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Sample records for herpesvirus viral protein

  1. Identification of functional domains of the IR2 protein of equine herpesvirus 1 required for inhibition of viral gene expression and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seong K. Kim, Seongman; Dai Gan; Zhang Yunfei; Ahn, Byung C.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2011-09-01

    The equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) negative regulatory IR2 protein (IR2P), an early 1,165-amino acid (aa) truncated form of the 1487-aa immediate-early protein (IEP), lacks the trans-activation domain essential for IEP activation functions but retains domains for binding DNA, TFIIB, and TBP and the nuclear localization signal. IR2P mutants of the N-terminal region which lack either DNA-binding activity or TFIIB-binding activity were unable to down-regulate EHV-1 promoters. In EHV-1-infected cells expressing full-length IR2P, transcription and protein expression of viral regulatory IE, early EICP0, IR4, and UL5, and late ETIF genes were dramatically inhibited. Viral DNA levels were reduced to 2.1% of control infected cells, but were vey weakly affected in cells that express the N-terminal 706 residues of IR2P. These results suggest that IR2P function requires the two N-terminal domains for binding DNA and TFIIB as well as the C-terminal residues 707 to 1116 containing the TBP-binding domain. - Highlights: > We examine the functional domains of IR2P that mediates negative regulation. > IR2P inhibits at the transcriptional level. > DNA-binding mutant or TFIIB-binding mutant fails to inhibit. > C-terminal aa 707 to 1116 are required for full inhibition. > Inhibition requires the DNA-binding domain, TFIIB-binding domain, and C-terminus.

  2. Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) K13 suppresses CXCR4 expression by upregulating miR-146a

    PubMed Central

    Punj, Vasu; Matta, Hittu; Schamus, Sandra; Tamewitz, Aletheia; Anyang, Bean; Chaudhary, Preet M.

    2009-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) K13 is a potent activator of the NF-κB pathway. Here we demonstrate that infection with KHSV and ectopic expression of K13, but not its NF-κB-defective mutant, suppressed the expression of CXCR4. Suppression of CXCR4 by KSHV and K13 was associated with upregulated expression of miR-146a, a microRNA that is known to bind to the 3′ untranslated region of CXCR4 mRNA. Reporter studies identified two NF-κB sites in the promoter of miR-146a that were essential for its activation by K13. Accordingly, ectopic expression of K13, but not its NF-κB-defective mutant or other vFLIPs, strongly stimulated the miR-146a promoter activity, which could be blocked by specific genetic and pharmacological inhibitors of the NF-κB pathway. Finally, expression of CXCR4 was downregulated in clinical samples of KS and this was accompanied by increased expression of miR-146a. Our results demonstrate that K13-induced NF-κB activity suppresses CXCR4 via upregulation of miR-146a. Downregulation of CXCR4 expression by K13 may contribute to KS development by promoting premature release of KSHV-infected endothelial progenitors into the circulation. PMID:20023696

  3. Herpesvirus Late Gene Expression: A Viral-Specific Pre-initiation Complex Is Key

    PubMed Central

    Gruffat, Henri; Marchione, Roberta; Manet, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    During their productive cycle, herpesviruses exhibit a strictly regulated temporal cascade of gene expression that can be divided into three general stages: immediate-early (IE), early (E), and late (L). This expression program is the result of a complex interplay between viral and cellular factors at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, as well as structural differences within the promoter architecture for each of the three gene classes. Since the cellular enzyme RNA polymerase II (RNAP-II) is responsible for the transcription of herpesvirus genes, most viral promoters contain DNA motifs that are common with those of cellular genes, although promoter complexity decreases from immediate-early to late genes. Immediate-early and early promoters contain numerous cellular and viral cis-regulating sequences upstream of a TATA box, whereas late promoters differ significantly in that they lack cis-acting sequences upstream of the transcription start site (TSS). Moreover, in the case of the β- and γ-herpesviruses, a TATT box motif is frequently found in the position where the consensus TATA box of eukaryotic promoters usually localizes. The mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the late viral gene promoters appear to be different between α-herpesviruses and the two other herpesvirus subfamilies (β and γ). In this review, we will compare the mechanisms of late gene transcriptional regulation between HSV-1, for which the viral IE transcription factors – especially ICP4 – play an essential role, and the two other subfamilies of herpesviruses, with a particular emphasis on EBV, which has recently been found to code for its own specific TATT-binding protein. PMID:27375590

  4. p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein Stability and Transcriptional Activity Are Targeted by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Baresova, Petra; Musilova, Jana; Pitha, Paula M.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses have developed numerous strategies to counteract the host cell defense. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a DNA tumor virus linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The virus-encoded viral interferon regulatory factor 3 (vIRF-3) gene is a latent gene which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, antiviral immunity, and tumorigenesis. vIRF-3 was shown to interact with p53 and inhibit p53-mediated apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon has not been established. Here, we show that vIRF-3 associates with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibits p53 phosphorylation on serine residues S15 and S20, and antagonizes p53 oligomerization and the DNA-binding affinity. Furthermore, vIRF-3 destabilizes p53 protein by increasing the levels of p53 polyubiquitination and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. Consequently, vIRF-3 attenuates p53-mediated transcription of the growth-regulatory p21 gene. These effects of vIRF-3 are of biological relevance since the knockdown of vIRF-3 expression in KSHV-positive BC-3 cells, derived from PEL, leads to an increase in p53 phosphorylation, enhancement of p53 stability, and activation of p21 gene transcription. Collectively, these data suggest that KSHV evolved an efficient mechanism to downregulate p53 function and thus facilitate uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:24248600

  5. Kaposi’s Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus Encoded Viral FLICE Inhibitory Protein K13 Activates NF-κB Pathway Independent of TRAF6, TAK1 and LUBAC

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Hittu; Gopalakrishnan, Ramakrishnan; Graham, Ciaren; Tolani, Bhairavi; Khanna, Akshat; Yi, Han; Suo, Yulan; Chaudhary, Preet M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) K13 activates the NF-κB pathway by binding to the NEMO/IKKγ subunit of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex. However, it has remained enigmatic how K13-NEMO interaction results in the activation of the IKK complex. Recent studies have implicated TRAF6, TAK1 and linear ubiquitin chains assembled by a linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) consisting of HOIL-1, HOIP and SHARPIN in IKK activation by proinflammatory cytokines. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we demonstrate that K13-induced NF-κB DNA binding and transcriptional activities are not impaired in cells derived from mice with targeted disruption of TRAF6, TAK1 and HOIL-1 genes and in cells derived from mice with chronic proliferative dermatitis (cpdm), which have mutation in the Sharpin gene (Sharpincpdm/cpdm). Furthermore, reconstitution of NEMO-deficient murine embryonic fibroblast cells with NEMO mutants that are incapable of binding to linear ubiquitin chains supported K13-induced NF-κB activity. K13-induced NF-κB activity was not blocked by CYLD, a deubiquitylating enzyme that can cleave linear and Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains. On the other hand, NEMO was required for interaction of K13 with IKK1/IKKα and IKK2/IKKβ, which resulted in their activation by “T Loop” phosphorylation. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that K13 activates the NF-κB pathway by binding to NEMO which results in the recruitment of IKK1/IKKα and IKK2/IKKβ and their subsequent activation by phosphorylation. Thus, K13 activates NF-κB via a mechanism distinct from that utilized by inflammatory cytokines. These results have important implications for the development of therapeutic agents targeting K13-induced NF-κB for the treatment of KSHV-associated malignancies. PMID:22590573

  6. Regulation of the retinoblastoma proteins by the human herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Adam J; Kalejta, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that alter the environment of infected cells in order to replicate more efficiently. One way viruses achieve this is by modulating cell cycle progression. The main regulators of progression out of G0, through G1, and into S phase are the members of the retinoblastoma (Rb) family of tumor suppressors. Rb proteins repress the transcription of genes controlled by the E2F transcription factors. Because the expression of E2F-responsive genes is required for cell cycle progression into the S phase, Rb arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1. A number of viral proteins directly target Rb family members for inactivation, presumably to create an environment more hospitable for viral replication. Such viral proteins include the extensively studied oncoproteins E7 (from human papillomavirus), E1A (from adenovirus), and the large T (tumor) antigen (from simian virus 40). Elucidating how these three viral proteins target and inactivate Rb has proven to be an invaluable approach to augment our understanding of both normal cell cycle progression and carcinogenesis. In addition to these proteins, a number of other virally-encoded inactivators of the Rb family have subsequently been identified including a surprising number encoded by human herpesviruses. Here we review how the human herpesviruses modulate Rb function during infection, introduce the individual viral proteins that directly or indirectly target Rb, and speculate about what roles Rb modulation by these proteins may play in viral replication, pathogenesis, and oncogenesis. PMID:19146698

  7. The ICP0 protein of equine herpesvirus 1 is an early protein that independently transactivates expression of all classes of viral promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, D E; Holden, V R; Zhao, Y; O'Callaghan, D J

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) ICP0 protein (EICP0) in gene regulation, a variety of molecular studies on the EICP0 gene and gene products of both the attenuated cell culture-adapted Kentucky A (KyA) strain and the Ab4p strain were conducted. These investigations revealed that (i) the ICP0 open reading frame (ORF) of the KyA virus strain is 1,257 bp in size and would encode a protein of 419 amino acids, and in comparison to the ICP0 gene (ORF63) of the Ab4p strain of 1,596 bp (E. A. Telford, M. S. Watson, K. McBride, and A. J. Davison, Virology 189:304-316, 1992), it has an internal in-frame deletion of 339 bp; (ii) one early transcript of 1.4 kb predicted to encode the EICP0 protein and a late transcript of 1.8 kb are detected in Northern blot analyses using probes containing the EICP0 ORF; (iii) the KyA EICP0 protein (50 kDa) and the Ab4p EICP0 protein (80 kDa) are expressed as several species of early proteins that are first detected at 3 to 4 h postinfection by Western blot analyses of infected-cell polypeptides, using an antiserum generated to a TrpE fusion protein that harbors amino acids 46 to 153 of the EICP0 protein; and (iv) the EICP0 protein of both EHV-1 strains is a potent transactivator of EHV-1 genes. Transient expression assays using a simian virus 40 expression construct of the EICP0 protein of the KyA strain showed that the EICP0 protein independently transactivated chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter constructs under the control of the immediate-early promoter (3.9-fold), the early thymidine kinase promoter (95-fold), the late (gamma1) IR5 promoter (85-fold), and the late (gamma2) glycoprotein K promoter (21-fold). The finding that the EICP0 protein of the KyA virus can function as an activator of gene expression indicates that amino acids corresponding to residues 319 to 431 of the Ab4p EICP0 protein are not essential for EICP0 transactivation of EHV-1 promoters. PMID:9188552

  8. Immune evasion strategies of the human gamma-herpesviruses: implications for viral tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangning; Dawson, Christopher W; He, Zhiwei; Huang, Peichun

    2012-02-01

    Two human gamma-herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 display oncogenic potential, causing benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders in genetically susceptible or immunosuppressed individuals. As a family of viruses that establish persistent life-long infections, herpesviruses have evolved strategies to limit innate antiviral responses and evade host immune surveillance. Herpesviruses have developed mechanisms to disrupt antigen presentation, pirate the production of immune regulating cytokines, and inhibit pro-apoptotic signaling pathways. Although these strategies are designed to facilitate the long-term persistence of herpesviruses, in certain circumstances they can contribute to viral-driven carcinogenesis. PMID:22170548

  9. Structural proteins of Herpesvirus saimiri.

    PubMed Central

    Keil, G; Fleckenstein, B; Bodemer, W

    1983-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri particles were purified from productively infected owl monkey kidney cell cultures, and the virion polypeptides were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 21 predominant proteins were found in lysates of H. saimiri 11 particles by Coomassie blue staining or by [35S]methionine labeling and autoradiography; all proteins were between 160,000 and 12,000 daltons in size. They are most probably virion constituents, as most of them were precipitated by immune sera, and no dominant proteins of equivalent sizes were found in mock-infected cultures. Four glycoproteins (gp 155/160, gp 128, gp 84/90, gp 55) and three polypeptides that appeared not to be glycosylated (p71, p35, p28) were assigned to the envelope or matrix of virions, whereas at least four phosphoproteins (pp132, pp118, pp55, pp13) and ten polypeptides without apparent secondary modification (p155/160, p106, p96, p67, p53, p36, p32, p15, p14, p12) were found in the nucleocapsid fraction. Analysis of virion proteins from different H. saimiri strains did not reveal appreciable differences in the migration behavior of most polypeptides, including all glycoproteins; however, determination of a strain-specific size pattern was possible for three of four phosphoproteins. The overall similarity in protein architecture of H. saimiri strains obviously does not reflect the variability in biology, such as oncogenic properties. In comparison, DNA sequence divergences appear to remain a better taxonomic criterion for strain distinction. Images PMID:6312078

  10. Modulation of cellular signaling by herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) are widespread infectious pathogens that have been associated with proliferative and inflammatory diseases. During viral evolution, HHVs have pirated genes encoding viral G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs), which are expressed on infected host cells. These vGPCRs show highest homology to human chemokine receptors, which play a key role in the immune system. Importantly, vGPCRs have acquired unique properties such as constitutive activity and the ability to bind a broad range of human chemokines. This allows vGPCRs to hijack human proteins and modulate cellular signaling for the benefit of the virus, ultimately resulting in immune evasion and viral dissemination to establish a widespread and lifelong infection. Knowledge on the mechanisms by which herpesviruses reprogram cellular signaling might provide insight in the contribution of vGPCRs to viral survival and herpesvirus-associated pathologies. PMID:25805993

  11. Tegument protein control of latent herpesvirus establishment and animation.

    PubMed

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Herpesviruses are successful pathogens that infect most vertebrates as well as at least one invertebrate species. Six of the eight human herpesviruses are widely distributed in the population. Herpesviral infections persist for the life of the infected host due in large part to the ability of these viruses to enter a non-productive, latent state in which viral gene expression is limited and immune detection and clearance is avoided. Periodically, the virus will reactivate and enter the lytic cycle, producing progeny virus that can spread within or to new hosts. Latency has been classically divided into establishment, maintenance, and reactivation phases. Here we focus on demonstrated and postulated molecular mechanisms leading to the establishment of latency for representative members of each human herpesvirus family. Maintenance and reactivation are also briefly discussed. In particular, the roles that tegument proteins may play during latency are highlighted. Finally, we introduce the term animation to describe the initiation of lytic phase gene expression from a latent herpesvirus genome, and discuss why this step should be separated, both molecularly and theoretically, from reactivation. PMID:21429246

  12. Characterization of a Novel Human Herpesvirus 8-Encoded Protein, vIRF-3, That Shows Homology to Viral and Cellular Interferon Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lubyova, Barbora; Pitha, Paula M.

    2000-01-01

    The genome of the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) contains a cluster of open reading frames (ORFs) encoding proteins with homology to the cellular transcription factors of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. Two of these homologues, vIRF-1 and vIRF-2, were previously identified and functionally analyzed. In this study, we have characterized a novel gene, designated vIRF-3, encoded within the previously predicted ORF K10.5 and our newly identified ORF K10.6. Northern blotting of RNA extracted from BCBL-1 cells with a vIRF-3-specific probe and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed a single transcript of 2.2 kb with a splice present in the coding region. The vIRF-3 mRNA levels in BCBL-1 cells were increased upon 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment, with kinetics of expression similar to those of the early immediate genes. The vIRF-3 ORF encodes a 73-kDa protein with homology to cellular IRF-4 and HHV-8-encoded vIRF-2 and K11. In transient transfection assays with the IFNACAT reporter, vIRF-3 functioned as a dominant-negative mutant of both IRF-3 and IRF-7 and inhibited virus-mediated transcriptional activity of the IFNA promoter. Similarly, the overexpression of vIRF-3 in mouse L929 cells resulted in inhibition of virus-mediated synthesis of biologically active interferons. These results suggest that by targeting IRF-3 and IRF-7, which play a critical role in the activation of alpha/beta interferon (IFN) genes, HHV-8 has evolved a mechanism by which it directly subverts the functions of IRFs and down-regulates the induction of the IFN genes that are important components of the innate immunity. PMID:10933732

  13. Modulation of Immune System by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus: Lessons from Viral Evasion Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Brulois, Kevin; Wong, LaiYee; Jung, Jae U.

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a member of the herpesvirus family, has evolved to establish a long-term, latent infection of cells such that while they carry the viral genome gene expression is highly restricted. Latency is a state of cryptic viral infection associated with genomic persistence in their host and this hallmark of KSHV infection leads to several clinical–epidemiological diseases such as KS, a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease, and primary effusion lymphoma upon immune suppression of infected hosts. In order to sustain efficient life-long persistency as well as their life cycle, KSHV dedicates a large portion of its genome to encode immunomodulatory proteins that antagonize its host’s immune system. In this review, we will describe our current knowledge of the immune evasion strategies employed by KSHV at distinct stages of its viral life cycle to control the host’s immune system. PMID:22403573

  14. Class III viral membrane fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Backovic, Marija

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulating structural studies of viral fusion glycoproteins have revealed unanticipated structural relationships between unrelated virus families and allowed the grouping of these membrane fusogens into three distinct classes. Here we review the newly identified group of class III viral fusion proteins, whose members include fusion proteins from rhabdoviruses, herpesviruses and baculoviruses. While clearly related in structure, the class III viral fusion proteins exhibit distinct structural features in their architectures as well as in their membrane-interacting fusion loops, which are likely related to their virus-specific differences in cellular entry. Further study of the similarities and differences in the class III viral fusion glycoproteins may provide greater insights into protein:membrane interactions that are key to promoting efficient bilayer fusion during virus entry. PMID:19356922

  15. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population. PMID:9060668

  16. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Ian B; Bosse, Jens B; Engel, Esteban A; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W

    2015-11-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  17. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  18. Interaction between ORF24 and ORF34 in the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Late Gene Transcription Factor Complex Is Essential for Viral Late Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zoe H.; Hesser, Charles R.; Park, Jimin

    2015-01-01

    Transcription of herpesviral late genes is stimulated after the onset of viral DNA replication but otherwise restricted. Late gene expression in gammaherpesviruses requires the coordination of six early viral proteins, termed viral transactivation factors (vTFs). Here, we mapped the organization of this protein complex for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Disruption of this complex via point mutation of the interaction interface between the open reading frame 24 (ORF24) and ORF34 vTFs ablated both late gene expression and viral replication. PMID:26468530

  19. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  20. Human herpesvirus-8 and other viral infections, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Rezza, G.; Danaya, R. T.; Wagner, T. M.; Sarmati, L.; Owen, I. L.; Monini, P.; Andreoni, M.; Suligoi, B.; Ensoli, B.; Pozio, E.

    2001-01-01

    We studied residents of remote villages and the capital (Port Moresby) of Papua New Guinea to determine the distribution of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) infection. Our data suggest that HHV-8 has been endemic on the island for a long time and that the epidemiologic pattern of HHV-8 is more similar to that of herpes simplex virus-2 than hepatitis C virus. PMID:11747707

  1. Regulation of viral and cellular gene expression by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus polyadenylated nuclear RNA.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Tarrant-Elorza, Margaret; Verma, Subhash; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Pari, Gregory S

    2013-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the cause of Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity lymphoma. In cell culture, KSHV results in a latent infection, and lytic reactivation is usually induced with the expression of K-Rta or by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA) and/or n-butyrate. Lytic infection is marked by the activation of the entire viral genomic transcription cascade and the production of infectious virus. KSHV-infected cells express a highly abundant, long, noncoding transcript referred to as polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). PAN RNA interacts with specific demethylases and physically binds to the KSHV genome to mediate activation of viral gene expression. A recombinant BACmid lacking the PAN RNA locus fails to express K-Rta and does not produce virus. We now show that the lack of PAN RNA expression results in the failure of the initiation of the entire KSHV transcription program. In addition to previous findings of an interaction with demethylases, we show that PAN RNA binds to protein components of Polycomb repression complex 2 (PRC2). RNA-Seq analysis using cell lines that express PAN RNA shows that transcription involving the expression of proteins involved in cell cycle, immune response, and inflammation is dysregulated. Expression of PAN RNA in various cell types results in an enhanced growth phenotype, higher cell densities, and increased survival compared to control cells. Also, PAN RNA expression mediates a decrease in the production of inflammatory cytokines. These data support a role for PAN RNA as a major global regulator of viral and cellular gene expression. PMID:23468496

  2. Human herpesvirus 6 U11 protein is critical for virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Nora F; Kawabata, Akiko; Tang, Huamin; Wakata, Aika; Wang, Bochao; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-02-01

    All herpesviruses contain a tegument layer comprising a protein matrix; these proteins play key roles during viral assembly and egress. Here, liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS) of proteins from human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-infected cells revealed a possible association between two major tegument proteins, U14 and U11. This association was verified by immunoprecipitation experiments. Moreover, U11 protein was expressed during the late phase of infection and incorporated into virions. Finally, in contrast to its revertant, a U11 deletion mutant could not be reconstituted. Taken together, these results suggest that HHV-6 U11 is an essential gene for virus growth and propagation. PMID:26761397

  3. Small RNA deep sequencing identifies viral microRNAs during malignant catarrhal fever induced by alcelaphine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Sorel, Océane; Tuddenham, Lee; Myster, Françoise; Palmeira, Leonor; Kerkhofs, Pierre; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Dewals, Benjamin G

    2015-11-01

    Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is a c-herpesvirus (c-HV) carried asymptomatically by wildebeest. Upon cross-species transmission, AlHV-1 induces a fatal lymphoproliferative disease named malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in many ruminants, including cattle, and the rabbit model. Latency has been shown to be essential for MCF induction. However, the mechanisms causing the activation and proliferation of infected CD8+T cells are unknown. Many c-HVs express microRNAs (miRNAs). These small non-coding RNAs can regulate expression of host or viral target genes involved in various pathways and are thought to facilitate viral infection and/or mediate activation and proliferation of infected lymphocytes. The AlHV-1 genome has been predicted to encode a large number of miRNAs. However, their precise contribution in viral infection and pathogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here, using cloning and sequencing of small RNAs we identified 36 potential miRNAs expressed in a lymphoblastoid cell line propagated from a calf infected with AlHV-1 and developing MCF. Among the sequenced candidate miRNAs, 32 were expressed on the reverse strand of the genome in two main clusters. The expression of these 32 viral miRNAs was further validated using Northern blot and quantitative reverse transcription PCR in lymphoid organs of MCF developing calves or rabbits. To determine the concerted contribution in MCF of 28 viralmiRNAs clustered in the non-protein-coding region of the AlHV-1 genome, a recombinant virus was produced. The absence of these 28 miRNAs did not affect viral growth in vitro or MCF induction in rabbits, indicating that the AlHV-1 miRNAs clustered in this non-protein-coding genomic region are dispensable for MCF induction. PMID:26329753

  4. MicroRNAs encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus regulate viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chih-Chung; Li, Zhonghan; Chu, Chia-Ying; Feng, Jiaying; Feng, Jun; Sun, Ren; Rana, Tariq M

    2010-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked with Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphomas. The pathogenesis of KSHV depends on the balance between two phases of the viral cycle: latency and lytic replication. In this study, we report that KSHV-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) function as regulators by maintaining viral latency and inhibiting viral lytic replication. MiRNAs are short, noncoding, small RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of messenger RNAs. Of the 12 viral miRNAs expressed in latent KSHV-infected cells, we observed that expression of miR-K3 can suppress both viral lytic replication and gene expression. Further experiments indicate that miR-K3 can regulate viral latency by targeting nuclear factor I/B. Nuclear factor I/B can activate the promoter of the viral immediate-early transactivator replication and transcription activator (RTA), and depletion of nuclear factor I/B by short hairpin RNAs had similar effects on the viral life cycle to those of miR-K3. Our results suggest a role for KSHV miRNAs in regulating the viral life cycle. PMID:20847741

  5. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF45 Interacts with Kinesin-2 Transporting Viral Capsid-Tegument Complexes along Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Sathish, Narayanan; Zhu, Fan Xiu; Yuan, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Open reading frame (ORF) 45 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a tegument protein. A genetic analysis with a null mutant suggested a possible role for this protein in the events leading to viral egress. In this study, ORF45 was found to interact with KIF3A, a kinesin-2 motor protein that transports cargoes along microtubules to cell periphery in a yeast two-hybrid screen. The association was confirmed by both co-immunoprecipitation and immunoflorescence approaches in primary effusion lymphoma cells following virus reactivation. ORF45 principally mediated the docking of entire viral capsid-tegument complexes onto the cargo-binding domain of KIF3A. Microtubules served as the major highways for transportation of these complexes as evidenced by drastically reduced viral titers upon treatment of cells with a microtubule depolymerizer, nocodazole. Confocal microscopic images further revealed close association of viral particles with microtubules. Inhibition of KIF3A–ORF45 interaction either by the use of a headless dominant negative (DN) mutant of KIF3A or through shRNA-mediated silencing of endogenous KIF3A expression noticeably decreased KSHV egress reflecting as appreciable reductions in the release of extracellular virions. Both these approaches, however, failed to impact HSV-1 egress, demonstrating the specificity of KIF3A in KSHV transportation. This study thus reports on transportation of KSHV viral complexes on microtubules by KIF3A, a kinesin motor thus far not implicated in virus transportation. All these findings shed light on the understudied but significant events in the KSHV life cycle, delineating a crucial role of a KSHV tegument protein in cellular transport of viral particles. PMID:19282970

  6. Global mapping of herpesvirus-host protein complexes reveals a novel transcription strategy for late genes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zoe H.; Verschueren, Erik; Jang, Gwendolyn M.; Kleffman, Kevin; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Park, Jimin; Von Dollen, John; Maher, M. Cyrus; Johnson, Tasha; Newton, William; Jäger, Stefanie; Shales, Michael; Horner, Julie; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mapping host-pathogen interactions has proven instrumental for understanding how viruses manipulate host machinery and how numerous cellular processes are regulated. DNA viruses such as herpesviruses have relatively large coding capacity and thus can target an extensive network of cellular proteins. To identify the host proteins hijacked by this pathogen, we systematically affinity tagged and purified all 89 proteins of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) from human cells. Mass spectrometry of this material identified over 500 virus-host interactions. KSHV causes AIDS-associated cancers and its interaction network is enriched for proteins linked to cancer and overlaps with proteins that are also targeted by HIV-1. We found that the conserved KSHV protein ORF24 binds to RNA polymerase II and brings it to viral late promoters by mimicking and replacing cellular TATA-box-binding protein (TBP). This is required for herpesviral late gene expression, a complex and poorly understood phase of the viral lifecycle. PMID:25544563

  7. Phase-dependent immune evasion of herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Vider-Shalit, Tal; Fishbain, Vered; Raffaeli, Shai; Louzoun, Yoram

    2007-09-01

    Viruses employ various modes to evade immune detection. Two possible evasion modes are a reduction of the number of epitopes presented and the mimicry of host epitopes. The immune evasion efforts are not uniform among viral proteins. The number of epitopes in a given viral protein and the similarity of the epitopes to host peptides can be used as a measure of the viral attempts to hide this protein. Using bioinformatics tools, we here present a genomic analysis of the attempts of four human herpesviruses (herpes simplex virus type 1-human herpesvirus 1, Epstein-Barr virus-human herpesvirus 4, human cytomegalovirus-human herpesvirus 5, and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-human herpesvirus 8) and one murine herpesvirus (murine herpesvirus 68) to escape from immune detection. We determined the full repertoire of CD8 T-lymphocyte epitopes presented by each viral protein and show that herpesvirus proteins present many fewer epitopes than expected. Furthermore, the epitopes that are presented are more similar to host epitopes than are random viral epitopes, minimizing the immune response. We defined a score for the size of the immune repertoire (the SIR score) based on the number of epitopes in a protein. The numbers of epitopes in proteins expressed in the latent and early phases of infection were significantly smaller than those in proteins expressed in the lytic phase in all tested viruses. The latent and immediate-early epitopes were also more similar to host epitopes than were lytic epitopes. A clear trend emerged from the analysis. In general, herpesviruses demonstrated an effort to evade immune detection. However, within a given herpesvirus, proteins expressed in phases critical to the fate of infection (e.g., early lytic and latent) evaded immune detection more than all others. The application of the SIR score to specific proteins allows us to quantify the importance of immune evasion and to detect optimal targets for immunotherapy and vaccine development

  8. Vesicle formation from the nuclear membrane is induced by coexpression of two conserved herpesvirus proteins

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Granzow, Harald; Fuchs, Walter; Keil, Günther M.; Finke, Stefan; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    Although the nuclear envelope is a dynamic structure that disassembles and reforms during mitosis, the formation of membranous vesicles derived from the nuclear envelope has not yet been described in noninfected cells. However, during herpesvirus maturation, intranuclear capsids initiate transit to the cytosol for final maturation by budding at the inner nuclear membrane. Two conserved herpesvirus proteins are required for this primary envelopment, designated in the alphaherpesviruses as pUL31 and pUL34. Here, we show that simultaneous expression of pUL31 and pUL34 of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus in stably transfected rabbit kidney cells resulted in the formation of vesicles in the perinuclear space that resemble primary envelopes without a nucleocapsid. They contain pUL31 and pUL34 as shown by immunolabeling and are derived from the nuclear envelope. Thus, coexpression of only two conserved herpesvirus proteins without any other viral factor is sufficient to induce the formation of vesicles from the nuclear membrane. This argues for the contribution of cellular factors in this process either recruited from their natural cytoplasmic location or not yet identified as components of the nuclear compartment. PMID:17426144

  9. A virally encoded small peptide regulates RTA stability and facilitates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic replication.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Tareq; Yuan, Yan

    2013-03-01

    In both mammalian and viral genomes, a large proportion of sequences are transcribed and annotated as noncoding RNAs. A polyadenylated RNA of 3.0 kb (T3.0) is transcribed from the opposite strand of the open reading frame 50 (ORF50) DNA template in the genome of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and has been annotated previously as a noncoding RNA. ORF50 encodes the replication and transcription activator (RTA), which controls the switch of the virus between the latent and lytic phases of the life cycle. Here we show that T3.0 encodes a small peptide of 48 amino acids (designated viral small peptide 1 [vSP-1]). vSP-1 interacts with RTA at the protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) motifs, and the association prevents RTA from being subjected to degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. As a consequence, vSP-1 facilitates KSHV gene expression and lytic replication. This finding reveals a novel mechanism of gene regulation in the viral life cycle. PMID:23302891

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Herpesvirus 6B Tegument Protein U14

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Huamin; Kawabata, Akiko; Mahmoud, Nora F.; Khanlari, Zahra; Hamada, Daizo; Tsuruta, Hiroki; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    The tegument protein U14 of human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) constitutes the viral virion structure and is essential for viral growth. To define the characteristics and functions of U14, we determined the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HHV-6B U14 (U14-NTD) at 1.85 Å resolution. U14-NTD forms an elongated helix-rich fold with a protruding β hairpin. U14-NTD exists as a dimer exhibiting broad electrostatic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds. This is first report of the crystal structure and dimerization of HHV-6B U14. The surface of the U14-NTD dimer reveals multiple clusters of negatively- and positively-charged residues that coincide with potential functional sites of U14. Three successive residues, L424, E425 and V426, which relate to viral growth, reside on the β hairpin close to the dimer's two-fold axis. The hydrophobic side-chains of L424 and V426 that constitute a part of a hydrophobic patch are solvent-exposed, indicating the possibility that the β hairpin region is a key functional site of HHV-6 U14. Structure-based sequence comparison suggests that U14-NTD corresponds to the core fold conserved among U14 homologs, human herpesvirus 7 U14, and human cytomegalovirus UL25 and UL35, although dimerization appears to be a specific feature of the U14 group. PMID:27152739

  11. Crystal Structure of Human Herpesvirus 6B Tegument Protein U14.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bochao; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Tang, Huamin; Kawabata, Akiko; Mahmoud, Nora F; Khanlari, Zahra; Hamada, Daizo; Tsuruta, Hiroki; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-05-01

    The tegument protein U14 of human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) constitutes the viral virion structure and is essential for viral growth. To define the characteristics and functions of U14, we determined the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HHV-6B U14 (U14-NTD) at 1.85 Å resolution. U14-NTD forms an elongated helix-rich fold with a protruding β hairpin. U14-NTD exists as a dimer exhibiting broad electrostatic interactions and a network of hydrogen bonds. This is first report of the crystal structure and dimerization of HHV-6B U14. The surface of the U14-NTD dimer reveals multiple clusters of negatively- and positively-charged residues that coincide with potential functional sites of U14. Three successive residues, L424, E425 and V426, which relate to viral growth, reside on the β hairpin close to the dimer's two-fold axis. The hydrophobic side-chains of L424 and V426 that constitute a part of a hydrophobic patch are solvent-exposed, indicating the possibility that the β hairpin region is a key functional site of HHV-6 U14. Structure-based sequence comparison suggests that U14-NTD corresponds to the core fold conserved among U14 homologs, human herpesvirus 7 U14, and human cytomegalovirus UL25 and UL35, although dimerization appears to be a specific feature of the U14 group. PMID:27152739

  12. Herpesvirus saimiri.

    PubMed Central

    Fickenscher, H; Fleckenstein, B

    2001-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (saimiriine herpesvirus 2) is the classical prototype of the gamma(2)-herpesviruses or rhadinoviruses, which also contains a human member, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. The T-lymphotropic Herpesvirus saimiri establishes specific replicative and persistent conditions in different primate host species. Virtually all squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) are persistently infected with this virus. In its natural host, the virus does not cause disease, whereas it induces fatal acute T-cell lymphoma in other monkey species after experimental infection. The virus can be isolated by cocultivation of permissive epithelial cells with peripheral blood cells from naturally infected squirrel monkeys and from susceptible New World monkeys during the virus-induced disease. Tumour-derived and in vitro-transformed T-cell lines from New World monkeys release virus particles. Herpesvirus ateles is a closely related virus of spider monkeys (Ateles spp.) and has similar pathogenic properties to Herpesvirus saimiri in other New World primate species. Similar to other rhadinoviruses, the genome of Herpesvirus saimiri harbours a series of virus genes with pronounced homology to cellular counterparts including a D-type cyclin, a G-protein-coupled receptor, an interleukin-17, a superantigen homologue, and several inhibitors of the complement cascade and of different apoptosis pathways. Preserved function has been demonstrated for most of the homologues of cellular proteins. These viral functions are mostly dispensable for the transforming and pathogenic capability of the virus. However, they are considered relevant for the apathogenic persistence of Herpesvirus saimiri in its natural host. A terminal region of the non-repetitive coding part of the virus genome is essential for pathogenicity and T-cell transformation. Based on the pathogenic phenotypes and the different alleles of this variable region, the virus strains have been assigned to three subgroups

  13. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.

    2015-01-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses. PMID:26202231

  14. Canine herpesvirus ORF2 is a membrane protein modified by N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Kimura, Michiko; Xuan, Xuenan; Makala, Levi; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Mikami, Takeshi; Otsuka, Haruki

    2002-07-01

    Canine herpesvirus (CHV) ORF2, located downstream of the glycoprotein C (gC) gene, has homologues with some of the alphaherpesviruses. To characterize CHV OFR2, a recombinant CHV carrying a LacZ gene in the ORF2 locus, and recombinant vaccinia virus expressing ORF2 protein were constructed. Northern blot analysis revealed ORF2 and a gamma2 class late gene, and its protein product was detectable in CHV-infected cells reacted with ORF2 protein antiserum. Tunicamycin and N-glycosidase F treatment revealed that the ORF2 protein was modified by N-linked glycosylation. Fractionation and immune fluorescence analyses of the CHV-infected cells showed the ORF2 as a membrane protein transportable to the surface of infected cells. In vitro, the ORF2 protein did not affect viral replication and cell-to-cell viral spreading. Present findings represent the first evidence pointing to the CHV ORF2 as a membrane protein modified by an N-linked glycosylation. PMID:12135784

  15. Distinct Roles of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Viral Interferon Regulatory Factors in Inflammatory Response and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baresova, Petra; Pitha, Paula M.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). Similar to other herpesviruses, KSHV has two life cycles, latency and lytic replication. In latency, the KSHV genome persists as a circular episome in the nucleus of the host cell and only a few viral genes are expressed. In this review, we focus on oncogenic, antiapoptotic, and immunomodulating properties of KSHV-encoded homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs)—viral IRF1 (vIRF1) to vIRF4—and their possible role in the KSHV-mediated antiviral response, apoptosis, and oncogenicity. PMID:23785197

  16. Inhibition of LSD1 reduces herpesvirus infection, shedding, and recurrence by promoting epigenetic suppression of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, James M.; Quenelle, Debra C.; Cardin, Rhonda D.; Vogel, Jodi L.; Clement, Christian; Bravo, Fernando J.; Foster, Timothy P.; Bosch-Marce, Marta; Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Bernstein, David I.; Krause, Philip R.; Knipe, David M.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of Herpesviruses in the population and the maintenance of lifelong latent reservoirs are challenges to the control of herpetic diseases, despite the availability of antiviral pharmaceuticals that target viral DNA replication. In addition to oral and genital lesions, herpes simplex virus infections and recurrent reactivations from the latent pool can result in severe pathology including neonatal infection and mortality, blindness due to ocular keratitis, and viral-induced complications in immunosuppressed individuals. Herpesviruses, like their cellular hosts, are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin and chromatin modulation machinery that promotes or suppresses gene expression. The initiation of herpes simplex virus infection and reactivation from latency is dependent on a transcriptional coactivator complex that contains two required histone demethylases, LSD1 and JMJD2s. Inhibition of either of these enzymes results in heterochromatic suppression of the viral genome and a block to infection and reactivation in vitro. Here, the concept of epigenetic suppression of viral infection is demonstrated in three animal models of herpes simplex virus infection and disease. Inhibition of LSD1 via treatment of animals with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine results in suppression of viral lytic infection, subclinical shedding, and reactivation from latency in vivo. Phenotypic suppression is correlated with enhanced epigenetic suppression of the viral genome and suggests that, even during latency, the chromatin state of the virus is dynamic. Given the expanding development of epipharmaceuticals, this approach has substantial potential for anti-herpetic treatments with distinct advantages over the present pharmaceutical options. PMID:25473037

  17. A single 13-kilobase divergent locus in the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8) genome contains nine open reading frames that are homologous to or related to cellular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, J; Ruvolo, V; Zong, J; Ciufo, D; Guo, H G; Reitz, M S; Hayward, G S

    1997-01-01

    Two small fragments of a novel human gammaherpesvirus genome known as Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) have been shown to be present in virtually all AIDS and non-AIDS KS lesions, as well as in body cavity-based lymphomas (BCBL) and in multicentric Castleman's disease. We have extended those studies by identifying and sequencing a third fragment of HHV-8 DNA encoding a viral thymidylate synthetase (TS) gene. Use of this viral TS fragment as a probe led to the identification and mapping of a cluster of overlapping phage lambda clones from a BCBL tumor DNA genomic library that spanned 48 kb on the left-hand side of the HHV-8 genome between the equivalents of open reading frame 6 (ORF6) and ORF31 of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS). DNA sequencing of a 17-kb segment encompassing a gammaherpesvirus divergent locus (DL-B) between ORF11 and ORF17 revealed the presence of nine viral ORFs with predicted gene products related to cellular proteins. These include the complete TS gene and a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene, four novel cytokine genes (encoding viral interleukin-6, viral MIP-1A, viral MIP-1B, and BCK) that have not previously been found to be encoded by a virus, and a bcl-2 homolog. This region in HHV-8 also contains the T1.1 abundant lytic cycle nuclear RNA gene and encompasses two genes (or exons) encoding proteins with C4HC3 zinc finger domains of the PHD/leukemia-associated protein subtype. The latter are related to the spliced immediate-early IE1 protein of the gamma-2 class herpesvirus bovine herpesvirus type 4 and a similar motif found in HVS ORF12. Although genes for TS and DHFR enzymes are also encoded by HVS (ORF70 and ORF2), both occur at different genomic loci than in HHV-8, and the HHV-8 DHFR protein is much farther diverged from human DHFR than is the HVS version, implying that they were probably acquired as host cell cDNAs by independent evolutionary events. Transcripts from the IE1-A, IE1-B, DHFR, and MIP-1B

  18. Substrate specificity of three viral thymidine kinases (TK): vaccinia virus TK, feline herpesvirus TK, and canine herpesvirus TK.

    PubMed

    Solaroli, N; Johansson, M; Balzarini, J; Karlsson, A

    2006-01-01

    In search of novel suicide gene candidates we have cloned and characterized thymidine kinases from three viruses; vaccinia virus TK (VVTK), feline herpesvirus TK (FHV-TK), and canine herpesvirus TK (CHV-TK). Our studies showed that VVTK primarily is a thymidine kinase, with a substrate specificity mainly restricted to dThd and only minor affinity for dCyd. VVTK also is related closely to mammalian thymidine kinase 1 (TK1), with 66% identity and 75% general homology. Although CHV-TK and FHV-TK are sequence related to herpes simplex virus types 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK), with 31% and 35% identity and a general similarity of 54%, the substrate specificity of these enzymes was restricted to dThd and thymidine analogs. PMID:17065088

  19. Modulation of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Interleukin-6 Function by Hypoxia-Upregulated Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Louise; Yan, Feng; Major, M. Ben

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called human herpesvirus 8) is linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV expresses several proteins that modulate host cell signaling pathways. One of these proteins is viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), which is a homolog of human IL-6 (hIL-6). vIL-6 is able to prevent apoptosis and promote proinflammatory signaling, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Although it can be secreted, vIL-6 is mainly an intracellular protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We performed affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify novel vIL-6 binding partners and found that a cellular ER chaperone, hypoxia-upregulated protein 1 (HYOU1), interacts with vIL-6. Immunohistochemical staining reveals that both PEL and KS tumor tissues express significant amounts of HYOU1. We also show that HYOU1 increases endogenous vIL-6 protein levels and that HYOU1 facilitates vIL-6-induced JAK/STAT signaling, migration, and survival in endothelial cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that HYOU1 also modulates vIL-6's ability to induce CCL2, a chemokine involved in cell migration. Finally, we investigated the impact of HYOU1 on cellular hIL-6 signaling. Collectively, our data indicate that HYOU1 is important for vIL-6 function and may play a role in the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated cancers. IMPORTANCE KSHV vIL-6 is detectable in all KSHV-associated malignancies and promotes tumorigenesis and inflammation. We identified a cellular protein, called hypoxia-upregulated protein 1 (HYOU1), that interacts with KSHV vIL-6 and is present in KSHV-infected tumors. Our data suggest that HYOU1 facilitates the vIL-6-induced signaling, migration, and survival of endothelial cells. PMID:24920810

  20. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K-Rta exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) like activity and is essential for viral reactivation.

    PubMed

    Izumiya, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Kim, Kevin Y; Pochampalli, Mamata; Izumiya, Chie; Shevchenko, Bogdan; Wang, Don-Hong; Huerta, Steve B; Martinez, Anthony; Campbell, Mel; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2013-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a protein that regulates a wide variety of cellular processes by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to a diverse array of target proteins. Sumoylation also plays an important role in the replication of many viruses. Previously, we showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a SUMO-ligase, K-bZIP, which catalyzes sumoylation of host and viral proteins. We report here that this virus also encodes a gene that functions as a SUMO-targeting ubiquitin-ligase (STUbL) which preferentially targets sumoylated proteins for degradation. K-Rta, the major transcriptional factor which turns on the entire lytic cycle, was recently found to have ubiquitin ligase activity toward a selected set of substrates. We show in this study that K-Rta contains multiple SIMs (SUMO interacting motif) and binds SUMOs with higher affinity toward SUMO-multimers. Like RNF4, the prototypic cellular STUbL, K-Rta degrades SUMO-2/3 and SUMO-2/3 modified proteins, including promyelocytic leukemia (PML) and K-bZIP. PML-NBs (nuclear bodies) or ND-10 are storage warehouses for sumoylated proteins, which negatively regulate herpesvirus infection, as part of the intrinsic immune response. Herpesviruses have evolved different ways to degrade or disperse PML bodies, and KSHV utilizes K-Rta to inhibit PML-NBs formation. This process depends on K-Rta's ability to bind SUMO, as a K-Rta SIM mutant does not effectively degrade PML. Mutations in the K-Rta Ring finger-like domain or SIM significantly inhibited K-Rta transactivation activity in reporter assays and in the course of viral reactivation. Finally, KSHV with a mutation in the Ring finger-like domain or SIM of K-Rta replicates poorly in culture, indicating that reducing SUMO-conjugates in host cells is important for viral replication. To our knowledge, this is the first virus which encodes both a SUMO ligase and a SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase that together may generate unique gene

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K-Rta Exhibits SUMO-Targeting Ubiquitin Ligase (STUbL) Like Activity and Is Essential for Viral Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Izumiya, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Kim, Kevin Y.; Pochampalli, Mamata; Izumiya, Chie; Shevchenko, Bogdan; Wang, Don-Hong; Huerta, Steve B.; Martinez, Anthony; Campbell, Mel; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2013-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a protein that regulates a wide variety of cellular processes by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to a diverse array of target proteins. Sumoylation also plays an important role in the replication of many viruses. Previously, we showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a SUMO-ligase, K-bZIP, which catalyzes sumoylation of host and viral proteins. We report here that this virus also encodes a gene that functions as a SUMO-targeting ubiquitin-ligase (STUbL) which preferentially targets sumoylated proteins for degradation. K-Rta, the major transcriptional factor which turns on the entire lytic cycle, was recently found to have ubiquitin ligase activity toward a selected set of substrates. We show in this study that K-Rta contains multiple SIMs (SUMO interacting motif) and binds SUMOs with higher affinity toward SUMO-multimers. Like RNF4, the prototypic cellular STUbL, K-Rta degrades SUMO-2/3 and SUMO-2/3 modified proteins, including promyelocytic leukemia (PML) and K-bZIP. PML-NBs (nuclear bodies) or ND-10 are storage warehouses for sumoylated proteins, which negatively regulate herpesvirus infection, as part of the intrinsic immune response. Herpesviruses have evolved different ways to degrade or disperse PML bodies, and KSHV utilizes K-Rta to inhibit PML-NBs formation. This process depends on K-Rta's ability to bind SUMO, as a K-Rta SIM mutant does not effectively degrade PML. Mutations in the K-Rta Ring finger-like domain or SIM significantly inhibited K-Rta transactivation activity in reporter assays and in the course of viral reactivation. Finally, KSHV with a mutation in the Ring finger-like domain or SIM of K-Rta replicates poorly in culture, indicating that reducing SUMO-conjugates in host cells is important for viral replication. To our knowledge, this is the first virus which encodes both a SUMO ligase and a SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase that together may generate unique gene

  2. A Single Herpesvirus Protein Can Mediate Vesicle Formation in the Nuclear Envelope*

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Michael; Vollmer, Benjamin; Unsay, Joseph D.; Klupp, Barbara G.; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Antonin, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses assemble capsids in the nucleus and egress by unconventional vesicle-mediated trafficking through the nuclear envelope. Capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane into the nuclear envelope lumen. The resulting intralumenal vesicles fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, delivering the capsids to the cytoplasm. Two viral proteins are required for vesicle formation, the tail-anchored pUL34 and its soluble interactor, pUL31. Whether cellular proteins are involved is unclear. Using giant unilamellar vesicles, we show that pUL31 and pUL34 are sufficient for membrane budding and scission. pUL34 function can be bypassed by membrane tethering of pUL31, demonstrating that pUL34 is required for pUL31 membrane recruitment but not for membrane remodeling. pUL31 can inwardly deform membranes by oligomerizing on their inner surface to form buds that constrict to vesicles. Therefore, a single viral protein can mediate all events necessary for membrane budding and abscission. PMID:25605719

  3. A bovine herpesvirus 1 pUL51 deletion mutant shows impaired viral growth in vitro and reduced virulence in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Sohail; Deng, Mingliang; Shahin, Farzana; Yang, Kui; Hu, Changmin; Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Huanchun; Guo, Aizhen

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) UL51 protein (pUL51) is a tegument protein of BoHV-1 whose function is currently unknown. Here, we aimed to illustrate the specific role of pUL51 in virion morphogenesis and its importance in BoHV-1 virulence. To do so, we constructed a BoHV-1 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). We used recombinant BAC and transgenic techniques to delete a major part of the UL51 open reading frame. Deletion of pUL51 resulted in severe viral growth defects, as evidenced by lower single and multi-step growth kinetics, reduced plaque size, and the accumulation of non-enveloped capsids in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Using tagged BoHV-1 recombinant viruses, it was determined that the pUL51 protein completely co-localized with the cis-Golgi marker protein GM-130. Taken altogether, pUL51 was demonstrated to play a critical role in BoHV-1 growth and it is involved in viral maturation and egress. Moreover, an in vivo analysis showed that the pUL51 mutant exhibited reduced virulence in rabbits, with no clinical signs, no nasal shedding of the virus, and no detectable serum neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, we conclude that the BoHV-1 pUL51 is indispensable for efficient viral growth in vitro and is essential for virulence in vivo. PMID:26934330

  4. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling. PMID:26929373

  5. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-DMAG decreases expression of conserved herpesvirus protein kinases and reduces virus production in Epstein-Barr virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoping; Bristol, Jillian A; Iwahori, Satoko; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Meng, Qiao; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Tarakanova, Vera L; Kalejta, Robert F; Kenney, Shannon C

    2013-09-01

    All eight human herpesviruses have a conserved herpesvirus protein kinase (CHPK) that is important for the lytic phase of the viral life cycle. In this study, we show that heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) interacts directly with each of the eight CHPKs, and we demonstrate that an Hsp90 inhibitor drug, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), decreases expression of all eight CHPKs in transfected HeLa cells. 17-DMAG also decreases expression the of the endogenous Epstein-Barr virus protein kinase (EBV PK, encoded by the BGLF4 gene) in lytically infected EBV-positive cells and inhibits phosphorylation of several different known EBV PK target proteins. Furthermore, 17-DMAG treatment abrogates expression of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) kinase UL97 in HCMV-infected human fibroblasts. Importantly, 17-DMAG treatment decreased the EBV titer approximately 100-fold in lytically infected AGS-Akata cells without causing significant cellular toxicity during the same time frame. Increased EBV PK expression in 17-DMAG-treated AGS-Akata cells did not restore EBV titers, suggesting that 17-DMAG simultaneously targets multiple viral and/or cellular proteins required for efficient viral replication. These results suggest that Hsp90 inhibitors, including 17-DMAG, may be a promising group of drugs that could have profound antiviral effects on herpesviruses. PMID:23843639

  6. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  7. Structural proteins of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus antagonize p53-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, P; Konrad, A; Jochmann, R; Lausen, B; Holz, P; Naschberger, E; Neipel, F; Britzen-Laurent, N; Stürzl, M

    2015-01-29

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a central regulatory molecule of apoptosis and is commonly mutated in tumors. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-related malignancies express wild-type p53. Accordingly, KSHV encodes proteins that counteract the cell death-inducing effects of p53. Here, the effects of all KSHV genes on the p53 signaling pathway were systematically analyzed using the reversely transfected cell microarray technology. With this approach we detected eight KSHV-encoded genes with potent p53 inhibiting activity in addition to the previously described inhibitory effects of KSHV genes ORF50, K10 and K10.5. Interestingly, the three most potent newly identified inhibitors were KSHV structural proteins, namely ORF22 (glycoprotein H), ORF25 (major capsid protein) and ORF64 (tegument protein). Validation of these results with a classical transfection approach showed that these proteins inhibited p53 signaling in a dose-dependent manner and that this effect could be reversed by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the respective viral gene. All three genes inhibited p53-mediated apoptosis in response to Nutlin-3 treatment in non-infected and KSHV-infected cells. Addressing putative mechanisms, we could show that these proteins could also inhibit the transactivation of the promoters of apoptotic mediators of p53 such as BAX and PIG3. Altogether, we demonstrate for the first time that structural proteins of KSHV can counteract p53-induced apoptosis. These proteins are expressed in the late lytic phase of the viral life cycle and are incorporated into the KSHV virion. Accordingly, these genes may inhibit cell death in the productive and in the early entrance phase of KSHV infection. PMID:24469037

  8. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) alters E2F1/Rb pathways and utilizes the E2F1 transcription factor to express viral genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Eyal; Volchek, Ludmila; Frenkel, Niza

    2014-01-01

    E2F transcription factors play pivotal roles in controlling the expression of genes involved in cell-cycle progression. Different viruses affect E2F1/retinoblastoma (Rb) interactions by diverse mechanisms releasing E2F1 from its suppressor Rb, enabling viral replication. We show that in T cells infected with human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), the E2F1 protein and its cofactor DP1 increased, whereas the Rb protein underwent massive degradation without hyperphosphorylation at three sites known to control E2F/Rb association. Although E2F1 and DP1 increased without Rb suppression, the E2F1 target genes—including cyclin A, cyclin E, and dihydrofolate reductase—were not up-regulated. To test whether the E2F1/DP1 complexes were used for viral transcription, we scanned the viral genome for genes containing the E2F binding site in their promoters. In the present work, we concentrated on the U27 and U79 genes known to act in viral DNA synthesis. We constructed amplicon-6 vectors containing a GFP reporter gene driven by WT viral promoter or by promoter mutated in the E2F binding site. We found that the expression of the fusion U27 promoter was dependent on the presence of the E2F binding site. Test of the WT U79 promoter yielded >10-fold higher expression of the GFP reporter gene than the mutant U79 promoter with abrogated E2F binding site. Moreover, by using siRNA to E2F1, we found that E2F1 was essential for the activity of the U79 promoter. These findings revealed a unique pathway in HHV-6 replication: The virus causes Rb degradation and uses the increased E2F1 and DP1 factors to transcribe viral genes. PMID:24335704

  9. The superantigen-homologous viral immediate-early gene ie14/vsag in herpesvirus saimiri-transformed human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Knappe, A; Hiller, C; Thurau, M; Wittmann, S; Hofmann, H; Fleckenstein, B; Fickenscher, H

    1997-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri C488 transforms human T lymphocytes to stable growth in culture. The growth-transformed human T cells harbor the viral genome in a nonintegrated episomal form without production of virus particles. In these cells, virus gene expression was previously found to be confined to the transforming genes stpC and tip. In order to analyze virus gene expression in more detail, we applied a subtractive hybridization technique and compared stimulated virus-transformed cells with uninfected parental T cells of the same donor. A number of known T-cell activation genes were isolated. Viral stpC/tip cDNAs were enriched after subtraction. In addition, the viral immediate-early, superantigen-homologous gene ie14/vsag was represented by numerous cDNA clones that comprised the entire spliced transcript. Whereas a weak basal expression of ie14/vsag was detected by reverse transcription-PCR only, the phorbol ester-induced transcripts were readily shown by Northern blotting. ie14/vsag, which before had been classified as a major immediate-early gene of herpesvirus saimiri, is localized within a highly conserved region with extensive homologies to the cellular genome. Mutant viruses without the ie14/vsag gene are replication competent and fully capable of transforming human and marmoset T cells. Since ie14/vsag is transiently expressed after stimulation, it may increase T-cell proliferation in an activation-dependent and superantigen-like but apparently Vbeta-independent way. PMID:9371569

  10. Microarray chip based identification of a mixed infection of bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine viral diarrhea 2 from Indian cattle.

    PubMed

    Ratta, Barkha; Yadav, Brijesh Singh; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVD2) are endemic in India although no mixed infection with these viruses has been reported from India. We report first mixed infection of these viruses in cattle during routine screening with a microarray chip. 62 of the 69 probes of BHV1 and 42 of the 57 BVD2 probes in the chip gave positive signals for the virus. The virus infections were subsequently confirmed by RT-PCR. We also discuss the implications of these findings. PMID:24026447

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF6 gene is essential in viral lytic replication.

    PubMed

    Peng, Can; Chen, Jungang; Tang, Wei; Liu, Chunlan; Chen, Xulin

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with Kaposis's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV encodes at least 8 open reading frames (ORFs) that play important roles in its lytic DNA replication. Among which, ORF6 of KSHV encodes an ssDNA binding protein that has been proved to participate in origin-dependent DNA replication in transient assays. To define further the function of ORF6 in the virus life cycle, we constructed a recombinant virus genome with a large deletion within the ORF6 locus by using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system. Stable 293T cells carrying the BAC36 (wild type) and BACΔ6 genomes were generated. When monolayers of 293T-BAC36 and 293T-BACΔ6 cells were induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and sodium butyrate, infectious virus was detected from the 293T-BAC36 cell supernatants only and not from the 293T- BACΔ6 cell supernatants. DNA synthesis was defective in 293T-BACΔ6 cells. Expression of ORF6 in trans in BACΔ6-containing cells was able to rescue both defects. Our results provide genetic evidence that ORF6 is essential for KSHV lytic replication. The stable 293T cells carrying the BAC36 and BACΔ6 genomes could be used as tools to investigate the detailed functions of ORF6 in the lytic replication of KSHV. PMID:24911362

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase-like function is shared by the beta- and gamma- subset of the conserved herpesvirus protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Kuny, Chad V; Chinchilla, Karen; Culbertson, Michael R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    The UL97 protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, or HHV-5 (human herpesvirus 5)), is a kinase that phosphorylates the cellular retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor and lamin A/C proteins that are also substrates of cellular cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). A functional complementation assay has further shown that UL97 has authentic Cdk-like activity. The other seven human herpesviruses each encode a kinase with sequence and positional homology to UL97. These UL97-homologous proteins have been termed the conserved herpesvirus protein kinases (CHPKs) to distinguish them from other human herpesvirus-encoded kinases. To determine if the Cdk-like activities of UL97 were shared by all of the CHPKs, we individually expressed epitope-tagged alleles of each protein in human Saos-2 cells to test for Rb phosphorylation, human U-2 OS cells to monitor nuclear lamina disruption and lamin A phosphorylation, or S. cerevisiae cdc28-13 mutant cells to directly assay for Cdk function. We found that the ability to phosphorylate Rb and lamin A, and to disrupt the nuclear lamina, was shared by all CHPKs from the beta- and gamma-herpesvirus families, but not by their alpha-herpesvirus homologs. Similarly, all but one of the beta and gamma CHPKs displayed bona fide Cdk activity in S. cerevisiae, while the alpha proteins did not. Thus, we have identified novel virally-encoded Cdk-like kinases, a nomenclature we abbreviate as v-Cdks. Interestingly, we found that other, non-Cdk-related activities reported for UL97 (dispersion of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) and disruption of cytoplasmic or nuclear aggresomes) showed weak conservation among the CHPKs that, in general, did not segregate to specific viral families. Therefore, the genomic and evolutionary conservation of these kinases has not been fully maintained at the functional level. Our data indicate that these related kinases, some of which are targets of approved or developmental antiviral drugs, are likely to

  13. Kaposi΄s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF36 protein induces chromosome condensation and phosphorylation of histone H3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunmi; Cha, Seho; Jang, Jun Hyeong; Kim, Yejin; Seo, Taegun

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi΄s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has been known as an agent causing Kaposi΄s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman΄s disease. In the lytic phase of the virus cycle, various viral genes are expressed, which causes host cell dysregulation. Among the lytic genes, viral protein kinase (vPK) encoded by ORF36 is a member of serine/threonine protein kinase (CHPK) family, which is involved in viral gene expression, viral DNA replication and encapsidation, and nuclear egress of virions. Recent studies have shown that the BGLF4 protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of the CHPK family, alters the host cell chromatin structure through phosphorylation of its key regulators. The role of KSHV ORF36 in cellular mitotic events, however, is not yet understood. In the current study, we showed that KSHV ORF36 induced chromosome condensation and phosphorylation of histone H3 on Ser 10, which are known as cellular mitosis markers. These processes have occurred in a kinase activity-dependent manner. PMID:23530827

  14. Interaction of Gamma-Herpesvirus Genome Maintenance Proteins with Cellular Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Simone; Gastaldello, Stefano; Masucci, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of gamma-herpesviruses to establish lifelong infections is dependent on the expression of genome maintenance proteins (GMPs) that tether the viral episomes to cellular chromatin and allow their persistence in latently infected proliferating cells. Here we have characterized the chromatin interaction of GMPs encoded by viruses belonging to the genera Lymphocryptovirus (LCV) and Rhadinovirus (RHV). We found that, in addition to a similar diffuse nuclear localization and comparable detergent resistant interaction with chromatin in transfected cells, all GMPs shared the capacity to promote the decondensation of heterochromatin in the A03-1 reporter cell line. They differed, however, in their mobility measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and in the capacity to recruit accessory molecules required for the chromatin remodeling function. While the AT-hook containing GMPs of LCVs were highly mobile, a great variability was observed among GMPs encoded by RHV, ranging from virtually immobile to significantly reduced mobility compared to LCV GMPs. Only the RHV GMPs recruited the bromo- and extra terminal domain (BET) proteins BRD2 and BRD4 to the site of chromatin remodeling. These findings suggest that differences in the mode of interaction with cellular chromatin may underlie different strategies adopted by these viruses for reprogramming of the host cells during latency. PMID:23667520

  15. Modulation of Cellular and Viral Gene Expression by the Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Rolf; Barry, Chris; Dittmer, Dirk; Compitello, Nicole; Brown, Patrick O.; Ganem, Don

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also called human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), is the likely etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma. Common to these malignancies is that tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV. Viral gene expression is limited to a few genes, one of which is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), the product of ORF73. Examination of the primary sequence of LANA reveals some structural features reminiscent of transcription factors, leading us to hypothesize that LANA may regulate viral and cellular transcription during latency. In reporter gene-based transient transfection assays, we found that LANA can have either positive or negative effects on gene expression. While expression of a reporter gene from several synthetic promoters was increased in the presence of LANA, expression from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat (LTR)—and from NF-κB-dependent reporter genes—was reduced by LANA expression. In addition, the promoter of KSHV ORF73 itself is activated up to 5.5-fold by LANA. This autoregulation may be important in tumorigenesis, because two other genes (v-cyclin and v-FLIP) with likely roles in cell growth and survival are also controlled by this element. To identify cellular genes influenced by LANA, we employed cDNA array-based expression profiling. Six known genes (and nine expressed sequence tags) were found to be upregulated in LANA-expressing cell lines. One of these, Staf-50, is known to inhibit expression from the HIV LTR; most of the other known genes are interferon inducible, although the interferon genes themselves were not induced by LANA. These data demonstrate that LANA expression has effects on cellular and viral gene expression. We suggest that, whether direct or indirect in origin, these effects may play important roles in the pathobiology of KSHV infection. PMID:11119614

  16. Evaluation of a Viral Microarray Based on Simultaneous Extraction and Amplification of Viral Nucleotide Acid for Detecting Human Herpesviruses and Enteroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxiu; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Rui; Zhou, Jiajing; Gai, Zhongtao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a viral microarray based assay was developed to detect the human herpesviruses and enteroviruses associated with central nervous system infections, including herpes simplex virus type 1, type 2 (HSV1 and HSV2), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), enterovirus 71 (EV71), coxsackievirus A 16 (CA16) and B 5(CB5). The DNA polymerase gene of human herpesviruses and 5’-untranslated region of enteroviruses were selected as the targets to design primers and probes. Human herpesviruses DNA and enteroviruses RNA were extracted simultaneously by using a guanidinium thiocyanate acid buffer, and were subsequently amplified through a biotinylated asymmetry multiplex RT-PCR with the specific primer of enteroviruses. In total, 90 blood samples and 49 cerebrospinal fluids samples with suspected systemic or neurological virus infections were investigated. Out of 139 samples, 66 were identified as positive. The specificities of this multiplex RT-PCR microarray assay were over 96% but the sensitivities were various from 100% for HSV1, HSV2, EV71 and CB5, 95.83% for CMV, 80% for EBV to 71.43% for CA16 in comparison with reference standards of TaqMan qPCR/qRT-PCR. The high Kappa values (>0.90) from HSV1, HSV2, CMV, EV71 and CB5 were obtained, indicating almost perfect agreement in term of the 5 viruses detection. But lower Kappa values for EBV (0.63) and CA16 (0.74) displayed a moderate to substantial agreement. This study provides an innovation of simultaneous extraction, amplification, hybridization and detection of DNA viruses and RNA viruses with simplicity and specificity, and demonstrates a potential clinical utility for a variety of viruses’ detection. PMID:25774509

  17. Effects of Preinfection With Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus on Immune Cells From the Lungs of Calves Inoculated With Bovine Herpesvirus 1.1.

    PubMed

    Risalde, M A; Molina, V; Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Romero-Palomo, F; Pedrera, M; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interstitial aggregates of immune cells observed in pulmonary parenchyma of calves preinfected with bovine viral diarrhea virus and challenged later with bovine herpesvirus 1. In addition, the intent of this research was to clarify the role of bovine viral diarrhea virus in local cell-mediated immunity and potentially in predisposing animals to bovine respiratory disease complex. Twelve Friesian calves, aged 8 to 9 months, were inoculated with noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1. Ten were subsequently challenged with bovine herpesvirus 1 and euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 7, or 14 days postinoculation. The other 2 calves were euthanized prior to the second inoculation. Another cohort of 10 calves was inoculated only with bovine herpesvirus 1 and then were euthanized at the same time points. Two calves were not inoculated with any agent and were used as negative controls. Pulmonary lesions were evaluated in all animals, while quantitative and biosynthetic changes in immune cells were concurrently examined immunohistochemically to compare coinfected calves and calves challenged only with bovine herpesvirus 1. Calves preinfected with bovine viral diarrhea virus demonstrated moderate respiratory clinical signs and histopathologic evidence of interstitial pneumonia with aggregates of mononuclear cells, which predominated at 4 days postinoculation. Furthermore, this group of animals was noted to have a suppression of interleukin-10 and associated alterations in the Th1-driven cytokine response in the lungs, as well as inhibition of the response of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes against bovine herpesvirus 1. These findings suggest that bovine viral diarrhea virus preinfection could affect the regulation of the immune response as modulated by regulatory T cells, as well as impair local cell-mediated immunity to secondary respiratory pathogens. PMID:25322747

  18. Structure of a herpesvirus nuclear egress complex subunit reveals an interaction groove that is essential for viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Kendra E.; Sharma, Mayuri; Mansueto, My Sam; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Wagner, Gerhard; Coen, Donald M.; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses require a nuclear egress complex (NEC) for efficient transit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The NEC orchestrates multiple steps during herpesvirus nuclear egress, including disruption of nuclear lamina and particle budding through the inner nuclear membrane. In the important human pathogen human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this complex consists of nuclear membrane protein UL50, and nucleoplasmic protein UL53, which is recruited to the nuclear membrane through its interaction with UL50. Here, we present an NMR-determined solution-state structure of the murine CMV homolog of UL50 (M50; residues 1–168) with a strikingly intricate protein fold that is matched by no other known protein folds in its entirety. Using NMR methods, we mapped the interaction of M50 with a highly conserved UL53-derived peptide, corresponding to a segment that is required for heterodimerization. The UL53 peptide binding site mapped onto an M50 surface groove, which harbors a large cavity. Point mutations of UL50 residues corresponding to surface residues in the characterized M50 heterodimerization interface substantially decreased UL50–UL53 binding in vitro, eliminated UL50–UL53 colocalization, prevented disruption of nuclear lamina, and halted productive virus replication in HCMV-infected cells. Our results provide detailed structural information on a key protein–protein interaction involved in nuclear egress and suggest that NEC subunit interactions can be an attractive drug target. PMID:26150520

  19. Activation of p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase by ORF45 of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and Its Role in Viral Lytic Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Ersheng; Tang, Qiyi; Maul, Gerd G.; Zhu, Fanxiu

    2008-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is essential for infection by a variety of viruses. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinases (RSKs) are direct substrates of ERK and functional mediators of ERK MAPK signaling, but their roles in viral infection have never been examined. We demonstrate that ORF45 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with RSK1 and RSK2 and strongly stimulates their kinase activities. The activation of RSK by ORF45 is correlated with ERK activation but does not require MEK. We further demonstrate that RSK1/RSK2 is activated during KSHV primary infection and reactivation from latency; a subset of RSK1/RSK2 is present in the viral replication compartment in the nucleus. Depletion of RSK1/RSK2 by small interfering RNA or the specific inhibitor BI-D1870 suppresses KSHV lytic gene expression and progeny virion production, suggesting an essential role of RSK1/RSK2 in KSHV lytic replication. PMID:18057234

  20. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 in Parana State, Brazil: case report, viral isolation, and molecular identification.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Ernesto Renato; Penha, Tania Regina; Stoffelo, Daura Regina Eira; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ribeiro, Magda Costa; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is a member of Gammaherpesvirinae sub-family and belongs to genus Rhadinovirus . This virus has been associated with different clinical manifestations and research activity has put forward a strong correlation among virus infection, postpartum metritis, and abortion. The goal of this work was to characterize a virus strain isolate from a cow's uterine outflow. From swabs drawn of uterine secretion, a virus strain was isolated and characterized by its cytopathology, morphology, and molecular biology approaches. In culture there was CPE development, characterized mainly by long strands with several small balloons along them, radiated from infected cells. Electron microscopy analysis revealed virus particles that had icosahedrical capsid symmetry surrounded by a loose envelope, typical of a herpesvirus. A 2,571 bp PCR product after Hind III digestion generated four fragments, whose base pair composition were 403, 420, 535, and 1,125 bp. Restriction enzymes Hind III and Bam HI generated the expected diagnostic bands as well as a 2,350 bp hypermolar fragment as a result of Bam HI treatment to demonstrate that agent was a bovine herpesvirus 4, appertaining to DN-599 group. PMID:26221118

  1. Bovine Herpesvirus 4 in Parana State, Brazil: case report, viral isolation, and molecular identification

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Ernesto Renato; Penha, Tania Regina; Stoffelo, Daura Regina Eira; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ribeiro, Magda Costa; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz

    2015-01-01

    Bovine Herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) is a member of Gammaherpesvirinae sub-family and belongs to genus Rhadinovirus . This virus has been associated with different clinical manifestations and research activity has put forward a strong correlation among virus infection, postpartum metritis, and abortion. The goal of this work was to characterize a virus strain isolate from a cow’s uterine outflow. From swabs drawn of uterine secretion, a virus strain was isolated and characterized by its cytopathology, morphology, and molecular biology approaches. In culture there was CPE development, characterized mainly by long strands with several small balloons along them, radiated from infected cells. Electron microscopy analysis revealed virus particles that had icosahedrical capsid symmetry surrounded by a loose envelope, typical of a herpesvirus. A 2,571 bp PCR product after Hind III digestion generated four fragments, whose base pair composition were 403, 420, 535, and 1,125 bp. Restriction enzymes Hind III and Bam HI generated the expected diagnostic bands as well as a 2,350 bp hypermolar fragment as a result of Bam HI treatment to demonstrate that agent was a bovine herpesvirus 4, appertaining to DN-599 group. PMID:26221118

  2. Functional characterization of viral tumor necrosis factor receptors encoded by cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) genome.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yang; Qi, Hemei; Yuan, Jimin; Wang, Rui; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Dong, Chuanfu

    2015-08-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV3) is a large double-stranded DNA virus of Alloherpesviridae family in the order Herpesvirales. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in common carp and its ornamental koi variety, and threatens the aquaculture industries worldwide. Mimicry of cytokines and cytokine receptors is a particular strategy for large DNA viruses in modulating the host immune response. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two novel viral homologues of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) encoded by CyHV3-ORF4 and -ORF12, respectively. CyHV3-ORF4 was identified as a homologue of HVEM and CyHV3-ORF12 as a homologue of TNFRSF1. Overexpression of ORF4 and ORF12 in zebrafish embryos results in embryonic lethality, morphological defects and increased apoptosis. Although we failed to identify any interaction between the two vTNFRs and their potential ligands in zebrafish TNF superfamily by yeast two-hybrid system, the expression of some genes in TNF superfamily or TNFR superfamily were mis-regulated in ORF4 or ORF12-overexpressing embryos, especially the death receptor zHDR and its cognate ligand DL1b. Further studies showed that the apoptosis induced by the both CyHV3 vTNFRs is mainly activated through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and requires the crosstalk between the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Additionally, using RT-qPCR and Western blot assays, the expression patterns of the both vTNFRs were also analyzed during CyHV3 productive infection. Collectively, this is the first functional study of two unique vTNFRs encoded by a herpesvirus infecting non-mammalian vertebrates, which may provide novel insights into viral immune regulation mechanism and the pathogenesis of CyHV3 infection. PMID:26052019

  3. Herpesviruses and the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, David H

    2013-12-01

    The focus of this article will be to examine the role of common herpesviruses as a component of the microbiome of atopic patients and to review clinical observations suggesting that atopic patients might be predisposed to more severe and atypical herpes-related illness because their immune response is biased toward a TH2 cytokine profile. Human populations are infected with 8 herpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus HSV1 and HSV2 (also termed HHV1 and HHV2), varicella zoster virus (VZV or HHV3), EBV (HHV4), cytomegalovirus (HHV5), HHV6, HHV7, and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (termed KSV or HHV8). Herpesviruses are highly adapted to lifelong infection of their human hosts and thus can be considered a component of the human "microbiome" in addition to their role in illness triggered by primary infection. HSV1 and HSV2 infection and reactivation can present with more severe cutaneous symptoms termed eczema herpeticum in the atopic population, similar to the more severe eczema vaccinatum, and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome (DRESS) is associated with reactivation of HSV6 and possibly other herpesviruses in both atopic and nonatopic patients. In this review evidence is reviewed that primary infection with herpesviruses may have an atypical presentation in the atopic patient and conversely that childhood infection might alter the atopic phenotype. Reactivation of latent herpesviruses can directly alter host cytokine profiles through viral expression of cytokine-like proteins, such as IL-10 (EBV) or IL-6 (cytomegalovirus and HHV8), viral encoded and secreted siRNA and microRNAs, and modulation of expression of host transcription pathways, such as nuclear factor κB. Physicians caring for allergic and atopic populations should be aware of common and uncommon presentations of herpes-related disease in atopic patients to provide accurate diagnosis and avoid unnecessary laboratory testing or incorrect diagnosis of other conditions

  4. Identification and characterization of the genomic termini and cleavage/packaging signals of gallid herpesvirus 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herpesvirus replication within infected host cells results in concatameric head-to-tail genomes which are cleaved at specific sites and packaged into the viral capsid by a complex of proteins. The sites of cleavage have been characterized for a number of herpesviruses and conserved signaling sequenc...

  5. The serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinases (SGK) stimulate bovine herpesvirus 1 and herpes simplex virus 1 productive infection.

    PubMed

    Kook, Insun; Jones, Clinton

    2016-08-15

    Serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinases (SGK) are serine/threonine protein kinases that contain a catalytic domain resembling other protein kinases: AKT/protein kinase B, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C-Zeta for example. Unlike these constitutively expressed protein kinases, SGK1 RNA and protein levels are increased by growth factors and corticosteroids. Stress can directly stimulate SGK1 levels as well as stimulate bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) productive infection and reactivation from latency suggesting SGK1 can stimulate productive infection. For the first time, we provide evidence that a specific SGK inhibitor (GSK650394) significantly reduced BoHV-1 and HSV-1 replication in cultured cells. Proteins encoded by the three BoHV-1 immediate early genes (bICP0, bICP4, and bICP22) and two late proteins (VP16 and gE) were consistently reduced by GSK650394 during early stages of productive infection. In summary, these studies suggest SGK may stimulate viral replication following stressful stimuli. PMID:27297663

  6. An Important Role for Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling Protein in the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    West, John A.; Wicks, Megan; Gregory, Sean M.; Chugh, Pauline; Jacobs, Sarah R.; Zhang, Zhigang; Host, Kurtis M.; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has been shown to be recognized by two families of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs). Here we show that MAVS and RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene 1), an RLR family member, also have a role in suppressing KSHV replication and production. In the context of primary infection, we show that in cells with depleted levels of MAVS or RIG-I, KSHV transcription is increased, while beta interferon (IFN-β) induction is attenuated. We also observed that MAVS and RIG-I are critical during the process of reactivation. Depletion of MAVS and RIG-I prior to reactivation led to increased viral load and production of infectious virus. Finally, MAVS depletion in latent KSHV-infected B cells leads to increased viral gene transcription. Overall, this study suggests a role for MAVS and RIG-I signaling during different stages of the KSHV life cycle. IMPORTANCE We show that RIG-I and its adaptor protein, MAVS, can sense KSHV infection and that these proteins can suppress KSHV replication following primary infection and/or viral reactivation. PMID:24623417

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen interacts with bromodomain protein Brd4 on host mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    You, Jianxin; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Denis, Gerald V; Harrington, William J; Ballestas, Mary E; Kaye, Kenneth M; Howley, Peter M

    2006-09-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is required for viral episome maintenance in host cells during latent infection. Two regions of the protein have been implicated in tethering LANA/viral episomes to the host mitotic chromosomes, and LANA chromosome-binding sites are subjects of high interest. Because previous studies had identified bromodomain protein Brd4 as the mitotic chromosome anchor for the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein, which tethers the viral episomes to host mitotic chromosomes (J. You, J. L. Croyle, A. Nishimura, K. Ozato, and P. M. Howley, Cell 117:349-360, 2004, and J. You, M. R. Schweiger, and P. M. Howley, J. Virol. 79:14956-14961, 2005), we examined whether KSHV LANA interacts with Brd4. We found that LANA binds Brd4 in vivo and in vitro and that the binding is mediated by a direct protein-protein interaction between the ET (extraterminal) domain of Brd4 and a carboxyl-terminal region of LANA previously implicated in chromosome binding. Brd4 associates with mitotic chromosomes throughout mitosis and demonstrates a strong colocalization with LANA and the KSHV episomes on host mitotic chromosomes. Although another bromodomain protein, RING3/Brd2, binds to LANA in a similar fashion in vitro, it is largely excluded from the mitotic chromosomes in KSHV-uninfected cells and is partially recruited to the chromosomes in KSHV-infected cells. These data identify Brd4 as an interacting protein for the carboxyl terminus of LANA on mitotic chromosomes and suggest distinct functional roles for the two bromodomain proteins RING3/Brd2 and Brd4 in LANA binding. Additionally, because Brd4 has recently been shown to have a role in transcription, we examined whether Brd4 can regulate the CDK2 promoter, which can be transactivated by LANA. PMID:16940503

  8. KINETICS OF VIRAL LOADS AND GENOTYPIC ANALYSIS OF ELEPHANT ENDOTHELIOTROPIC HERPESVIRUS-1 INFECTION IN CAPTIVE ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS)

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Jeffrey J.; Zong, Jian-Chao; Eng, Crystal; Howard, Lauren; Flanagan, Joe; Stevens, Martina; Schmitt, Dennis; Wiedner, Ellen; Graham, Danielle; Junge, Randall E.; Weber, Martha A.; Fischer, Martha; Mejia, Alicia; Tan, Jie; Latimer, Erin; Herron, Alan; Hayward, Gary S.; Ling, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Elephant endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHVs) can cause fatal hemorrhagic disease in juvenile Asian elephants (Elephas maximus); however, sporadic shedding of virus in trunk washes collected from healthy elephants also has been detected. Data regarding the relationship of viral loads in blood compared with trunk washes are lacking, and questions about whether elephants can undergo multiple infections with EEHVs have not been addressed previously. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the kinetics of EEHV1 loads, and genotypic analysis was performed on EEHV1 DNA detected in various fluid samples obtained from five Asian elephants that survived detectable EEHV1 DNAemia on at least two separate occasions. In three elephants displaying clinical signs of illness, preclinical EEHV1 DNAemia was detectable, and peak whole-blood viral loads occurred 3–8 days after the onset of clinical signs. In two elephants with EEHV1 DNAemia that persisted for 7–21 days, no clinical signs of illness were observed. Detection of EEHV1 DNA in trunk washes peaked approximately 21 days after DNAemia, and viral genotypes detected during DNAemia matched those detected in subsequent trunk washes from the same elephant. In each of the five elephants, two distinct EEHV1 genotypes were identified in whole blood and trunk washes at different time points. In each case, these genotypes represented both an EEHV1A and an EEHV1B subtype. These data suggest that knowledge of viral loads could be useful for the management of elephants before or during clinical illness. Furthermore, sequential infection with both EEHV1 subtypes occurs in Asian elephants, suggesting that they do not elicit cross-protective sterilizing immunity. These data will be useful to individuals involved in the husbandry and clinical care of Asian elephants. PMID:23505702

  9. IFITM Proteins Restrict Viral Membrane Hemifusion

    PubMed Central

    Golfetto, Ottavia; Bungart, Brittani; Li, Minghua; Ding, Shilei; He, Yuxian; Liang, Chen; Lee, James C.; Gratton, Enrico; Cohen, Fredric S.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2013-01-01

    The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) protein family represents a new class of cellular restriction factors that block early stages of viral replication; the underlying mechanism is currently not known. Here we provide evidence that IFITM proteins restrict membrane fusion induced by representatives of all three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins. IFITM1 profoundly suppressed syncytia formation and cell-cell fusion induced by almost all viral fusion proteins examined; IFITM2 and IFITM3 also strongly inhibited their fusion, with efficiency somewhat dependent on cell types. Furthermore, treatment of cells with IFN also markedly inhibited viral membrane fusion and entry. By using the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope and influenza A virus hemagglutinin as models for study, we showed that IFITM-mediated restriction on membrane fusion is not at the steps of receptor- and/or low pH-mediated triggering; instead, the creation of hemifusion was essentially blocked by IFITMs. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a chemical known to promote the transition from hemifusion to full fusion, was unable to rescue the IFITM-mediated restriction on fusion. In contrast, oleic acid (OA), a lipid analog that generates negative spontaneous curvature and thereby promotes hemifusion, virtually overcame the restriction. To explore the possible effect of IFITM proteins on membrane molecular order and fluidity, we performed fluorescence labeling with Laurdan, in conjunction with two-photon laser scanning and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We observed that the generalized polarizations (GPs) and fluorescence lifetimes of cell membranes expressing IFITM proteins were greatly enhanced, indicating higher molecularly ordered and less fluidized membranes. Collectively, our data demonstrated that IFITM proteins suppress viral membrane fusion before the creation of hemifusion, and suggested that they may do so by reducing membrane fluidity and conferring a positive spontaneous

  10. Poly(A) Binding Protein 1 Enhances Cap-Independent Translation Initiation of Neurovirulence Factor from Avian Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Tahiri-Alaoui, Abdessamad; Zhao, Yuguang; Sadigh, Yashar; Popplestone, James; Kgosana, Lydia; Smith, Lorraine P.; Nair, Venugopal

    2014-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1) plays a central role in mRNA translation and stability and is a target by many viruses in diverse manners. We report a novel viral translational control strategy involving the recruitment of PABP1 to the 5' leader internal ribosome entry site (5L IRES) of an immediate-early (IE) bicistronic mRNA that encodes the neurovirulence protein (pp14) from the avian herpesvirus Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1). We provide evidence for the interaction between an internal poly(A) sequence within the 5L IRES and PABP1 which may occur concomitantly with the recruitment of PABP1 to the poly(A) tail. RNA interference and reverse genetic mutagenesis results show that a subset of virally encoded-microRNAs (miRNAs) targets the inhibitor of PABP1, known as paip2, and therefore plays an indirect role in PABP1 recruitment strategy by increasing the available pool of active PABP1. We propose a model that may offer a mechanistic explanation for the cap-independent enhancement of the activity of the 5L IRES by recruitment of a bona fide initiation protein to the 5' end of the message and that is, from the affinity binding data, still compatible with the formation of ‘closed loop’ structure of mRNA. PMID:25503397

  11. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 Interacts with a Member of the Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Sarah R.; Stopford, Charles M.; West, John A.; Bennett, Christopher L.; Giffin, Louise

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a gammaherpesvirus known to establish lifelong latency in the human host. We and others have previously shown that three KSHV homologs of cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), known as viral IRFs (vIRFs), participate in evasion of the host interferon (IFN) response. We report that vIRF1 interacts with the cellular interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) E3 ligase, HERC5, in the context of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) activation and IFN induction. The ISG15 protein is covalently conjugated to target proteins upon activation of the interferon response. Interaction between vIRF1 and HERC5 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, and the region between amino acids 224 and 349 of vIRF1 was required for interaction with HERC5. We further report that expression of vIRF1 in the context of TLR3 activation results in decreased ISG15 conjugation of proteins. Specifically, TLR3-induced ISG15 conjugation and protein levels of cellular IRF3, a known ISG15 target, were decreased in the presence of vIRF1 compared to the control. vIRF1 itself was also identified as a target of ISG15 conjugation. KSHV-infected cells exhibited increased ISG15 conjugation upon reactivation from latency in coordination with increased IFN. Furthermore, knockdown of ISG15 in latently infected cells resulted in a higher level of KSHV reactivation and an increase in infectious virus. These data suggest that the KSHV vIRF1 protein affects ISG15 conjugation and interferon responses and may contribute to effective KSHV replication. IMPORTANCE The KSHV vIRF1 protein can inhibit interferon activation in response to viral infection. We identified a cellular protein named HERC5, which is the major ligase for ISG15, as a vIRF1 binding partner. vIRF1 association with HERC5 altered ISG15 modification of cellular proteins, and knockdown of ISG15 augmented reactivation of KSHV from latency. PMID:26355087

  12. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M.; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W.; Lira, Sergio A.; Levine, Beth

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi’s sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling. PMID:26929373

  13. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine viral diarrhea virus in North-Eastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Correa, J.C.; Zapata-Campos, C.C.; Jasso-Obregón, J.O.; Martinez-Burnes, J.; López-Zavala, R.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are well known etiological agents of cattle that produce important economic losses due to reproductive failures and calf mortality, as well as enteric and respiratory disease. Tamaulipas is located northeast of Mexico, an important cattle production and the principal exporter of calf and heifer to the United States. The objectives of this study were to estimate the seroprevalence of BoHV-1 and of BVDV, and to determine the effects of risk factors on these infections. Blood samples of cattle from 57 farms from rural districts of Tamaulipas were collected. The samples were tested for antibodies against BoHV-1 and BVDV using commercial ELISA kits. Data on potential risk factors were obtained using a questionnaire administered to the farmer at the time the blood samples were taken. The seroprevalences for BoHV-1 and BVDV were 64.4% and 47.8%, respectively. In the logistic regression analysis, the significant risk factors were rural district, herd size and cattle introduced to the farm. This study confirms the high seroprevalence of BoHV-1 and BVDV in unvaccinated cattle in Tamaulipas, Mexico. The results of this study could be used for the development of BoHV-1 and BVDV prevention and control program in North-Eastern, Mexico. PMID:27622156

  14. Seroprevalence and risk factors associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine viral diarrhea virus in North-Eastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Segura-Correa, J C; Zapata-Campos, C C; Jasso-Obregón, J O; Martinez-Burnes, J; López-Zavala, R

    2016-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are well known etiological agents of cattle that produce important economic losses due to reproductive failures and calf mortality, as well as enteric and respiratory disease. Tamaulipas is located northeast of Mexico, an important cattle production and the principal exporter of calf and heifer to the United States. The objectives of this study were to estimate the seroprevalence of BoHV-1 and of BVDV, and to determine the effects of risk factors on these infections. Blood samples of cattle from 57 farms from rural districts of Tamaulipas were collected. The samples were tested for antibodies against BoHV-1 and BVDV using commercial ELISA kits. Data on potential risk factors were obtained using a questionnaire administered to the farmer at the time the blood samples were taken. The seroprevalences for BoHV-1 and BVDV were 64.4% and 47.8%, respectively. In the logistic regression analysis, the significant risk factors were rural district, herd size and cattle introduced to the farm. This study confirms the high seroprevalence of BoHV-1 and BVDV in unvaccinated cattle in Tamaulipas, Mexico. The results of this study could be used for the development of BoHV-1 and BVDV prevention and control program in North-Eastern, Mexico. PMID:27622156

  15. Trapping mammalian protein complexes in viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Eyckerman, Sven; Titeca, Kevin; Van Quickelberghe, Emmy; Cloots, Eva; Verhee, Annick; Samyn, Noortje; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Timmerman, Evy; De Sutter, Delphine; Lievens, Sam; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Gevaert, Kris; Tavernier, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cell lysis is an inevitable step in classical mass spectrometry–based strategies to analyse protein complexes. Complementary lysis conditions, in situ cross-linking strategies and proximal labelling techniques are currently used to reduce lysis effects on the protein complex. We have developed Virotrap, a viral particle sorting approach that obviates the need for cell homogenization and preserves the protein complexes during purification. By fusing a bait protein to the HIV-1 GAG protein, we show that interaction partners become trapped within virus-like particles (VLPs) that bud from mammalian cells. Using an efficient VLP enrichment protocol, Virotrap allows the detection of known binary interactions and MS-based identification of novel protein partners as well. In addition, we show the identification of stimulus-dependent interactions and demonstrate trapping of protein partners for small molecules. Virotrap constitutes an elegant complementary approach to the arsenal of methods to study protein complexes. PMID:27122307

  16. K1 and K15 of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Are Partial Functional Homologues of Latent Membrane Protein 2A of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrück, Lisa; Gustems, Montse; Medele, Stephanie; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lutter, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and Primary effusion lymphomas (PEL), respectively, which are B cell malignancies that originate from germinal center B cells. PEL cells but also a quarter of EBV-positive HL tumor cells do not express the genuine B cell receptor (BCR), a situation incompatible with survival of normal B cells. EBV encodes LMP2A, one of EBV's viral latent membrane proteins, which likely replaces the BCR's survival signaling in HL. Whether KSHV encodes a viral BCR mimic that contributes to oncogenesis is not known because an experimental model of KSHV-mediated B cell transformation is lacking. We addressed this uncertainty with mutant EBVs encoding the KSHV genes K1 or K15 in lieu of LMP2A and infected primary BCR-negative (BCR−) human B cells with them. We confirmed that the survival of BCR– B cells and their proliferation depended on an active LMP2A signal. Like LMP2A, the expression of K1 and K15 led to the survival of BCR− B cells prone to apoptosis, supported their proliferation, and regulated a similar set of cellular target genes. K1 and K15 encoded proteins appear to have noncomplementing, redundant functions in this model, but our findings suggest that both KSHV proteins can replace LMP2A's key activities contributing to the survival, activation and proliferation of BCR– PEL cells in vivo. IMPORTANCE Several herpesviruses encode oncogenes that are receptor-like proteins. Often, they are constitutively active providing important functions to the latently infected cells. LMP2A of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is such a receptor that mimics an activated B cell receptor, BCR. K1 and K15, related receptors of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expressed in virus-associated tumors, have less obvious functions. We found in infection experiments that both viral receptors of KSHV can replace LMP2A and deliver functions

  17. Differential Reovirus-Specific and Herpesvirus-Specific Activator Protein 1 Activation of Secretogranin II Leads to Altered Virus Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Alicia R.; Severini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses utilize host cell machinery for propagation and manage to evade cellular host defense mechanisms in the process. Much remains unknown regarding how the host responds to viral infection. We recently performed global proteomic screens of mammalian reovirus TIL- and T3D-infected and herpesvirus (herpes simplex virus 1 [HSV-1])-infected HEK293 cells. The nonenveloped RNA reoviruses caused an upregulation, whereas the enveloped DNA HSV-1 caused a downregulation, of cellular secretogranin II (SCG2). SCG2, a member of the granin family that functions in hormonal peptide sorting into secretory vesicles, has not been linked to virus infections previously. We confirmed SCG2 upregulation and found SCG2 phosphorylation by 18 h postinfection (hpi) in reovirus-infected cells. We also found a decrease in the amount of reovirus secretion from SCG2 knockdown cells. Similar analyses of cells infected with HSV-1 showed an increase in the amount of secreted virus. Analysis of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway indicated that each virus activates different pathways leading to activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation, which is the known SCG2 transcription activator. We conclude from these experiments that the negative correlation between SCG2 quantity and virus secretion for both viruses indicates a virus-specific role for SCG2 during infection. IMPORTANCE Mammalian reoviruses affect the gastrointestinal system or cause respiratory infections in humans. Recent work has shown that all mammalian reovirus strains (most specifically T3D) may be useful oncolytic agents. The ubiquitous herpes simplex viruses cause common sores in mucosal areas of their host and have coevolved with hosts over many years. Both of these virus species are prototypical representatives of their viral families, and investigation of these viruses can lead to further knowledge of how they and the other more pathogenic members of their respective

  18. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (vIRF4/K10) Is a Novel Interaction Partner of CSL/CBF1, the Major Downstream Effector of Notch Signaling▿

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann, Katharina; Scholz, Barbara A.; Nowak, Agnes; Fossum, Even; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Haas, Juergen; Frank, Ronald; Kempkes, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    In cells infected with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), CSL/CBF1 signaling is essential for viral replication and promotes the survival of KSHV-infected cells. CSL/CBF1 is a DNA adaptor molecule which recruits coactivator and corepressor complexes to regulate viral and cellular gene transcription and which is a major downstream effector molecule of activated Notch. The interaction of KSHV RTA and LANA with CSL/CBF1 has been shown to balance the lytic and latent viral life cycle. Here we report that a third KSHV protein, viral interferon regulatory factor 4 (vIRF4/K10), but none of the three other KSHV-encoded vIRFs, interacts with CSL/CBF1. Two regions of vIRF4 with dissimilar affinities contribute to CSL/CBF1 binding. Similar to Notch, vIRF4 targets the hydrophobic pocket in the beta trefoil domain of CSL/CBF1 through a short peptide motif which closely resembles a motif found in Notch but does not strictly follow the ΦWΦP consensus conserved in human and mouse Notch proteins. Our results suggest that vIRF4 might compete with Notch for CSL/CBF1 binding and signaling. PMID:20861242

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus viral interferon regulatory factor 4 (vIRF4/K10) is a novel interaction partner of CSL/CBF1, the major downstream effector of Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Katharina; Scholz, Barbara A; Nowak, Agnes; Fossum, Even; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Haas, Juergen; Frank, Ronald; Kempkes, Bettina

    2010-12-01

    In cells infected with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), CSL/CBF1 signaling is essential for viral replication and promotes the survival of KSHV-infected cells. CSL/CBF1 is a DNA adaptor molecule which recruits coactivator and corepressor complexes to regulate viral and cellular gene transcription and which is a major downstream effector molecule of activated Notch. The interaction of KSHV RTA and LANA with CSL/CBF1 has been shown to balance the lytic and latent viral life cycle. Here we report that a third KSHV protein, viral interferon regulatory factor 4 (vIRF4/K10), but none of the three other KSHV-encoded vIRFs, interacts with CSL/CBF1. Two regions of vIRF4 with dissimilar affinities contribute to CSL/CBF1 binding. Similar to Notch, vIRF4 targets the hydrophobic pocket in the beta trefoil domain of CSL/CBF1 through a short peptide motif which closely resembles a motif found in Notch but does not strictly follow the ΦWΦP consensus conserved in human and mouse Notch proteins. Our results suggest that vIRF4 might compete with Notch for CSL/CBF1 binding and signaling. PMID:20861242

  20. Progress toward the development of polyvalent vaccination strategies against multiple viral infections in chickens using herpesvirus of turkeys as vector

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Munir

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is the most cost effective strategy for the control and prevention of the plethora of viral diseases affecting poultry production. The major challenge for poultry vaccination is the design of vaccines that will protect against multiple pathogens via a single protective dose, delivered by mass vaccination. The Marek disease virus and the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus cause severe disease outbreaks in chickens. Vaccination with live herpesvirus of turkeys protects chickens from Marek disease and inactivated influenza viruses are used as antigens to protect chickens against influenza virus infections. We developed herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) as a vaccine vector that can act as a dual vaccine against avian influenza and Marek disease. The HVT vector was developed using reverse genetics based on an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of HVT. The BAC carrying the HVT genome was genetically modified to express the haemagglutinin (HA) gene of a highly pathogenic H7N1 virus. The resultant recombinant BAC construct containing the modified HVT sequence was transfected into chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells and HVT recombinants (rHVT-H7HA) harbouring the H7N1 HA were recovered. Analysis of cultured CEF cells infected with the rHVT-H7HA showed that HA was expressed and that the rescued rHVT-H7HA stocks were stable during several in vitro passages with no difference in growth kinetics compared with the parent HVT. Immunization of one-day-old chicks with rHVT-H7HA induced H7-specific antibodies and protected chickens challenged with homologous H7N1 virus against virus shedding, clinical disease and death. The rHVT-H7HA vaccine also induced strong and long-lasting antibody titers against H7HA in chickens that were vaccinated in ovo 3 d before hatching. This vaccine supports differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA), because no influenza virus nucleoprotein-specific antibodies were detected in the rHVT-H7HA

  1. Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 Enhances Viral Replication in CD172a+ Monocytic Cells upon Adhesion to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laval, Kathlyn; Favoreel, Herman W.; Poelaert, Katrien C. K.; Van Cleemput, Jolien

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a main cause of respiratory disease, abortion, and encephalomyelopathy in horses. Monocytic cells (CD172a+) are the main carrier cells of EHV-1 during primary infection and are proposed to serve as a “Trojan horse” to facilitate the dissemination of EHV-1 to target organs. However, the mechanism by which EHV-1 is transferred from CD172a+ cells to endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate EHV-1 transmission between these two cell types. We hypothesized that EHV-1 employs specific strategies to promote the adhesion of infected CD172a+ cells to EC to facilitate EHV-1 spread. Here, we demonstrated that EHV-1 infection of CD172a+ cells resulted in a 3- to 5-fold increase in adhesion to EC. Antibody blocking experiments indicated that α4β1, αLβ2, and αVβ3 integrins mediated adhesion of infected CD172a+ cells to EC. We showed that integrin-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK/MAPK signaling pathways were involved in EHV-1-induced CD172a+ cell adhesion at early times of infection. EHV-1 replication was enhanced in adherent CD172a+ cells, which correlates with the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In the presence of neutralizing antibodies, approximately 20% of infected CD172a+ cells transferred cytoplasmic material to uninfected EC and 0.01% of infected CD172a+ cells transmitted infectious virus to neighboring cells. Our results demonstrated that EHV-1 infection induces adhesion of CD172a+ cells to EC, which enhances viral replication, but that transfer of viral material from CD172a+ cells to EC is a very specific and rare event. These findings give new insights into the complex pathogenesis of EHV-1. IMPORTANCE Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a highly prevalent pathogen worldwide, causing frequent outbreaks of abortion and myeloencephalopathy, even in vaccinated horses. After primary replication in the respiratory tract, EHV-1 disseminates

  2. Herpesviruses: interfering innate immunity by targeting viral sensing and interferon pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Puja; Narayanan, Sathish; Kumar, Himanshu

    2015-05-01

    Type I-interferon (IFN-I) induction pathway is one of the most commonly stimulated signaling pathways in response to viral infection. During viral infection this pathway is stimulated by various pattern-recognition receptors, which recognize different pathogen-associated molecular patterns. The pathways stimulated by different pattern-recognition receptors merge into common transcription factors IRF3 and IRF7, lead to the production of IFN-I. The secreted IFN-I stimulates JAK-STAT pathway leading to induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). The ISGs along with IFN-I create antiviral state to eliminate the virus from host. HHV infection enhances IFN-I-mediated innate antiviral response during both de novo infection and lytic reactivation from latency. However, HHV developed various molecular strategies to evade the sudden upsurge of the IFN-I and IFN-I-mediated antiviral response to establish a successful infection. Here, we focus on IFN-I induction and signaling pathways induced by three representative HHVs from each sub-family of HHV and strategies acquired by these HHVs to subvert the induction of IFN-I and ISGs to evade the host innate immunity. These fundamental understanding provides the clue for viral targets for pharmacological manipulation to develop potential therapeutics for broad subtypes of HHVs. PMID:25847408

  3. Regulation and Function of Phosphorylation on VP8, the Major Tegument Protein of Bovine Herpesvirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Afroz, Sharmin; Brownlie, Robert; Snider, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major tegument protein of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), VP8, is essential for virus replication in cattle. VP8 is phosphorylated in vitro by casein kinase 2 (CK2) and BoHV-1 unique short protein 3 (US3). In this study, VP8 was found to be phosphorylated in both transfected and infected cells but was detected as a nonphosphorylated form in mature virions. This suggests that phosphorylation of VP8 is strictly controlled during different stages of the viral life cycle. The regulation and function of VP8 phosphorylation by US3 and CK2 were further analyzed. An in vitro kinase assay, site-directed mutagenesis, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to identify the active sites for US3 and CK2. The two kinases phosphorylate VP8 at different sites, resulting in distinct phosphopeptide patterns. S16 is a primary phosphoreceptor for US3, and it subsequently triggers phosphorylation at S32. CK2 has multiple active sites, among which T107 appears to be the preferred residue. Additionally, CK2 consensus motifs in the N terminus of VP8 are essential for phosphorylation. Based on these results, a nonphosphorylated VP8 mutant was constructed and used for further studies. In transfected cells phosphorylation was not required for nuclear localization of VP8. Phosphorylated VP8 appeared to recruit promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein and to remodel the distribution of PML in the nucleus; however, PML protein did not show an association with nonphosphorylated VP8. This suggests that VP8 plays a role in resisting PML-related host antiviral defenses by redistributing PML protein and that this function depends on the phosphorylation of VP8. IMPORTANCE The progression of VP8 phosphorylation over time and its function in BoHV-1 replication have not been characterized. This study demonstrates that activation of S16 initiates further phosphorylation at S32 by US3. Additionally, VP8 is phosphorylated by CK2 at several residues, with T107 having the highest level

  4. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus from Zambian Kaposi's Sarcoma Biopsy Specimens Reveals Unique Viral Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Olp, Landon N.; Jeanniard, Adrien; Marimo, Clemence; West, John T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Both KSHV and KS are endemic in sub-Saharan Africa where approximately 84% of global KS cases occur. Nevertheless, whole-genome sequencing of KSHV has only been completed using isolates from Western countries—where KS is not endemic. The lack of whole-genome KSHV sequence data from the most clinically important geographical region, sub-Saharan Africa, represents an important gap since it remains unclear whether genomic diversity has a role on KSHV pathogenesis. We hypothesized that distinct KSHV genotypes might be present in sub-Saharan Africa compared to Western countries. Using a KSHV-targeted enrichment protocol followed by Illumina deep-sequencing, we generated and analyzed 16 unique Zambian, KS-derived, KSHV genomes. We enriched KSHV DNA over cellular DNA 1,851 to 18,235-fold. Enrichment provided coverage levels up to 24,740-fold; therefore, supporting highly confident polymorphism analysis. Multiple alignment of the 16 newly sequenced KSHV genomes showed low level variability across the entire central conserved region. This variability resulted in distinct phylogenetic clustering between Zambian KSHV genomic sequences and those derived from Western countries. Importantly, the phylogenetic segregation of Zambian from Western sequences occurred irrespective of inclusion of the highly variable genes K1 and K15. We also show that four genes within the more conserved region of the KSHV genome contained polymorphisms that partially, but not fully, contributed to the unique Zambian KSHV whole-genome phylogenetic structure. Taken together, our data suggest that the whole KSHV genome should be taken into consideration for accurate viral characterization. IMPORTANCE Our results represent the largest number of KSHV whole-genomic sequences published to date and the first time that multiple genomes have been sequenced from sub-Saharan Africa, a geographic area

  5. Interaction of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF6 Protein with Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ozgur, Sezgin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF6 is homologous to the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP8 and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BALF2 proteins. Here, we describe its single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding properties. Based on previous findings with ICP8 and BALF2, a 60-amino-acid C-terminal deletion mutant of Orf6 was generated, and the protein was purified to explore the function of the C terminus in ssDNA binding. We showed that full-length ORF6 binds cooperatively to M13 ssDNA, disrupting its secondary structure and extending it to a length equivalent to that of duplex M13 DNA. The width of the ORF6-ssDNA filament is 9 nm, and a 7.3-nm repeat can be distinguished along the filament axis. Fluorescence polarization analysis revealed that the wild-type and C-terminal mutant ORF6 proteins bind equally well to short ssDNA substrates, with dissociation constant (Kd) values of 2.2 × 10−7M and 1.5 × 10−7M, respectively. These values were confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) analysis, which also suggested that binding by the full-length protein may involve both monomers and small multimers. While no significant difference in affinities of binding between full-length ORF6 and the C-terminal deletion mutant were observed with the short DNAs, binding of the C-terminal mutant protein to M13 ssDNA showed a clear lack of cooperativity as seen by electron microscopy (EM). Incubation of a duplex DNA containing a long single-stranded tail with double-helical ORF6 protein filaments revealed that the ssDNA segment can be enveloped within the protein filament without disrupting the filament structure. IMPORTANCE This work describes the biochemical characterization of the single-stranded DNA binding protein of KSHV, ORF6, central to viral DNA replication in infected cells. A C-terminal deletion mutant protein was generated to aid in understanding the role of the C terminus in DNA binding. Here we analyze the binding of the wild-type and

  6. A Structural Basis for BRD2/4-Mediated Host Chromatin Interaction and Oligomer Assembly of Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and Murine Gammaherpesvirus LANA Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Krausze, Joern; Richter, Ulrike; Adler, Heiko; Fedorov, Roman; Pietrek, Marcel; Rückert, Jessica; Ritter, Christiane; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lührs, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes a lifelong latent infection and causes several malignancies in humans. Murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) is a related γ2-herpesvirus frequently used as a model to study the biology of γ-herpesviruses in vivo. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (kLANA) and the MHV68 mLANA (orf73) protein are required for latent viral replication and persistence. Latent episomal KSHV genomes and kLANA form nuclear microdomains, termed ‘LANA speckles’, which also contain cellular chromatin proteins, including BRD2 and BRD4, members of the BRD/BET family of chromatin modulators. We solved the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA binding domains (CTD) of kLANA and MHV-68 mLANA. While these structures share the overall fold with the EBNA1 protein of Epstein-Barr virus, they differ substantially in their surface characteristics. Opposite to the DNA binding site, both kLANA and mLANA CTD contain a characteristic lysine-rich positively charged surface patch, which appears to be a unique feature of γ2-herpesviral LANA proteins. Importantly, kLANA and mLANA CTD dimers undergo higher order oligomerization. Using NMR spectroscopy we identified a specific binding site for the ET domains of BRD2/4 on kLANA. Functional studies employing multiple kLANA mutants indicate that the oligomerization of native kLANA CTD dimers, the characteristic basic patch and the ET binding site on the kLANA surface are required for the formation of kLANA ‘nuclear speckles’ and latent replication. Similarly, the basic patch on mLANA contributes to the establishment of MHV-68 latency in spleen cells in vivo. In summary, our data provide a structural basis for the formation of higher order LANA oligomers, which is required for nuclear speckle formation, latent replication and viral persistence. PMID:24146614

  7. Structure of the infected cell protein 0 gene of canine herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, M; Takiguchi, M; Yasuda, J; Hashimoto, A; Takada, A; Okazaki, K; Kida, H

    2000-01-01

    The canine herpesvirus infected cell protein 0 (CICP0) gene was sequenced. The CICP0 gene was transcribed as a 1.4 kb mRNA from the end of the unique long region nearby the internal repeat during early phase of productive infection of the virus. An open reading frame of the gene encodes a polypeptide of 333 amino acids. The RING finger domain and acidic transcriptional activation domain were found at the N-terminus and within the middle region in the deduced amino acid sequence, respectively, suggesting that the CICP0, like the ICP0 of herpes simplex virus 1, is a transactivating protein. PMID:11003479

  8. Molecular piracy of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Choi, J; Means, R E; Damania, B; Jung, J U

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most recently discovered human tumor virus and is associated with the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and Multicentric Casttleman's disease. KSHV contains numerous open reading frames with striking homology to cellular genes. These viral gene products play a variety of roles in KSHV-associated pathogenesis by disrupting cellular signal transduction pathways, which include interferon-mediated anti-viral responses, cytokine-regulated cell growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle control. In this review, we will attempt to cover our understanding of how viral proteins deregulate cellular signaling pathways, which ultimately contribute to the conversion of normal cells to cancerous cells. PMID:11325605

  9. Cooperation between Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 and RTA To Activate a Subset of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiangmei; Persson, Linda M.; O'Brien, Michael W.; Mohr, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The four Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded interferon (IFN) regulatory factor homologues (vIRF1 to vIRF4) are used to counter innate immune defenses and suppress p53. The vIRF genes are arranged in tandem but differ in function and expression. In KSHV-infected effusion lymphoma lines, K10.5/vIRF3 and K11/vIRF2 mRNAs are readily detected during latency, whereas K9/vIRF1 and K10/vIRF4 mRNAs are upregulated during reactivation. Here we show that the K10/vIRF4 promoter responds to the lytic switch protein RTA in KSHV-infected cells but is essentially unresponsive in uninfected cells. Coexpression of RTA with vIRF4 is sufficient to restore regulation, a property not shared by other vIRFs. The K9/vIRF1 promoter behaves similarly, and production of infectious virus is enhanced by the presence of vIRF4. Synergy requires the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and C-terminal IRF homology regions of vIRF4. Mutations of arginine residues within the putative DNA recognition helix of vIRF4 or the invariant cysteines of the adjacent CxxC motif abolish cooperation with RTA, in the latter case by preventing self-association. The oligomerization and transactivation functions of RTA are also essential for synergy. The K10/vIRF4 promoter contains two transcription start sites (TSSs), and a 105-bp fragment containing the proximal promoter is responsive to vIRF4/RTA. Binding of a cellular factor(s) to this fragment is altered when both viral proteins are present, suggesting a possible mechanism for transcriptional synergy. Reliance on coregulators encoded by either the host or viral genome provides an elegant strategy for expanding the regulatory potential of a master regulator, such as RTA. PMID:22090118

  10. Viral and host proteins involved in picornavirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Weng, Kuo-Feng; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Li-Lien; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2009-01-01

    Picornaviruses cause several diseases, not only in humans but also in various animal hosts. For instance, human enteroviruses can cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease, herpangina, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, severe neurological complications, including brainstem encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis, and even death. The interaction between the virus and the host is important for viral replication, virulence and pathogenicity. This article reviews studies of the functions of viral and host factors that are involved in the life cycle of picornavirus. The interactions of viral capsid proteins with host cell receptors is discussed first, and the mechanisms by which the viral and host cell factors are involved in viral replication, viral translation and the switch from translation to RNA replication are then addressed. Understanding how cellular proteins interact with viral RNA or viral proteins, as well as the roles of each in viral infection, will provide insights for the design of novel antiviral agents based on these interactions. PMID:19925687

  11. HCMV gB shares structural and functional properties with gB proteins from other herpesviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sapna; Wisner, Todd W.; Johnson, David C.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2013-01-20

    Glycoprotein B (gB) facilitates HCMV entry into cells by binding receptors and mediating membrane fusion. The crystal structures of gB ectodomains from HSV-1 and EBV are available, but little is known about the HCMV gB structure. Using multiangle light scattering and electron microscopy, we show here that HCMV gB ectodomain is a trimer with the overall shape similar to HSV-1 and EBV gB ectodomains. HCMV gB ectodomain forms rosettes similar to rosettes formed by EBV gB and the postfusion forms of other viral fusogens. Substitution of several bulky hydrophobic residues within the putative fusion loops with more hydrophilic residues reduced rosette formation and abolished cell fusion. We propose that like gB proteins from HSV-1 and EBV, HCMV gB has two internal hydrophobic fusion loops that likely interact with target membranes. Our work establishes structural and functional similarities between gB proteins from three subfamilies of herpesviruses.

  12. Viral DNA tethering domains complement replication-defective mutations in the p12 protein of MuLV Gag.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William M; Brzezinski, Jonathon D; Aiyer, Sriram; Malani, Nirav; Gyuricza, Mercedes; Bushman, Frederic D; Roth, Monica J

    2013-06-01

    The p12 protein of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) group-specific antigen (Gag) is associated with the preintegration complex, and mutants of p12 (PM14) show defects in nuclear entry or retention. Here we show that p12 proteins engineered to encode peptide sequences derived from known viral tethering proteins can direct chromatin binding during the early phase of viral replication and rescue a lethal p12-PM14 mutant. Peptides studied included segments of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA)(1-23), human papillomavirus 8 E2, and prototype foamy virus chromatin-binding sequences. Amino acid substitutions in Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus LANA and prototype foamy virus chromatin-binding sequences that blocked nucleosome association failed to rescue MuLV p12-PM14. Rescue by a larger LANA peptide, LANA(1-32), required second-site mutations that are predicted to reduce peptide binding affinity to chromosomes, suggesting that excessively high binding affinity interfered with Gag/p12 function. This is supported by confocal microscopy of chimeric p12-GFP fusion constructs showing the reverted proteins had weaker association to condensed mitotic chromosomes. Analysis of the integration-site selection of these chimeric viruses showed no significant change in integration profile compared with wild-type MuLV, suggesting release of the tethered p12 post mitosis, before viral integration. PMID:23661057

  13. Curvature Sensing by a Viral Scission Protein.

    PubMed

    Martyna, Agnieszka; Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Lindén, Martin; Rossman, Jeremy S

    2016-06-28

    Membrane scission is the final step in all budding processes wherein a membrane neck is sufficiently constricted so as to allow for fission and the release of the budded particle. For influenza viruses, membrane scission is mediated by an amphipathic helix (AH) domain in the viral M2 protein. While it is known that the M2AH alters membrane curvature, it is not known how the protein is localized to the center neck of budding virions where it would be able to cause membrane scission. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations on buckled lipid bilayers to show that the M2AH senses membrane curvature and preferentially localizes to regions of high membrane curvature, comparable to that seen at the center neck of budding influenza viruses. These results were then validated using in vitro binding assays to show that the M2AH senses membrane curvature by detecting lipid packing defects in the membrane. Our results show that the M2AH senses membrane curvature and suggest that the AH domain may localize the protein at the viral neck where it can then mediate membrane scission and the release of budding viruses. PMID:27299375

  14. Herpesvirus-dependent amplification and inversion of cell-associated viral thymidine kinase gene flanked by viral a sequences and linked to an origin of viral DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Mocarski, E S; Roizman, B

    1982-01-01

    The genome of herpes simplex virus 1 or 2 consists of two components, L and S, which invert relative to each other during infection. As a result, viral DNA consists of four equimolar populations of molecules differing solely in the relative orientations of the L and S components. Previous studies have shown that the a sequences, located in the same orientation at the genomic termini and in inverted orientation at the L-S junction, play a key role in the inversion of L and S components. In this report we describe a virus-dependent system designed to allow identification of the viral genes capable of acting in trans to invert DNA flanked by inverted copies of a sequences. In this system, cells are converted to the thymidine kinase-positive phenotype with a chimeric plasmid carrying the thymidine kinase gene flanked by inverted copies of the a sequence and linked to an origin of viral DNA replication derived from the S component. The DNA introduced into the cells is retained and propagated in its original sequence arrangement as head-to-tail concatemers. Infection of these cells with herpes simplex virus 1 or 2 results in as much as 100-fold amplification of the plasmid sequences and inversion of the DNA flanked by copies of the a sequence. In infected cells, the amplified resident DNA accumulates in head-to-tail concatemers and no rearrangement other than the inversions could be detected. These results suggest that the a sequence-dependent inversions required trans-acting viral gene products. Images PMID:6291055

  15. Superresolution imaging of viral protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Salka, Kyle; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Yang, David

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane is closely apposed to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), which facilitates communication between these organelles. These contacts, known as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), facilitate calcium signaling, lipid transfer, as well as antiviral and stress responses. How cellular proteins traffic to the MAM, are distributed therein, and interact with ER and mitochondrial proteins are subject of great interest. The human cytomegalovirus UL37 exon 1 protein or viral mitochondria-localized inhibitor of apoptosis (vMIA) is crucial for viral growth. Upon synthesis at the ER, vMIA traffics to the MAM and OMM, where it reprograms the organization and function of these compartments. vMIA significantly changes the abundance of cellular proteins at the MAM and OMM, including proteins that regulate calcium homeostasis and cell death. Through the use of superresolution imaging, we have shown that vMIA is distributed at the OMM in nanometer scale clusters. This is similar to the clusters reported for the mitochondrial calcium channel, VDAC, as well as electron transport chain, translocase of the OMM complex, and mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system components. Thus, aside from addressing how vMIA targets the MAM and regulates survival of infected cells, biochemical studies and superresolution imaging of vMIA offer insights into the formation, organization, and functioning of MAM. Here, we discuss these insights into trafficking, function, and organization of vMIA at the MAM and OMM and discuss how the use of superresolution imaging is contributing to the study of the formation and trafficking of viruses. PMID:25724304

  16. Selective killing of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytically infected cells with a recombinant immunotoxin targeting the viral gpK8.1A envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Deboeeta; Chandran, Bala; Berger, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) is etiologically associated with three neoplastic syndromes: Kaposi sarcoma and the uncommon HIV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease. The incidence of the latter B-cell pathology has been increasing in spite of antiretroviral therapy; its association with lytic virus replication has prompted interest in therapeutic strategies aimed at this phase of the virus life cycle. We designed and expressed a recombinant immunotoxin (2014-PE38) targeting the gpK8.1A viral glycoprotein expressed on the surface of the virion and infected cells. We show that this immunotoxin selectively kills KSHV-infected cells in dose-dependent fashion, resulting in major reductions of infectious virus release. The immunotoxin and ganciclovir, an inhibitor of viral DNA replication, showed marked reciprocal potentiation of antiviral activities. These results suggest that the immunotoxin, alone or in combination, may represent a new approach to treat diseases associated with KSHV lytic replication. PMID:22377676

  17. Equine herpesvirus type 4 UL56 and UL49.5 proteins downregulate cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I expression independently of each other.

    PubMed

    Said, Abdelrahman; Azab, Walid; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules are critically important in the host defense against various pathogens through presentation of viral peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), a process resulting in the destruction of virus-infected cells. Herpesviruses interfere with CTL-mediated elimination of infected cells by various mechanisms, including inhibition of peptide transport and loading, perturbation of MHC-I trafficking, and rerouting and proteolysis of cell surface MHC-I. In this study, we show that equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) modulates MHC-I cell surface expression through two different mechanisms. First, EHV-4 can lead to a significant downregulation of MHC-I expression at the cell surface through the product of ORF1, a protein expressed with early kinetics from a gene that is homologous to herpes simplex virus 1 UL56. The EHV-4 UL56 protein reduces cell surface MHC-I as early as 4 h after infection. Second, EHV-4 can interfere with MHC-I antigen presentation, starting at 6 h after infection, by inhibition of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) through its UL49.5 protein. Although pUL49.5 has no immediate effect on overall surface MHC-I levels in infected cells, it blocks the supply of antigenic peptides to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transport of peptide-loaded MHC-I to the cell surface. Taken together, our results show that EHV-4 encodes at least two viral immune evasion proteins: pUL56 reduces MHC-I molecules on the cell surface at early times after infection, and pUL49.5 interferes with MHC-I antigen presentation by blocking peptide transport in the ER. PMID:22623773

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K3 and K5 proteins down regulate both DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sabine M; Bynoe, Meisha O F; Karki, Roshan; Tartell, Michael A; Means, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of multicentric Castleman's disease, primary effusion lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma. In this study, we show that like the C-type lectin DC-SIGN, the closely related DC-SIGNR can also enhance KSHV infection. Following infection, they are both targeted for down modulation and our data indicate that the KSHV MARCH-family ubiquitin ligase K5 is mediating this regulation and subsequent targeting for degradation of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR in the context of the virus. The closely related viral K3 protein, is also able to target these lectins in exogenous expressions studies, but only weakly during viral infection. In addition to requiring a functional RING-CH domain, several protein trafficking motifs in the C-terminal region of both K3 and K5 are important in regulation of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR. Further exploration of this modulation revealed that DC-SIGN is endocytosed from the cell surface in THP-1 monocytes, but degraded from an internal location with minimal endocytosis in HEK-293 cells. Pull-down data indicate that both K3 and K5 preferentially associate with immature forms of the lectins, mediating their ubiquitylation and degradation. Together, these data emphasize the molecular complexities of K3 and K5, while expanding the repertoire of targets of these two viral proteins. PMID:23460925

  19. The Role of PI3K/Akt in Human Herpesvirus Infection: from the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Liu, XueQiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway regulates several key cellular functions including protein synthesis, cell growth, glucose metabolism, and inflammation. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to manipulate this signaling pathway to ensure successful virus replication. The human herpesviruses undergo both latent and lytic infection, but differ in cell tropism, growth kinetics, and disease manifestations. Herpesviruses express multiple proteins that target the PI3K/Akt cell signaling pathway during the course of their life cycle to facilitate viral infection, replication, latency, and reactivation. Rare human genetic disorders with mutations in either the catalytic or regulatory subunit of PI3K that result in constitutive activation of the protein predispose to severe herpesvirus infections as well as to virus-associated malignancies. Inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway or its downstream proteins using drugs already approved for other diseases can block herpesvirus lytic infection and may reduce malignancies associated with latent herpesvirus infections. PMID:25798530

  20. The role of PI3K/Akt in human herpesvirus infection: From the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Liu, XueQiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2015-05-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway regulates several key cellular functions including protein synthesis, cell growth, glucose metabolism, and inflammation. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to manipulate this signaling pathway to ensure successful virus replication. The human herpesviruses undergo both latent and lytic infection, but differ in cell tropism, growth kinetics, and disease manifestations. Herpesviruses express multiple proteins that target the PI3K/Akt cell signaling pathway during the course of their life cycle to facilitate viral infection, replication, latency, and reactivation. Rare human genetic disorders with mutations in either the catalytic or regulatory subunit of PI3K that result in constitutive activation of the protein predispose to severe herpesvirus infections as well as to virus-associated malignancies. Inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway or its downstream proteins using drugs already approved for other diseases can block herpesvirus lytic infection and may reduce malignancies associated with latent herpesvirus infections. PMID:25798530

  1. Detection of cyprinid herpesvirus 2 in peripheral blood cells of silver crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio (Bloch), suggests its potential in viral diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Xu, Lj; Lu, Lq

    2016-02-01

    Epidemics caused by cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2) in domestic cyprinid species have been reported in both European and Asian countries. Although the mechanisms remain unknown, acute CyHV-2 infections generally result in high mortality, and the surviving carps become chronic carriers displaying no external clinical signs. In this study, in situ hybridization analysis showed that CyHV-2 tended to infect peripheral blood cells during either acute or chronic infections in silver crucian carp, Carassius auratus gibelio (Bloch). Laboratory challenge experiments coupled with real-time PCR quantification assays further indicated that steady-state levels of the viral genomic copy number in fish serum exhibited a typical 'one-step' growth curve post-viral challenge. Transcriptional expression of open reading frames (ORF) 121, which was selected due to its highest transcriptional levels in almost all tested tissues, was monitored to represent the replication kinetics of CyHV-2 in peripheral blood cells. Similar kinetic curve of active viral gene transcription in blood cells was obtained as that of serum viral load, indicating that CyHV-2 replicated in peripheral blood cells as well as in other well-characterized tissues. This study should pave the way for designing non-invasive and cost-effective serum diagnostic methods for quick detection of CyHV-2 infection. PMID:25630360

  2. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  3. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  4. Detection of Human Herpesvirus-6 Variants in Pediatric Brain Tumors: Association of Viral Antigen in Low Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John R.; Santi, Maria R.; Thorarinsdottir, Halldora K.; Cornelison, Robert; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Zhang, Huizhen; Yao, Karen; Jacobson, Steven; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) has been associated with a diverse spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and reported glial tropism. Objective To determine if HHV-6 is present in a series of pediatric brain tumors. Study Design Pediatric gliomas from 88 untreated patients represented in a tissue microarray (TMA) were screened for HHV-6 by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in situ hybridization (ISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and compared to non glial tumors (N=22) and control brain (N=32). Results were correlated with tumor grade and overall survival. Results HHV-6 U57 was detected by nested PCR in 68/120 (57%) tumors and 7/32 (22%) age-matched non-tumor brain (P=0.001). HHV-6 U31 was positive in 73/120 (61%) tumors and 11/32 (34%) controls (P=0.019). Seventy-two percent (43/60) of tumors were HHV-6 Variant A. HHV-6 U57 was confirmed by ISH in 83/150 (54%) tumors and 10/32 (31%) controls (P=0.021), revealing a non-lymphocytic origin of HHV-6. HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 late antigen was detected by IHC in 50/124 (40%) tumors and 6/32 (18%) controls (P=0.013). Interestingly, 58% of low grade gliomas (N=67) were IHC positive compared to 19% of high grade gliomas (N=21, P=0.002) and 25% of non gliomas (N=36; P=0.001). HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 antigen co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein, confirming the astrocytic origin of antigen. Overall, there was no primary association between HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 antigen detection and survival (P=0.861). Conclusions We provide the first reported series of HHV-6 detection in pediatric brain tumors. The predominance of HHV-6 in glial tumors warrants further investigation into potential neurooncologic disease mechanisms. PMID:19505845

  5. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Konstantinos V.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; McDonald, Michael; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Davison, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154) isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp) and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp) that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively). The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease. PMID:27213534

  6. Recombinant bovine herpesvirus-1 expressing p23 protein of Cryptosporidium parvum induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Xuan, Xuenan; Kimata, Isao; Iseki, Motohiro; Kodama, Yoshikatsu; Nagane, Noriko; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Yasunobu; Mikami, Takeshi; Otsuka, Haruki

    2003-04-01

    In order to develop a vaccine against cryptosporidiosis in cattle, we constructed a recombinant bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) expressing an immunodominant surface protein, p23, of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites. In the recombinant virus, the p23 gene under the control of a CAG promoter and a gene coding for an enhanced green fluorescent protein were integrated into the gG gene of BHV-1. Despite a low frequency of homologous recombination, cloning of the recombinants was easy because of the specific fluorescence of the plaques formed by recombinants. These plaques were among the plaques of the nonfluorescent parental virus. All clones selected for fluorescence also contained the p23 gene. In MDBK cells infected with the recombinant BHV-1, the antibody against the p23 protein recognized the p23 protein as an approximately 23-kDa specific band in Western blotting analysis. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant produced IgG against the p23 protein. It was also demonstrated that the sera of immunized rabbits reduced infection of C. parvum sporozoites in HCT-8 cells. The serum of an immunized rabbit reduced infection compared with the normal rabbit serum control. These results indicate that the recombinant BHV-1 induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. PMID:12760641

  7. Viral Interactions with PDZ Domain-Containing Proteins-An Oncogenic Trait?

    PubMed

    James, Claire D; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Many of the human viruses with oncogenic capabilities, either in their natural host or in experimental systems (hepatitis B and C, human T cell leukaemia virus type 1, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, human immunodeficiency virus, high-risk human papillomaviruses and adenovirus type 9), encode in their limited genome the ability to target cellular proteins containing PSD95/ DLG/ZO-1 (PDZ) interaction modules. In many cases (but not always), the viruses have evolved to bind the PDZ domains using the same short linear peptide motifs found in host protein-PDZ interactions, and in some cases regulate the interactions in a similar fashion by phosphorylation. What is striking is that the diverse viruses target a common subset of PDZ proteins that are intimately involved in controlling cell polarity and the structure and function of intercellular junctions, including tight junctions. Cell polarity is fundamental to the control of cell proliferation and cell survival and disruption of polarity and the signal transduction pathways involved is a key event in tumourigenesis. This review focuses on the oncogenic viruses and the role of targeting PDZ proteins in the virus life cycle and the contribution of virus-PDZ protein interactions to virus-mediated oncogenesis. We highlight how many of the viral associations with PDZ proteins lead to deregulation of PI3K/AKT signalling, benefitting virus replication but as a consequence also contributing to oncogenesis. PMID:26797638

  8. Bovine herpesvirus 1 tegument protein VP22 interacts with histones, and the carboxyl terminus of VP22 is required for nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Harms, J S; Splitter, G A

    2001-09-01

    The bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) UL49 gene encodes a viral tegument protein termed VP22. UL49 homologs are conserved among alphaherpesviruses. Interestingly, the BHV-1 VP22 deletion mutant virus is asymptomatic and avirulent in infected cattle but produces only a slight reduction in titer in vitro. Attenuation of the BHV-1 VP22 deletion mutant virus in vivo suggests that VP22 plays a functional role in BHV-1 replication. In herpes simplex virus type 1, the VP22 homolog was previously shown to interact with another tegument protein,VP16, the alpha-transinducing factor in vitro. In this report, we show that (i) the nuclear targeting of VP22 is independent of other viral factors, (ii) the carboxyl terminus of VP22 is required for its nuclear localization, (iii) VP22 associates with histones and nucleosomes, (iv) an antihistone monoclonal antibody cross-reacts with VP22, and (v) acetylation of histone H4 is decreased in VP22-expressing cells as well as virus-infected cells. Our data suggest that VP22 may have a modulatory function during BHV-1 infection. PMID:11483770

  9. Structures and Mechanisms of Viral Membrane Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith M.; Delos, Sue E.; Brecher, Matthew; Schornberg, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Recent work has identified three distinct classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria. In addition, there are at least four distinct mechanisms by which viral fusion proteins can be triggered to undergo fusion-inducing conformational changes. Viral fusion proteins also contain different types of fusion peptides and vary in their reliance on accessory proteins. These differing features combine to yield a rich diversity of fusion proteins. Yet despite this staggering diversity, all characterized viral fusion proteins convert from a fusion-competent state (dimers or trimers, depending on the class) to a membrane-embedded homotrimeric prehairpin, and then to a trimer-of-hairpins that brings the fusion peptide, attached to the target membrane, and the transmembrane domain, attached to the viral membrane, into close proximity thereby facilitating the union of viral and target membranes. During these conformational conversions, the fusion proteins induce membranes to progress through stages of close apposition, hemifusion, and then the formation of small, and finally large, fusion pores. Clearly, highly divergent proteins have converged on the same overall strategy to mediate fusion, an essential step in the life cycle of every enveloped virus. PMID:18568847

  10. Propranolol Decreases Proliferation of Endothelial Cells Transformed by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and Induces Lytic Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Ryan S.; Manion, Rory D.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is common in Africa, but economic constraints hinder successful treatment in most patients. Propranolol, a generic β-adrenergic antagonist, decreased proliferation of KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected cells. Downregulation of cyclin A2 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) recapitulated this phenotype. Additionally, propranolol induced lytic gene expression in association with downregulation of CDK6. Thus, propranolol has diverse effects on KSHV-infected cells, and this generic drug has potential as a therapeutic agent for KS. PMID:26269192

  11. Effect of viral dose on experimental pneumonia caused by aerosol exposure of calves to bovine herpesvirus 1 and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W D; Jericho, K W; Doige, C E

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various aerosol doses of bovine herpesvirus 1, followed four days later by aerosol exposure to a constant level of Pasteurella haemolytica, was studied in 16 crossbred Hereford range calves. A Collision nebulizer was used to generate aerosols from virus suspensions with concentrations of 10(8.2) (high), 10(5.2) (moderate) or 10(2.2) (low) TCID50/mL. The bacterial suspension contained 10(7) colony forming units/mL. Control calves exposed only to P. haemolytica developed no pulmonary lesions. Calves in the low, moderate and high virus exposure groups developed lobular areas of atelectasis; in addition, one calf in the moderate and all four in the high virus exposure group developed fibrinous pneumonia. One of the latter calves died. The 50% effective dose for fibrinous pneumonia under these experimental conditions was 10(6.0) TCID50 bovine herpesvirus 1/mL of suspension in the nebulizer reservoir, and approximately 10(4.0) infectious units inhaled per calf. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6299485

  12. Identification and initial characterization of the IR6 protein of equine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, D J; Colle, C F; Flowers, C C; Smith, R H; Benoit, J N; Bigger, C A

    1994-09-01

    The IR6 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is a novel gene that maps within each inverted repeat (IR), encodes a potential protein of 272 amino acids, and is expressed as a 1.2-kb RNA whose synthesis begins at very early times (1.5 h) after infection and continues throughout the infection cycle (C. A. Breeden, R. R. Yalamanchili, C.F. Colle, and D.J. O'Callaghan, Virology 191:649-660,1992). To identify the IR6 protein and ascertain its properties, we generated an IR6-specific polyclonal antiserum to a TrpE/IR6 fusion protein containing 129 amino acids (residues 134 to 262) of the IR6 protein. This antiserum immunoprecipitated a 33-kDa protein generated by in vitro translation of mRNA transcribed from a pGEM construct (IR6/pGEM-3Z) that contains the entire IR6 open reading frame. The anti-IR6 antibody also recognized an infected-cell protein of approximately 33 kDa that was expressed as early as 1 to 2 h postinfection and was synthesized throughout the infection cycle. A variety of biochemical analyses including radiolabeling the IR6 protein with oligosaccharide precursors, translation of IR6 mRNA in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes, radiolabeling the IR6 protein in the presence of tunicamycin, and pulse-chase labeling experiments indicated that the two potential sites for N-linked glycosylation were not used and that the IR6 protein does not enter the secretory pathway. To address the possibility that the unique IR6 gene encodes a novel regulatory protein, we transiently transfected an IR6 expression construct into L-M fibroblasts alone or with an immediate-early gene expression construct along with a representative EHV-1 immediate-early, early, or late promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct. The results indicated that the IR6 protein does not affect the expression of these representative promoter constructs. Interestingly, the IR6 protein was shown to be phosphorylated and to associate with purified EHV-1 virions and

  13. Identification and initial characterization of the IR6 protein of equine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, D J; Colle, C F; Flowers, C C; Smith, R H; Benoit, J N; Bigger, C A

    1994-01-01

    The IR6 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is a novel gene that maps within each inverted repeat (IR), encodes a potential protein of 272 amino acids, and is expressed as a 1.2-kb RNA whose synthesis begins at very early times (1.5 h) after infection and continues throughout the infection cycle (C. A. Breeden, R. R. Yalamanchili, C.F. Colle, and D.J. O'Callaghan, Virology 191:649-660,1992). To identify the IR6 protein and ascertain its properties, we generated an IR6-specific polyclonal antiserum to a TrpE/IR6 fusion protein containing 129 amino acids (residues 134 to 262) of the IR6 protein. This antiserum immunoprecipitated a 33-kDa protein generated by in vitro translation of mRNA transcribed from a pGEM construct (IR6/pGEM-3Z) that contains the entire IR6 open reading frame. The anti-IR6 antibody also recognized an infected-cell protein of approximately 33 kDa that was expressed as early as 1 to 2 h postinfection and was synthesized throughout the infection cycle. A variety of biochemical analyses including radiolabeling the IR6 protein with oligosaccharide precursors, translation of IR6 mRNA in the presence of canine pancreatic microsomes, radiolabeling the IR6 protein in the presence of tunicamycin, and pulse-chase labeling experiments indicated that the two potential sites for N-linked glycosylation were not used and that the IR6 protein does not enter the secretory pathway. To address the possibility that the unique IR6 gene encodes a novel regulatory protein, we transiently transfected an IR6 expression construct into L-M fibroblasts alone or with an immediate-early gene expression construct along with a representative EHV-1 immediate-early, early, or late promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct. The results indicated that the IR6 protein does not affect the expression of these representative promoter constructs. Interestingly, the IR6 protein was shown to be phosphorylated and to associate with purified EHV-1 virions and

  14. Viral and host control of cytomegalovirus maturation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ritesh; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2012-01-01

    Maturation in herpesviruses initiates in the nucleus of the infected cell with encapsidation of viral DNA to form nucleocapsids and concludes with envelopment in the cytoplasm to form infectious virions that egress the cell. The entire process of virus maturation is orchestrated by protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities of viral and host origin. Viral tegument proteins play important roles in maintaining the structural stability of capsids and directing the acquisition of virus envelope. Envelopment occurs at modified host membranes and exploits host vesicular trafficking. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and concepts in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) maturation and their parallels in other herpesviruses with an emphasis on viral and host factors regulating this process. PMID:22633075

  15. Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Induces HO-1 during De Novo Infection of Endothelial Cells via Viral miRNA-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Botto, Sara; Totonchy, Jennifer E.; Gustin, Jean K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi sarcoma (KS) herpesvirus (KSHV) infection of endothelial cells (EC) is associated with strong induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a stress-inducible host gene that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for heme catabolism. KS is an angioproliferative tumor characterized by the proliferation of KSHV-infected spindle cells, and HO-1 is highly expressed in such cells. HO-1 converts the pro-oxidant, proinflammatory heme molecule into metabolites with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and proliferative activities. Previously published work has shown that KSHV-infected EC in vitro proliferate in response to free heme in a HO-1-dependent manner, thus implicating virus-enhanced HO-1 activity in KS tumorigenesis. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying KSHV induction of HO-1 in lymphatic EC (LEC), which are the likely spindle cell precursors. In a time course analysis of KSHV-infected cells, HO-1 expression displays biphasic kinetics characterized by an early transient induction that is followed by a more sustained upregulation coincident with the establishment of viral latency. A viral microRNA miR-K12-11 deletion mutant of KSHV was found to be defective for induction of HO-1 during latency. A potential mechanism for this phenotype was provided by BACH1, a cellular HO-1 transcriptional repressor targeted by miR-K12-11. In fact, in KSHV-infected LEC, the BACH1 message level is reduced, BACH1 subcellular localization is altered, and miR-K12-11 mediates the inverse regulation of HO-1 and BACH1 during viral latency. Interestingly, the data indicate that neither miR-K12-11 nor de novo KSHV gene expression is required for the burst of HO-1 expression observed at early times postinfection, which suggests that additional virion components promote this phenotype. PMID:26045540

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Antibodies to five Simian Viruses in Nonhuman Primates using Recombinant Viral Protein Based Multiplex Microbead ImmunoAssays

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qi; Guo, Huishan; Tang, Min; Touzjian, Neal; Lerche, Nicholas W.; Lu, Yichen; Yee, JoAnn L.

    2011-01-01

    Routine screening for infectious agents is critical in establishing and maintaining specific pathogen free (SPF) nonhuman primate (NHP) colonies. More efficient, higher throughput, less costly reagent, and reduced sample consumption multiplex microbead immunoassays (MMIAs) using purified viral lysates have been developed previously to address some disadvantages of the traditional individual enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. To overcome some of the technical and biosafety difficulties in preparing antigens from live viruses for viral lysate protein based MMIAs, novel MMIAs using recombinant glycoprotein D precursor (gD) protein of herpesvirus B and four viral gag proteins of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV), Simian T Cell Lymphotropic Virus (STLV), Simian Foamy Virus (SFV) and Simian Betaretrovirus (SRV) as antigens have been developed in the current study. The data showed that the recombinant viral protein based MMIAs detected simultaneously antibodies to each of these five viruses with high sensitivity and specificity, and correlated well with viral lysate based MMIAs. Therefore, recombinant viral protein based MMIA is an effective and efficient routine screening method to determine the infection status of nonhuman primates. PMID:21945221

  17. Illuminating structural proteins in viral "dark matter" with metaproteomics.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Ignacio-Espinoza, J Cesar; Kim, Eun-Hae; Trubl, Gareth; Jones, Robert M; Roux, Simon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Rich, Virginia I; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-03-01

    Viruses are ecologically important, yet environmental virology is limited by dominance of unannotated genomic sequences representing taxonomic and functional "viral dark matter." Although recent analytical advances are rapidly improving taxonomic annotations, identifying functional dark matter remains problematic. Here, we apply paired metaproteomics and dsDNA-targeted metagenomics to identify 1,875 virion-associated proteins from the ocean. Over one-half of these proteins were newly functionally annotated and represent abundant and widespread viral metagenome-derived protein clusters (PCs). One primarily unannotated PC dominated the dataset, but structural modeling and genomic context identified this PC as a previously unidentified capsid protein from multiple uncultivated tailed virus families. Furthermore, four of the five most abundant PCs in the metaproteome represent capsid proteins containing the HK97-like protein fold previously found in many viruses that infect all three domains of life. The dominance of these proteins within our dataset, as well as their global distribution throughout the world's oceans and seas, supports prior hypotheses that this HK97-like protein fold is the most abundant biological structure on Earth. Together, these culture-independent analyses improve virion-associated protein annotations, facilitate the investigation of proteins within natural viral communities, and offer a high-throughput means of illuminating functional viral dark matter. PMID:26884177

  18. Illuminating structural proteins in viral "dark matter" with metaproteomics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brum, Jennifer R.; Ignacio-Espinoza, J. Cesar; Kim, Eun -Hae; Trubl, Gareth; Jones, Robert M.; Roux, Simon; Verberkmoes, Nathan C.; Rich, Virginia I.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2016-02-16

    Viruses are ecologically important, yet environmental virology is limited by dominance of unannotated genomic sequences representing taxonomic and functional "viral dark matter." Although recent analytical advances are rapidly improving taxonomic annotations, identifying functional darkmatter remains problematic. Here, we apply paired metaproteomics and dsDNA-targeted metagenomics to identify 1,875 virion-associated proteins from the ocean. Over one-half of these proteins were newly functionally annotated and represent abundant and widespread viral metagenome-derived protein clusters (PCs). One primarily unannotated PC dominated the dataset, but structural modeling and genomic context identified this PC as a previously unidentified capsid protein from multiple uncultivated tailed virus families. Furthermore,more » four of the five most abundant PCs in the metaproteome represent capsid proteins containing the HK97-like protein fold previously found in many viruses that infect all three domains of life. The dominance of these proteins within our dataset, as well as their global distribution throughout the world's oceans and seas, supports prior hypotheses that this HK97-like protein fold is the most abundant biological structure on Earth. Altogether, these culture-independent analyses improve virion-associated protein annotations, facilitate the investigation of proteins within natural viral communities, and offer a high-throughput means of illuminating functional viral dark matter.« less

  19. The A, B, Cs of Herpesvirus Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ritesh; Mocarski, Edward S.; Conway, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of herpesvirus nucleocapsids shares significant similarities with the assembly of tailed dsDNA bacteriophages; however, important differences exist. A unique feature of herpesviruses is the presence of different mature capsid forms in the host cell nucleus during infection. These capsid forms, referred to as A-, B-, and C-capsids, represent empty capsids, scaffold containing capsids and viral DNA containing capsids, respectively. The C-capsids are the closest in form to those encapsidated into mature virions and are considered precursors to infectious virus. The evidence supporting A- and B-capsids as either abortive forms or assembly intermediates has been lacking. Interaction of specific capsid forms with viral tegument proteins has been proposed to be a mechanism for quality control at the point of nuclear egress of mature particles. Here, we will review the available literature on these capsid forms and present data to debate whether A- and B-capsids play an important or an extraneous role in the herpesvirus life cycle. PMID:25730559

  20. Herpesvirus BACs: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Charles; Tang, Qiyi; Zhu, Hua

    2011-01-01

    The herpesviridae are a large family of DNA viruses with large and complicated genomes. Genetic manipulation and the generation of recombinant viruses have been extremely difficult. However, herpesvirus bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) that were developed approximately 10 years ago have become useful and powerful genetic tools for generating recombinant viruses to study the biology and pathogenesis of herpesviruses. For example, BAC-directed deletion mutants are commonly used to determine the function and essentiality of viral genes. In this paper, we discuss the creation of herpesvirus BACs, functional analyses of herpesvirus mutants, and future applications for studies of herpesviruses. We describe commonly used methods to create and mutate herpesvirus BACs (such as site-directed mutagenesis and transposon mutagenesis). We also evaluate the potential future uses of viral BACs, including vaccine development and gene therapy. PMID:21048927

  1. Experimental infection of European flat oyster Ostrea edulis with ostreid herpesvirus 1 microvar (OsHV-1μvar): Mortality, viral load and detection of viral transcripts by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    López Sanmartín, Monserrat; Power, Deborah M; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navas, José I; Batista, Frederico M

    2016-06-01

    Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections have been reported in several bivalve species. Mortality of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas spat has increased considerably in Europe since 2008 linked to the spread of a variant of OsHV-1 called μvar. In the present study we demonstrated that O. edulis juveniles can be infected by OsHV-1μvar when administered as an intramuscular injection. Mortality in the oysters injected with OsHV-1μvar was first detected 4 days after injection and reached 25% mortality at day 10. Moreover, the high viral load observed and the detection of viral transcripts by in situ hybridization in several tissues of dying oysters suggested that OsHV-1μvar was the cause of mortality in the O. edulis juveniles. This is therefore the first study to provide evidence about the pathogenicity of OsHV-1μvar in a species that does not belong to the Crassostrea genus. Additionally, we present a novel method to detect OsHV-1 transcripts in infected individuals' using in situ hybridization. PMID:26945849

  2. New insights into an X-traordinary viral protein

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Torsten; Bauby, Hélène; Hué, Stéphane; Malim, Michael H.; Goujon, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Vpx is a protein encoded by members of the HIV-2/SIVsmm and SIVrcm/SIVmnd-2 lineages of primate lentiviruses, and is packaged into viral particles. Vpx plays a critical role during the early steps of the viral life cycle and has been shown to counteract SAMHD1, a restriction factor in myeloid and resting T cells. However, it is becoming evident that Vpx is a multifunctional protein in that SAMHD1 antagonism is likely not its sole role. This review summarizes the current knowledge on this X-traordinary protein. PMID:24782834

  3. The Equine Herpesvirus 2 E1 Open Reading Frame Encodes a Functional Chemokine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Camarda, Grazia; Spinetti, Gaia; Bernardini, Giovanni; Mair, Catherine; Davis-Poynter, Nick; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Napolitano, Monica

    1999-01-01

    Several herpesviruses contain open reading frames (ORFs) that encode potential homologs of eucaryotic genes. Equine herpesvirus 2 (EHV-2) is a gammaherpesvirus related to other lymphotropic herpesviruses such as herpesvirus saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus. The E1 ORF of EHV-2, a G protein-coupled receptor homolog, shows 31 to 47% amino acid identity with known CC chemokine receptors. To investigate whether E1 may encode a functional receptor, we cloned the E1 ORF and expressed it in stably transfected cell lines. We report here the identification of the CC chemokine eotaxin as a functional ligand for the EHV-2 E1 receptor. Chemokines are likely to play a role in the regulation of immune functions in equine hosts during EHV-2 infection and, via interaction with E1, may affect viral replication and/or escape from immune responses. PMID:10559296

  4. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liming; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Hong; Yan, Shicui; Chen, Qingxiu; Zhang, Fuxian; Fang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsid proteins (VP5 and VP7), within VIBs in co-transfected or infected cells. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that NS80 could interact with each core protein respectively. In addition, we found that newly synthesized viral RNAs co-localized with VIBs. Furthermore, time-course analysis of viral structural proteins expression showed that the expression of NS80 was detected first, followed by the detection of inner shell protein VP3, and then of other inner-capsid proteins, suggesting that VIBs were essential for the formation of viral core frame or progeny virion. Moreover, knockdown of NS80 by shRNA not only inhibited the expression of aquareovirus structural proteins, but also inhibited viral infection. These results indicated that NS80-based VIBs were formed at earlier stage of infection, and NS80 was able to coordinate the expression of viral structural proteins and viral replication. PMID:25938226

  5. Development of a duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bovine herpesvirus 1 and bovine viral diarrhea virus in bovine follicular fluid.

    PubMed

    Marley, Mylissa S D; Givens, M Daniel; Galik, Patricia K; Riddell, Kay P; Stringfellow, David A

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for simultaneous detection of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type I and type II. Follicular fluid was collected from a BoHV-1 acutely infected heifer, a BVDV I persistently infected heifer, and from 10 ovaries recovered from an abattoir. Both the BoHV-1 and BVDV contaminated follicular fluid were diluted 1:5 to 1:10(7) using the pooled, abattoir-origin follicular fluid. Each dilution sample was analyzed using the duplex qPCR, virus isolation, reverse transcription-nested PCR (RT-nPCR), and BoHV-1 qPCR. The duplex qPCR was able to simultaneously detect BoHV-1 and BVDV I in the fluid diluted to 1:100 and 1:1000, respectively. These results corresponded with the reverse transcription-nested PCR and BoHV-1 qPCR. Therefore, the duplex qPCR might be used for quality assurance testing to identify these two viruses in cells, fluids and tissues collected from donor animals and used in reproductive technologies. PMID:18452983

  6. Human Oncogenic Herpesvirus and Post-translational Modifications - Phosphorylation and SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Campbell, Mel; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, especially viruses, evolve abilities to utilize cellular machineries to facilitate their survival and propagation. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), especially phosphorylation and SUMOylation, that reversibly modulate the function and interactions of target proteins are among the most important features in cell signaling pathways. PTM-dependent events also serve as one of the favorite targets for viruses. Among the seven unambiguous human oncogenic viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), human papillomavirus (HPV), Human T lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-1), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), two are herpesviruses. The life cycle of herpesviruses consists of latent and lytic phases and the rapid switch between these states includes global remodeling of the viral genome from heterochromatin-to-euchromatin. The balance between lytic replication and latency is essential for herpesvirus to maintain a persistent infection through a combination of viral propagation and evasion of the host immune response, which consequently may contribute to tumorigenesis. It is no surprise that the swift reversibility of PTMs, especially SUMOylation, a modification that epigenetically regulates chromatin structure, is a major hijack target of the host for oncogenic herpesviruses. In this brief review, we summarize the varied ways in which herpesviruses engage the host immune components through PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation and SUMOylation. PMID:27379086

  7. Human Oncogenic Herpesvirus and Post-translational Modifications – Phosphorylation and SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Campbell, Mel; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, especially viruses, evolve abilities to utilize cellular machineries to facilitate their survival and propagation. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), especially phosphorylation and SUMOylation, that reversibly modulate the function and interactions of target proteins are among the most important features in cell signaling pathways. PTM-dependent events also serve as one of the favorite targets for viruses. Among the seven unambiguous human oncogenic viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), human papillomavirus (HPV), Human T lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-1), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), two are herpesviruses. The life cycle of herpesviruses consists of latent and lytic phases and the rapid switch between these states includes global remodeling of the viral genome from heterochromatin-to-euchromatin. The balance between lytic replication and latency is essential for herpesvirus to maintain a persistent infection through a combination of viral propagation and evasion of the host immune response, which consequently may contribute to tumorigenesis. It is no surprise that the swift reversibility of PTMs, especially SUMOylation, a modification that epigenetically regulates chromatin structure, is a major hijack target of the host for oncogenic herpesviruses. In this brief review, we summarize the varied ways in which herpesviruses engage the host immune components through PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation and SUMOylation. PMID:27379086

  8. Studies on viral respiratory disease in laboratory cats. I. Isolation of feline herpesvirus and choice of proper disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Yagami, K; Ando, S; Omata, Y; Furukawa, T; Fukui, M

    1982-01-01

    In the laboratory cat colony consisted of 14 Korats and 8 Japanese native cats, the disease characterized by upper respiratory signs occurred. Seven cytopathogenic agents were isolated from the oropharyngeal swabs and necropsy materials of affected cats by means of inoculation to primary feline kidney cell cultures. One of the isolates (KS-1 strain) was identical with feline herpesvirus (FHV), and appeared to be a causal agent of the trouble. Properties of the KS-1 strain were in general agreement with the known strains of FHV. Serologic examination and clinical analysis suggested that Japanese native cats became carriers, re-excreted the virus and spread it to susceptible cats. Virucidal activities of several disinfectants against FHV, comparing with a feline calicivirus (FCV), were studied and the following conclusions reached: 1) Sodium hypochlorite, iodine complex, benzethonium chloride and chlorhexidine were effective against FHV at commonly used concentrations. 2) Among chemicals tested sodium hypochlorite was most effective against FCV and followed by iodine complex. 3) Benzethonium chloride and chlorhexidine had little efficacy against FCV at commonly used doses. PMID:6281040

  9. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Inhibits Gamma Interferon and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Katharina; Wies, Effi; Neipel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) carries four genes with homology to human interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). One of these IRFs, the viral interferon regulatory factor 3 (vIRF-3), is expressed in latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells and required for their continuous proliferation. Moreover, vIRF-3 is known to be involved in modulation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. We now show that vIRF-3 also interferes with the type II interferon system and antigen presentation to the adaptive immune system. Starting with an analysis of the transcriptome, we show that vIRF-3 inhibits expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules: small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of vIRF-3 in KSHV-infected PEL cell lines resulted in increased MHC II levels; overexpression of vIRF-3 in KSHV-negative B cells leads to downmodulation of MHC II. This regulation could be traced back to inhibition of class II transactivator (CIITA) transcription by vIRF-3. Reporter assays revealed that the gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-sensitive CIITA promoters PIV and PIII were inhibited by vIRF-3. Consistently, IFN-γ levels increased upon vIRF-3 knockdown in PEL cells. IFN-γ regulation by vIRF-3 was confirmed in reporter assays as well as by upregulation of typical IFN-γ target genes upon knockdown of vIRF-3 in PEL cells. In summary, we conclude that vIRF-3 contributes to the viral immunoevasion by downregulation of IFN-γ and CIITA and thus MHC II expression. PMID:21345951

  10. Genomewide mapping and screening of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) 3' untranslated regions identify bicistronic and polycistronic viral transcripts as frequent targets of KSHV microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhiqiang; Huang, Yufei; Li, Wan; Zhu, Ying; Jung, Jae U; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes over 90 genes and 25 microRNAs (miRNAs). The KSHV life cycle is tightly regulated to ensure persistent infection in the host. In particular, miRNAs, which primarily exert their effects by binding to the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of target transcripts, have recently emerged as key regulators of KSHV life cycle. Although studies with RNA cross-linking immunoprecipitation approach have identified numerous targets of KSHV miRNAs, few of these targets are of viral origin because most KSHV 3'UTRs have not been characterized. Thus, the extents of viral genes targeted by KSHV miRNAs remain elusive. Here, we report the mapping of the 3'UTRs of 74 KSHV genes and the effects of KSHV miRNAs on the control of these 3'UTR-mediated gene expressions. This analysis reveals new bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts of KSHV genes. Due to the 5'-distal open reading frames (ORFs), KSHV bicistronic or polycistronic transcripts have significantly longer 3'UTRs than do KSHV monocistronic transcripts. Furthermore, screening of the 3'UTR reporters has identified 28 potential new targets of KSHV miRNAs, of which 11 (39%) are bicistronic or polycistronic transcripts. Reporter mutagenesis demonstrates that miR-K3 specifically targets ORF31-33 transcripts at the lytic locus via two binding sites in the ORF33 coding region, whereas miR-K10a-3p and miR-K10b-3p and their variants target ORF71-73 transcripts at the latent locus through distinct binding sites in both 5'-distal ORFs and intergenic regions. Our results indicate that KSHV miRNAs frequently target the 5'-distal coding regions of bicistronic or polycistronic transcripts and highlight the unique features of KSHV miRNAs in regulating gene expression and life cycle. PMID:24155407

  11. Alpha-herpesvirus infection induces the formation of nuclear actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Feierbach, Becket; Piccinotti, Silvia; Bisher, Margaret; Denk, Winfried; Enquist, Lynn W

    2006-08-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that replicate in the nuclei of infected cells. Spatial control of viral replication and assembly in the host nucleus is achieved by the establishment of nuclear compartments that serve to concentrate viral and host factors. How these compartments are established and maintained remains poorly understood. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is an alpha-herpesvirus often used to study herpesvirus invasion and spread in the nervous system. Here, we report that PRV and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of neurons results in formation of actin filaments in the nucleus. Filamentous actin is not found in the nucleus of uninfected cells. Nuclear actin filaments appear physically associated with the viral capsids, as shown by serial block-face scanning electron micropscopy and confocal microscopy. Using a green fluorescent protein-tagged viral capsid protein (VP26), we show that nuclear actin filaments form prior to capsid assembly and are required for the efficient formation of viral capsid assembly sites. We find that actin polymerization dynamics (e.g., treadmilling) are not necessary for the formation of these sites. Green fluorescent protein-VP26 foci co-localize with the actin motor myosin V, suggesting that viral capsids travel along nuclear actin filaments using myosin-based directed transport. Viral transcription, but not viral DNA replication, is required for actin filament formation. The finding that infection, by either PRV or herpes simplex virus type 1, results in formation of nuclear actin filaments in neurons, and that PRV infection of an epithelial cell line results in a similar phenotype is evidence that F-actin plays a conserved role in herpesvirus assembly. Our results suggest a mechanism by which assembly domains are organized within infected cells and provide insight into how the viral infectious cycle and host actin cytoskeleton are integrated to promote the infection process. PMID:16933992

  12. Anti-Viral Antibody Profiling by High Density Protein Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wiktor, Peter; Kahn, Peter; Brunner, Al; Khela, Amritpal; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Yu, Xiaobo; Magee, Mitch; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Gibson, David; Rooney, Madeleine E; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections elicit anti-viral antibodies and have been associated with various chronic diseases. Detection of these antibodies can facilitate diagnosis, treatment of infection and understanding of the mechanisms of virus associated diseases. In this work, we assayed anti-viral antibodies using a novel high density-nucleic acid programmable protein array (HD-NAPPA) platform. Individual viral proteins were expressed in situ directly from plasmids encoding proteins in an array of microscopic reaction chambers. Quality of protein display and serum response was assured by comparing intra- and inter- array correlation within or between printing batches with average correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. HD-NAPPA showed higher signal to background (S/B) ratio compared with standard NAPPA on planar glass slides and ELISA. Antibody responses to 761 antigens from 25 different viruses were profiled among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common as well as unique antibody reactivity patterns were detected between patients and healthy controls. We believe HD-viral-NAPPA will enable the study of host-pathogen interactions at unprecedented dimensions and elucidate the role of pathogen infections in disease development. PMID:25758251

  13. Discovery of host-viral protein complexes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Rowles, Daniell L.; Terhune, Scott S.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viruses have co-evolved with their hosts, developing effective approaches for hijacking and manipulating host cellular processes. Therefore, for their efficient replication and spread, viruses depend on dynamic and temporally-regulated interactions with host proteins. The rapid identification of host proteins targeted by viral proteins during infection provides significant insights into mechanisms of viral protein function. The resulting discoveries often lead to unique and innovative hypotheses on viral protein function. Here, we describe a robust method for identifying virus-host protein interactions and protein complexes, which we have successfully utilized to characterize spatial-temporal protein interactions during infections with either DNA or RNA viruses, including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), pseudorabies virus (PRV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), Sindbis, and West Nile virus (WNV). This approach involves cryogenic cell lysis, rapid immunoaffinity purification targeting a virus or host protein, followed by identification of associated proteins using mass spectrometry. Like most proteomic approaches, this methodology has evolved over the past few years and continues to evolve. We are presenting here the updated approaches for each step, and discuss alternative strategies allowing for the protocol to be optimized for different biological systems. PMID:23996249

  14. [Vaccine application of recombinant herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, N; Xuan, X; Mikami, T

    2000-04-01

    Recently, genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques has been applied to design new viral vaccines in order to reduce some problems which the present viral vaccines have. Up to now, many viruses have been investigated for development of recombinant attenuated vaccines or live viral vectors for delivery of foreign genes coding immunogenic antigens. In this article, we introduced the new vaccine strategy using genetically engineered herpesviruses. PMID:10774221

  15. Actin in Herpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kari L.; Baines, Joel D.

    2011-01-01

    Actin is important for a variety of cellular processes, including uptake of extracellular material and intracellular transport. Several emerging lines of evidence indicate that herpesviruses exploit actin and actin-associated myosin motors for viral entry, intranuclear transport of capsids, and virion egress. The goal of this review is to explore these processes and to highlight potential future directions for this area of research. PMID:21994736

  16. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus noncoding polyadenylated nuclear RNA interacts with virus- and host cell-encoded proteins and suppresses expression of genes involved in immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Pari, Gregory S

    2011-12-01

    During lytic infection, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses a polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). This noncoding RNA (ncRNA) is localized to the nucleus and is the most abundant viral RNA during lytic infection; however, to date, the role of PAN RNA in the virus life cycle is unknown. Many examples exist where ncRNAs have a defined key regulatory function controlling gene expression by various mechanisms. Our goal for this study was to identify putative binding partners for PAN RNA in an effort to elucidate a possible function for the transcript in KSHV infection. We employed an in vitro affinity protocol where PAN RNA was used as bait for factors present in BCBL-1 cell nuclear extract to show that PAN RNA interacts with several virus- and host cell-encoded factors, including histones H1 and H2A, mitochondrial and cellular single-stranded binding proteins (SSBPs), and interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). RNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed that PAN RNA interacted with these factors in the infected cell environment. A luciferase reporter assay showed that PAN RNA expression interfered with the ability of IRF4/PU.1 to activate the interleukin-4 (IL-4) promoter, strongly suggesting a role for PAN RNA in immune modulation. Since the proteomic screen and functional data suggested a role in immune responses, we investigated if constitutive PAN RNA expression could affect other genes involved in immune responses. PAN RNA expression decreased expression of gamma interferon, interleukin-18, alpha interferon 16, and RNase L. These data strongly suggest that PAN RNA interacts with viral and cellular proteins and can function as an immune modulator. PMID:21957289

  17. Animal models of tumorigenic herpesviruses--an update.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Dirk P; Damania, Blossom; Sin, Sang-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    Any one model system, be it culture or animal, only recapitulates one aspect of the viral life cycle in the human host. By providing recent examples of animal models for Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, we would argue that multiple animal models are needed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis associated with human oncogenic herpesviruses. Transgenic mice, homologous animal herpesviruses, and tumorgraft and humanized mouse models all complement each other in the study of viral pathogenesis. The use of animal model systems facilitates the exploration of novel anti-viral and anti-cancer treatment modalities for diseases associated with oncogenic herpesviruses. PMID:26476352

  18. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection. PMID:26669819

  19. Equine Herpesvirus 1 Multiply Inserted Transmembrane Protein pUL43 Cooperates with pUL56 in Downregulation of Cell Surface Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Teng; Ma, Guanggang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesviruses have evolved an array of strategies to counteract antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I). Previously, we identified pUL56 of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) as one major determinant of the downregulation of cell surface MHC-I (G. Ma, S. Feineis, N. Osterrieder, and G. R. Van de Walle, J. Virol. 86:3554–3563, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06994-11; T. Huang, M. J. Lehmann, A. Said, G. Ma, and N. Osterrieder, J. Virol. 88:12802–12815, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02079-14). Since pUL56 was able to exert its function only in the context of virus infection, we hypothesized that pUL56 cooperates with another viral protein. Here, we generated and screened a series of EHV-1 single-gene deletion mutants and found that the pUL43 orthologue was required for downregulation of cell surface MHC-I expression at the same time of infection as when pUL56 exerts its function. We demonstrate that the absence of pUL43 was not deleterious to virus growth and that expression of pUL43 was detectable from 2 h postinfection (p.i.) but decreased after 8 h p.i. due to lysosomal degradation. pUL43 localized within Golgi vesicles and required a unique hydrophilic N-terminal domain to function properly. Finally, coexpression of pUL43 and pUL56 in transfected cells reduced the cell surface expression of MHC-I. This process was dependent on PPxY motifs present in pUL56, suggesting that late domains are required for pUL43- and pUL56-dependent sorting of MHC class I for lysosomal degradation. IMPORTANCE We describe here that the poorly characterized herpesviral protein pUL43 is involved in downregulation of cell surface MHC-I. pUL43 is an early protein and degraded in lysosomes. pUL43 resides in the Golgi vesicles and needs an intact N terminus to induce MHC-I downregulation in infected cells. Importantly, pUL43 and pUL56 cooperate to reduce MHC-I expression on the surface of transfected cells. Our results suggest a model for

  20. Theoretical studies of viral capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Phelps, D K; Speelman, B; Post, C B

    2000-04-01

    Recent results in structural biology and increases in computer power have prompted initial theoretical studies on capsids of nonenveloped icosahedral viruses. The macromolecular assembly of 60 to 180 protein copies into a protein shell results in a structure of considerable size for molecular dynamics simulations. Nonetheless, progress has been made in examining these capsid assemblies from molecular dynamics calculations and kinetic models. The goals of these studies are to understand capsid function and structural properties, including quarternary structural stability, effects of antiviral compounds that bind the capsid and the self-assembly process. The insight that can be gained from the detailed information provided by simulations is demonstrated in studies of human rhinovirus; an entropic basis for the antiviral activity of hydrophobic compounds, predicted from calculated compressibility values, has been corroborated by experimental measurements on poliovirus. PMID:10753813

  1. Epstein-Barr Viral BNLF2a Protein Hijacks the Tail-anchored Protein Insertion Machinery to Block Antigen Processing by the Transport Complex TAP*

    PubMed Central

    Wycisk, Agnes I.; Lin, Jiacheng; Loch, Sandra; Hobohm, Kathleen; Funke, Jessica; Wieneke, Ralph; Koch, Joachim; Skach, William R.; Mayerhofer, Peter U.; Tampé, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Virus-infected cells are eliminated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which recognize viral epitopes displayed on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules at the cell surface. Herpesviruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to escape this immune surveillance. During the lytic phase of EBV infection, the viral factor BNLF2a interferes with antigen processing by preventing peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Here we reveal details of the inhibition mechanism of this EBV protein. We demonstrate that BNLF2a acts as a tail-anchored protein, exploiting the mammalian Asna-1/WRB (Get3/Get1) machinery for posttranslational insertion into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, where it subsequently blocks antigen translocation by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). BNLF2a binds directly to the core TAP complex arresting the ATP-binding cassette transporter in a transport-incompetent conformation. The inhibition mechanism of EBV BNLF2a is distinct and mutually exclusive of other viral TAP inhibitors. PMID:21984826

  2. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Baptiste; Gillet, Laurent; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections. PMID:26907323

  3. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Baptiste; Gillet, Laurent; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-02-01

    Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections. PMID:26907323

  4. Viral and host proteins that modulate filovirus budding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuliang; Harty, Ronald N

    2010-01-01

    The filoviruses, Ebola and Marburg, utilize a multifaceted mechanism for assembly and budding of infectious virions from mammalian cells. Growing evidence not only demonstrates the importance of multiple viral proteins for efficient assembly and budding, but also the exploitation of various host proteins/pathways by the virus during this late stage of filovirus replication, including endocytic compartments, vacuolar protein sorting pathways, ubiquitination machinery, lipid rafts and cytoskeletal components. Continued elucidation of these complex and orchestrated virus-host interactions will provide a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of filovirus assembly/budding and ultimately lead to the development of novel viral- and/or host-oriented therapeutics to inhibit filovirus egress and spread. This article will focus on the most recent studies on host interactions and modulation of filovirus budding and summarize the key findings from these investigations. PMID:20730024

  5. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (vIRF4) Perturbs the G1-S Cell Cycle Progression via Deregulation of the cyclin D1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Mitra, Jaba; Lee, Stacy; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee; Ha, Taekjip; Jung, Jae U

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection modulates the host cell cycle to create an environment optimal for its viral-DNA replication during the lytic life cycle. We report here that KSHV vIRF4 targets the β-catenin/CBP cofactor and blocks its occupancy on the cyclin D1 promoter, suppressing the G1-S cell cycle progression and enhancing KSHV replication. This shows that KSHV vIRF4 suppresses host G1-S transition, possibly providing an intracellular milieu favorable for its replication. PMID:26491150

  6. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Hong; Chen, Qingxiu; Zhang, Fuxian; Fang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1–471) of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection. PMID:26871941

  7. Large-scale adeno-associated viral vector production using a herpesvirus-based system enables manufacturing for clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Clément, Nathalie; Knop, David R; Byrne, Barry J

    2009-08-01

    The ability of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors to exhibit minimal immunogenicity and little to no toxicity or inflammation while eliciting robust, multiyear gene expression in vivo are only a few of the salient features that make them ideally suited for many gene therapy applications. A major hurdle for the use of rAAV in sizeable research and clinical applications is the lack of efficient and versatile large-scale production systems. Continued progression toward flexible, scalable production techniques is a prerequisite to support human clinical evaluation of these novel biotherapeutics. This review examines the current state of large-scale production methods that employ the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) platform to produce rAAV vectors for gene delivery. Improvements have substantially advanced the HSV/AAV hybrid method for large-scale rAAV manufacture, facilitating the generation of highly potent, clinical-grade purity rAAV vector stocks. At least one human clinical trial employing rAAV generated via rHSV helper-assisted replication is poised to commence, highlighting the advances and relevance of this production method. PMID:19569968

  8. Broad-Spectrum Allosteric Inhibition of Herpesvirus Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses rely on a homodimeric protease for viral capsid maturation. A small molecule, DD2, previously shown to disrupt dimerization of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protease (KSHV Pr) by trapping an inactive monomeric conformation and two analogues generated through carboxylate bioisosteric replacement (compounds 2 and 3) were shown to inhibit the associated proteases of all three human herpesvirus (HHV) subfamilies (α, β, and γ). Inhibition data reveal that compound 2 has potency comparable to or better than that of DD2 against the tested proteases. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a new application of the kinetic analysis developed by Zhang and Poorman [Zhang, Z. Y., Poorman, R. A., et al. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 15591–15594] show DD2, compound 2, and compound 3 inhibit HHV proteases by dimer disruption. All three compounds bind the dimer interface of other HHV proteases in a manner analogous to binding of DD2 to KSHV protease. The determination and analysis of cocrystal structures of both analogues with the KSHV Pr monomer verify and elaborate on the mode of binding for this chemical scaffold, explaining a newly observed critical structure–activity relationship. These results reveal a prototypical chemical scaffold for broad-spectrum allosteric inhibition of human herpesvirus proteases and an approach for the identification of small molecules that allosterically regulate protein activity by targeting protein–protein interactions. PMID:24977643

  9. Post-Translational Modifications of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Regulatory Proteins – SUMO and KSHV

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    KSHV latency can be envisioned as an outcome that is balanced between factors that promote viral gene expression and lytic replication against those that facilitate gene silencing and establish or maintain latency. A large body of work has focused on the activities of the key viral regulatory proteins involved in KSHV latent or lytic states. Moreover, recent studies have also begun to document the importance of epigenetic landscape evolution of the KSHV viral genome during latency and reactivation. However, one area of KSHV molecular virology that remains largely unanswered is the precise role of post-translational modifications on the activities of viral factors that function during latency and reactivation. In this review, we will summarize the post-translational modifications associated with three viral factors whose activities contribute to the viral state. The viral proteins discussed are the two major KSHV encoded transcription factors, K-Rta (KSHV replication and transcriptional activator) and K-bZIP (KSHV basic leucine zipper) and the viral latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). A special emphasis will be placed on the role of the sumoylation pathway in the modulation of the KSHV lifecycle. Newly uncovered small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-associated properties of LANA and K-Rta will also be presented, namely LANA histone targeting SUMO E3 ligase activity and K-Rta SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase function. PMID:22347876

  10. Uncovering Viral Protein-Protein Interactions and their Role in Arenavirus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; D’Antuono, Alejandra; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M.; López, Nora

    2012-01-01

    The Arenaviridae family includes widely distributed pathogens that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. Replication and packaging of their single-stranded RNA genome involve RNA recognition by viral proteins and a number of key protein-protein interactions. Viral RNA synthesis is directed by the virus-encoded RNA dependent-RNA polymerase (L protein) and requires viral RNA encapsidation by the Nucleoprotein. In addition to the role that the interaction between L and the Nucleoprotein may have in the replication process, polymerase activity appears to be modulated by the association between L and the small multifunctional Z protein. Z is also a structural component of the virions that plays an essential role in viral morphogenesis. Indeed, interaction of the Z protein with the Nucleoprotein is critical for genome packaging. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that binding between Z and the viral envelope glycoprotein complex is required for virion infectivity, and that Z homo-oligomerization is an essential step for particle assembly and budding. Efforts to understand the molecular basis of arenavirus life cycle have revealed important details on these viral protein-protein interactions that will be reviewed in this article. PMID:23170177

  11. Uncovering viral protein-protein interactions and their role in arenavirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M; López, Nora

    2012-09-01

    The Arenaviridae family includes widely distributed pathogens that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. Replication and packaging of their single-stranded RNA genome involve RNA recognition by viral proteins and a number of key protein-protein interactions. Viral RNA synthesis is directed by the virus-encoded RNA dependent-RNA polymerase (L protein) and requires viral RNA encapsidation by the Nucleoprotein. In addition to the role that the interaction between L and the Nucleoprotein may have in the replication process, polymerase activity appears to be modulated by the association between L and the small multifunctional Z protein. Z is also a structural component of the virions that plays an essential role in viral morphogenesis. Indeed, interaction of the Z protein with the Nucleoprotein is critical for genome packaging. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that binding between Z and the viral envelope glycoprotein complex is required for virion infectivity, and that Z homo-oligomerization is an essential step for particle assembly and budding. Efforts to understand the molecular basis of arenavirus life cycle have revealed important details on these viral protein-protein interactions that will be reviewed in this article. PMID:23170177

  12. The Tegument Protein pp65 of Human Cytomegalovirus Acts as an Optional Scaffold Protein That Optimizes Protein Uploading into Viral Particles

    PubMed Central

    Reyda, Sabine; Tenzer, Stefan; Navarro, Pedro; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Saur, Michael; Krauter, Steffi; Büscher, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms that lead to the tegumentation of herpesviral particles are only poorly defined. The phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) is the most abundant constituent of the virion tegument of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). It is, however, nonessential for virion formation. This seeming discrepancy has not met with a satisfactory explanation regarding the role of pp65 in HCMV particle morphogenesis. Here, we addressed the question of how the overall tegument composition of the HCMV virion depended on pp65 and how the lack of pp65 influenced the packaging of particular tegument proteins. To investigate this, we analyzed the proteomes of pp65-positive (pp65pos) and pp65-negative (pp65neg) virions by label-free quantitative mass spectrometry and determined the relative abundances of tegument proteins. Surprisingly, only pUL35 was elevated in pp65neg virions. As the abundance of pUL35 in the HCMV tegument is low, it is unlikely that it replaced pp65 as a structural component in pp65neg virions. A subset of proteins, including the third most abundant tegument protein, pUL25, as well as pUL43, pUL45, and pUL71, were reduced in pp65neg or pp65low virions, indicating that the packaging of these proteins was related to pp65. The levels of tegument components, like pp28 and the capsid-associated tegument proteins pp150, pUL48, and pUL47, were unaffected by the lack of pp65. Our analyses demonstrate that deletion of pp65 is not compensated for by other viral proteins in the process of virion tegumentation. The results are concordant with a model of pp65 serving as an optional scaffold protein that facilitates protein upload into the outer tegument of HCMV particles. IMPORTANCE The assembly of the tegument of herpesviruses is only poorly understood. Particular proteins, like HCMV pp65, are abundant tegument constituents. pp65 is thus considered to play a major role in tegument assembly in the process of virion morphogenesis. We show here that deletion of the pp65 gene leads to

  13. Molecular piracy: manipulation of the ubiquitin system by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Fujimuro, Masahiro; Hayward, S Diane; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitination, one of several post-translational protein modifications, plays a key role in the regulation of cellular events, including protein degradation, signal transduction, endocytosis, protein trafficking, apoptosis and immune responses. Ubiquitin attachment at the lysine residue of cellular factors acts as a signal for endocytosis and rapid degradation by the 26S proteasome. It has recently been observed that viruses, especially oncogenic herpesviruses, utilise molecular piracy by encoding their own proteins to interfere with regulation of cell signalling. Kaposi's sarcoma- associated herpesvirus (KSHV) manipulates the ubiquitin system to facilitate cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis and evasion from immunity. In this review, we will describe the strategies used by KSHV at distinct stages of the viral life-cycle to control the ubiquitin system and promote oncogenesis and viral persistence. PMID:17688306

  14. A Gateway recombination herpesvirus cloning system with negative selection that produces vectorless progeny.

    PubMed

    Kunec, Dusan; van Haren, Sandra; Burgess, Shane C; Hanson, Larry A

    2009-01-01

    Crossover recombination based on the lambda phage integration/excision functions enables insertion of a gene of interest into a specific locus by a simple one-step in vitro recombination reaction. Recently, a highly efficient recombination system for targeted mutagenesis, which utilizes lambda phage crossover recombination cloning, has been described for a human herpesvirus 2 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). The disadvantages of the system are that it allows only neutral selection (loss of green fluorescent protein) of desired recombinants and that it regenerates herpesvirus progeny containing the BAC sequence inserted in the herpesvirus genome. In this study, the existing channel catfish herpesvirus (CCV) infectious clone (in the form of overlapping fragments) was modified to allow introduction of foreign genes by modified lambda phage crossover recombination cloning. This novel system enables negative and neutral selection and regenerates vectorless herpesvirus progeny. Construction of two CCV mutants expressing lacZ, one from the native CCV ORF5 promoter and the other from the immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter, demonstrated the efficiency and reliability of this system. This novel cloning system enables rapid incorporation, direct delivery and high-level expression of foreign genes by a herpesvirus. This system has broad utility and could be used to facilitate development of recombinant viruses, viral vectors and better vaccines. PMID:18948138

  15. The Varicella-Zoster Virus Portal Protein Is Essential for Cleavage and Packaging of Viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Visalli, Melissa A.; House, Brittany L.; Selariu, Anca; Zhu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame 54 (ORF54) gene encodes an 87-kDa monomer that oligomerizes to form the VZV portal protein, pORF54. pORF54 was hypothesized to perform a function similar to that of a previously described herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) homolog, pUL6. pUL6 and the associated viral terminase are required for processing of concatemeric viral DNA and packaging of individual viral genomes into preformed capsids. In this report, we describe two VZV bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) constructs with ORF54 gene deletions, Δ54L (full ORF deletion) and Δ54S (partial internal deletion). The full deletion of ORF54 likely disrupted essential adjacent genes (ORF53 and ORF55) and therefore could not be complemented on an ORF54-expressing cell line (ARPE54). In contrast, Δ54S was successfully propagated in ARPE54 cells but failed to replicate in parental, noncomplementing ARPE19 cells. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of only empty VZV capsids in Δ54S-infected ARPE19 cell nuclei. Similar to the HSV-1 genome, the VZV genome is composed of a unique long region (UL) and a unique short region (US) flanked by inverted repeats. DNA from cells infected with parental VZV (VZVLUC strain) contained the predicted UL and US termini, whereas cells infected with Δ54S contained neither. This result demonstrates that Δ54S is not able to process and package viral DNA, thus making pORF54 an excellent chemotherapeutic target. In addition, the utility of BAC constructs Δ54L and Δ54S as tools for the isolation of site-directed ORF54 mutants was demonstrated by recombineering single-nucleotide changes within ORF54 that conferred resistance to VZV-specific portal protein inhibitors. IMPORTANCE Antivirals with novel mechanisms of action would provide additional therapeutic options to treat human herpesvirus infections. Proteins involved in the herpesviral DNA encapsidation process have become promising antiviral targets

  16. Serum amyloid A protein in acute viral infections.

    PubMed Central

    Miwata, H; Yamada, T; Okada, M; Kudo, T; Kimura, H; Morishima, T

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) were measured in 254 children with viral diseases, including measles, varicella, rubella, mumps, echo-30 meningitis, chronic hepatitis B and C, and in eight with Kawasaki disease. Latex agglutination nephelometric immunoassay was used for assaying SAA. In 191 out of 195 patients (98%), SAA concentrations became markedly raised in the acute phase of the viral disease: measles (97%), varicella (100%), mumps (95%), and echo-30 meningitis (99%) with mean titres of 82.4, 80.5, 60.2, 75.2, and 101.1 micrograms/ml respectively. This increase in SAA was followed by a rapid return to normal concentrations (< 5 micrograms/ml) during convalescence. Remarkably higher concentrations of SAA (mean 1630 micrograms/ml) were detected in the acute phase of patients with Kawasaki disease, but in most of the children with chronic hepatitis B or C, the titres of SAA remained normal. There was no close correlation between SAA and serum concentrations for alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, beta 2-microglobulin, transferrin, and IgG. There was a clear correlation between SAA and C reactive protein concentrations, although SAA showed a greater incremental change than C reactive protein in the acute phase. In the acute phase of these viral diseases, 56% of the patients had raised SAA concentrations (> or = 5 micrograms/ml) with normal C reactive protein concentrations (< 5 micrograms/ml). These results indicate that SAA could be useful as an inflammatory marker in children with acute viral infections. PMID:8481043

  17. Controlled Assembly of Viral Surface Proteins into Biological Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri

    In recent years, therapeutic use of engineered particles on the 1-1,000 nm scale has gained popularity; these nanoparticles have been developed for use in drug delivery, gene therapy, vaccine preparation, and diagnostics. Often, viral proteins are utilized in the design of such species, and outlined here are completed studies on the in vitro assembly of nanoparticles derived from two very different viral systems. The incorporation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein precursor gp160 into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs is discussed as a potential platform for vaccine design; efforts were successful, however yield currently limits the practical application of this approach. The utility of bacteriophage lambda procapsids and virus-like particles in therapeutic nanoparticle design is also outlined, as are efforts toward the structural and thermodynamic characterization of a urea-triggered capsid maturation event. It is demonstrated that lambda virus-like particles can be assembled from purified capsid and scaffolding proteins, and that these particles undergo urea-triggered maturation and in vitro decoration protein addition similar to that seen in lambda procapsids. The studies on lambda provided materials for the further development of nanoparticles potentially useful in a clinical setting, as well as shedding light on critical viral assembly and maturation events as they may take place in vivo.

  18. TDP-43 regulates endogenous retrovirus-K viral protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Manghera, Mamneet; Ferguson-Parry, Jennifer; Douville, Renée N

    2016-10-01

    The concomitant expression of neuronal TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and human endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) is a hallmark of ALS. Since the involvement of TDP-43 in retrovirus replication remains controversial, we sought to evaluate whether TDP-43 exerts an effect on ERVK expression. In this study, TDP-43 bound the ERVK promoter in the context of inflammation or proteasome inhibition, with no effect on ERVK transcription. However, over-expression of ALS-associated aggregating forms of TDP-43, but not wild-type TDP-43, significantly enhanced ERVK viral protein accumulation. Human astrocytes and neurons further demonstrated cell-type specific differences in their ability to express and clear ERVK proteins during inflammation and proteasome inhibition. Astrocytes, but not neurons, were able to clear excess ERVK proteins through stress granule formation and autophagy. In vitro findings were validated in autopsy motor cortex tissue from patients with ALS and neuro-normal controls. We further confirmed marked enhancement of ERVK in cortical neurons of patients with ALS. Despite evidence of enhanced stress granule and autophagic response in ALS cortical neurons, these cells failed to clear excess ERVK protein accumulation. This highlights how multiple cellular pathways, in conjunction with disease-associated mutations, can converge to modulate the expression and clearance of viral gene products from genomic elements such as ERVK. In ALS, ERVK protein aggregation is a novel aspect of TDP-43 misregulation contributing towards the pathology of this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27370226

  19. Cementing proteins provide extra mechanical stabilization to viral cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando-Pérez, M.; Lambert, S.; Nakatani-Webster, E.; Catalano, C. E.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    The study of virus shell stability is key not only for gaining insights into viral biological cycles but also for using viral capsids in materials science. The strength of viral particles depends profoundly on their structural changes occurring during maturation, whose final step often requires the specific binding of ‘decoration’ proteins (such as gpD in bacteriophage lambda) to the viral shell. Here we characterize the mechanical stability of gpD-free and gpD-decorated bacteriophage lambda capsids. The incorporation of gpD into the lambda shell imparts a major mechanical reinforcement that resists punctual deformations. We further interrogate lambda particle stability with molecular fatigue experiments that resemble the sub-lethal Brownian collisions of virus shells with macromolecules in crowded environments. Decorated particles are especially robust against collisions of a few kBT (where kB is the Boltzmann’s constant and T is the temperature ~300 K), which approximate those anticipated from molecular insults in the environment.

  20. Cementing proteins provide extra mechanical stabilization to viral cages.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Lambert, S; Nakatani-Webster, E; Catalano, C E; de Pablo, P J

    2014-01-01

    The study of virus shell stability is key not only for gaining insights into viral biological cycles but also for using viral capsids in materials science. The strength of viral particles depends profoundly on their structural changes occurring during maturation, whose final step often requires the specific binding of 'decoration' proteins (such as gpD in bacteriophage lambda) to the viral shell. Here we characterize the mechanical stability of gpD-free and gpD-decorated bacteriophage lambda capsids. The incorporation of gpD into the lambda shell imparts a major mechanical reinforcement that resists punctual deformations. We further interrogate lambda particle stability with molecular fatigue experiments that resemble the sub-lethal Brownian collisions of virus shells with macromolecules in crowded environments. Decorated particles are especially robust against collisions of a few kBT (where kB is the Boltzmann's constant and T is the temperature ~300 K), which approximate those anticipated from molecular insults in the environment. PMID:25072871

  1. Detection of human herpesvirus-6 in adult central nervous system tumors: predominance of early and late viral antigens in glial tumors.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John R; Santi, Maria Rita; Cornelison, Robbie; Sallinen, Satu-Leena; Haapasalo, Hannu; MacDonald, Tobey J

    2009-10-01

    The purpose is to determine the incidence of active and latent human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) infection in a large cohort of adult primary and recurrent CNS tumors. We screened a tissue microarray (TMA) containing more than 200 adult primary and recurrent CNS tumors with known clinical information for the presence of HHV-6 DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH) and protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC). One hundred six of 224 (47%) CNS tumors were positive for HHV-6 U57 Major Capsid Protein (MCP) gene by ISH compared to 0/25 non tumor control brain (P = 0.001). Fourteen of 30 (47%) tumors were HHV-6 MCP positive by nested PCR compared to 0/25 non-tumor brain controls (P = 0.001), revealing HHV-6 Variant A in 6 of 14 samples. HHV-6A/B early (p41) and late (gp116/64/54) antigens were detected by IHC in 66 of 277 (24%) (P = 0.003) and 84 of 282 (35%) (P = 0.002) tumors, respectively, suggesting active infection. HHV-6 p41 (P = 0.645) and gp116/64/54 (P = 0.198) antigen detection was independent of recurrent disease. Glial tumors were 3 times more positive by IHC compared to non glial tumors for both HHV-6 gp116/64/54 (P = 0.0002) and HHV-6 p41 (P = 0.004). Kaplan Meier survival analysis showed no effect of HHV-6 gp116/64/54 (P = 0.852) or HHV-6 p41 (P = 0.817) antigen detection on survival. HHV-6 early and late antigens are detected in adult primary and recurrent CNS tumors more frequently in glial tumors. We hypothesize that the glial-tropic features of HHV-6 may play an important modifying role in tumor biology that warrants further investigation. PMID:19424665

  2. Psychosocial modulation of antibody to Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen and human herpesvirus type-6 in HIV-1-infected and at-risk gay men.

    PubMed

    Esterling, B A; Antoni, M H; Schneiderman, N; Carver, C S; LaPerriere, A; Ironson, G; Klimas, N G; Fletcher, M A

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two behavioral interventions--aerobic exercise and cognitive behavioral stress management (CBSM)--on Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA) and human herpesvirus type-6 (HHV-6) antibody modulation in 65 asymptomatic gay men measured at several time points in the 5 weeks preceding and following notification of their human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) serostatus. After accounting for potential immunomodulatory confounds, we found that HIV-1 seropositive men had higher EBV-VCA antibody titers than those diagnosed as seronegative at every time point during the study; however, no significant differences were found with respect to HHV-6. Among HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative subjects, respectively, those randomized to either behavioral intervention had significant decreases in both EBV-VCA and HHV-6 antibody titers over the course of the intervention as compared with assessment-only controls (of HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative status) whose antibody titers did not significantly change and which remained consistently higher than either serostatus-matched intervention group over subsequent time points, independent of total immunoglobulin G levels and degree of polyclonal B cell activation. In attempting to explain serostatus differences in EBV and HHV-6 values, it was found that HIV-1 seropositive men had significantly lower CD4 cells, CD4:CD8 ratio, and blastogenic response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), as well as significantly higher CD8 cells at baseline. No significant differences were found between the HIV-1 seropositive and seronegative men with respect to anxiety and depression at baseline. Since the greatest changes in EBV and HHV-6 occurred between baseline and week 10, we correlated changes in immune (CD4, CD8, CD4:CD8 ratio, PHA stimulation) and distress-related markers (state depression and anxiety) with EBV and HHV-6 change scores over this time period. No significant correlations were found between any

  3. Transactivation of programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a viral protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhua; Treffers, Emmely E; Napthine, Sawsan; Tas, Ali; Zhu, Longchao; Sun, Zhi; Bell, Susanne; Mark, Brian L; van Veelen, Peter A; van Hemert, Martijn J; Firth, Andrew E; Brierley, Ian; Snijder, Eric J; Fang, Ying

    2014-05-27

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is a widely used translational mechanism facilitating the expression of two polypeptides from a single mRNA. Commonly, the ribosome interacts with an mRNA secondary structure that promotes -1 frameshifting on a homopolymeric slippery sequence. Recently, we described an unusual -2 frameshifting (-2 PRF) signal directing efficient expression of a transframe protein [nonstructural protein 2TF (nsp2TF)] of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from an alternative reading frame overlapping the viral replicase gene. Unusually, this arterivirus PRF signal lacks an obvious stimulatory RNA secondary structure, but as confirmed here, can also direct the occurrence of -1 PRF, yielding a third, truncated nsp2 variant named "nsp2N." Remarkably, we now show that both -2 and -1 PRF are transactivated by a protein factor, specifically a PRRSV replicase subunit (nsp1β). Embedded in nsp1β's papain-like autoproteinase domain, we identified a highly conserved, putative RNA-binding motif that is critical for PRF transactivation. The minimal RNA sequence required for PRF was mapped within a 34-nt region that includes the slippery sequence and a downstream conserved CCCANCUCC motif. Interaction of nsp1β with the PRF signal was demonstrated in pull-down assays. These studies demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that a protein can function as a transactivator of ribosomal frameshifting. The newly identified frameshifting determinants provide potential antiviral targets for arterivirus disease control and prevention. Moreover, protein-induced transactivation of frameshifting may be a widely used mechanism, potentially including previously undiscovered viral strategies to regulate viral gene expression and/or modulate host cell translation upon infection. PMID:24825891

  4. Structural basis of the herpesvirus M3-chemokine interaction.

    PubMed

    Alcami, Antonio

    2003-05-01

    Viruses have been fighting the immune systems of their hosts for millions of years and have evolved evasion strategies to ensure their survival. Viruses can teach us efficient mechanisms to control the immune system, and this information can be used to design new strategies of immune modulation that we might apply to diminish immunopathological responses that cause human diseases. Large DNA viruses, such as poxviruses and herpesviruses, encode proteins that are secreted from infected cells, bind cytokines and neutralize their activity. A subgroup of these viral proteins binds chemokines, a complex family of cytokines that control the recruitment of cells to sites of infection and inflammation. One of the major unresolved questions in the field was to understand how these viral secreted proteins bind chemokines with high affinity, despite having no amino acid sequence similarity to the host chemokine receptors, which are seven-transmembrane-domain proteins that cannot be engineered as soluble proteins. PMID:12781515

  5. Chemokine binding proteins: An immunomodulatory strategy going viral.

    PubMed

    González-Motos, Víctor; Kropp, Kai A; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel

    2016-08-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines whose main function is to direct cell migration. The chemokine network is highly complex and its deregulation is linked to several diseases including immunopathology, cancer and chronic pain. Chemokines also play essential roles in the antiviral immune response. Viruses have therefore developed several counter strategies to modulate chemokine activity. One of these is the expression of type I transmembrane or secreted proteins with the ability to bind chemokines and modulate their activity. These proteins, termed viral chemokine binding proteins (vCKBP), do not share sequence homology with host proteins and are immunomodulatory in vivo. In this review we describe the discovery and characterization of vCKBP, explain their role in the context of infection in vivo and discuss relevant novel findings. PMID:26987612

  6. Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Regulatory Proteins bICP0 and VP16 Are Readily Detected in Trigeminal Ganglionic Neurons Expressing the Glucocorticoid Receptor during the Early Stages of Reactivation from Latency

    PubMed Central

    Frizzo da Silva, Leticia; Kook, Insun; Doster, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) establishes a lifelong latent infection in sensory neurons following acute infection. Increased corticosteroid levels, due to stress, increases the incidence of reactivation from latency. Within minutes, corticosteroids activate the glucocorticoid receptor and transcription of promoters containing a glucocorticoid receptor element. A single intravenous injection of the synthetic corticosteroid dexamethasone consistently induces reactivation from latency in calves. Lytic cycle viral gene expression is detected within 6 h after dexamethasone treatment of calves latently infected with BHV-1. Cellular transcription factors are induced by dexamethasone in trigeminal ganglionic neurons within 1.5 h after dexamethasone treatment, suggesting they promote viral gene expression during the early phases of reactivation from latency, which we operationally defined as the escape from latency. In this study, immunohistochemistry was utilized to examine viral protein expression during the escape from latency. Within 1.5 h after dexamethasone treatment, bICP0 and a late protein (VP16) were consistently detected in a subset of trigeminal ganglionic neurons. Most neurons expressing bICP0 also expressed VP16. Additional studies revealed that neurons expressing the glucocorticoid receptor also expressed bICP0 or VP16 at 1.5 h after dexamethasone treatment. Two other late proteins, glycoprotein C and D, were not detected until 6 h after dexamethasone treatment and were detected in only a few neurons. These studies provide evidence that VP16 and the promiscuous viral trans-activator (bICP0) are expressed during the escape from latency, suggesting they promote the production of infectious virus in a small subset of latently infected neurons. PMID:23926348

  7. Bovine herpesvirus 1 regulatory proteins bICP0 and VP16 are readily detected in trigeminal ganglionic neurons expressing the glucocorticoid receptor during the early stages of reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    Frizzo da Silva, Leticia; Kook, Insun; Doster, Alan; Jones, Clinton

    2013-10-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) establishes a lifelong latent infection in sensory neurons following acute infection. Increased corticosteroid levels, due to stress, increases the incidence of reactivation from latency. Within minutes, corticosteroids activate the glucocorticoid receptor and transcription of promoters containing a glucocorticoid receptor element. A single intravenous injection of the synthetic corticosteroid dexamethasone consistently induces reactivation from latency in calves. Lytic cycle viral gene expression is detected within 6 h after dexamethasone treatment of calves latently infected with BHV-1. Cellular transcription factors are induced by dexamethasone in trigeminal ganglionic neurons within 1.5 h after dexamethasone treatment, suggesting they promote viral gene expression during the early phases of reactivation from latency, which we operationally defined as the escape from latency. In this study, immunohistochemistry was utilized to examine viral protein expression during the escape from latency. Within 1.5 h after dexamethasone treatment, bICP0 and a late protein (VP16) were consistently detected in a subset of trigeminal ganglionic neurons. Most neurons expressing bICP0 also expressed VP16. Additional studies revealed that neurons expressing the glucocorticoid receptor also expressed bICP0 or VP16 at 1.5 h after dexamethasone treatment. Two other late proteins, glycoprotein C and D, were not detected until 6 h after dexamethasone treatment and were detected in only a few neurons. These studies provide evidence that VP16 and the promiscuous viral trans-activator (bICP0) are expressed during the escape from latency, suggesting they promote the production of infectious virus in a small subset of latently infected neurons. PMID:23926348

  8. Herpesvirus systematics.

    PubMed

    Davison, Andrew J

    2010-06-16

    This paper is about the taxonomy and genomics of herpesviruses. Each theme is presented as a digest of current information flanked by commentaries on past activities and future directions. The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses recently instituted a major update of herpesvirus classification. The former family Herpesviridae was elevated to a new order, the Herpesvirales, which now accommodates 3 families, 3 subfamilies, 17 genera and 90 species. Future developments will include revisiting the herpesvirus species definition and the criteria used for taxonomic assignment, particularly in regard to the possibilities of classifying the large number of herpesviruses detected only as DNA sequences by polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequence accessions in primary databases, such as GenBank, consist of the sequences plus annotations of the genetic features. The quality of these accessions is important because they provide a knowledge base that is used widely by the research community. However, updating the accessions to take account of improved knowledge is essentially reserved to the original depositors, and this activity is rarely undertaken. Thus, the primary databases are likely to become antiquated. In contrast, secondary databases are open to curation by experts other than the original depositors, thus increasing the likelihood that they will remain up to date. One of the most promising secondary databases is RefSeq, which aims to furnish the best available annotations for complete genome sequences. Progress in regard to improving the RefSeq herpesvirus accessions is discussed, and insights into particular aspects of herpesvirus genomics arising from this work are reported. PMID:20346601

  9. Cholesterol-binding viral proteins in virus entry and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Up to now less than a handful of viral cholesterol-binding proteins have been characterized, in HIV, influenza virus and Semliki Forest virus. These are proteins with roles in virus entry or morphogenesis. In the case of the HIV fusion protein gp41 cholesterol binding is attributed to a cholesterol recognition consensus (CRAC) motif in a flexible domain of the ectodomain preceding the trans-membrane segment. This specific CRAC sequence mediates gp41 binding to a cholesterol affinity column. Mutations in this motif arrest virus fusion at the hemifusion stage and modify the ability of the isolated CRAC peptide to induce segregation of cholesterol in artificial membranes.Influenza A virus M2 protein co-purifies with cholesterol. Its proton translocation activity, responsible for virus uncoating, is not cholesterol-dependent, and the transmembrane channel appears too short for integral raft insertion. Cholesterol binding may be mediated by CRAC motifs in the flexible post-TM domain, which harbours three determinants of binding to membrane rafts. Mutation of the CRAC motif of the WSN strain attenuates virulence for mice. Its affinity to the raft-non-raft interface is predicted to target M2 protein to the periphery of lipid raft microdomains, the sites of virus assembly. Its influence on the morphology of budding virus implicates M2 as factor in virus fission at the raft boundary. Moreover, M2 is an essential factor in sorting the segmented genome into virus particles, indicating that M2 also has a role in priming the outgrowth of virus buds.SFV E1 protein is the first viral type-II fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol when the fusion peptide loop locks into the target membrane. Cholesterol binding is modulated by another, proximal loop, which is also important during virus budding and as a host range determinant, as shown by mutational studies. PMID:20213541

  10. Protective immunity in gibel carp, Carassius gibelio of the truncated proteins of cyprinid herpesvirus 2 expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Jiang, Nan; Ma, Jie; Fan, Yuding; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Jin; Zeng, Lingbing

    2015-12-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV-2) infection is a newly emerged infectious disease of farmed gibel carp (Carassius gibelio) in China and causes huge economic losses to the aquaculture industry. In this study, the three membrane proteins encoded by genes ORF25, ORF25C, and ORF25D of CyHV-2 were truncated and expressed in yeast, Pichia pastoris. Screening of the recombinant yeasts was done by detecting the truncated proteins using Western blot. Through immunogold labeling, it was shown that proteins binding the colloidal gold were presented on the surface of cells. In the experiment of inhibition of virus binding by the recombinant truncated proteins, the TCID50 of the tORF25 group (10(4.1)/ml) was lower than that of tORF25C (10(4.6)/ml) or tORF25D groups (10(5)/ml). These results suggested that the proteins may be involved in attachment of the virus to the cell surface. Healthy gibel carp were immunized with 20 μg of tORF25, tORF25C, and tORF25D proteins, and the control group received PBS. Interleukin 11 (IL-11) expression in the spleens of the immunized fish peaked at day 4 and the complement component C3 (C3) genes were significantly up-regulated at day 7 post-immunization. Specific antibodies were measured in the three immunized groups and the titer detected in the tORF25 group reached 327, that was significantly higher than the tORF25C (247) or tORF25D (228) groups. When the immunized fish were challenged with live CyHV-2 by intraperitoneal injection the relative percent survival (RPS) of the tORF25, tORF25C, and tORF25D immunized groups was 75%, 63%, and 54%, respectively. The feasibility of the P. pastoris yeast expression system for the production of the recombinant truncated proteins and their apparent bioactivity suggests that tORF25, tORF25C, and tORF25D are potential candidate vaccines against Cyprinid herpesvirus 2 infection in gibel carp. PMID:26564473

  11. Herpesvirus Entry into Host Cells Mediated by Endosomal Low pH.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Anthony V

    2016-09-01

    Herpesviral pathogenesis stems from infection of multiple cell types including the site of latency and cells that support lytic replication. Herpesviruses utilize distinct cellular pathways, including low pH endocytic pathways, to enter different pathophysiologically relevant target cells. This review details the impact of the mildly acidic milieu of endosomes on the entry of herpesviruses, with particular emphasis on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Epithelial cells, the portal of primary HSV-1 infection, support entry via low pH endocytosis mechanisms. Mildly acidic pH triggers reversible conformational changes in the HSV-1 class III fusion protein glycoprotein B (gB). In vitro treatment of herpes simplex virions with a similar pH range inactivates infectivity, likely by prematurely activating the viral entry machinery in the absence of a target membrane. How a given herpesvirus mediates both low pH and pH-independent entry events is a key unresolved question. PMID:27126894

  12. Human cytomegalovirus RL13 protein interacts with host NUDT14 protein affecting viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanping; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the host and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is important in determining the outcome of a viral infection. The HCMV RL13 gene product exerts independent, inhibitory effects on viral growth in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. At present, there are few reports on the interactions between the HCMV RL13 protein and human host proteins. The present study provided direct evidence for the specific interaction between HCMV RL13 and host nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X (nudix)‑type motif 14 (NUDT14), a UDP‑glucose pyrophosphatase, using two‑hybrid screening, an in vitro glutathione S‑transferase pull‑down assay, and co‑immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Additionally, the RL13 protein was shown to co‑localize with the NUDT14 protein in the HEK293 cell membrane and cytoplasm, demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Decreasing the expression level of NUDT14 via NUDT14‑specific small interfering RNAs increased the number of viral DNA copies in the HCMV‑infected cells. However, the overexpression of NUDT14 in a stably expressing cell line did not affect viral DNA levels significantly in the HCMV infected cells. Based on the known functions of NUDT14, the results of the present study suggested that the interaction between the RL13 protein and NUDT14 protein may be involved in HCMV DNA replication, and that NUDT14 may offer potential in the modulation of viral infection. PMID:26781650

  13. Evaluation of the immune response elicited by vaccination with viral vectors encoding FMDV capsid proteins and boosted with inactivated virus.

    PubMed

    Romanutti, Carina; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Palacios, Carlos; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Zamorano, Patricia; La Torre, Jose; Mattion, Nora

    2013-08-30

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of introducing a priming step with replication-defective viral vectors encoding the capsid proteins of FMDV, followed by a boost with killed virus vaccines, using a suitable BALB/c mice model. Additionally, the immune response to other combined vector immunization regimens was studied. For this purpose, we analyzed different prime-boost immunizations with recombinant adenovirus (Ad), herpesvirus amplicons (Hs) and/or killed virus (KV) vaccines. The highest antibody titers were found in the group that received two doses of adjuvanted KV (P<0.002). Antibody titers were higher in those groups receiving a mixed regimen of vectors, compared to immunization with either vector alone (P<0.0001). Priming with any of the viral vectors induced a shift of the cytokine balance toward a Th1 type immune response regardless of the delivery system used for boosting. The highest IgG1 titer was induced by two doses of adjuvanted KV (P=0.0002) and the highest IgG2a titer corresponded to the group primed with Ad and boosted with KV (P=0.01). Re-stimulation of all groups of mice with 0.5 μg of inactivated virus five months later resulted in a fast increase of antibody titers in all the groups tested. After virus stimulation, antibody titers in the groups that received KV alone or Ad prime-KV boost, were indistinguishable (P=0.800). Protection from challenge was similar (75%) in the groups of animals that received Ad prime-Hs boost or Ad prime-KV boost, or two doses of oil-adjuvanted KV. The data presented in this study suggest that sequential immunization with viral vectors-based vaccines combined with protein-based vaccines have the potential to enhance the quality of the immune response against FMDV. PMID:23683999

  14. In situ localization and tissue distribution of ostreid herpesvirus 1 proteins in infected Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Martenot, Claire; Segarra, Amélie; Baillon, Laury; Faury, Nicole; Houssin, Maryline; Renault, Tristan

    2016-05-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays were conducted on paraffin sections from experimentally infected spat and unchallenged spat produced in hatchery to determine the tissue distribution of three viral proteins within the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Polyclonal antibodies were produced from recombinant proteins corresponding to two putative membrane proteins and one putative apoptosis inhibitor encoded by ORF 25, 72, and 87, respectively. Results were then compared to those obtained by in situ hybridization performed on the same individuals, and showed a substantial agreement according to Landis and Koch numeric scale. Positive signals were mainly observed in connective tissue of gills, mantle, adductor muscle, heart, digestive gland, labial palps, and gonads of infected spat. Positive signals were also reported in digestive epithelia. However, few positive signals were also observed in healthy appearing oysters (unchallenged spat) and could be due to virus persistence after a primary infection. Cellular localization of staining seemed to be linked to the function of the viral protein targeted. A nucleus staining was preferentially observed with antibodies targeting the putative apoptosis inhibitor protein whereas a cytoplasmic localization was obtained using antibodies recognizing putative membrane proteins. The detection of viral proteins was often associated with histopathological changes previously reported during OsHV-1 infection by histology and transmission electron microscopy. Within the 6h after viral suspension injection, positive signals were almost at the maximal level with the three antibodies and all studied organs appeared infected at 28h post viral injection. Connective tissue appeared to be a privileged site for OsHV-1 replication even if positive signals were observed in the epithelium cells of different organs which may be interpreted as a hypothetical portal of entry or release for the virus. IHC constitutes a suited method for analyzing the

  15. The herpesvirus associated ubiquitin specific protease, USP7, is a negative regulator of PML proteins and PML nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Sarkari, Feroz; Wang, Xueqi; Nguyen, Tin; Frappier, Lori

    2011-01-01

    The PML tumor suppressor is the founding component of the multiprotein nuclear structures known as PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), which control several cellular functions including apoptosis and antiviral effects. The ubiquitin specific protease USP7 (also called HAUSP) is known to associate with PML-NBs and to be a tight binding partner of two herpesvirus proteins that disrupt PML NBs. Here we investigated whether USP7 itself regulates PML-NBs. Silencing of USP7 was found to increase the number of PML-NBs, to increase the levels of PML protein and to inhibit PML polyubiquitylation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. This effect of USP7 was independent of p53 as PML loss was observed in p53-null cells. PML-NBs disruption was induced by USP7 overexpression independently of its catalytic activity and was induced by either of the protein interaction domains of USP7, each of which localized to PML-NBs. USP7 also disrupted NBs formed from some single PML isoforms, most notably isoforms I and IV. CK2α and RNF4, which are known regulators of PML, were dispensable for USP7-associated PML-NB disruption. The results are consistent with a novel model of PML regulation where a deubiquitylase disrupts PML-NBs through recruitment of another cellular protein(s) to PML NBs, independently of its catalytic activity. PMID:21305000

  16. Functional dissection of latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus involved in latent DNA replication and transcription of terminal repeats of the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chunghun; Sohn, Hekwang; Lee, Daeyoup; Gwack, Yousang; Choe, Joonho

    2002-10-01

    Latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is implicated in the maintenance of the viral genome during latent infection. LANA1 colocalizes with KSHV episomes on the host chromosome and mediates their maintenance by attaching these viral structures to host chromosomes. Data from long-term selection of drug resistance in cells conferred by plasmids containing the terminal repeat (TR) sequence of KSHV revealed that KSHV TRs and LANA1 act as cis and trans elements of viral latent replication, respectively. In this study, we further characterized the cis- and trans-acting elements of KSHV latent replication by using a transient replication assay with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme, DpnI. Transient reporter and replication assays disclosed that the orientation and basal transcriptional activity of TR constructs did not significantly affect the efficiency of replication. However, at least two TR units were necessary for efficient replication. The N-terminal 90 amino acids comprising the chromosome-binding domain of LANA1 were required for the mediation of LANA1 C-terminal DNA-binding and dimerization domains to support the transient replication of KSHV TRs. LANA1 interacted with components of the origin recognition complexes (ORCs), similar to Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1. Our data suggest that LANA1 recruits ORCs to KSHV TRs for latent replication of the viral genome. PMID:12239308

  17. Use of Amplicon-6 Vectors Derived from Human Herpesvirus 6 for Efficient Expression of Membrane-Associated and -Secreted Proteins in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Ronen; Singer, Oded; Moseri, Adi; Frenkel, Niza

    2004-01-01

    The composite amplicon-6 vectors, which are derived from human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), can target hematopoietic cells. In the presence of the respective helper viruses, the amplicons are replicated by the rolling circle mechanism, yielding defective genomes of overall size 135 to 150 kb, composed of multiple repeats of units, containing the viral DNA replication origin, packaging signals, and the selected transgene(s). We report the use of amplicon-6 vectors designed for transgene expression in T cells. The selected transgenes included the green fluorescent protein marker, the herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D (gD), and the gD gene deleted in the transmembrane region (gDsec). The vectors were tested after electroporation and passage in T cells with or without helper HHV-6A superinfections. The results were as follows. (i)The vectors could be passaged both as cell-associated and as cell-free secreted virions infectious to new cells. (ii)The intact gD accumulated at the cell surface, whereas the gDsec was dispersed at internal locations of the cells or was secreted into the medium. (iii)Analyses of amplicon-6-gD expression by flow cytometry have shown significant expression in cultures with reiterated amplicons and helper viruses. The vector has spread to >60% of the cells, and the efficiency of expression per cell increased 15-fold, most likely due to the presence of concatemeric amplicon repeats. Current studies are designed to test whether amplicon-6 vectors can be used for gene therapy in lymphocytes and whether amplicon-6 vectors expressed in T cells and dendritic cells can induce strong cellular and humoral immune responses. PMID:15078955

  18. Inhibition of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation by gamma 2-herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, P G; Efstathiou, S; Doherty, P C; Lehner, P J

    2000-07-18

    The gamma-herpesviruses, in contrast to the alpha- and beta-herpesviruses, are not known to inhibit antigen presentation to CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during lytic cycle replication. However, murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 causes a chronic lytic infection in CD4(+) T cell-deficient mice despite the persistence of a substantial CTL response, suggesting that CTL evasion occurs. Here we show that, distinct from host protein synthesis shutoff, gamma-herpesvirus 68 down-regulates surface MHC class I expression on lytically infected fibroblasts and inhibits their recognition by antigen-specific CTLs. The viral K3 gene, encoding a zinc-finger-containing protein, dramatically reduced the half-life of nascent class I molecules and the level of surface MHC class I expression and was by itself sufficient to block antigen presentation. The homologous K3 and K5 genes of the related Kaposi's sarcoma-associated virus also inhibited antigen presentation and decreased cell surface expression of HLA class I antigens. Thus it appears that an immune evasion strategy shared by at least two gamma-herpesviruses allows continued lytic infection in the face of strong CTL immunity. PMID:10890918

  19. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Christopher M.; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N.; Desai, Keshal V.; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP–GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present – indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP–GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP–His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP–GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP–GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP–MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  20. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Christopher M; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N; Desai, Keshal V; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP-GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present - indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP-GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP-His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP-GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP-GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP-MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  1. Autophagy and immunity - insights from human herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Williams, Luke R; Taylor, Graham S

    2012-01-01

    The herpesviruses are a family of double-stranded DNA viruses that infect a wide variety of organisms. Having co-evolved with their hosts over millennia, herpesviruses have developed a large repertoire of mechanisms to manipulate normal cellular processes for their own benefit. Consequently, studies on these viruses have made important contributions to our understanding of fundamental biological processes. Here we describe recent research on the human herpesviruses that has contributed to our understanding of, and interactions between, viruses, autophagy, and the immune system. The ability of autophagy to degrade proteins located within the nucleus, the site of herpesvirus latency and replication, is also considered. PMID:22783253

  2. Hsp90 Inhibitors Are Efficacious against Kaposi Sarcoma by Enhancing the Degradation of the Essential Viral Gene LANA, of the Viral Co-Receptor EphA2 as well as Other Client Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wuguo; Sin, Sang-Hoon; Wen, Kwun Wah; Damania, Blossom; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2012-01-01

    Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors exhibit activity against human cancers. We evaluated a series of new, oral bioavailable, chemically diverse Hsp90 inhibitors (PU-H71, AUY922, BIIB021, NVP-BEP800) against Kaposi sarcoma (KS). All Hsp90 inhibitors exhibited nanomolar EC50 in culture and AUY922 reduced tumor burden in a xenograft model of KS. KS is associated with KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). We identified the viral latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) as a novel client protein of Hsp90 and demonstrate that the Hsp90 inhibitors diminish the level of LANA through proteasomal degradation. These Hsp90 inhibitors also downregulated EphA2 and ephrin-B2 protein levels. LANA is essential for viral maintenance and EphA2 has recently been shown to facilitate KSHV infection; which in turn feeds latent persistence. Further, both molecules are required for KS tumor formation and both were downregulated in response to Hsp90 inhibitors. This provides a rationale for clinical testing of Hsp90 inhibitors in KSHV-associated cancers and in the eradication of latent KSHV reservoirs. PMID:23209418

  3. Competitive and Cooperative Interactions Mediate RNA Transfer from Herpesvirus Saimiri ORF57 to the Mammalian Export Adaptor ALYREF

    PubMed Central

    Tunnicliffe, Richard B.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Kalra, Priti; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2014-01-01

    The essential herpesvirus adaptor protein HVS ORF57, which has homologs in all other herpesviruses, promotes viral mRNA export by utilizing the cellular mRNA export machinery. ORF57 protein specifically recognizes viral mRNA transcripts, and binds to proteins of the cellular transcription-export (TREX) complex, in particular ALYREF. This interaction introduces viral mRNA to the NXF1 pathway, subsequently directing it to the nuclear pore for export to the cytoplasm. Here we have used a range of techniques to reveal the sites for direct contact between RNA and ORF57 in the absence and presence of ALYREF. A binding site within ORF57 was characterized which recognizes specific viral mRNA motifs. When ALYREF is present, part of this ORF57 RNA binding site, composed of an α-helix, binds preferentially to ALYREF. This competitively displaces viral RNA from the α-helix, but contact with RNA is still maintained by a flanking region. At the same time, the flexible N-terminal domain of ALYREF comes into contact with the viral RNA, which becomes engaged in an extensive network of synergistic interactions with both ALYREF and ORF57. Transfer of RNA to ALYREF in the ternary complex, and involvement of individual ORF57 residues in RNA recognition, were confirmed by UV cross-linking and mutagenesis. The atomic-resolution structure of the ORF57-ALYREF interface was determined, which noticeably differed from the homologous ICP27-ALYREF structure. Together, the data provides the first site-specific description of how viral mRNA is locked by a herpes viral adaptor protein in complex with cellular ALYREF, giving herpesvirus access to the cellular mRNA export machinery. The NMR strategy used may be more generally applicable to the study of fuzzy protein-protein-RNA complexes which involve flexible polypeptide regions. PMID:24550725

  4. Activated Nrf2 Interacts with Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency Protein LANA-1 and Host Protein KAP1 To Mediate Global Lytic Gene Repression

    PubMed Central

    Gjyshi, Olsi; Roy, Arunava; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. We have previously shown that KSHV utilizes the host transcription factor Nrf2 to aid in infection of endothelial cells and oncogenesis. Here, we investigate the role of Nrf2 in PEL and PEL-derived cell lines and show that KSHV latency induces Nrf2 protein levels and transcriptional activity through the COX-2/PGE2/EP4/PKCζ axis. Next-generation sequencing of KSHV transcripts in the PEL-derived BCBL-1 cell line revealed that knockdown of this activated Nrf2 results in global elevation of lytic genes. Nrf2 inhibition by the chemical brusatol also induces lytic gene expression. Both Nrf2 knockdown and brusatol-mediated inhibition induced KSHV lytic reactivation in BCBL-1 cells. In a series of follow-up experiments, we characterized the mechanism of Nrf2-mediated regulation of KSHV lytic repression during latency. Biochemical assays showed that Nrf2 interacted with KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA-1) and the host transcriptional repressor KAP1, which together have been shown to repress lytic gene expression. Promoter studies showed that although Nrf2 alone induces the open reading frame 50 (ORF50) promoter, its association with LANA-1 and KAP1 abrogates this effect. Interestingly, LANA-1 is crucial for efficient KAP1/Nrf2 association, while Nrf2 is essential for LANA-1 and KAP1 recruitment to the ORF50 promoter and its repression. Overall, these results suggest that activated Nrf2, LANA-1, and KAP1 assemble on the ORF50 promoter in a temporal fashion. Initially, Nrf2 binds to and activates the ORF50 promoter during early de novo infection, an effect that is exploited during latency by LANA-1-mediated recruitment of the host transcriptional repressor KAP1 on Nrf2. Cell death assays further showed that Nrf2 and KAP1 knockdown induce significant cell death in PEL cell lines

  5. Molecular Features Contributing to Virus-Independent Intracellular Localization and Dynamic Behavior of the Herpesvirus Transport Protein US9

    PubMed Central

    Pedrazzi, Manuela; Nash, Bradley; Meucci, Olimpia; Brandimarti, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Reaching the right destination is of vital importance for molecules, proteins, organelles, and cargoes. Thus, intracellular traffic is continuously controlled and regulated by several proteins taking part in the process. Viruses exploit this machinery, and viral proteins regulating intracellular transport have been identified as they represent valuable tools to understand and possibly direct molecules targeting and delivery. Deciphering the molecular features of viral proteins contributing to (or determining) this dynamic phenotype can eventually lead to a virus-independent approach to control cellular transport and delivery. From this virus-independent perspective we looked at US9, a virion component of Herpes Simplex Virus involved in anterograde transport of the virus inside neurons of the infected host. As the natural cargo of US9-related vesicles is the virus (or its parts), defining its autonomous, virus-independent role in vesicles transport represents a prerequisite to make US9 a valuable molecular tool to study and possibly direct cellular transport. To assess the extent of this autonomous role in vesicles transport, we analyzed US9 behavior in the absence of viral infection. Based on our studies, Us9 behavior appears similar in different cell types; however, as expected, the data we obtained in neurons best represent the virus-independent properties of US9. In these primary cells, transfected US9 mostly recapitulates the behavior of US9 expressed from the viral genome. Additionally, ablation of two major phosphorylation sites (i.e. Y32Y33 and S34ES36) have no effect on protein incorporation on vesicles and on its localization on both proximal and distal regions of the cells. These results support the idea that, while US9 post-translational modification may be important to regulate cargo loading and, consequently, virion export and delivery, no additional viral functions are required for US9 role in intracellular transport. PMID:25133647

  6. WSV399, a viral tegument protein, interacts with the shrimp protein PmVRP15 to facilitate viral trafficking and assembly.

    PubMed

    Jaree, Phattarunda; Senapin, Saengchan; Hirono, Ikuo; Lo, Chu-Fang; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya

    2016-06-01

    Viral responsive protein 15 (PmVRP15) has been identified as a highly up-regulated gene in the hemocyte of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-infected shrimp Penaeus monodon. However, the function of PmVRP15 in host-viral interaction was still unclear. To elucidate PmVRP15 function, the interacting partner of PmVRP15 from WSSV was screened by yeast two-hybrid assay and then confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP). Only WSV399 protein was identified as a PmVRP15 binding protein; however, the function of WSV399 has not been characterized. Localization of WSV399 on the WSSV virion was revealed by immunoblotting analysis (in vitro) and immunoelectron microscopy (in vivo). The results showed that WSV399 is a structural protein of the WSSV virion and is particularly located on the tegument. Gene silencing of wsv399 in WSSV-infected shrimp reduced the percentage of cumulative mortality by 74%, although the expression level of a viral replication marker gene, vp28, was not changed suggesting that WSV399 might not involved in viral replication but viral assembly. Because it has already been known that tegument proteins function in capsid transport during viral trafficking and assembly, interaction between PmVRP15 on hemocyte nuclear membrane and the WSV399 viral tegument protein suggests that PmVRP15 might be required for trafficking and assembly of WSSV during infection. PMID:26828390

  7. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latent Gene vFLIP Inhibits Viral Lytic Replication through NF-κB-Mediated Suppression of the AP-1 Pathway: a Novel Mechanism of Virus Control of Latency▿

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng-Chun; Zhou, Fu-Chun; Xie, Jian-Ping; Kang, Tao; Greene, Whitney; Kuhne, Kurt; Lei, Xiu-Fen; Li, Qui-Hua; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency is central to the evasion of host immune surveillances and induction of KSHV-related malignancies. The mechanism of KSHV latency remains unclear. Here, we show that the KSHV latent gene vFLIP promotes viral latency by inhibiting viral lytic replication. vFLIP suppresses the AP-1 pathway, which is essential for KSHV lytic replication, by activating the NF-κB pathway. Thus, by manipulating two convergent cellular pathways, vFLIP regulates both cell survival and KSHV lytic replication to promote viral latency. These results also indicate that the effect of the NF-κB pathway on KSHV replication is determined by the status of the AP-1 pathway and hence provide a mechanistic explanation for the contradictory role of the NF-κB pathway in KSHV replication. Since the NF-κB pathway is commonly activated during infection of gammaherpesviruses, these findings might have general implications for the control of gammaherpesviral latency. PMID:18305042

  8. Rodent models of HAND and drug abuse: exogenous administration of viral protein(s) and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Yao, Honghong; Buch, Shilpa

    2012-06-01

    Humans and chimpanzees are the natural hosts for HIV. Non-human primate models of SIV/SHIV infection in rhesus, cynomologus and pigtail macaques have been used extensively as excellent model systems for pathogenesis and vaccine studies. However, owing to the variability of disease progression in infected macaques, a phenomenon identical to humans, coupled with their prohibitive costs, there exists a critical need for the development of small-animal models in which to study the untoward effects of HIV-1 infection. Owing to the fact that rodents are not the natural permissive hosts for lentiviral infection, development of small animal models for studying virus infection has used strategies that circumvent the steps of viral entry and infection. Such strategies involve overexpression of toxic viral proteins, SCID mice engrafted with the human PBLs or macrophages, and EcoHIV chimeric virus wherein the gp120 of HIV-1 was replaced with the gp80 of the ecotropic murine leukemia virus. Additional strategy that is often used by investigators to study the toxic effect of viral proteins involves direct stereotactic injection of the viral protein(s) into specific brain regions. The present report is a compilation of the applications of direct administration of Tat into the striatum to mimic the effects of the viral neurotoxin in the CNS. Added advantage of this model is that it is also amenable to repeated intraperitoneal cocaine injections, thereby allowing the study of the additive/synergistic effects of both the viral protein and cocaine. Such a model system recapitulates aspects of HAND in the context of drug abuse. PMID:22447295

  9. Functional and Structural Mimicry of Cellular Protein Kinase A Anchoring Proteins by a Viral Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    King, Cason R.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Gregory J.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2016-01-01

    The oncoproteins of the small DNA tumor viruses interact with a plethora of cellular regulators to commandeer control of the infected cell. During infection, adenovirus E1A deregulates cAMP signalling and repurposes it for activation of viral gene expression. We show that E1A structurally and functionally mimics a cellular A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP). E1A interacts with and relocalizes protein kinase A (PKA) to the nucleus, likely to virus replication centres, via an interaction with the regulatory subunits of PKA. Binding to PKA requires the N-terminus of E1A, which bears striking similarity to the amphipathic α-helical domain present in cellular AKAPs. E1A also targets the same docking-dimerization domain of PKA normally bound by cellular AKAPs. In addition, the AKAP like motif within E1A could restore PKA interaction to a cellular AKAP in which its normal interaction motif was deleted. During infection, E1A successfully competes with endogenous cellular AKAPs for PKA interaction. E1A’s role as a viral AKAP contributes to viral transcription, protein expression and progeny production. These data establish HAdV E1A as the first known viral AKAP. This represents a unique example of viral subversion of a crucial cellular regulatory pathway via structural mimicry of the PKA interaction domain of cellular AKAPs. PMID:27137912

  10. Systematic Identification of Cellular Signals Reactivating Kaposi Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fuqu; Harada, Josephine N; Brown, Helen J; Deng, Hongyu; Song, Moon Jung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Kato-Stankiewicz, Juran; Nelson, Christian G; Vieira, Jeffrey; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Chanda, Sumit K; Sun, Ren

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary effusion lymphoma–derived cells that harbor the latent virus. A group of diverse cellular signaling proteins were identified and validated in their effect of inducing viral lytic gene expression from the latent viral genome. The results suggest that multiple cellular signaling pathways can reactivate the virus in a genetically homogeneous cell population. Further analysis revealed that the Raf/MEK/ERK/Ets-1 pathway mediates Ras-induced reactivation. The same pathway also mediates spontaneous reactivation, which sets the first example to our knowledge of a specific cellular pathway being studied in the spontaneous reactivation process. Our study provides a functional genomic approach to systematically identify the cellular signals regulating the herpesvirus life cycle, thus facilitating better understanding of a fundamental issue in virology and identifying novel therapeutic targets. PMID:17397260

  11. Fragment-Based Protein-Protein Interaction Antagonists of a Viral Dimeric Protease.

    PubMed

    Gable, Jonathan E; Lee, Gregory M; Acker, Timothy M; Hulce, Kaitlin R; Gonzalez, Eric R; Schweigler, Patrick; Melkko, Samu; Farady, Christopher J; Craik, Charles S

    2016-04-19

    Fragment-based drug discovery has shown promise as an approach for challenging targets such as protein-protein interfaces. We developed and applied an activity-based fragment screen against dimeric Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protease (KSHV Pr) using an optimized fluorogenic substrate. Dose-response determination was performed as a confirmation screen, and NMR spectroscopy was used to map fragment inhibitor binding to KSHV Pr. Kinetic assays demonstrated that several initial hits also inhibit human cytomegalovirus protease (HCMV Pr). Binding of these hits to HCMV Pr was also confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Despite the use of a target-agnostic fragment library, more than 80 % of confirmed hits disrupted dimerization and bound to a previously reported pocket at the dimer interface of KSHV Pr, not to the active site. One class of fragments, an aminothiazole scaffold, was further explored using commercially available analogues. These compounds demonstrated greater than 100-fold improvement of inhibition. This study illustrates the power of fragment-based screening for these challenging enzymatic targets and provides an example of the potential druggability of pockets at protein-protein interfaces. PMID:26822284

  12. Isolation and characterization of a herpesvirus from feral pigeons in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Ma, Jian; Guo, Ying; Tian, Li; Guo, Guangyang; Zhang, Kexin; Xing, Mingwei

    2015-12-01

    A herpesvirus was isolated during a diagnostic investigation of severe cases of conjunctivitis in feral pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica). Isolates of the virus were recovered from throat swabs of the pigeons followed by inoculation of the swab samples in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Pigeons inoculated with the isolated virus had similar clinical signs to those observed in naturally infected birds. Transmission electron microscopy revealed viral structures with typical herpesvirus morphology. Polymerase chain reaction amplification, using herpesvirus-identifying primers resulted in an amplicon of the expected size for herpesvirus. Sequencing of these amplicons and database comparisons identified the herpesvirus UL30 homologue. Phylogenetic reconstructions suggested that the isolated herpesvirus belongs to the Mardivirus genus of Alphaherpesvirinae. Using the current herpesvirus nomenclature conventions, the authors propose that the herpesvirus be named Columbid herpesvirus-1 Heilongjiang. PMID:26542366

  13. Hijacking GPCRs by viral pathogens and tumor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Feng, Hao; Xu, Simin; Feng, Pinghui

    2016-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of molecules that transduce signals across the plasma membrane. Herpesviruses are successful pathogens that evolved diverse mechanisms to benefit their infection. Several human herpesviruses express GPCRs to exploit cellular signaling cascades during infection. These viral GPCRs demonstrate distinct biochemical and biophysical properties that result in the activation of a broad spectrum of signaling pathways. In immune-deficient individuals, human herpesvirus infection and the expression of their GPCRs are implicated in virus-associated diseases and pathologies. Emerging studies also uncover diverse mutations in components, particularly GPCRs and small G proteins, of GPCR signaling pathways that render the constitutive activation of proliferative and survival signal, which contributes to the oncogenesis of various human cancers. Hijacking GPCR-mediated signaling is a signature shared by diseases associated with constitutively active viral GPCRs and cellular mutations activating GPCR signaling, exposing key molecules that can be targeted for anti-viral and anti-tumor therapy. PMID:27060663

  14. Toll-like receptor sensing of human herpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    West, John A.; Gregory, Sean M.; Damania, Blossom

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are evolutionarily conserved pathogen sensors that constitute the first line of defense in the human immune system. Herpesviruses are prevalent throughout the world and cause significant disease in the human population. Sensing of herpesviruses via TLRs has only been documented in the last 10 years and our understanding of the relationship between these sentinels of the immune system and herpesvirus infection has already provided great insight into how the host cell responds to viral infection. This report will summarize the activation and modulation of TLR signaling in the context of human herpesvirus infections. PMID:23061052

  15. Sequence and Genomic Analysis of a Rhesus Macaque Rhadinovirus with Similarity to Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus/Human Herpesvirus 8

    PubMed Central

    Searles, Robert P.; Bergquam, Eric P.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Wong, Scott W.

    1999-01-01

    We have sequenced the long unique region (LUR) and characterized the terminal repeats of the genome of a rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV), strain 17577. The LUR as sequenced is 131,364 bp in length, with a G+C content of 52.2% and a CpG ratio of 1.11. The genome codes for 79 open reading frames (ORFs), with 67 of these ORFs similar to genes found in both Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) (formal name, human herpesvirus 8) and herpesvirus saimiri. Eight of the 12 unique genes show similarity to genes found in KSHV, including genes for viral interleukin-6, viral macrophage inflammatory protein, and a family of viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs). Genomic organization is essentially colinear with KSHV, the primary differences being the number of cytokine and IRF genes and the location of the gene for dihydrofolate reductase. Highly repetitive sequences are located in positions corresponding to repetitive sequences found in KSHV. Phylogenetic analysis of several ORFs supports the similarity between RRV and KSHV. Overall, the sequence, structural, and phylogenetic data combine to provide strong evidence that RRV 17577 is the rhesus macaque homolog of KSHV. PMID:10074154

  16. Visualizing viral protein structures in cells using genetic probes for correlated light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Ellisman, Mark H; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2015-11-15

    Structural studies of viral proteins most often use high-resolution techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, single particle negative stain, or cryo-electron microscopy (EM) to reveal atomic interactions of soluble, homogeneous viral proteins or viral protein complexes. Once viral proteins or complexes are separated from their host's cellular environment, their natural in situ structure and details of how they interact with other cellular components may be lost. EM has been an invaluable tool in virology since its introduction in the late 1940's and subsequent application to cells in the 1950's. EM studies have expanded our knowledge of viral entry, viral replication, alteration of cellular components, and viral lysis. Most of these early studies were focused on conspicuous morphological cellular changes, because classic EM metal stains were designed to highlight classes of cellular structures rather than specific molecular structures. Much later, to identify viral proteins inducing specific structural configurations at the cellular level, immunostaining with a primary antibody followed by colloidal gold secondary antibody was employed to mark the location of specific viral proteins. This technique can suffer from artifacts in cellular ultrastructure due to compromises required to provide access to the immuno-reagents. Immunolocalization methods also require the generation of highly specific antibodies, which may not be available for every viral protein. Here we discuss new methods to visualize viral proteins and structures at high resolutions in situ using correlated light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We discuss the use of genetically encoded protein fusions that oxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) into an osmiophilic polymer that can be visualized by EM. Detailed protocols for applying the genetically encoded photo-oxidizing protein MiniSOG to a viral protein, photo-oxidation of the fusion protein to yield DAB polymer staining, and

  17. Anguillid herpesvirus 1 transcriptome.

    PubMed

    van Beurden, Steven J; Gatherer, Derek; Kerr, Karen; Galbraith, Julie; Herzyk, Pawel; Peeters, Ben P H; Rottier, Peter J M; Engelsma, Marc Y; Davison, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    We used deep sequencing of poly(A) RNA to characterize the transcriptome of an economically important eel virus, anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV1), at a stage during the lytic life cycle when infectious virus was being produced. In contrast to the transcription of mammalian herpesviruses, the overall level of antisense transcription from the 248,526-bp genome was low, amounting to only 1.5% of transcription in predicted protein-coding regions, and no abundant, nonoverlapping, noncoding RNAs were identified. RNA splicing was found to be more common than had been anticipated previously. Counting the 10,634-bp terminal direct repeat once, 100 splice junctions were identified, of which 58 were considered likely to be involved in the expression of functional proteins because they represent splicing between protein-coding exons or between 5' untranslated regions and protein-coding exons. Each of the 30 most highly represented of these 58 splice junctions was confirmed by RT-PCR. We also used deep sequencing to identify numerous putative 5' and 3' ends of AngHV1 transcripts, confirming some and adding others by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The findings prompted a revision of the AngHV1 genome map to include a total of 129 protein-coding genes, 5 of which are duplicated in the terminal direct repeat. Not counting duplicates, 11 genes contain integral, spliced protein-coding exons, and 9 contain 5' untranslated exons or, because of alternative splicing, 5' untranslated and 5' translated exons. The results of this study sharpen our understanding of AngHV1 genomics and provide the first detailed view of a fish herpesvirus transcriptome. PMID:22787220

  18. HUMORAL ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO INDIVIDUAL VIRAL PROTEINS AFTER MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to identify viral proteins that played an important role in the humoral immune response to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Viral proteins were separated from a purified virus preparation on polyacrylamide gels, were blotted onto nitrocellulose strips,...

  19. The 6-Aminoquinolone WC5 Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Replication at an Early Stage by Interfering with the Transactivating Activity of Viral Immediate-Early 2 Protein ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Loregian, Arianna; Mercorelli, Beatrice; Muratore, Giulia; Sinigalia, Elisa; Pagni, Silvana; Massari, Serena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gatto, Barbara; Palumbo, Manlio; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    WC5 is a 6-aminoquinolone that potently inhibits the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) but has no activity, or significantly less activity, against other herpesviruses. Here we investigated the nature of its specific anti-HCMV activity. Structure-activity relationship studies on a small series of analogues showed that WC5 possesses the most suitable pattern of substitutions around the quinolone scaffold to give potent and selective anti-HCMV activity. Studies performed to identify the possible target of WC5 indicated that it prevents viral DNA synthesis but does not significantly affect DNA polymerase activity. In yield reduction experiments with different multiplicities of infection, the anti-HCMV activity of WC5 appeared to be highly dependent on the viral inoculum, suggesting that WC5 may act at an initial stage of virus replication. Consistently, time-of-addition and time-of-removal studies demonstrated that WC5 affects a phase of the HCMV replicative cycle that precedes viral DNA synthesis. Experiments to monitor the effects of the compound on virus attachment and entry showed that it does not inhibit either process. Evaluation of viral mRNA and protein expression revealed that WC5 targets an event of the HCMV replicative cycle that follows the transcription and translation of immediate-early genes and precedes those of early and late genes. In cell-based assays to test the effects of WC5 on the transactivating activity of the HCMV immediate-early 2 (IE2) protein, WC5 markedly interfered with IE2-mediated transactivation of viral early promoters. Finally, WC5 combined with ganciclovir in checkerboard experiments exhibited highly synergistic activity. These findings suggest that WC5 deserves further investigation as a candidate anti-HCMV drug with a novel mechanism of action. PMID:20194695

  20. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  1. Viral Inhibition of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP): A Striking Example of Functional Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, Marieke C.; Horst, Daniëlle; Griffin, Bryan D.; Luteijn, Rutger D.; Davison, Andrew J.; Ressing, Maaike E.; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large DNA viruses that are highly abundant within their host populations. Even in the presence of a healthy immune system, these viruses manage to cause lifelong infections. This persistence is partially mediated by the virus entering latency, a phase of infection characterized by limited viral protein expression. Moreover, herpesviruses have devoted a significant part of their coding capacity to immune evasion strategies. It is believed that the close coexistence of herpesviruses and their hosts has resulted in the evolution of viral proteins that specifically attack multiple arms of the host immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in antiviral immunity. CTLs recognize their target through viral peptides presented in the context of MHC molecules at the cell surface. Every herpesvirus studied to date encodes multiple immune evasion molecules that effectively interfere with specific steps of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) plays a key role in the loading of viral peptides onto MHC class I molecules. This is reflected by the numerous ways herpesviruses have developed to block TAP function. In this review, we describe the characteristics and mechanisms of action of all known virus-encoded TAP inhibitors. Orthologs of these proteins encoded by related viruses are identified, and the conservation of TAP inhibition is discussed. A phylogenetic analysis of members of the family Herpesviridae is included to study the origin of these molecules. In addition, we discuss the characteristics of the first TAP inhibitor identified outside the herpesvirus family, namely, in cowpox virus. The strategies of TAP inhibition employed by viruses are very distinct and are likely to have been acquired independently during evolution. These findings and the recent discovery of a non-herpesvirus TAP inhibitor represent a striking example of functional convergent evolution

  2. Herpesvirus sylvilagus infects both B and T lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kramp, W J; Medveczky, P; Mulder, C; Hinze, H C; Sullivan, J L

    1985-01-01

    Herpesvirus sylvilagus infection of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) was studied as a model of herpesvirus-induced lymphoproliferative disorders. Leukocytosis, splenomegaly, proliferation of T cells and virus production by lymphocytes characterized this infectious mononucleosis-like disease. Approximately two copies of circular herpesvirus sylvilagus genomes per cell were detected in spleen cells at 2 weeks postinfection, and circular genomes could still be observed after 4 months. Circular viral genomes were found in both B and T lymphocytes. Small amounts of linear viral DNA (0.1 to 0.3 copies per cell) were also detected in both B and T cells. These results indicated that the virus did not replicate in the majority of lymphocytes in vivo. Herpesvirus sylvilagus infection in cottontail rabbits could be useful as a model for studying the complex virus-host relationships of lymphotropic herpesviruses and perhaps as an animal model for Epstein-Barr virus infection in humans. Images PMID:2993667

  3. Herpesvirus sylvilagus infects both B and T lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kramp, W J; Medveczky, P; Mulder, C; Hinze, H C; Sullivan, J L

    1985-10-01

    Herpesvirus sylvilagus infection of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) was studied as a model of herpesvirus-induced lymphoproliferative disorders. Leukocytosis, splenomegaly, proliferation of T cells and virus production by lymphocytes characterized this infectious mononucleosis-like disease. Approximately two copies of circular herpesvirus sylvilagus genomes per cell were detected in spleen cells at 2 weeks postinfection, and circular genomes could still be observed after 4 months. Circular viral genomes were found in both B and T lymphocytes. Small amounts of linear viral DNA (0.1 to 0.3 copies per cell) were also detected in both B and T cells. These results indicated that the virus did not replicate in the majority of lymphocytes in vivo. Herpesvirus sylvilagus infection in cottontail rabbits could be useful as a model for studying the complex virus-host relationships of lymphotropic herpesviruses and perhaps as an animal model for Epstein-Barr virus infection in humans. PMID:2993667

  4. Genome-Wide Mapping of the Binding Sites and Structural Analysis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 2 Reveal that It Is a DNA-Binding Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haidai; Dong, Jiazhen; Liang, Deguang; Gao, Zengqiang; Bai, Lei; Sun, Rui; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oncogenic herpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is known to encode four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4) to subvert the host antiviral immune response, but their detailed DNA-binding profiles as transcription factors in the host remain uncharacterized. Here, we first performed genome-wide vIRF2-binding site mapping in the human genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq). vIRF2 was capable of binding to the promoter regions of 100 putative target genes. Importantly, we confirmed that vIRF2 can specifically interact with the promoters of the genes encoding PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL, which are associated with autophagosome formation or tumor progression and metastasis, and regulate their transcription in vivo. The crystal structure of the vIRF2 DNA-binding domain (DBD) (referred to here as vIRF2DBD) showed variable loop conformations and positive-charge distributions different from those of vIRF1 and cellular IRFs that are associated with DNA-binding specificities. Structure-based mutagenesis revealed that Arg82 and Arg85 are required for the in vitro DNA-binding activity of vIRF2DBD and can abolish the transcription regulation function of vIRF2 on the promoter reporter activity of PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL. Collectively, our study provided unique insights into the DNA-binding potency of vIRF2 and suggested that vIRF2 could act as a transcription factor of its target genes in the host antiviral immune response. IMPORTANCE The oncogenic herpesvirus KSHV is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to subvert the host antiviral immune responses by encoding four homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4). However, none of their DNA-binding profiles in the human genome have been characterized until now, and the structural basis for their diverse

  5. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  6. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  7. KSHV Rta Promoter Specification and Viral Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Guito, Jonathan; Lukac, David M

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens whose biological success depends upon replication and packaging of viral genomes, and transmission of progeny viruses to new hosts. The biological success of herpesviruses is enhanced by their ability to reproduce their genomes without producing progeny viruses or killing the host cells, a process called latency. Latency permits a herpesvirus to remain undetected in its animal host for decades while maintaining the potential to reactivate, or switch, to a productive life cycle when host conditions are conducive to generating viral progeny. Direct interactions between many host and viral molecules are implicated in controlling herpesviral reactivation, suggesting complex biological networks that control the decision. One viral protein that is necessary and sufficient to switch latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) into the lytic infection cycle is called K-Rta. K-Rta is a transcriptional activator that specifies promoters by binding DNA directly and interacting with cellular proteins. Among these cellular proteins, binding of K-Rta to RBP-Jk is essential for viral reactivation. In contrast to the canonical model for Notch signaling, RBP-Jk is not uniformly and constitutively bound to the latent KSHV genome, but rather is recruited to DNA by interactions with K-Rta. Stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding requires high affinity binding of Rta to repetitive and palindromic "CANT DNA repeats" in promoters, and formation of ternary complexes with RBP-Jk. However, while K-Rta expression is necessary for initiating KSHV reactivation, K-Rta's role as the switch is inefficient. Many factors modulate K-Rta's function, suggesting that KSHV reactivation can be significantly regulated post-Rta expression and challenging the notion that herpesviral reactivation is bistable. This review analyzes rapidly evolving research on KSHV K-Rta to consider the role of K-Rta promoter specification in regulating the progression of KSHV

  8. Exploitation of Lipid Components by Viral and Host Proteins for Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moriishi, Kohji; Matsuura, Yashiharu

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is a major causative agent of blood-borne hepatitis, has chronically infected about 170 million individuals worldwide and leads to chronic infection, resulting in development of steatosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatocellular carcinoma associated with HCV infection is not only caused by chronic inflammation, but also by the biological activity of HCV proteins. HCV core protein is known as a main component of the viral nucleocapsid. It cooperates with host factors and possesses biological activity causing lipid alteration, oxidative stress, and progression of cell growth, while other viral proteins also interact with host proteins including molecular chaperones, membrane-anchoring proteins, and enzymes associated with lipid metabolism to maintain the efficiency of viral replication and production. HCV core protein is localized on the surface of lipid droplets in infected cells. However, the role of lipid droplets in HCV infection has not yet been elucidated. Several groups recently reported that other viral proteins also support viral infection by regulation of lipid droplets and core localization in infected cells. Furthermore, lipid components are required for modification of host factors and the intracellular membrane to maintain or up-regulate viral replication. In this review, we summarize the current status of knowledge regarding the exploitation of lipid components by viral and host proteins in HCV infection. PMID:22347882

  9. STAT3 Regulates Lytic Activation of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofan; Barbachano-Guerrero, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lytic activation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) from latency is a critical contributor to pathogenesis and progression of KSHV-mediated disease. Development of targeted treatment strategies and improvement of lytic-phase-directed oncolytic therapies, therefore, hinge on gaining a better understanding of latency-to-lytic-phase transition. A key observation in that regard, also common to other herpesviruses, is the partial permissiveness of latently infected cells to lytic-cycle-inducing agents. Here, we address the molecular basis of why only some KSHV-infected cells respond to lytic stimuli. Since cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively active in KSHV-associated cancers, KSHV activates STAT3, and STAT3 has been found to regulate lytic activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells, we asked if STAT3 contributes similarly to the life cycle of KSHV. We found that high levels of STAT3 correlate with the refractory state at the single-cell level under conditions of both spontaneous and induced lytic activation; importantly, STAT3 also regulates lytic susceptibility. Further, knockdown of STAT3 suppresses the cellular transcriptional corepressor Krüppel-associated box domain-associated protein 1 (KAP1; also known as TRIM28), and suppression of KAP1 activates lytic genes, including the viral lytic switch RTA, thereby linking STAT3 via KAP1 to regulation of the balance between lytic and latent cells. These findings, taken together with those from EBV-infected and, more recently, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-infected cells, cement the contribution of host STAT3 to persistence of herpesviruses and simultaneously reveal an important lead to devise strategies to improve lytic-phase-directed therapies for herpesviruses. IMPORTANCE Lytic activation of the cancer-causing Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is vital to its life cycle and causation of disease. Like other herpesviruses

  10. Membrane Requirements for Uridylylation of the Poliovirus VPg Protein and Viral RNA Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Mark H.; Teterina, Natalya L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2003-01-01

    Efficient translation of poliovirus (PV) RNA in uninfected HeLa cell extracts generates all of the viral proteins required to carry out viral RNA replication and encapsidation and to produce infectious virus in vitro. In infected cells, viral RNA replication occurs in ribonucleoprotein complexes associated with clusters of vesicles that are formed from preexisting intracellular organelles, which serve as a scaffold for the viral RNA replication complex. In this study, we have examined the role of membranes in viral RNA replication in vitro. Electron microscopic and biochemical examination of extracts actively engaged in viral RNA replication failed to reveal a significant increase in vesicular membrane structures or the protective aggregation of vesicles observed in PV-infected cells. Viral, nonstructural replication proteins, however, bind to heterogeneous membrane fragments in the extract. Treatment of the extracts with nonionic detergents, a membrane-altering inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis (cerulenin), or an inhibitor of intracellular membrane trafficking (brefeldin A) prevents the formation of active replication complexes in vitro, under conditions in which polyprotein synthesis and processing occur normally. Under all three of these conditions, synthesis of uridylylated VPg to form the primer for initiation of viral RNA synthesis, as well as subsequent viral RNA replication, was inhibited. Thus, although organized membranous structures morphologically similar to the vesicles observed in infected cells do not appear to form in vitro, intact membranes are required for viral RNA synthesis, including the first step of forming the uridylylated VPg primer for RNA chain elongation. PMID:14557626

  11. [The use of a dried protein mixture in treating patients with viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, G A; Karpenko, P A; Denisiako, E I; Tsimbal, A E; Iurkovskaia, N B

    1989-07-01

    The authors studied the effect of a dry protein mixture on the clinical course and protein and pigmentary metabolism, functional tests of the liver in 223 patients with viral hepatitis. It was found that this mixture favours reduction of the icteric period, more rapid restoration of the liver function and improves prognosis. The dry protein mixture is recommended to be included in dietotherapy of patients with viral hepatitis. PMID:2800480

  12. The Viral G Protein-Coupled Receptor ORF74 Hijacks β-Arrestins for Endocytic Trafficking in Response to Human Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Kooistra, Albert J.; van Offenbeek, Jody; Nijmeijer, Saskia; de Graaf, Chris; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected cells express the virally encoded G protein-coupled receptor ORF74. Although ORF74 is constitutively active, it binds human CXC chemokines that modulate this basal activity. ORF74-induced signaling has been demonstrated to underlie the development of the angioproliferative tumor Kaposi’s sarcoma. Whereas G protein-dependent signaling of ORF74 has been the subject of several studies, the interaction of this viral GPCR with β-arrestins has hitherto not been investigated. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer experiments demonstrate that ORF74 recruits β-arrestins and subsequently internalizes in response to human CXCL1 and CXCL8, but not CXCL10. Internalized ORF74 traffics via early endosomes to recycling and late endosomes. Site-directed mutagenesis and homology modeling identified four serine and threonine residues at the distal end of the intracellular carboxyl-terminal of ORF74 that are required for β-arrestin recruitment and subsequent endocytic trafficking. Hijacking of the human endocytic trafficking machinery is a previously unrecognized action of ORF74. PMID:25894435

  13. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus small capsid protein by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan Yan

    2010-11-25

    A systematic investigation of interactions amongst KSHV capsid proteins was undertaken in this study to comprehend lesser known KSHV capsid assembly mechanisms. Interestingly the interaction patterns of the KSHV small capsid protein, ORF65 suggested its plausible role in viral capsid assembly pathways. Towards further understanding this, ORF65-null recombinant mutants (BAC-{Delta}65 and BAC-stop65) employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system were generated. No significant difference was found in both overall viral gene expression and lytic DNA replication between stable monolayers of 293T-BAC36 (wild-type) and 293T-BAC-ORF65-null upon induction with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, though the latter released 30-fold fewer virions to the medium than 293T-BAC36 cells. Sedimentation profiles of capsid proteins of ORF65-null recombinant mutants were non-reflective of their organization into the KSHV capsids and were also undetectable in cytoplasmic extracts compared to noticeable levels in nuclear extracts. These observations collectively suggested the pivotal role of ORF65 in the KSHV capsid assembly processes.

  14. HSV Usurps Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 3 Subunit M for Viral Protein Translation: Novel Prevention Target

    PubMed Central

    Cheshenko, Natalia; Trepanier, Janie B.; Segarra, Theodore J.; Fuller, A. Oveta; Herold, Betsy C.

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of genital herpes is a global health priority. B5, a recently identified ubiquitous human protein, was proposed as a candidate HSV entry receptor. The current studies explored its role in HSV infection. Viral plaque formation was reduced by ∼90% in human cells transfected with small interfering RNA targeting B5 or nectin-1, an established entry receptor. However, the mechanisms were distinct. Silencing of nectin-1 prevented intracellular delivery of viral capsids, nuclear transport of a viral tegument protein, and release of calcium stores required for entry. In contrast, B5 silencing had no effect on these markers of entry, but inhibited viral protein translation. Specifically, viral immediate early genes, ICP0 and ICP4, were transcribed, polyadenylated and transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, but the viral transcripts did not associate with ribosomes or polysomes in B5-silenced cells. In contrast, immediate early gene viral transcripts were detected in polysome fractions isolated from control cells. These findings are consistent with sequencing studies demonstrating that B5 is eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit m (eIF3m). Although B5 silencing altered the polysome profile of cells, silencing had little effect on cellular RNA or protein expression and was not cytotoxic, suggesting that this subunit is not essential for host cellular protein synthesis. Together these results demonstrate that B5 plays a major role in the initiation of HSV protein translation and could provide a novel target for strategies to prevent primary and recurrent herpetic disease. PMID:20676407

  15. Antigenic and protein sequence homology between VP13/14, a herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein, and gp10, a glycoprotein of equine herpesvirus 1 and 4.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, G R; Riggio, M P; Halliburton, I W; Killington, R A; Allen, G P; Meredith, D M

    1991-01-01

    Monospecific polyclonal antisera raised against VP13/14, a major tegument protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 cross-reacted with structural equine herpesvirus 1 and 4 proteins of Mr 120,000 and 123,000, respectively; these proteins are identical in molecular weight to the corresponding glycoprotein 10 (gp10) of each virus. Using a combination of immune precipitation and Western immunoblotting techniques, we confirmed that anti-VP13/14 and a monoclonal antibody to gp10 reacted with the same protein. Sequence analysis of a lambda gt11 insert of equine herpesvirus 1 gp10 identified an open reading frame in equine herpesvirus 4 with which it showed strong homology; this open reading frame also shared homology with gene UL47 of herpes simplex virus type 1 and gene 11 of varicella-zoster virus. This showed that, in addition to immunological cross-reactivity, VP13/14 and gp10 have protein sequence homology; it also allowed identification of VP13/14 as the gene product of UL47. Images PMID:1850013

  16. Multivalent display of proteins on viral nanoparticles using molecular recognition and chemical ligation strategies.

    PubMed

    Venter, P Arno; Dirksen, Anouk; Thomas, Diane; Manchester, Marianne; Dawson, Philip E; Schneemann, Anette

    2011-06-13

    Multivalent display of heterologous proteins on viral nanoparticles forms a basis for numerous applications in nanotechnology, including vaccine development, targeted therapeutic delivery, and tissue-specific bioimaging. In many instances, precise placement of proteins is required for optimal functioning of the supramolecular assemblies, but orientation- and site-specific coupling of proteins to viral scaffolds remains a significant technical challenge. We have developed two strategies that allow for controlled attachment of a variety of proteins on viral particles using covalent and noncovalent principles. In one strategy, an interaction between domain 4 of anthrax protective antigen and its receptor was used to display multiple copies of a target protein on virus-like particles. In the other, expressed protein ligation and aniline-catalyzed oximation was used to display covalently a model protein. The latter strategy, in particular, yielded nanoparticles that induced potent immune responses to the coupled protein, suggesting potential applications in vaccine development. PMID:21545187

  17. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  18. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  19. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  20. Generation of Recombinant Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (rVHSV) Expressing Two Foreign Proteins and Effect of Lengthened Viral Genome on Viral Growth and In Vivo Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a new recombinant VHSV (rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp) was generated by insertion of a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene between N and P genes, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene between P and M genes of VHSV genome, the expression of each heterologous gene in infected cells, and effects of the lengthened recombinant VHSV's genome on the replication ability and in vivo virulence to olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) fingerlings were compared with previously generated rVHSVs (rVHSV-wild, rVHSV-Arfp, and rVHSV-Brfp). The expression of RFP and GFP in cells infected with rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp was verified through fluorescent microscopy and FACS analysis. In the viral growth analysis, rVHSV-Arfp and rVHSV-Brfp showed significantly lower viral titers than rVHSV-wild, and the replication of rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp was significantly decreased compared to that of even rVHSV-Arfp or rVHSV-Brfp. These results suggest that the genome length is a critical factor for the determination of rVHSVs replication efficiency. In the in vivo virulence experiment, the cumulative mortalities of olive flounder fingerlings infected with each rVHSV were inversely proportional to the length of the viral genome, suggesting that decreased viral growth rate due to the lengthened viral genome is accompanied with the decrease of in vivo virulence of rVHSVs. Recombinant viruses expressing multiple foreign antigens can be used for the development of combined vaccines. However, as the present rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp still possesses an ability to kill hosts (although very weakened), researches on the producing more attenuated viruses or propagation-deficient replicon particles are needed to solve safety-related problems. PMID:26921191

  1. A negative element involved in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF11 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei

    2009-01-01

    The ORF11 of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a lytic viral gene with delayed-early expression kinetics. How the ORF11 gene expression is regulated in the KSHV lytic cascade is largely unknown. Here we report that the deletion of the KSHV viral IL-6 gene from the viral genome leads to deregulated ORF11 gene expression. The KSHV-encoded viral IL-6 protein was found not to be essentially involved in the regulation of ORF11, suggesting a potential transcriptional cis-regulation. A negative element was identified downstream of the ORF11 gene, which suppresses the ORF11 basal promoter activity in a position-independent manner.

  2. Bioactive activities of natural products against herpesvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungki; Lee, Minjung; Sung, Gi-Ho; Lee, Taeho; Shin, Yu Su; Cho, Hyosun; Lieberman, Paul M; Kang, Hyojeung

    2013-10-01

    More than 90% of adults have been infected with at least one human herpesvirus, which establish long-term latent infection for the life of the host. While anti-viral drugs exist that limit herpesvirus replication, many of these are ineffective against latent infection. Moreover, drug-resistant strains of herpesvirus emerge following chemotherapeutic treatment. For example, resistance to acyclovir and related nucleoside analogues can occur when mutations arise in either HSV thymidine kinase or DNA polymerases. Thus, there exists an unmet medical need to develop new anti-herpesvirus agents with different mechanisms of action. In this Review, we discuss the promise of anti-herpetic substances derived from natural products including extracts and pure compounds from potential herbal medicines. One example is Glycyrrhizic acid isolated from licorice that shows promising antiviral activity towards human gammaherpesviruses. Secondly, we discuss anti-herpetic mechanisms utilized by several natural products in molecular level. While nucleoside analogues inhibit replicating herpesviruses in lytic replication, some natural products can disrupt the herpesvirus latent infection in the host cell. In addition, natural products can stimulate immune responses against herpesviral infection. These findings suggest that natural products could be one of the best choices for development of new treatments for latent herpesvirus infection, and may provide synergistic anti-viral activity when supplemented with nucleoside analogues. Therefore, it is important to identify which natural products are more efficacious anti-herpetic agents, and to understand the molecular mechanism in detail for further advance in the anti-viral therapies. PMID:24173639

  3. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  4. Human herpesvirus 7: antigenic properties and prevalence in children and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, L S; Rodriguez, W J; Balachandran, N; Frenkel, N

    1991-01-01

    The recent isolation of human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) from activated CD4+ T lymphocytes of a healthy individual raises questions regarding the prevalence of this virus in humans and its immunological relationship to previously characterized human herpesviruses. We report that HHV-7 is a ubiquitous virus which is immunologically distinct from the highly prevalent T-lymphotropic HHV-6. Thus, (i) only two of six monoclonal antibodies to HHV-6 cross-reacted with HHV-7-infected cells, (ii) Western immunoblot analyses of viral proteins revealed different patterns for HHV-6- and HHV-7-infected cells, (iii) tests of sequential serum samples from children revealed seroconversion to HHV-6 without concomitant seroconversion to HHV-7, and (iv) in some instances HHV-7 infection occurred in the presence of high titers of HHV-6 antibodies, suggesting the lack of apparent protection of children seropositive for HHV-6 against subsequent infection with HHV-7. On the basis of the analyses of sera from children and adults it can be concluded that HHV-7 is a prevalent human herpesvirus which, like other human herpesviruses, infects during childhood. The age of infection appears to be somewhat later than the very early age documented for HHV-6. Images PMID:1656093

  5. One year duration of immunity of the modified live bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 and type 2 and bovine herpesvirus-1 fractions of Vista® Once SQ vaccine.

    PubMed

    Purtle, Lisa; Mattick, Debra; Schneider, Corey; Smith, Linda; Xue, Wenzhi; Trigo, Emilio

    2016-03-18

    Three studies were performed to determine the duration of immunity of the bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 and type 2 (BVDV-1 and BVDV-2) and bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) fractions of a commercially prepared modified-live vaccine. Vista® Once SQ (Vista®) vaccine contains five modified-live viruses, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, BHV-1, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, and bovine parainfluenza 3 virus, and two modified-live bacteria, Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica. For all three studies, calves were administered a single dose of vaccine or placebo vaccine subcutaneously, and were challenged with one of the three virulent viruses at least one year following vaccination. Calves were evaluated daily following challenge for clinical signs of disease associated with viral infection, nasal swab samples were evaluated for virus shedding, and serum was tested for neutralizing antibodies. Following the BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 challenges, whole blood was evaluated for white blood cell counts, and for the BVDV-2 study, whole blood was also evaluated for platelet counts. Calves vaccinated with BVDV type 1a, were protected from challenge with BVDV type 1b, and had significant reductions in clinical disease, fever, leukopenia, and virus shedding compared to control calves. Vaccinated calves in the BVDV-2 study were protected from clinical disease, mortality, fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and virus shedding compared to controls. Vaccinated calves in the BHV-1 study were protected from clinical disease and fever, and had significantly reduced duration of nasal virus shedding. These three studies demonstrated that a single administration of the Vista® vaccine to healthy calves induces protective immunity against BVDV-1, BVDV-2 and BHV-1 that lasts at least one year following vaccination. PMID:26859238

  6. Characterization of bovine herpesviruses isolated from six sheep and four goats by restriction endonuclease analysis and radioimmunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Whetstone, C A; Evermann, J F

    1988-06-01

    Viral DNA from 10 herpesviruses isolated from 6 sheep and 4 goats were examined by restriction endonuclease analysis with respect to their relatedness to one another; to bovine herpesvirus type 6 (BHV-6), also known as caprine herpesvirus; and to 2 strains of bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), known as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV) and infectious pustular vulvovaginitis virus (IPVV). Viral proteins from the isolates were examined by radioimmunoprecipitation with anti-BHV-1/IBRV gnotobiotic calf (bovine) serum, anti-BHV-1/IBRV bovine hyperimmune serum, and anti-BHV-6 rabbit serum to evaluate their antigenic relatedness to each other. The goat isolates were obtained from animals with various disease conditions including respiratory tract disorders, vulvovaginitis, and wart-like lesions on the eyelid. The other isolates were from domestic sheep and came from aborted fetuses or from sheep with fatal pneumonia or proliferative lesions around lips and nose. All of the goats and 4 of the sheep from which the viral isolates were obtained had comingled with cattle. Purified DNA from each of the 10 field isolates and from BHV-1/IBRV, BHV-1/IPVV, and BHV-6 caprine herpesvirus was cleaved with restriction endonuclease Pst I. Five of 6 sheep isolates and 3 of 4 goat isolates yielded unique restriction patterns, ie, patterns that differed from each other by one or more bands. Sheep isolate DNA patterns were different from goat isolate patterns, and all restriction endonuclease analysis patterns were similar to the pattern for BHV-1/IBRV, but different from that for BHV-1/IPVV or for BHV-6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2840840

  7. Herpesviruses that Infect Fish

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Larry; Dishon, Arnon; Kotler, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Herpesviruses are host specific pathogens that are widespread among vertebrates. Genome sequence data demonstrate that most herpesviruses of fish and amphibians are grouped together (family Alloherpesviridae) and are distantly related to herpesviruses of reptiles, birds and mammals (family Herpesviridae). Yet, many of the biological processes of members of the order Herpesvirales are similar. Among the conserved characteristics are the virion structure, replication process, the ability to establish long term latency and the manipulation of the host immune response. Many of the similar processes may be due to convergent evolution. This overview of identified herpesviruses of fish discusses the diseases that alloherpesviruses cause, the biology of these viruses and the host-pathogen interactions. Much of our knowledge on the biology of Alloherpesvirdae is derived from research with two species: Ictalurid herpesvirus 1 (channel catfish virus) and Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus). PMID:22163339

  8. Computational analysis reveal inhibitory action of nimbin against dengue viral envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Lavanya, P; Ramaiah, Sudha; Anbarasu, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Dengue has emerged to be global health problem worldwide. Hence there is an immediate need to adopt new strategies in the development of effective anti-dengue drugs. Extracts from the leaves of Azadirachta indica has been traditionally used in folk medicine for viral infections. In the present study we report the anti-viral potency of nimbin, the active compound from the neem leaf extract against the envelope protein of dengue virus. Progression of viral entry into the host cell is facilitated by the envelope protein of dengue virus, suggesting; it as an effective anti-viral target. Nimbin is found to be effective against the envelope protein of all four types of dengue virus (dengue 1-4), which is evident from our in silico analysis. Our findings suggest the clinical importance of nimbin, which can serve as effective lead compound for further analysis. PMID:26645034

  9. Influenza B virus non-structural protein 1 counteracts ISG15 antiviral activity by sequestering ISGylated viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Sridharan, Haripriya; Chen, Ran; Baker, Darren P; Wang, Shanshan; Krug, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 and its conjugation to proteins (ISGylation) are strongly induced by type I interferon. Influenza B virus encodes non-structural protein 1 (NS1B) that binds human ISG15 and provides an appropriate model for determining how ISGylation affects virus replication in human cells. Here using a recombinant virus encoding a NS1B protein defective in ISG15 binding, we show that NS1B counteracts ISGylation-mediated antiviral activity by binding and sequestering ISGylated viral proteins, primarily ISGylated viral nucleoprotein (NP), in infected cells. ISGylated NP that is not sequestered by mutant NS1B acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of oligomerization of the more abundant unconjugated NP. Consequently formation of viral ribonucleoproteins that catalyse viral RNA synthesis is inhibited, causing decreased viral protein synthesis and virus replication. We verify that ISGylated NP is largely responsible for inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by generating recombinant viruses that lack known ISGylation sites in NP. PMID:27587337

  10. Formation of a stable complex between the human immunodeficiency virus integrase protein and viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Vink, C; Lutzke, R A; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    The integrase (IN) protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediates two distinct reactions: (i) specific removal of two nucleotides from the 3' ends of the viral DNA and (ii) integration of the viral DNA into target DNA. Although IN discriminates between specific (viral) DNA and nonspecific DNA in physical in vitro assays, a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain could not be identified in the protein. A nonspecific DNA-binding domain, however, was found at the C terminus of the protein. We examined the DNA-binding characteristics of HIV-1 IN, and found that a stable complex of IN and viral DNA is formed in the presence of Mn2+. The IN-viral DNA complex is resistant to challenge by an excess of competitor DNA. Stable binding of IN to the viral DNA requires that the protein contains an intact N-terminal domain and active site (in the central region of the protein), in addition to the C-terminal DNA-binding domain. Images PMID:7937134

  11. Effects of ER stress on unfolded protein responses, cell survival, and viral replication in primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shigemi, Zenpei; Baba, Yusuke; Hara, Naoko; Matsuhiro, Jumpei; Kagawa, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tadashi; Fujimuro, Masahiro

    2016-01-15

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a subtype of non-Hodgkin's B-lymphoma, is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in immunosuppressed patients. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which induces expression of ER chaperones, which in turn decrease ER stress, leading to ER homeostasis. The UPR is necessary for not only ER homeostasis but also persistent infection by, and replication of, many viruses. However, the precise roles and regulation of the UPR in KSHV infection remain poorly understood. Here, we found that IRE1α and PERK were significantly downregulated in PEL cells cultured under normal conditions, compared with KSHV-uninfected B-lymphoma cells. IRE1α and PERK mRNA levels were decreased in PEL cells, and KSHV-encoded LANA and v-cyclin D led to suppressed IRE1α transcription. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress activated the UPR and increased the mRNA levels of UPR-related molecules, including IRE1α and PERK, in PEL cells. However the IRE1α and PERK mRNA levels in PEL cells were lower than those in KSHV-uninfected cells. Furthermore, ER stress induced by brefeldin A and thapsigargin dramatically reduced the viability of PEL cells, compared with KSHV-uninfected cells, and induced apoptosis of PEL cells via the pro-apoptotic UPR through expression of CHOP and activation of caspase-9. In addition to the pro-apoptotic UPR, thapsigargin-induced ER stress enhanced transcription of lytic genes, including RTA, K-bZIP and K8.1, and viral production in PEL cells resulted in induction of the lytic cycle. Thus, we demonstrated downregulation of IRE1α and PERK in PEL cells, transcriptional suppression of IRE1α by LANA and v-cyclin D, apoptosis induction in PEL cells by ER stress, and potentiation of lytic replication by ER stress. PMID:26692493

  12. Andes Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Interrupts Protein Kinase R Dimerization To Counteract Host Interference in Viral Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zekun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogenic hantaviruses delay the type I interferon response during early stages of viral infection. However, the robust interferon response and induction of interferon-stimulated genes observed during later stages of hantavirus infection fail to combat the virus replication in infected cells. Protein kinase R (PKR), a classical interferon-stimulated gene product, phosphorylates the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α and causes translational shutdown to create roadblocks for the synthesis of viral proteins. The PKR-induced translational shutdown helps host cells to establish an antiviral state to interrupt virus replication. However, hantavirus-infected cells do not undergo translational shutdown and fail to establish an antiviral state during the course of viral infection. In this study, we showed for the first time that Andes virus infection induced PKR overexpression. However, the overexpressed PKR was not active due to a significant inhibition of autophosphorylation. Further studies revealed that Andes virus nucleocapsid protein inhibited PKR dimerization, a critical step required for PKR autophosphorylation to attain activity. The studies reported here establish a hantavirus nucleocapsid protein as a new PKR inhibitor. These studies provide mechanistic insights into hantavirus resistance to the host interferon response and solve the puzzle of the lack of translational shutdown observed in hantavirus-infected cells. The sensitivity of hantavirus replication to PKR has likely imposed a selective evolutionary pressure on hantaviruses to evade the PKR antiviral response for survival. We envision that evasion of the PKR antiviral response by NP has likely helped hantaviruses to exist during evolution and to survive in infected hosts with a multifaceted antiviral defense. IMPORTANCE Protein kinase R (PKR), a versatile antiviral host factor, shuts down the translation machinery upon activation in virus-infected cells to create hurdles for the

  13. Illuminating structural proteins in viral “dark matter” with metaproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Jennifer R.; Ignacio-Espinoza, J. Cesar; Kim, Eun-Hae; Trubl, Gareth; Jones, Robert M.; Roux, Simon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Rich, Virginia I.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are ecologically important, yet environmental virology is limited by dominance of unannotated genomic sequences representing taxonomic and functional “viral dark matter.” Although recent analytical advances are rapidly improving taxonomic annotations, identifying functional dark matter remains problematic. Here, we apply paired metaproteomics and dsDNA-targeted metagenomics to identify 1,875 virion-associated proteins from the ocean. Over one-half of these proteins were newly functionally annotated and represent abundant and widespread viral metagenome-derived protein clusters (PCs). One primarily unannotated PC dominated the dataset, but structural modeling and genomic context identified this PC as a previously unidentified capsid protein from multiple uncultivated tailed virus families. Furthermore, four of the five most abundant PCs in the metaproteome represent capsid proteins containing the HK97-like protein fold previously found in many viruses that infect all three domains of life. The dominance of these proteins within our dataset, as well as their global distribution throughout the world’s oceans and seas, supports prior hypotheses that this HK97-like protein fold is the most abundant biological structure on Earth. Together, these culture-independent analyses improve virion-associated protein annotations, facilitate the investigation of proteins within natural viral communities, and offer a high-throughput means of illuminating functional viral dark matter. PMID:26884177

  14. The protective antigens of equine herpesvirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Papp-Vid, G; Derbyshire, J B

    1978-04-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 was cultivated in swine testis cell cultures and partially purified by differential centrifugation and centrifugation in a linear sucrose density gradient. The viral envelope was separated from the nucleocapsid by treatment with Rexol 25J followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation. The envelope and nucleocapsid preparations were then electrophoresed in polyacrylamide gel after solubilization with sodium dodecyl sulphate. Hamsters were immunized with various preparations of the partially purified virus, including live or inactivated equine herpesvirus type 1 and viral envelope and nucleocapsid, all derived from the Kentucky D strain of the virus. Challenge of the immunized hamsters, with a hamster-adapted strain of equine herpesvirus type 1 demonstrated protection only in those animals which had been vaccinated with envelope-containing materials. When vaccination was carried out with fractions of electrophoresed envelope or nucleocapsid, protection was induced only by polypeptides of high molecular weight containing a glycoprotein component of the envelope of equine herpesvirus type 1. PMID:208736

  15. Analysis of HSV viral reactivation in explants of sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Anne-Marie W.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    As with all Herpesviruses, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has both a lytic replication phase and a latency-reactivation cycle. During lytic replication, there is an ordered cascade of viral gene expression that leads to the synthesis of infectious viral progeny. In contrast, latency is characterized by the lack of significant lytic gene expression and the absence of infectious virus. Reactivation from latency is characterized by the re-entry of the virus into the lytic replication cycle and the production of recurrent disease. This unit describes the establishment of the mouse sensory neuron model of HSV-1 latency-reactivation as a useful in vivo system for the analysis of mechanisms involved in latency and reactivation. Assays including the determination of viral yields, immunohistochemical/immunofluorescent detection of viral antigens, and mRNA quantitation are used in experiments designed to investigate the network of cellular and viral proteins regulating HSV-1 lytic infection, latency, and reactivation. PMID:25367271

  16. MSLVP: prediction of multiple subcellular localization of viral proteins using a support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Anamika; Rajput, Akanksha; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-07-19

    Knowledge of the subcellular location (SCL) of viral proteins in the host cell is important for understanding their function in depth. Therefore, we have developed "MSLVP", a two-tier prediction algorithm for predicting multiple SCLs of viral proteins. For this study, data sets of comprehensive viral proteins with experimentally validated SCL annotation were collected from UniProt. Non-redundant (90%) data sets of 3480 viral proteins that belonged to single (2715), double (391) and multiple (374) sites were employed. Additionally, 1687 (30% sequence identity) viral proteins were categorised into single (1366), double (167) and multiple (154) sites. Single, double and multiple locations further comprised of eight, four and six categories, respectively. Viral protein locations include the nucleus, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, extracellular, single-pass membrane, multi-pass membrane, capsid, remaining others and combinations thereof. Support vector machine based models were developed using sequence features like amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physicochemical properties and their hybrids. We have employed "one-versus-one" as well as "one-versus-other" strategies for multiclass classification. The performance of "one-versus-one" is better than the "one-versus-other" approach during 10-fold cross-validation. For the 90% data set, we achieved an accuracy, a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) of 99.99%, 1.00, 1.00; 100.00%, 1.00, 1.00 and 99.90%; 1.00, 1.00 for single, double and multiple locations, respectively. Similar results were achieved for a 30% sequence identity data set. Predictive models for each SCL performed equally well on the independent dataset. The MSLVP web server () can predict subcellular locations i.e. single (8; including single and multi-pass membrane), double (4) and multiple (6). This would be helpful for elucidating the functional annotation of viral proteins and potential drug

  17. Comparative Genomics of Carp Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kurobe, Tomofumi; Gatherer, Derek; Cunningham, Charles; Korf, Ian; Fukuda, Hideo; Hedrick, Ronald P.; Waltzek, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Three alloherpesviruses are known to cause disease in cyprinid fish: cyprinid herpesviruses 1 and 3 (CyHV1 and CyHV3) in common carp and koi and cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV2) in goldfish. We have determined the genome sequences of CyHV1 and CyHV2 and compared them with the published CyHV3 sequence. The CyHV1 and CyHV2 genomes are 291,144 and 290,304 bp, respectively, in size, and thus the CyHV3 genome, at 295,146 bp, remains the largest recorded among the herpesviruses. Each of the three genomes consists of a unique region flanked at each terminus by a sizeable direct repeat. The CyHV1, CyHV2, and CyHV3 genomes are predicted to contain 137, 150, and 155 unique, functional protein-coding genes, respectively, of which six, four, and eight, respectively, are duplicated in the terminal repeat. The three viruses share 120 orthologous genes in a largely colinear arrangement, of which up to 55 are also conserved in the other member of the genus Cyprinivirus, anguillid herpesvirus 1. Twelve genes are conserved convincingly in all sequenced alloherpesviruses, and two others are conserved marginally. The reference CyHV3 strain has been reported to contain five fragmented genes that are presumably nonfunctional. The CyHV2 strain has two fragmented genes, and the CyHV1 strain has none. CyHV1, CyHV2, and CyHV3 have five, six, and five families of paralogous genes, respectively. One family unique to CyHV1 is related to cellular JUNB, which encodes a transcription factor involved in oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first time that JUNB-related sequences have been reported in a herpesvirus. PMID:23269803

  18. Comparative genomics of carp herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Davison, Andrew J; Kurobe, Tomofumi; Gatherer, Derek; Cunningham, Charles; Korf, Ian; Fukuda, Hideo; Hedrick, Ronald P; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2013-03-01

    Three alloherpesviruses are known to cause disease in cyprinid fish: cyprinid herpesviruses 1 and 3 (CyHV1 and CyHV3) in common carp and koi and cyprinid herpesvirus 2 (CyHV2) in goldfish. We have determined the genome sequences of CyHV1 and CyHV2 and compared them with the published CyHV3 sequence. The CyHV1 and CyHV2 genomes are 291,144 and 290,304 bp, respectively, in size, and thus the CyHV3 genome, at 295,146 bp, remains the largest recorded among the herpesviruses. Each of the three genomes consists of a unique region flanked at each terminus by a sizeable direct repeat. The CyHV1, CyHV2, and CyHV3 genomes are predicted to contain 137, 150, and 155 unique, functional protein-coding genes, respectively, of which six, four, and eight, respectively, are duplicated in the terminal repeat. The three viruses share 120 orthologous genes in a largely colinear arrangement, of which up to 55 are also conserved in the other member of the genus Cyprinivirus, anguillid herpesvirus 1. Twelve genes are conserved convincingly in all sequenced alloherpesviruses, and two others are conserved marginally. The reference CyHV3 strain has been reported to contain five fragmented genes that are presumably nonfunctional. The CyHV2 strain has two fragmented genes, and the CyHV1 strain has none. CyHV1, CyHV2, and CyHV3 have five, six, and five families of paralogous genes, respectively. One family unique to CyHV1 is related to cellular JUNB, which encodes a transcription factor involved in oncogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first time that JUNB-related sequences have been reported in a herpesvirus. PMID:23269803

  19. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Triggered by a Plant Viral Movement Protein1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Changming; Dickman, Martin B.; Whitham, Steven A.; Payton, Mark; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Potato virus X (PVX) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants leads to increased transcript levels of several stress-related host genes, including basic-region leucine zipper 60 (bZIP60), SKP1, ER luminal binding protein (BiP), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), calreticulin (CRT), and calmodulin (CAM). bZIP60 is a key transcription factor that responds to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induces the expression of ER-resident chaperones (BiP, PDI, CRT, and CAM). SKP1 is a component of SCF (for SKP1-Cullin-F box protein) ubiquitin ligase complexes that target proteins for proteasomal degradation. Expression of PVX TGBp3 from a heterologous vector induces the same set of genes in N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Virus-induced gene silencing was employed to knock down the expression of bZIP60 and SKP1, and the number of infection foci on inoculated leaves was reduced and systemic PVX accumulation was altered. Silencing bZIP60 led to the suppression of BiP and SKP1 transcript levels, suggesting that bZIP60 might be an upstream signal transducer. Overexpression of TGBp3 led to localized necrosis, but coexpression of TGBp3 with BiP abrogated necrosis, demonstrating that the unfolded protein response alleviates ER stress-related cell death. Steady-state levels of PVX replicase and TGBp2 (which reside in the ER) proteins were unaltered by the presence of TGBp3, suggesting that TGBp3 does not contribute to their turnover. Taken together, PVX TGBp3-induced ER stress leads to up-regulation of bZIP60 and unfolded protein response-related gene expression, which may be important to regulate cellular cytotoxicity that could otherwise lead to cell death if viral proteins reach high levels in the ER. PMID:21474436

  20. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-03-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1. PMID:22942441

  1. Columbid herpesvirus-1 mortality in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) from Calgary, Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Nicole; Warren, Amy L.; Whiteside, Douglas; Bidulka, Julie; Robinson, John H.; Illanes, Oscar; Brookfield, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Four cases of Columbid herpesvirus-1 infection in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were identified in Calgary, Alberta. Necropsy findings included severe multifocal hepatic and splenic necrosis, pharyngeal ulceration and necrosis, and gastrointestinal necrosis. Occasional eosinophilic intranuclear viral inclusion bodies were associated with the foci of necrosis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing confirmed a diagnosis of herpesvirus-induced disease. The sequence of a PCR amplicon had 99.7% homology to Columbid herpesvirus-1. PMID:22942441

  2. Dynamics of virus shedding and in situ confirmation of chelonid herpesvirus 5 in Hawaiian green turtles with Fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Balazs, George H.; Schettle, Nelli; Ackermann, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Cancers in humans and animals can be caused by viruses, but virus-induced tumors are considered to be poor sites for replication of intact virions (lytic replication). Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a neoplastic disease associated with a herpesvirus, chelonid herpesvirus 5 (ChHV5), that affects green turtles globally. ChHV5 probably replicates in epidermal cells of tumors, because epidermal intranuclear inclusions (EIIs) contain herpesvirus-like particles. However, although EIIs are a sign of herpesvirus replication, they have not yet been firmly linked to ChHV5. Moreover, the dynamics of viral shedding in turtles are unknown, and there are no serological reagents to confirm actual presence of the specific ChHV5 virus in tissues. The investigators analyzed 381 FP tumors for the presence of EIIs and found that overall, about 35% of green turtles had lytic replication in skin tumors with 7% of tumors showing lytic replication. A few (11%) turtles accounted for more than 30% cases having lytic viral replication, and lytic replication was more likely in smaller tumors. To confirm that turtles were actively replicating ChHV5, a prerequisite for shedding, the investigators used antiserum raised against F-VP26, a predicted capsid protein of ChHV5 that localizes to the host cell nucleus during viral replication. This antiserum revealed F-VP26 in EIIs of tumors, thus confirming the presence of replicating ChHV5. In this light, it is proposed that unlike other virus-induced neoplastic diseases, FP is a disease that may depend on superspreaders, a few highly infectious individuals growing numerous small tumors permissive to viral production, for transmission of ChHV5.

  3. At the crossroads of autophagy and infection: Noncanonical roles for ATG proteins in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Solvik, Tina; Debnath, Jayanta

    2016-08-29

    Autophagy-related (ATG) proteins have increasingly demonstrated functions other than cellular self-eating. In this issue, Mauthe et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201602046) conduct an unbiased RNA interference screen of the ATG proteome to reveal numerous noncanonical roles for ATG proteins during viral infection. PMID:27573461

  4. Hsp70 Isoforms Are Essential for the Formation of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Replication and Transcription Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Baquero-Pérez, Belinda; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with various AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, multiple processes required for KSHV lytic replication, including viral transcription, viral DNA synthesis and capsid assembly occur in virus-induced intranuclear structures, termed replication and transcription compartments (RTCs). Here we utilised a novel methodology, combining subcellular fractionation and quantitative proteomics, to identify cellular proteins which are recruited to KSHV-induced RTCs and thus play a key role in KSHV lytic replication. We show that several isoforms of the HSP70 chaperone family, Hsc70 and iHsp70, are redistributed from the cytoplasm into the nucleus coinciding with the initial formation of KSHV-induced RTCs. We demonstrate that nuclear chaperone foci are dynamic, initially forming adjacent to newly formed KSHV RTCs, however during later time points the chaperones move within KSHV RTCs and completely co-localise with actively replicating viral DNA. The functional significance of Hsp70 isoforms recruitment into KSHV RTCs was also examined using the specific Hsp70 isoform small molecule inhibitor, VER-155008. Intriguingly, results highlight an essential role of Hsp70 isoforms in the KSHV replication cycle independent of protein stability and maturation. Notably, inhibition of Hsp70 isoforms precluded KSHV RTC formation and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) relocalisation to the viral genome leading to the abolishment of global KSHV transcription and subsequent viral protein synthesis and DNA replication. These new findings have revealed novel mechanisms that regulate KSHV lytic replication and highlight the potential of HSP70 inhibitors as novel antiviral agents. PMID:26587836

  5. HMGB1 Protein Binds to Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein and Promotes Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moisy, Dorothée; Avilov, Sergiy V.; Jacob, Yves; Laoide, Brid M.; Ge, Xingyi; Baudin, Florence; Jestin, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus has evolved replication strategies that hijack host cell pathways. To uncover interactions between viral macromolecules and host proteins, we applied a phage display strategy. A library of human cDNA expression products displayed on filamentous phages was submitted to affinity selection for influenza viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). High-mobility-group box (HMGB) proteins were found to bind to the nucleoprotein (NP) component of vRNPs. HMGB1 and HMGB2 bind directly to the purified NP in the absence of viral RNA, and the HMG box A domain is sufficient to bind the NP. We show that HMGB1 associates with the viral NP in the nuclei of infected cells, promotes viral growth, and enhances the activity of the viral polymerase. The presence of a functional HMGB1 DNA-binding site is required to enhance influenza virus replication. Glycyrrhizin, which reduces HMGB1 binding to DNA, inhibits influenza virus polymerase activity. Our data show that the HMGB1 protein can play a significant role in intranuclear replication of influenza viruses, thus extending previous findings on the bornavirus and on a number of DNA viruses. PMID:22696656

  6. Phosphorylation of human respiratory syncytial virus P protein at serine 54 regulates viral uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Ana; Gonzalez-Armas, Juan C.; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-10-10

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) structural P protein, phosphorylated at serine (S) and threonine (T) residues, is a co-factor of viral RNA polymerase. The phosphorylation of S54 is controlled by the coordinated action of two cellular enzymes: a lithium-sensitive kinase, probably glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3) {beta} and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of lithium-sensitive kinase, soon after infection, blocks the viral growth cycle by inhibiting synthesis and/or accumulation of viral RNAs, proteins and extracellular particles. P protein phosphorylation at S54 is required to liberate viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) from M protein, during the uncoating process. Kinase inhibition, late in infection, produces a decrease in genomic RNA and infectious viral particles. LiCl, intranasally applied to mice infected with HRSV A2 strain, reduces the number of mice with virus in their lungs and the virus titre. Administration of LiCl to humans via aerosol should prevent HRSV infection, without secondary effects.

  7. Broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitors of human herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Lora; Zhi, Yun; Cheng, Hoyee; Ghosh, Ayantika; Piazza, Paolo; Yee, Michael B.; Kumar, Santosh; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bloom, David C.; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Kinchington, Paul R.; Yolken, Robert; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; D’Aiuto, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Herpesvirus infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality through lifelong recurrent cycles of lytic and latent infection in several tissues, including the human nervous system. Acyclovir (ACV) and its prodrug, the current antivirals of choice for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and, to some extent, varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections are nucleoside analogues that inhibit viral DNA replication. Rising viral resistance and the need for more effective second-line drugs have motivated searches for additional antiviral agents, particularly non-nucleoside based agents. We evaluated the antiviral activity of five compounds with predicted lysosomotropic activity using conventional and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal (iPSC-neurons) cultures. Their potency and toxicity were compared with ACV and the lysosomotropic agents chloroquine and bafilomycin A1. Out of five compounds tested, micromolar concentrations of 30N12, 16F19, and 4F17 showed antiviral activity comparable to ACV (50μM) during lytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections, reduced viral DNA copy number, and reduced selected HSV-1 protein levels. These compounds also inhibited the reactivation of ‘quiescent’ HSV-1 infection established in iPSC-neurons, but did not inhibit viral entry into host cells. The same compounds had greater potency than ACV against lytic VZV infection; they also inhibited replication of human cytomegalovirus. The anti-herpetic effects of these non-nucleoside agents merit further evaluation in vivo. PMID:26079681

  8. Broad-spectrum non-nucleoside inhibitors of human herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    McClain, Lora; Zhi, Yun; Cheng, Hoyee; Ghosh, Ayantika; Piazza, Paolo; Yee, Michael B; Kumar, Santosh; Milosevic, Jadranka; Bloom, David C; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Kinchington, Paul R; Yolken, Robert; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; D'Aiuto, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality through lifelong recurrent cycles of lytic and latent infection in several tissues, including the human nervous system. Acyclovir (ACV) and its prodrug, the current antivirals of choice for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and, to some extent, varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections are nucleoside analogues that inhibit viral DNA replication. Rising viral resistance and the need for more effective second-line drugs have motivated searches for additional antiviral agents, particularly non-nucleoside based agents. We evaluated the antiviral activity of five compounds with predicted lysosomotropic activity using conventional and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal (iPSC-neurons) cultures. Their potency and toxicity were compared with ACV and the lysosomotropic agents chloroquine and bafilomycin A1. Out of five compounds tested, micromolar concentrations of 30N12, 16F19, and 4F17 showed antiviral activity comparable to ACV (50μM) during lytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections, reduced viral DNA copy number, and reduced selected HSV-1 protein levels. These compounds also inhibited the reactivation of 'quiescent' HSV-1 infection established in iPSC-neurons, but did not inhibit viral entry into host cells. The same compounds had greater potency than ACV against lytic VZV infection; they also inhibited replication of human cytomegalovirus. The anti-herpetic effects of these non-nucleoside agents merit further evaluation in vivo. PMID:26079681

  9. Crystal Structure of USP7 Ubiquitin-like Domains with an ICP0 Peptide Reveals a Novel Mechanism Used by Viral and Cellular Proteins to Target USP7

    PubMed Central

    Capar, Adam; Zheng, Hong; Frappier, Lori; Saridakis, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 immediate-early protein ICP0 activates viral genes during early stages of infection, affects cellular levels of multiple host proteins and is crucial for effective lytic infection. Being a RING-type E3 ligase prone to auto-ubiquitination, ICP0 relies on human deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 for protection against 26S proteasomal mediated degradation. USP7 is involved in apoptosis, epigenetics, cell proliferation and is targeted by several herpesviruses. Several USP7 partners, including ICP0, GMPS, and UHRF1, interact through its C-terminal domain (CTD), which contains five ubiquitin-like (Ubl) structures. Despite the fact that USP7 has emerged as a drug target for cancer therapy, structural details of USP7 regulation and the molecular mechanism of interaction at its CTD have remained elusive. Here, we mapped the binding site between an ICP0 peptide and USP7 and determined the crystal structure of the first three Ubl domains bound to the ICP0 peptide, which showed that ICP0 binds to a loop on Ubl2. Sequences similar to the USP7-binding site in ICP0 were identified in GMPS and UHRF1 and shown to bind USP7-CTD through Ubl2. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation assays in human cells comparing binding to USP7 with and without a Ubl2 mutation, confirmed the importance of the Ubl2 binding pocket for binding ICP0, GMPS and UHRF1. Therefore we have identified a novel mechanism of USP7 recognition that is used by both viral and cellular proteins. Our structural information was used to generate a model of near full-length USP7, showing the relative position of the ICP0/GMPS/UHRF1 binding pocket and the structural basis by which it could regulate enzymatic activity. PMID:26046769

  10. Involvement of SSRP1 in Latent Replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhong; Liu, Eugene; Renne, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (also named human herpesvirus 8) is a γ-herpesvirus that undergoes both lytic and latent infection. During latent infection, two viral elements are required: latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which functions as an origin binding protein, and the latent origin, which resides within the terminal repeats (TRs) of the viral genome. Previously, we identified two cis-elements within the TRs which are required for latent DNA replication: two LANA binding sites (LBS1 and LBS2 [LBS1/2]) and a GC-rich replication element (RE) upstream of LBS1/2. To further characterize the RE, we constructed a 71-bp minimal replicon (MR) and performed a detailed mutational analysis. Our data indicate that the first 8 nucleotides within the RE are critical for replication. Moreover, both the position and the distance between the RE and LBS1/2 can affect origin replication activity, suggesting that the RE may function as a loading pad for cellular proteins involved in replication. Using biotinylated DNA fragments of wild-type or mutant MRs as probes, we identified 30 proteins that preferentially bind to the origin. Among these proteins, structure-specific recognition protein 1 (SSRP1), a subunit of the FACT complex, and telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) formed complexes with LANA at the MR region. Furthermore, the small interfering RNA-based knockdown of SSRP1, but not the dominant-negative-based knockdown of TRF2, significantly decreased the efficiency of LANA-dependent DNA replication. These results indicate that SSRP1 is a novel cellular protein involved in LANA-dependent DNA replication. PMID:19710137

  11. Manipulation of Plant Host Susceptibility: An Emerging Role for Viral Movement Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Khalid; Vazquez, Franck; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing, a major antiviral defense response in plants. Recent studies indicate a role of virus-derived siRNAs in manipulating the expression of specific host genes and that certain plant viral movement proteins (MPs) can act as viral enhancers of RNA silencing (VERs) by stimulating the spread of silencing between cells. This suggests that viruses have evolved complex responses capable to efficiently hijack the host RNA silencing machinery to their own advantage. We draw here a dynamic model of the interaction of plant viruses with the silencing machinery during invasion of the host. The model proposes that cells at the spreading front of infection, where infection starts from zero and the VSR levels are supposedly low, represent potential sites for viral manipulation of host gene expression by using virus- and host-derived small RNAs. Viral MPs may facilitate the spread of silencing to produce a wave of small RNA-mediated gene expression changes ahead of the infection to increase host susceptibility. When experimentally ascertained, this hypothetical model will call for re-defining viral movement and the function of viral MPs. PMID:22639637

  12. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Genome Replication, Partitioning, and Maintenance in Latency.

    PubMed

    Ohsaki, Eriko; Ueda, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is thought to be an oncogenic member of the γ-herpesvirus subfamily. The virus usually establishes latency upon infection as a default infection pattern. The viral genome replicates according to the host cell cycle by recruiting the host cellular replication machinery. Among the latently expressing viral factors, LANA plays pivotal roles in viral genome replication, partitioning, and maintenance. LANA binds with two LANA-binding sites (LBS1/2) within a terminal repeat (TR) sequence and is indispensable for viral genome replication in latency. The nuclear matrix region seems to be important as a replication site, since LANA as well as cellular replication factors accumulate there and recruit the viral replication origin in latency (ori-P) by its binding activity to LBS. KSHV ori-P consists of LBS followed by a 32-bp GC-rich segment (32GC). Although it has been reported that LANA recruits cellular pre-replication complexes (pre-RC) such as origin recognition complexes (ORCs) to the ori-P through its interaction with ORCs, this mechanism does not account completely for the requirement of the 32GC. On the other hand, there are few reports about the partitioning and maintenance of the viral genome. LANA interacts with many kinds of chromosomal proteins, including Brd2/RING3, core histones, such as H2A/H2B and histone H1, and so on. The detailed molecular mechanisms by which LANA enables KSHV genome partitioning and maintenance still remain obscure. By integrating the findings reported thus far on KSHV genome replication, partitioning, and maintenance in latency, we will summarize what we know now, discuss what questions remain to be answered, and determine what needs to be done next to understand the mechanisms underlying viral replication, partitioning, and maintenance strategy. PMID:22291692

  13. Vaccinia virus telomeres: interaction with the viral I1, I6, and K4 proteins.

    PubMed

    DeMasi, J; Du, S; Lennon, D; Traktman, P

    2001-11-01

    The 192-kb linear DNA genome of vaccinia virus has covalently closed hairpin termini that are extremely AT rich and contain 12 extrahelical bases. Vaccinia virus telomeres have previously been implicated in the initiation of viral genome replication; therefore, we sought to determine whether the telomeres form specific protein-DNA complexes. Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we found that extracts prepared from virions and from the cytoplasm of infected cells contain telomere binding activity. Four shifted complexes were detected using hairpin probes representing the viral termini, two of which represent an interaction with the "flip" isoform and two with the "flop" isoform. All of the specificity for protein binding lies within the terminal 65-bp hairpin sequence. Viral hairpins lacking extrahelical bases cannot form the shifted complexes, suggesting that DNA structure is crucial for complex formation. Using an affinity purification protocol, we purified the proteins responsible for hairpin-protein complex formation. The vaccinia virus I1 protein was identified as being necessary and sufficient for the formation of the upper doublet of shifted complexes, and the vaccinia virus I6 protein was shown to form the lower doublet of shifted complexes. Competition and challenge experiments confirmed that the previously uncharacterized I6 protein binds tightly and with great specificity to the hairpin form of the viral telomeric sequence. Incubation of viral hairpins with extracts from infected cells also generates a smaller DNA fragment that is likely to reflect specific nicking at the apex of the hairpin; we show that the vaccinia virus K4 protein is necessary and sufficient for this reaction. We hypothesize that these telomere binding proteins may play a role in the initiation of vaccinia virus genome replication and/or genome encapsidation. PMID:11581377

  14. The enzymes LSD1 and Set1A cooperate with the viral protein HBx to establish an active hepatitis B viral chromatin state.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Valentina; Hernández, Sergio; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Francisca; Flores, Yvo; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V; Kann, Michael; Villanueva, Rodrigo A; Loyola, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    With about 350 million people chronically infected around the world hepatitis B is a major health problem. Template for progeny HBV synthesis is the viral genome, organized as a minichromosome (cccDNA) inside the hepatocyte nucleus. How viral cccDNA gene expression is regulated by its chromatin structure; more importantly, how the modulation of this structure impacts on viral gene expression remains elusive. Here, we found that the enzyme SetDB1 contributes to setting up a repressed cccDNA chromatin state. This repressive state is activated by the histone lysine demethylase-1 (LSD1). Consistently, inhibiting or reducing LSD1 levels led to repression of viral gene expression. This correlates with the transcriptionally repressive mark H3K9 methylation and reduction on the activating marks H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation on viral promoters. Investigating the importance of viral proteins we found that LSD1 recruitment to viral promoters was dependent on the viral transactivator protein HBx. Moreover, the histone methyltransferase Set1A and HBx are simultaneously bound to the core promoter, and Set1A expression correlates with cccDNA H3K4 methylation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of HBV regulation mediated by the cccDNA chromatin structure, offering new therapeutic targets to develop drugs for the treatment of chronically infected HBV patients. PMID:27174370

  15. The enzymes LSD1 and Set1A cooperate with the viral protein HBx to establish an active hepatitis B viral chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, Valentina; Hernández, Sergio; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Francisca; Flores, Yvo; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.; Kann, Michael; Villanueva, Rodrigo A.; Loyola, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    With about 350 million people chronically infected around the world hepatitis B is a major health problem. Template for progeny HBV synthesis is the viral genome, organized as a minichromosome (cccDNA) inside the hepatocyte nucleus. How viral cccDNA gene expression is regulated by its chromatin structure; more importantly, how the modulation of this structure impacts on viral gene expression remains elusive. Here, we found that the enzyme SetDB1 contributes to setting up a repressed cccDNA chromatin state. This repressive state is activated by the histone lysine demethylase-1 (LSD1). Consistently, inhibiting or reducing LSD1 levels led to repression of viral gene expression. This correlates with the transcriptionally repressive mark H3K9 methylation and reduction on the activating marks H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation on viral promoters. Investigating the importance of viral proteins we found that LSD1 recruitment to viral promoters was dependent on the viral transactivator protein HBx. Moreover, the histone methyltransferase Set1A and HBx are simultaneously bound to the core promoter, and Set1A expression correlates with cccDNA H3K4 methylation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of HBV regulation mediated by the cccDNA chromatin structure, offering new therapeutic targets to develop drugs for the treatment of chronically infected HBV patients. PMID:27174370

  16. Identification of Proteins Bound to Dengue Viral RNA In Vivo Reveals New Host Proteins Important for Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Stacia L.; Soderblom, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus is the most prevalent cause of arthropod-borne infection worldwide. Due to the limited coding capacity of the viral genome and the complexity of the viral life cycle, host cell proteins play essential roles throughout the course of viral infection. Host RNA-binding proteins mediate various aspects of virus replication through their physical interactions with viral RNA. Here we describe a technique designed to identify such interactions in the context of infected cells using UV cross-linking followed by antisense-mediated affinity purification and mass spectrometry. Using this approach, we identified interactions, several of them novel, between host proteins and dengue viral RNA in infected Huh7 cells. Most of these interactions were subsequently validated using RNA immunoprecipitation. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we showed that more than half of these host proteins are likely involved in regulating virus replication, demonstrating the utility of this method in identifying biologically relevant interactions that may not be identified using traditional in vitro approaches. PMID:26733069

  17. Coupled Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Human Lymphotropic Tumor Viruses: Insights on the Detection and Discovery of Viral Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dresang, Lindsay R.; Teuton, Jeremy R.; Feng, Huichen; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Li, Zhihua; Smith, Richard D.; Sugden, Bill; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2011-12-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are related human tumor viruses that cause primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) and Burkitt's lymphomas (BL), respectively. Viral genes expressed in naturally-infected cancer cells contribute to disease pathogenesis; knowing which viral genes are expressed is critical in understanding how these viruses cause cancer. To evaluate the expression of viral genes, we used high-resolution separation and mass spectrometry coupled with custom tiling arrays to align the viral proteomes and transcriptomes of three PEL and two BL cell lines under latent and lytic culture conditions. Results The majority of viral genes were efficiently detected at the transcript and/or protein level on manipulating the viral life cycle. Overall the correlation of expressed viral proteins and transcripts was highly complementary in both validating and providing orthogonal data with latent/lytic viral gene expression. Our approach also identified novel viral genes in both KSHV and EBV, and extends viral genome annotation. Several previously uncharacterized genes were validated at both transcript and protein levels. Conclusions This systems biology approach coupling proteome and transcriptome measurements provides a comprehensive view of viral gene expression that could not have been attained using each methodology independently. Detection of viral proteins in combination with viral transcripts is a potentially powerful method for establishing virus-disease relationships.

  18. A Herpesviral Lytic Protein Regulates the Structure of Latent Viral Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infections by viruses usually involve minimizing viral protein expression so that the host immune system cannot recognize the infected cell through the viral peptides presented on its cell surface. Herpes simplex virus (HSV), for example, is thought to express noncoding RNAs such as latency-associated transcripts (LATs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) as the only abundant viral gene products during latent infection. Here we describe analysis of HSV-1 mutant viruses, providing strong genetic evidence that HSV-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) is expressed during establishment and/or maintenance of latent infection in murine sensory neurons in vivo. Studies of an ICP0 nonsense mutant virus showed that ICP0 promotes heterochromatin and latent and lytic transcription, arguing that ICP0 is expressed and functional. We propose that ICP0 promotes transcription of LATs during establishment or maintenance of HSV latent infection, much as it promotes lytic gene transcription. This report introduces the new concept that a lytic viral protein can be expressed during latent infection and can serve dual roles to regulate viral chromatin to optimize latent infection in addition to its role in epigenetic regulation during lytic infection. An additional implication of the results is that ICP0 might serve as a target for an antiviral therapeutic acting on lytic and latent infections. PMID:27190217

  19. Viral Evolved Inhibition Mechanism of the RNA Dependent Protein Kinase PKR's Kinase Domain, a Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, K. Hari; Vadlamudi, Yallamandayya; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR activated by viral dsRNA, phosphorylates the eIF2α, which inhibit the mechanism of translation initiation. Viral evolved proteins mimicking the eIF2α block its phosphorylation and help in the viral replication. To decipher the molecular basis for the PKR’s substrate and inhibitor interaction mechanisms, we carried the molecular dynamics studies on the catalytic domain of PKR in complex with substrate eIF2α, and inhibitors TAT and K3L. The studies conducted show the altered domain movements of N lobe, which confers open and close state to the substrate-binding cavity. In addition, PKR exhibits variations in the secondary structural transition of the activation loop residues, and inter molecular contacts with the substrate and the inhibitors. Phosphorylation of the P+1 loop at the Thr-451 increases the affinity of the binding proteins exhibiting its role in the phosphorylation events. The implications of structural mechanisms uncovered will help to understand the basis of the evolution of the host-viral and the viral replication mechanisms. PMID:27088597

  20. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein K interacts with Sindbis virus nonstructural proteins and viral subgenomic mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, Andrew J.; Gong, Lei; Hardy, Richard W.

    2007-10-10

    Alphaviruses are a group of arthropod-borne human and animal pathogens that can cause epidemics of significant public health and economic consequence. Alphavirus RNA synthesis requires four virally encoded nonstructural proteins and probably a number of cellular proteins. Using comparative two-dimensional electrophoresis we were able to identify proteins enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions containing viral RNA synthetic complexes following infection with Sindbis virus. Our studies demonstrated the following: (i) the host protein hnRNP K is enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions following Sindbis virus infection, (ii) viral nonstructural proteins co-immunoprecipitate with hnRNP K, (iii) nsP2 and hnRNP K co-localize in the cytoplasm of Sindbis virus infected cells, (iv) Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA, but not genomic RNA co-immunoprecipitates with hnRNP K, (v) viral RNA does not appear to be required for the interaction of hnRNP K with the nonstructural proteins. Potential functions of hnRNP K during virus replication are discussed.

  1. Regulation of Viral RNA Synthesis by the V Protein of Parainfluenza Virus 5

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zengel, James; Sun, Minghao; Sleeman, Katrina; Timani, Khalid Amine; Aligo, Jason; Rota, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses include many important animal and human pathogens. The genome of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), a prototypical paramyxovirus, encodes a V protein that inhibits viral RNA synthesis. In this work, the mechanism of inhibition was investigated. Using mutational analysis and a minigenome system, we identified regions in the N and C termini of the V protein that inhibit viral RNA synthesis: one at the very N terminus of V and the second at the C terminus of V. Furthermore, we determined that residues L16 and I17 are critical for the inhibitory function of the N-terminal region of the V protein. Both regions interact with the nucleocapsid protein (NP), an essential component of the viral RNA genome complex (RNP). Mutations at L16 and I17 abolished the interaction between NP and the N-terminal domain of V. This suggests that the interaction between NP and the N-terminal domain plays a critical role in V inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by the N-terminal domain. Both the N- and C-terminal regions inhibited viral RNA replication. The C terminus inhibited viral RNA transcription, while the N-terminal domain enhanced viral RNA transcription, suggesting that the two domains affect viral RNA through different mechanisms. Interestingly, V also inhibited the synthesis of the RNA of other paramyxoviruses, such as Nipah virus (NiV), human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV3), measles virus (MeV), mumps virus (MuV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This suggests that a common host factor may be involved in the replication of these paramyxoviruses. IMPORTANCE We identified two regions of the V protein that interact with NP and determined that one of these regions enhances viral RNA transcription via its interaction with NP. Our data suggest that a common host factor may be involved in the regulation of paramyxovirus replication and could be a target for broad antiviral drug development. Understanding the regulation of paramyxovirus replication will enable the

  2. The Structure of Herpesvirus Fusion Glycoprotein B-Bilayer Complex Reveals the Protein-Membrane and Lateral Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Ulrike E.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Cairns, Tina M.; Hannah, Brian P.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Topf, Maya; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Grünewald, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycoprotein B (gB) is a key component of the complex herpesvirus fusion machinery. We studied membrane interaction of two gB ectodomain forms and present an electron cryotomography structure of the gB-bilayer complex. The two forms differed in presence or absence of the membrane proximal region (MPR) but showed an overall similar trimeric shape. The presence of the MPR impeded interaction with liposomes. In contrast, the MPR-lacking form interacted efficiently with liposomes. Lateral interaction resulted in coat formation on the membranes. The structure revealed that interaction of gB with membranes was mediated by the fusion loops and limited to the outer membrane leaflet. The observed intrinsic propensity of gB to cluster on membranes indicates an additional role of gB in driving the fusion process forward beyond the transient fusion pore opening and subsequently leading to fusion pore expansion. PMID:23850455

  3. Sigma 1 protein of mammalian reoviruses extends from the surfaces of viral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, D.B.; Nibert, M.L.; Fields, B.N.

    1988-01-01

    Electron microscopy revealed structures consisting of long fibers topped with knobs extending from the surfaces of virions of mammalian reoviruses. The morphology of these structures was reminiscent of the fiber protein of adenovirus. Fibers were also seen extending from the reovirus top component and intermediate subviral particles but not from cores, suggesting that the fibers consist of either the ..mu..1C or sigma1 outer capsid protein. Amino acid sequence analysis predicts that the reovirus cell attachment protein sigma1 contains an extended fiber domain. When sigma1 protein was released from viral particles with mild heat and subsequently obtained in isolation, it was found to have a morphology identical to that of the fiber structures seen extending from the viral particles. The identification of an extended form of sigma1 has important implications for its function in cell attachment. Other evidence suggest that sigma1 protein may occur in virions in both an extended and an unextended state.

  4. Modulation of the Translational Landscape During Herpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviral mRNAs are produced and translated by cellular machinery, rendering them susceptible to the network of regulatory events that impact translation. In response, these viruses have evolved to infiltrate and hijack translational control pathways as well as to integrate specialized host translation strategies into their own repertoire. They are robust systems to dissect mechanisms of mammalian translational regulation and continue to offer insight into cis-acting mRNA features that impact assembly and activity of the translation apparatus. Here, I discuss recent advances revealing the extent to which the three herpesvirus subfamilies regulate both host and viral translation, thereby dramatically impacting the landscape of protein synthesis in infected cells. PMID:26958918

  5. Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus: mechanisms of oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Thomas F; Cesarman, Ethel

    2015-10-01

    Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV8) causes three human malignancies, Kaposi Sarcoma (KS), an endothelial tumor, as well as Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) and the plasma cell variant of Multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD), two B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. All three cancers occur primarily in the context of immune deficiency and/or HIV infection, but their pathogenesis differs. KS most likely results from the combined effects of an endotheliotropic virus with angiogenic properties and inflammatory stimuli and thus represents an interesting example of a cancer that arises in an inflammatory context. Viral and cellular angiogenic and inflammatory factors also play an important role in the pathogenesis of MCD. In contrast, PEL represents an autonomously growing malignancy that is, however, still dependent on the continuous presence of KSHV and the action of several KSHV proteins. PMID:26431609

  6. Immune evasion by Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Lee, Stacy; Chaudhary, Preet M; Gill, Parkash; Jung, Jae U

    2011-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are often associated with serious diseases, primarily by altering functions of the host immune system. The hallmark of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection is the establishment of a life-long persistent infection, which leads to several clinical, epidemiological and infectious diseases, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma, a plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease, and primary effusion lymphoma. To sustain an efficient life-long persistency, KSHV dedicates a large portion of its genome to encoding immunomodulatory proteins that antagonize the immune system of its host. In this article, we highlight the strategies KSHV uses to evade, escape and survive its battle against the host’s immune system. PMID:20860481

  7. Cleavage of spike protein of SARS coronavirus by protease factor Xa is associated with viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Lanying; Kao, Richard Y.; Zhou, Yusen; He, Yuxian; Zhao, Guangyu; Wong, Charlotte; Jiang, Shibo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Jian . E-mail: bzheng@hkucc.hku.hk

    2007-07-20

    The spike (S) protein of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been known to recognize and bind to host receptors, whose conformational changes then facilitate fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membrane, leading to viral entry into target cells. However, other functions of SARS-CoV S protein such as proteolytic cleavage and its implications to viral infection are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the infection of SARS-CoV and a pseudovirus bearing the S protein of SARS-CoV was inhibited by a protease inhibitor Ben-HCl. Also, the protease Factor Xa, a target of Ben-HCl abundantly expressed in infected cells, was able to cleave the recombinant and pseudoviral S protein into S1 and S2 subunits, and the cleavage was inhibited by Ben-HCl. Furthermore, this cleavage correlated with the infectivity of the pseudovirus. Taken together, our study suggests a plausible mechanism by which SARS-CoV cleaves its S protein to facilitate viral infection.

  8. HIV1-viral protein R (Vpr) mutations: associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rui; Rocha, Graça; Meliço-Silvestre, António; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 30 years, research into HIV has advanced the knowledge of virus genetics and the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is a specialized and multifunctional protein that plays important roles at multiple stages of the HIV-1 viral life cycle. This protein interacts with a number of cellular and viral proteins and with multiple activities including nuclear transport of the pre-integration complex (PIC) to the nucleus, transcriptional activation, cell cycle arrest at G2/M transition phase and induction of cell death via apoptosis. Specifically, Vpr has been shown to control many host cell functions through a variety of biological processes and by interaction with several cellular pathways. The different functions of Vpr may enhance viral replication and impair the immune system in HIV-1 infected patients. Importantly, functional defects induced by mutations in the Vpr protein correlate with slow disease progression of HIV-infected patients. Vpr is also associated with other concomitant pathologies developed by these patients, which may lead it to be considered as a potential novel therapeutic target. This review will focus on HIV-1 Vpr, mainly on the importance of its structural mutations on the progression of HIV infection, associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27264019

  9. The critical protein interactions and structures that elicit growth deregulation in cancer and viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Horng D.; May, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to define the critical targets and network interactions that are subverted to elicit growth deregulation in human cells. Understanding and developing rational treatments for cancer requires a definition of the key molecular targets and how they interact to elicit the complex growth deregulation phenotype. Viral proteins provide discerning and powerful probes to understand both how cells work and how they can be manipulated using a minimal number of components. The small DNA viruses have evolved to target inherent weaknesses in cellular protein interaction networks to hijack the cellular DNA and protein replication machinery. In the battle to escape the inevitability of senescence and programmed cell death, cancers have converged on similar mechanisms, through the acquisition and selection of somatic mutations that drive unchecked cellular replication in tumors. Understanding the dynamic mechanisms through which a minimal number of viral proteins promote host cells to undergo unscheduled and pathological replication is a powerful strategy to identify critical targets that are also disrupted in cancer. Viruses can therefore be used as tools to probe the system-wide protein-protein interactions and structures that drive growth deregulation in human cells. Ultimately this can provide a path for developing system context-dependent therapeutics. This review will describe ongoing experimental approaches using viruses to study pathways deregulated in cancer, with a particular focus on viral cellular protein-protein interactions and structures. PMID:21061422

  10. The critical protein interactions and structures that elicit growth deregulation in cancer and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng D; May, Andrew P; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2011-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to define the critical targets and network interactions that are subverted to elicit growth deregulation in human cells. Understanding and developing rational treatments for cancer requires a definition of the key molecular targets and how they interact to elicit the complex growth deregulation phenotype. Viral proteins provide discerning and powerful probes to understand both how cells work and how they can be manipulated using a minimal number of components. The small DNA viruses have evolved to target inherent weaknesses in cellular protein interaction networks to hijack the cellular DNA and protein replication machinery. In the battle to escape the inevitability of senescence and programmed cell death, cancers have converged on similar mechanisms, through the acquisition and selection of somatic mutations that drive unchecked cellular replication in tumors. Understanding the dynamic mechanisms through which a minimal number of viral proteins promote host cells to undergo unscheduled and pathological replication is a powerful strategy to identify critical targets that are also disrupted in cancer. Viruses can therefore be used as tools to probe the system-wide protein-protein interactions and structures that drive growth deregulation in human cells. Ultimately this can provide a path for developing system context-dependent therapeutics. This review will describe ongoing experimental approaches using viruses to study pathways deregulated in cancer, with a particular focus on viral cellular protein-protein interactions and structures. PMID:21061422

  11. Control of α-herpesvirus IE gene expression by HCF-1 coupled chromatin modification activities

    PubMed Central

    Kristie, Thomas M.; Liang, Yu; Vogel, Jodi L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The immediate early genes of the α-herpesviruses HSV and VZV are transcriptionally regulated by viral and cellular factors in a complex combinatorial manner. Despite this complexity and the apparent redundancy of activators, the expression of the viral IE genes is critically dependent upon the cellular transcriptional coactivator HCF-1. Although the role of HCF-1 had remained elusive, recent studies have demonstrated that the protein is a component of multiple chromatin modification complexes including the Set1/MLL1 histone H3K4 methyltransferases. Studies using model viral promoter-reporter systems as well as analyses of components recruited to the viral genome during the initiation of infection have elucidated the significance of HCF-1 chromatin modification complexes in contributing to the final state of modified histones assembled on the viral IE promoters. Strikingly, the absence of HCF-1 results in the accumulation of nucleosomes bearing repressive marks on the viral IE promoters and silencing of viral gene expression. PMID:19682612

  12. Novel approaches and challenges to treatment of CNS viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Avindra; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Existing and emerging viral CNS infections are major sources of human morbidity and mortality. Treatments of proven efficacy are currently limited predominantly to herpesviruses and human immunodeficiency virus. Development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal model systems for some important viruses and by the difficulty in conducting human clinical trials for diseases that may be rare, or in the case of arboviral infections, often have variable seasonal and geographic incidence. Nonetheless, many novel approaches to antiviral therapy are available including candidate thiazolide and purazinecarboxamide derivatives with potential broad-spectrum antiviral efficacy. New herpesvirus drugs include viral helicase-primase and terminase inhibitors. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and other strategies to interfere with viral RNA translation has shown efficacy in experimental models of CNS viral disease. Identifying specific molecular targets within viral replication cycles has led to many existing antivirals and will undoubtedly continue to be the basis of future drug design. A promising new area of research involves therapies based on enhanced understanding of host antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptor agonists, and drugs that inhibit specific cytokines as well as interferon preparations have all shown potential therapeutic efficacy. Passive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes have been used in humans and may provide an effective therapies for some herpesvirus infections and potentially for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against specific viral proteins have been developed and in several cases evaluated in humans in settings including West Nile virus and HIV infection and in pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies. PMID:23913580

  13. The HSV-1 tegument protein pUL46 associates with cellular membranes and viral capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael A.; Bucks, Michelle A.; O'Regan, Kevin J.; Courtney, Richard J.

    2008-07-05

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the addition of tegument proteins into nascent herpesvirus particles are poorly understood. To better understand the tegumentation process of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, we initiated studies that showed the tegument protein pUL46 (VP11/12) has a similar cellular localization to the membrane-associated tegument protein VP22. Using membrane flotation analysis we found that pUL46 associates with membranes in both the presence and absence of other HSV-1 proteins. However, when purified virions were stripped of their envelope, the majority of pUL46 was found to associate with the capsid fraction. This strong affinity of pUL46 for capsids was confirmed by an in vitro capsid pull-down assay in which purified pUL46-GST was able to interact specifically with capsids purified from the nuclear fraction of HSV-1 infected cells. These results suggest that pUL46 displays a dynamic interaction between cellular membranes and capsids.

  14. Effect of metal catalyzed oxidation in recombinant viral protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein assemblies, such as virus-like particles, have increasing importance as vaccines, delivery vehicles and nanomaterials. However, their use requires stable assemblies. An important cause of loss of stability in proteins is oxidation, which can occur during their production, purification and storage. Despite its importance, very few studies have investigated the effect of oxidation in protein assemblies and their structural units. In this work, we investigated the role of in vitro oxidation in the assembly and stability of rotavirus VP6, a polymorphic protein. Results The susceptibility to oxidation of VP6 assembled into nanotubes (VP6NT) and unassembled VP6 (VP6U) was determined and compared to bovine serum albumin (BSA) as control. VP6 was more resistant to oxidation than BSA, as determined by measuring protein degradation and carbonyl content. It was found that assembly protected VP6 from in vitro metal-catalyzed oxidation. Oxidation provoked protein aggregation and VP6NT fragmentation, as evidenced by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Oxidative damage of VP6 correlated with a decrease of its center of fluorescence spectral mass. The in vitro assembly efficiency of VP6U into VP6NT decreased as the oxidant concentration increased. Conclusions Oxidation caused carbonylation, quenching, and destruction of aromatic amino acids and aggregation of VP6 in its assembled and unassembled forms. Such modifications affected protein functionality, including its ability to assemble. That assembly protected VP6 from oxidation shows that exposure of susceptible amino acids to the solvent increases their damage, and therefore the protein surface area that is exposed to the solvent is determinant of its susceptibility to oxidation. The inability of oxidized VP6 to assemble into nanotubes highlights the importance of avoiding this modification during the production of proteins that self-assemble. This is the first time that the role of

  15. Bovine viral diarrhea virus structural protein E2 as a complement regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Ostachuk, Agustín

    2016-07-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the genus Pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, and is one of the most widely distributed viruses in cattle worldwide. Approximately 60 % of cattle in endemic areas without control measures are infected with BVDV during their lifetime. This wide prevalence of BVDV in cattle populations results in significant economic losses. BVDV is capable of establishing persistent infections in its host due to its ability to infect fetuses, causing immune tolerance. However, this cannot explain how the virus evades the innate immune system. The objective of the present work was to test the potential activity of E2 as a complement regulatory protein. E2 glycoprotein, produced both in soluble and transmembrane forms in stable CHO-K1 cell lines, was able to reduce complement-mediated cell lysis up to 40 % and complement-mediated DNA fragmentation by 50 %, in comparison with cell lines not expressing the glycoprotein. This work provides the first evidence of E2 as a complement regulatory protein and, thus, the finding of a mechanism of immune evasion by BVDV. Furthermore, it is postulated that E2 acts as a self-associated molecular pattern (SAMP), enabling the virus to avoid being targeted by the immune system and to be recognized as self. PMID:27038454

  16. Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses EEHV1A, EEHV1B, and EEHV2 from Cases of Hemorrhagic Disease Are Highly Diverged from Other Mammalian Herpesviruses and May Form a New Subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Laura K.; Zong, Jian-Chao; Latimer, Erin M.; Lock, Justin; Fleischer, Robert C.; Heaggans, Sarah Y.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A family of novel endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHVs) assigned to the genus Proboscivirus have been identified as the cause of fatal hemorrhagic disease in 70 young Asian elephants worldwide. Although EEHV cannot be grown in cell culture, we have determined a total of 378 kb of viral genomic DNA sequence directly from clinical tissue samples from six lethal cases and two survivors. Overall, the data obtained encompass 57 genes, including orthologues of 32 core genes common to all herpesviruses, 14 genes found in some other herpesviruses, plus 10 novel genes, including a single large putative transcriptional regulatory protein (ORF-L). On the basis of differences in gene content and organization plus phylogenetic analyses of conserved core proteins that have just 20% to 50% or less identity to orthologues in other herpesviruses, we propose that EEHV1A, EEHV1B, and EEHV2 could be considered a new Deltaherpesvirinae subfamily of mammalian herpesviruses that evolved as an intermediate branch between the Betaherpesvirinae and Gammaherpesvirinae. Unlike cytomegaloviruses, EEHV genomes encode ribonucleotide kinase B subunit (RRB), thymidine kinase (TK), and UL9-like origin binding protein (OBP) proteins and have an alphaherpesvirus-like dyad symmetry Ori-Lyt domain. They also differ from all known betaherpesviruses by having a 40-kb large-scale inversion of core gene blocks I, II, and III. EEHV1 and EEHV2 DNA differ uniformly by more than 25%, but EEHV1 clusters into two major subgroups designated EEHV1A and EEHV1B with ancient partially chimeric features. Whereas large segments are nearly identical, three nonadjacent loci totaling 15 kb diverge by between 21 and 37%. One strain of EEHV1B analyzed is interpreted to be a modern partial recombinant with EEHV1A. IMPORTANCE Asian elephants are an endangered species whose survival is under extreme pressure in wild range countries and whose captive breeding populations in zoos are not self-sustaining. In 1999, a

  17. The chromatin landscape of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Toth, Zsolt; Brulois, Kevin; Jung, Jae U

    2013-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus that causes latent infection in humans. In cells, the viral genome adopts a highly organized chromatin structure, which is controlled by a wide variety of cellular and viral chromatin regulatory factors. In the past few years, interrogation of the chromatinized KSHV genome by whole genome-analyzing tools revealed that the complex chromatin landscape spanning the viral genome in infected cells has important regulatory roles during the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the most recent findings regarding the role of histone modifications, histone modifying enzymes, DNA methylation, microRNAs, non-coding RNAs and the nuclear organization of the KSHV epigenome in the regulation of latent and lytic viral gene expression programs as well as their connection to KSHV-associated pathogenesis. PMID:23698402

  18. Towards protein-based viral mimetics for cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Vázquez, Esther; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramón; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    High resistance and recurrence rates, together with elevated drug clearance, compel the use of maximum-tolerated drug doses in cancer therapy, resulting in high-grade toxicities and limited clinical applicability. Promoting active drug accumulation in tumor tissues would minimize such issues and improve therapeutic outcomes. A new class of therapeutic drugs suitable for the task has emerged based on the concept of virus-mimetic nanocarriers, or 'artificial viruses'. Among the spectrum of materials under exploration in nanocarrier research, proteins offer unparalleled structural and functional versatility for designing virus-like molecular vehicles. By exhibiting 'smart' functions and biomimetic traits, protein-based nanocarriers will be a step ahead of the conventional drug-protein conjugates already in the clinic in ensuring efficient delivery of passenger antitumor drugs. PMID:25805413

  19. Singapore Grouper Iridovirus ORF75R is a Scaffold Protein Essential for Viral Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fan; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Yi; Ngoc Tran, Bich; Wu, Jinlu; Leong Hew, Choy

    2015-01-01

    Singapore Grouper Iridovirus (SGIV) is a member of nucleo cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV). This paper reports the functional analysis of ORF75R, a major structural protein of SGIV. Immuno fluorescence studies showed that the protein was accumulated in the viral assembly site. Immunogold-labelling indicated that it was localized between the viral capsid shell and DNA core. Knockdown of ORF75R by morpholinos resulted in the reduction of coreshell thickness, the failure of DNA encapsidation, and the low yield of infectious particles. Comparative proteomics further identified the structural proteins affected by ORF75R knockdown. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with proteomics demonstrated that ORF75R was phosphorylated at multiple sites in SGIV-infected cell lysate and virions, but the vast majority of ORF75R in virions was the dephosphorylated isoform. A kinase assay showed that ORF75R could be phosphorylated in vitro by the SGIV structural protein ORF39L. Addition of ATP and Mg2+ into purified virions prompted extensive phosphorylation of structural proteins and release of ORF75R from virions. These data suggest that ORF75R is a novel scaffold protein important for viral assembly and DNA encapsidation, but its phosphorylation facilitates virion disassembly. Compared to proteins from other viruses, we found that ORF75R shares common features with herpes simplex virus VP22. PMID:26286371

  20. Molecular gymnastics at the herpesvirus surface

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Félix A

    2006-01-01

    This review analyses recent structural results that provide clues about a possible molecular mechanism for the transmission of a fusogenic signal among the envelope glycoproteins of the herpes simplex virus on receptor binding by glycoprotein gD. This signal triggers the membrane-fusion machinery of the virus—contained in glycoproteins gB, gH and gL—to induce the merging of viral and cellular membranes, and to allow virus entry into target cells. This activating process parallels that of γ-retroviruses, in which receptor binding by the amino-terminal domain of the envelope protein activates the fusogenic potential of the virion in a similar way, despite the different organization of the envelope complexes of these two types of viruses. Therefore, the new structural results on the interaction of gD with its receptors might also provide insights into the mechanism of fusogenic signal transmission in γ-retroviruses. Furthermore, the fusion activation parallels with retroviruses, together with the recently reported structural homology of gB with the rhabdovirus envelope glycoprotein indicate that the complex entry apparatus of herpesviruses appears to be functionally related to that of simpler enveloped viruses. PMID:17016458

  1. Structural basis for viral 5′-PPP-RNA recognition by human IFIT proteins

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Yazan M.; Pichlmair, Andreas; Górna, Maria W.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    IFIT proteins are interferon-inducible, innate immune effector molecules that are thought to confer antiviral defence through disruption of protein-protein interactions in the host translation initiation machinery. However, recently it was discovered that IFITs could directly recognize viral RNA bearing a 5′-triphosphate group (PPP-RNA), which is a molecular signature that distinguishes it from host RNA. Here, we report crystal structures of human IFIT5, its complex with PPP-RNAs, and an N-terminal fragment of IFIT1. The structures reveal a new helical domain that houses a positively charged cavity designed to specifically engage only single stranded PPP-RNA, thus distinguishing it from the canonical cytosolic sensor of double stranded viral PPP-RNA, RIG-I. Mutational analysis, proteolysis and gel-shift assays reveal that PPP-RNA is bound in a non-sequence specific manner and requires approximately a 3-nucleotide 5′-overhang. Abrogation of PPP-RNA binding in IFIT1 and IFIT5 were found to cause a defect in the anti-viral response by HEK cells. These results demonstrate the mechanism by which IFIT proteins selectively recognize viral RNA and lend insight into their downstream effector function. PMID:23334420

  2. Viral AlkB proteins repair RNA damage by oxidative demethylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Born, Erwin; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Bekkelund, Anders; Leihne, Vibeke; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Falnes, Pål Ø.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial and mammalian AlkB proteins are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that reverse methylation damage, such as 1-methyladenine and 3-methylcytosine, in RNA and DNA. An AlkB-domain is encoded by the genome of numerous single-stranded, plant-infecting RNA viruses, the majority of which belong to the Flexiviridae family. Our phylogenetic analysis of AlkB sequences suggests that a single plant virus might have acquired AlkB relatively recently, followed by horizontal dissemination among other viruses via recombination. Here, we describe the first functional characterization of AlkB proteins from three plant viruses. The viral AlkB proteins efficiently reactivated methylated bacteriophage genomes when expressed in Escherichia coli, and also displayed robust, iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent demethylase activity in vitro. Viral AlkB proteins preferred RNA over DNA substrates, and thus represent the first AlkBs with such substrate specificity. Our results suggest a role for viral AlkBs in maintaining the integrity of the viral RNA genome through repair of deleterious methylation damage, and support the notion that AlkB-mediated RNA repair is biologically relevant. PMID:18718927

  3. Comparison of levels and duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus 2, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 in calves fed maternal colostrum or a colostrum-replacement product.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Manuel F; Walz, Paul H; Haines, Deborah M; Passler, Thomas; Earleywine, Thomas; Palomares, Roberto A; Riddell, Kay P; Galik, Patricia; Zhang, Yijing; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Colostrum-replacement products are an alternative to provide passive immunity to neonatal calves; however, their ability to provide adequate levels of antibodies recognizing respiratory viruses has not been described. The objective of this study was to compare the serum levels of IgG at 2 d of age and the duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3) in calves fed maternal colostrum (MC) or a colostrum replacement (CR) at birth. Forty newborn male Holstein calves were assigned to the CR or the MC group. Group CR (n = 20) received 2 packets of colostrum replacement (100 g of IgG per 470-g packet), while group MC (n = 20) received 3.8 L of maternal colostrum. Blood samples for detection of IgG and virus antibodies were collected from each calf at birth, at 2 and 7 d, and monthly until the calves became seronegative. Calves in the MC group had greater IgG concentrations at 2 d of age. The apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG was greater in the MC group than in the CR group, although the difference was not significant. Calves in the CR group had greater concentrations of BVDV neutralizing antibodies during the first 4 mo of life. The levels of antibodies to BRSV, BHV-1, and BPIV-3 were similar in the 2 groups. The mean time to seronegativity was similar for each virus in the 2 groups; however, greater variation was observed in the antibody levels and in the duration of detection of immunity in the MC group than in the CR group. Thus, the CR product provided calves with more uniform levels and duration of antibodies to common bovine respiratory viruses. PMID:24688168

  4. Comparison of levels and duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus 2, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine herpesvirus 1, and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 in calves fed maternal colostrum or a colostrum-replacement product

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Manuel F.; Walz, Paul H.; Haines, Deborah M.; Passler, Thomas; Earleywine, Thomas; Palomares, Roberto A.; Riddell, Kay P.; Galik, Patricia; Zhang, Yijing; Givens, M. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Colostrum-replacement products are an alternative to provide passive immunity to neonatal calves; however, their ability to provide adequate levels of antibodies recognizing respiratory viruses has not been described. The objective of this study was to compare the serum levels of IgG at 2 d of age and the duration of detection of antibodies to bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 (BVDV-2), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), and bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3) in calves fed maternal colostrum (MC) or a colostrum replacement (CR) at birth. Forty newborn male Holstein calves were assigned to the CR or the MC group. Group CR (n = 20) received 2 packets of colostrum replacement (100 g of IgG per 470-g packet), while group MC (n = 20) received 3.8 L of maternal colostrum. Blood samples for detection of IgG and virus antibodies were collected from each calf at birth, at 2 and 7 d, and monthly until the calves became seronegative. Calves in the MC group had greater IgG concentrations at 2 d of age. The apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG was greater in the MC group than in the CR group, although the difference was not significant. Calves in the CR group had greater concentrations of BVDV neutralizing antibodies during the first 4 mo of life. The levels of antibodies to BRSV, BHV-1, and BPIV-3 were similar in the 2 groups. The mean time to seronegativity was similar for each virus in the 2 groups; however, greater variation was observed in the antibody levels and in the duration of detection of immunity in the MC group than in the CR group. Thus, the CR product provided calves with more uniform levels and duration of antibodies to common bovine respiratory viruses. PMID:24688168

  5. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-01-01

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%–99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy. PMID:26114473

  6. Primary Structure of the Herpesvirus Ateles Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jens-Christian

    2000-01-01

    Herpesvirus ateles is an agent indigenous to spider monkeys (Ateles spp.) and causes fulminant lymphomas in various New World primates. Structural and genetic relatedness led to the classification of this virus as a member of the genus Rhadinovirus. It is most closely related to Herpesvirus saimiri. The 108,409-bp light DNA segment of the herpesvirus ateles strain 73 genome has two genes for U-RNA-like transcripts and 73 open reading frames, of which at least 6 show significant homologies to cellular genes (encoding complement control proteins, apoptosis-regulatory proteins, D-type cyclins, interleukin-8 receptors, and enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism). The left terminal region of the light DNA segment bears the putative rhadinovirus oncogene tio. PMID:10623770

  7. Viral-Host Protein Interaction Studies Using Yeast Two-Hybrid Screening Method.

    PubMed

    Dudha, Namrata; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay is one of the earliest methods developed to study protein-protein interactions. In the proteomics era, Y2H has created a niche of its own by providing protein interaction maps for various organisms. Owing to limited coding capacities of their genomes, viruses are dependent on their host cellular machinery for successful infection. Identification of the key players orchestrating the survival of virus in their host is essential for understanding viral life cycle and devising strategies to prevent interactions resulting in pathogenesis. In this chapter, Y2H assay will be explained in detail for studying viral-host protein interactions of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). PMID:27233270

  8. The virally encoded killer proteins from Ustilago maydis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several strains of Ustilago maydis, a causal agent of corn smut disease, exhibit a 'killer' phenotype that is due to persistent infection by double-stranded RNA Totiviruses. These viruses produce potent killer proteins that are secreted by the host. This is a rare example of virus/host symbiosis in ...

  9. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far. PMID:27455310

  10. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far. PMID:27455310

  11. Herpesvirus orthologues of CD200 bind host CD200R but not related activating receptors.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Lai Shan; Akkaya, Munir; Barclay, A Neil; Hatherley, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Several herpesviruses have acquired the gene for the CD200 membrane protein from their hosts and can downregulate myeloid activity through interaction of this viral CD200 orthologue with the host receptor for CD200, namely CD200R, which can give inhibitory signals. This receptor is a 'paired receptor', meaning proteins related to the inhibitory CD200R are present but differ in that they can give activating signals and also give a negligible interaction with CD200. We showed that the viral orthologues e127 from rat cytomegalovirus and K14 from human herpesvirus 8 do not bind the activating CD200R-like proteins from their respective species, although they do bind the inhibitory receptors. It is thought that the activating receptors have evolved in response to pathogens targeting the inhibitory receptor. In this case, the CD200 orthologue is not trapped by the activating receptor but has maintained the specificity of the host from which it was acquired, suggesting that the activating members of the CD200R family have evolved to protect against a different pathogen. PMID:26538068

  12. Ethnomedicines and ethnomedicinal phytophores against herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan

    2008-01-01

    Herpesviruses are important human pathogens that can cause mild to severe lifelong infections with high morbidity in susceptible adults. Moreover, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2, for example, has been reported to be responsible for increased transmission and disease progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Therefore, the discovery of novel anti-HSV drugs deserves great efforts. Herbal medicinal products have been used as source of putative candidate drugs in many diseases. However, in case of viral diseases the development of antivirals from natural source is less explored probably because within the virus there are few specific targets where the small molecules can interact to inhibit or kill the virus. The currently available antiherpes drugs are nucleoside analogs that did not cure the lifelong or recurrent infections and the use of these drugs often lead to the development of viral resistance coupled with the problem of side effects, recurrence and viral latency. However a wide array of herbal products, used by diverse medicinal systems throughout the world, showed high level of antiherpesvirus activities and many of them have complementary and overlapping mechanism of action, either by inhibiting viral replication, or viral genome synthesis. This chapter will summarize some of the promising herbal extracts and purified compounds isolated from the herbal sources by several laboratories. Cases with proven in vitro and documented in vivo activities, along with their structure-activity relationship against herpesviruses are discussed. PMID:18606369

  13. DNA-templated assembly of viral protein hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Tao, Ailin; Xu, Yun

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogels are a promising class of biomaterials that can be easily tailored to produce a native extracellular matrix that exhibits desirable mechanical and chemical properties. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel via the assembly of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) capsid protein and Y-shaped and cross-shaped DNAs.Hydrogels are a promising class of biomaterials that can be easily tailored to produce a native extracellular matrix that exhibits desirable mechanical and chemical properties. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel via the assembly of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) capsid protein and Y-shaped and cross-shaped DNAs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02414a

  14. Thermodynamic instability of viral proteins is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern targeted by human defensins.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Koneru, Pratibha C; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Strömstedt, Adam A; Lu, Wuyuan; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2016-01-01

    Human defensins are innate immune defense peptides with a remarkably broad repertoire of anti-pathogen activities. In addition to modulating immune response, inflammation, and angiogenesis, disintegrating bacterial membranes, and inactivating bacterial toxins, defensins are known to intercept various viruses at different stages of their life cycles, while remaining relatively benign towards human cells and proteins. Recently we have found that human defensins inactivate proteinaceous bacterial toxins by taking advantage of their low thermodynamic stability and acting as natural "anti-chaperones", i.e. destabilizing the native conformation of the toxins. In the present study we tested various proteins produced by several viruses (HIV-1, PFV, and TEV) and found them to be susceptible to destabilizing effects of human α-defensins HNP-1 and HD-5 and the synthetic θ-defensin RC-101, but not β-defensins hBD-1 and hBD-2 or structurally related plant-derived peptides. Defensin-induced unfolding promoted exposure of hydrophobic groups otherwise confined to the core of the viral proteins. This resulted in precipitation, an enhanced susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage, and a loss of viral protein activities. We propose, that defensins recognize and target a common and essential physico-chemical property shared by many bacterial toxins and viral proteins - the intrinsically low thermodynamic protein stability. PMID:27581352

  15. Thermodynamic instability of viral proteins is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern targeted by human defensins

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Elena; Koneru, Pratibha C.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Strömstedt, Adam A.; Lu, Wuyuan; Kudryashov, Dmitri S.

    2016-01-01

    Human defensins are innate immune defense peptides with a remarkably broad repertoire of anti-pathogen activities. In addition to modulating immune response, inflammation, and angiogenesis, disintegrating bacterial membranes, and inactivating bacterial toxins, defensins are known to intercept various viruses at different stages of their life cycles, while remaining relatively benign towards human cells and proteins. Recently we have found that human defensins inactivate proteinaceous bacterial toxins by taking advantage of their low thermodynamic stability and acting as natural “anti-chaperones”, i.e. destabilizing the native conformation of the toxins. In the present study we tested various proteins produced by several viruses (HIV-1, PFV, and TEV) and found them to be susceptible to destabilizing effects of human α-defensins HNP-1 and HD-5 and the synthetic θ-defensin RC-101, but not β-defensins hBD-1 and hBD-2 or structurally related plant-derived peptides. Defensin-induced unfolding promoted exposure of hydrophobic groups otherwise confined to the core of the viral proteins. This resulted in precipitation, an enhanced susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage, and a loss of viral protein activities. We propose, that defensins recognize and target a common and essential physico-chemical property shared by many bacterial toxins and viral proteins – the intrinsically low thermodynamic protein stability. PMID:27581352

  16. MicroRNA-binding viral protein interferes with Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Chellappan, Padmanabhan; Vanitharani, Ramachandran; Fauquet, Claude M

    2005-07-19

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (approximately 21 nt), noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate target mRNAs at the posttranscriptional level that are involved in development. In plants, virus-induced disease symptoms often result in developmental abnormalities resembling perturbation of miRNA-mediated function. Here, we report that expression in transgenic plants of a geminivirus-encoded AC4 protein from African cassava mosaic virus Cameroon Strain (ACMV), a suppressor of posttranscriptional gene silencing, was correlated with decreased accumulation of host miRNAs and increased development abnormalities in Arabidopsis. Down-regulation of miRNA correlated with an up-regulation of target mRNA level. In vitro binding assays revealed the ability of AC4 of ACMV (A-AC4) but not East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus AC2 to bind single-stranded forms of miRNAs and short interfering RNAs but not double-stranded RNA forms. Normally, a labile intermediate during the miRNA biogenesis/RNA-induced silencing complex assembly, miRNA*, was below the level of detection, indicating that AC4 might interfere at a point downstream of the miRNA duplex unwinding process. The association of AC4 with miRNA was demonstrated by the association of A-AC4-GFP fusion protein, extracted from Arabidopsis protoplasts, with 2'-O-methyloligonucleotide complementary to miR159 (miR159*) and by the presence of miRNA with the A-AC4-GFP fusion protein after immunoprecipitation with antibody against GFP. In both assays, A-AC4 protein and miRNA complexes were copurified. These results provide direct evidence that AC4 is a unique virus-encoded posttranscriptional gene-silencing suppressor protein that binds to and presumably inactivates mature miRNAs and thus blocks the normal miRNA-mediated regulation of target mRNAs, resulting in developmental defects in Arabidopsis. PMID:16006510

  17. Transgenic expression of the chemokine receptor encoded by human herpesvirus 8 induces an angioproliferative disease resembling Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, T Y; Chen, S C; Leach, M W; Manfra, D; Homey, B; Wiekowski, M; Sullivan, L; Jenh, C H; Narula, S K; Chensue, S W; Lira, S A

    2000-02-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8, also known as Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) has been implicated as an etiologic agent for KS, an angiogenic tumor composed of endothelial, inflammatory, and spindle cells. Here, we report that transgenic mice expressing the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor (viral G protein-coupled receptor) within hematopoietic cells develop angioproliferative lesions in multiple organs that morphologically resemble KS lesions. These lesions are characterized by a spectrum of changes ranging from erythematous maculae to vascular tumors, by the presence of spindle and inflammatory cells, and by expression of vGPCR, CD34, and vascular endothelial growth factor. We conclude that vGPCR contributes to the development of the angioproliferative lesions observed in these mice and suggest that this chemokine receptor may play a role in the pathogenesis of KS in humans. PMID:10662790

  18. Assembly of vaccinia virus: effects of rifampin on the intracellular distribution of viral protein p65.

    PubMed Central

    Sodeik, B; Griffiths, G; Ericsson, M; Moss, B; Doms, R W

    1994-01-01

    The cytoplasmic assembly of vaccinia virus is reversibly blocked by the antibiotic rifampin, leading to the accumulation of partially membrane-delineated rifampin bodies in infected cells. Rifampin-resistant vaccinia virus mutants have point mutations in the D13L gene, which is controlled by a late promoter and expresses a 65-kDa protein, designated p65. To further characterize the mechanism of rifampin inhibition and the function of p65 in virus assembly, we raised antibodies to this protein. Immunoreactive p65 was expressed at late times of infection, and neither its expression nor its turnover was affected by rifampin. Virus-associated p65 could be extracted only with denaturing detergents from purified virions, suggesting that it is an integral viral component. Immunofluorescence studies showed that p65 is localized to the sites of virus assembly. Also, immunoelectron microscopy showed p65 to be associated with viral crescents as well as spherical, immature virions, in both cases predominantly on the inner or concave surface. In the presence of rifampin, p65 was found in large, cytoplasmic inclusion bodies that were distinct from rifampin bodies. The rifampin bodies themselves were labeled with p65 antibodies only after reversal of the rifampin block, predominantly on the viral crescents which rapidly formed following removal of the drug. We propose that p65 functions as an internal scaffold in the formation of viral crescents and immature virions, analogously to the matrix proteins of other viruses. Images PMID:8289340

  19. Functional Constraint Profiling of a Viral Protein Reveals Discordance of Evolutionary Conservation and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nicholas C.; Olson, C. Anders; Du, Yushen; Le, Shuai; Tran, Kevin; Remenyi, Roland; Gong, Danyang; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Qi, Hangfei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Viruses often encode proteins with multiple functions due to their compact genomes. Existing approaches to identify functional residues largely rely on sequence conservation analysis. Inferring functional residues from sequence conservation can produce false positives, in which the conserved residues are functionally silent, or false negatives, where functional residues are not identified since they are species-specific and therefore non-conserved. Furthermore, the tedious process of constructing and analyzing individual mutations limits the number of residues that can be examined in a single study. Here, we developed a systematic approach to identify the functional residues of a viral protein by coupling experimental fitness profiling with protein stability prediction using the influenza virus polymerase PA subunit as the target protein. We identified a significant number of functional residues that were influenza type-specific and were evolutionarily non-conserved among different influenza types. Our results indicate that type-specific functional residues are prevalent and may not otherwise be identified by sequence conservation analysis alone. More importantly, this technique can be adapted to any viral (and potentially non-viral) protein where structural information is available. PMID:26132554

  20. Herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C: molecular mimicry of complement regulatory proteins by a viral protein.

    PubMed

    Huemer, H P; Wang, Y; Garred, P; Koistinen, V; Oppermann, S

    1993-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encodes a protein, glycoprotein C (gC), which binds to the third complement component, the central mediator of complement activation. In this study the structural and functional relationships of gC from HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and known human complement regulatory proteins factor H, properdin, factor B, complement receptor 1 (CR1) and 2 (CR2) were investigated. The interaction of gC with C3b was studied using purified complement components, synthetic peptides, antisera against different C3 fragments and anti-C3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with known inhibitory effects on C3-ligand interactions. All the mAb that inhibited gC/C3b interactions, in a differential manner, also prevented binding of C3 fragments to factors H, B, CR1 or CR2. No blocking was observed with synthetic peptides representing different C3 regions or with factor B and C3d, whereas C3b, C3c and factor H were inhibitory, as well as purified gC. There was no binding of gC to cobra venom factor (CVF), a C3c-like fragment derived from cobra gland. Purified gC bound to iC3, iC3b and C3c, but failed to bind to C3d. Glycoprotein C bound only weakly to iC3 derived from bovine and porcine plasma, thus indicating a preference of the viral protein for the appropriate host. Binding of gC was also observed to proteolytic C3 fragments, especially to the beta-chain, thus suggesting the importance of the C3 region as a binding site. Purified gC from HSV-1, but not HSV-2, inhibited the binding of factor H and properdin but not of CR1 to C3b. The binding of iC3b to CR2, a molecule involved in B-cell activation and binding of the Epstein-Barr virus, was also inhibited by the HSV-1 protein. As factor H and properdin, the binding of which was inhibited by gC, are important regulators of the alternative complement pathway, these data further support a role of gC in the evasion of HSV from a major first-line host defence mechanism, i.e. the complement system. In addition, the inhibition of the C3/CR

  1. Heat shock protein 70 is associated with CSFV NS5A protein and enhances viral RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengcheng; Kang, Kai; Ning, Pengbo; Peng, Yangxin; Lin, Zhi; Cui, Hongjie; Cao, Zhi; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yanming

    2015-08-01

    The non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is proven to be involved in viral replication and can also modulate cellular signaling via to its ability to interact with various cellular proteins. Here, HSP70/NS5A complex formation is confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pulldown studies. Additionally, the N-terminal amino acids (29-240) of NS5A were identified as the interaction region through in vivo deletion analyses, and confocal microscopy showed that NS5A and HSP70 colocalized in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of HSP70 via the eukaryotic expression plasmid pDsRED N1 or lentivirus significantly promoted viral RNA synthesis. Whereas the knockdown of HSP70 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA or inhibition by quercetin markedly decreased the viral load. These data suggest that HSP70 plays a critical role in the viral life cycle, particularly during the virus RNA replication period. The investigation of HSP70 protein functions may be beneficial for developing new strategies to treat CSFV infection. PMID:25827528

  2. Directional transneuronal spread of α-herpesvirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Curanovic, D; Enquist, LW

    2010-01-01

    Most α-herpesviruses are pantropic, neuroinvasive pathogens that establish a reactivateable, latent infection in the PNS of their natural hosts. Various manifestations of herpes disease rely on extent and direction of the spread of infection between the surface epithelia and the nervous system components that innervate that surface. One aspect of such controlled spread of infection is the capacity for synaptically defined, transneuronal spread, a property that makes α-herpesviruses useful tools for determining the connectivity of neural circuits. The current understanding of intra-axonal transport and transneuronal spread of α-herpesviruses is reviewed, focusing on work with herpes simplex virus and pseudorabies virus, the available in vitro technology used to study viral transport and spread is evaluated and how certain viral mutants can be used to examine neural circuit architecture is described in this article. PMID:20161665

  3. Graph theoretic network analysis reveals protein pathways underlying cell death following neurotropic viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sourish; Kumar, G. Vinodh; Basu, Anirban; Banerjee, Arpan

    2015-01-01

    Complex protein networks underlie any cellular function. Certain proteins play a pivotal role in many network configurations, disruption of whose expression proves fatal to the cell. An efficient method to tease out such key proteins in a network is still unavailable. Here, we used graph-theoretic measures on protein-protein interaction data (interactome) to extract biophysically relevant information about individual protein regulation and network properties such as formation of function specific modules (sub-networks) of proteins. We took 5 major proteins that are involved in neuronal apoptosis post Chandipura Virus (CHPV) infection as seed proteins in a database to create a meta-network of immediately interacting proteins (1st order network). Graph theoretic measures were employed to rank the proteins in terms of their connectivity and the degree upto which they can be organized into smaller modules (hubs). We repeated the analysis on 2nd order interactome that includes proteins connected directly with proteins of 1st order. FADD and Casp-3 were connected maximally to other proteins in both analyses, thus indicating their importance in neuronal apoptosis. Thus, our analysis provides a blueprint for the detection and validation of protein networks disrupted by viral infections. PMID:26404759

  4. Graph theoretic network analysis reveals protein pathways underlying cell death following neurotropic viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourish; Kumar, G Vinodh; Basu, Anirban; Banerjee, Arpan

    2015-01-01

    Complex protein networks underlie any cellular function. Certain proteins play a pivotal role in many network configurations, disruption of whose expression proves fatal to the cell. An efficient method to tease out such key proteins in a network is still unavailable. Here, we used graph-theoretic measures on protein-protein interaction data (interactome) to extract biophysically relevant information about individual protein regulation and network properties such as formation of function specific modules (sub-networks) of proteins. We took 5 major proteins that are involved in neuronal apoptosis post Chandipura Virus (CHPV) infection as seed proteins in a database to create a meta-network of immediately interacting proteins (1(st) order network). Graph theoretic measures were employed to rank the proteins in terms of their connectivity and the degree upto which they can be organized into smaller modules (hubs). We repeated the analysis on 2(nd) order interactome that includes proteins connected directly with proteins of 1(st) order. FADD and Casp-3 were connected maximally to other proteins in both analyses, thus indicating their importance in neuronal apoptosis. Thus, our analysis provides a blueprint for the detection and validation of protein networks disrupted by viral infections. PMID:26404759

  5. Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence.

    PubMed

    Juillard, Franceline; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has an etiologic role in Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA's role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease. PMID:27570517

  6. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanpin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns.Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer inHCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis. PMID:27240978

  7. Phage Phenomics: Physiological Approaches to Characterize Novel Viral Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Savannah E.; Cuevas, Daniel A.; Rostron, Jason E.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Pivaroff, Cullen G.; Haynes, Matthew R.; Nulton, Jim; Felts, Ben; Bailey, Barbara A.; Salamon, Peter; Edwards, Robert A.; Burgin, Alex B.; Segall, Anca M.; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Current investigations into phage-host interactions are dependent on extrapolating knowledge from (meta)genomes. Interestingly, 60 - 95% of all phage sequences share no homology to current annotated proteins. As a result, a large proportion of phage genes are annotated as hypothetical. This reality heavily affects the annotation of both structural and auxiliary metabolic genes. Here we present phenomic methods designed to capture the physiological response(s) of a selected host during expression of one of these unknown phage genes. Multi-phenotype Assay Plates (MAPs) are used to monitor the diversity of host substrate utilization and subsequent biomass formation, while metabolomics provides bi-product analysis by monitoring metabolite abundance and diversity. Both tools are used simultaneously to provide a phenotypic profile associated with expression of a single putative phage open reading frame (ORF). Representative results for both methods are compared, highlighting the phenotypic profile differences of a host carrying either putative structural or metabolic phage genes. In addition, the visualization techniques and high throughput computational pipelines that facilitated experimental analysis are presented. PMID:26132888

  8. Phage phenomics: Physiological approaches to characterize novel viral proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sanchez, Savannah E.; Cuevas, Daniel A.; Rostron, Jason E.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Pivaroff, Cullen G.; Haynes, Matthew R.; Nulton, Jim; Felts, Ben; Bailey, Barbara A.; Salamon, Peter; et al

    2015-06-11

    Current investigations into phage-host interactions are dependent on extrapolating knowledge from (meta)genomes. Interestingly, 60 - 95% of all phage sequences share no homology to current annotated proteins. As a result, a large proportion of phage genes are annotated as hypothetical. This reality heavily affects the annotation of both structural and auxiliary metabolic genes. Here we present phenomic methods designed to capture the physiological response(s) of a selected host during expression of one of these unknown phage genes. Multi-phenotype Assay Plates (MAPs) are used to monitor the diversity of host substrate utilization and subsequent biomass formation, while metabolomics provides bi-product analysismore » by monitoring metabolite abundance and diversity. Both tools are used simultaneously to provide a phenotypic profile associated with expression of a single putative phage open reading frame (ORF). Thus, representative results for both methods are compared, highlighting the phenotypic profile differences of a host carrying either putative structural or metabolic phage genes. In addition, the visualization techniques and high throughput computational pipelines that facilitated experimental analysis are presented.« less

  9. Phage phenomics: Physiological approaches to characterize novel viral proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Savannah E.; Cuevas, Daniel A.; Rostron, Jason E.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Pivaroff, Cullen G.; Haynes, Matthew R.; Nulton, Jim; Felts, Ben; Bailey, Barbara A.; Salamon, Peter; Edwards, Robert A.; Burgin, Alex B.; Segall, Anca M.; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-06-11

    Current investigations into phage-host interactions are dependent on extrapolating knowledge from (meta)genomes. Interestingly, 60 - 95% of all phage sequences share no homology to current annotated proteins. As a result, a large proportion of phage genes are annotated as hypothetical. This reality heavily affects the annotation of both structural and auxiliary metabolic genes. Here we present phenomic methods designed to capture the physiological response(s) of a selected host during expression of one of these unknown phage genes. Multi-phenotype Assay Plates (MAPs) are used to monitor the diversity of host substrate utilization and subsequent biomass formation, while metabolomics provides bi-product analysis by monitoring metabolite abundance and diversity. Both tools are used simultaneously to provide a phenotypic profile associated with expression of a single putative phage open reading frame (ORF). Thus, representative results for both methods are compared, highlighting the phenotypic profile differences of a host carrying either putative structural or metabolic phage genes. In addition, the visualization techniques and high throughput computational pipelines that facilitated experimental analysis are presented.

  10. Flavivirus NS1: a multifaceted enigmatic viral protein.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Meghana; Sharma, Nikhil; Singh, Sunit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses are emerging arthropod-borne viruses representing an immense global health problem. The prominent viruses of this group include dengue virus, yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus tick borne encephalitis virus and Zika Virus. These are endemic in many parts of the world. They are responsible for the illness ranging from mild flu like symptoms to severe hemorrhagic, neurologic and cognitive manifestations leading to death. NS1 is a highly conserved non-structural protein among flaviviruses, which exist in diverse forms. The intracellular dimer form of NS1 plays role in genome replication, whereas, the secreted hexamer plays role in immune evasion. The secreted NS1 has been identified as a potential diagnostic marker for early detection of the infections caused by flaviviruses. In addition to the diagnostic marker, the importance of NS1 has been reported in the development of therapeutics. NS1 based subunit vaccines are at various stages of development. The structural details and diverse functions of NS1 have been discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27473856

  11. Deletion of Murid Herpesvirus 4 ORF63 Affects the Trafficking of Incoming Capsids toward the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Muhammad Bilal; Machiels, Bénédicte; Xiao, Xue; Mast, Jan; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses are important human and animal pathogens. Despite the fact that they display the classical architecture of herpesviruses, the function of most of their structural proteins is still poorly defined. This is especially true for tegument proteins. Interestingly, a potential role in immune evasion has recently been proposed for the tegument protein encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 63 (ORF63). To gain insight about the roles of ORF63 in the life cycle of a gammaherpesvirus, we generated null mutations in the ORF63 gene of murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4). We showed that disruption of ORF63 was associated with a severe MuHV-4 growth deficit both in vitro and in vivo. The latter deficit was mainly associated with a defect of replication in the lung but did not affect the establishment of latency in the spleen. From a functional point of view, inhibition of caspase-1 or the inflammasome did not restore the growth of the ORF63-deficient mutant, suggesting that the observed deficit was not associated with the immune evasion mechanism identified previously. Moreover, this growth deficit was also not associated with a defect in virion egress from the infected cells. In contrast, it appeared that MuHV-4 ORF63-deficient mutants failed to address most of their capsids to the nucleus during entry into the host cell, suggesting that ORF63 plays a role in capsid movement. In the future, ORF63 could therefore be considered a target to block gammaherpesvirus infection at a very early stage of the infection. IMPORTANCE The important diseases caused by gammaherpesviruses in human and animal populations justify a better understanding of their life cycle. In particular, the role of most of their tegument proteins is still largely unknown. In this study, we used murid herpesvirus 4, a gammaherpesvirus infecting mice, to decipher the role of the protein encoded by the viral ORF63 gene. We showed that the absence of this protein is

  12. Coevolution analysis of Hepatitis C virus genome to identify the structural and functional dependency network of viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Champeimont, Raphaël; Laine, Elodie; Hu, Shuang-Wei; Penin, Francois; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    A novel computational approach of coevolution analysis allowed us to reconstruct the protein-protein interaction network of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) at the residue resolution. For the first time, coevolution analysis of an entire viral genome was realized, based on a limited set of protein sequences with high sequence identity within genotypes. The identified coevolving residues constitute highly relevant predictions of protein-protein interactions for further experimental identification of HCV protein complexes. The method can be used to analyse other viral genomes and to predict the associated protein interaction networks. PMID:27198619

  13. Coevolution analysis of Hepatitis C virus genome to identify the structural and functional dependency network of viral proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champeimont, Raphaël; Laine, Elodie; Hu, Shuang-Wei; Penin, Francois; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-05-01

    A novel computational approach of coevolution analysis allowed us to reconstruct the protein-protein interaction network of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) at the residue resolution. For the first time, coevolution analysis of an entire viral genome was realized, based on a limited set of protein sequences with high sequence identity within genotypes. The identified coevolving residues constitute highly relevant predictions of protein-protein interactions for further experimental identification of HCV protein complexes. The method can be used to analyse other viral genomes and to predict the associated protein interaction networks.

  14. Coevolution analysis of Hepatitis C virus genome to identify the structural and functional dependency network of viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Champeimont, Raphaël; Laine, Elodie; Hu, Shuang-Wei; Penin, Francois; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    A novel computational approach of coevolution analysis allowed us to reconstruct the protein-protein interaction network of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) at the residue resolution. For the first time, coevolution analysis of an entire viral genome was realized, based on a limited set of protein sequences with high sequence identity within genotypes. The identified coevolving residues constitute highly relevant predictions of protein-protein interactions for further experimental identification of HCV protein complexes. The method can be used to analyse other viral genomes and to predict the associated protein interaction networks. PMID:27198619

  15. In vivo imaging of alphaherpesvirus infection reveals synchronized activity dependent on axonal sorting of viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Granstedt, Andrea E.; Bosse, Jens B.; Thiberge, Stephan Y.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2013-01-01

    A clinical hallmark of human alphaherpesvirus infections is peripheral pain or itching. Pseudorabies virus (PRV), a broad host range alphaherpesvirus, causes violent pruritus in many different animals, but the mechanism is unknown. Previous in vitro studies have shown that infected, cultured peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibited aberrant electrical activity after PRV infection due to the action of viral membrane fusion proteins, yet it is unclear if such activity occurs in infected PNS ganglia in living animals and if it correlates with disease symptoms. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged autonomic ganglia in living mice infected with PRV strains expressing GCaMP3, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, and used the changes in calcium flux to monitor the activity of many neurons simultaneously with single-cell resolution. Infection with virulent PRV caused these PNS neurons to fire synchronously and cyclically in highly correlated patterns among infected neurons. This activity persisted even when we severed the presynaptic axons, showing that infection-induced firing is independent of input from presynaptic brainstem neurons. This activity was not observed after infections with an attenuated PRV recombinant used for circuit tracing or with PRV mutants lacking either viral glycoprotein B, required for membrane fusion, or viral membrane protein Us9, required for sorting virions and viral glycoproteins into axons. We propose that the viral fusion proteins produced by virulent PRV infection induce electrical coupling in unmyelinated axons in vivo. This action would then give rise to the synchronous and cyclical activity in the ganglia and contribute to the characteristic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:23980169

  16. Evasion and subversion of interferon-mediated antiviral immunity by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Narayanan; Yuan, Yan

    2011-11-01

    Viral invasion of a host cell triggers immune responses with both innate and adaptive components. The innate immune response involving the induction of type I interferons (alpha and beta interferons [IFN-α and -β]) constitutes the first line of antiviral defenses. The type I IFNs signal the transcription of a group of antiviral effector proteins, the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which target distinct viral components and distinct stages of the viral life cycle, aiming to eliminate invading viruses. In the case of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a sudden upsurge of type I IFN-mediated innate antiviral signals is seen immediately following both primary de novo infection and viral lytic reactivation from latency. Potent subversion of these responses thus becomes mandatory for the successful establishment of a primary infection following viral entry as well as for efficient viral assembly and egress. This review gives a concise overview of the induction of the type I IFN signaling pathways in response to viral infection and provides a comprehensive understanding of the antagonizing effects exerted by KSHV on type I IFN pathways wielded at various stages of the viral life cycle. Information garnered from this review should result in a better understanding of KSHV biology essential for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies targeted toward KSHV-associated malignancies. PMID:21775463

  17. Ubiquitination of lysine-331 by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protein K5 targets HFE for lysosomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, David A.; Boyle, Louise H.; Boname, Jessica M.; Lehner, Paul J.; Trowsdale, John

    2010-01-01

    The nonclassical MHC class I-related (MHC-I) molecule HFE controls cellular iron homeostasis by a mechanism that has not been fully elucidated. We examined the regulation of HFE by K5, the E3 ubiquitin ligase encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV8), that is known to down-regulate classical MHC-I. K5 down-regulated HFE efficiently, using polyubiquitination of the membrane proximal lysine in the HFE cytoplasmic tail (K331), to target the molecule for degradation via ESCRT1/TSG101-dependent sorting from endosomes to multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/lysosomes. In the primary effusion lymphoma cell line BC-3, which carries latent KSHV, HFE was degraded rapidly upon virus reactivation. HFE was ubiquitinated on lysine-331 in unactivated BC-3 cells, conditions where K5 was not detectable, consistent with an endogenous E3 ubiquitin ligase controlling HFE expression. The results show regulated expression of HFE by ubiquitination, consistent with a role in cellular iron homeostasis, a molecular mechanism targeted by KSHV to achieve a positive iron balance. PMID:20805500

  18. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao; Miao, Ji; Zhao, Qinjian

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  19. Artificial Neural Networks Trained to Detect Viral and Phage Structural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Seguritan, Victor; Raymond, Amy; Lorimer, Don; Burgin, Alex B.; Salamon, Peter; Segall, Anca M.

    2012-01-01

    Phages play critical roles in the survival and pathogenicity of their hosts, via lysogenic conversion factors, and in nutrient redistribution, via cell lysis. Analyses of phage- and viral-encoded genes in environmental samples provide insights into the physiological impact of viruses on microbial communities and human health. However, phage ORFs are extremely diverse of which over 70% of them are dissimilar to any genes with annotated functions in GenBank. Better identification of viruses would also aid in better detection and diagnosis of disease, in vaccine development, and generally in better understanding the physiological potential of any environment. In contrast to enzymes, viral structural protein function can be much more challenging to detect from sequence data because of low sequence conservation, few known conserved catalytic sites or sequence domains, and relatively limited experimental data. We have designed a method of predicting phage structural protein sequences that uses Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). First, we trained ANNs to classify viral structural proteins using amino acid frequency; these correctly classify a large fraction of test cases with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity. Subsequently, we added estimates of protein isoelectric points as a feature to ANNs that classify specialized families of proteins, namely major capsid and tail proteins. As expected, these more specialized ANNs are more accurate than the structural ANNs. To experimentally validate the ANN predictions, several ORFs with no significant similarities to known sequences that are ANN-predicted structural proteins were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Some of these self-assembled into structures strongly resembling virion structures. Thus, our ANNs are new tools for identifying phage and potential prophage structural proteins that are difficult or impossible to detect by other bioinformatic analysis. The networks will be valuable when sequence is

  20. Artificial neural networks trained to detect viral and phage structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Seguritan, Victor; Alves, Nelson; Arnoult, Michael; Raymond, Amy; Lorimer, Don; Burgin, Alex B; Salamon, Peter; Segall, Anca M

    2012-01-01

    Phages play critical roles in the survival and pathogenicity of their hosts, via lysogenic conversion factors, and in nutrient redistribution, via cell lysis. Analyses of phage- and viral-encoded genes in environmental samples provide insights into the physiological impact of viruses on microbial communities and human health. However, phage ORFs are extremely diverse of which over 70% of them are dissimilar to any genes with annotated functions in GenBank. Better identification of viruses would also aid in better detection and diagnosis of disease, in vaccine development, and generally in better understanding the physiological potential of any environment. In contrast to enzymes, viral structural protein function can be much more challenging to detect from sequence data because of low sequence conservation, few known conserved catalytic sites or sequence domains, and relatively limited experimental data. We have designed a method of predicting phage structural protein sequences that uses Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). First, we trained ANNs to classify viral structural proteins using amino acid frequency; these correctly classify a large fraction of test cases with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity. Subsequently, we added estimates of protein isoelectric points as a feature to ANNs that classify specialized families of proteins, namely major capsid and tail proteins. As expected, these more specialized ANNs are more accurate than the structural ANNs. To experimentally validate the ANN predictions, several ORFs with no significant similarities to known sequences that are ANN-predicted structural proteins were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Some of these self-assembled into structures strongly resembling virion structures. Thus, our ANNs are new tools for identifying phage and potential prophage structural proteins that are difficult or impossible to detect by other bioinformatic analysis. The networks will be valuable when sequence is

  1. Roles of Serine and Threonine Residues of Mumps Virus P Protein in Viral Transcription and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Li, Zhuo; Zengel, James

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mumps virus (MuV), a paramyxovirus containing a negative-sense nonsegmented RNA genome, is a human pathogen that causes an acute infection with symptoms ranging from parotitis to mild meningitis and severe encephalitis. Vaccination against mumps virus has been effective in reducing mumps cases. However, recently large outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. There is no anti-MuV drug. Understanding replication of MuV may lead to novel antiviral strategies. MuV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase minimally consists of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large protein (L). The P protein is heavily phosphorylated. To investigate the roles of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues of P in viral RNA transcription and replication, P was subjected to mass spectrometry and mutational analysis. P, a 392-amino acid residue protein, has 64 S and T residues. We have found that mutating nine S/T residues significantly reduced and mutating residue T at 101 to A (T101A) significantly enhanced activity in a minigenome system. A recombinant virus containing the P-T101A mutation (rMuV-P-T101A) was recovered and analyzed. rMuV-P-T101A grew to higher titers and had increased protein expression at early time points. Together, these results suggest that phosphorylation of MuV-P-T101 plays a negative role in viral RNA synthesis. This is the first time that the P protein of a paramyxovirus has been systematically analyzed for S/T residues that are critical for viral RNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE Mumps virus (MuV) is a reemerging paramyxovirus that caused large outbreaks in the United States, where vaccination coverage is very high. There is no anti-MuV drug. In this work, we have systematically analyzed roles of Ser/Thr residues of MuV P in viral RNA synthesis. We have identified S/T residues of P critical for MuV RNA synthesis and phosphorylation sites that are important for viral RNA synthesis. This work leads to a better understanding of viral RNA synthesis as well as to potential

  2. The Role of microRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Herpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Piedade, Diogo; Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs important in gene regulation. They are able to regulate mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity. Cellular miRNAs have been involved in the regulation of nearly all cellular pathways, and their deregulation has been associated with several diseases such as cancer. Given the importance of microRNAs to cell homeostasis, it is no surprise that viruses have evolved to take advantage of this cellular pathway. Viruses have been reported to be able to encode and express functional viral microRNAs that target both viral and cellular transcripts. Moreover, viral inhibition of key proteins from the microRNA pathway and important changes in cellular microRNA pool have been reported upon viral infection. In addition, viruses have developed multiple mechanisms to avoid being targeted by cellular microRNAs. This complex interaction between host and viruses to control the microRNA pathway usually favors viral infection and persistence by either reducing immune detection, avoiding apoptosis, promoting cell growth, or promoting lytic or latent infection. One of the best examples of this virus-host-microRNA interplay emanates from members of the Herperviridae family, namely the herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), and the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). In this review, we will focus on the general functions of microRNAs and the interactions between herpesviruses, human hosts, and microRNAs and will delve into the related mechanisms that contribute to infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27271654

  3. The Role of microRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Herpesvirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Piedade, Diogo; Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs important in gene regulation. They are able to regulate mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity. Cellular miRNAs have been involved in the regulation of nearly all cellular pathways, and their deregulation has been associated with several diseases such as cancer. Given the importance of microRNAs to cell homeostasis, it is no surprise that viruses have evolved to take advantage of this cellular pathway. Viruses have been reported to be able to encode and express functional viral microRNAs that target both viral and cellular transcripts. Moreover, viral inhibition of key proteins from the microRNA pathway and important changes in cellular microRNA pool have been reported upon viral infection. In addition, viruses have developed multiple mechanisms to avoid being targeted by cellular microRNAs. This complex interaction between host and viruses to control the microRNA pathway usually favors viral infection and persistence by either reducing immune detection, avoiding apoptosis, promoting cell growth, or promoting lytic or latent infection. One of the best examples of this virus-host-microRNA interplay emanates from members of the Herperviridae family, namely the herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this review, we will focus on the general functions of microRNAs and the interactions between herpesviruses, human hosts, and microRNAs and will delve into the related mechanisms that contribute to infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27271654

  4. Shutoff of Host Gene Expression in Influenza A Virus and Herpesviruses: Similar Mechanisms and Common Themes

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Hembly G.; Schmaling, Summer K.; Gaglia, Marta M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to shut off host gene expression is a shared feature of many viral infections, and it is thought to promote viral replication by freeing host cell machinery and blocking immune responses. Despite the molecular differences between viruses, an emerging theme in the study of host shutoff is that divergent viruses use similar mechanisms to enact host shutoff. Moreover, even viruses that encode few proteins often have multiple mechanisms to affect host gene expression, and we are only starting to understand how these mechanisms are integrated. In this review we discuss the multiplicity of host shutoff mechanisms used by the orthomyxovirus influenza A virus and members of the alpha- and gamma-herpesvirus subfamilies. We highlight the surprising similarities in their mechanisms of host shutoff and discuss how the different mechanisms they use may play a coordinated role in gene regulation. PMID:27092522

  5. Shutoff of Host Gene Expression in Influenza A Virus and Herpesviruses: Similar Mechanisms and Common Themes.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Hembly G; Schmaling, Summer K; Gaglia, Marta M

    2016-04-01

    The ability to shut off host gene expression is a shared feature of many viral infections, and it is thought to promote viral replication by freeing host cell machinery and blocking immune responses. Despite the molecular differences between viruses, an emerging theme in the study of host shutoff is that divergent viruses use similar mechanisms to enact host shutoff. Moreover, even viruses that encode few proteins often have multiple mechanisms to affect host gene expression, and we are only starting to understand how these mechanisms are integrated. In this review we discuss the multiplicity of host shutoff mechanisms used by the orthomyxovirus influenza A virus and members of the alpha- and gamma-herpesvirus subfamilies. We highlight the surprising similarities in their mechanisms of host shutoff and discuss how the different mechanisms they use may play a coordinated role in gene regulation. PMID:27092522

  6. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Alzhanova, Dina; Hammarlund, Erika; Reed, Jason; Meermeier, Erin; Rawlings, Stephanie; Ray, Caroline A; Edwards, David M; Bimber, Ben; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Sprague, Jerald; Axthelm, Michael K; Pickup, David J; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C; Wong, Scott W; Sacha, Jonah B; Slifka, Mark K; Früh, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197) caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination. PMID:24832205

  7. Targeting of Pseudorabies Virus Structural Proteins to Axons Requires Association of the Viral Us9 Protein with Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Mathew G.; Curanovic, Dusica; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2008-01-01

    The pseudorabies virus (PRV) Us9 protein plays a central role in targeting viral capsids and glycoproteins to axons of dissociated sympathetic neurons. As a result, Us9 null mutants are defective in anterograde transmission of infection in vivo. However, it is unclear how Us9 promotes axonal sorting of so many viral proteins. It is known that the glycoproteins gB, gC, gD and gE are associated with lipid raft microdomains on the surface of infected swine kidney cells and monocytes, and are directed into the axon in a Us9-dependent manner. In this report, we determined that Us9 is associated with lipid rafts, and that this association is critical to Us9-mediated sorting of viral structural proteins. We used infected non-polarized and polarized PC12 cells, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line that acquires many of the characteristics of sympathetic neurons in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). In these cells, Us9 is highly enriched in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). Moreover, reducing the affinity of Us9 for lipid rafts inhibited anterograde transmission of infection from sympathetic neurons to epithelial cells in vitro. We conclude that association of Us9 with lipid rafts is key for efficient targeting of structural proteins to axons and, as a consequence, for directional spread of PRV from pre-synaptic to post-synaptic neurons and cells of the mammalian nervous system. PMID:18483549

  8. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  9. Rubella virus capsid protein modulation of viral genomic and subgenomic RNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, W.-P.; Frey, Teryl K. . E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu

    2005-07-05

    The ratio of the subgenomic (SG) to genome RNA synthesized by rubella virus (RUB) replicons expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (RUBrep/GFP) is substantially higher than the ratio of these species synthesized by RUB (4.3 for RUBrep/GFP vs. 1.3-1.4 for RUB). It was hypothesized that this modulation of the viral RNA synthesis was by one of the virus structural protein genes and it was found that introduction of the capsid (C) protein gene into the replicons as an in-frame fusion with GFP resulted in an increase of genomic RNA production (reducing the SG/genome RNA ratio), confirming the hypothesis and showing that the C gene was the moiety responsible for the modulation effect. The N-terminal one-third of the C gene was required for the effect of be exhibited. A similar phenomenon was not observed with the replicons of Sindbis virus, a related Alphavirus. Interestingly, modulation was not observed when RUBrep/GFP was co-transfected with either other RUBrep or plasmid constructs expressing the C gene, demonstrating that modulation could occur only when the C gene was provided in cis. Mutations that prevented translation of the C protein failed to modulate RNA synthesis, indicating that the C protein was the moiety responsible for modulation; consistent with this conclusion, modulation of RNA synthesis was maintained when synonymous codon mutations were introduced at the 5' end of the C gene that changed the C gene sequence without altering the amino acid sequence of the C protein. These results indicate that C protein translated in proximity of viral replication complexes, possibly from newly synthesized SG RNA, participate in regulating the replication of viral RNA.

  10. Regulation of the herpesvirus saimiri oncogene stpC, similar to that of T-cell activation genes, in growth-transformed human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fickenscher, H; Biesinger, B; Knappe, A; Wittmann, S; Fleckenstein, B

    1996-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri strain C488, a T-cell tumor virus of New World primates, transforms human T lymphocytes to stable interleukin-2-dependent growth without need for further stimulation by antigen or mitogen. The transformed cell lines show the phenotype of activated mature T cells and retain many essential features of the primary parental cells, e.g., antigen specificity. In contrast to transformed New World monkey T cells, the human lines do not support lytic growth of the virus, even after chemical stimulation. Here we show that many viral genes remain silent during episomal persistence. However, the viral oncogene stpC is predominantly transcribed and translated to a stable cytoplasmic protein of 20 kDa that is heterogeneously expressed in individual cells. This 1.7-kb mRNA is bicistronic, encoding also Tip, a viral protein interacting with the T-cell-specific tyrosine kinase Lck. stpC/tip transcripts are heavily induced upon stimulation by mitogen or phorbol ester. Block of protein synthesis does not abolish transcription: treatment with cycloheximide greatly induces stpC/tip mRNA levels. Thus, this gene complex is regulated similarly to early T-cell activation genes. Constitutive and induced expression engage different transcription start sites. The T-cell regulation of the viral genes stpC and tip may contribute to the T-cell tropism of growth transformation by herpesvirus saimiri. PMID:8709223

  11. Viral miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, more than 200 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered in double-stranded DNA viruses, mainly herpesviruses and polyomaviruses (Nucleic Acids Res 32:D109-D111, 2004). miRNAs are short 22  ±  3 nt RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTR) of target mRNAs, thereby inducing translational silencing and/or transcript degradation (Nature 431:350-355, 2004; Cell 116:281-297, 2004). Since miRNAs require only limited complementarity for binding, miRNA targets are difficult to determine (Mol Cell 27:91-105, 2007). To date, targets have only been experimentally verified for relatively few viral miRNAs, which either target viral or host cellular gene expression: For example, SV40 and related polyomaviruses encode miRNAs which target viral large T antigen expression (Nature 435:682-686, 2005; J Virol 79:13094-13104, 2005; Virology 383:183-187, 2009; J Virol 82:9823-9828, 2008) and miRNAs of α-, β-, and γ-herpesviruses have been implicated in regulating the transition from latent to lytic gene expression, a key step in the herpesvirus life cycle. Viral miRNAs have also been shown to target various host cellular genes. Although this field is just beginning to unravel the multiple roles of viral miRNA in biology and pathogenesis, the current data strongly suggest that virally encoded miRNAs are able to regulate fundamental biological processes such as immune recognition, promotion of cell survival, angiogenesis, proliferation, and cell differentiation. This chapter aims to summarize our current knowledge of viral miRNAs, their targets and function, and the challenges lying ahead to decipher their role in viral biology, pathogenesis, and for γ-herepsvirus-encoded miRNAs, potentially tumorigenesis. PMID:21431678

  12. Transient viral DNA replication and repression of viral transcription are supported by the C-terminal domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E1 protein.

    PubMed

    Ferran, M C; McBride, A A

    1998-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E1 protein is important for viral DNA replication and transcriptional repression. It has been proposed that the full-length E1 protein consists of a small N-terminal and a larger C-terminal domain. In this study, it is shown that an E1 polypeptide containing residues 132 to 605 (which represents the C-terminal domain) is able to support transient viral DNA replication, although at a level lower than that supported by the wild-type protein. This domain can also repress E2-mediated transactivation from the P89 promoter as well as the wild-type E1 protein can. PMID:9420289

  13. Synthesis and characterization of different immunogenic viral nanoconstructs from rotavirus VP6 inner capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Bugli, Francesca; Caprettini, Valeria; Cacaci, Margherita; Martini, Cecilia; Paroni Sterbini, Francesco; Torelli, Riccardo; Della Longa, Stefano; Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Giardina, Bruno; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Arcovito, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In order to deliver low-cost viral capsomeres from a large amount of soluble viral VP6 protein from human rotavirus, we developed and optimized a biotechnological platform in Escherichia coli. Specifically, three different expression protocols were compared, differing in their genetic constructs, ie, a simple native histidine-tagged VP6 sequence, VP6 fused to thioredoxin, and VP6 obtained with the newly described small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) fusion system. Our results demonstrate that the histidine-tagged protein does not escape the accumulation in the inclusion bodies, and that SUMO is largely superior to the thioredoxin-fusion tag in enhancing the expression and solubility of VP6 protein. Moreover, the VP6 protein produced according to the SUMO fusion tag displays well-known assembly properties, as observed in both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images, giving rise to either VP6 trimers, 60 nm spherical virus-like particles, or nanotubes a few microns long. This different quaternary organization of VP6 shows a higher level of immunogenicity for the elongated structures with respect to the spheres or the protein trimers. Therefore, the expression and purification strategy presented here – providing a large amount of the viral capsid protein in the native form with relatively simple, rapid, and economical procedures – opens a new route toward large-scale production of a more efficient antigenic compound to be used as a vaccination tool or as an adjuvant, and also represents a top-quality biomaterial to be further modified for biotechnological purposes. PMID:24936129

  14. Synthesis and characterization of different immunogenic viral nanoconstructs from rotavirus VP6 inner capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Bugli, Francesca; Caprettini, Valeria; Cacaci, Margherita; Martini, Cecilia; Paroni Sterbini, Francesco; Torelli, Riccardo; Della Longa, Stefano; Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Giardina, Bruno; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Arcovito, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In order to deliver low-cost viral capsomeres from a large amount of soluble viral VP6 protein from human rotavirus, we developed and optimized a biotechnological platform in Escherichia coli. Specifically, three different expression protocols were compared, differing in their genetic constructs, ie, a simple native histidine-tagged VP6 sequence, VP6 fused to thioredoxin, and VP6 obtained with the newly described small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) fusion system. Our results demonstrate that the histidine-tagged protein does not escape the accumulation in the inclusion bodies, and that SUMO is largely superior to the thioredoxin-fusion tag in enhancing the expression and solubility of VP6 protein. Moreover, the VP6 protein produced according to the SUMO fusion tag displays well-known assembly properties, as observed in both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images, giving rise to either VP6 trimers, 60 nm spherical virus-like particles, or nanotubes a few microns long. This different quaternary organization of VP6 shows a higher level of immunogenicity for the elongated structures with respect to the spheres or the protein trimers. Therefore, the expression and purification strategy presented here - providing a large amount of the viral capsid protein in the native form with relatively simple, rapid, and economical procedures - opens a new route toward large-scale production of a more efficient antigenic compound to be used as a vaccination tool or as an adjuvant, and also represents a top-quality biomaterial to be further modified for biotechnological purposes. PMID:24936129

  15. Cytoskeletal proteins participate in conserved viral strategies across kingdoms of life.

    PubMed

    Erb, Marcella L; Pogliano, Joe

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of tubulin-like cytoskeletal proteins carried on the genomes of bacteriophages that are actively used for phage propagation during both the lytic and lysogenic cycle have revealed that there at least two ways that viruses can utilize a cytoskeleton; co-opt the host cytoskeleton or bring their own homologues. Either strategy underscores the deep evolutionary relationship between viruses and cytoskeletal proteins and points to a conservation of viral strategies that crosses the kingdoms of life. Here we review some of the most recent discoveries about tubulin cytoskeletal elements encoded by phages and compare them to some of the strategies utilized by the gammaherpesvirues of mammalian cells. PMID:24055040

  16. Coordinated and sequential transcription of the cyprinid herpesvirus-3 annotated genes.

    PubMed

    Ilouze, Maya; Dishon, Arnon; Kotler, Moshe

    2012-10-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) is the cause of a fatal disease in carp and koi fish. The disease is seasonal and appears when water temperatures range from 18 to 28°C. CyHV-3 is a member of the Alloherpesviridae, a family in the Herpesvirales order that encompasses mammalian, avian and reptilian viruses. CyHV-3 is a large double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) herpesvirus with a genome of approximately 295kbp, divergent from other mammalian, avian and reptilian herpesviruses, but bearing several genes similar to cyprinid herpesvirus-1 (CyHV-1), CyHV-2, anguillid herpesvirus-1 (AngHV-1), ictalurid herpesvirus-1 (IcHV-1) and ranid herpes virus-1 (RaHV-1). Here we show that viral DNA synthesis commences 4-8h post-infection (p.i.), and is completely inhibited by pre-treatment with cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside (Ara-C). Transcription of CyHV-3 genes initiates after infection as early as 1-2h p.i., and precedes viral DNA synthesis. All 156 annotated open reading frames (ORFs) of the CyHV-3 genome are transcribed into RNAs, most of which can be classified into immediate early (IE or α), early (E or β) and late (L or γ) classes, similar to all other herpesviruses. Several ORFs belonging to these groups are clustered along the viral genome. PMID:22841491

  17. Herpesvirus infections in childhood: 2.

    PubMed

    Nathwani, D; Wood, M J

    Infections due to herpesviruses have received increasing attention over the past decade, culminating in the isolation in 1986 of human herpesvirus-6. This is the second of two articles in which we examine the clinical spectrum of acquired herpesvirus infections in children and review developments in our understanding of the molecular biology, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of these infections. PMID:8242213

  18. Structural organization of poliovirus RNA replication is mediated by viral proteins of the P2 genomic region.

    PubMed Central

    Bienz, K; Egger, D; Troxler, M; Pasamontes, L

    1990-01-01

    Transcriptionally active replication complexes bound to smooth membrane vesicles were isolated from poliovirus-infected cells. In electron microscopic, negatively stained preparations, the replication complex appeared as an irregularly shaped, oblong structure attached to several virus-induced vesicles of a rosettelike arrangement. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry of such preparations demonstrated that the poliovirus replication complex contains the proteins coded by the P2 genomic region (P2 proteins) in a membrane-associated form. In addition, the P2 proteins are also associated with viral RNA, and they can be cross-linked to viral RNA by UV irradiation. Guanidine hydrochloride prevented the P2 proteins from becoming membrane bound but did not change their association with viral RNA. The findings allow the conclusion that the protein 2C or 2C-containing precursor(s) is responsible for the attachment of the viral RNA to the vesicular membrane and for the spatial organization of the replication complex necessary for its proper functioning in viral transcription. A model for the structure of the viral replication complex and for the function of the 2C-containing P2 protein(s) and the vesicular membranes is proposed. Images PMID:2154600

  19. The non-structural protein μNS of piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) forms viral factory-like structures.

    PubMed

    Haatveit, Hanne Merethe; Nyman, Ingvild B; Markussen, Turhan; Wessel, Øystein; Dahle, Maria Krudtaa; Rimstad, Espen

    2016-01-01

    Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) is associated with heart- and skeletal muscle inflammation in farmed Atlantic salmon. The virus is ubiquitous and found in both farmed and wild salmonid fish. It belongs to the family Reoviridae, closely related to the genus Orthoreovirus. The PRV genome comprises ten double-stranded RNA segments encoding at least eight structural and two non-structural proteins. Erythrocytes are the major target cells for PRV. Infected erythrocytes contain globular inclusions resembling viral factories; the putative site of viral replication. For the mammalian reovirus (MRV), the non-structural protein μNS is the primary organizer in factory formation. The analogous PRV protein was the focus of the present study. The subcellular location of PRV μNS and its co-localization with the PRV σNS, µ2 and λ1 proteins was investigated. We demonstrated that PRV μNS forms dense globular cytoplasmic inclusions in transfected fish cells, resembling the viral factories of MRV. In co-transfection experiments with μNS, the σNS, μ2 and λ1 proteins were recruited to the globular structures. The ability of μNS to recruit other PRV proteins into globular inclusions indicates that it is the main viral protein involved in viral factory formation and pivotal in early steps of viral assembly. PMID:26743679

  20. 3C protein of feline coronavirus inhibits viral replication independently of the autophagy pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Li-En; Huang, Wei-Pang; Tang, Da-Jay; Wang, Ying-Ting; Chen, Ching-Tang; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2013-12-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) can cause either asymptomatic enteric infection or fatal peritonitis in cats. Although the mutation of FCoV accessory gene 3c has been suggested to be related to the occurrence of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), how the 3C protein is involved in this phenomenon remains unknown. To investigate the role of the 3C protein, a full-length 3c gene was transiently expressed and the cytoplasmic distribution of the protein was found to be primarily in the perinuclear region. Using 3c-stable expression cells, the replication of a 3c-defective FCoV strain was titrated and a significant decrease in replication (p<0.05) was observed. The mechanism underlying the decreased FIPV replication caused by the 3C protein was further investigated; neither the induction nor inhibition of autophagy rescued the viral replication. Taken together, our data suggest that the 3C protein might have a virulence-suppressing effect in FCoV-infected cats. Deletion of the 3c gene could therefore cause more efficient viral replication, which leads to a fatal infection. PMID:24050534

  1. Viral terminal protein directs early organization of phage DNA replication at the bacterial nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Holguera, Isabel; Ballesteros-Plaza, David; Carballido-López, Rut; Salas, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism leading to protein-primed DNA replication has been studied extensively in vitro. However, little is known about the in vivo organization of the proteins involved in this fundamental process. Here we show that the terminal proteins (TPs) of phages ϕ29 and PRD1, infecting the distantly related bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, respectively, associate with the host bacterial nucleoid independently of other viral-encoded proteins. Analyses of phage ϕ29 revealed that the TP N-terminal domain (residues 1–73) possesses sequence-independent DNA-binding capacity and is responsible for its nucleoid association. Importantly, we show that in the absence of the TP N-terminal domain the efficiency of ϕ29 DNA replication is severely affected. Moreover, the TP recruits the phage DNA polymerase to the bacterial nucleoid, and both proteins later are redistributed to enlarged helix-like structures in an MreB cytoskeleton-dependent way. These data disclose a key function for the TP in vivo: organizing the early viral DNA replication machinery at the cell nucleoid. PMID:20823229

  2. Molecular Genetics of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (Human Herpesvirus 8) Epidemiology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dourmishev, Lyubomir A.; Dourmishev, Assen L.; Palmeri, Diana; Schwartz, Robert A.; Lukac, David M.

    2003-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma had been recognized as unique human cancer for a century before it manifested as an AIDS-defining illness with a suspected infectious etiology. The discovery of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus-8, in 1994 by using representational difference analysis, a subtractive method previously employed for cloning differences in human genomic DNA, was a fitting harbinger for the powerful bioinformatic approaches since employed to understand its pathogenesis in KS. Indeed, the discovery of KSHV was rapidly followed by publication of its complete sequence, which revealed that the virus had coopted a wide armamentarium of human genes; in the short time since then, the functions of many of these viral gene variants in cell growth control, signaling apoptosis, angiogenesis, and immunomodulation have been characterized. This critical literature review explores the pathogenic potential of these genes within the framework of current knowledge of the basic herpesvirology of KSHV, including the relationships between viral genotypic variation and the four clinicoepidemiologic forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, current viral detection methods and their utility, primary infection by KSHV, tissue culture and animal models of latent- and lytic-cycle gene expression and pathogenesis, and viral reactivation from latency. Recent advances in models of de novo endothelial infection, microarray analyses of the host response to infection, receptor identification, and cloning of full-length, infectious KSHV genomic DNA promise to reveal key molecular mechanisms of the candidate pathogeneic genes when expressed in the context of viral infection. PMID:12794189

  3. The equine herpesvirus-1 IR3 gene that lies antisense to the sole immediate-early (IE) gene is trans-activated by the IE protein, and is poorly expressed to a protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byung Chul; Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Kim, Seong K.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J. . E-mail: docall@lsuhsc.edu

    2007-06-20

    The unique IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is expressed as a late 1.0-kb transcript. Previous studies confirmed the IR3 transcription initiation site and tentatively identified other cis-acting elements specific to IR3 such as a TATA box, a 443 base pair 5'untranslated region (UTR), a 285 base pair open reading frame (ORF), and a poly adenylation (A) signal [Holden, V.R., Harty, R.N., Yalamanchili, R.R., O'Callaghan, D.J., 1992. The IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus type 1: a unique gene regulated by sequences within the intron of the immediate-early gene. DNA Seq. 3, 143-152]. Transient transfection assays revealed that the IR3 promoter is strongly trans-activated by the IE protein (IEP) and that coexpression of the IEP with the early EICP0 and IR4 regulatory proteins results in maximal trans-activation of the IR3 promoter. Gel shift assays revealed that the IEP directly binds to the IR3 promoter region. Western blot analysis showed that the IR3 protein produced in E. coli was detected by antibodies to IR3 synthetic peptides; however, the IR3 protein was not detected in EHV-1 infected cell extracts by these same anti-IR3 antibodies, even though the IR3 transcript was detected by northern blot. These findings suggest that the IR3 may not be expressed to a protein. Expression of an IR3/GFP fusion gene was not observed, but expression of a GFP/IR3 fusion gene was detected by fluorescent microscopy. In further attempts to detect the IR3/GFP fusion protein using anti-GFP antibody, western blot analysis showed that the IR3/GFP fusion protein was not detected in vivo. Interestingly, a truncated form of the GFP/IR3 protein was synthesized from the GFP/IR3 fusion gene. However, GFP/IR3 and IR3/GFP fusion proteins of the predicted sizes were synthesized by in vitro coupled transcription and translation of the fusion genes, suggesting poor expression of the IR3 protein in vivo. The possible role of the IR3 transcript in EHV-1 infection is discussed.

  4. Herpesviral ICP0 Protein Promotes Two Waves of Heterochromatin Removal on an Early Viral Promoter during Lytic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer S.; Raja, Priya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesviruses must contend with host cell epigenetic silencing responses acting on their genomes upon entry into the host cell nucleus. In this study, we confirmed that unchromatinized herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) genomes enter primary human foreskin fibroblasts and are rapidly subjected to assembly of nucleosomes and association with repressive heterochromatin modifications such as histone 3 (H3) lysine 9-trimethylation (H3K9me3) and lysine 27-trimethylation (H3K27me3) during the first 1 to 2 h postinfection. Kinetic analysis of the modulation of nucleosomes and heterochromatin modifications over the course of lytic infection demonstrates a progressive removal that coincided with initiation of viral gene expression. We obtained evidence for three phases of heterochromatin removal from an early gene promoter: an initial removal of histones and heterochromatin not dependent on ICP0, a second ICP0-dependent round of removal of H3K9me3 that is independent of viral DNA synthesis, and a third phase of H3K27me3 removal that is dependent on ICP0 and viral DNA synthesis. The presence of ICP0 in transfected cells is also sufficient to promote removal of histones and H3K9me3 modifications of cotransfected genes. Overall, these results show that ICP0 promotes histone removal, a reduction of H3K9me3 modifications, and a later indirect reduction of H3K27me3 modifications following viral early gene expression and DNA synthesis. Therefore, HSV ICP0 promotes the reversal of host epigenetic silencing mechanisms by several mechanisms. PMID:26758183

  5. Viral potassium channels as a robust model system for studies of membrane-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christian J; Lachnit, Christine; Becker, Patrick; Henkes, Leonhard M; Arrigoni, Cristina; Kast, Stefan M; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Schroeder, Indra

    2014-04-01

    The viral channel KcvNTS belongs to the smallest K(+) channels known so far. A monomer of a functional homotetramer contains only 82 amino acids. As a consequence of the small size the protein is almost fully submerged into the membrane. This suggests that the channel is presumably sensitive to its lipid environment. Here we perform a comparative analysis for the function of the channel protein embedded in three different membrane environments. 1. Single-channel currents of KcvNTS were recorded with the patch clamp method on the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells. 2. They were also measured after reconstitution of recombinant channel protein into classical planar lipid bilayers and 3. into horizontal bilayers derived from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). The recombinant channel protein was either expressed and purified from Pichia pastoris or from a cell-free expression system; for the latter a new approach with nanolipoprotein particles was used. The data show that single-channel activity can be recorded under all experimental conditions. The main functional features of the channel like a large single-channel conductance (80pS), high open-probability (>50%) and the approximate duration of open and closed dwell times are maintained in all experimental systems. An apparent difference between the approaches was only observed with respect to the unitary conductance, which was ca. 35% lower in HEK293 cells than in the other systems. The reason for this might be explained by the fact that the channel is tagged by GFP when expressed in HEK293 cells. Collectively the data demonstrate that the small viral channel exhibits a robust function in different experimental systems. This justifies an extrapolation of functional data from these systems to the potential performance of the channel in the virus/host interaction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Viral Membrane Proteins-Channels for Cellular Networking. PMID:23791706

  6. Proteomic analysis of shrimp white spot syndrome viral proteins and characterization of a novel envelope protein VP466.

    PubMed

    Huang, Canhua; Zhang, Xiaobo; Lin, Qingsong; Xu, Xun; Hu, Zhihong; Hew, Choy-L

    2002-03-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is at present one of the major pathogens in shrimp culture worldwide. The complete genome of this virus has been sequenced recently. To identify the structural and functional proteins of WSSV, the purified virions were separated by SDS-PAGE. Twenty-four protein bands were excised, in-gel digested with trypsin, and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Eighteen proteins matching the open reading frames of WSSV genome were identified. Except for three known structural proteins and collagen, the functions of the remaining 14 proteins were unknown. Temporal analysis revealed that all the genes were transcribed in the late stage of WSSV infection except for vp121. Of the newly identified proteins, VP466 (derived from band 16) was further characterized. The cDNA encoding VP466 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein. Specific antibody was generated with the purified GST-VP466 fusion protein. Western blot showed that the mouse anti-GST-VP466 antibody bound specifically to a 51-kDa protein of WSSV. Immunogold labeling revealed that VP466 protein is a component of the viral envelope. Results in this investigation thus proved the effectiveness of proteomic approaches for discovering new proteins of WSSV. PMID:12096122

  7. Proteomic approaches to uncovering virus–host protein interactions during the progression of viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Krystal K; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-01-01

    The integration of proteomic methods to virology has facilitated a significant breadth of biological insight into mechanisms of virus replication, antiviral host responses and viral subversion of host defenses. Throughout the course of infection, these cellular mechanisms rely heavily on the formation of temporally and spatially regulated virus–host protein–protein interactions. Reviewed here are proteomic-based approaches that have been used to characterize this dynamic virus–host interplay. Specifically discussed are the contribution of integrative mass spectrometry, antibody-based affinity purification of protein complexes, cross-linking and protein array techniques for elucidating complex networks of virus–host protein associations during infection with a diverse range of RNA and DNA viruses. The benefits and limitations of applying proteomic methods to virology are explored, and the contribution of these approaches to important biological discoveries and to inspiring new tractable avenues for the design of antiviral therapeutics is highlighted. PMID:26817613

  8. Viral channel forming proteins - How to assemble and depolarize lipid membranes in silico.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Wolfgang B; Kalita, Monoj Mon; Heermann, Dieter

    2016-07-01

    Viral channel forming proteins (VCPs) have been discovered in the late 70s and are found in many viruses to date. Usually they are small and have to assemble to form channels which depolarize the lipid membrane of the host cells. Structural information is just about to emerge for just some of them. Thus, computational methods play a pivotal role in generating plausible structures which can be used in the drug development process. In this review the accumulation of structural data is introduced from a historical perspective. Computational performances and their predictive power are reported guided by biological questions such as the assembly, mechanism of function and drug-protein interaction of VCPs. An outlook of how coarse grained simulations can contribute to yet unexplored issues of these proteins is given. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26806161

  9. Chromatin Modulation of Herpesvirus Lytic Gene Expression: Managing Nucleosome Density and Heterochromatic Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Kristie, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Like their cellular hosts, herpesviruses are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin assembled on their genomes. Upon infection, these viruses are assembled into domains of chromatin with heterochromatic signatures that suppress viral gene expression or euchromatic characteristics that promote gene expression. The organization and modulation of these chromatin domains appear to be intimately linked to the coordinated expression of the different classes of viral genes and thus ultimately play an important role in the progression of productive infection or the establishment and maintenance of viral latency. A recent report from the Knipe laboratory (J. S. Lee, P. Raja, and D. M. Knipe, mBio 7:e02007-15, 2016) contributes to the understanding of the dynamic modulation of chromatin assembled on the herpes simplex virus genome by monitoring the levels of characteristic heterochromatic histone modifications (histone H3 lysine 9 and 27 methylation) associated with a model viral early gene during the progression of lytic infection. Additionally, this study builds upon previous observations that the viral immediate-early protein ICP0 plays a role in reducing the levels of heterochromatin associated with the early genes. PMID:26884430

  10. Regulation of viral gene expression by the herpes simplex virus 1UL24 protein (HSV-1UL24 inhibits accumulation of viral transcripts).

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Solano, Carolina; Gonzalez, Carmen Elena; Richerioux, Nicolas; Bertrand, Luc; Dridi, Slimane; Griffiths, Anthony; Langelier, Yves; Pearson, Angela

    2016-08-01

    UL24 is conserved among all Herpesviridae. In herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), UL24 mutations lead to reduced viral titers both in cell culture and in vivo, and reduced pathogenicity. The human cytomegalovirus ortholog of UL24 has a gene regulatory function; however, it is not known whether other UL24 orthologs also affect gene expression. We discovered that in co-transfection experiments, expression of UL24 correlated with a reduction in the expression of several viral proteins and transcripts. Substitution mutations targeting conserved residues in UL24 impaired this function. Reduced transcript levels did not appear attributable to changes in mRNA stability. The UL24 ortholog of Herpes B virus exhibited a similar activity. An HSV-1 mutant that does not express UL24 produced more viral R1 and R2 transcripts than the wild type or rescue virus relative to the amount of viral DNA. These results reveal a new role for HSV-1UL24 in regulating viral mRNA accumulation. PMID:27214229

  11. Human herpesvirus 8.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Paul T; Tyring, Stephen K

    2002-04-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV 8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a g2 herpesvirus and the most recently identified human tumor virus. HHV 8 has been consistently implicated in the pathogenesis of all clinical variants of Kaposi's sarcoma, as well as in the plasma cell variant of multicentric Castleman's disease and primary effusion lymphomas. Pathogenicity of the virus is increased in the host who is immunosuppressed, either iatrogenically or through H1V-1 infection. The HHV 8 genome contains several homologues of cellular genes that regulate cell growth and differentiation, and the exact mechanisms of the virus' oncogenicity using molecular piracy are still being investigated and elucidated. In this article, the authors review the epidemiology, transmission, clinical manifestations, and molecular genetics of HHV 8 infection and provide a summary of the current treatment modalities available to the clinician. PMID:12120444

  12. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. IMPORTANCE The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection

  13. Use of host-like peptide motifs in viral proteins is a prevalent strategy in host-virus interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hagai, Tzachi; Azia, Ariel; Babu, M. Madan; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Virus interact extensively with host proteins, but the mechanisms controlling these interactions are not well understood. We present a comprehensive analysis of eukaryotic linear-peptide motifs (ELMs) in 2,208 viral genomes and reveal that viruses exploit molecular mimicry of host-like ELMs to possibly assist in host-virus interactions. Using a statistical genomics approach, we identify a large number of potentially functional ELMs and observe that the occurrence of ELMs is often evolutionarily conserved but not uniform across virus families. Some viral proteins contain multiple types of ELMs, in striking similarity to complex regulatory modules in host proteins, suggesting that ELMs may act combinatorially to assist viral replication. Furthermore, a simple evolutionary model suggests that the inherent structural simplicity of ELMs often enables them to tolerate mutations and evolve quickly. Our findings suggest that ELMs may allow fast rewiring of host-virus interactions, which likely assists rapid viral evolution and adaptation to diverse environments. PMID:24882001

  14. Application of virus-like particles (VLP) to NMR characterization of viral membrane protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Kingsley, Carolyn; Basu, Arnab; Bowlin, Terry L; Rong, Lijun; Caffrey, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The membrane proteins of viruses play critical roles in the virus life cycle and are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Virus-like particles (VLP) present the possibility to study the biochemical and biophysical properties of viral membrane proteins in their native environment. Specifically, the VLP constructs contain the entire protein sequence and are comprised of native membrane components including lipids, cholesterol, carbohydrates and cellular proteins. In this study we prepare VLP containing full-length hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) from influenza and characterize their interactions with small molecule inhibitors. Using HA-VLP, we first show that VLP samples prepared using the standard sucrose gradient purification scheme contain significant amounts of serum proteins, which exhibit high potential for non-specific interactions, thereby complicating NMR studies of ligand-target interactions. We then show that the serum contaminants may be largely removed with the addition of a gel filtration chromatography step. Next, using HA-VLP we demonstrate that WaterLOGSY NMR is significantly more sensitive than Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR for the study of ligand interactions with membrane bound targets. In addition, we compare the ligand orientation to HA embedded in VLP with that of recombinant HA by STD NMR. In a subsequent step, using NA-VLP we characterize the kinetic and binding properties of substrate analogs and inhibitors of NA, including study of the H274Y-NA mutant, which leads to wide spread resistance to current influenza antivirals. In summary, our work suggests that VLP have high potential to become standard tools in biochemical and biophysical studies of viral membrane proteins, particularly when VLP are highly purified and combined with control VLP containing native membrane proteins. PMID:26921030

  15. Application and correlation of nano resolution microscopy techniques to viral protein localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Jeffery Allen

    This dissertation is primarily focused on the application of super-resolution microscopy techniques to localization of viral proteins within envelope viruses. Advances in optical super-resolution microscopy techniques have enabled scientists to observe phenomena much smaller than the Abbe diffraction limit by stochastically limiting the number of molecules excited at a given instance and localizing their positions one at a time. Additionally, methods such as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allow scientists to measure the topological features and material properties of samples through contact with a force probe. This dissertation describes the application of these two techniques to virology in order to localize internal viral proteins of enveloped virions, and measure their effect on the elastic properties of the virion. By utilizing super-resolution microscopy techniques such as Fluorescent Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy (fPALM) on virions, which have had their surface glycoproteins labeled with a photo-switchable label, the viral envelope may be accurately recovered. This dissertation describes the development and application of this technique as it applies to envelope recovery of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1). By fluorescently labeling proteins, which are internal to each of these viruses, I have been able to localize a variety of viral proteins within their recovered envelopes. This is done without significant damage to the virion, making this method a highly effective in vivo technique. In the case of VSV, an asymmetric localization along the central axis towards the blunt 5' end was found to exist for both the polymerase and phosphoproteins. These have been determined to occupy a region in the central cavity of ˜57 +/- 12 nm on the 5' end. This inhomogeneity of the underlying proteins such an asymmetry would predict that the Young's modulus would vary along the central axis of the virion. This dissertation

  16. Human herpes virus 8 (Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus).

    PubMed

    Porter, S R; Di Alberti, L; Kumar, N

    1998-01-01

    Human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) is a recently discovered herpesvirus related to Herpesvirus saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). It has been assigned to the Rhadinovirus genus (gamma-2 herpesvirus) on the basis of its genomic sequence and structure. HHV-8 is the first member of this genus known to infect humans and it is now evident that it is the likely cause of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The virus is present in endothelial and spindle cells of KS, and in HIV disease the presence of HHV-8 in peripheral blood, and/or serum IgG antibodies to HHV-8, predicts the development of AIDS-related KS. HHV-8 can also infect CD19 + B cells and is of aetiological significance in the development of body cavity B cell lymphomas of AIDS. Of note, the translation products of viral open reading frames (ORFs) reveal HHV-8 to be a molecular pirate, capable of producing homologues of several human gene products that may result in alterations in cell cycle arrest, inhibit apoptosis and cell-mediated immune responses, and thus provide the potential for tumour production. PMID:9659514

  17. Identification and characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame 11 promotor activation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei

    2008-01-01

    Open reading frame 11 (ORF11) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus belongs to a herpesviral homologous protein family shared by some members of the gamma- herpesvirus subfamily. Little is known about this ORF11 homologous protein family. We have characterized an unknown open reading frame, ORF11, located adjacent and in the opposite orientation to a well-characterized viral IL-6 gene. Northern blot analysis reveals that ORF11 is expressed during the KSHV lytic cycle with delayed-early transcription kinetics. We have determined the 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated region of the unspliced ORF11 transcript and identified both the transcription start site and the transcription termination site. Core promoter region, representing ORF11 promoter activity, was mapped to a 159nt fragment 5{prime} most proximal to the transcription start site. A functional TATA box was identified in the core promoter region. Interestingly, we found that ORF11 transcriptional activation is not responsive to Rta, the KSHV lytic switch protein. We also discovered that part of the ORF11 promoter region, the 209nt fragment upstream of the transcription start site, was repressed by phorbol esters. Our data help to understand transcription regulation of ORF11 and to elucidate roles of ORF11 in KSHV pathogenesis and life cycle.

  18. Circular Herpesvirus sylvilagus DNA in spleen cells of experimentally infected cottontail rabbits.

    PubMed

    Medveczky, P; Kramp, W J; Sullivan, J L

    1984-11-01

    Cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) were infected with Herpesvirus sylvilagus, and spleen cells were analyzed for the presence of virus-specific, covalently closed circular, and linear DNA molecules by a simple electrophoretic technique, followed by transfer to nitrocellulose filters and hybridization with cloned viral DNA (Gardella et al., J. Virol. 50:248-254, 1984). Approximately 0.2 copies per cell of circular DNA and 0.2 copies per cell of linear DNA were detected by hybridization with a cloned viral DNA fragment. The size of the viral DNA was estimated at ca. 158 kilobase pairs. Restriction endonuclease patterns suggested structural similarities to cottontail herpesvirus DNA. PMID:6092696

  19. A proteomic study of the differential protein expression in MDBK cells after bovine herpesvirus type 1 infection (BHV-1) strain treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Yang, Yanling; Liu, Linna; Liao, Peng; Wen, Yongjun; Wu, Hua; Cheng, Shipeng

    2015-01-01

    Different BHV-1 strains, such as the virulent IBRV LN01/08 strains and the attenuated vaccine strain IBRV LNM, produces different clinical immune responses; however, the study of the differential protein expression in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells after BHV-1-infection still remains unclear. Here, we applied a comparative proteomic strategy, based on 2D and MALDI-TOF/MS platforms, to examine the differential expression of proteins in MDBK cells that were treated and not treated with virulent IBRV LN01/08 and attenuated IBRV LNM strains. A total of eight differential proteins, including pyruvate kinase, heat shock protein (HSP) 90 (HSP90AA1 and HSP90AB1), annexin A, albumin (ALB), scinderin (SCIN), tubulin (alpha 1a) and vimentin (VIM), were identified. Among these proteins, pyruvate kinase, and HSP90 (HSP90AB1), tubulin and vimentin were identified in the virulent IBRV LN01/08 strain group, but were not identified in the attenuated IBRV LNM group. These results play an important role in tumor formation and development, cell migration, tumor cell line apoptosis, cell invasion and viral infection. The HSP90 (HSP90AA1) protein was identified in the control group and the attenuated IBRV LNM-infected group. Most studies have shown that HSP90 proteins were more of a cancer gene target, and inhibiting its function would result to oncogene degradation during cancer treatment. On the other hand, ALB is associated to cell differentiation, apoptosis, necrosis, cell death, viral infection, autophagy, interstitial tissue inflammation, and cell survival. These results provide a theoretical basis for the systematic understanding of BHV-1-infection mechanisms and BHV-1-induced immune responses. PMID:26064331

  20. Function of ubiquitin (Ub) specific protease 15 (USP15) in HIV-1 replication and viral protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Pyeon, Dohun; Timani, Khalid Amine; Gulraiz, Fahad; He, Johnny J; Park, In-Woo

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 Nef is necessary and may be sufficient for HIV-1-associated AIDS pathogenicity, in that knockout of Nef alone can protect HIV-infected patients from AIDS. We therefore investigated the feasibility of physical knockout of Nef, using the host ubiquitin proteasome system in HIV-1-infected cells. Our co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Nef interacted with ubiquitin specific protease 15 (USP15), and that USP15, which is known to stabilize cellular proteins, degraded Nef. Nef could also cause decay of USP15, although Nef-mediated degradation of USP15 was weaker than USP15-mediated Nef degradation. Direct interaction between Nef and USP15 was essential for the observed reciprocal decay of the proteins. Further, USP15 degraded not only Nef but also HIV-1 structural protein, Gag, thereby substantially inhibiting HIV-1 replication. However, Gag did not degrade USP15, indicating that the Nef and USP15 complex, in distinction to other viral proteins, play an integral role in coordinating viral protein degradation and hence HIV-1 replication. Moreover, Nef and USP15 globally suppressed ubiquitylation of cellular proteins, indicating that these proteins are major determinants for the stability of cellular as well as viral proteins. Taken together, these data indicate that Nef and USP15 are vital in regulating degradation of viral and cellular proteins and thus HIV-1 replication, and specific degradation of viral, not cellular proteins, by USP15 points to USP15 as a candidate therapeutic agent to combat AIDS by eliminating viral proteins from the infected cells via USP15-mediated proteosomal degradation. PMID:27460547

  1. The viral G protein-coupled receptor ORF74 unmasks phospholipase C signaling of the receptor tyrosine kinase IGF-1R.

    PubMed

    de Munnik, Sabrina M; van der Lee, Rosan; Velders, Daniëlle M; van Offenbeek, Jody; Smits-de Vries, Laura; Leurs, Rob; Smit, Martine J; Vischer, Henry F

    2016-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes the constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor ORF74, which is expressed on the surface of infected host cells and has been linked to the development of the angioproliferative tumor Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase, also plays an essential role in Kaposi's sarcoma growth and survival. In this study we examined the effect of the constitutively active viral receptor ORF74 on human IGF-1R signaling. Constitutive and CXCL1-induced ORF74 signaling did not transactivate IGF-1R. In contrast, IGF-1 stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activation in an ORF74-dependent manner without affecting chemokine binding to ORF74. Inhibition of constitutive ORF74 activity by mutagenesis or the inverse agonist CXCL10, or neutralizing IGF-1R with an antibody or silencing IGF-1R expression using siRNA inhibited PLC activation by IGF-1. Transactivation of ORF74 in response to IGF-1 occurred independently of Src, PI3K, and secreted ORF74 ligands. Furthermore, tyrosine residues in the carboxyl-terminus and intracellular loop 2 of ORF74 are not essential for IGF-1-induced PLC activation. Interestingly, PLC activation in response to IGF-1 is specific for ORF74 as IGF-1 was unable to activate PLC in cells expressing the constitutively active human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded GPCR US28. Interestingly, IGF-1 does not induce β-arrestin recruitment to ORF74. The proximity ligation assay revealed close proximity between ORF74 and IGF-1R on the cell surface, but a physical interaction was not confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Unmasking IGF-1R signaling to PLC in response to IGF-1 is a previously unrecognized action of ORF74. PMID:26931381

  2. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  3. Translation Inhibition of Capped and Uncapped Viral RNAs Mediated by Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vivanco, Jorge M; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2003-05-01

    ABSTRACT Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases that remove specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of the large rRNA and arrest protein synthesis at the translocation step. In addition to their enzymatic activity, RIPs have been reputed to be potent antiviral agents against many plant, animal, and human viruses. We recently showed that pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), an RIP from pokeweed, inhibits translation in cell extracts by binding to the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNA and viral RNAs and depurinating these RNAs at multiple sites downstream of the cap structure. In this study, we examined the activity of three different RIPs against capped and uncapped viral RNAs. PAP, Mirabilis expansa RIP (ME1), and the Saponaria officinalis RIP (saporin) depurinated the capped Tobacco mosaic virus and Brome mosaic virus RNAs, but did not depurinate the uncapped luciferase RNA, indicating that other type I RIPs besides PAP can distinguish between capped and uncapped RNAs. We did not detect depurination of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs at multiple sites by PAP or ME1. Because AMV RNAs are capped, these results indicate that recognition of the cap structure alone is not sufficient for depurination of the RNA at multiple sites throughout its sequence. Furthermore, PAP did not cause detectable depurination of uncapped RNAs from Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV), and uncapped RNA containing poliovirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES). However, in vitro translation experiments showed that PAP inhibited translation of AMV, TBSV, SPMV RNAs, and poliovirus IRES dependent translation. These results demonstrate that PAP does not depurinate every capped RNA and that PAP can inhibit translation of uncapped viral RNAs in vitro without causing detectable depurination at multiple sites. Thus, the cap structure is not the only determinant for inhibition of translation by PAP. PMID:18942981

  4. [KIL-d] Protein Element Confers Antiviral Activity via Catastrophic Viral Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Genjiro; Weissman, Jonathan S; Tanaka, Motomasa

    2015-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells are targeted by pathogenic viruses and have developed cell defense mechanisms against viral infection. In yeast, the cellular extrachromosomal genetic element [KIL-d] alters killer activity of M double-stranded RNA killer virus and confers cell resistance against the killer virus. However, its underlying mechanism and the molecular nature of [KIL-d] are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that [KIL-d] is a proteinaceous prion-like aggregate with non-Mendelian cytoplasmic transmission. Deep sequencing analyses revealed that [KIL-d] selectively increases the rate of de novo mutation in the killer toxin gene of the viral genome, producing yeast harboring a defective mutant killer virus with a selective growth advantage over those with WT killer virus. These results suggest that a prion-like [KIL-d] element reprograms the viral replication machinery to induce mutagenesis and genomic inactivation via the long-hypothesized mechanism of "error catastrophe." The findings also support a role for prion-like protein aggregates in cellular defense and adaptation. PMID:26590718

  5. Singapore grouper iridovirus protein VP088 is essential for viral infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yongming; Wang, Yunzhi; Liu, Qizhi; Zhu, Feng; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection is a great challenge in healthcare and agriculture. The Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) is highly infectious to numerous marine fishes and increasingly threatens mariculture and wildlife conservation. SGIV intervention is not available because little is known about key players and their precise roles in SGVI infection. Here we report the precise role of VP088 as a key player in SGIV infection. VP088 was verified as an envelope protein encoded by late gene orf088. We show that SGIV could be neutralized with an antibody against VP088. Depletion or deletion of VP088 significantly suppresses SGIV infection without altering viral gene expression and host responses. By precisely quantifying the genome copy numbers of host cells and virions, we reveal that VP088 deletion dramatically reduces SGIV infectivity through inhibiting virus entry without altering viral pathogenicity, genome stability and replication and progeny virus release. These results pinpoint that VP088 is a key player in SGIV entry and represents an ideal target for SGIV intervention. PMID:27498856

  6. Singapore grouper iridovirus protein VP088 is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongming; Wang, Yunzhi; Liu, Qizhi; Zhu, Feng; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection is a great challenge in healthcare and agriculture. The Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) is highly infectious to numerous marine fishes and increasingly threatens mariculture and wildlife conservation. SGIV intervention is not available because little is known about key players and their precise roles in SGVI infection. Here we report the precise role of VP088 as a key player in SGIV infection. VP088 was verified as an envelope protein encoded by late gene orf088. We show that SGIV could be neutralized with an antibody against VP088. Depletion or deletion of VP088 significantly suppresses SGIV infection without altering viral gene expression and host responses. By precisely quantifying the genome copy numbers of host cells and virions, we reveal that VP088 deletion dramatically reduces SGIV infectivity through inhibiting virus entry without altering viral pathogenicity, genome stability and replication and progeny virus release. These results pinpoint that VP088 is a key player in SGIV entry and represents an ideal target for SGIV intervention. PMID:27498856

  7. Flavivirus premembrane protein cleavage and spike heterodimer secretion require the function of the viral proteinase NS3.

    PubMed Central

    Lobigs, M

    1993-01-01

    Flavivirus protein biosynthesis involves the proteolytic processing of a single polyprotein precursor by host- and virus-encoded proteinases. In this study, the requirement for the proteolytic function of the viral proteinase NS3 for correct processing of a polyprotein segment encompassing the Murray Valley encephalitis virus structural proteins is shown. The NS3-mediated cleavage in the structural polyprotein region presumably releases the capsid protein from its membrane anchor and triggers the appearance of the premembrane (prM) protein. This suggests that cleavage of prM by signal peptidase in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum is under control of a cytoplasmic cleavage catalyzed by a viral proteinase. The function of the viral proteinase is also essential for secretion of flaviviral spike proteins when expressed from cDNA via vaccinia virus recombinants or in COS cell transfections. This has important implications for the design of flavivirus subunit vaccines. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8392191

  8. Protein kinase R reveals an evolutionary model for defeating viral mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Elde, Nels C.; Child, Stephanie J.; Geballe, Adam P.; Malik, Harmit S.

    2008-01-01

    Distinguishing self from non-self is a fundamental biological challenge. Many pathogens exploit the challenge of self discrimination by employing mimicry to subvert key cellular processes including the cell cycle, apoptosis, and cytoskeletal dynamics1-5. Other mimics interfere with immunity6, 7. Poxviruses encode K3L, a mimic of eIF2α, which is the substrate of Protein Kinase R (PKR), an important component of innate immunity in vertebrates8, 9. The PKR-K3L interaction exemplifies the conundrum imposed by viral mimicry. To be effective, PKR must recognize a conserved substrate (eIF2α) while avoiding rapidly evolving substrate mimics like K3L. Using the PKR-K3L system and a combination of phylogenetic and functional analyses, we uncover evolutionary strategies by which host proteins can overcome mimicry. We find that PKR has evolved under dramatic episodes of positive selection in primates. The ability of PKR to evade viral mimics is partly due to positive selection at sites most intimately involved in eIF2α recognition. We also find that adaptive changes on multiple surfaces of PKR produce combinations of substitutions that increase the odds of defeating mimicry. Thus, while it can appear that pathogens gain insurmountable advantages by mimicking cellular components, host factors like PKR can compete in molecular ‘arms races’ with mimics because of remarkable evolutionary flexibility at protein interaction interfaces challenged by mimicry. PMID:19043403

  9. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  10. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  11. Importance of SARS-CoV spike protein Trp-rich region in viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yanning; Neo, T.L.; Liu, D.Xi.; Tam, James P.

    2008-07-04

    SARS-CoV entry is mediated by spike glycoprotein. During the viral and host cellular membrane fusion, HR1 and HR2 form 6-helix bundle, positioning the fusion peptide closely to the C-terminal region of ectodomain to drive apposition and subsequent membrane fusion. Connecting to the HR2 region is a Trp-rich region which is absolutely conserved in members of coronaviruses. To investigate the importance of Trp-rich region in SARS-CoV entry, we produced different mutated S proteins using Alanine scan strategy. SARS-CoV pseudotyped with mutated S protein was used to measure viral infectivity. To restore the aromaticity of Ala-mutants, we performed rescue experiments using phenylalanine substitutions. Our results show that individually substituted Ala-mutants substantially decrease infectivity by >90%, global Ala-mutants totally abrogated infectivity. In contrast, Phe-substituted mutants are able to restore 10-25% infectivity comparing to the wild-type. The results suggest that the Trp-rich region of S protein is essential for SARS-CoV infectivity.

  12. Expanding the proteome of an RNA virus by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered viral protein.

    PubMed

    Cordek, Daniel G; Croom-Perez, Tayler J; Hwang, Jungwook; Hargittai, Michele R S; Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Han, Qingxia; Lodeiro, Maria Fernanda; Ning, Gang; McCrory, Thomas S; Arnold, Jamie J; Koc, Hasan; Lindenbach, Brett D; Showalter, Scott A; Cameron, Craig E

    2014-08-29

    The human proteome contains myriad intrinsically disordered proteins. Within intrinsically disordered proteins, polyproline-II motifs are often located near sites of phosphorylation. We have used an unconventional experimental paradigm to discover that phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) occurs in the intrinsically disordered domain of hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) on Thr-2332 near one of its polyproline-II motifs. Phosphorylation shifts the conformational ensemble of the NS5A intrinsically disordered domain to a state that permits detection of the polyproline motif by using (15)N-, (13)C-based multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. PKA-dependent proline resonances were lost in the presence of the Src homology 3 domain of c-Src, consistent with formation of a complex. Changing Thr-2332 to alanine in hepatitis C virus genotype 1b reduced the steady-state level of RNA by 10-fold; this change was lethal for genotype 2a. The lethal phenotype could be rescued by changing Thr-2332 to glutamic acid, a phosphomimetic substitution. Immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy showed that the inability to produce Thr(P)-2332-NS5A caused loss of integrity of the virus-induced membranous web/replication organelle. An even more extreme phenotype was observed in the presence of small molecule inhibitors of PKA. We conclude that the PKA-phosphorylated form of NS5A exhibits unique structure and function relative to the unphosphorylated protein. We suggest that post-translational modification of viral proteins containing intrinsic disorder may be a general mechanism to expand the viral proteome without a corresponding expansion of the genome. PMID:25031324

  13. Rift Valley Fever Virus Nonstructural Protein NSs Promotes Viral RNA Replication and Transcription in a Minigenome System

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Peters, C. J.; Makino, Shinji

    2005-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, has a tripartite negative-strand genome (S, M, and L segments) and is an important mosquito-borne pathogen for domestic animals and humans. We established an RVFV T7 RNA polymerase-driven minigenome system in which T7 RNA polymerase from an expression plasmid drove expression of RNA transcripts for viral proteins and minigenome RNA transcripts carrying a reporter gene between both termini of the M RNA segment in 293T cells. Like other viruses of the Bunyaviridae family, replication and transcription of the RVFV minigenome required expression of viral N and L proteins. Unexpectedly, the coexpression of an RVFV nonstructural protein, NSs, with N and L proteins resulted in a significant enhancement of minigenome RNA replication. Coexpression of NSs protein with N and L proteins also enhanced minigenome mRNA transcription in the cells expressing viral-sense minigenome RNA transcripts. NSs protein expression increased the RNA replication of minigenomes that originated from S and L RNA segments. Enhancement of minigenome RNA synthesis by NSs protein occurred in cells lacking alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) genes, indicating that the effect of NSs protein on minigenome RNA replication was unrelated to a putative NSs protein-induced inhibition of IFN-α/β production. Our finding that RVFV NSs protein augmented minigenome RNA synthesis was in sharp contrast to reports that Bunyamwera virus (genus Bunyavirus) NSs protein inhibits viral minigenome RNA synthesis, suggesting that RVFV NSs protein and Bunyamwera virus NSs protein have distinctly different biological roles in viral RNA synthesis. PMID:15827175

  14. A Trio of Viral Proteins Tunes Aphid-Plant Interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhiyou; Murphy, Alex M.; Anggoro, Damar Tri; Tungadi, Trisna; Luang-In, Vijitra; Lewsey, Mathew G.; Rossiter, John T.; Powell, Glen; Smith, Alison G.; Carr, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Virus-induced deterrence to aphid feeding is believed to promote plant virus transmission by encouraging migration of virus-bearing insects away from infected plants. We investigated the effects of infection by an aphid-transmitted virus, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), on the interaction of Arabidopsis thaliana, one of the natural hosts for CMV, with Myzus persicae (common names: ‘peach-potato aphid’, ‘green peach aphid’). Methodology/Principal Findings Infection of Arabidopsis (ecotype Col-0) with CMV strain Fny (Fny-CMV) induced biosynthesis of the aphid feeding-deterrent 4-methoxy-indol-3-yl-methylglucosinolate (4MI3M). 4MI3M inhibited phloem ingestion by aphids and consequently discouraged aphid settling. The CMV 2b protein is a suppressor of antiviral RNA silencing, which has previously been implicated in altering plant-aphid interactions. Its presence in infected hosts enhances the accumulation of CMV and the other four viral proteins. Another viral gene product, the 2a protein (an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase), triggers defensive signaling, leading to increased 4MI3M accumulation. The 2b protein can inhibit ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1), a host factor that both positively-regulates 4MI3M biosynthesis and negatively-regulates accumulation of substance(s) toxic to aphids. However, the 1a replicase protein moderated 2b-mediated inhibition of AGO1, ensuring that aphids were deterred from feeding but not poisoned. The LS strain of CMV did not induce feeding deterrence in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Conclusions/Significance Inhibition of AGO1 by the 2b protein could act as a booby trap since this will trigger antibiosis against aphids. However, for Fny-CMV the interplay of three viral proteins (1a, 2a and 2b) appears to balance the need of the virus to inhibit antiviral silencing, while inducing a mild resistance (antixenosis) that is thought to promote transmission. The strain-specific effects of CMV on Arabidopsis-aphid interactions, and differences between

  15. Expression of Multiple Functional RNAs or Proteins from One Viral Vector.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will cover the available design choices for enabling expression of two functional protein or RNA sequences from a single viral vector. Such vectors are very useful in the neuroscience-related field of neuronal control and modulation, e.g., using optogenetics or DREADDs, but are also desirable in applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in situ genome editing and more refined therapeutic approaches. Each approach to achieving this combined expression has its own strengths and limitations, which makes them more or less suitable for different applications. In this chapter, we describe the available alternatives and provide tips on how they can be implemented. PMID:26611577

  16. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF34 Protein Binds to HIF-1α and Causes Its Degradation via the Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kousoulas, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761–6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  17. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF34 protein binds to HIF-1α and causes its degradation via the proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Haque, Muzammel; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2013-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two other lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascular tumor, and recently both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α were detected in KS samples, indicating a role of HIFs in the KSHV life cycle. Previously, we showed that ORF34, a lytic gene of unassigned function, was activated by hypoxia and that ORF34 transcription was upregulated by both HIFs (M. Haque, D. A. Davis, V. Wang, I. Widmer, and R. Yarchoan, J Virol. 77:6761-6768, 2003). In the present study, we show that coexpression of ORF34 with HIF-1αm (degradation-resistant HIF-1α) caused substantial reduction in HIF-1α-dependent transcription, as evidenced by reporter assays. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that ORF34 physically interacted with HIF-1αm in transient expression experiments. Deletion analysis revealed that three different ORF34 domains interacted with the amino-terminal domain of HIF-1α. Also, purified HIF-1α and ORF34 proteins interacted with each other. The observed transcriptional inhibition of HIF-1α-dependent promoters was attributed to degradation of HIF-1α after binding with ORF34, since the overall amount of wild-type HIF-1α but not the degradation-resistant one (HIF-1αm) was reduced in the presence of ORF34. Moreover, ORF34 caused degradation of HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the ubiquitin-dependent pathway by the chemical proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented HIF-1α degradation in the presence of ORF34. These results show that ORF34 binds to HIF-1α, leading to its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. PMID:23221556

  18. Cross-regulation between herpesviruses and the TNF superfamily members

    PubMed Central

    Šedý, John R.; Spear, Patricia G.

    2008-01-01

    Herpesviruses have evolved numerous strategies to subvert host immune responses so they can coexist with their host species. These viruses ‘co-opt’ host genes for entry into host cells and then express immunomodulatory genes, including mimics of members of the tumour-necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, that initiate and alter host-cell signalling pathways. TNF superfamily members have crucial roles in controlling herpesvirus infection by mediating the direct killing of infected cells and by enhancing immune responses. Despite these strong immune responses, herpesviruses persist in a latent form, which suggests a dynamic relationship between the host immune system and the virus that results in a balance between host survival and viral control. PMID:18949019

  19. The HIV-1 Tat Protein Has a Versatile Role in Activating Viral Transcription ▿

    PubMed Central

    Das, Atze T.; Harwig, Alex; Berkhout, Ben

    2011-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the Tat protein has a pivotal role in HIV-1 replication because it stimulates transcription from the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter by binding to the TAR hairpin in the nascent RNA transcript. However, a multitude of additional Tat functions have been suggested. The importance of these functions is difficult to assess in replication studies with Tat-mutated HIV-1 variants because of the dominant negative effect on viral gene expression. We therefore used an HIV-1 construct that does not depend on the Tat-TAR interaction for transcription to reevaluate whether or not Tat has a second essential function in HIV-1 replication. This HIV-rtTA variant uses the incorporated Tet-On gene expression system for activation of transcription and replicates efficiently upon complete TAR deletion. Here we demonstrated that Tat inactivation does nevertheless severely inhibit replication. Upon long-term culturing, the Tat-minus HIV-rtTA variant acquired mutations in the U3 region that improved promoter activity and reestablished replication. We showed that in the absence of a functional TAR, Tat remains important for viral transcription via Sp1 sequence elements in the U3 promoter region. Substitution of these U3 sequences with nonrelated promoter elements created a virus that replicates efficiently without Tat in SupT1 T cells. These results indicate that Tat has a versatile role in transcription via TAR and U3 elements. The results also imply that Tat has no other essential function in viral replication in cultured T cells. PMID:21752913

  20. Viral infections of the liver in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Hepatitis A and hepatitis B viruses and yellow fever virus are the most important causes of acute inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis is also frequently associated with other common viral infections such as cytomegalovirus (human herpesvirus 5) and EB virus (human herpesvirus 4). In addition, there are a number of viruses which occasionally display increased hepatotropism producing a clinical picture which is similar to classical hepatitis. PMID:4377172

  1. Novel approaches and challenges to treatment of central nervous system viral infections.

    PubMed

    Nath, Avindra; Tyler, Kenneth L

    2013-09-01

    Existing and emerging viral central nervous system (CNS) infections are major sources of human morbidity and mortality. Treatments of proven efficacy are currently limited predominantly to herpesviruses and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal model systems for some important viruses and by the difficulty in conducting human clinical trials for diseases that may be rare, or in the case of arboviral infections, often have variable seasonal and geographic incidence. Nonetheless, many novel approaches to antiviral therapy are available, including candidate thiazolide and pyrazinecarboxamide derivatives with potential broad-spectrum antiviral efficacy. New herpesvirus drugs include viral helicase-primase and terminase inhibitors. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and other strategies to interfere with viral RNA translation has shown efficacy in experimental models of CNS viral disease. Identifying specific molecular targets within viral replication cycles has led to many existing antiviral agents and will undoubtedly continue to be the basis of future drug design. A promising new area of research involves therapies based on enhanced understanding of host antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptor agonists and drugs that inhibit specific cytokines as well as interferon preparations have all shown potential therapeutic efficacy. Passive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes has been used in humans and may provide an effective therapy for some herpesvirus infections and potentially for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against specific viral proteins have been developed and in several cases evaluated in humans in settings including West Nile virus and HIV infection and in pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies. PMID:23913580

  2. p32 Is a Novel Target for Viral Protein ICP34.5 of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Facilitates Viral Nuclear Egress*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Yang, Yin; Wu, Songfang; Pan, Shuang; Zhou, Chaodong; Ma, Yijie; Ru, Yongxin; Dong, Shuxu; He, Bin; Zhang, Cuizhu; Cao, Youjia

    2014-01-01

    As a large double-stranded DNA virus, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) assembles capsids in the nucleus where the viral particles exit by budding through the inner nuclear membrane. Although a number of viral and host proteins are involved, the machinery of viral egress is not well understood. In a search for host interacting proteins of ICP34.5, which is a virulence factor of HSV-1, we identified a cellular protein, p32 (gC1qR/HABP1), by mass spectrophotometer analysis. When expressed, ICP34.5 associated with p32 in mammalian cells. Upon HSV-1 infection, p32 was recruited to the inner nuclear membrane by ICP34.5, which paralleled the phosphorylation and rearrangement of nuclear lamina. Knockdown of p32 in HSV-1-infected cells significantly reduced the production of cell-free viruses, suggesting that p32 is a mediator of HSV-1 nuclear egress. These observations suggest that the interaction between HSV-1 ICP34.5 and p32 leads to the disintegration of nuclear lamina and facilitates the nuclear egress of HSV-1 particles. PMID:25355318

  3. A Viral Pilot for HCMV Navigation?

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    gH/gL virion envelope glycoprotein complexes of herpesviruses serve as entry complexes and mediate viral cell tropism. By binding additional viral proteins, gH/gL forms multimeric complexes which bind to specific host cell receptors. Both Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) express alternative multimeric gH/gL complexes. Relative amounts of these alternative complexes in the viral envelope determine which host cells are preferentially infected. Host cells of EBV can modulate the gH/gL complex complement of progeny viruses by cell type-dependent degradation of one of the associating proteins. Host cells of HCMV modulate the tropism of their virus progenies by releasing or not releasing virus populations with a specific gH/gL complex complement out of a heterogeneous pool of virions. The group of Jeremy Kamil has recently shown that the HCMV ER-resident protein UL148 controls integration of one of the HCMV gH/gL complexes into virions and thus creates a pool of virions which can be routed by different host cells. This first mechanistic insight into regulation of the gH/gL complex complement of HCMV progenies presents UL148 as a pilot candidate for HCMV navigation in its infected host. PMID:26184287

  4. Arterivirus Minor Envelope Proteins Are a Major Determinant of Viral Tropism in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Debin; Wei, Zuzhang; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Liu, Runxia; Tong, Guangzhi

    2012-01-01

    Arteriviruses are enveloped positive-strand RNA viruses for which the attachment proteins and cellular receptors have remained largely controversial. Arterivirus particles contain at least eight envelope proteins, an unusually large number among RNA viruses. These appear to segregate into three groups: major structural components (major glycoprotein GP5 and membrane protein [M]), minor glycoproteins (GP2a, GP3, and GP4), and small hydrophobic proteins (E and the recently discovered ORF5a protein). Biochemical studies previously suggested that the GP5-M heterodimer of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) interacts with porcine sialoadhesin (pSn) in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM). However, another study proposed that minor protein GP4, along with GP2a, interacts with CD163, another reported cellular receptor for PRRSV. In this study, we provide genetic evidence that the minor envelope proteins are the major determinant of arterivirus entry into cultured cells. A PRRSV infectious cDNA clone was equipped with open reading frames (ORFs) encoding minor envelope and E proteins of equine arteritis virus (EAV), the only known arterivirus displaying a broad tropism in cultured cells. Although PRRSV and EAV are only distantly related and utilize diversified transcription-regulating sequences (TRSs), a viable chimeric progeny virus was rescued. Strikingly, this chimeric virus (vAPRRS-EAV2ab34) acquired the broad in vitro cell tropism of EAV, demonstrating that the minor envelope proteins play a critical role as viral attachment proteins. We believe that chimeric arteriviruses of this kind will be a powerful tool for further dissection of the arterivirus replicative cycle, including virus entry, subgenomic RNA synthesis, and virion assembly. PMID:22258262

  5. Functional characterization of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus open reading frame K8 by bacterial artificial chromosome-based mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sathish, Narayanan; Hollow, Charles; Yuan, Yan

    2011-03-01

    The open reading frame K8 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a basic leucine zipper (bZip) protein that binds to the origin of viral DNA replication and is an integral component of viral lytic DNA replication complex. Moreover, K8 physically interacts with replication and transcription activator (RTA) and represses its transactivation activity on several viral promoters. To investigate the role of this protein in viral life cycle, we constructed two K8-null recombinant mutant viruses (BAC-ΔK8 and BAC-stopK8) by using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system. Latent viral infection can be reconstituted in 293T and BJAB cells with wild-type and the K8-null recombinant viruses by introducing the cloned viral genomes into the cells. When the cells carrying these viruses were induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and sodium butyrate, no significant difference was seen in overall viral gene expression between wild-type and K8-null viruses, with lytic DNA replication still active in the latter. However, 293T cells harboring K8-null mutant viruses, either BAC-ΔK8 or BAC-stopK8, displayed lower copy numbers of latent KSHV genome in comparison with wild-type viruses. Furthermore, although K8 deficiency appeared to not affect infectivity when K8-null viruses were used to infect 293T, primary human microvascular dermal endothelial and human foreskin fibroblast cells, they exhibited much lower viral genome copy numbers in all types of cell compared to wild-type viruses. Taken together, these data suggest a possible role of K8 in abortive lytic DNA replication occurring in early stages of de novo infection or in the maintenance of latent viral genomes. PMID:21159864

  6. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  7. N(6)-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m(6)A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1-3) bind to m(6)A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1-3 proteins recognize m(6)A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4(+) T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1-3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1-3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m(6)A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m(6)A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m(6)A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. PMID:27371828

  8. Visualizing Viral Dissemination in the Mouse Nervous System, Using a Green Fluorescent Protein-Expressing Borna Disease Virus Vector▿

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Andreas; Guelzow, Timo; Staeheli, Peter; Schneider, Urs; Heimrich, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) frequently persists in the brain of infected animals. To analyze viral dissemination in the mouse nervous system, we generated a mouse-adapted virus that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP). This viral vector supported GFP expression for up to 150 days and possessed an extraordinary staining capacity, visualizing complete dendritic arbors as well as individual axonal fibers of infected neurons. GFP-positive cells were first detected in cortical areas from where the virus disseminated through the entire central nervous system (CNS). Late in infection, GFP expression was found in the sciatic nerve, demonstrating viral spread from the central to the peripheral nervous system. PMID:20219925

  9. Herpesvirus infections of the central nervous system in immunocompromised patients

    PubMed Central

    Strank, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    Human herpesviruses may cause infections of the central nervous system during primary infection or following reactivation from a latent state. Especially in immunosuppressed patients the infection can take a life-threatening course, and therefore early diagnosis of herpesvirus-associated neurological diseases should have high priority. Clinical presentation in these patients is usually without typical features, making diagnosis even more challenging. Therefore general broad testing for different herpesviruses in cerebrospinal fluid samples is highly recommended. In addition, determination of the virus DNA level in the cerebrospinal fluid by quantitative assays seems to be of high importance to determine prognosis. Moreover, it might help to differentiate between specific virus-associated disease and unspecific presence of virus in the cerebrospinal fluid, especially in immunocompromised patients. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of cerebrospinal fluid has revolutionized the diagnosis of nervous system viral infections, particularly those caused by human herpesviruses. This review summarizes the role human herpesviruses play in central nervous system infections in immunocompromised patients, with a focus on the clinical manifestation of encephalitis. PMID:22973424

  10. Evidence of apoptosis induced by viral protein 2 of chicken anaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kaffashi, Amir; Pagel, Charles N; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Browning, Glenn F

    2015-10-01

    Although viral protein 3 (VP3) of chicken anaemia virus (CAV) has been well recognised as an inducer of apoptosis, viral protein 2 (VP2) of the virus has only been speculated to have apoptotic activity. This has not been verified because the open reading frame (ORF) encoding VP2 completely encompasses that encoding VP3, and thus the possibility of expression of VP3 cannot be excluded. The aim of this study was to elucidate the potential role of VP2 as an inducer of apoptosis. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a point mutation that knocked out VP3 by early termination of its translation with a stop codon without imposing any change in the amino acid sequence of VP2. The mutated sequence was inserted into the pCAT plasmid preceded by a favorable Kozak's consensus sequence to create pCAT-VP2(+)VP3(-). The absence of VP3 expression in MSB1 cells transfected with this plasmid was confirmed using Western blotting, and DNA strand breaks and nuclear morphological changes were assessed to detect apoptosis. There was an increased level of apoptotic death in cells transfected with pCAT-VP2(+)VP3(-) compared to those transfected with the vector alone. This provides evidence that CAV VP2 can induce apoptosis. PMID:26233670

  11. Quassinoids: Viral protein R inhibitors from Picrasma javanica bark collected in Myanmar for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Win, Nwet Nwet; Ito, Takuya; Win, Yi Yi; Ngwe, Hla; Kodama, Takeshi; Abe, Ikuro; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Viral protein R (Vpr) is an accessory protein that plays important roles in the viral pathogenesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1). An assay for anti-Vpr activity, using TREx-HeLa-Vpr cells, is a promising strategy to discover Vpr inhibitors. The anti-Vpr assay revealed that the CHCl3-soluble extract of Picrasma javanica bark possesses potent anti-Vpr activity. Furthermore, studies of quassinoids (1-15) previously isolated from the extract demonstrated that all of the tested quassinoids exhibit anti-Vpr activity. Among the tested compounds, javanicin I (15) exhibited the most potent anti-Vpr activity ((***)p <0.001) in comparing with that of the positive control, damnacanthal. The structure-activity relationships of the active quassinoids suggested that the presence of a methyl group at C-13 in the 2,12,14-triene-1,11,16-trione-2,12-dimethoxy-18-norpicrasane quassinoids is the important factor for the potent inhibitory effect in TREx-HeLa-Vpr cells. PMID:27575477

  12. Two Plant–Viral Movement Proteins Traffic in the Endocytic Recycling PathwayW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Sophie; Cowan, Graham H.; Ziegler, Angelika; Roberts, Alison G.; Oparka, Karl J.; Torrance, Lesley

    2005-01-01

    Many plant viruses exploit a conserved group of proteins known as the triple gene block (TGB) for cell-to-cell movement. Here, we investigated the interaction of two TGB proteins (TGB2 and TGB3) of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV), with components of the secretory and endocytic pathways when expressed as N-terminal fusions to green fluorescent protein or monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP). Our studies revealed that fluorophore-labeled TGB2 and TGB3 showed an early association with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and colocalized in motile granules that used the ER-actin network for intracellular movement. Both proteins increased the size exclusion limit of plasmodesmata, and TGB3 accumulated at plasmodesmata in the absence of TGB2. TGB3 contains a putative Tyr-based sorting motif, mutations in which abolished ER localization and plasmodesmatal targeting. Later in the expression cycle, both fusion proteins were incorporated into vesicular structures. TGB2 associated with these structures on its own, but TGB3 could not be incorporated into the vesicles in the absence of TGB2. Moreover, in addition to localization to the ER and motile granules, mRFP-TGB3 was incorporated into vesicles when expressed in PMTV-infected epidermal cells, indicating recruitment by virus-expressed TGB2. The TGB fusion protein-containing vesicles were labeled with FM4-64, a marker for plasma membrane internalization and components of the endocytic pathway. TGB2 also colocalized in vesicles with Ara7, a Rab5 ortholog that marks the early endosome. Protein interaction analysis revealed that recombinant TGB2 interacted with a tobacco protein belonging to the highly conserved RME-8 family of J-domain chaperones, shown to be essential for endocytic trafficking in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Collectively, the data indicate the involvement of the endocytic pathway in viral intracellular movement, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:15608333

  13. Hepatitis C Virus NS2 Protein Triggers Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Suppresses its Own Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    von dem Bussche, Annette; Machida, Raiki; Li, Ke; Loevinsohn, Gideon; Khander, Amrin; Wang, Jianguo; Wakita, Takaji; Wands, Jack R.; Li, Jisu

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims We previously reported that the NS2 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) inhibits the expression of reporter genes driven by a variety of cellular and viral promoters. The aim of the study was to determine whether the broad transcriptional repression is caused by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Methods Phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α and HCV replication were detected by Western and Northern blot, respectively. De novo protein synthesis was measured by metabolic labeling. Activation of ER stress responsive genes was determined by promoter reporter assay, as well as mRNA and protein measurement by real time PCR and Western blot. Results Transient or inducible NS2 protein expression increased eIF2α phosphorylation and reduced de novo protein synthesis. It up-regulated promoter activities and transcript levels of ER stress inducible genes including GRP78, ATF6, and GADD153, as well as GRP78 protein level. The same effect was observed when NS2 was synthesized as part of the core-E1-E2-p7-NS2 polypeptide. NS2 protein also inhibited reporter gene expression from the HCV internal ribosome entry site and consequently reduced HCV replication. The full-length HCV replicon activated GRP78, ATF6, and GADD153 promoters more efficiently than the subgenomic replicon lacking the coding sequence for both the structural proteins and NS2. Abrogation of HCV infection/replication, by an inhibitor of the NS3 protease, relieved ER stress. Conclusions HCV infection can induce ER stress, with NS2 protein being a major mediator. The stress can be relieved by a feedback mechanism. PMID:20801537

  14. RhoB is a component of the human cytomegalovirus assembly complex and is required for efficient viral production

    PubMed Central

    Goulidaki, Nektaria; Alarifi, Saud; Alkahtani, Saad H; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Stournaras, Christos; Sourvinos, George

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV), an ubiquitous β-herpesvirus, is a significant pathogen that causes medically severe diseases in immunocompromised individuals and in congenitally infected neonates. RhoB belongs to the family of Rho GTPases, which regulates diverse cellular processes. Rho proteins are implicated in the entry and egress from the host cell of mainly α- and γ-herpesviruses, whereas β-herpesviruses are the least studied in this regard. Here, we studied the role of RhoB GTPase during HCMV lytic infection. Microscopy analysis, both in fixed and live infected cells showed that RhoB was translocated to the assembly complex/compartment (AC) of HCMV, a cytoplasmic zone in infected cells where many viral structural proteins are known to accumulate and assembly of new virions takes place. Furthermore, RhoB was localized at the AC even when the expression of the late HCMV AC proteins was inhibited. At the very late stages of infection, cellular projections were formed containing RhoB and HCMV virions, potentially contributing to the successful viral spread. Interestingly, the knockdown of RhoB in HCMV-infected cells resulted in a significant reduction of the virus titer and could also affect the accumulation of AC viral proteins at this subcellular compartment. RhoB knockdown also affected actin fibers' structure. Actin reorganization was observed at late stages of infection originating from the viral AC and surrounding the cellular projections, implying a potential interplay between RhoB and actin during HCMV assembly and egress. In conclusion, our results demonstrate for the first time that RhoB is a constituent of the viral AC and is required for HCMV productive infection. PMID:26114383

  15. The potato mop-top virus TGB2 protein and viral RNA associate with chloroplasts and viral infection induces inclusions in the plastids

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Graham H.; Roberts, Alison G.; Chapman, Sean N.; Ziegler, Angelika; Savenkov, Eugene I.; Torrance, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    The potato mop-top virus (PMTV) triple gene block 2 (TGB2) movement proteins fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP-TGB2) was expressed under the control of the PMTV subgenomic promoter from a PMTV vector. The subcellular localizations and interactions of mRFP-TGB2 were investigated using confocal imaging [confocal laser-scanning microscope, (CLSM)] and biochemical analysis. The results revealed associations with membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mobile granules, small round structures (1–2 μm in diameter), and chloroplasts. Expression of mRFP-TGB2 in epidermal cells enabled cell-to-cell movement of a TGB2 defective PMTV reporter clone, indicating that the mRFP-TGB2 fusion protein was functional and required for cell-to-cell movement. Protein-lipid interaction assays revealed an association between TGB2 and lipids present in chloroplasts, consistent with microscopical observations where the plastid envelope was labeled later in infection. To further investigate the association of PMTV infection with chloroplasts, ultrastructural studies of thin sections of PMTV-infected potato and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves by electron microscopy revealed abnormal chloroplasts with cytoplasmic inclusions and terminal projections. Viral coat protein (CP), genomic RNA and fluorescently-labeled TGB2 were detected in plastid preparations isolated from the infected leaves, and viral RNA was localized to chloroplasts in infected tissues. The results reveal a novel association of TGB2 and vRNA with chloroplasts, and suggest viral replication is associated with chloroplast membranes, and that TGB2 plays a novel role in targeting the virus to chloroplasts. PMID:23269927

  16. Osmolyte-Mediated Encapsulation of Proteins inside MS2 Viral Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Jeff E.; Capehart, Stacy L.; Francis, Matthew B.; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes in nanometer-sized compartments has the potential to enhance and control enzymatic activity, both in vivo and in vitro. Despite this potential, there are little quantitative data on the effect of encapsulation in a well-defined compartment under varying conditions. To gain more insight into these effects, we have characterized two improved methods for the encapsulation of heterologous molecules inside bacteriophage MS2 viral capsids. First, attaching DNA oligomers to a molecule of interest and incubating it with MS2 coat protein dimers yielded reassembled capsids that packaged the tagged molecules. The addition of a protein stabilizing osmolyte, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), significantly increased the yields of reassembly. Second, we found that expressed proteins with genetically encoded negatively charged peptide tags could also induce capsid reassembly, resulting in high yields of reassembled capsids containing the protein. This second method was used to encapsulate alkaline phosphatase tagged with a 16 amino acid peptide. The purified encapsulated enzyme was found to have the same Km value and a slightly lower kcat value than the free enzyme, indicating that this method of encapsulation had a minimal effect on enzyme kinetics. This method provides a practical and potentially scalable way of studying the complex effects of encapsulating enzymes in protein-based compartments. PMID:22953696

  17. Diagnosis and Control of Viral Diseases of Reproductive Importance: Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis and Bovine Viral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Givens, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Both bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine herpesvirus 1 can have significant negative reproductive impacts on cattle health. Vaccination is the primary control method for the viral pathogens in US cattle herds. Polyvalent, modified-live vaccines are recommended to provide optimal protection against various viral field strains. Of particular importance to bovine viral diarrhea control is the limitation of contact of pregnant cattle with potential viral reservoirs during the critical first 125 days of gestation. PMID:27140298

  18. Small glutamine-rich protein/viral protein U–binding protein is a novel cochaperone that affects heat shock protein 70 activity

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Peter C.; Walker, Doriann; Panganiban, Antonito T.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular chaperone complexes containing heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 and Hsp90 are regulated by cochaperones, including a subclass of regulators, such as Hsp70 interacting protein (Hip), C-terminus of Hsp70 interacting protein (CHIP), and Hsp70-Hsp90 organizing factor (Hop), that contain tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs), where Hsp70 refers to Hsp70 and its nearly identical constitutive counterpart, Hsc70, together. These proteins interact with the Hsp70 to regulate adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and folding activities or to generate the chaperone complex. Here we provide evidence that small glutamine-rich protein/viral protein U–binding protein (SGT/UBP) is a cochaperone that negatively regulates Hsp70. By “Far-Western” and pull-down assays, SGT/UBP was shown to interact directly with Hsp70 and weakly with Hsp90. The interaction of SGT/UBP with both these protein chaperones was mapped to 3 TPRs in SGT/UBP (amino acids 95–195) that are flanked by charged residues. Moreover, SGT/UBP caused an approximately 30% reduction in both the intrinsic ATPase activity of Hsc70 and the ability of Hsc70 to refold denatured luciferase in vitro. This negative effect of SGT/UBP on Hsc70 is similar in magnitude to that observed for the cochaperone CHIP. A role for SGT/UBP in protein folding is also supported by evidence that a yeast strain containing a deletion in the yeast homolog to SGT/UBP (ΔSGT/UBP) displays a 50-fold reduction in recovery from heat shock compared with the wild type parent. Together, these results are consistent with a regulatory role for SGT/UBP in the chaperone complex. PMID:12482202

  19. Bacterial expression of antigenic sites A and D in the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and evaluation of their inhibitory effects on viral infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spike (S) protein is a key structural protein of coronaviruses including, the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). The S protein is a type I membrane glycoprotein located in the viral envelope and is responsible for mediating the binding of viral particles to specific cell recepto...

  20. A Genomic Approach to Unravel Host-Pathogen Interaction in Chelonians: The Example of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3.

    PubMed

    Origgi, Francesco C; Tecilla, Marco; Pilo, Paola; Aloisio, Fabio; Otten, Patricia; Aguilar-Bultet, Lisandra; Sattler, Ursula; Roccabianca, Paola; Romero, Carlos H; Bloom, David C; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2015-01-01

    We report the first de novo sequence assembly and analysis of the genome of Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV3), one of the most pathogenic chelonian herpesviruses. The genome of TeHV3 is at least 150,080 nucleotides long, is arranged in a type D configuration and comprises at least 102 open reading frames extensively co-linear with those of Human herpesvirus 1. Consistently, the phylogenetic analysis positions TeHV3 among the Alphaherpesvirinae, closely associated with Chelonid herpesvirus 5, a Scutavirus. To date, there has been limited genetic characterization of TeHVs and a resolution beyond the genotype was not feasible because of the lack of informative DNA sequences. To exemplify the potential benefits of the novel genomic information provided by this first whole genome analysis, we selected the glycoprotein B (gB) gene, for detailed comparison among different TeHV3 isolates. The rationale for selecting gB is that it encodes for a well-conserved protein among herpesviruses but is coupled with a relevant antigenicity and is consequently prone to accumulate single nucleotide polymorphisms. These features were considered critical for an ideal phylogenetic marker to investigate the potential existence of distinct TeHV3 genogroups and their associated pathology. Fifteen captive tortoises presumptively diagnosed to be infected with TeHVs or carrying compatible lesions on the basis of either the presence of intranuclear inclusions (presumptively infected) and/or diphtheronecrotic stomatitis-glossitis or pneumonia (compatible lesions) were selected for the study. Viral isolation, TeHV identification, phylogenetic analysis and pathological characterization of the associated lesions, were performed. Our results revealed 1) the existence of at least two distinct TeHV3 genogroups apparently associated with different pathologies in tortoises and 2) the first evidence for a putative homologous recombination event having occurred in a chelonian herpesvirus. This novel

  1. A Genomic Approach to Unravel Host-Pathogen Interaction in Chelonians: The Example of Testudinid Herpesvirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Origgi, Francesco C.; Tecilla, Marco; Pilo, Paola; Aloisio, Fabio; Otten, Patricia; Aguilar-Bultet, Lisandra; Sattler, Ursula; Roccabianca, Paola; Romero, Carlos H.; Bloom, David C.; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first de novo sequence assembly and analysis of the genome of Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV3), one of the most pathogenic chelonian herpesviruses. The genome of TeHV3 is at least 150,080 nucleotides long, is arranged in a type D configuration and comprises at least 102 open reading frames extensively co-linear with those of Human herpesvirus 1. Consistently, the phylogenetic analysis positions TeHV3 among the Alphaherpesvirinae, closely associated with Chelonid herpesvirus 5, a Scutavirus. To date, there has been limited genetic characterization of TeHVs and a resolution beyond the genotype was not feasible because of the lack of informative DNA sequences. To exemplify the potential benefits of the novel genomic information provided by this first whole genome analysis, we selected the glycoprotein B (gB) gene, for detailed comparison among different TeHV3 isolates. The rationale for selecting gB is that it encodes for a well-conserved protein among herpesviruses but is coupled with a relevant antigenicity and is consequently prone to accumulate single nucleotide polymorphisms. These features were considered critical for an ideal phylogenetic marker to investigate the potential existence of distinct TeHV3 genogroups and their associated pathology. Fifteen captive tortoises presumptively diagnosed to be infected with TeHVs or carrying compatible lesions on the basis of either the presence of intranuclear inclusions (presumptively infected) and/or diphtheronecrotic stomatitis-glossitis or pneumonia (compatible lesions) were selected for the study. Viral isolation, TeHV identification, phylogenetic analysis and pathological characterization of the associated lesions, were performed. Our results revealed 1) the existence of at least two distinct TeHV3 genogroups apparently associated with different pathologies in tortoises and 2) the first evidence for a putative homologous recombination event having occurred in a chelonian herpesvirus. This novel

  2. Identification and characterization of the genomic termini and cleavage/packaging signals of gallid herpesvirus 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herpesvirus replication within host cells produces concatameric genomic DNA which is cleaved into unit-length genomes and packaged into the capsid by a complex of proteins. The sites of cleavage have been identified for many herpesviruses and conserved signaling sequences involved in cleavage and p...

  3. Far upstream element binding protein 2 interacts with enterovirus 71 internal ribosomal entry site and negatively regulates viral translation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Li, Mei-Ling; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2009-01-01

    An internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of viral protein translation is a potential drug target for enterovirus 71 (EV71). Regulation of internal initiation requires the interaction of IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs) with the internal ribosomal entry site. Biotinylated RNA-affinity chromatography and proteomic approaches were employed to identify far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein 2 (FBP2) as an ITAF for EV71. The interactions of FBP2 with EV71 IRES were confirmed by competition assay and by mapping the association sites in both viral IRES and FBP2 protein. During EV71 infection, FBP2 was enriched in cytoplasm where viral replication occurs, whereas FBP2 was localized in the nucleus in mock-infected cells. The synthesis of viral proteins increased in FBP2-knockdown cells that were infected by EV71. IRES activity in FBP2-knockdown cells exceeded that in the negative control (NC) siRNA-treated cells. On the other hand, IRES activity decreased when FBP2 was over-expressed in the cells. Results of this study suggest that FBP2 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and negatively regulates viral translation. PMID:19010963

  4. Single-site cleavage in the 5'-untranslated region of Leishmaniavirus RNA is mediated by the viral capsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    MacBeth, K J; Patterson, J L

    1995-01-01

    Leishmaniavirus (LRV) is a double-stranded RNA virus that persistently infects the protozoan parasite Leishmania. LRV produces a short RNA transcript, corresponding to the 5' end of positive-sense viral RNA, both in vivo and in in vitro polymerase assays. The short transcript is generated by a single site-specific cleavage event in the 5' untranslated region of the 5.3-kb genome. This cleavage event can be reproduced in vitro with purified viral particles and a substrate RNA transcript possessing the viral cleavage site. A region of nucleotides required for cleavage was identified by analyzing the cleavage sites yielding the short transcripts of various LRV isolates. A 6-nt deletion at this cleavage site completely abolished RNA processing. In an in vitro cleavage assay, baculovirus-expressed capsid protein possessed an endonuclease activity identical to that of native virions, showing that the viral capsid protein is the RNA endonuclease. Identification of the LRV capsid protein as an RNA endonuclease is unprecedented among known viral capsid proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7568059

  5. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s).

  6. [Increased efficiency of recombinant proteins production in plants due to optimized translation of RNA of viral vector].

    PubMed

    Mardanova, E S; Kotliarov, R Iu; Ravin, N V

    2009-01-01

    One of the most efficient methods for fast and efficient production of the target proteins in plants is based on the use of self-replicating recombinant viral vectors. We constructed phytoviral vector based on the genome of potato X virus containing the sequence of 5'-untranslated region of RNA 4 of alfalfa mosaic virus immediately upstream of the target gene. We demonstrated that incorporation of this sequence into the viral vector results in 3-4 fold elevation of the level of production of the target protein in plant due to increased efficiency of translation of viral subgenomic RNA comprising the target gene. The new vector may be used for production of recombinant proteins in plants. PMID:19548543

  7. Annexin II Binds to Capsid Protein VP1 of Enterovirus 71 and Enhances Viral Infectivity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Su-Lin; Chou, Ying-Ting; Wu, Cheng-Nan; Ho, Mei-Shang

    2011-01-01

    Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which is mostly self-limited but may be complicated with a severe to fatal neurological syndrome in some children. Understanding the molecular basis of virus-host interactions might help clarify the largely unknown neuropathogenic mechanisms of EV71. In this study, we showed that human annexin II (Anx2) protein could bind to the EV71 virion via the capsid protein VP1. Either pretreatment of EV71 with soluble recombinant Anx2 or pretreatment of host cells with an anti-Anx2 antibody could result in reduced viral attachment to the cell surface and a reduction of the subsequent virus yield in vitro. HepG2 cells, which do not express Anx2, remained permissive to EV71 infection, though the virus yield was lower than that for a cognate lineage expressing Anx2. Stable transfection of plasmids expressing Anx2 protein into HepG2 cells (HepG2-Anx2 cells) could enhance EV71 infectivity, with an increased virus yield, especially at a low infective dose, and the enhanced infectivity could be reversed by pretreating HepG2-Anx2 cells with an anti-Anx2 antibody. The Anx2-interacting domain was mapped by yeast two-hybrid analysis to VP1 amino acids 40 to 100, a region different from the known receptor binding domain on the surface of the picornavirus virion. Our data suggest that binding of EV71 to Anx2 on the cell surface can enhance viral entry and infectivity, especially at a low infective dose. PMID:21900167

  8. Subcellular localization of host and viral proteins associated with tobamovirus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yuka; Komoda, Keisuke; Yamanaka, Takuya; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Funada, Ryo; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Naito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2003-01-15

    Arabidopsis TOM1 (AtTOM1) and TOM2A (AtTOM2A) are integral membrane proteins genetically identified to be necessary for efficient intracellular multiplication of tobamoviruses. AtTOM1 interacts with the helicase domain polypeptide of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins and with AtTOM2A, suggesting that both AtTOM1 and AtTOM2A are integral components of the tobamovirus replication complex. We show here that AtTOM1 and AtTOM2A proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) are targeted to the vacuolar membrane (tonoplast)-like structures in plant cells. In subcellular fractionation analyses, GFP-AtTOM2A, AtTOM2A and its tobacco homolog NtTOM2A were predominantly fractionated to low-density tonoplast-rich fractions, whereas AtTOM1-GFP, AtTOM1 and its tobacco homolog NtTOM1 were distributed mainly into the tonoplast-rich fractions and partially into higher-buoyant-density fractions containing membranes from several other organelles. The tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins were co-fractionated with both NtTOM1 and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity. The replication proteins were also found in the fractions containing non-membrane-bound proteins, but neither NtTOM1 nor the polymerase activity was detected there. These observations suggest that the formation of tobamoviral RNA replication complex occurs on TOM1-containing membranes and is facilitated by TOM2A. PMID:12514140

  9. The N-terminus of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nonstructural protein 2 modulates viral genome RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wu, Rui; Zheng, Fengwei; Zhao, Cheng; Pan, Zishu

    2015-12-01

    Pestivirus nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) is a multifunctional, hydrophobic protein with an important but poorly understood role in viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. In the present study, based on sequence analysis, we mutated several representative conserved residues within the N-terminus of NS2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and investigated how these mutations affected viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. Our results demonstrated that the mutation of two aspartic acids, NS2/D60A or NS2/D60K and NS2/D78K, in the N-terminus of NS2 abolished infectious virus production and that the substitution of arginine for alanine at position 100 (NS2/R100A) resulted in significantly decreased viral titer. The serial passage of cells containing viral genomic RNA molecules generated the revertants NS2/A60D, NS2/K60D and NS2/K78D, leading to the recovery of infectious virus. In the context of the NS2/R100A mutant, the NS2/I90L mutation compensated for infectious virus production. The regulatory roles of the indicated amino acid residues were identified to occur at the viral RNA replication level. These results revealed a novel function for the NS2 N-terminus of CSFV in modulating viral RNA replication. PMID:26232654

  10. Conserved residues in Lassa fever virus Z protein modulate viral infectivity at the level of the ribonucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles. PMID:21228230

  11. Conserved Residues in Lassa Fever Virus Z Protein Modulate Viral Infectivity at the Level of the Ribonucleoprotein▿

    PubMed Central

    Capul, Althea A.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles. PMID:21228230

  12. Intermediate divergence levels maximize the strength of structure-sequence correlations in enzymes and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Eleisha L; Shahmoradi, Amir; Spielman, Stephanie J; Jack, Benjamin R; Wilke, Claus O

    2016-07-01

    Structural properties such as solvent accessibility and contact number predict site-specific sequence variability in many proteins. However, the strength and significance of these structure-sequence relationships vary widely among different proteins, with absolute correlation strengths ranging from 0 to 0.8. In particular, two recent works have made contradictory observations. Yeh et al. (Mol. Biol. Evol. 31:135-139, 2014) found that both relative solvent accessibility (RSA) and weighted contact number (WCN) are good predictors of sitewise evolutionary rate in enzymes, with WCN clearly out-performing RSA. Shahmoradi et al. (J. Mol. Evol. 79:130-142, 2014) considered these same predictors (as well as others) in viral proteins and found much weaker correlations and no clear advantage of WCN over RSA. Because these two studies had substantial methodological differences, however, a direct comparison of their results is not possible. Here, we reanalyze the datasets of the two studies with one uniform analysis pipeline, and we find that many apparent discrepancies between the two analyses can be attributed to the extent of sequence divergence in individual alignments. Specifically, the alignments of the enzyme dataset are much more diverged than those of the virus dataset, and proteins with higher divergence exhibit, on average, stronger structure-sequence correlations. However, the highest structure-sequence correlations are observed at intermediate divergence levels, where both highly conserved and highly variable sites are present in the same alignment. PMID:26971720

  13. Interplay of viral miRNAs and host mRNAs and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2011-10-01

    Recent experiments indicate that several viruses may encode microRNAs (miRNAs) in cells. Such RNAs may interfere with the host mRNAs and proteins. We present a kinetic analysis of this interplay. In our treatment, the viral miRNA is considered to be able to associate with the host mRNA with subsequent degradation. This process may result in a decline of the mRNA population and also in a decline of the population of the protein encoded by this mRNA. With these ingredients, we first show the types of the corresponding steady-state kinetics in the cases of positive and negative regulation of the miRNA synthesis by the protein. In addition, we scrutinize the situation when the protein regulates the virion replication or, in other words, provides a feedback for the replication. For the negative feedback, the replication rate is found to increase with increasing the intracellular virion population. For the positive feedback, the replication rate first increases and then drops. These features may determine the stability of steady states.

  14. Toll-interacting protein inhibits HIV-1 infection and regulates viral latency.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Kuang, Wen-Dong; Qu, Di; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-06-24

    HIV-1 latency is mainly characterized by a reversible silencing of long-terminal repeat (LTR)-driven transcription of provirus. The existing of repressive factors has been described to contribute to transcription silencing of HIV-1. Toll-interacting protein (Tollip) has been identified as a repressor of Toll like receptors (TLR)-mediated signaling. Our previous study has found that Tollip inhibited NF-κB-dependent HIV-1 promoter LTR-driven transcription, indicating the potential role of Tollip in governing viral latency. In this study, by using HIV-1 latently infected Jurkat T-cell and central memory CD4(+) T-cells, we demonstrate the role of Tollip in regulating HIV-1 latency, as the knock-down of Tollip promoted HIV-1 reactivation from both HIV-1 latently infected Jurkat CD4(+) T cells and primary central memory T cells (TCM). Moreover, we found that the activities of LTRs derived from multiple HIV-1 subtypes could be repressed by Tollip; Knock-down of Tollip promoted HIV-1 transcription and infection in CD4(+) T cells. Our data indicate a key role of Tollip in suppressing HIV-1 infection and regulating viral latency, which provides a potential host target for combating HIV-1 infection and latency. PMID:27181351

  15. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

    PubMed

    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M; Romano, Fabian B; Heuck, Alejandro P; Hebert, Daniel N

    2013-06-01

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results revealed that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-3-indacene-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of 1-5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers. PMID:23651212

  16. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01). The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01). The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle. PMID:27414795

  17. Modulation of cellular and viral promoters by mutant human p53 proteins found in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deb, S; Jackson, C T; Subler, M A; Martin, D W

    1992-01-01

    Wild-type p53 has recently been shown to repress transcription from several cellular and viral promoters. Since p53 mutations are the most frequently reported genetic defects in human cancers, it becomes important to study the effects of mutations of p53 on promoter functions. We, therefore, have studied the effects of wild-type and mutant human p53 on the human proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promoter and on several viral promoters, including the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL9 promoter, the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early promoter-enhancer, and the long terminal repeat promoters of Rous sarcoma virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. HeLa cells were cotransfected with a wild-type or mutant p53 expression vector and a plasmid containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene under viral (or cellular) promoter control. As expected, expression of the wild-type p53 inhibited promoter function. Expression of a p53 with a mutation at any one of the four amino acid positions 175, 248, 273, or 281, however, correlated with a significant increase of the PCNA promoter activity (2- to 11-fold). The viral promoters were also activated, although to a somewhat lesser extent. We also showed that activation by a mutant p53 requires a minimal promoter containing a lone TATA box. A more significant increase (25-fold) in activation occurs when the promoter contains a binding site for the activating transcription factor or cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Using Saos-2 cells that do not express p53, we showed that activation by a mutant p53 was a direct enhancement. The mutant forms of p53 used in this study are found in various cancer cells. The activation of PCNA by mutant p53s may indicate a way to increase cell proliferation by the mutant p53s. Thus, our data indicate a possible functional role for the mutants of p53 found in cancer cells in activating several important loci, including PCNA. Images PMID:1356162

  18. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  19. Herpesvirus gB: A Finely Tuned Fusion Machine

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Rebecca S.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped viruses employ a class of proteins known as fusogens to orchestrate the merger of their surrounding envelope and a target cell membrane. Most fusogens accomplish this task alone, by binding cellular receptors and subsequently catalyzing the membrane fusion process. Surprisingly, in herpesviruses, these functions are distributed among multiple proteins: the conserved fusogen gB, the conserved gH/gL heterodimer of poorly defined function, and various non-conserved receptor-binding proteins. We summarize what is currently known about gB from two closely related herpesviruses, HSV-1 and HSV-2, with emphasis on the structure of the largely uncharted membrane interacting regions of this fusogen. We propose that the unusual mechanism of herpesvirus fusion could be linked to the unique architecture of gB. PMID:26690469

  20. Tales from the crypt and coral reef: the successes and challenges of identifying new herpesviruses using metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Breuer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are ubiquitous double-stranded DNA viruses infecting many animals, with the capacity to cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Different herpesviruses have different cell tropisms, and have been detected in a diverse range of tissues and sample types. Metagenomics—encompassing viromics—analyses the nucleic acid of a tissue or other sample in an unbiased manner, making few or no prior assumptions about which viruses may be present in a sample. This approach has successfully discovered a number of novel herpesviruses. Furthermore, metagenomic analysis can identify herpesviruses with high degrees of sequence divergence from known herpesviruses and does not rely upon culturing large quantities of viral material. Metagenomics has had success in two areas of herpesvirus sequencing: firstly, the discovery of novel exogenous and endogenous herpesviruses in primates, bats and cnidarians; and secondly, in characterizing large areas of the genomes of herpesviruses previously only known from small fragments, revealing unexpected diversity. This review will discuss the successes and challenges of using metagenomics to identify novel herpesviruses, and future directions within the field. PMID:25821447

  1. Humoral Response in Toscana Virus Acute Neurologic Disease Investigated by Viral-Protein-Specific Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Magurano, Fabio; Nicoletti, Loredana

    1999-01-01

    The Toscana virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is the only sandfly-transmitted virus that demonstrates neurotropic activity. Clinical cases ranging from aseptic meningitis to meningoencephalitis caused by Toscana virus are yearly observed in central Italy during the summer, and several cases have been reported among tourists returning from zones of endemicity (Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Cyprus). In Toscana virus patients, immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, usually present at the onset of symptoms, can reveal elevated titers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and can persist for at least 1 year. IgG antibodies can be absent at the onset of symptoms: titers rise in convalescent sera and persist for many years. At least five proteins have been identified in Toscana virus-infected cells: nucleoprotein N, glycoproteins G1 and G2, a large protein (L) assumed to be a component of the polymerase, and two nonstructural proteins, NSm and NSs. We report results of a study on the antibody response to individual viral proteins in patients with Toscana virus-associated acute neurologic disease. Immunoblotting and semiquantitative radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) allow identification of nucleoprotein N as the major antigen responsible for both IgM and IgG responses. Antibodies to proteins other than nucleoprotein N are detected only by RIPA. Antibodies to glycoproteins are detected in about one-third of patients, and whereas their presence always predicts neutralization, some serum samples with neutralizing activity have undetectable levels of antibodies to G1-G2. Antibodies to nonstructural proteins NSm and NSs are also identified. The results obtained raise some questions about antigenic variability and relevant neutralization epitopes of Toscana virus. PMID:9874664

  2. Canine Enteric Coronaviruses: Emerging Viral Pathogens with Distinct Recombinant Spike Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Licitra, Beth N.; Duhamel, Gerald E.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Canine enteric coronavirus (CCoV) is an alphacoronavirus infecting dogs that is closely related to enteric coronaviruses of cats and pigs. While CCoV has traditionally caused mild gastro-intestinal clinical signs, there are increasing reports of lethal CCoV infections in dogs, with evidence of both gastrointestinal and systemic viral dissemination. Consequently, CCoV is now considered to be an emerging infectious disease of dogs. In addition to the two known serotypes of CCoV, novel recombinant variants of CCoV have been found containing spike protein N-terminal domains (NTDs) that are closely related to those of feline and porcine strains. The increase in disease severity in dogs and the emergence of novel CCoVs can be attributed to the high level of recombination within the spike gene that can occur during infection by more than one CCoV type in the same host. PMID:25153347

  3. Inhibition of iridovirus protein synthesis and virus replication by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides targeted to the major capsid protein, the 18 kDa immediate-early protein, and a viral homolog of RNA polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sample, Robert; Bryan, Locke; Long, Scott; Majji, Sai; Hoskins, Glenn; Sinning, Allan; Olivier, Jake; Chinchar, V. Gregory . E-mail: vchinchar@microbio.umsmed.edu

    2007-02-20

    Frog virus 3 (FV3) is a large DNA virus that encodes {approx} 100 proteins. Although the general features of FV3 replication are known, the specific roles that most viral proteins play in the virus life cycle have not yet been elucidated. To address the question of viral gene function, antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (asMOs) were used to transiently knock-down expression of specific viral genes and thus infer their role in virus replication. We designed asMOs directed against the major capsid protein (MCP), an 18 kDa immediate-early protein (18K) that was thought to be a viral regulatory protein, and the viral homologue of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (vPol-II{alpha}). All three asMOs successfully inhibited translation of the targeted protein, and two of the three asMOs resulted in marked phenotypic changes. Knock-down of the MCP resulted in a marked reduction in viral titer without a corresponding drop in the synthesis of other late viral proteins. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that in cells treated with the anti-MCP MO assembly sites were devoid of viral particles and contained numerous aberrant structures. In contrast, inhibition of 18K synthesis did not block virion formation, suggesting that the 18K protein was not essential for replication of FV3 in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. Finally, consistent with the view that late viral gene expression is catalyzed by a virus-encoded or virus-modified Pol-II-like protein, knock-down of vPol-II{alpha} triggered a global decline in late gene expression and virus yields without affecting the synthesis of early viral genes. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of using asMOs to elucidate the function of FV3 proteins.

  4. Roles of Phosphorylation of the Nucleocapsid Protein of Mumps Virus in Regulating Viral RNA Transcription and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, James; Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Lin, Alita

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mumps virus (MuV) is a paramyxovirus with a negative-sense nonsegmented RNA genome. The viral RNA genome is encapsidated by the nucleocapsid protein (NP) to form the ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for transcription and replication. In this study, we investigated the roles of phosphorylation sites of NP in MuV RNA synthesis. Using radioactive labeling, we first demonstrated that NP was phosphorylated in MuV-infected cells. Using both liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and in silico modeling, we identified nine putative phosphorylated residues within NP. We mutated these nine residues to alanine. Mutation of the serine residue at position 439 to alanine (S439A) was found to reduce the phosphorylation of NP in transfected cells by over 90%. The effects of these mutations on the MuV minigenome system were examined. The S439A mutant was found to have higher activity, four mutants had lower activity, and four mutants had similar activity compared to wild-type NP. MuV containing the S439A mutation had 90% reduced phosphorylation of NP and enhanced viral RNA synthesis and viral protein expression at early time points after infection, indicating that S439 is the major phosphorylation site of NP and its phosphorylation plays an important role in downregulating viral RNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE Mumps virus (MuV), a paramyxovirus, is an important human pathogen that is reemerging in human populations. Nucleocapsid protein (NP) of MuV is essential for viral RNA synthesis. We have identified the major phosphorylation site of NP. We have found that phosphorylation of NP plays a critical role in regulating viral RNA synthesis. The work will lead to a better understanding of viral RNA synthesis and possible novel targets for antiviral drug development. PMID:25948749

  5. Neutralizing determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies on polypeptides specified by bovine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J K; Butcher, A C; Riegel, C A; McGrane, V; Blair, C D; Teramoto, Y A; Winston, S

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to study neutralizing determinants on polypeptides of bovine herpesvirus 1. Two of three monoclonal antibodies which recognized nonoverlapping epitopes on a glycoprotein of 82,000 daltons were found to neutralize. A second group of monoclonal antibodies that individually precipitated five viral glycopolypeptides ranging in size from 102,000 to 55,000 daltons also neutralized. Two monoclonal antibodies which were the most efficient in neutralization recognized a non-glycosylated protein of 115,000 daltons which was the major polypeptide on the virus. A fourth group of monoclonal antibodies precipitated a non-glycosylated polypeptide of 91,000 daltons and several smaller polypeptides, but these antibodies demonstrated only limited neutralizing activity. Images PMID:6208375

  6. Zebra-borne equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection in non-African captive mammals.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Azza; Azab, Walid; Damiani, Armando M; Baumgartner, Katrin; Will, Hermann; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Greenwood, Alex D

    2014-02-21

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) was detected in an Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis), which was euthanized because of severe neurological disease. Encephalitis was suspected and EHV-1 DNA was detected in brain, lung, and spleen tissues. The viral IR6 protein was detected in lung tissues by Western blot analysis. Phylogenetic analyses of EHV-1 sequences amplified from various tissues was nearly identical to one recently described that resulted in both non-fatal and fatal encephalitis in polar bears. This represents transmission of EHV-1 to a species that is not naturally sympatric with the natural host of the virus and broadens the host range to Asian non-equid perissodactyls. PMID:24440374

  7. The interaction between bovine herpesvirus type 1 and activated bovine T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Griebel, P J; Ohmann, H B; Lawman, M J; Babiuk, L A

    1990-02-01

    The interaction between activated bovine T lymphocytes (BTLs) and bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) was investigated. BHV-1 infection of BTLs reduced the amplitude of recombinant bovine interleukin 2-induced proliferative responses. This decreased proliferation was caused by a virus-induced lymphocytolysis which was dependent on viable virus and was not inhibited by recombinant bovine interferon-alpha I1. Furthermore, lymphocytolysis was not associated with virus replication or with the synthesis of detectable levels of viral proteins. Electron microscopic examination of virus-infected cells revealed that lymphocytolysis was characterized by early nuclear disintegration resembling apoptosis. These observations suggest that activated T cells, localized at the site of BHV-1 infection, may be susceptible to virus-induced cytolysis. PMID:2155290

  8. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. PMID:26210077

  9. A Low Protein Binding Cationic Poly(2-oxazoline) as Non-Viral Vector

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhijian; Miao, Lei; Jordan, Rainer; S-Manickam, Devika; Luxenhofer, Robert; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    Developing safe and efficient non-viral gene delivery systems remains a major challenge. We present a new cationic poly(2-oxazoline) (CPOx) block copolymer for gene therapy that was synthesized by sequential polymerization of non-ionic 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and a new 2-oxazoline monomer, 2-(N-methyl, N-Boc-amino)-methyl-2-oxazoline, followed by deprotection of the pendant secondary amine groups. Upon mixing with plasmid DNA (pDNA), CPOx forms small (diameter ≈ 80 nm) and narrowly dispersed polyplexes (PDI < 0.2), which are stable upon dilution in saline and against thermal challenge. These polyplexes exhibited low plasma protein binding and very low cytotoxicity in vitro compared to the polyplexes of pDNA and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine) (PEG-b-PLL). CPOx/pDNA polyplexes at N/P = 5 bound considerably less plasma protein compared to polyplexes of PEG-b-PLL at the same N/P ratio. This is a unique aspect of the developed polyplexes emphasizing their potential for systemic delivery in vivo. The transfection efficiency of the polyplexes in B16 murine melanoma cells was low after 4 h but increased significantly for 10 h exposure time, indicative of slow internalization of polyplexes. Addition of Pluronic P85 boosted the transfection using CPOx/pDNA polyplexes considerably. The low protein binding of CPOx/pDNA polyplexes is particularly interesting for the future development of targeted gene delivery. PMID:25846127

  10. Stochastic Kinetics of Viral Capsid Assembly Based on Detailed Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hemberg, Martin; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    We present a generic computational framework for the simulation of viral capsid assembly which is quantitative and specific. Starting from PDB files containing atomic coordinates, the algorithm builds a coarse-grained description of protein oligomers based on graph rigidity. These reduced protein descriptions are used in an extended Gillespie algorithm to investigate the stochastic kinetics of the assembly process. The association rates are obtained from a diffusive Smoluchowski equation for rapid coagulation, modified to account for water shielding and protein structure. The dissociation rates are derived by interpreting the splitting of oligomers as a process of graph partitioning akin to the escape from a multidimensional well. This modular framework is quantitative yet computationally tractable, with a small number of physically motivated parameters. The methodology is illustrated using two different viruses which are shown to follow quantitatively different assembly pathways. We also show how in this model the quasi-stationary kinetics of assembly can be described as a Markovian cascading process, in which only a few intermediates and a small proportion of pathways are present. The observed pathways and intermediates can be related a posteriori to structural and energetic properties of the capsid oligomers. PMID:16473916

  11. Flavivirus NS1 protein in infected host sera enhances viral acquisition by mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianying; Liu, Yang; Nie, Kaixiao; Du, Senyan; Qiu, Jingjun; Pang, Xiaojing; Wang, Penghua; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    The arbovirus life cycle involves viral transfer between a vertebrate host and an arthropod vector, and acquisition of virus from an infected mammalian host by a vector is an essential step in this process. Here, we report that flavivirus nonstructural protein-1 (NS1), which is abundantly secreted into the serum of an infected host, plays a critical role in flavivirus acquisition by mosquitoes. The presence of dengue virus (DENV) and Japanese encephalitis virus NS1s in the blood of infected interferon-α and γ receptor-deficient mice (AG6) facilitated virus acquisition by their native mosquito vectors because the protein enabled the virus to overcome the immune barrier of the mosquito midgut. Active immunization of AG6 mice with a modified DENV NS1 reduced DENV acquisition by mosquitoes and protected mice against a lethal DENV challenge, suggesting that immunization with NS1 could reduce the number of virus-carrying mosquitoes as well as the incidence of flaviviral diseases. Our study demonstrates that flaviviruses utilize NS1 proteins produced during their vertebrate phases to enhance their acquisition by vectors, which might be a result of flavivirus evolution to adapt to multiple host environments. PMID:27562253

  12. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process. PMID:26906695

  13. Bovine herpesvirus type 5 infection regulates Bax/BCL-2 ratio.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A F; Novais, J B; Antello, T F; Silva-Frade, C; Ferrarezi, M C; Flores, E F; Cardoso, T C

    2013-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5) is an α-herpesvirus that causes neurological disease in young cattle and is also occasionally involved in reproductive disorders. Although there have been many studies of the apoptotic pathways induced by viruses belonging to the family Herpesviridae, there is little information about the intrinsic programmed cell death pathway in host-BoHV-5 interactions. We found that BoHV-5 is able to replicate in both mesenchymal and epithelial cell lines, provoking cytopathology that is characterized by cellular swelling and cell fusion. Viral antigens were detected in infected cells by immunofluorescence assay at 48 to 96 h post-infection (p.i.). At 48 to 72 h p.i., anti-apoptotic BCL-2 antigens were found at higher levels than Bax antigens; the latter is considered a pro-apoptotic protein. Infected cells had increased BCL-2 phenotype cells from 48 to 96 h p.i., based on flow cytometric analysis. At 48 to 96 h p.i., Bax mRNA was not expressed in any of the infected cell monolayers. In contrast, BCL-2 mRNA was found at high levels at all p.i. in both types of cells. BoHV-5 replication apparently modulates BCL-2 expression and gene transcription, enhancing production of virus progeny. PMID:24085451

  14. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages via the Alternative Pathway in Herpesvirus-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Ana L.; Torres-González, Edilson; Rojas, Mauricio; Corredor, Claudia; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey; Xu, Jianguo; Roman, Jesse; Brigham, Kenneth; Stecenko, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is unknown. Because viral pathogenesis of IPF has been suggested, we have established a murine model of progressive pulmonary fibrosis by infecting IFN-γR–deficient mice (IFN-γR−/−) with the murine γ-herpesvirus 68. Because alveolar macrophages in humans with IPF have been implicated in driving the profibrotic response, we studied their role in our model. Chronic herpesvirus infection of the lung was associated with recruitment of alveolar macrophages to areas with epithelial hyperplasia and fibrosis in infected lungs. Using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and RT-PCR techniques, we demonstrated that recruited alveolar macrophages showed high levels of expression of the proteins Ym1/2, FIZZ1 (found in inflammatory zone 1), insulin-like growth factor-1, and arginase I, and also active transcription of fibronectin, indicative of activation of macrophages by an alternative pathway. Arginase I expression was also evident in interstitial fibroblasts, and increased arginase activity was found in lungs of infected animals. Lung tissue from patients with IPF showed increased expression of arginase I in epithelial cells, fibroblast foci, and alveolar macrophages compared with normal lung. These results suggest that virus-induced upregulation of arginase I could be a mechanism driving lung fibrogenesis. PMID:16709958

  15. Human herpesvirus 8 glycoprotein B binds the entry receptor DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Hensler, Heather R; Tomaszewski, Monica J; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Rinaldo, Charles R; Jenkins, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) uses DC-SIGN as an entry receptor for dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells. The viral attachment protein for DC-SIGN is unknown. HHV-8 virions contain 5 conserved herpesvirus glycoproteins, a single unique glycoprotein, and 2 predicted glycoproteins. Previous studies have shown that DC-SIGN binds highly mannosylated glycoproteins. The HHV-8 glycoprotein B (gB) has been reported to be highly mannosylated, and therefore we hypothesized that gB will bind to DC-SIGN. In this report we confirm that gB has a high mannose carbohydrate structure and demonstrate for the first time that it binds DC-SIGN in a dose-dependent manner. We also identify key amino acids in the DC-SIGN carbohydrate recognition domain that are required for HHV-8 infection and compare these results with published binding regions for ICAM-2/3 and HIV-1 gp120. These results clarify some of the initial events in HHV-8 entry and can be used for the design of targeted preventive therapies. PMID:25018023

  16. Investigation of reference gene expression during human herpesvirus 6B infection indicates peptidylprolyl isomerase A as a stable reference gene and TATA box binding protein as a gene up-regulated by this virus.

    PubMed

    Engdahl, Elin; Dunn, Nicky; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna

    2016-01-01

    When using relative gene expression for quantification of RNA it is crucial that the reference genes used for normalization do not change with the experimental condition. We aimed at investigating the expressional stability of commonly used reference genes during Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) infection. Expression of eight commonly used reference genes were investigated with quantitative PCR in a T-cell line infected with HHV-6B. The stability of genes was investigated using the 2(-ΔΔCT) method and the algorithms BestKeeper, GeNorm and NormFinder. Our results indicate that peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA) is the most stably expressed gene while TATA box binding protein (TBP) is the least stably expressed gene during HHV-6B infection. In a confirmatory experiment, TBP was demonstrated to be dose and time dependently upregulated by HHV-6B. The stability of PPIA is in line with other studies investigating different herpesvirus infections whereas the finding that HHV-6B significantly upregulates TBP is novel and most likely specific to HHV-6B. PMID:26542463

  17. Nucleotide sequence of glycoprotein genes B, C, D, G, H and I, the thymidine kinase and protein kinase genes and gene homologue UL24 of an Australian isolate of canine herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Reubel, Gerhard Herbert; Pekin, Jenny; Webb-Wagg, Kyleen; Hardy, Christopher Miles

    2002-10-01

    We report the complete nucleotide (nt) sequence of nine genes of an Australian isolate of canine herpesvirus (CHV). Four of them are located in the unique short (US) region: glycoprotein (g) genes gG, gD and gI, and the protein kinase gene. Five are in the unique long (UL) region: the thymidine kinase gene, gB, gC, gH, and gene homologue UL24. Partial sequence was determined for four genes, two in the UL region (UL21 and virion protein) and two in the US region (US2 and gE). A repeat sequence of 382 nt with unknown function was identified in the 615 nt intergenic region between gH and UL21. A total of 16.93 kb was sequenced and compared with sequences from CHV isolates from the USA, France, Japan and Australia. Only minor nt and/or amino acid (aa) differences were observed. PMID:12416682

  18. Structure of the immediate early gene of canine herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, M; Takiguchi, M; Yasuda, J; Hashimoto, A; Takada, A; Okazaki, K; Kida, H

    1999-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the immediate early (IE) gene of canine herpesvirus was determined. This gene was located in the inverted repeat regions, encoding a polypeptide of 1,383 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence was most closely related to that of the feline herpesvirus 1 IE protein among those of other alphaherpesviruses. DNA binding and transcriptional activation domains were found in the IE protein. A spliced region of the IE gene transcript was determined in its 5' non-coding region. PMID:10470264

  19. A longitudinal study of poor performance and subclinical respiratory viral activity in Standardbred trotters

    PubMed Central

    Back, Helena; Penell, Johanna; Pringle, John; Isaksson, Mats; Ronéus, Nils; Treiberg Berndtsson, Louise; Ståhl, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While clinical respiratory disease is considered a main cause of poor performance in horses, the role of subclinical respiratory virus infections is less clear and needs further investigation. Aims and objectives In this descriptive longitudinal study the relationship of markers of subclinical respiratory viral activity to occurrence of poor performance in racing Standardbred trotters was investigated. Material and methods 66 elite Standardbred trotters were followed for 13 months by nasal swabs analysed with qPCR for equine influenza virus, equine arteritis virus, equine rhinitis B virus (ERBV), equine herpesvirus type 1(EHV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) and serology to equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV), ERBV, EHV-1 and EHV-4, as well as the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). Findings on lab analyses were subsequently assessed for possible correlations to workload performance and trainer opinion measures of poor performance. Results Despite occurrence of poor performance and subclinical viral activity the authors were unable to detect association neither between subclinical viral activity and poor performance, nor between SAA elevations and either viral activity or poor performance. Conclusions Consistent with earlier study results, antibody titres to ERBV remained high for at least a year and few horses two years or older were seronegative to either ERAV or ERBV. In absence of clinical signs, serology to common respiratory viruses appears to have little diagnostic benefit in evaluation of poor performance in young athletic horses. PMID:26392904

  20. Synaptogyrin-2 Promotes Replication of a Novel Tick-borne Bunyavirus through Interacting with Viral Nonstructural Protein NSs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiyu; Qi, Xian; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Xiaodong; Liang, Mifang; Li, Chuan; Li, Dexin; Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng

    2016-07-29

    Synaptogyrin-2 is a non-neuronal member of the synaptogyrin family involved in synaptic vesicle biogenesis and trafficking. Little is known about the function of synaptogyrin-2. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease characterized by high fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytopenia with high mortality, caused by a novel tick-borne phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. Our previous studies have shown that the viral nonstructural protein NSs forms inclusion bodies (IBs) that are involved in viral immune evasion, as well as viral RNA replication. In this study, we sought to elucidate the mechanism by which NSs formed the IBs, a lipid droplet-based structure confirmed by NSs co-localization with perilipin A and adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Through a high throughput screening, we identified synaptogyrin-2 to be highly up-regulated in response to SFTS bunyavirus (SFTSV) infection and to be a promoter of viral replication. We demonstrated that synaptogyrin-2 interacted with NSs and was translocated into the IBs, which were reconstructed from lipid droplets into large structures in infection. Viral RNA replication decreased, and infectious virus titers were lowered significantly when synaptogyrin-2 was silenced in specific shRNA-expressing cells, which correlated with the reduced number of the large IBs restructured from regular lipid droplets. We hypothesize that synaptogyrin-2 is essential to promoting the formation of the IBs to become virus factories for viral RNA replication through its interaction with NSs. These findings unveil the function of synaptogyrin-2 as an enhancer in viral infection. PMID:27226560

  1. Inhibition of host protein synthesis by Sindbis virus: correlation with viral RNA replication and release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel A; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Infection of mammalian cells by Sindbis virus (SINV) profoundly blocks cellular mRNA translation. Experimental evidence points to viral non-structural proteins (nsPs), in particular nsP2, as the mediator of this inhibition. However, individual expression of nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 or nsP1-4 does not block cellular protein synthesis in BHK cells. Trans-complementation of a defective SINV replicon lacking most of the coding region for nsPs by the co-expression of nsP1-4 propitiates viral RNA replication at low levels, and inhibition of cellular translation is not observed. Exit of nuclear proteins including T-cell intracellular antigen and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein is clearly detected in SINV-infected cells, but not upon the expression of nsPs, even when the defective replicon was complemented. Analysis of a SINV variant with a point mutation in nsP2, exhibiting defects in the shut-off of host protein synthesis, indicates that both viral RNA replication and the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm are greatly inhibited. Furthermore, nucleoside analogues that inhibit cellular and viral RNA synthesis impede the blockade of host mRNA translation, in addition to the release of nuclear proteins. Prevention of the shut-off of host mRNA translation by nucleoside analogues is not due to the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, as this prevention is also observed in PKR(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not phosphorylate eIF2α after SINV infection. Collectively, our observations are consistent with the concept that for the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis to occur, viral RNA replication must take place at control levels, leading to the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm. PMID:25329362

  2. Crystal structure of a human rhinovirus neutralizing antibody complexed with a peptide derived from viral capsid protein VP2.

    PubMed Central

    Tormo, J; Blaas, D; Parry, N R; Rowlands, D; Stuart, D; Fita, I

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the complex between the Fab fragment of an anti-human rhinovirus neutralizing antibody (8F5) and a cross-reactive synthetic peptide from the viral capsid protein VP2 has been determined at 2.5 A resolution by crystallographic methods. The refinement is presently at an R factor of 0.18 and the antigen-binding site and viral peptide are well defined. The peptide antigen adopts a compact fold by two tight turns and interacts through hydrogen bonds, some with ionic character, and van der Waals contacts with antibody residues from the six hypervariable loops as well as several framework amino acids. The conformation adopted by the peptide is closely related to the corresponding region of the viral protein VP2 on the surface of human rhinovirus 1A whose three-dimensional structure is known. Implications for the cross-reactivity between peptides and the viral capsid are discussed. The peptide-antibody interactions, together with the analysis of mutant viruses that escape neutralization by 8F5 suggest two different mechanisms for viral escape. The comparison between the complexed and uncomplexed antibody structures shows important conformational rearrangements, especially in the hypervariable loops of the heavy chain. Thus, it constitutes a clear example of the 'induced fit' molecular recognition mechanism. Images PMID:8194515

  3. Principles of selective inactivation of a viral genome. Comparative kinetic study of modification of the viral RNA and model protein with oligoaziridines.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, E A; Nepomnyaschaya, N M

    2001-08-01

    Comparative kinetic analysis of inactivation of bacteriophage MS2 infectivity and aminoalkylation of a model protein (trypsin inhibitor) with oligoaziridines was performed in order to evaluate the selectivity of viral RNA modification with oligocationic reagents. The transition from ethyleneimine monomer to di-, tri-, and tetramer leads to a sharp increase in the rate constant of infectivity inactivation, whereas the rate constant of protein modification changes insignificantly. The selectivity coefficient of the phage RNA aminoalkylation relative to trypsin inhibitor modification increases in this series by more than an order of magnitude. This effect is probably associated with the strengthening of the reagent binding to the nucleic acid, which implies a reaction mechanism that involves the formation of a reactive intermediate. The latter might be an electrostatic complex of the oligocationic reagent and RNA, the only polyanion in the virion. A pronounced decrease in the rate constant of infectivity inactivation in the presence of multiply charged anions (in phosphate buffer) and a biogenic polyamine (spermine) favors this hypothesis. Increasing the reaction temperature increases the rate constant of infectivity inactivation and decreases selectivity of the viral RNA modification. PMID:11566057

  4. Role of Accessory Proteins of HTLV-1 in Viral Replication, T Cell Activation, and Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amithraj; Lairmore, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), and initiates a variety of immune mediated disorders. The viral genome encodes common structural and enzymatic proteins characteristic of all retroviruses and utilizes alternative splicing and alternate codon usage to make several regulatory and accessory proteins encoded in the pX region (pX ORF I to IV). Recent studies indicate that the accessory proteins p12I, p27I, p13II, and p30II, encoded by pX ORF I and II, contribute to viral replication and the ability of the virus to maintain typical in vivo expression levels. Proviral clones that are mutated in either pX ORF I or II, while fully competent in cell culture, are severely limited in their replicative capacity in a rabbit model. These HTLV-1 accessory proteins are critical for establishment of viral infectivity, enhance T- lymphocyte activation and potentially alter gene transcription and mitochondrial function. HTLV-1 pX ORF I expression is critical to the viral infectivity in resting primary lymphocytes suggesting a role for the calcineurin-binding protein p12I in lymphocyte activation. The endoplasmic reticulum and cis-Golgi localizing p12I activates NFAT, a key T cell transcription factor, through calcium-mediated signaling pathways and may lower the threshold of lymphocyte activation via the JAK/STAT pathway. In contrast p30II localizes to the nucleus and represses viral promoter activity, but may regulate cellular gene expression through p300/CBP or related co-activators of transcription. The mitochondrial localizing p13II induces morphologic changes in the organelle and may influence energy metabolism infected cells. Future studies of the molecular details HTLV-1 “accessory” proteins interactions will provide important new directions for investigations of HTLV-1 and related viruses associated with lymphoproliferative diseases. Thus, the accessory proteins of HTLV-1, once thought to be dispensable for

  5. Gene Delivery of a Viral Anti-Inflammatory Protein to Combat Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J.; Jaime, Henrique; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Li, Qiuhong; Boye, Shannon E.; Hauswirth, William W.; Lucas, Alexandra R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Inflammation of the retina is a contributing factor in ocular diseases such as uveitis, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The M013 immunomodulatory protein from myxoma virus has been shown to interfere with the proinflammatory signaling pathways involving both the NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB. We have developed and characterized an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector that delivers a secretable and cell-penetrating form of the M013 protein (TatM013). The expressed TatM013 protein was secreted and blocked the endotoxin-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β in monocyte-derived cells and the reactive aldehyde-induced secretion of IL-1β in retinal pigment epithelium cells. The local anti-inflammatory effects of AAV-delivered TatM013 were evaluated in an endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) mouse model after intravitreal injection of mice with an AAV2-based vector carrying either TatM013 fused to a secreted green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag (sGFP-TatM013) or GFP. Expression of the sGFP-TatM013 transgene was demonstrated by fluorescence funduscopy in living mice. In EIU, the number of infiltrating cells and the concentration of IL-1β in the vitreous body were significantly lower in the eyes injected with AAV-sGFP-TatM013 compared with the eyes injected with control AAV-GFP. These results suggest that a virus-derived inhibitor of the innate immune response, when delivered via AAV, could be a generalized therapy for various inflammatory diseases of the eye. PMID:25420215

  6. Encephalomyocarditis Virus 2A Protein Is Required for Viral Pathogenesis and Inhibition of Apoptosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Carocci, M.; Cordonnier, N.; Huet, H.; Romey, A.; Relmy, A.; Gorna, K.; Blaise-Boisseau, S.; Zientara, S.; Kassimi, L. Bakkali

    2011-01-01

    The encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Picornaviridae virus, has a wide host spectrum and can cause various diseases. EMCV virulence factors, however, are as yet ill defined. Here, we demonstrate that the EMCV 2A protein is essential for the pathogenesis of EMCV. Infection of mice with the B279/95 strain of EMCV resulted in acute fatal disease, while the clone C9, derived by serial in vitro passage of the B279/95 strain, was avirulent. C9 harbored a large deletion in the gene encoding the 2A protein. This deletion was incorporated into the cDNA of a pathogenic EMCV1.26 strain. The new virus, EMCV1.26Δ2A, was capable of replicating in vitro, albeit more slowly than EMCV1.26. Only mice inoculated with EMCV1.26 triggered death within a few days. Mice infected with EMCV1.26Δ2A did not exhibit clinical signs, and histopathological analyses showed no damage in the central nervous system, unlike EMCV1.26-infected mice. In vitro, EMCV1.26Δ2A presented a defect in viral particle release correlating with prolonged cell viability. Unlike EMCV1.26, which induced cytopathic cell death, EMCV1.26Δ2A induced apoptosis via caspase 3 activation. This strongly suggests that the 2A protein is required for inhibition of apoptosis during EMCV infection. All together, our data indicate that the EMCV 2A protein is important for the virus in counteracting host defenses, since Δ2A viruses were no longer pathogenic and were unable to inhibit apoptosis in vitro. PMID:21849462

  7. Viral protein R of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 induces retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Viral protein R (Vpr), a protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) with various biological functions, was shown to be present in the blood of HIV-1-positive patients. However, it remained unclear whether circulating Vpr in patients’ blood is biologically active. Here, we examined the activity of blood Vpr using an assay system by which retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1 (L1-RTP) was detected. We also investigated the in vivo effects of recombinant Vpr (rVpr) by administrating it to transgenic mice harboring human L1 as a transgene (hL1-Tg mice). Based on our data, we discuss the involvement of blood Vpr in the clinical symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Results We first discovered that rVpr was active in induction of L1-RTP. Biochemical analyses revealed that rVpr-induced L1-RTP depended on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. By using a sensitive L1-RTP assay system, we showed that 6 of the 15 blood samples from HIV-1 patients examined were positive for induction of L1-RTP. Of note, the L1-RTP-inducing activity was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for Vpr. Moreover, L1-RTP was reproducibly induced in various organs, including the kidney, when rVpr was administered to hL1-Tg mice. Conclusions Blood Vpr is biologically active, suggesting that its monitoring is worthwhile for clarification of the roles of Vpr in the pathogenesis of AIDS. This is the first report to demonstrate a soluble factor in patients’ blood active for L1-RTP activity, and implies the involvement of L1-RTP in the development of human diseases. PMID:23915234

  8. Serological assays based on recombinant viral proteins for the diagnosis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tani, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Saijo, Masayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2012-10-01

    The family Arenaviridae, genus Arenavirus, consists of two phylogenetically independent groups: Old World (OW) and New World (NW) complexes. The Lassa and Lujo viruses in the OW complex and the Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Chapare viruses in the NW complex cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans, leading to serious public health concerns. These viruses are also considered potential bioterrorism agents. Therefore, it is of great importance to detect these pathogens rapidly and specifically in order to minimize the risk and scale of arenavirus outbreaks. However, these arenaviruses are classified as BSL-4 pathogens, thus making it difficult to develop diagnostic techniques for these virus infections in institutes without BSL-4 facilities. To overcome these difficulties, antibody detection systems in the form of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an indirect immunofluorescence assay were developed using recombinant nucleoproteins (rNPs) derived from these viruses. Furthermore, several antigen-detection assays were developed. For example, novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the rNPs of Lassa and Junin viruses were generated. Sandwich antigen-capture (Ag-capture) ELISAs using these mAbs as capture antibodies were developed and confirmed to be sensitive and specific for detecting the respective arenavirus NPs. These rNP-based assays were proposed to be useful not only for an etiological diagnosis of VHFs, but also for seroepidemiological studies on VHFs. We recently developed arenavirus neutralization assays using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudotypes bearing arenavirus recombinant glycoproteins. The goal of this article is to review the recent advances in developing laboratory diagnostic assays based on recombinant viral proteins for the diagnosis of VHFs and epidemiological studies on the VHFs caused by arenaviruses. PMID:23202455

  9. The Membrane Fusion Step of Vaccinia Virus Entry Is Cooperatively Mediated by Multiple Viral Proteins and Host Cell Components

    PubMed Central

    Laliberte, Jason P.; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    For many viruses, one or two proteins allow cell attachment and entry, which occurs through the plasma membrane or following endocytosis at low pH. In contrast, vaccinia virus (VACV) enters cells by both neutral and low pH routes; four proteins mediate cell attachment and twelve that are associated in a membrane complex and conserved in all poxviruses are dedicated to entry. The aim of the present study was to determine the roles of cellular and viral proteins in initial stages of entry, specifically fusion of the membranes of the mature virion and cell. For analysis of the role of cellular components, we used well characterized inhibitors and measured binding of a recombinant VACV virion containing Gaussia luciferase fused to a core protein; viral and cellular membrane lipid mixing with a self-quenching fluorescent probe in the virion membrane; and core entry with a recombinant VACV expressing firefly luciferase and electron microscopy. We determined that inhibitors of tyrosine protein kinases, dynamin GTPase and actin dynamics had little effect on binding of virions to cells but impaired membrane fusion, whereas partial cholesterol depletion and inhibitors of endosomal acidification and membrane blebbing had a severe effect at the later stage of core entry. To determine the role of viral proteins, virions lacking individual membrane components were purified from cells infected with members of a panel of ten conditional-lethal inducible mutants. Each of the entry protein-deficient virions had severely reduced infectivity and except for A28, L1 and L5 greatly impaired membrane fusion. In addition, a potent neutralizing L1 monoclonal antibody blocked entry at a post-membrane lipid-mixing step. Taken together, these results suggested a 2-step entry model and implicated an unprecedented number of viral proteins and cellular components involved in signaling and actin rearrangement for initiation of virus-cell membrane fusion during poxvirus entry. PMID:22194690