pressure and subsequent compromised arterial flow. Although not as common as compartment syndrome of the leg and forearm, compartment syndrome of the hand is not rare and can lead to devastating sequelae as a result of tissue necrosis. Compartment syndrome of the hand has several etiologies, including trauma, arterial injury, thermal injury, and constrictive bandaging. The cardinal clinical sign is pain that is aggravated by passive stretching of the muscles within the involved compartments. Extremity function is usually restored with expeditious fasciotomy of the involved myofascial compartments, and complications, such as intrinsic muscular dysfunction and Volkmann's ischemic contracture, can usually be prevented. There are no reported cases of compartment syndrome of the hand in patients with systemic sclerosis or Raynaud's phenomenon. Systemic sclerosis is a form of scleroderma that affects the skin and internal organs. The limited cutaneous subset affects the skin of the extremities but is associated with a set of characteristic features that includes calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia. This report describes an unusual case of a patient who had spontaneous compartment syndrome of the hand. The patient's concomitant limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis may have played a role in this unusual occurrence. The diagnosis was based on the clinical picture, and the symptoms resolved after surgical decompression. PMID:26375546

  3. [A case of multiple sclerosis manifesting piano playing movement].

    PubMed

    Nagano, T; Mizoi, R; Watanabe, I; Tomi, H; Sunohara, N

    1993-04-01

    We report a case of 33-year-old man with multiple sclerosis, showing piano playing movement in both hands. His course of multiple sclerosis was remittent/progressive during 2 years and the clinical manifestation suggested the spinal cord involvement. On July 15, 1991, he was admitted with numbness of the right limbs, and then developed piano playing movement in both hands, more marked in the right side. Neurological examination revealed mild weakness in the right upper extremity, and rough touch, pain, and temperature sensation were slightly decreased. However, there was no deep sensory abnormalities, such as vibration, fine touch, and position senses. Vibration sense was lost below ilium. CSF examination showed elevation of IgG index (1.6), three oligoclonal bands and myelin basic protein content of 2.4 ng/ml. There was no HTLV-I antibody in CSF. SSEP, elicited by median nerve stimulation at the right wrist, showed no N13 and low amplitude of N20. T2-weighted images of cervical MRI revealed area of high signal intensity at the C3-C4 level. The piano playing movement gradually improved and disappeared by the initiation of steroid hormone therapy. It was considered that involuntary movement in this patient was due to the spinal cord lesion caused by multiple sclerosis. These findings suggested that the involuntary movement like pseudoathetosis could present without deep sensory abnormalities. PMID:8370208

  4. Spasticity in multiple sclerosis and role of glatiramer acetate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meca-Lallana, Jose Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spasticity is one of the most disabling and difficult-to-treat symptoms shown by patients with multiple sclerosis, who often show a suboptimal and unsatisfactory response to classic treatment and new available nonpharmacological alternatives. Due to the progressive nature of this condition, the early management should be essential to improve long-term outcomes. Methods We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of spasticity to the burden of multiple sclerosis and the potential role of classic disease-modifying drugs. Results Added to the underlying pathophysiology of spasticity, certain external factors and drugs such as interferon may exacerbate the existing condition, hence their awareness is crucial as part of an effective management of spasticity. Furthermore, the evidence for the effectiveness of glatiramer acetate in preventing spasticity in naïve patients and in those switching from interferon should not be ignored. Conclusions This literature review proposes the examination of spasticity and the influence of classic disease-modifying agents on the level of existing condition among the variables to be considered when deciding on therapy for multiple sclerosis in clinical practice. PMID:26445705

  5. Hepatoportal Sclerosis in Childhood: Descriptive Analysis of 12 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gerenli, Nelgin; Ertekin, Vildan; Güllüoğlu, Mine; Durmaz, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Hepatoportal sclerosis (HPS) is defined as sclerosis of portal areas in the absence of cirrhosis. There is little information about HPS in children in the literature. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation, associated disorders, laboratory characteristics and outcome of children who were diagnosed as HPS. This study included 12 children diagnosed as HPS by the Pathology Department between 2005 and 2011. Data were collected from the gastroenterology clinic charts retrospectively, including demographics, presentation characteristics, laboratory data and recent status of patients. Twelve patients were enrolled (6 girls, 6 boys). The median age of patients was 13.5 yr. Median age at the time of biopsy was 11 yr. Four patients had splenomegaly, 3 had esophageal varices, one had hepatopulmonary syndrome and had been transplanted. Smooth muscle antibody was found positive in 4 patients, without autoimmune hepatitis findings in liver biopsy. One patient had celiac disease and another patient had positive celiac disease serology but pathology findings. Another patient had Turner's syndrome. Mean follow-up time was 39 months (3.3 yr) after biopsy. Hepatoportal sclerosis does not necessarily present with portal hypertension in children. PMID:24133357

  6. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in U. S. veterans: 2. Latitude, climate and the risk of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, J.E. Jr.; Kurtzke, J.F.; Beebe, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of ten climatic factors and elevation for the counties of birth of 4371 U.S. white male veterans with multiple sclerosis and matched controls has been made in relation to birthplace latitude. The climatic factors include an air pollution index, concentrations of minerals in ground water, measures of annual solar radiation, both in energy per unit area and in hours of sunshine, mean annual periods of high and low temperatures, and measures of annual rainfall and average humidity. These variables all significantly influence the risk of multiple sclerosis when analyzed alone, but when they are adjusted for latitude, their effect is found to be due to their correlation with this variable.

  7. Focal thinning of the cerebral cortex in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sailer, Michael; Fischl, Bruce; Salat, David; Tempelmann, Claus; Schönfeld, Mircea Ariel; Busa, Evelina; Bodammer, Nils; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dale, Anders

    2003-08-01

    Brain atrophy as determined by quantitative MRI can be used to characterize disease progression in multiple sclerosis. Many studies have addressed white matter (WM) alterations leading to atrophy, while changes of the cerebral cortex have been studied to a lesser extent. In vivo, the cerebral cortex has been difficult to study due to its complex structure and regional variability. Measurement of cerebral cortex thickness at different disease stages may provide new insights into grey matter (GM) pathology. In the present investigation, we evaluated in vivo cortical thickness and its relationship to disability, disease duration, WM T2 hyper-intense and T1 hypo-intense lesion volumes. High-resolution MRI brain scans were obtained in 20 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis and 15 age-matched normal subjects. A novel method of automated surface reconstruction yielded measurements of the cortical thickness for each subject's entire brain and computed cross-subject statistics based on the cortical anatomy. Statistical thickness difference maps were generated by performing t-tests between patient and control groups and individual thickness measures were submitted to analyses of variance to investigate the relationship between cortical thickness and clinical variables. The mean overall thickness of the cortical ribbon was reduced in multiple sclerosis patients compared with controls [2.30 mm (SD 0.14) versus 2.48 mm (SD 0.11)], showing a significant main effect of group (controls versus patients). In patients, we found significant main effects for disability, disease duration, T2 and T1 lesion volumes. The visualization of statistical difference maps of the cortical GM thickness on inflated brains across the cortical surface revealed a distinct distribution of significant focal thinning of the cerebral cortex in addition to the diffuse cortical atrophy. Focal cortical thinning in frontal [2.37 mm (SD 0.17) versus 2.73 mm (SD 0.25)] and in temporal [2.65 mm

  8. Neuroaxial anesthesia in a patient with progressive systemic sclerosis : case presentation and review of the literature on systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Erk, Gülcan; taşpınar, Vildan; Dönmez, Ferah; örnek, Dilşen

    2006-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc), a progressive disease characterized by excessive accumulation of connective tissue components. Although most patients have long survival, some of them progress rapidly to death. Pulmonary system involvement and pulmonary hypertension are the most frequent cause of death. When the patient with SSc is to be operated, the anesthetic procedure could be a serious problem. In this article, we report a combined spinal – epidural technique in a patient with progressive SSc and the anesthetic considerations that could be recommended for these patients. Case presentation A 68-year-old woman who had a history of progressive systemic sclerosis, pulmonary fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis and decreased oral apertura underwent total hip arthroplasty. This operation was performed successfully under combined spinal epidural anesthesia. Conclusion Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease that involves multiple organ systems. Every aspects of anesthetic care may be altered or hindered by the pathogenesis of disease. Although the choice of regional or general anesthesia is unclear, to choose combined spinal epidural anesthesia may be useful. PMID:17042962

  9. Depression in Multiple Sclerosis: A Review of Assessment and Treatment Approaches in Adult and Pediatric Populations

    PubMed Central

    Skokou, Maria; Soubasi, Evanthia; Gourzis, Philippos

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disease affecting one million people worldwide, with a significant burden of psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the commonest psychiatric manifestation but still remains largely underdiagnosed and undertreated. The present work reviews current knowledge on diagnosis, assessment, and somatic and psychotherapeutic treatment interventions for depression in adult and pediatric populations of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23097716

  10. Is Hypovitaminosis D One of the Environmental Risk Factors for Multiple Sclerosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierrot-Deseilligny, Charles; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The role of hypovitaminosis D as a possible risk factor for multiple sclerosis is reviewed. First, it is emphasized that hypovitaminosis D could be only one of the risk factors for multiple sclerosis and that numerous other environmental and genetic risk factors appear to interact and combine to trigger the disease. Secondly, the classical…

  11. 76 FR 78823 - Schedule for Rating Disabilities; Evaluation of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... INFORMATION: On June 23, 2010, VA published in the Federal Register (75 FR 35711) a proposed rule that would... Sclerosis AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Veterans... criterion provided for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to provide an evaluation of 100 percent for...

  12. Impact of psychotherapy on insomnia symptoms in patients with depression and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Corden, Marya; Jin, Ling; Mohr, David C

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of insomnia in multiple sclerosis patients with comorbid depression, associations between psychological symptoms, multiple sclerosis symptoms and insomnia, and to test effects of a 16-week protocol-based psychotherapy intervention for depression on insomnia symptoms. Participants with multiple sclerosis and depression (n = 127) were randomized to telephone administered cognitive behavioral therapy and telephone administered supportive emotion-focused therapy. Multiple sclerosis functional limitation was measured at baseline. Depression, insomnia, anxiety and quality of life were evaluated at pre treatment, mid treatment (8 weeks), and post treatment (16 weeks). Prevalence of insomnia ≥3 times per week was 78% at pre treatment and 43% at post treatment. Insomnia at baseline was associated with depression, multiple sclerosis related mood symptoms and anxiety. Middle of the night awakenings were associated with swallowing and speech problems. Improvements in insomnia were associated with improvement in depression and anxiety. Participants with residual insomnia were more likely to have major depressive disorder, greater multiple sclerosis severity, elevated anxiety and lower mental components of quality of life. Results demonstrate rates of insomnia in patients with comorbid multiple sclerosis and depression are higher than those reported in the general multiple sclerosis population and additional insomnia treatment is indicated beyond the treatment of comorbid psychological disorders. PMID:20809354

  13. Advances and Future Directions for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research: Recommendations From the 2015 Strategic Planning Conference.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Mustafa; Henske, Elizabeth P; Manning, Brendan D; Ess, Kevin C; Bissler, John J; Klann, Eric; Kwiatkowski, David J; Roberds, Steven L; Silva, Alcino J; Hillaire-Clarke, Coryse St; Young, Lisa R; Zervas, Mark; Mamounas, Laura A

    2016-07-01

    On March 10 to March 12, 2015, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance sponsored a workshop in Bethesda, Maryland, to assess progress and new opportunities for research in tuberous sclerosis complex with the goal of updating the 2003 Research Plan for Tuberous Sclerosis (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/about_ninds/plans/tscler_research_plan.htm). In addition to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance, participants in the strategic planning effort and workshop included representatives from six other Institutes of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program, and a broad cross-section of basic scientists and clinicians with expertise in tuberous sclerosis complex along with representatives from the pharmaceutical industry. Here we summarize the outcomes from the extensive premeeting deliberations and final workshop recommendations, including (1) progress in the field since publication of the initial 2003 research plan for tuberous sclerosis complex, (2) the key gaps, needs, and challenges that hinder progress in tuberous sclerosis complex research, and (3) a new set of research priorities along with specific recommendations for addressing the major challenges in each priority area. The new research plan is organized around both short-term and long-term goals with the expectation that progress toward specific objectives can be achieved within a five to ten year time frame. PMID:27267556

  14. Reliability and Clinical Significance of Mobility and Balance Assessments in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Paul, Lorna; McFadyen, Angus K.; Mattison, Paul; Miller, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the test-retest reliability, clinical significance and precision of four mobility and balance measures--the Timed 25-Foot Walk, Six-minute Walk, Timed Up and Go and the Berg Balance Scale--in individuals moderately affected by multiple sclerosis. Twenty four participants with multiple sclerosis (Extended…

  15. Early perivenular sclerosis in alcoholic fatty liver: an index of progressive liver injury.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, L; Lieber, C S

    1977-10-01

    Alcoholic steatosis was associated with sclerosis around the terminal hepatic venules in liver biopsies of 40% of chronic alcoholics but not in those of moderate drinkers. To determine whether this sclerosis could be a precursor lesion of cirrhosis, controlled studies were performed in animal models. In the alcohol-fed baboons that developed fibrosis or cirrhosis, progressive perivenular sclerosis invariably started at the fatty liver stage before or even more commonly in the absence of alcoholic hepatitis. No sclerosis occurred in controls or in alcohol-fed baboons and rats that did not progress beyond the fatty liver stage. The clinical and experimental data indicate that sclerosis around the terminal venules, a common but often overlooked complication of alcoholic fatty liver, reflects heavy prolonged drinking, and may identify those patients who are susceptible to develop the more advanced lesions of alcoholic liver injury upon continued drinking. PMID:408218

  16. Differential diagnosis of Mendelian and mitochondrial disorders in patients with suspected multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Katz Sand, Ilana B.; Honce, Justin M.; Lublin, Fred D.

    2015-01-01

    Several single gene disorders share clinical and radiologic characteristics with multiple sclerosis and have the potential to be overlooked in the differential diagnostic evaluation of both adult and paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. This group includes lysosomal storage disorders, various mitochondrial diseases, other neurometabolic disorders, and several other miscellaneous disorders. Recognition of a single-gene disorder as causal for a patient’s ‘multiple sclerosis-like’ phenotype is critically important for accurate direction of patient management, and evokes broader genetic counselling implications for affected families. Here we review single gene disorders that have the potential to mimic multiple sclerosis, provide an overview of clinical and investigational characteristics of each disorder, and present guidelines for when clinicians should suspect an underlying heritable disorder that requires diagnostic confirmation in a patient with a definite or probable diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25636970

  17. Pain is associated with prospective memory dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ashley K; Basso, Michael R; Candilis, Philip J; Combs, Dennis R; Woods, Steven Paul

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) pertains to the execution of a future goal or behavior. Initial research implies that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) are apt to show impaired prospective memory for activities of daily living. Yet, PM impairment does not occur in all people with MS. Thus, some other variable besides disease status alone may contribute to PM dysfunction in people with MS. Chronic pain may be such a variable. Approximately 50-70% of people with MS experience significant pain, and such pain has been thought to diminish memory function. To investigate this possibility, 96 patients with MS and 29 healthy subjects were administered the Memory for Intentions Screening Test (MIST; Woods, S. P., Iudicello, J. E., Moran, L. M, Carey, C. L., Dawson, M. S., & Grant, I. (2008). HIV-associated prospective memory impairment increases risk of dependence in everyday functioning. Neuropsychology, 22, 110-117.), a well-validated measure of prospective memory, and the Medical Outcomes Study Pain Effects Scale (PES; Fischer, J. S., Rudick, R. A., Cutter, G. R., & Reingold, S. C. (1999). The multiple sclerosis functional composite measure (MSFC): An integrated approach to MS clinical outcome assessment. National MS Society Clinical Outcomes Assessment Task Force. Multiple Sclerosis, 5, 244-250.) to assess chronic pain. After controlling for demographic variables and disability severity, subjective pain accounted for significant variance in PM, particularly for time-based intentions over sustained delay periods. These data accord well with assertions that pain may degrade ability to remember new intentions and suggests that pain is associated with PM dysfunction in people with MS. PMID:25338929

  18. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Sima; Ahmadi, Golchehreh; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS), such as other information system (IS), depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis), their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management. PMID:25709660

  19. Patient perceptions of multiple sclerosis and its treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Seze, Jérôme; Borgel, Florent; Brudon, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to improve the treatment outcome in multiple sclerosis, it is important to document the factors that influence adherence to therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine patient perceptions and awareness of multiple sclerosis and its treatment, treatment adherence, and impact on quality of life and daily living. Methods This was a cross-sectional observational study performed in France. Each participating neurologist included the first three patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who consulted after the start of the study. Data on clinical features were collected from a physician questionnaire and on disease and treatment perception and on quality of life from a patient autoquestionnaire. Results A total of 175 neurologists entered 202 patients in the study. The mean duration of disease was 8.0 ± 7.0 years, and immunomodulatory treatment had been administered for a mean duration of 3.0 ± 2.0 years. A total of 166 patients (82.2%) were treated with interferon-β preparations and 36 patients (17.8%) with glatiramer acetate. Eighty-five patients (42.1%) reported missing their injections from time to time and 36 patients (17.8%) reported “drug holidays”. The most frequently given reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness (38.7% of cases). Eighty-six patients (42.6%) and 70 patients (34.7%) claimed to be well informed about their disease and treatment, respectively. Adherence was significantly higher in well informed patients (P = 0.035). The majority of patients (176 patients, 87.1%) intended continuing their current treatment and 49.5% considered that their current treatment might reduce relapses. The most frequently reported side effect was muscle pain (124 patients, 61.4%). Conclusion Patient understanding of treatment for disease enhances treatment adherence. Greater patient involvement in disease management requires better communication between physicians and their patients. PMID:22536062

  20. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Ahmadi, Golchehreh; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS), such as other information system (IS), depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis), their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management. PMID:25709660

  1. Urodynamic studies in female patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Beck, R P; Warren, K G; Whitman, P

    1981-02-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis may have two fundamental, related problems in the lower urinary tract, i.e., urinary retention and/or urinary incontinence. Forty-six patients were assessed by urodynamic testing. Evidence of detrusor overactivity was seen in 40 patients (86.9%), elevated resting urethral pressures in 39 patients (84.8%), a positive bethanechol chloride (Urecholine) stress test in 24 patients (63.2%), and a significant residual urine in 26 patients (56.5%). Data were analyzed in an attempt to explain retention and incontinence in these patients. PMID:7468694

  2. Respiratory failure as the presenting manifestation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Srivali, Narat; Ryu, Jay H; Rabatin, Jeffrey T

    2016-07-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) does not directly affect the lung parenchyma, it can jeopardize the mechanical function of the respiratory system. About one-quarter of ALS patients have had at least one prior misdiagnosis. Therefore, a high clinical suspicion, and careful correlation of physical examination and electromyography (EMG) are needed to reach the correct diagnosis. We report a 65-year-old man who presented with a progressive exertional dyspnea. He was subsequently found to have a diaphragmatic paralysis that was felt to be secondary to spinal cord stenosis. However, his subsequent EMG showed evidence of muscle fasciculation and he was ultimately diagnosed with ALS. PMID:26899358

  3. Cross-sectional Imaging Review of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anant; Kaza, Ravi K; Vummidi, Dharshan R

    2016-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem, genetic disorder characterized by development of hamartomas in the brain, abdomen, and thorax. It results from a mutation in one of 2 tumor suppressor genes that activates the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. This article discusses the origins of the disorder, the recently updated criteria for the diagnosis of TSC, and the cross-sectional imaging findings and recommendations for surveillance. Familiarity with the diverse radiological features facilitates diagnosis and helps in treatment planning and monitoring response to treatment of this multisystem disorder. PMID:27153781

  4. [Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamic and distribution in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Walczak, Jarosław; Szczepanowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a complex disease leading to degradation of motor neurons. One of the early symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders are mitochondrial dysfunctions. Since few decades mitochondrial morphology changes have been observed in tissues of patients with ALS. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles which constantly undergo continuous process of fusion and fission and are actively transported within the cell. Proper functioning of mitochondrial dynamics and distribution is crucial for cell survival, especially neuronal cells that have long axons. This article summarizes the current knowledge about the role of mitochondrial dynamics and distribution in pathophysiology of familial and sporadic form of ALS. PMID:26689011

  5. [Emerging new therapies for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Anis, Saar; Achiron, Anat

    2014-11-01

    For the last 20 years the classic treatment for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis was based on injectable disease-modifying drugs, interferon-β and glatiramer acetate (copaxone). Currently, new disease-modifying drugs have been added to the clinician's arsenal with similar and even improved efficacy and safety profiles. Some of these drugs are given orally and are recommended as first line treatment. In this review we will discuss the various innovative and emerging disease-modifying drugs including the method of administration, mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and major side effects. PMID:25563027

  6. /sup 67/Gallium lung scans in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Feiglin, D.; Hyland, R.; Urowitz, M.B.; Shiff, B.

    1983-08-01

    /sup 67/Gallium lung scans were performed in 19 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Results were expressed quantitatively as the /sup 67/Gallium Uptake Index. The mean total pulmonary /sup 67/Gallium Uptake Index in patients was significantly higher than that in controls (41 versus 25), and 4 patients (21%) fell outside the normal range. There were no clinical or laboratory variables that correlated with the /sup 56/Gallium uptake. Increased pulmonary /sup 67/Gallium uptake in scleroderma may prove useful as an index of pulmonary disease activity.

  7. Microvesicles: What is the Role in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Carandini, Tiziana; Colombo, Federico; Finardi, Annamaria; Casella, Giacomo; Garzetti, Livia; Verderio, Claudia; Furlan, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles are a recently described way of cell communication that has been implicated in a number of biological processes, including neuroinflammation. Widely investigated as biomarkers in oncology and neurological disorders, little is known of the role of microvesicles in the pathogenesis of diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Several evidences suggest that pro-inflammatory microglia and infiltrating macrophages release microvesicles that spread inflammatory signals and alter neuronal functions. We review here available information on microvesicles, with a special focus on microglia and macrophage microvesicles, in the pathogenesis of MS, and as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26074867

  8. Tuberous sclerosis with oral manifestations: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Sps; Dang, Ramandeep Singh; Brar, Gursimrat

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurocutaneous syndrome, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with a high incidence of sporadic cases and protean clinical expression, with a incidence of prevalence between 1 in 10,000 and 1 in 170,000. The cardinal features of TSC are skin lesions, convulsive seizures, and mental retardation. We report a sporadically occurring case of definite TSC in a young female who presented with oral and cutaneous manifestations without mental retardation or history of convulsive seizures, which to the best of our knowledge has not been reported so far. PMID:26958526

  9. Brain imaging of multiple sclerosis: the next 10 years.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Paul M

    2009-02-01

    MR imaging has had a major impact on understanding the dynamic neuropathologic findings of multiple sclerosis (MS), early diagnosis of the disease, and clinical trial conduct. The next 10 years can be expected to see further advances with a greater emphasis on large multicenter studies, new techniques and hardware allowing greater imaging sensitivity and resolution, and the exploitation of positron emission tomography molecular imaging for MS. The impact should be felt with a new emphasis on gray matter disease and processes of repair. With new ways of monitoring the disease, new treatment targets should become practical, helping to translate advances in the understanding of immunology and regenerative medicine into novel therapies. PMID:19064203

  10. Nature plus nurture: the triggering of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wekerle, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical and experimental studies indicate that multiple sclerosis develops as consequence of a failed interplay between genetic ("nature") and environmental ("nurture") factors. A large number of risk genes favour an autoimmune response against the body's own brain matter. New experimental data indicate that the actual trigger of this attack is however provided by an interaction of brain-specific immune cells with components of the regular commensal gut flora, the intestinal microbiota. This concept opens the way for new therapeutic approaches involving modulation of the microbiota by dietary or antibiotic regimens. PMID:26430854

  11. Social support: gender differences in multiple sclerosis spousal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Good, D M; Bower, D A; Einsporn, R L

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in social support of spousal caregivers of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). The sample consisted of 37 male and 28 female caregivers of individuals with MS. It was found that female caregivers scored significantly higher than males on the total number of resources available, perceived social support and the perceived availability of friends and self-help groups. There was a positive relationship between caregiver-perceived social support and the ability of the mate to perform intimate functions. Caregiver-perceived social support was also found to be positively correlated with the caregiver's level of commitment to the spousal relationship. PMID:8568348

  12. Reliability of gait in multiple sclerosis over 6 months.

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Klaren, Rachel E; Pilutti, Lara A; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Motl, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    Gait impairment is ubiquitous in multiple sclerosis (MS) and is often characterized by alterations in spatiotemporal parameters of gait. There is limited information concerning reliability of spatiotemporal gait parameters over clinical timescales (e.g. 6 months). The current report provides novel evidence that gait parameters of 74 ambulatory persons with MS with mild-to-moderate disability are reliable over 6-months (ICC's for overall sample range from 0.56 to 0.91) in the absence of any intervention above and beyond standard care. Such data can inform clinical decision-making and power analyses for designing RCTs (i.e., sample size estimates) involving persons with MS. PMID:25772669

  13. Optimal management of digital ulcers in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Shawn; Steen, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Raynaud’s phenomenon and digital ulcerations are two common clinical features seen in patients with systemic sclerosis. They are painful and lead to significant morbidity and altered hand function within this patient population. While currently there are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications for the treatment of digital ulcerations in the United States, clinical trials have supported the use of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities in facilitating healing of existing digital ulcers and preventing formation of new ulcers. This article reviews the published data on these therapeutic options. PMID:26109864

  14. Complementary and Alternative Therapies in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bedlack, Richard S; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T; Paganoni, Sabrina; Karam, Chafic

    2015-11-01

    Given the severity of their illness and lack of effective disease-modifying agents, it is not surprising that most patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) consider trying complementary and alternative therapies. Some of the most commonly considered alternative therapies include special diets, nutritional supplements, cannabis, acupuncture, chelation, and energy healing. This article reviews these in detail. The authors also describe 3 models by which physicians may frame discussions about alternative therapies: paternalism, autonomy, and shared decision making. Finally, the authors review a program called ALSUntangled, which uses shared decision making to review alternative therapies for ALS. PMID:26515629

  15. A controlled trial of antihypertensive therapy in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Fries, J F; Wasner, C; Brown, J; Feigenbaum, P

    1984-06-01

    Antihypertensive treatment may be life saving in scleroderma renal crisis. Patients surviving such crises frequently have had dramatic improvement in the dermal manifestations of their scleroderma. To investigate the potential role of antihypertensive treatment in nonhypertensive patients we randomly assigned 28 patients with systemic sclerosis into drug (14) and placebo (14) groups, using blocked randomisation , and followed them up in a prospective, double-blind clinical trial for 24 months. Overall, both groups improved slightly, with both subjective and objective markers. There were no statistically significant differences and no clinically meaningful trends between the 2 groups, except that the blood pressure was reduced in the group on the active drug. PMID:6378105

  16. A very rare paroxysmal symptom in multiple sclerosis: convergence spasm.

    PubMed

    Anlıaçık, Süleyman; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Akpınar, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects many regions of the central nervous system and leads to visual, oculomotor, motor, sensorial, cerebellar, and cognitive disorders. In addition to classic clinical findings, sudden paroxysmal symptoms triggered by motion, hyperventilation, or sensory stimulus may occur. In this article, we present a case of convergence spasm attended by paroxysmal symptoms, a rarely observed situation but one which can have complete recovery through administration of 5-day intravenous (i.v.) methylprednisolone therapy, together with its imaging findings and video records. PMID:26164409

  17. Neuro-Ophthalmic Syndromes and Processing Speed in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Silvana L; Gonçalves, Óscar F; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; DeLuca, John; Almeida, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    The impact of prior neuro-ophthalmic syndromes on the performance on vision-based neuropsychological tasks in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown. Two groups of MS participants, one with (Msos+) and the other without (Msos-), a history of neuro-ophthalmic syndromes, underwent neuropsychological assessment and were compared with healthy age- and education-matched controls (HC). Participants with Msos+ performed significantly worse on the symbol digit modalities test than the Msos- (P < 0.03) and the HC groups (P < 0.01) and coding (P < 0.01). A clinical history of neuro-ophthalmic syndromes is associated with reduced performance on visual processing speed tasks. PMID:26132964

  18. Smoking: effects on multiple sclerosis susceptibility and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Wingerchuk, Dean M

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with both genetic and environmental factors that influence disease susceptibility. Exposure to cigarette smoke is emerging as a viable environmental risk factor for MS that contributes to both increased disease susceptibility and more rapid disease advancement. The relative risk for MS development is approximately 1.5 for smokers compared with nonsmokers. Furthermore, there may be important interactions between smoking, an individual's genetic background, and other environmental risk exposures. This review summarizes the current evidence supporting the association of smoking with MS risk and disease course, with additional comments on causation. PMID:22276073

  19. The Current State of Biomarkers in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Scleroderma is a complex, multisystem autoimmune rheumatic disease with wide heterogeneity in phenotype and outcome. There are often coexisting ongoing pathologic processes including immune system activation, progressive fibrosis, and vascular disease in subsets of patients. Currently, it is challenging to identify patients at risk for developing adverse outcomes and to determine which patients are responding to current therapies. For these reasons, it is highly valuable to find easily measurable biomarkers that may represent ongoing disease activity or treatment response. This review examines the current state of biomarker development in systemic sclerosis and identifies areas in which further work should be directed. PMID:20425531

  20. Frontotemporal Dysfunction and Dementia in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Susan C; Strong, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is classically considered a disorder exclusively affecting motor neurons, there is substantial clinical, neuroimaging, and neuropathologic evidence that more than half of patients have an associated syndrome of frontotemporal dysfunction. These syndromes range from frontotemporal dementia to behavioral or cognitive syndromes. Neuroimaging and neuropathologic findings are consistent with frontotemporal lobar degeneration that underpins alterations in network connectivity. Future clinical trials need to be stratified based on the presence or absence of frontotemporal dysfunction on the disease course of ALS. PMID:26515622

  1. Scalp fibroma: a rare cutaneous manifestation of tuberous sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhawna; Prakash, Swayam; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki; Panagariya, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 23-year-old woman with a history of generalised tonic–clonic seizures, reddish brown maculopapular swelling over the face and an enlarging swelling over the scalp. Physical examinations revealed angiofibroma of the face and other typical cutaneous lesions of tuberous sclerosis, for example, shagreen patch and periungual fibroma. Scalp swelling was labelled as fibroma by dermatologists, which was further supported by the histopathological findings. Fibroma of the face is one of the commonest lesions, however, fibroma of the scalp is a rarely described entity. PMID:24748136

  2. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Patrucco, Liliana; Miguez, Jimena; Cristiano, Edgardo

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients. PMID:27050854

  3. Tracheomegaly Secondary to Tracheotomy Tube Cuff in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tracheomegaly has not been reported in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Herein, the authors report a case of tracheomegaly secondary to tracheotomy tube cuff in a patient with ALS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an ALS patient with tracheomegaly and of tracheomegaly being associated with tracheotomy tube cuff and home tracheotomy mechanical ventilator. The clinician should consider the possibility of tracheomegaly in the differential diagnosis, if a patient with ALS develops repeat air leakage around the tracheotomy tube or rupture of tracheotomy tube cuff. PMID:26496301

  4. Information processing speed in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rao, S M; St Aubin-Faubert, P; Leo, G J

    1989-08-01

    We have recently proposed that the cognitive deficits of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) share numerous characteristics associated with the syndrome of subcortical dementia. One such characteristic, slowness of mental processing, was evaluated in the present study. Thirty-six MS patients were compared to 26 normal controls of equivalent age, education, and verbal intelligence on the Sternberg memory scanning test. As anticipated, the motor-involved MS patients had an overall slower reaction time than did controls. Their scanning rate, a measure of pure cognitive speed, was also significantly slower than controls. These results suggest that MS patients exhibit a slowing of mental processing independent of motor involvement. PMID:2760182

  5. Recent Treatments of Interstitial Lung Disease with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yasuoka, Hidekata

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a disorder characterized by immune dysfunction, microvascular injury, and fibrosis. Organ involvement in patients with SSc is variable; however, pulmonary involvement occurs in up to 90% of patients with SSc. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a major cause of mortality and, thus, a major determinant in the prognosis of patients with SSc. This review summarizes current findings about the characteristics of ILD in patients with SSc, selection of patients with SSc-ILD who are candidates for the treatment, and current treatment options. PMID:26819563

  6. Nodular Scleroderma Revisited: Systemic Sclerosis Presenting as Annular Keloidal Sclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Lortscher, David N.; Cohen, Philip R.; Bangert, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nodular scleroderma, also known as keloidal scleroderma, is a rare variant of systemic sclerosis. Purpose: The clinical features, pathologic findings and postulated pathogenesis of nodular scleroderma are discussed. Methods: A woman with previously undiagnosed systemic sclerosis who presented with nodular scleroderma is described. Using the PubMed database, a literature search was performed on keloidal scleroderma, nodular scleroderma, and systemic sclerosis. Results: Nodular scleroderma is characterized by firm plaques or nodules, which can mimic a keloid, that are typically located on the anterior orposterior upper trunk and the arms; they show pathologic changes of scleroderma, keloid, or hypertrophic scar. Akeloidal response of inflamed skin that is involved in an active fibrotic process inherent to systemic sclerosis, in individuals who are genetically predisposed to keloid formation, is the hypothesized pathogenesis. Conclusion: Nodular scleroderma is rare. The authors’ patient presented with diarrhea, dysphagia, fatigue, Raynaud’s phenomenon, shortness of breath, and annular keloidal plaques of morphea whose biopsy showed features of hypertrophic scar; additional studies confirmed the diagnosis of the nodular scleroderma variant of systemic sclerosis. The possibility of systemic sclerosis should be entertained in patients who present with nodularor keloidal plaques that morphologically resemble morphea and have histologic findings of a scar or a keloid—especially if there are associated symptoms suggestive for systemic sclerosis. PMID:27386053

  7. Intravenous immunoglobulin and interferon: successful treatment of optic neuritis in pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Spalice, Alberto; Properzi, Enrico; Lo Faro, Valentina; Acampora, Barbara; Iannetti, Paola

    2004-08-01

    Optic neuritis is a common clinical condition that causes loss of vision. It can be clinically isolated or can occur as one of the manifestations of multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is a severe disabling demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which is rare among children. The treatment of optic neuritis has been investigated in several trials, the results of which have shown that corticosteroids speed up the recovery of vision without affecting the final visual outcome. Treatment of neurologic disorders with intravenous immunoglobulin is an increasing feature of our practice for an expanding range of indications, including multiple sclerosis. Owing to its anti-inflammatory properties, intravenous immunoglobulin can be beneficial in the treatment of acute relapses and in the prevention of new relapses of multiple sclerosis. To our knowledge, there is only one experience of treatment of optic neuritis with intravenous immunoglobulin in multiple sclerosis, even if therapeutic trials are used in the therapy of multiple sclerosis. We report on a girl with optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis in whom treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin at first alone and subsequently associated with interferon achieved great improvement in visual acuity. PMID:15605474

  8. Regulatory T cell number in multiple sclerosis patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Bistoon-Beigloo, Sara; Bakhtiyari, Salar; Abbaszadeh, Hojjat-Allah; Darabi, Shahram; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Abdanipour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells), defined as CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T cells by expression of CD4, high-affinity IL-2 receptor and the transcription factor, forkhead box P3 (FoxP3). They play a pivotal role in protecting individuals from autoimmunity and a growing body of evidence suggests their role in the prevention of multiple sclerosis development. However, there are discrepancies about the type of defect in the Treg cells of multiple sclerosis patients and especially whether the Treg number alteration could be contributed to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. Indeed, whether low number of Treg cells can be a risk factor contributing to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis is the matter of debate and there is not any comprehensive agreement on it. Thus, the objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to precisely quantify the nature and magnitude of the association between Treg cell number and the risk ratio/odds ratio (OR) of multiple sclerosis in the case-control studies. Hence, medical databases of Embase, PubMed/Medline, PubMed, PubMed Central and SCOPUS were searched for empirical papers using "Regulatory T cell frequency", "Treg frequency" in combination with "multiple sclerosis". In the case-control studies, papers were reviewed for inclusion/exclusion criteria and 8 publications were included. Under random-effect model meta-analysis the data showed that the frequency of Treg cells was not a risk factor in multiple sclerosis using current laboratory methods. PMID:26856947

  9. Visual Evoked Potentials as a Readout of Cortical Function in Infants With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Varcin, Kandice J; Nelson, Charles A; Ko, Jordan; Sahin, Mustafa; Wu, Joyce Y; Jeste, Shafali Spurling

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that confers a high risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Studies have demonstrated specific delays in visual reception skills that may predict the development of autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Based on evidence for alterations in the retinogeniculate pathway in animal models of tuberous sclerosis complex, we asked whether children with tuberous sclerosis complex demonstrate alterations in early visual processing that may undermine the development of higher-level visual behaviors. Pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials were recorded in infants with tuberous sclerosis complex (n = 16) and typically developing infants (n = 18) at 12 months of age. Infants with tuberous sclerosis complex demonstrated remarkably intact visual evoked potentials even within the context of intellectual disability and epilepsy. Infants with tuberous sclerosis complex show intact visual cortical processing, suggesting that delays in visually mediated behaviors in tuberous sclerosis complex may not be rooted in early visual processing deficits. PMID:26018199

  10. Serum VEGF levels are related to the presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Kiropoulos, Theodoros; Koutsokera, Angela; Ziogas, Athanasios; Koutroumpas, Athanasios; Sakkas, Lazaros; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Daniil, Zoe D

    2009-01-01

    Background The association between systemic sclerosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is well recognized. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been reported to play an important role in pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between systolic pulmonary artery pressure, clinical and functional manifestations of the disease and serum VEGF levels in systemic sclerosis. Methods Serum VEGF levels were measured in 40 patients with systemic sclerosis and 13 control subjects. All patients underwent clinical examination, pulmonary function tests and echocardiography. Results Serum VEGF levels were higher in systemic sclerosis patients with sPAP ≥ 35 mmHg than in those with sPAP < 35 mmHg (352 (266, 462 pg/ml)) vs (240 (201, 275 pg/ml)) (p < 0.01), while they did not differ between systemic sclerosis patients with sPAP < 35 mmHg and controls. Serum VEGF levels correlated to systolic pulmonary artery pressure, to diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and to MRC dyspnea score. In multiple linear regression analysis, serum VEGF levels, MRC dyspnea score, and DLCO were independent predictors of systolic pulmonary artery pressure. Conclusion Serum VEGF levels are increased in systemic sclerosis patients with sPAP ≥ 35 mmHg. The correlation between VEGF levels and systolic pulmonary artery pressure may suggest a possible role of VEGF in the pathogenesis of PAH in systemic sclerosis. PMID:19426547

  11. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis. PMID:27190026

  12. Disability profile of multiple sclerosis in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Alla, Sridhar; Pearson, John F; Taylor, Bruce V; Miller, David H; Clarke, Glynnis; Richardson, Ann; Willoughby, Ernie; Abernethy, David A; Sabel, Clive E; Mason, Deborah F

    2016-06-01

    New Zealand is a high risk region for multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to investigate demographic, clinical and temporal factors associated with disability status in the New Zealand National Multiple Sclerosis Prevalence Study (NZNMSPS) cohort. Data were obtained from the 2006 NZNMSPS with MS diagnosis based on the 2005 McDonald criteria. Disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Disability profiles were generated using multiple linear regression analysis. A total of 2917 persons with MS was identified, of whom disability data were available for 2422 (75% females). The overall disability was EDSS 4.4±standard deviation 2.6. Higher disability was associated with older age, longer disease duration, older and younger ages of onset, spinal cord syndromes with motor involvement at onset, and a progressive onset type. Lower disability was associated with sensory symptoms at onset and a relapsing onset type. Overall, the factors studied explained about one-third of the variation in disability, and of this, about two-thirds was accounted for by age, age of onset and disease duration and one-third by the nature of first symptoms and type of disease onset (progressive or relapsing). Current age, age at onset and disease duration all had independent associations with disability and their effects also interacted in contributing to higher disability levels over the course of the disease. PMID:26765754

  13. Thermal comfort requirements: A study of people with multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, L.H.; Parsons, K.C.; Hodder, S.G.

    1999-07-01

    Existing specifications for thermal comfort in built environments are coming under increased criticism for failing to consider the requirements of specific populations. People with physical disabilities are an example of one such population. This paper presents the results of a study on the thermal comfort requirements of 32 people with multiple sclerosis. Subjects were exposed to three conditions: 18.5 C, PMV = {minus}1.5, slightly cool to cool; 23 C, PMV = 0, neutral; 29 C, PMV = +1.5, slightly warm to warm. Results indicate that people with multiple sclerosis have a wide range of responses to the three experimental conditions. The actual percentage dissatisfied was much higher than predicted by Fange's (1970) predicted percentage dissatisfied. Their preferred environment is slightly warmer than 23 C, PMV = 0, neutral. A subgroup of the population prefers an environment that is slightly cooler than 23 C. Further work is needed to qualify if their preferred environments match that of PMV+1 and PMV{minus}1 and to identify if any of the factors such as age, duration of disability, and medication affect the actual mean vote.

  14. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, A.C.; Zheng, W.; Haacke, E.M.; Webb, S.; Nichol, H.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  15. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng, Weili; Mark Haacke, E.; Webb, Sam; Nichol, Helen

    2010-07-01

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  16. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng Weili; Mark Haacke, E.; Webb, Sam; Nichol, Helen

    2010-07-23

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  17. Lesion enhancement diminishes with time in primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khaleeli, Z; Ciccarelli, O; Mizskiel, K; Altmann, D; Miller, D H; Thompson, A J

    2010-03-01

    Fewer gadolinium-enhancing lesions are seen in established primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) compared with other subtypes. Previously, we found unexpectedly high enhancement levels in early PPMS (42%), suggesting an early inflammatory phase. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this level of enhancement was maintained, and whether it influenced clinical progression, over 5 years. Forty-five patients with PPMS, within 5 years of onset, were scored on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) and its subtests (including the timed walk test [TWT]) 6-monthly for 3 years, and at 5 years. T1-weighted brain and spinal cord images after triple dose gadolinium-DTPA, and T2-weighted brain sequences were also acquired. A mixed effect logistic model evaluated change in the percentage of patients with enhancing lesions. Ordinal logistic and multiple linear regression models identified predictors of progression, adjusted for T2 lesion load. The percentage of patients with enhancing lesions in the brain and spinal cord declined over 5 years (p = 0.03). Among patients with enhancement, more enhancing lesions at baseline predicted greater decline in mobility on the TWT over 5 years (p = 0.02). In conclusion, a proportion of patients with PPMS may undergo an early inflammatory phase, which has some impact on subsequent mobility. PMID:20203148

  18. Oxidative Damage and Antioxidative Therapy in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder of unknown etiology. This disease is characterized by a large variety of clinical patterns, which include the fibrosis of skin and visceral organs causing a variety of clinical manifestations. Genetic and environmental factors participate in the etiology of this disease; however, recently many studies underline the oxidative background influencing the course and complications of this disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesized in SSc can mediate extra- and intracellular oxidative processes affecting endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The estimation of prooxidative markers in the pathogenesis of SSc can enable the identification of useful markers for disease activity and, thus, may help in planning appropriate therapy focusing on the fibrotic or vascular pattern. Recently, many attempts have been made to find antioxidative molecules (nutritional and pharmacological) reducing the prooxidant state in a variety of cells—mainly in endothelium and proliferating fibroblasts. This paper presents both the background of oxidative stress processes in systemic sclerosis mediated by different mechanisms and the evidence suggesting which of the dietary and pharmacological antioxidants can be used as therapeutic targets for this disease. PMID:25313270

  19. Anthropometry of Arm: Nutritional Risk Indicator in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salvioni, Cristina Cleide Dos Santos; Stanich, Patricia; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Orsini, Marco

    2015-12-29

    The aim of the paper is to examine the correlation between clinical data, nutritional, respiratory and functional parameters in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This is a descriptive study of 111 ALS patients [91 spinal onset (GS) and 20 bulbar onset (GB)] carried on using nutritional and respiratory parameters and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS). ALSFRS was analyzed in the main domains (D1, D2 and D3). Forced vital capacity and anthropometric measurements, there was significant association for GS and GB, and in GS there was positive correlation with midarm circumference (MAC) (r=0.30; P=0.020), midarm muscle circumference (r=0.29; P=0.026), arm muscle area (r=0.28; P=0.033) and protein-caloric malnutrition score (r=0.27; P=0.039), while for GB only with body weight (r=0.64; P=0.024). On correlation of nutritional parameters and ALSFRS for GS patients we observed that MAC and %MAC presented positive association with both issues of D1 and D2. For GB, the total score in addition to correlate positively with anthropometric parameters related to lean body mass also presented negative association with a parameter associated with body fat. In summary, it is suggested that the application of anthropometry of arm could be useful in routine monitoring of ALS patients. PMID:26788263

  20. Anthropometry of Arm: Nutritional Risk Indicator in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stanich, Patricia; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Orsini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to examine the correlation between clinical data, nutritional, respiratory and functional parameters in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This is a descriptive study of 111 ALS patients [91 spinal onset (GS) and 20 bulbar onset (GB)] carried on using nutritional and respiratory parameters and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS). ALSFRS was analyzed in the main domains (D1, D2 and D3). Forced vital capacity and anthropometric measurements, there was significant association for GS and GB, and in GS there was positive correlation with midarm circumference (MAC) (r=0.30; P=0.020), midarm muscle circumference (r=0.29; P=0.026), arm muscle area (r=0.28; P=0.033) and protein-caloric malnutrition score (r=0.27; P=0.039), while for GB only with body weight (r=0.64; P=0.024). On correlation of nutritional parameters and ALSFRS for GS patients we observed that MAC and %MAC presented positive association with both issues of D1 and D2. For GB, the total score in addition to correlate positively with anthropometric parameters related to lean body mass also presented negative association with a parameter associated with body fat. In summary, it is suggested that the application of anthropometry of arm could be useful in routine monitoring of ALS patients. PMID:26788263

  1. Profile of the Brazilian scientific production in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Araujo, C R; Moreira, M A; Lana-Peixoto, M A

    2006-09-01

    This paper analyzes the profile of the Brazilian output in the field of multiple sclerosis from 1981 to 2004. The search was conducted through the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, selecting papers in which the term "multiple sclerosis" was defined as the main topic and "Brazil" or "Brasil" as others. The data were analyzed regarding the themes, the state in Brazil and institution where the papers were produced, the journals where the papers were published, journal's impact factor, and language. The search disclosed 141 documents (91 from MEDLINE and LILACS, and 50 from LILACS only) published in 44 different journals (23 of them MEDLINE-indexed). A total of 111 documents were produced by 17 public universities, 29 by 3 private medical schools and 1 by a non-governmental organization. There were 65 original contributions, 37 case reports, 20 reviews, 6 PhD dissertations, 5 guidelines, 2 validation studies, 2 clinical trials, 2 chapters in textbooks, 1 Master of Science thesis, and 1 patient education handout. The journal impact factor ranged from 0.0217 to 6.039 (median 3.03). Of 91 papers from MEDLINE, 65 were published by Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria. More than 90% of the papers were written in Portuguese. São Paulo was the most productive state in the country, followed by Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais and Paraná. Eighty-two percent of the Brazilian output came from the Southeastern region. PMID:16981042

  2. Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: Epidemiology, Outcomes and Management. A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses (episodic exacerbations of neurological signs or symptoms) are a defining feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent MS phenotype. While their diagnostic value relates predominantly to the definition of clinically definite MS, their prognostic value is determined by their relatively high associated risk of incomplete remission resulting in residual disability. The mechanisms governing a relapse incidence are unknown, but numerous modifiers of relapse risk have been described, including demographic and clinical characteristics, many of which represent opportunities for improved disease management. Also relapse phenotypes have been associated with patient and disease characteristics and an individual predisposition to certain phenotypic presentations may imply individual neuroanatomical disease patterns. While immunomodulatory therapies and corticosteroids represent the mainstay of relapse prevention and acute management, respectively, their effect has only been partial and further search for more efficient relapse therapies is warranted. Other areas of research include pathophysiology and determinants of relapse incidence, recurrence and phenotypes, including the characteristics of the relapsing and non-relapsing multiple sclerosis variants and their responsiveness to therapies. PMID:25997994

  3. Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: Mechanisms, Evaluation, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Braley, Tiffany J.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    Among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), fatigue is the most commonly reported symptom, and one of the most debilitating. Despite its high prevalence and significant impact, fatigue is still poorly understood and often under-emphasized because of its complexity and subjective nature. In recent years, an abundance of literature from specialists in sleep medicine, neurology, psychiatry, psychology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, and radiology have shed light on the potential causes, impact, and treatment of MS-related fatigue. Though such a diversity of contributions clearly has advantages, few recent articles have attempted to synthesize this literature, and existing overviews have focused primarily on potential causes of fatigue rather than clinical evaluation or treatment. The aims of this review are to examine, in particular for sleep specialists, the most commonly proposed primary and secondary mechanisms of fatigue in MS, tools for assessment of fatigue in this setting, and available treatment approaches to a most common and challenging problem. Citation: Braley TJ; Chervin RD. Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: mechanisms, evaluation, and treatment. SLEEP 2010;33(8):1061-1067. PMID:20815187

  4. Chitotriosidase - a putative biomarker for sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Potential biomarkers to aid diagnosis and therapy need to be identified for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a progressive motor neuronal degenerative disorder. The present study was designed to identify the factor(s) which are differentially expressed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS; ALS-CSF), and could be associated with the pathogenesis of this disease. Results Quantitative mass spectrometry of ALS-CSF and control-CSF (from orthopaedic surgical patients undergoing spinal anaesthesia) samples showed upregulation of 31 proteins in the ALS-CSF, amongst which a ten-fold increase in the levels of chitotriosidase-1 (CHIT-1) was seen compared to the controls. A seventeen-fold increase in the CHIT-1 levels was detected by ELISA, while a ten-fold elevated enzyme activity was also observed. Both these results confirmed the finding of LC-MS/MS. CHIT-1 was found to be expressed by the Iba-1 immunopositive microglia. Conclusion Elevated CHIT-1 levels in the ALS-CSF suggest a definitive role for the enzyme in the disease pathogenesis. Its synthesis and release from microglia into the CSF may be an aligned event of neurodegeneration. Thus, high levels of CHIT-1 signify enhanced microglial activity which may exacerbate the process of neurodegeneration. In view of the multifold increase observed in ALS-CSF, it can serve as a potential CSF biomarker for the diagnosis of SALS. PMID:24295388

  5. Case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Deapen, D.M.; Henderson, B.E.

    1986-05-01

    The authors conducted a study of 518 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients identified between 1977 and 1979 and 518 controls to investigate putative risk factors for this disease. Occupations at risk of electrical exposure were reported more often by patients (odds ratio (OR) = 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-13.0) as were electrical shocks producing unconsciousness (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-9.9). Although an overall excess of physical trauma associated with unconsciousness was observed in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0-2.4), the effect was inversely associated with duration of the unconscious episodes, suggesting an effect of recall bias. Only slight differences were found for surgical traumata to the nervous system. Parkinsonism was reported more often among first degree relatives of cases (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.1-7.6). The frequencies of prior poliomyelitis or other central nervous system diseases were similar for patients and controls. Occupational exposure to selected toxic substances was similar for patients and controls except for the manufacture of plastics (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.0-20.5), although few details of these exposures were provided. No differences in occupations with exposure to animal skins or hides were observed.

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Perlejewski, Karol; Bukowska-Ośko, Iwona; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Stokowy, Tomasz; Płoski, Rafał; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Podlecka-Piętowska, Aleksandra; Nojszewska, Monika; Gogol, Anna; Caraballo Cortés, Kamila; Demkow, Urszula; Stępień, Adam; Laskus, Tomasz; Radkowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of central nervous system of unknown etiology. However, some infectious agents have been suggested to play a significant role in its pathogenesis. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and metagenomics can be employed to characterize microbiome of MS patients and to identify potential causative pathogens. In this study, 12 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disorders (IIDD) of the central nervous system were studied: one patient had clinically isolated syndrome, one patient had recurrent optic neuritis, and ten patients had multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, there was one patient with other non-inflammatory neurological disease. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled from all patients. RNA was extracted from CSF and subjected to a single-primer isothermal amplification followed by NGS and comprehensive data analysis. Altogether 441,608,474 reads were obtained and mapped using blastn. In a CSF sample from the patient with clinically isolated syndrome, 11 varicella-zoster virus reads were found. Other than that similar bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and protozoan reads were identified in all samples, indicating a common presence of contamination in metagenomics. In conclusion, we identified varicella zoster virus sequences in one out of the 12 patients with IIDD, which suggests that this virus could be occasionally related to the MS pathogenesis. A widespread bacterial contamination seems inherent to NGS and complicates the interpretation of results. PMID:27311319

  7. Contrast Sensitivity versus Visual Evoked Potentials in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shandiz, Javad Heravian; Nourian, Abbas; Hossaini, Mercedeh Bahr; Moghaddam, Hadi Ostadi; yekta, Abbas-Ali; Sharifzadeh, Laleh; Marouzi, Parviz

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the Cambridge contrast sensitivity (CS) test and visual evoked potentials (VEP) in detecting visual impairment in a population of visually symptomatic and asymptomatic patients affected by clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Fifty patients (100 eyes) presenting with MS and 25 healthy subjects (50 eyes) with normal corrected visual acuity were included in this study. CS was determined using the Cambridge Low Contrast Grating test and VEP was obtained in all eyes. Findings were evaluated in two age strata of 10–29 and 30–49 years. Results Of the 42 eyes in the 10–29 year age group, CS was abnormal in 22 (52%), VEP was also abnormal in 22 (52%), but only 12 eyes (28%) had visual symptoms. Of the 58 eyes in the 30–49 year group, CS was abnormal in 7 (12%), VEP was abnormal in 34 (58%), while only 11 eyes were symptomatic. No single test could detect all of the abnormal eyes. Conclusion The Cambridge Low Contrast Grating test is useful for detection of clinical and subclinical visual dysfunction especially in young patients with multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, only a combination of CS and VEP tests can detect most cases of visual dysfunction associated with MS. PMID:22737353

  8. [Mitoxantrone role in treatment of primary progressive multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Stępień, Adam; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Durka-Kęsy, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, autoimmunological disease of central nervous system in which axonal damage in brain and spinal cord is observed. It is second most common cause of disability in young adults in West Europe and North America after injuries. There is 2.5 million people suffered from multiple sclerosis worldwide. The worse prognosis is connected with primary progressive MS in which recovery after first symptoms of central nervous system damage isn't observed. That subtype of disease is seen in case of 10-20% people with MS. MTX is a synthetic antracycline with antineoplastic, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Drug was allowed to treatment of leukemia. It is also used in treatment of breast, prostate, ovarian, stomach and liver cancer. Additionally MTX is used in treatment of secondary progressive SM and relapsing - remitting subtype of disease with no respond to treatment with interferon beta and glatiramer acetate. MTX inhibits topoisomerase II activity, matches to DNA molecule and damage her structure. Drug inhibits limphocyte T, B and macrophages activity and antibodies synthesis. The most dangerous side effects of MTX treatment are cardiotoxicity and induction of leukemia. There is lack of studies describing MTX effectiveness and safety in treatment of primary progressive SM. PMID:26891441

  9. Myocardial Fatty Foci in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Rop, Baiywo; Derrick, Edward; Armaly, Jamil; Siddiqui, Usman

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic syndrome. The hallmark of the disease is multiple hamartomatous lesions in multiple organ systems. Common cardiac manifestations of TSC are rhabdomyomas, which are a benign tumor of striated muscle. In some patients with TSC, myocardial fatty foci (MFF) deposition has been described with or without the presence of rhabdomyomas. We present the case of a 24-year-old female with TSC and refractory seizures, who was evaluated with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) for an intracardiac right ventricular mass thought to be rhabdomyoma on echocardiography and for multiple areas of myocardial fatty deposition. Myocardial fatty deposition is a common finding in patients at cardiac imaging. In patients with TSC, it is critical that fatty deposits and lipomas are clearly distinguished from rhabdomyoma. CMR is an integral part of characterizing cardiac masses as it has superior soft tissue characterization and a wider field of view compared to echocardiography. A positive correlation has been shown between the number of MFF and the degree of extracardiac tuberous sclerosis (TS) manifestations suggesting that MFF may indicate more severe multiorgan disease in patients with TSC. Cardiac MR is superior to echocardiogram in evaluating and distinguishing intracardiac lipomas and fatty deposits from rhabdomyomas. Published studies have indicated that in patients with TSC, the presence of MFF correlates with the severity of multiorgan disease as was seen in our case. PMID:27555991

  10. The Latest Innovations in the Drug Pipeline for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Radick, Lea; Mehr, Stanton R.

    2015-01-01

    Several new medications are being investigated in late-phase studies for the treatment of patients with relapsing or progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). These agents represent a variety of mechanisms of action and provide not only lower relapse rates but also improvement in disabilities. The majority of investigational trials involve selective sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 immunomodulators, such as laquinimod, ozanimod, ponesimod, and siponimod, in an effort to build on the success of fingolimod. Ocrelizumab is a CD20-positive B-cell–targeting monoclonal antibody with a promising new mechanism of action. Ofatumumab is also a CD20 inhibitor. Daclizumab, an interleukin-2 inhibitor, has evidence of good efficacy but is associated with unfavorable side effects. Masitinib is a mast-cell inhibitor that also has shown efficacy in Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Phase 3 trials for some of these agents will conclude in the next 12 months, and their manufacturers are expected to apply for US Food and Drug Administration approval soon thereafter. This review article summarizes data for newly approved and late-phase investigational agents for the treatment of patients with MS. PMID:26702336

  11. Selecting Rehabilitation Outcome Measures for People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Kirsten; Allen, Diane D.; Bennett, Susan E.; Brandfass, Kathi G.; Widener, Gail L.; Yorke, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of using standardized outcome measures (OMs) in clinical practice, a variety of barriers interfere with their use. In particular, rehabilitation therapists lack sufficient knowledge in selecting appropriate OMs. The challenge is compounded when working with people with multiple sclerosis (MS) owing to heterogeneity of the patient population and symptom variability in individual patients. To help overcome these barriers, the American Physical Therapy Association appointed the Multiple Sclerosis Outcome Measures Task Force to review and make evidence-based recommendations for OM use in clinical practice, education, and research specific to people with MS. Sixty-three OMs were reviewed based on their clinical utility, psychometric properties, and a consensus evaluation of the appropriateness of use for people with MS. We sought to illustrate use of the recommendations for two cases. The first case involves a 43-year-old man with new-onset problems after an exacerbation. The second case pertains to an outpatient clinic interested in assessing the effectiveness of their MS rehabilitation program. For each case, clinicians identified areas that were important to assess and various factors deemed important for OM selection. Criteria were established and used to assist in OM selection. In both cases, the described processes narrowed the selection of OMs and assisted with choosing the most appropriate ones. The recommendations, in addition to the processes described in these two cases, can be used by clinicians in any setting working with patients with MS across the disability spectrum. PMID:26300704

  12. Cognitive status in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lanzarote

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, María Yaiza; Eguia-del Río, Pablo; González-Platas, Montserrat; Jiménez-Sosa, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive impairment is a common feature in multiple sclerosis affecting ~43%–72% of patients, which involves cognitive functions such as memory, processing speed, attention, and executive function. The aim of this study was to describe the extent and pattern of the involvement of cognitive impairment and psychological status in all patients with multiple sclerosis on a small Spanish island. Patients and methods In all, 70 patients and 56 healthy controls were included in the study between February 2013 and May 2013. All participants were assessed using the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Test. The patients also completed instruments to evaluate the presence of fatigue, perceived cognitive dysfunction, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. All procedures were performed in a single session. Results Cognitive impairment, defined as a score <1.5 standard deviation on two subtests of the battery, was present in 35% of the participants. The most frequently affected domain was working memory, followed by verbal memory and processing speed. Disease duration showed a moderate correlation with visuospatial memory and processing speed. The Expanded Disability Status Scale score correlated with verbal and processing speed. Verbal memory was correlated with depression symptoms and fatigue. Conclusion Cognitive impairment was present in 35% of the study population. The most affected domains were working memory and verbal memory. Working memory and verbal fluency deficit are independent factors of disease evolution. Cognitive decline is related to clinical variables and psychological measures such as fatigue or depression but not to anxiety. PMID:27418825

  13. Myasthenia Gravis Development and Crisis Subsequent to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gharagozli, Kurosh; Shojaei, Maziar; Harandi, Ali Amini; Akbari, Nayyereh; Ilkhani, Manouchehr

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, sporadic combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) has been reported repeatedly. Although these are anecdotal, they are important enough to raise concerns about co-occurrence of MG and MS. Here, we present a case of an MS patient who developed an MG crisis. She had received interferon for relapsing remitting MS. Interestingly, she developed an MG crisis 4 years after the diagnosis of MS. MS and MG have relatively the same distribution for age, corresponding to the younger peak of the bimodal age distribution in MG. They also share some HLA typing characteristics. Furthermore, some evidences support the role of systemic immune dysregulation due to a genetic susceptibility that is common to these two diseases. The association may be underdiagnosed because of the possible overlap of symptoms especially bulbar manifestations in which either MG or MS can mimic each other, leading to underestimating incidence of the combination. The evidence warrants physicians, especially neurologists, to always consider the possibility of the other disease when encountering any patients either with MS or MG. Anecdotal and sporadic reports of combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) have been raised concerns about co-occurrence of them. PMID:21629802

  14. Modifiable factors influencing relapses and disability in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'hooghe, M B; Nagels, G; Bissay, V; De Keyser, J

    2010-07-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that the natural course of multiple sclerosis can be influenced by a number of factors. Strong evidence suggests that relapses can be triggered by infections, the postpartum period and stressful life events. Vaccinations against influenza, hepatitis B and tetanus appear to be safe. Surgery, general and epidural anaesthesia, and physical trauma are not associated with an increased risk of relapses. Factors that have been associated with a reduced relapse rate are pregnancy, exclusive breastfeeding, sunlight exposure and higher vitamin D levels. A number of medications, including hormonal fertility treatment, seem to be able to trigger relapses. Factors that may worsen progression of disability include stressful life events, radiotherapy to the head, low levels of physical activity and low vitamin D levels. Strong evidence suggests that smoking promotes disease progression, both clinically and on brain magnetic resonance imaging. There is no evidence for an increased progression of disability following childbirth in women with multiple sclerosis. Moderate alcohol intake and exercise might have a neuroprotective effect, but this needs to be confirmed. PMID:20483884

  15. Epidemiology and genetic aspects of multiple sclerosis in India

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Rohit; Bali, Prerna; Chaudhari, Rima M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a complex pathophysiology. Considered a rare disease in India in the past, studies over time suggest an increase in subjects with MS in India, although the observations are limited by the lack of formally conducted epidemiological studies and the absence of a nationwide registry. The current World Health Organization (WHO) Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (MSIF) “Atlas of MS” 2013 estimates a prevalence rate of 5-20 per 100,000, which also seems an underestimate. Although there have been reports of phenotypic differences between MS in Indians and the Western counterparts, recent studies report a reasonable similarity in disease types and characteristics. A few studies on the genetics of MS have been reported, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations and non-major histopathology complex (MHC) disease loci. The current review discusses the pivotal studies of the past, newer observations on MS from India, and the need for a national registry. PMID:26538851

  16. Value, Challenges, and Satisfaction of Certification for Multiple Sclerosis Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Halper, June

    2014-01-01

    Background: Specialist certification among interdisciplinary multiple sclerosis (MS) team members provides formal recognition of a specialized body of knowledge felt to be necessary to provide optimal care to individuals and families living with MS. Multiple sclerosis specialist certification (MS Certified Specialist, or MSCS) first became available in 2004 for MS interdisciplinary team members, but prior to the present study had not been evaluated for its perceived value, challenges, and satisfaction. Methods: A sample consisting of 67 currently certified MS specialists and 20 lapsed-certification MS specialists completed the following instruments: Perceived Value of Certification Tool (PVCT), Perceived Challenges and Barriers to Certification Scale (PCBCS), Overall Satisfaction with Certification Scale, and a demographic data form. Results: Satisfactory reliability was shown for the total scale and four factored subscales of the PVCT and for two of the three factored PCBCS subscales. Currently certified MS specialists perceived significantly greater value and satisfaction than lapsed-certification MS specialists in terms of employer and peer recognition, validation of MS knowledge, and empowering MS patients. Lapsed-certification MS specialists reported increased confidence and caring for MS patients using evidence-based practice. Both currently certified and lapsed-certification groups reported dissatisfaction with MSCS recognition and pay/salary rewards. Conclusions: The results of this study can be used in efforts to encourage initial certification and recertification of interdisciplinary MS team members. PMID:25061432

  17. Multiple sclerosis in research workers studying swayback in lambs: an updated report.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G; McDougall, E I; Elian, M

    1985-01-01

    Four out of seven research workers into swayback disease, a neurological disease of lambs, developed symptoms and signs of multiple sclerosis, and were reported in 1947. A further worker later joined the group. All of the original seven have died and two at necropsy had multiple areas of demyelination in the brain and spinal cord. The chance of four or more out of a random group of eight men developing multiple sclerosis is about one in a thousand million. Multiple sclerosis has not occurred in other workers on swayback disease elsewhere. Images PMID:4045479

  18. The Therapeutic Potential of the Ketogenic Diet in Treating Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Storoni, Mithu; Plant, Gordon T.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, multiple sclerosis has been viewed as an entirely inflammatory disease without acknowledgment of the significant neurodegenerative component responsible for disease progression and disability. This perspective is being challenged by observations of a dissociation between inflammation and neurodegeneration where the neurodegenerative component may play a more significant role in disease progression. In this review, we explore the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. We review evidence that the ketogenic diet can improve mitochondrial function and discuss the potential of the ketogenic diet in treating progressive multiple sclerosis for which no treatment currently exists. PMID:26839705

  19. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  20. Total lymphoid irradiation in multiple sclerosis: blood lymphocytes and clinical course

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Zito, G.; Hafstein, M.; Lavenhar, M.; Hernandez, E.; Dowling, P.C.

    1987-11-01

    We have found a significant relationship between blood lymphocyte count and prognosis in 45 patients receiving either total lymphoid irradiation or sham irradiation for chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Patients with sustained lymphocyte counts less than 900 mm-3 for prolonged periods after treatment showed less rapid progression over the ensuing 3 years than did patients with multiple sclerosis who had lymphocyte counts above this level (p less than 0.01). Our results suggest that a simple laboratory test, the absolute blood lymphocyte count, may serve as a valuable barometer for monitoring the amount of immunosuppressive therapy needed to prevent progression in patients with multiple sclerosis, and possibly other autoimmune diseases.

  1. [Late-onset multiple sclerosis and serum monoclonal gammopathy: an incidental association?].

    PubMed

    Tréfouret, S; Azulay, J P; Pouget, J; Boucraut, J; Serratrice, G

    1996-01-01

    Four patients older than 45 years with a central nervous system demyelinating disease associated to a monoclonal gammopathy are reported. The neurologic disease met the diagnostic criteria of multiple sclerosis, with the particularity of a late onset. Monoclonal paraproteinemia was also present in the cerebrospinal fluid, associated with an intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis. The clinical data and the course of the disease were comparable to the previous reports of late onset multiple sclerosis. A causal link between the dysglobulinemia and the neurological disease may not be demonstrated. However, such an association may underline the role of humoral processes in multiple sclerosis. PMID:8991179

  2. Dimethyl fumarate inhibits integrin α4 expression in multiple sclerosis models.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Groves, Aran; Rivera, Richard R; Chun, Jerold

    2015-10-01

    Dimethyl fumarate is an orally bioavailable compound for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. A mechanism involving nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 activation has been proposed to account for its efficacy in multiple sclerosis. Here, we report that dimethyl fumarate inhibits expression of integrin α4 on circulating lymphocytes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice and also on activated human Jurkat T cells in a manner distinct from nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 activation. Our results offer an alternative mechanism for the efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26478898

  3. Effect of the antiepileptic therapy on olfactory disorders associated with mesial temporal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Fabrizia; De Salvo, Simona; Nunnari, Domenica; Bramanti, Placido; Ciurleo, Rosella; Granata, Francesca; Marino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Parosmia has been described in neurological disorders, including temporal epilepsy. We reported a case of parosmia associated with unilateral hyposmia and mesial temporal sclerosis. We assessed the olfactory function by using Sniffin' sticks test and olfactory event-related potentials (OERPs). The findings of unilateral deficit of identification associated with parosmia only in the side ipsilateral to mesial temporal sclerosis area, that involves temporal olfactory regions responsible for higher level of smell processing, suggest a central genesis of olfactory disorders. The administration of levetiracetam restored olfactory function, OERP N1-P2 amplitude, and mesial temporal sclerosis-related electroencephalographic findings. PMID:27347726

  4. [Application of laser therapy in the physiotherapy of patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kubsik, Anna; Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease of the nervous system, which main manifestations are disseminated demyelinated the changes in the central nervous system. The pathogenesis of this disease is still not known, the curative treatment is not possible. In connection with the alleged autoimmune genesis of MS patients are administered immunomodulatory drugs. Patients with multiple sclerosis suffer from a number of symptoms associated with this disease. The aim of this article is to present the main clinical symptoms characteristic of MS and to present biological effects of low-energy lasers used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. PMID:22827117

  5. Coordinate expression of AOS genes and JA accumulation: JA is not required for initiation of closing layer in wound healing tubers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wounding induces a series of coordinated physiological responses essential for protection and healing of the damaged tissue. Wound-induced formation of jasmonic acid (JA) is important in defense responses in leaves, but comparatively little is known about the induction of JA biosynthesis and its ro...

  6. Sturge Weber-Like Gyral Calcification Seen in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 1.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayan; Mukherjee, Sharmila Banerjee; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Aneja, Satinder

    2015-07-01

    A 10-year-old girl presented with poorly controlled epilepsy. On evaluation, she had microcephaly, neuro-cutaneous stigmata of tuberous sclerosis complex, profound mental retardation, and spastic hemiparesis. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a calcified subependymal nodule and extensive left gyral calcification of the temporal, parietal, and occipital regions with unilateral cerebral atrophy, radiologic features usually seen in Sturge Weber syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed absence of tubers, enlarged choroid plexus, or leptomeningeal angiomas, thus excluding type 3 Sturge Weber syndrome. The genotype was a heterozygous mutation in exon 18 of the tuberous sclerosis type 1 gene (c.2293C>T p.Q765X). A comparison of previously reported 7 cases of Sturge Weber syndrome and tuberous sclerosis complex was made. This revealed 4 actual double phakomatoses (clinical, radiologic, or genetic phenotypes) and 3 cases with clinical phenotype of tuberous sclerosis and gyral calcifications within tubers simulating the radiologic picture of Sturge Weber syndrome. PMID:25117416

  7. CT of multiple sclerosis: reassessment of delayed scanning with high doses of contrast material

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, S.M.; Vinuela, F.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    A prospective study involving 87 patients was carried out to evaluate the necessity for a high dose of contrast material in addition to delayed computed tomographic (CT) scanning for optimal detection of the lesions of multiple sclerosis in the brain. In patients with either clinically definite multiple sclerosis or laboratory-supported definite multiple sclerosis, CT scans were obtained with a uniform protocol. Lesions consistent with multiple sclerosis were demonstrated on the second scan in 54 patients. In 36 of these 54 patients, the high-dose delayed scan added information. These results are quite similar to those of a previous study from this institution using different patients, in whom the second scan was obtained immediately after the bolus injection of contrast material containing 40 g of organically bound iodine. The lack of real difference in the results of the two studies indicate that the increased dose, not just the delay in scanning, is necessary for a proper study.

  8. The Impact of Disability on the Career Development of People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.; O'Connell, Kathryn R.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with 12 people with multiple sclerosis explored the meaning of career and work in their lives and the implications of living with a disability, as well as barriers they faced, particularly environmental barriers and societal attitudes. (SK)

  9. Women with Multiple Sclerosis and Employment Issues: A Focus on Social and Institutional Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyck, Isabel; Jongbloed, Lyn

    2000-01-01

    Examines employment issues for women with multiple sclerosis. Focuses on experiences of women managing their disability and demonstrates the importance of the social and institutional dimensions of environment in shaping occupational performance. (Contains 27 references.) (JOW)

  10. Oxidative Stress is Increased in Serum from Mexican Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Cruz-Ramos, José A.; Sustersik, Silvia; Barba, Elías Alejandro; Aguayo, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oxidative stress markers in serum from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Methods: Blood samples from healthy controls and 22 patients 15 women (7 aged from 20 to 30 and 8 were > 40 years old) and 7 men (5 aged from 20 to 30 and 2 were > 40 years old) fulfilling the McDonald Criteria and classified as having Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis accordingly with Lublin were collected for oxidative stress markers quantification. Results: Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrates/nitrites), lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde plus 4-hidroxialkenals), and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly increased in serum of subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in comparison with that of healthy controls. These data support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is a component closely linked to oxidative stress. PMID:19242067

  11. Multiple cardiac rhabdomyomas, wolff-Parkinson-white syndrome, and tuberous sclerosis: an infrequent combination.

    PubMed

    Castilla Cabanes, Elena; Lacambra Blasco, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac rhabdomyomas are benign cardiac tumours and are often associated with tuberous sclerosis. They are often asymptomatic with spontaneus regresion but can cause heart failure, arrhythmias, and obstruction. There have also been a few isolated reports of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome occurring in association with tuberous sclerosis and the great majority has been detected in patients with concomitant rhabdomyomas. We report a 12-day-old infant girl with tuberous sclerosis who presented with intraparietal and intracavitary rhabdomyomas with a Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). She represents one of the few published cases of WPW syndrome and tuberous sclerosis and particularly interesting because of intramural rhabdomyomas regression with persistent intracavitary rhabdomyomas after two years of followup. PMID:25328743

  12. Biopsy Proven Tumefactive Multiple Sclerosis with Concomitant Glioma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Golombievski, Esteban E.; McCoyd, Matthew A.; Lee, John M.; Schneck, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pathologically confirmed tumefactive multiple sclerosis (MS) followed shortly thereafter by the diagnosis of an oligoastrocytoma. The complexity of diagnosis and management of concomitant presence of tumefactive MS and glial cell tumors is discussed. PMID:26236276

  13. Occurrence of multiple sclerosis in the north and south of New Zealand.

    PubMed Central

    Skegg, D C; Corwin, P A; Craven, R S; Malloch, J A; Pollock, M

    1987-01-01

    An impression that multiple sclerosis is commoner in southern parts of New Zealand than in the north has never been tested rigorously. Identical methods were used to determine the prevalence and incidence of multiple sclerosis in two regions: the Waikato (in the North Island) and Otago and Southland (in the South Island). No cases were found in Maoris, while the expected number was 11.7. The prevalence rate of multiple sclerosis (excluding possible cases) in non-Maoris was 24 per 100,000 in the northern region and 69 per 100,000 in the south. The incidence rate was also more than twice as high in the southern region. These findings are considered in relation to genetic and environmental hypotheses about the aetiology of multiple sclerosis. PMID:3494813

  14. A Rare Reason of Ileus in Renal Transplant Patients With Peritoneal Dialysis History: Encapsulated Peritoneal Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Ali Murat; Özel, Leyla; İbişoğlu, Sevinç; Ata, Pınar; Şahin, Gülizar; Gücün, Murat; Kara, V Melih; Özdemir, Ebru; Titiz, M İzzet

    2015-12-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis is a rare complication of long-term peritoneal dialysis ranging from moderate inflammation of peritoneal structures to severe sclerosing peritonitis and encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis. Complicated it, ileus may occur during or after peritoneal dialysis treatment or after kidney transplant. We sought to evaluate 3 posttransplant encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis through clinical presentation, radiologic findings, and outcomes. We analyzed 3 renal transplant patients with symptoms of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis admitted posttransplant to our hospital with ileus between 2012 and 2013. Conservative treatment was applied to the patients whenever necessary to avoid surgery. One patient improved with medical therapy. Surgical treatment was delayed and we decided it as a last resort, in 2 cases with no response to conservative treatment for a long time. Finally, patients with peritoneal dialysis history should be searched carefully before renal transplant for intermittent bowel obstruction story. PMID:25343532

  15. Clinical trials in progressive multiple sclerosis: lessons learned and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.; Chataway, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multiple sclerosis is characterized by the gradual accrual of disability independent of relapses and can occur with disease onset (primary progressive) or preceded by a relapsing disease course (secondary progressive). An effective disease modifying treatment for progressive multiple sclerosis has not been identified, and the results of clinical trials to date have been generally disappointing. Ongoing advances in our understanding of pathogenesis, identification of novel targets for neuro-protection, and improved outcome measures have the potential to lead to effective treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis. In this review lessons learned from previous clinical trials and perspectives from current trials in progressive multiple sclerosis are summarized. Promising clinical, imaging, and biological markers will also be reviewed, along with novel clinical trial designs. PMID:25772899

  16. Weighing Evidence from Mendelian Randomization-Early-Life Obesity as a Causal Factor in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Ascherio, Alberto; Munger, Kassandra L

    2016-06-01

    In this Perspective, Alberto Ascherio and Kassandra Munger discuss the implications of Richards and colleagues' study exploring the role of early-life obesity in risk of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27351631

  17. "Clues on Balo's concentric sclerosis evolution from serial analysis of ADC values".

    PubMed

    Ripellino, Paolo; Khonsari, Roman; Stecco, Alessandro; Filippi, Massimo; Perchinunno, Marco; Cantello, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Balò's sclerosis is considered a rare variant of multiple sclerosis characterized by demyelination with concentric rings. Advanced magnetic resonance studies allow nowadays early diagnosis and prompt treatment. However, the pathophysiology of lesion evolution is still matter of debate, as detailed in our literature review. Based on a clear-cut Balò's lesion analysis, we describe early changes in DWI and ADC values within the different layers, favoring the concept of a centrifugal growth. PMID:25405537

  18. [Fatigue and multiple sclerosis: preliminary study of 15 patients with self-reported scales].

    PubMed

    Mendes, M F; Tilbery, C P; Felipe, E

    2000-06-01

    Fatigue is a common and disabiling symptom in multiple sclerosis but is poorly understood. Self-report measures are designed to capture the patient's subjective sense of fatigue. We applied three scales in 15 patients with MS. Nine of them reported fatigue. The scores were high in all of these patients. We conclude that these scales must be used in assemble, to evaluate this symptom. Also, fatigue a very important symptom in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:10920408

  19. Indirect evidence that ultraviolet-B radiation mitigates multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Davis, George E; Lowell, Walter E

    2015-10-01

    This article describes on the relationship of the relative prevalence of persons dying with multiple sclerosis with the latitude of the population centroid of those affected in each of the United States. Regression to zero prevalence occurs at the Tropic of Cancer, the latitude where the Sun is at zenith on the summer solstice and where ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is least attenuated. This observation supports UVR as a mitigating force in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26163947

  20. Imaging Manifestations of a Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma in Tuberous Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joseph R.; Reidman, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disorder resulting in benign tumor growth in various organs including the brain, heart, skin, eyes, kidney, and lung as well as systemic manifestations including seizures, cognitive impairment, and dermatologic abnormalities. This report shows the radiological findings and differentiation between a subependymal nodule and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in a patient with tuberous sclerosis presenting with new onset seizures. PMID:26942030