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Sample records for herv-w cytokine production

  1. Direct Involvement of HERV-W Env Glycoprotein in Human Trophoblast Cell Fusion and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Frendo, Jean-Louis; Olivier, Delphine; Cheynet, Valérie; Blond, Jean-Luc; Bouton, Olivier; Vidaud, Michel; Rabreau, Michèle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Mallet, François

    2003-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the product of the HERV-W env gene, a retroviral envelope protein also dubbed syncytin, is a highly fusogenic membrane glycoprotein inducing the formation of syncytia on interaction with the type D mammalian retrovirus receptor. In addition, the detection of HERV-W Env protein (Env-W) expression in placental tissue sections led us to propose a role for this fusogenic glycoprotein in placenta formation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we analyzed the involvement of Env-W in the differentiation of primary cultures of human villous cytotrophoblasts that spontaneously differentiate by cell fusion into syncytiotrophoblasts in vitro. First, we observed that HERV-W env mRNA and glycoprotein expression are colinear with primary cytotrophoblast differentiation and with expression of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a marker of syncytiotrophoblast formation. Second, we observed that in vitro stimulation of trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation by cyclic AMP is also associated with a concomitant increase in HERV-W env and hCG mRNA and protein expression. Finally, by using specific antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrated that inhibition of Env-W protein expression leads to a decrease of trophoblast fusion and differentiation, with the secretion of hCG in culture medium of antisense oligonucleotide-treated cells being decreased by fivefold. Taken together, these results strongly support a direct role for Env-W in human trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation. PMID:12724415

  2. The aliens inside human DNA: HERV-W/MSRV/syncytin-1 endogenous retroviruses and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Dolei, Antonina; Uleri, Elena; Ibba, Gabriele; Caocci, Maurizio; Piu, Claudia; Serra, Caterina

    2015-06-01

    The human genome contains remnants of ancestral retroviruses now endogenously transmitted, called human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). HERVs can be variably expressed, and both beneficial and detrimental effects have described. This review focuses on the MSRV and syncytin-1 HERV-W elements in relationship to neurodegeneration in view of their neuro-pathogenic and immune-pathogenic properties. Multiple sclerosis (MS) and a neurodegenerative disease (neuroAIDS) are reported in this review. In vivo studies in patients and controls for molecular epidemiology and follow-up studies are reviewed, along with in vitro cellular studies of the effects of treatments and of molecular mechanisms. HERV-W/MSRV has been repeatedly found in MS patients (in blood, spinal fluid, and brain samples), and MRSV presence/load strikingly parallels MS stages and active/remission phases, as well as therapy outcome. The DNA of MS patients has increased MSRVenv copies, while syncytin-1 copies are unchanged in controls. Presence of MSRV in the spinal fluid predicted the worst MS progression, ten years in advance. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activates HERV-W/MSRV both in vitro and in vivo. With respect to neuroAIDS, the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein activates HERV-W/MSRV in monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes indirectly by interaction with TLR4 and induction of TNFa. HERV-W/MSRV can be considered a biomarker for MS behavior and therapy outcome. Regarding MS pathogenesis, we postulate the possibility for EBV of an initial trigger of future MS, years later, and for MSRV of a direct role of effector of neuropathogenesis during MS. Additionally, HERV-W/MSR/syncytin-1 activation by HIV Tat could contribute to the HIV-related neurodegeneration. PMID:26142666

  3. HERV-W polymorphism in chromosome X is associated with multiple sclerosis risk and with differential expression of MSRV

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease that occurs more frequently in women than in men. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Retrovirus (MSRV) is a member of HERV-W, a multicopy human endogenous retroviral family repeatedly implicated in MS pathogenesis. MSRV envelope protein is elevated in the serum of MS patients and induces inflammation and demyelination but, in spite of this pathogenic potential, its exact genomic origin and mechanism of generation are unknown. A possible link between the HERV-W copy on chromosome Xq22.3, that contains an almost complete open reading frame, and the gender differential prevalence in MS has been suggested. Results MSRV transcription levels were higher in MS patients than in controls (U-Mann–Whitney; p = 0.004). Also, they were associated with the clinical forms (Spearman; p = 0.0003) and with the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) (Spearman; p = 0.016). By mapping a 3 kb region in Xq22.3, including the HERV-W locus, we identified three polymorphisms: rs6622139 (T/C), rs6622140 (G/A) and rs1290413 (G/A). After genotyping 3127 individuals (1669 patients and 1458 controls) from two different Spanish cohorts, we found that in women rs6622139 T/C was associated with MS susceptibility: [χ2; p = 0.004; OR (95% CI) = 0.50 (0.31-0.81)] and severity, since CC women presented lower MSSS scores than CT (U-Mann–Whitney; p = 0.039) or TT patients (U-Mann–Whitney; p = 0.031). Concordantly with the susceptibility conferred in women, rs6622139*T was associated with higher MSRV expression (U-Mann–Whitney; p = 0.003). Conclusions Our present work supports the hypothesis of a direct involvement of HERV-W/MSRV in MS pathogenesis, identifying a genetic marker on chromosome X that could be one of the causes underlying the gender differences in MS. PMID:24405691

  4. Elevation of Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK3β is required for HERV-W env-mediated BDNF signaling in human U251 cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chengchen; Li, Shan; Yan, Qiujin; Wang, Xiuling; Chen, Yatang; Zhou, Ping; Lu, Mengxin; Zhu, Fan

    2016-08-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus W family (HERV-W) envelope (env) is known to be associated with neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia. Previous studies showed that overexpression of HERV-W env could induce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression. In human and rat cells, BDNF-mediated signal transduction might be modulated by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Both BDNF and GSK3β are schizophrenia-related genes. In this paper, we investigated whether GSK3β was involved in the HERV-W env-induced expression of BDNF. We found that HERV-W env increased phosphorylation of GSK3β at Ser9 (p-GSK3β (Ser9)) and the ratio of p-GSK3β (Ser9) to total GSK3β (p<0.05) in U251 cells. Overexpression of HERV-W env led to a 36.2% reduction in GSK3β activity compared to control (p<0.05). The levels of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and TSC2 mRNAs were upregulated (p<0.05). These data suggested that overexpression of HERV-W env might activate the GSK3β signaling pathway in U251 cells. Further, knockdown of GSK3β reduced the expression of total GSK3β, p-GSK3β (Ser9), and the ratio of p-GSK3β (Ser9) to total GSK3β by 28.6%, 50.4%, and 30.2%, respectively (p<0.05). Levels of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and TSC2 mRNAs were also reduced (p<0.05). Interestingly, GSK3β activity increased (p<0.05). Knockdown of GSK3β also decreased mRNA and protein expression of BDNF by 49.9% and 48.5% respectively (p<0.05). These results indicated that phosphorylation of GSK3β at Ser9 might be involved in HERV-W env-induced BDNF expression, and will hopefully improve our understanding of the role of HERV-W env in neurological and psychiatric diseases (schizophrenia, etc). PMID:27235578

  5. Custom human endogenous retroviruses dedicated microarray identifies self-induced HERV-W family elements reactivated in testicular cancer upon methylation control

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Juliette; Montgiraud, Cécile; Pichon, Jean-Philippe; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Arsac, Maud; Ruel, Karine; Bouton, Olivier; Mallet, François

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are an inherited part of the eukaryotic genomes, and represent ∼400 000 loci in the human genome. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) can be divided into distinct families, composed of phylogenetically related but structurally heterogeneous elements. The majority of HERVs are silent in most physiological contexts, whereas a significant expression is observed in pathological contexts, such as cancers. Owing to their repetitive nature, few of the active HERV elements have been accurately identified. In addition, there are no criteria defining the active promoters among HERV long-terminal repeats (LTRs). Hence, it is difficult to understand the HERV (de)regulation mechanisms and their implication on the physiopathology of the host. We developed a microarray to specifically detect the LTR-containing transcripts from the HERV-H, HERV-E, HERV-W and HERV-K(HML-2) families. HERV transcriptome was analyzed in the placenta and seven normal/tumoral match-pair samples. We identified six HERV-W loci overexpressed in testicular cancer, including a usually placenta-restricted transcript of ERVWE1. For each locus, specific overexpression was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, and comparison of the activity of U3 versus U5 regions suggested a U3-promoted transcription coupled with 5′R initiation. The analysis of DNA from tumoral versus normal tissue revealed that hypomethylation of U3 promoters in tumors is a prerequisite for their activation. PMID:20053729

  6. B cells and monocytes from patients with active multiple sclerosis exhibit increased surface expression of both HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env, accompanied by increased seroreactivity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The etiology of the neurogenerative disease multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown. The leading hypotheses suggest that MS is the result of exposure of genetically susceptible individuals to certain environmental factor(s). Herpesviruses and human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) represent potentially important factors in MS development. Herpesviruses can activate HERVs, and HERVs are activated in MS patients. Results Using flow cytometry, we have analyzed HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env epitope expression on the surface of PBMCs from MS patients with active and stable disease, and from control individuals. We have also analyzed serum antibody levels to the expressed HERV-H and HERV-W Env epitopes. We found a significantly higher expression of HERV-H and HERV-W Env epitopes on B cells and monocytes from patients with active MS compared with patients with stable MS or control individuals. Furthermore, patients with active disease had relatively higher numbers of B cells in the PBMC population, and higher antibody reactivities towards HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env epitopes. The higher antibody reactivities in sera from patients with active MS correlate with the higher levels of HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env expression on B cells and monocytes. We did not find such correlations for stable MS patients or for controls. Conclusion These findings indicate that both HERV-H Env and HERV-W Env are expressed in higher quantities on the surface of B cells and monocytes in patients with active MS, and that the expression of these proteins may be associated with exacerbation of the disease. PMID:19917105

  7. Effect of space flight on cytokine production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    Space flight has been shown to alter many immunological responses. Among those affected are the production of cytokines, Cytokines are the messengers of the immune system that facilitate communication among cells that allow the interaction among cells leading to the development of immune responses. Included among the cytokines are the interferons, interleukins, and colony stimulating factors. Cytokines also facilitate communication between the immune system and other body systems, such as the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal systems. Some cytokines also have direct protective effects on the host, such as interferon, which can inhibit the replication of viruses. Studies in both humans and animals indicate that models of space flight as well as actual space flight alter the production and action of cytokines. Included among these changes are altered interferon production, altered responsiveness of bone marrow cells to granulocyte/monocyte-colony stimulating factor, but no alteration in the production of interleukin-3. This suggests that there are selective effects of space flight on immune responses, i.e. not all cytokines are affected in the same fashion by space flight. Tissue culture studies also suggest that there may be direct effects of space flight on the cells responsible for cytokine production and action. The results of the above study indicate that the effects of space flight on cytokines may be a fundamental mechanism by which space flight not only affects immune responses, but also other biological systems of the human.

  8. Cytokine production capacity in depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Vogelzangs, N; de Jonge, P; Smit, J H; Bahn, S; Penninx, B W

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that immune function may be dysregulated in persons with depressive and anxiety disorders. Few studies examined the expression of cytokines in response to ex vivo stimulation of blood by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to study the innate production capacity of cytokines in depression and anxiety. To investigate this, baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used, including persons (18-65 years; 66% women) with current (that is, past month; N=591) or remitted (N=354) DSM-IV depressive or anxiety disorders and healthy controls (N=297). Depressive and anxiety symptoms were measured by means of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Using Multi-Analyte Profiling technology, plasma levels of 13 cytokines were assayed after whole blood stimulation by addition of LPS. Basal plasma levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were also available. A basal and a LPS summary index were created. Results show that LPS-stimulated inflammation was associated with increased odds of current depressive/anxiety disorders (odds ratio (OR)=1.28, P=0.009), as was the case for basal inflammation (OR=1.28, P=0.001). These associations were no longer significant after adjustment for lifestyle and health (OR=1.13, P=0.21; OR=1.07, P=0.45, respectively). After adjustment for lifestyle and health, interleukin-8 was associated with both remitted (OR=1.25, P=0.02) and current (OR=1.28, P=0.005) disorders. In addition, LPS-stimulated inflammation was associated with more severe depressive (β=0.129, P<0.001) and anxiety (β=0.165, P<0.001) symptoms, as was basal inflammation. Unlike basal inflammation, LPS-stimulated inflammation was still associated with (anxiety) symptom severity after adjustment for lifestyle and health (IDS: interleukin (IL)-8, MCP-1, MMP2; BAI: LPS index, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, MCP-1, MMP2, TNF-β). To conclude, lifestyle and health

  9. Intracellular cytokine production and cognition in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Ellen E A; Hodkinson, Claire F; Maylor, Elizabeth A; McCormack, Jacqueline M; Rae, Gordon; Strain, Sean; Alexander, H Denis; Wallace, Julie M W

    2013-10-01

    Elevated concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 have been associated with impaired cognitive performance. There are, however, few studies that have examined the relationship between cytokine production and specific aspects of cognition in healthy older individuals. Two-colour flow cytometry was used to determine intracellular cytokine production by activated monocytes, and neuropsychological tests were performed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) in 93 apparently healthy men and women aged 55-70 years. A series of hierarchical regression analyses was carried out to examine the contribution of IL-1β and IL-6 (% expression and production (antibody binding capacity (ABC))) to recognition, attention and working memory, after controlling for socio-demographic variables (age, sex and social class). IL-1β% expression and IL-6 production predicted aspects of working memory. Recognition memory was found to be sensitive to the affects of age and social class. The current study suggests that higher intracellular cytokine production by activated monocytes may be predictive of lower cognitive performance in working memory in healthy older individuals. These findings indicate that utilization of models for in vivo cytokine production upon immune challenge may be useful in studying specific aspects of memory affected during inflammatory responses, for example in individuals at risk for cognitive decline owing to age-related inflammatory disorders. PMID:23664267

  10. Search for potent modulators of cytokine production by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A A; Abidov, M T; Kovalevskaya, E O; Kalyuzhin, O V

    2004-09-01

    We compared the effects of Tamerit, Polyoxidony, and Licopid on spontaneous and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor by mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. The test preparations were equally potent in stimulating nonactivated cells. Licopid produced a costimulatory effect on macrophages primed with endotoxin. Tamerit in different doses suppressed cytokine production by cells. Polyoxidony in low doses activated, but in high doses suppressed this process. PMID:15665918

  11. Modulation of Innate Cytokine Responses by Products of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Frank; Wilson, Keith T.; James, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    The gastric inflammatory and immune response in Helicobacter pylori infection may be due to the effect of different H. pylori products on innate immune mechanisms. The aim of this study was to determine whether bacterial components could modulate cytokine production in vitro and thus contribute to Th1 polarization of the gastric immune response observed in vivo. The effect of H. pylori recombinant urease, bacterial lysate, intact bacteria, and bacterial DNA on proliferation and cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from H. pylori-negative donors was examined as a model for innate cytokine responses. Each of the different H. pylori preparations induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12p40 (IL-12p40), but not IL-2 or IL-5, production, and all but H. pylori DNA stimulated release of IL-10. Addition of anti-IL-12 antibody to cultures partially inhibited IFN-γ production. In addition, each bacterial product inhibited mitogen-stimulated IL-2 production by PBMCs and Jurkat T cells. The inhibitory effect of bacterial products on IL-2 production correlated with inhibition of mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, although urease inhibited IL-2 production without inhibiting proliferation, suggesting that inhibition of IL-2 production alone is not sufficient to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation. The results of these studies demonstrate that Th1 polarization of the gastric immune response may be due in part to the direct effects of multiple different H. pylori components that enhance IFN-γ and IL-12 production while inhibiting both IL-2 production and cell proliferation that may be necessary for Th2 responses. PMID:11035734

  12. Differential regulation of cytokine production by nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, J; Chain, B M

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has recently been identified as a potent and pleiotropic intracellular mediator produced by and acting on many cells of the body. Although considerable attention has been devoted to the regulation of NO by inflammatory cytokines, and also to the role of NO as an important effector molecule in immune function, there is very little information on the role of this mediator in modulating T-cell-dependent cytokine production. In this study we show that physiological levels of NO (either produced by activated macrophages or by the addition of exogenous NO donors) can selectively down-regulate interleukin-3 (IL-3) production by spleen cells from contact-sensitized mice, while leaving IL-2 activity unaffected. Thus NO may have an important role as an immunomodulatory as well as effector molecule in the immune system. PMID:8244457

  13. Cytokine production by cell cultures from bronchial subepithelial myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Howarth, P H; Roche, W R

    1996-09-01

    Myofibroblasts have been previously described beneath the bronchial epithelium and were found to increase in number proportional to the accumulation of extracellular matrix in the bronchial lamina reticularis in asthma. The aim of this study was to assess further the contribution of these structural cells to allergic inflammation in the bronchial mucosa through their cytokine expression. Cell cultures were established from the lamina reticularis of human bronchial biopsies from asthmatic and non-asthmatic subjects. Cytokine secretion was measured by ELISA in supernatants of cultures with or without tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The mRNA levels for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the cultures were examined by ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs). Bronchial myofibroblasts grown from bronchial biopsies were capable of producing GM-CSF, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and stem cell factor (SCF) constitutively. The GM-CSF production by myofibroblasts was significantly increased in response to TNF-alpha simulation with a corresponding increase in GM-CSF mRNA expression. The enhancement of GM-CSF production by TNF-alpha in myofibroblasts was blocked by the inhibition of RNA synthesis. Prednisolone abolished the GM-CSF production. This study provides evidence for the role of bronchial myofibroblasts in the regulation of inflammatory cell recruitment and activation by interaction in the cytokine network in the bronchial mucosa. PMID:8943823

  14. Increased circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and imbalanced regulatory T-cell cytokines production in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Juliana Cristina; Azor, Mayce Helena; Nojima, Viviane Yoshimi; Lourenço, Francinelson Duarte; Prearo, Erica; Maruta, Celina Wakisaka; Rivitti, Evandro Ararigbóia; da Silva Duarte, Alberto José; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2008-10-01

    The immunologic characterization of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), mainly regarding cytokine profile needs more investigation. We examined circulating inflammatory cytokine levels, T-cell induced secretion, and cytokine mRNA expression in patients with CIU subjected to the intradermal autologous serum skin test (ASST). Increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-12p70, and IL-6 have been observed in most of patients with CIU, together with an enhancement of IL-2 secretion following T-cell stimulation. Highlighting the inflammatory profile in CIU found in ASST positive, is the enhanced B-cell proliferative responsiveness and increased IL-17 secretion levels. ASST-positive patients also exhibited impaired IL-4 secretion associated with increased IL-10 production. Altered cytokine expression in patients with ASST-negative, was the down-modulation of spontaneous IL-10 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our findings support the concept of immunologic dysregulation in CIU, revealing a systemic inflammatory profile associated with disturbed cytokine production by T cells, mainly related to IL-17 and IL-10 production. PMID:18586117

  15. Inhibition of cytokine production by a tumor cell product.

    PubMed Central

    Farram, E; Nelson, M; Nelson, D S; Moon, D K

    1982-01-01

    Supernatants from cultured mouse and human tumour cells, but not mouse or guinea-pig fibroblasts, inhibited the production of a lymphokine, macrophage chemotactic factor, by PHA-stimulated mouse spleen cells. The supernatants affected spleen cells from old, but not young, mice. They were most active if added at the start of the spleen cell culture and did not act by binding phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). The active material had an approximate molecular weight, on membrane filtration, of 1000-10,000 and could be bound to and eluted from Con A-Sepharose. Tumour supernatant factor(s) of similar molecular weight inhibited the production of interleukin 1 (lymphocyte activating factor) in response to lipopolysaccharide by stimulated thioglycollate-induced peritoneal exudate macrophages, but not by Corynebacterium parvum-activated macrophages. Similar tumour-produced material has been found to inhibit the early phase of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in older mice. It is suggested that this effect is due, at least in part, to inhibition of interleukin 1 production leading to inhibition of lymphokine production. PMID:7047385

  16. Cytokine production in peripheral blood cells of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer: elevated Th2/Th9 cytokine production before and reduced Th2 cytokine production after radioactive iodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Simonovic, Snezana Zivancevic; Mihaljevic, Olgica; Majstorovic, Ivana; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Kostic, Irena; Djordjevic, Olivera Milosevic; Teodorovic, Ljiljana Mijatovic

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the regulation of cells of the immune system and also have been implicated in the pathogenesis of malignant diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine profiles in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) before and 7 days after radioactive iodine (131-I) therapy. Cytokine levels were determined in supernatants obtained from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated whole blood cultures of 13 patients with DTC and 13 control subjects. The concentrations of selected cytokines: Th1-interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α); Th2-interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 5 (IL-5), interleukin 13 (IL-13) and interleukin 10 (IL-10); Th9-interleukin-9 (IL-9); and Th17-interleukin 17 (IL-17A) were measured using multiplex cytokine detection systems for Human Th1/Th2/Th9/Th17/Th22. We have shown that peripheral blood cells of DTC patients produce significantly higher concentrations of Th2/Th9 cytokines (IL-5, IL-13 and IL-9) than control subjects. The 131-I therapy led to reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Despite this, the calculated cytokine ratios (Th1/Th2) in DTC patients before and 7 days after 131-I therapy were not different from those in healthy subjects. DTC patients have significantly higher concentrations of Th2/Th9 cytokines (IL-5, IL-13 and IL-9) than control subjects. There is no influence of hypothyroidism or stage of disease on cytokine production in DTC patients before 131-I therapy. The radioactive 131-I therapy leads to reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Additional studies are needed to determine the significance of these findings. PMID:25297452

  17. Regulation of Inflammatory Cytokine Production by MKP-5 in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hömmö, Tuija; Pesu, Marko; Moilanen, Eeva; Korhonen, Riku

    2015-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) include p38 MAPKs, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), and they regulate many cell processes, such as cell division, differentiation and release of inflammatory mediators. MAPK activity is controlled by mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs), a phosphatase family with 11 members. MKP-1 is the most studied member of MKP family, and it is one of the anti-inflammatory factors induced by glucocorticoids. Less is known about the other MAPK phosphatases although they hold a promise as anti-inflammatory drug targets. In this study, we investigated the effect of MKP-5 on MAPK phosphorylation and cytokine production in J774 mouse macrophages. We used MKP-5 siRNA and an MKP-5 inhibitor (AS077234-4) to modulate MKP-5 function. We found that MKP-5 controlled p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but not that of JNK or ERK. In addition, the production of IL-6 and TNF was suppressed by MKP-5 in macrophages. Our results introduce a novel concept that compounds able to enhance MKP-5 expression and/or activity hold anti-inflammatory potential, because MKP-5 down-regulates the release of inflammatory mediators by controlling p38 MAPK activity. PMID:25615285

  18. Dharmendra antigen but not integral M. leprae is an efficient inducer of immunostimulant cytokine production by human monocytes, and M. leprae lipids inhibit the cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, C; Fukutomi, Y; Kashiwabara, Y; Oomoto, Y; Kojima, M; Hayashi, H; Onozaki, K

    1997-03-01

    Killed integral Mycobacterium leprae, Mitsuda antigen, and chloroform-treated M. leprae, Dharmendra antigen (Dh-Ag), have been used for the classification of leprosy patients based on cell-mediated immunity. Heat-killed M. leprae also were used as a component of the Convit vaccine. Human blood monocytes were stimulated with M. leprae or Dh-Ag and their cytokine-inducing ability was compared. Monocytes were cultured in the presence of fresh human serum because of the efficiency of cytokine induction and the phagocytosis of M. leprae have been shown to be optimal in the presence of fresh serum. M. leprae and Dh-Ag were equally phagocytosed by monocytes. Dh-Ag was more potent than M. leprae in the induction of immunostimulatory/proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In contrast, a comparable level of IL-1ra, an immunosuppressive cytokine, was induced by M. leprae and Dh-Ag. The lipids extracted from M. leprae induced none of these cytokines by monocytes. Nevertheless, when monocytes were pretreated with the lipids followed by stimulation with Dh-Ag, productions of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF were all inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. However, the lipids did not inhibit the cytokine production induced by other stimuli including BCG and lipopolysaccharide. Moreover the lipids did not affect the production of IL-1ra. These results suggest that the lipids from M. leprae are responsible for the poor cytokine-inducing ability of M. leprae, thus favoring their infection. These results also suggest that Dh-Ag rather than integral M. leprae may be useful as a vaccine candidate because Dh-Ag is able to induce a large amount of cytokines from monocytes. PMID:9207755

  19. Cytokine Production Assays Reveal Discriminatory Immune Defects in Adults with Recurrent Infections and Noninfectious Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Simon, Anna; van Crevel, Reinout; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Gyssens, Inge C.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; van Deuren, Marcel; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine production assays have been primarily used in research settings studying novel immunodeficiencies. We sought to determine the diagnostic value of cytokine production assays in patients with recurrent and/or severe infectious diseases (IDs) without known immunodeficiencies and unclassified noninfectious inflammatory disorders (NIIDs). We retrospectively examined cytokine production in whole-blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from 157 adult patients. A cytokine production rate of <5% of that of healthy controls was considered defective. While monocyte-derived cytokine (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], and IL-6) production was rarely affected, 30% of all included patients had deficient production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ), IL-17A, or IL-22. Twenty-five percent of the NIID patients displayed defective IFN-γ production, whereas IL-17A production was generally unaffected. In the group of ID patients, defective IFN-γ production was found in 19% and 14% of the patients with viral and bacterial infections, respectively, and in 38%, 24%, and 50% of patients with mycobacterial, mucocutaneous, and invasive fungal infections, respectively. Defective IL-17A and IL-22 production was mainly confined to ID patients with mucocutaneous fungal infections. In conclusion, cytokine production assays frequently detect defective Th1 responses in patients with mycobacterial or fungal infections, in contrast to patients with respiratory tract infections or isolated bacterial infections. Defective IL-17A and IL-22 production was primarily found in patients with fungal infections, while monocyte-derived cytokine production was unaffected. Thus, lymphocyte-derived cytokine production assays are helpful in the diagnostic workup of patients with recurrent infections and suspected immunodeficiencies and have the potential to reveal immune defects that might guide adjunctive immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:24872512

  20. Control of Cytokine Production by Human Fc Gamma Receptors: Implications for Pathogen Defense and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Vogelpoel, Lisa T. C.; Baeten, Dominique L. P.; de Jong, Esther C.; den Dunnen, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Control of cytokine production by immune cells is pivotal for counteracting infections via orchestration of local and systemic inflammation. Although their contribution has long been underexposed, it has recently become clear that human Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), which are receptors for the Fc region of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, play a critical role in this process by controlling tissue- and pathogen-specific cytokine production. Whereas individual stimulation of FcγRs does not evoke cytokine production, FcγRs cell-type specifically interact with various other receptors for selective amplification or inhibition of particular cytokines, thereby tailoring cytokine responses to the immunological context. The physiological function of FcγR-mediated control of cytokine production is to counteract infections with various classes of pathogens. Upon IgG opsonization, pathogens are simultaneously recognized by FcγRs as well as by various pathogen-sensing receptors, leading to the induction of pathogen class-specific immune responses. However, when erroneously activated, the same mechanism also contributes to the development of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we discuss control of cytokine production as a novel function of FcγRs in human innate immune cells in the context of homeostasis, infection, and autoimmunity and address the possibilities for future therapeutic exploitation. PMID:25759693

  1. INDUCTION OF CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN CHEETAH (ACINONYX JUBATUS) PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS AND VALIDATION OF FELINE-SPECIFIC CYTOKINE ASSAYS FOR ANALYSIS OF CHEETAH SERUM.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Ashley D; Crosier, Adrienne E; Vansandt, Lindsey M; Mattson, Elliot; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from the whole blood of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus ; n=3) and stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 for establishment of cross-reactivity between these cheetah cytokines and feline-specific cytokine antibodies provided in commercially available Feline DuoSet® ELISA kits (R&D Systems, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55413, USA). This study found that feline-specific cytokine antibodies bind specifically to cheetah proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 from cell culture supernatants. The assays also revealed that cheetah PBMCs produce a measurable, cell concentration-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation. To enable the use of these kits, which are designed for cell culture supernatants for analyzing cytokine concentrations in cheetah serum, percent recovery and parallelism of feline cytokine standards in cheetah serum were also evaluated. Cytokine concentrations in cheetah serum were approximated based on the use of domestic cat standards in the absence of cheetah standard material. In all cases (for cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6), percent recovery increased as the serum sample dilution increased, though percent recovery varied between cytokines at a given dilution factor. A 1:2 dilution of serum resulted in approximately 45, 82, and 7% recovery of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 standards, respectively. Adequate parallelism was observed across a large range of cytokine concentrations for TNF-α and IL-1β; however, a significant departure from parallelism was observed between the IL-6 standard and the serum samples (P=0.004). Therefore, based on our results, the Feline DuoSet ELISA (R&D Systems, Inc.) kits are valid assays for the measurement of TNF-α and IL-1β in cheetah serum but should not be used for accurate measurement of IL-6. PMID:26056884

  2. Microarray kit analysis of cytokines in blood product units and segments

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Richard B.; Yau, Rebecca; Sanchez, Rosa; Lowell, Clifford; Toy, Pearl

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytokine concentrations in transfused blood components are of interest for some clinical trials. It is not always possible to process samples of transfused components quickly after their administration. Additionally, it is not practical to sample material in an acceptable manner from many bags of components before transfusion, and after transfusion, the only representative remaining fluid of the component may be that in the “segment,” as the bag may have been completely transfused. Multiplex array technology allows rapid simultaneous testing of multiple analytes in small volume samples. We used this technology to measure leukocyte cytokine levels in blood products to determine (1) whether concentrations in segments correlate with those in the main bag, and thus, whether segments could be used for estimation of the concentrations in the transfused component; and (2) whether concentrations after sample storage at 4C for 24 hrs do not differ from concentrations before storage, thus allowing for processing within 24 hrs, rather than immediately after transfusion. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Leukocyte cytokines were measured in the supernatant from bags and segments of leukoreduced red blood cells, non-leukoreduced whole blood, and leukoreduced plateletphereses using the ProteoPlex Human Cytokine Array kit (Novagen). RESULTS Cytokine concentrations in packed red blood cell and whole blood, or plateletphereses stored at 4°C did not differ between bag and segment samples (all p>0.05). There was no evidence of systematic differences between segment and bag concentrations. Cytokine concentrations in samples from plateletphereses did not change within 24 hrs storage at 4°C. CONCLUSION Samples from either bag or segment can be used to study cytokine concentrations in groups of blood products. Cytokine concentrations in plateletphereses appear to be stable for at least 24 hrs of storage at 4°C, and, thus, samples stored with those conditions may be used to

  3. α-1-Antitrypsin is an endogenous inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine production in whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Gregory B.; Chan, Edward D.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Shapiro, Leland

    2009-01-01

    Several observations suggest endogenous suppressors of inflammatory mediators are present in human blood. α-1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is the most abundant serine protease inhibitor in blood, and AAT possesses anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that in vitro stimulation of whole blood from persons with a genetic AAT deficiency resulted in enhanced cytokine production compared with blood from healthy subjects. Using whole blood from healthy subjects, dilution of blood with RPMI tissue-culture medium, followed by incubation for 18 h, increased spontaneous production of IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra) significantly, compared with undiluted blood. Dilution-induced cytokine production suggested the presence of one or more circulating inhibitors of cytokine synthesis present in blood. Serially diluting blood with tissue-culture medium in the presence of cytokine stimulation with heat-killed Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epi) resulted in 1.2- to 55-fold increases in cytokine production compared with S. epi stimulation alone. Diluting blood with autologous plasma did not increase the production of IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, or IL-1Ra, suggesting that the endogenous, inhibitory activity of blood resided in plasma. In whole blood, diluted and stimulated with S. epi, exogenous AAT inhibited IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β significantly but did not suppress induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1Ra and IL-10. These ex vivo and in vitro observations suggest that endogenous AAT in blood contributes to the suppression of proinflammatory cytokine synthesis. PMID:19197072

  4. Multiple Sclerosis and HERV-W/MSRV: A Multicentric Study

    PubMed Central

    Arru, Giannina; Mameli, Giuseppe; Astone, Vito; Serra, Caterina; Huang, Yu-Min; Link, Hans; Fainardi, Enrico; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Granieri, Enrico; Fernandez, Miriam; Villoslada, Pablo; Fois, Maria Laura; Sanna, Alessandra; Rosati, Giulio; Dolei, Antonina; Sotgiu, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    We designed a large multicentric study to analyse the presence of MSRV particles in blood and CSF of a large cohort of patients and controls from different European areas. 149 MS patients and 153 neurological and healthy controls were selected from Sardinia, Spain, Northern-Italy and Sweden. To avoid biological and inter-assay variability MSRV was detected within a single laboratory through nested and real-time PCR assays specific for pol and env genes. MSRV detection in blood and CSF of MS patients and controls in populations of different ethnicity gave significant differences (p<0.05 compared to neurological controls and <0.001 compared to healthy controls). The presence and viral load of MSRV are significantly associated with MS as compared to neurological and healthy controls in all ethnic groups. PMID:23675056

  5. Correlating macrophage morphology and cytokine production resulting from biomaterial contact.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Stachelek, Stanley J; Tomczyk, Nancy; Finley, Matthew J; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2013-01-01

    The morphological and inflammatory responses of adherent macrophages are correlated to evaluate the biocompatibility of surfaces. Monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM), THP-1, and THP-1 cells expressing GFP-actin chimeric protein were seeded onto glass, polyurethane (PU), and glass surface modified with quaternary ammonium salt functionalized chitosan (CH-Q) and hyaluronic acid (HA). Using confocal microscopy, the surface area, volume and 3D shape factor of adherent macrophages was quantified. For comparison, functional consequences of cell-surface interactions that activate macrophages and thereby elicit secretion of a proinflammatory cytokine were evaluated. Using an enzyme linked immune sorbent assay, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was measured. On glass, macrophages exhibited mainly an amoeboid shape, exhibited the largest surface area, volume, and 3D shape factor and produced the most TNF-α. On PU, macrophages displayed mainly a hemispherical shape, exhibited an intermediate volume, surface area and 3D shape factor, and produced moderate TNF-α. In contrast, on CH-Q and HA surfaces, macrophages were spherical, exhibited the smallest volume, surface area, and 3D shape factor, and produced the least TNF-α. These studies begin to validate the use of GFP-actin-modified MDM as a novel tool to correlate cell morphology with inflammatory cell response. PMID:22847892

  6. Correlating macrophage morphology and cytokine production resulting from biomaterial contact

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Stachelek, Stanley J.; Tomczyk, Nancy; Finley, Matthew J.; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The morphological and inflammatory responses of adherent macrophages are correlated to evaluate the biocompatibility of surfaces. Monocyte derived macrophage, THP-1, and THP-1 cells expressing GFP-actin chimeric protein were seeded onto glass, polyurethane (PU), and glass surface modified with quaternary ammonium salt functionalized chitosan (CH-Q) and hyaluronic acid (HA). Using confocal microscopy, the surface area, volume and 3-D shape factor of adherent macrophages was quantified. For comparison, functional consequences of cell-surface interactions that activate macrophages and thereby elicit secretion of a pro-inflammatory cytokine were evaluated. Using an enzyme linked immune sorbent assay, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was measured. On glass, macrophages exhibited mainly an amoeboid shape, exhibited the largest surface area, volume, and 3-D shape factor and produced the most TNF-α. On PU, macrophages displayed mainly a hemispherical shape, exhibited an intermediate volume, surface area and 3-D shape factor, and produced moderate TNF-α. In contrast, on CH-Q and HA surfaces, macrophages were spherical, exhibited the smallest volume, surface area, and 3-D shape factor, and produced the least TNF-α. These studies begin to validate the use of GFP-actin modified MDM as a novel tool to correlate cell morphology with inflammatory cell response. PMID:22847892

  7. Impact of antidepressants on cytokine production of depressed patients in vitro.

    PubMed

    Munzer, Alexander; Sack, Ulrich; Mergl, Roland; Schönherr, Jeremias; Petersein, Charlotte; Bartsch, Stefanie; Kirkby, Kenneth C; Bauer, Katrin; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2013-11-01

    The interplay between immune and nervous systems plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of depression. In depressive episodes, patients show increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. There is limited information on the effect of antidepressant drugs on cytokines, most studies report on a limited sample of cytokines and none have reported effects on IL-22. We systematically investigated the effect of three antidepressant drugs, citalopram, escitalopram and mirtazapine, on secretion of cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22 and TNF-α in a whole blood assay in vitro, using murine anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3, and 5C3 monoclonal antibody against CD40, to stimulate T and B cells respectively. Citalopram increased production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-22. Mirtazapine increased IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-22. Escitalopram decreased IL-17 levels. The influence of antidepressants on IL-2 and IL-4 levels was not significant for all three drugs. Compared to escitalopram, citalopram led to higher levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-22; and mirtazapine to higher levels of IL-1β, IL-17, IL-22 and TNF-α. Mirtazapine and citalopram increased IL-22 production. The differing profile of cytokine production may relate to differences in therapeutic effects, risk of relapse and side effects. PMID:24257035

  8. Interleukin-18 Increases TLR4 and Mannose Receptor Expression and Modulates Cytokine Production in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão; Fernandes, Reginaldo Keller; Rodrigues, Daniela Ramos; Golim, Marjorie Assis; Soares, Angela Maria Victoriano Campos

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine belonging to the interleukin-1 family of cytokines. This cytokine exerts many unique biological and immunological effects. To explore the role of IL-18 in inflammatory innate immune responses, we investigated its impact on expression of two toll-like receptors (TLR2 and TLR4) and mannose receptor (MR) by human peripheral blood monocytes and its effect on TNF-α, IL-12, IL-15, and IL-10 production. Monocytes from healthy donors were stimulated or not with IL-18 for 18 h, and then the TLR2, TLR4, and MR expression and intracellular TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-10 production were assessed by flow cytometry and the levels of TNF-α, IL-12, IL-15, and IL-10 in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. IL-18 treatment was able to increase TLR4 and MR expression by monocytes. The production of TNF-α and IL-10 was also increased by cytokine treatment. However, IL-18 was unable to induce neither IL-12 nor IL-15 production by these cells. Taken together, these results show an important role of IL-18 on the early phase of inflammatory response by promoting the expression of some pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that are important during the microbe recognition phase and by inducing some important cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-10. PMID:25873755

  9. Production of MMP-9 and inflammatory cytokines by Trypanosoma cruzi-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; da Silva, Wellington Seguins; de Castro Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro; da Silva Vasconcelos Sousa, Periela; de Araujo Soares, Renata Oliveira; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a large family of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) dependent endopeptidases implicated in tissue remodeling and chronic inflammation. MMPs also play key roles in the activation of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines produced by many cell types, including lymphocytes, granulocytes, and, in particular, activated macrophages. Their synthesis and secretion appear to be important in a number of physiological processes, including the inflammatory process. Here, we investigated the interaction between human and mouse macrophages with T. cruzi Colombian and Y strains to characterize MMP-9 and cytokine production in this system. Supernatants and total extract of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages were obtained and used to assess MMP-9 profile and inflammatory cytokines. The presence of metalloproteinase activity was determined by zymography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting assays. The effect of cytokines on MMP-9 production in human macrophages was verified by previous incubation of cytokines on these cells in culture, and analyzed by zymography. We detected an increase in MMP-9 production in the culture supernatants of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages. The addition of IL-1β or TNF-α to human macrophage cultures increased MMP-9 production. In contrast, MMP-9 production was down-modulated when human macrophage cultures were treated with IFN-γ or IL-4 before infection. Human macrophages infected with T. cruzi Y or Colombian strains produced increased levels of MMP-9, which was related to the production of cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. PMID:25448360

  10. Diclofenac enhances proinflammatory cytokine-induced phagocytosis of cultured microglia via nitric oxide production

    SciTech Connect

    Kakita, Hiroki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Asai, Hayato; Hussein, Mohamed Hamed; Suzuki, Mieko; Kato, Shin; Saitoh, Shinji; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2013-04-15

    Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is a central nervous system complication with a high mortality rate, which is increased significantly by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac sodium (DCF). In the present study, we investigated the effects of DCF on brain immune cells (i.e. microglia) stimulated with three proinflammatory cytokines, namely tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interferon-γ. Similar to previous findings in astrocytes, all three cytokines induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), as well as NO production, in microglia. The addition of DCF to the culture system augmented iNOS expression and NO production. Immunocytochemical analysis and the phagocytosis assay revealed that cytokine treatment induced morphological changes to and phagocytosis by the microglia. The addition of DCF to the culture system enhanced microglial activation, as well as the phagocytic activity of cytokine-stimulated microglia. Inhibitors of nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibited iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated microglia with or without DCF, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway is one of the main signaling pathways involved. The iNOS inhibitor N{sup G}-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) reduced both cytokine-induced phagocytosis and phagocytosis induced by the combination of cytokines plus DCF. Furthermore, the NO donor sodium nitroprusside induced phagocytosis, indicating that NO production is a key regulator of microglial phagocytosis. In conclusion, DCF acts synergistically with proinflammatory cytokines to increase the production of NO in microglia, leading to phagocytic activity of the activated microglia. These findings, together with previous observations regarding astrocytes, may explain the significant increase in mortality of IAE patients treated with DCF. - Highlights: ► Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is associated with a high mortality rate. ► Hyperimmunization in the brain is believed to be responsible for

  11. Colchicine Acutely Suppresses Local Cardiac Production of Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients With an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Gonzalo J; Robertson, Stacy; Barraclough, Jennifer; Xia, Qiong; Mallat, Ziad; Bursill, Christina; Celermajer, David S; Patel, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, and downstream IL-6 are key inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. Colchicine is believed to block the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic complex responsible for the production of IL-1β and IL-18. In vivo effects of colchicine on cardiac cytokine release have not been previously studied. This study aimed to (1) assess the local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stable coronary artery disease and in controls; and (2) determine whether acute administration of colchicine inhibits their production. Methods and Results Forty ACS patients, 33 with stable coronary artery disease, and 10 controls, were included. ACS and stable coronary artery disease patients were randomized to oral colchicine treatment (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 hour later) or no colchicine, 6 to 24 hours prior to cardiac catheterization. Blood samples from the coronary sinus, aortic root (arterial), and lower right atrium (venous) were collected and tested for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 using ELISA. In ACS patients, coronary sinus levels of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were significantly higher than arterial and venous levels (P=0.017, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Transcoronary (coronary sinus-arterial) gradients for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were highest in ACS patients and lowest in controls (P=0.077, 0.033, and 0.014, respectively). Colchicine administration significantly reduced transcoronary gradients of all 3 cytokines in ACS patients by 40% to 88% (P=0.028, 0.032, and 0.032, for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6, respectively). Conclusions ACS patients exhibit increased local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines. Short-term colchicine administration rapidly and significantly reduces levels of these cytokines. PMID:26304941

  12. Production and function of cytokines in natural and acquired immunity to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, R B; Papadimitriou, J M

    1995-01-01

    Host resistance against infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans is mediated predominantly by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. Antigens of Candida stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine synthesis, and in both humans and mice, these cytokines enhance the candidacidal functions of the phagocytic cells. In systemic candidiasis in mice, cytokine production has been found to be a function of the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. The Th1 subset of these cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon and interleukin-2, is associated with macrophage activation and enhanced resistance against reinfection, whereas the Th2 subset, which produces interleukins-4, -6, and -10, is linked to the development of chronic disease. However, other models have generated divergent data. Mucosal infection generally elicits Th1-type cytokine responses and protection from systemic challenge, and identification of cytokine mRNA present in infected tissues of mice that develop mild or severe lesions does not show pure Th1- or Th2-type responses. Furthermore, antigens of C. albicans, mannan in particular, can induce suppressor cells that modulate both specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral immune responses, and there is an emerging body of evidence that molecular mimicry may affect the efficiency of anti-Candida responses within defined genetic contexts. PMID:8531890

  13. Persistence of local cytokine production in shigellosis in acute and convalescent stages.

    PubMed Central

    Raqib, R; Lindberg, A A; Wretlind, B; Bardhan, P K; Andersson, U; Andersson, J

    1995-01-01

    Shigella infection is accompanied by an intestinal activation of epithelial cells, T cells, and macrophages within the inflamed colonic mucosa. A prospective study was carried out to elucidate the cytokine pattern in Shigella infection linked to development of immunity and eradication of bacteria from the local site and also to correlate the cytokine profile with histological severity. An indirect immunohistochemical technique was used to determine the production and localization of various cytokines at the single-cell level in cryopreserved rectal biopsies from 24 patients with either Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (n = 18) or Shigella flexneri (n = 6) infection. The histopathological profile included presence of chronic inflammatory cells with or without neutrophils and microulcers in the lamina propria, crypt distortion, branching, and less frequently crypt abscesses. Patients had significantly higher (P < 0.005) numbers of cytokine producing cells for all of the cytokines studied, interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-1ra, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IL-10, gamma interferon, TNF-beta, and transforming growth factor beta 1-3, in the biopsies than the healthy controls (n = 13). The cytokine production profile during the study period was dominated by IL-1 beta, transforming growth factor beta 1-3, IL-4, and IL-10. Significantly increased frequencies of cytokine-producing cells (P < 0.05) were observed for IL-1, IL-6, gamma interferon, and TNF-alpha in biopsies with severe inflammation in comparison with those with mild inflammation. During the acute stage of the disease, 20 of 24 patients exhibited acute inflammation in the rectal biopsies and the cellular infiltration was still extensive 30 days after the onset of diarrhea, although the disease was clinically resolved. In accordance with the histological findings, cytokine production was also upregulated during the convalescent phase; there was no significant difference (P

  14. Whole Blood Activation Results in Altered T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production Profiles by Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    An excellent monitor of the immune balance of peripheral circulating cells is to determine their cytokine production patterns in response to stimuli. Using flow cytometry, a positive identification of cytokine producing cells in a mixed culture may be achieved. Recently, the ability to assess cytokine production following a whole-blood activation culture has been described. In this study, whole blood activation was compared to traditional PBMC activation and the individual cytokine secretion patterns for both T cells, T cell subsets and monocytes was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: For T cell cytokine assessment (IFNg/IL-10 and IL-21/L-4) following PMA +ionomycin activation: (1) a Significantly greater percentages of T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 were observed following whole-blood culture and (2) altered T cell cytokine production kinetics were observed by varying whole blood culture times. Four-color analysiS was used to allow assessment of cytokine production by specific T cell subsets. It was found that IFNgamma production was significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8+ T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8- population following five hours of whole blood activation. Conversely, IL-2 and IL-10 production were Significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8- T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8+ population. Monocyte cytokine production was assessed in both culture systems following LPS activation for 24 hours. A three-color flow cytometric was used to assess two cytokines (IL-1a/IL-12 and TNFa/IL-10) in conjunction with CD14. Nearly all monocytes were stimulated to produce IL-1a, IL-12 and TNFa. equally well in both culture systems, however monocyte production of IL-10 was significantly elevated in whole blood culture as compared to PBMC culture. IL-12 producing monocytes appeared to be a distinct subpopulation of the IL-1a producing set, whereas IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes were largely mutually exclusive. IL-10 and TNFa producing

  15. Shikonin Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Satoru; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Hosokawa, Ikuko; Ozaki, Kazumi; Matsuo, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Shikonin, which is derived from Lithospermum erythrorhizon, a herb used in traditional medicine, has long been considered to be a useful treatment for various diseases in traditional oriental medicine. Shikonin has recently been reported to have several pharmacological properties, e.g., it has anti-microbial, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to examine whether shikonin is able to influence the production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and/or chemokine C-C motif ligand (CCL)20, which contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, in human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLC). The production levels of IL-6, IL-8, and CCL20 in HPDLC were determined using an ELISA. Western blot analysis was used to detect nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway activation in HPDLC. Shikonin prevented IL-1β- or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated IL-6, IL-8, and CCL20 production in HPDLC. Moreover, we found that shikonin suppressed the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of kappa B-alpha (IκB-α) in IL-1β- or TNF-α-stimulated HPDLC. These findings suggest that shikonin could have direct beneficial effects against periodontal disease by reducing IL-6, IL-8, and CCL20 production in periodontal lesions. PMID:27072015

  16. Influence of Phthalates on Cytokine Production in Monocytes and Macrophages: A Systematic Review of Experimental Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Juliana Frohnert; Bendtzen, Klaus; Boas, Malene; Frederiksen, Hanne; Nielsen, Claus H.; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Background Phthalates are a group of endocrine disrupting chemicals suspected to influence the immune system. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise the present knowledge on the influence of phthalates on monocyte and macrophage production and secretion of cytokines, an influence which could affect both pro- and anti-inflammatory abilities of these cells. Strategy and Results A systematic search was performed in Medline, Embase and Toxline in June 2013, last updated 3rd of August 2014. Criteria used to select studies were described and published beforehand online on Prospero (http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/NIHR_PROSPERO, registration number CRD42013004236). In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies investigating the influence of phthalates on cytokine mRNA expression and cytokine secretion in animals and humans were included. A total of 11 reports, containing 12 studies, were found eligible for inclusion. In these, a total of four different phthalate diesters, six primary metabolites (phthalate monoesters) and seven different cytokines were investigated. Though all studies varied greatly in study design and species sources, four out of five studies that investigated di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate found an increased tumour necrosis factor-α secretion/production from monocytes or macrophages. A summary of cytokine measurements was not possible since few studies were comparable in study design and due to insufficient reporting of raw data for most of the included studies. Conclusion Results from this review have suggested that at least one phthalate (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) has the ability to enhance tumour necrosis factor-α production/secretion from monocytes/macrophages in vitro, but also observed ex vivo. Influence of other phthalates on other cytokines has only been investigated in few studies. Thus, in vitro studies on primary human monocytes/macrophages as well as more in vivo studies are needed to confirm or dispute these findings. PMID:25811352

  17. The Highway to Hell: A RIP Kinase-Directed Shortcut to Inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Joanne M; Murphy, James M

    2016-07-19

    RIPK1 and RIPK3 are well-known signaling traffic cops in innate immunity. In this issue of Immunity, Degterev and colleagues show that when they blow the whistle on bacterial infection, they quickly point a white-gloved hand down the express route to inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27438758

  18. Sulfasalazine and mesalamine modulate beryllium-specific lymphocyte proliferation and inflammatory cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Dobis, Dave R; Sawyer, Richard T; Gillespie, May M; Newman, Lee S; Maier, Lisa A; Day, Brian J

    2010-10-01

    Occupational exposure to beryllium (Be) results in Be sensitization (BeS) that can progress to pulmonary granulomatous inflammation associated with chronic Be disease (CBD). Be-specific lymphocytes are present in the blood of patients with BeS and in the blood and lungs of patients with CBD. Sulfasalazine and its active metabolite, mesalamine, are clinically used to ameliorate chronic inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease. We tested whether sulfasalazine or mesalamine could decrease Be-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation in subjects with CBD and BeS and Be-induced cytokine production in CBD bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells. CBD (n = 25), BeS (n = 12) and healthy normal control (n = 6) subjects were enrolled and ex vivo proliferation and cytokine production were assessed in the presence of Be and sulfasalazine or mesalamine. Be-stimulated PBMC proliferation was inhibited by treatment with either sulfasalazine or mesalamine. Be-stimulated CBD BAL cell IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokine production was decreased by treatment with sulfasalazine or mesalamine. Our data suggest that both sulfasalazine and mesalamine interfere with Be-stimulated PBMC proliferation in CBD and BeS and dampens Be-stimulated CBD BAL cell proinflammatory cytokine production. These studies demonstrate that sulfasalazine and mesalamine can disrupt inflammatory pathways critical to the pathogenesis of chronic granulomatous inflammation in CBD, and may serve as novel therapy for human granulomatous lung diseases. PMID:19901345

  19. Blueberries inhibit proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and IL-6 production in macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) have been reported to attenuate atherosclerosis in apoE deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, the effect of BB on proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages was investigated. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G diet (...

  20. Investigation of Macrophage Differentiation and Cytokine Production in an Undergraduate Immunology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkes, Charlotte; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a semester-long laboratory project for an undergraduate immunology course in which students study multiple aspects of macrophage biology including differentiation from progenitors in the bone marrow, activation upon stimulation with microbial ligands, expression of cell surface markers, and modulation of cytokine production. In…

  1. Chemically Modified N-Acylated Hyaluronan Fragments Modulate Proinflammatory Cytokine Production by Stimulated Human Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Babasola, Oladunni; Rees-Milton, Karen J.; Bebe, Siziwe; Wang, Jiaxi; Anastassiades, Tassos P.

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular mass hyaluronans are known to induce inflammation. To determine the role of the acetyl groups of low molecular mass hyaluronan in stimulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines, partial N-deacetylation was carried out by hydrazinolysis. This resulted in 19.7 ± 3.5% free NH2 functional groups, which were then acylated by reacting with an acyl anhydride, including acetic anhydride. Hydrazinolysis resulted in bond cleavage of the hyaluronan chain causing a reduction of the molecular mass to 30–214 kDa. The total NH2 and N-acetyl moieties in the reacetylated hyaluronan were 0% and 98.7 ± 1.5% respectively, whereas for butyrylated hyaluronan, the total NH2, N-acetyl, and N-butyryl moieties were 0, 82.2 ± 4.6, and 22.7 ± 3.8%, respectively, based on 1H NMR. We studied the effect of these polymers on cytokine production by cultured human macrophages (THP-1 cells). The reacetylated hyaluronan stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production to levels similar to LPS, whereas partially deacetylated hyaluronan had no stimulatory effect, indicating the critical role of the N-acetyl groups in the stimulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Butyrylated hyaluronan significantly reduced the stimulatory effect on cytokine production by the reacetylated hyaluronan or LPS but had no stimulatory effect of its own. The other partially N-acylated hyaluronan derivatives tested showed smaller stimulatory effects than reacetylated hyaluronan. Antibody and antagonist experiments suggest that the acetylated and partially butyrylated lower molecular mass hyaluronans exert their effects through the TLR-4 receptor system. Selectively N-butyrylated lower molecular mass hyaluronan shows promise as an example of a novel semisynthetic anti-inflammatory molecule. PMID:25053413

  2. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Harbort, C. J.; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M.; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  3. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Harbort, C J; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Amulic, Borko

    2015-12-24

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. PMID:26491069

  4. The Role of Intracellular Receptor NODs for Cytokine Production by Macrophages Infected with Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Jin

    2011-01-01

    The nucleotide-oligomerization domain (NOD) proteins are members of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, which are intracellular and cytoplasmic receptors. We analyzed the role of NODs for cytokine production by macrophages infected with intracellular pathogen M. leprae, the causative agent of leprosy. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α was inhibited in the presence of cytochalasin D, an agent blocking phagocytosis, suggesting that intracellular signaling was, partially, required for macrophage activation to M. leprae infection. Next, we investigated the role of NOD1 and NOD2 proteins on NF-κB activation and cytokine expression. Treatment with M. leprae significantly increased NF-κB activation and expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in NOD1- and NOD2-transfected cells. Interestingly, their activation and expression were inhibited by cytochalasin D, suggesting that stimulation of NOD proteins may be associated with the enhancement of cytokine production in host to M. leprae. PMID:22346786

  5. Mechanisms associated with defective TH1 cytokine production in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, N; Yano, N; Eylar, E; Yamamura, Y

    1997-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative changes in immune functions of different T-cell subsets associated with infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were analyzed by flow cytometric assessment of intracytoplasmic cytokines. The T(H)1 cytokines, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), were produced by both CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets. When normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were activated in culture, both cytokines were produced predominantly by CD4 (CD4) cell and only a minor fraction of normal CD8 cells produced these cytokines. In the cultures of PBMC from HIV-1-infected individuals (HIV+PBMC), more HIV+CD8 cells produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. Production of IFN-gamma by HIV+CD4 cells was markedly reduced, while IL-2nd tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by HIV+CD4 remained relatively intact until the disease progressed further. Normal CD4 cells which were isolated by using a cell sorter, FACSCalibur was still able to produce IL-2 and TNF-alpha. But for full production of IFN-gamma, normal CD4 required some accessory cells, the identity of which could not yet be established. PMID:9449527

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cytokine production and attenuates disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Frieda A; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Miljko, Sanda; Grazio, Simeon; Sokolovic, Sekib; Schuurman, P Richard; Mehta, Ashesh D; Levine, Yaakov A; Faltys, Michael; Zitnik, Ralph; Tracey, Kevin J; Tak, Paul P

    2016-07-19

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a heterogeneous, prevalent, chronic autoimmune disease characterized by painful swollen joints and significant disabilities. Symptomatic relief can be achieved in up to 50% of patients using biological agents that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or other mechanisms of action, but there are no universally effective therapies. Recent advances in basic and preclinical science reveal that reflex neural circuits inhibit the production of cytokines and inflammation in animal models. One well-characterized cytokine-inhibiting mechanism, termed the "inflammatory reflex," is dependent upon vagus nerve signals that inhibit cytokine production and attenuate experimental arthritis severity in mice and rats. It previously was unknown whether directly stimulating the inflammatory reflex in humans inhibits TNF production. Here we show that an implantable vagus nerve-stimulating device in epilepsy patients inhibits peripheral blood production of TNF, IL-1β, and IL-6. Vagus nerve stimulation (up to four times daily) in RA patients significantly inhibited TNF production for up to 84 d. Moreover, RA disease severity, as measured by standardized clinical composite scores, improved significantly. Together, these results establish that vagus nerve stimulation targeting the inflammatory reflex modulates TNF production and reduces inflammation in humans. These findings suggest that it is possible to use mechanism-based neuromodulating devices in the experimental therapy of RA and possibly other autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:27382171

  7. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cytokine production and attenuates disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Frieda A.; Chavan, Sangeeta S.; Miljko, Sanda; Grazio, Simeon; Sokolovic, Sekib; Schuurman, P. Richard; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Levine, Yaakov A.; Faltys, Michael; Zitnik, Ralph; Tracey, Kevin J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a heterogeneous, prevalent, chronic autoimmune disease characterized by painful swollen joints and significant disabilities. Symptomatic relief can be achieved in up to 50% of patients using biological agents that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or other mechanisms of action, but there are no universally effective therapies. Recent advances in basic and preclinical science reveal that reflex neural circuits inhibit the production of cytokines and inflammation in animal models. One well-characterized cytokine-inhibiting mechanism, termed the “inflammatory reflex,” is dependent upon vagus nerve signals that inhibit cytokine production and attenuate experimental arthritis severity in mice and rats. It previously was unknown whether directly stimulating the inflammatory reflex in humans inhibits TNF production. Here we show that an implantable vagus nerve-stimulating device in epilepsy patients inhibits peripheral blood production of TNF, IL-1β, and IL-6. Vagus nerve stimulation (up to four times daily) in RA patients significantly inhibited TNF production for up to 84 d. Moreover, RA disease severity, as measured by standardized clinical composite scores, improved significantly. Together, these results establish that vagus nerve stimulation targeting the inflammatory reflex modulates TNF production and reduces inflammation in humans. These findings suggest that it is possible to use mechanism-based neuromodulating devices in the experimental therapy of RA and possibly other autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. PMID:27382171

  8. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells express functional NKp30 receptor inducing type 2 cytokine production1

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Maryam; Xue, Luzheng; Jolin, Helen; Hardman, Clare; Cousins, David J.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.; Ogg, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) are important in effector functions for eliciting allergic inflammation, parasite defence, epithelial repair and lipid homeostasis. ILC2 lack rearranged antigen-specific receptors, and while many soluble factors such as cytokines and lipid mediators can influence ILC2, direct interaction of these cells with microenvironment and other cells has been less explored. Natural cytotoxicity receptors are expressed by subsets of ILC1 and ILC3 and thought to be important for their effector function, but have not been shown to be expressed by ILC2. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression and functional properties of the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp30 on human group 2 innate lymphoid cells. A subset of ex vivo and cultured ILC2 express NKp30 that upon interaction with its cognate activatory ligand B7-H6 induces rapid production of type 2 cytokines. This interaction can be blocked by NKp30 blocking antibody and an inhibitory ligand, galectin-3. Higher expression of B7-H6 was observed in lesional skin biopsies of patients with atopic dermatitis; and incubation of keratinocytes with pro-inflammatory and type 2 cytokines upregulated B7-H6 leading to increased ILC2 cytokine production. NKp30-B7-H6 interaction is a novel cell contact mechanism that mediates activation of ILC2 and identifies a potential target for the development of novel therapeutics for atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases. PMID:26582946

  9. Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Express Functional NKp30 Receptor Inducing Type 2 Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Maryam; Xue, Luzheng; Jolin, Helen; Hardman, Clare; Cousins, David J; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Ogg, Graham S

    2016-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) are important in effector functions for eliciting allergic inflammation, parasite defense, epithelial repair, and lipid homeostasis. ILC2 lack rearranged Ag-specific receptors, and although many soluble factors such as cytokines and lipid mediators can influence ILC2, direct interaction of these cells with the microenvironment and other cells has been less explored. Natural cytotoxicity receptors are expressed by subsets of group 1 ILC and group 3 ILC and thought to be important for their effector function, but they have not been shown to be expressed by ILC2. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression and functional properties of the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp30 on human ILC2. A subset of ex vivo and cultured ILC2 express NKp30 that upon interaction with its cognate activatory ligand B7-H6 induces rapid production of type 2 cytokines. This interaction can be blocked by NKp30 blocking Ab and an inhibitory ligand, galectin-3. Higher expression of B7-H6 was observed in lesional skin biopsies of patients with atopic dermatitis, and incubation of keratinocytes with proinflammatory and type 2 cytokines upregulated B7-H6, leading to increased ILC2 cytokine production. NKp30-B7-H6 interaction is a novel cell contact mechanism that mediates activation of ILC2 and identifies a potential target for the development of novel therapeutics for atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases. PMID:26582946

  10. Inhaled house dust mite induces pulmonary T helper 2 cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, L. G.; Causton, B.; Murdoch, J. R.; Mathie, S. A.; O’Donnell, V.; Thomas, C. P.; Priest, F. M.; Quint, D. J.; Lloyd, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhaled house dust mite (HDM) results in T-helper (TH) 2 type pathology in unsensitized mice, in conjunction with airway hyperreactivity and airway remodelling. However, the pulmonary cytokine and chemokine profile has not been reported. Methods We have performed a time course analysis of the characteristic molecular mediators and cellular influx in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung in order to define the pulmonary inflammatory response to inhaled HDM extract. Mice were exposed five times a week to soluble HDM extract for 3 weeks. Lung function was measured in groups of mice at intervals following the final HDM challenge. Recruitment of inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediator production was then assessed in BAL and lungs of individual mice. Results We found that Th2 cytokines were significantly increased in BAL and lung after HDM challenge from as early as 2 h post-final challenge. The levels of cytokines and chemokines correlated with the influx of eosinophils and Th2 cells to the different compartments of the lung. However, the production of key cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 preceded the increase in airways resistance. Conclusion Inhaled HDM challenge induces a classical Th2 inflammatory mediator profile in the BAL and lung. These data are important for studies determining the efficacy of novel treatment strategies for allergic airways disease. PMID:19545261

  11. T-cell immunity and cytokine production in cosmonauts after long-duration space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morukov, B.; Rykova, M.; Antropova, E.; Berendeeva, T.; Ponomaryov, S.; Larina, I.

    2011-04-01

    Long-duration spaceflight effects on T-cell immunity and cytokine production were studied in 12 Russian cosmonauts flown onto the International Space Station. Specific assays were performed before launch and after landing and included analysis of peripheral leukocyte distribution, analysis of T-cell phenotype, expression of activation markers, apoptosis, proliferation of T cells in response to a mitogen, concentrations of cytokines in supernatants of cell cultures. Statistically significant increase was observed in leukocytes', lymphocytes', monocytes' and granulocytes' total number, increase in percentage and absolutely number of CD3 +CD4 +-cells, CD4 +CD45RA +-cells and CD4 +CD45RA +/CD4 +CD45RО + ratio, CD4 +CD25 +Bright regulatory cells ( p<0,05) in peripheral blood after landing. T-lymphocytes' capacity to present CD69 and CD25 on its own surfaces was increased for the majority of crewmembers. Analysis of T-cell response to PHA-stimulation in vitro revealed there were some trends toward reduced proliferation of stimulated T-lymphocytes. There was an apparent post flight decrease in secreted IFN-g for the majority of crewmembers and in most instances there was elevation in secreted IL-10. It revealed depression of IFN-g/IL-10 ratio after flight. Correlation analysis according to Spearman's rank correlation test established significant positive correlations ( p<0.05) between cytokine production and T-cell activation (CD25+, CD38+) and negative correlation ( p<0.05) between cytokine production and number of bulk memory CD4+T-cells (CD45RO+). Thus, these results suggest that T-cell dysfunction can be conditioned by cytokine dysbalance and could lead to development of disease after long-duration space flights.

  12. Inhibition of Th2 cytokine production in T cells by monascin via PPAR-γ activation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Lee, Bao-Hong; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2013-08-28

    Yellow pigment monascin (MS) is a secondary metabolite isolated from Monascus -fermented products and has numerous physiological activities. However, the potential use of MS for immunomodulation remains unclear. We showed that MS and the synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ ligand rosiglitazone (RG) significantly inhibited the production of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, in PMA/ionomycin-activated mouse EL-4 T cells. Moreover, we showed that this was due to cellular PPAR-γ translocation. These results indicate that MS and RG promote PPAR-γ-DNA interactions and suggest that the regulatory effects of MS and RG on Th2 cytokine production could be abolished with PPAR-γ antagonist treatment. MS and RG also suppressed Th2 transcription factor translocation (e.g., GATA-3 and nuclear factor of activated T cells) by preventing the phosphorylation of protein kinase C and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6. PMID:23848565

  13. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates cytokine production through the modulation of chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    RIOS, ESTER C.S.; SZCZESNY, BARTOSZ; SORIANO, FRANCISCO G.; OLAH, GABOR; SZABO, CSABA

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous biological mediator, which regulates, among others, the oxidative balance of cells under normal physiological conditions, as well as in various diseases. Several previous studies have reported that H2S attenuates inflammatory mediator production. In this study, we investigated the role of H2S in chromatin modulation in an in vitro model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and evaluated its effects on inflammatory cytokine production. Tamm-Horsfall protein 1 (THP-1) differentiated macrophages were pre-treated with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (an H2S donor) at 0.01, 0.1, 0.5 or 1 mM for 30 min. To stimulate cytokine production, the cells were challenged with bacterial LPS (1 μg/ml) for 1, 4, 8 or 24 h. Histone H3 acetylation was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), cytokine production was measured by ELISA and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity was analyzed using a standard biochemical assay. H2S inhibited the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a concentration-dependent manner; it was most effective at the two highest concentrations used. This effect was associated with a decrease in histone H3 acetylation at the IL-6 and TNF-α promoters in the cells exposed to H2S or H2S + LPS. The findings of the present study suggest that H2S suppresses histone acetylation, which, in turn, inhibits chromatin openness, leading to a decrease in the gene transcription of various pro-inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, this mechanism may contribute to the previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects of H2S and various H2S donors. PMID:25873160

  14. FK506 inhibition of histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Sengoku, T; Kishi, S; Sakuma, S; Ohkubo, Y; Goto, T

    2000-03-01

    Histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils are thought to be closely involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Some reports show that FK506 (tacrolimus hydrate) inhibited histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils. However, as the effects of FK506 has not been compared with those of clinically used drugs in those reports, the clinical relevancy of FK506 inhibition remained unclear. In this paper, we compared the actions of FK506 with those of steroids or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) which has been clinically used. FK506 inhibited histamine release by Brown-Norway rat peritoneal mast cells more potently than steroids and especially DSCG. FK506 also inhibited histamine release by a mast rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cell line and human peripheral blood basophils, whereas steroids failed to inhibit histamine release by human basophils. FK506 as well as steroids inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-4 production by RBL-1 cells. FK506 was therefore more effective than steroids and DSCG in inhibiting histamine release, and it also had the ability of inhibiting cytokine production by mast cells as steroids do. We concluded that FK506 might regulate allergic diseases via these actions, judging from the viewpoint of clinical relevancy. PMID:10685002

  15. Evaluation of proliferation and cytokines production by mitogen-stimulated bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Norian, Reza; Delirezh, Nowruz; Azadmehr, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate lymphocyte blastogenic and cytokine production by bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and concanavalin A (Con A) mitogens, by using tetrazolium salt and ELISA tests, respectively. The results presented that Interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ production in response to PWM mitogens was the highest and Con A the lowest amount and the median values of three mitogens were in the following order: PWM > PHA > Con A > cell control. In the case of IL-6, the production of this cytokine was the same amount for PWM and Con A and a lower amount for PHA stimulation. The results of this study not only showed a normal range for the production of these cytokines from PBMCs that were affected by mitogens, but it demonstrated that the bovine immune system at 2.5 to 3 months was post-natally matured enough to mount an effective immune response to mitogens as well as specific antigens. PMID:26973760

  16. Triggering Dectin-1-Pathway Alone Is Not Sufficient to Induce Cytokine Production by Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Walachowski, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    β-glucans (BG) are abundant polysaccharides of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall (Sc CW), an industry byproduct. They have immuno-stimulatory properties upon engagement of dectin-1 (Clec7a), their main receptor on particular immune cells, and they actually become of great interest because of their preventive or therapeutic potentials. Zymosan, a crude extract of Sc CW was studied as a prototypic BG, despite its miscellaneous PAMPs content. Here, we examined the response of murine wild type or Clec7a-/- bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to products with increasing BG content (15, 65 or 75%) and compared their effects with those of other dectin-1 ligands. The enrichment process removed TLR ligands while preserving dectin-1 activity. The most enriched extracts have very low NFκB activity and triggered low amounts of cytokine production in contrast with crude products like zymosan and BG15. Furthermore, MyD88-/- BMDM did not produce TNFα in response to crude Sc CW extracts, whereas their response to BG-enriched extracts was unaffected, suggesting that BG alone are not able to initiate cytokine secretion. Although Sc CW-derived BG stimulated the late and strong expression of Csf2 in a dectin-1-dependent manner, they remain poor inducers of chemokine and cytokine production in murine macrophages. PMID:26840954

  17. Evaluation of proliferation and cytokines production by mitogen-stimulated bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Norian, Reza; Delirezh, Nowruz; Azadmehr, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate lymphocyte blastogenic and cytokine production by bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and concanavalin A (Con A) mitogens, by using tetrazolium salt and ELISA tests, respectively. The results presented that Interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ production in response to PWM mitogens was the highest and Con A the lowest amount and the median values of three mitogens were in the following order: PWM > PHA > Con A > cell control. In the case of IL-6, the production of this cytokine was the same amount for PWM and Con A and a lower amount for PHA stimulation. The results of this study not only showed a normal range for the production of these cytokines from PBMCs that were affected by mitogens, but it demonstrated that the bovine immune system at 2.5 to 3 months was post-natally matured enough to mount an effective immune response to mitogens as well as specific antigens. PMID:26973760

  18. Activation of natural killer cells and cytokine production in man by bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Wybran, J; Libin, M; Schandene, L

    1989-01-01

    Broncho-Vaxon (OM-85 BV) is a bacterial extract of eight bacterias usually involved in the respiratory tract infections. Since Broncho-Vaxom is clinically active in decreasing the incidence of such infections, its immunological effect was investigated, in vitro, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The experimental data indicate that Broncho-Vaxom can modulate various immune functions. It was shown, using a radioimmunoassay for these cytokines, that Broncho-Vaxom will spontaneously enhance TNF alpha and IL-2 production whereas it has no action on IF gamma production. However, when the PBMC are stimulated with PHA, an increased production for IF gamma, TNF alpha and IL-2 was observed suggesting that, under appropriate conditions, Broncho-Vaxom enhances the production of these cytokines. In other experiments, Broncho-Vaxom was shown to markedly increase the natural killer activity of PBMC. All these results demonstrate that Broncho-Vaxom is an immunomodulator affecting multiple immunological mechanisms including the activation of natural killer cells, of monocytes and of T cells through direct mechanisms or through the cytokine cascade. PMID:2503554

  19. Potent Inhibitors of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Production Produced by a Marine-Derived Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Strangman, Wendy K.; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Broide, David; Jensen, Paul R.; Fenical, William

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines produced through the Antigen Presenting Cell (APC)–T-cell interaction play a key role in the activation of the allergic asthmatic response. Evaluating small molecules that inhibit the production of these pro-inflammatory proteins is therefore important for the discovery of novel chemical structures with potential anti-asthma activity. We adapted a mouse splenocyte cytokine assay to screen a library of 2,500 marine microbial extracts for their ability to inhibit TH2 cytokine release and identified potent activity in a marine-derived strain CNQ431, identified as a Streptomyces species. Bioactivity guided fractionation of the organic extract of this strain led to the isolation of ten new 9-membered bis-lactones, splenocins A-J (1–10). The new compounds display potent biological activities, comparable to that of the corticosteroid dexamethasone, with IC50 values from 2–50 nanomolar in the splenocyte cytokine assay. This study provides the foundation for the optimization of these potent anti-inflammatory compounds for development in the treatment of asthma. PMID:19323483

  20. Selective modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced death and cytokine production by various muramyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Parant, M A; Pouillart, P; Le Contel, C; Parant, F J; Chedid, L A; Bahr, G M

    1995-01-01

    Pretreatment of animals with the adjuvant muramyl dipeptide enhances both the production of circulating tumor necrosis factor and the sensitivity to the lethal effect of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. The present study examined the capacity of various adjuvant muramyl dipeptide derivatives to potentiate responsiveness to LPS administration. Cytokine levels in serum were determined at various time intervals after LPS administration by bioassays and immunoassays; the cytokines examined were tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon. The time course of cytokine response was not modified by the pretreatment, but most of the levels were strongly enhanced. However, of the four compounds which were found to be potent priming agents, only two caused an increased sensitivity to LPS lethality, showing that elevated titers of cytokines in serum were not correlated with host sensitization. Interestingly, previous studies have shown that these two compounds also display neurobiological properties, implying a possible role of the central nervous system in LPS lethality. However, two hydrophilic derivatives with low activity as priming agents were capable of decreasing the toxicity of LPS when given after the challenge in galactosamine-sensitized mice. These results illustrate the diversity of responses elicited by immunological priming. They raise unanswered questions on the importance of endogenous mediators in the pathophysiological alterations during toxic shock. PMID:7806345

  1. Changes in cytokine production associated with acquired immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, M S M; Akanmori, B D; Waterfall, M; Riley, E M

    2001-01-01

    Individuals living in malaria-endemic areas eventually develop clinical immunity to Plasmodium falciparum. That is, they are able to limit blood parasite densities to extremely low levels and fail to show symptoms of infection. As the clinical symptoms of malaria infection are mediated in part by pro-inflammatory cytokines it is not clear whether the acquisition of clinical immunity is due simply to the development of antiparasitic mechanisms or whether the ability to regulate inflammatory cytokine production is also involved. We hypothesize that there is a correlation between risk of developing clinical malaria and the tendency to produce high levels of proinflammatory cytokines in response to malaria infection. In order to test this hypothesis, we have compared the ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from malaria-naive and malaria-exposed adult donors to proliferate and to secrete IFN-γ in response to P. falciparum schizont extract (PfSE). In order to determine how PfSE-induced IFN-γ production is regulated, we have also measured production of IL-12p40 and IL-10 from PfSE-stimulated PBMC and investigated the role of neutralizing antibody to IL-12 in modulating IFN-γ production. We find that cells from naive donors produce moderate amounts of IFN-γ in response to PfSE and that IFN-γ production is strongly IL-12 dependent. Cells from malaria-exposed donors living in an area of low malaria endemicity produce much higher levels of IFN-γ and this response is also at least partially IL-12 dependent. In complete contrast, cells from donors living in an area of very high endemicity produce minimal amounts of IFN-γ. No significant differences were detected between the groups in IL-10 production, suggesting that this cytokine does not play a major role in regulating malaria-induced IFN-γ production. The data from this study thus strongly support the hypothesis that down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine production may be a component of acquired clinical

  2. Kinetic study of cytokines production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to Brucella DNA.

    PubMed

    Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Ardestani, Sussan K; Kariminia, Amina; Ziaee, Abed-Ali; Torkabadi, Ebrahim; Ebrahimi, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    In spite of reports on cytokines induction by the Brucella DNA in murine model, there is no comparison between pathogenic and appropriate vaccine strains in human. We investigated the cytokines profile of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) induced by DNA extracted from pathogenic isolates of Brucella melitensis and B. abortus as well as Rev1 and S19; the appropriate vaccine strains. It was observed that despite differential induction of Interleukin(IL)-12 and IL-10 production, identical IL-12/IL-10 concentration ratio was obtained by all Brucella strains DNAs that was 2 after 24 h and 4 after 5 days of incubation. In addition, IL-2 and Interferon(IFN)-gamma production were profoundly increased compared to the medium at day 3 and 5 respectively but IFN-alpha was not induced. Therefore, Brucella strains DNAs are Th1 inducing component with similar pattern in human PBMCs. PMID:17008080

  3. Activation of natural killer cells and cytokine production in humans by bacterial extracts (OM-85 BV).

    PubMed

    Wybran, J; Libin, M; Schandene, L

    1990-01-01

    The influence of Broncho-Vaxom (BV) on different immune parameters was investigated in vitro on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). It was found that BV enhances the natural killer (NK) activity of PBMC and increases their spontaneous and phytohemagglutin (PHA)-induced production of tumor-necrosis factor--alpha and interleukin-2 as well as the PHA-stimulated production of interferon-gamma. These immunostimulating actions of BV on NK activity and cytokine production can contribute to the understanding of the enhancement of the body's defense mechanisms against respiratory tract infections. PMID:2117183

  4. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Claudia A.; Fievez, Laurence; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Bureau, Fabrice; Vanbever, Rita

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol decreased NF-{kappa}B activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (I{kappa}B{alpha}) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  5. Herbal medicine IMOD suppresses LPS-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines in human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Saeedeh; Drewniak, Agata; Sarrami-Forooshani, Ramin; Kaptein, Tanja M.; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional medicines that stimulate or modulate the immune system can be used as innovative approaches to treat immunological diseases. The herbal medicine IMOD has been shown to strongly modulate immune responses in several animal studies as well as in clinical trials. However, little is known about the mechanisms of IMOD to modulate immunity. Here we have investigated whether IMOD modulates the immunological function of human dendritic cells (DCs). IMOD alone did not induce DC maturation nor production of cytokines. Notably, IMOD decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12 p70, and TNFα by LPS-activated DCs at both mRNA and protein levels in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, treatment with IMOD did not affect LPS induced-production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, IMOD inhibited T cell activation/proliferation by LPS-treated DCs and skewed T-cells responses toward the T helper type 2 polarization. These data strongly indicate that IMOD has a potent immunomodulatory ability that affects TLR signaling and thereby modulates DC function. Insight into the immunomodulatory effect of herbal medicine IMOD may provide innovative strategies to affect the immune system and to help combat various diseases. PMID:25870561

  6. A miRNA upregulated in asthma airway T cells promotes TH2 cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Laura J.; Patel, Sana; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Choy, David F.; Brightbill, Hans D.; Ren, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Pua, Heather H.; Baumjohann, Dirk; Montoya, Misty M.; Panduro, Marisella; Remedios, Kelly A.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Fahy, John V.; Arron, Joseph R.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Ansel., Karl M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) exert powerful effects on immune function by tuning networks of target genes that orchestrate cell behavior. We sought to uncover miRNAs and miRNA-regulated pathways that control the TH2 responses that drive pathogenic inflammation in asthma. Profiling miRNA expression in human airway-infiltrating T cells revealed miR-19a elevation in asthma. Modulating miR-19 activity altered TH2 cytokine production in both human and mouse T cells, and TH2 cell responses were markedly impaired in cells lacking the entire miR-17∼92 cluster. miR-19 promotes TH2 cytokine production and amplifies PI(3)K, JAK-STAT, and NF-κB signaling by direct targeting of PTEN, SOCS1, and A20. Thus, miR-19a up regulation in asthma may be an indicator and a cause of increased TH2 cytokine production in the airways. PMID:25362490

  7. Photodynamic therapy induced production of cytokines by latent Epstein Barr virus infected epithelial tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koon, H. K.; Lo, K. W.; Lung, M. L.; Chang, C. K. C.; Wong, R. N. S.; Mak, N. K.

    2007-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a method to treat cancer or non-cancer diseases by activation of the light-sensitive photosensitizers. Epstein Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the development of certain cancers such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and B cell lymphoma. This study aims to examine the effects of EBV infection on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cells after the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM PDT treatment. Epithelial tumor cell lines HONE-1 and latent EBV-infected HONE-1 (EBV-HONE-1) cells were used in this study. Cells were treated with the photosensitizer Zn-BC-AM for 24 hours before light irradiation. RT-PCR and quantitative ELISA methods were used for the evaluation of mRNA expression and production of cytokines, respectively. Results show that Zn-BC-AM PDT increases the production of IL-1a and IL-1b in EBV-HONE-1. Over a 10-fold increase in the production of IL-6 was observed in the culture supernatant of Zn-BC-AM PDT-treated HONE-1 cells. PDT-induced IL-6 production was observed in HONE-1 cells. EBV-HONE-1 has a higher background level of IL-8 production than the HONE-1. The production of IL-8 was suppressed in EBV-HONE-1cells after Zn-BC-AM PDT. Our results indicate that the response of HONE-1 cells to Zn-BC-AM PDT depends on the presence of latent EBV infection. Since IL-8 is a cytokine with angiogenic activity, Zn-BC-AM PDT may exert an anti-angiogenic effect through the suppression of IL-8 production by the EBV-infected cells.

  8. Immunomodulatory capacity of fungal proteins on the cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jeurink, Prescilla V; Noguera, Cristina Lull; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wichers, Harry J

    2008-08-01

    Immunomodulation by fungal compounds can be determined by the capacity of the compounds to influence the cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC). These activities include mitogenicity, stimulation and activation of immune effector cells. Eight mushroom strains (Agaricus blazei, Coprinus comatus, Flammulina velutipes, Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa, Volvariella volvacea, Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus ostreatus) were tested for the immunomodulating activity of the isolated protein fractions and polysaccharides fractions present in mycelia and culture liquid. The fungal proteins and polysaccharides have been investigated for their in vitro effect on the cytokine profile (IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-alpha) of unstimulated or hPBMC stimulated with the polyclonal stimulations PMA/Ca-I, ConA or LPS. In addition to their influence on the cytokine profile, the hemagglutination activity of the fungal proteins on rabbit red blood cells was determined. Proteins from V. volvacea and G. lucidum showed immunomodulating activity without the presence of any mitogen, however, neither of them decreased the production of IL-4 and IFN-gamma in combination with a stimulus. All used stimuli resulted in an induction of IL-12 in the presence of the protein extracts, suggesting a direct effect on monocytes. This effect might lead to the indirect immunomodulation of T cell activation and cytokine production. In addition, both protein extracts showed more hemagglutination activity after trypsin treatment of the rabbit red blood cells, indicating the presence of carbohydrate-binding proteins, like lectins and FIPs. In conclusion, the protein extracts of V. volvacea and G. lucidum contain immunomodulating activity by acting directly on monocytes and thereby modulating T cell activation. Further purification of the fungal extracts is needed to clarify whether there are FIPs or lectins present that are responsible for this immunomodulating activity

  9. Docosahexaenoic diet supplementation, exercise and temperature affect cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Batle, Juan Miguel; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise induces changes in peripheral mononuclear cells' (PBMCs) capabilities to produce cytokines. The aim was to investigate the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) diet supplementation on cytokine production, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PBMCs after exercise, and the in vitro influence of temperature. Fifteen male soccer players were randomly assigned to a placebo or an experimental group. The experimental group consumed an almond-based beverage enriched with DHA (1.16 g DHA/day) for 8 weeks, whereas the placebo group consumed a similar non-enriched beverage. Blood samples were taken before and after the nutritional intervention in basal conditions and 2 h after acute exercise. Nutritional intervention significantly increased the DHA content in erythrocytes only in experimental group (from 34 ± 3.6 to 43 ± 3.6 nmols DHA/10(9) erythrocytes). Exercise significantly increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in PBMCs but only in the placebo group (203 %). Exercise also significantly increased IL6, IL8, VEGF, INFγ, TNFα, IL1α, IL1β, MCP1, and EGG production rates by LPS-stimulated PBMCs, and this response was attenuated by DHA supplementation. Temperature but not DHA also affected the pattern of cytokine production increasing IL6, IL8, IL1β, and MCP1 synthesis. The higher change was evidenced in IL1β increasing the production rate at 39.5 °C from 3.19 ± 0.77 to 22.4 ± 6.1 pg/h 10(6) PBMC in placebo and from 2.36 ± 0.11 to 10.6 ± 0.38 pg/h 10(6) PBMC in the supplemented group. The profile of affected cytokines differs between temperature and exercise, suggesting a different PBMC activation pathway. DHA diet supplementation only attenuated cytokine production after exercise and not that induced by temperature. PMID:27139422

  10. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Shiby M.; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  11. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Shiby M; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  12. Cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of women with a history of preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Morgan R; Faux, David S; Hamblin, Steven D; Silver, Robert M; Esplin, M Sean

    2010-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha at the maternal-fetal interface. Previous studies have suggested that women with a history of preterm birth produce aberrantly strong inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However many intrauterine infections in women are associated with pathogens including Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis and Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus) that contain pro-inflammatory factors other than LPS. We evaluated whether peripheral blood leukocytes from women with a history of preterm birth produce elevated amounts of TNFalpha upon stimulation with pathogens associated with preterm birth and if pre-treatment with aspirin, an anti-inflammatory medication, decreases the ex vivo production of this cytokine. Heat-killed bacteria elicited increased TNFalpha production from leukocytes in a dose-dependent manner, but no differences in TNFalpha production between leukocytes from women with preterm birth and control women with term birth were detected. In women who consumed aspirin each day for one week, TNFalpha production was increased in leukocytes from control women stimulated with Escherichia coli and U. urealyticum, but was reduced or unchanged in leukocytes from women with preterm birth. Similar trends were observed for a subset of samples stimulated with U. urealyticum and assayed for IL-6, IL-10, IL-1beta and TNFalpha by bead array. We conclude that leukocytes from women with a history of preterm birth do not have elevated pro-inflammatory responses to pathogens, and that reproductive history is associated with different effects of aspirin on pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:20005575

  13. Notch signaling enhances FcεRI-mediated cytokine production by mast cells through direct and indirect mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Yagita, Hideo; Hara, Mutsuko; Motomura, Yasutaka; Kubo, Masato; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2015-05-01

    Th2-type cytokines and TNF-α secreted by activated mast cells upon cross-linking of FcεRI contribute to the development and maintenance of Th2 immunity to parasites and allergens. We have previously shown that cytokine secretion by mouse mast cells is enhanced by signaling through Notch receptors. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Notch signaling enhances mast cell cytokine production induced by FcεRI cross-linking. FcεRI-mediated production of cytokines, particularly IL-4, was significantly enhanced in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells by priming with Notch ligands. Western blot analysis showed that Notch signaling augmented and prolonged FcεRI-mediated phosphorylation of MAPKs, mainly JNK and p38 MAPK, through suppression of the expression of SHIP-1, a master negative regulator of FcεRI signaling, resulting in the enhanced production of multiple cytokines. The enhancing effect of Notch ligand priming on multiple cytokine production was abolished by knockdown of Notch2, but not Notch1, and FcεRI-mediated production of multiple cytokines was enhanced by retroviral transduction with the intracellular domain of Notch2. However, only IL-4 production was enhanced by both Notch1 and Notch2. The enhancing effect of Notch signaling on IL-4 production was lost in bone marrow-derived mast cells from mice lacking conserved noncoding sequence 2, which is located at the distal 3' element of the Il4 gene locus and contains Notch effector RBP-J binding sites. These results indicate that Notch2 signaling indirectly enhances the FcεRI-mediated production of multiple cytokines, and both Notch1 and Notch2 signaling directly enhances IL-4 production through the noncoding sequence 2 enhancer of the Il4 gene. PMID:25821223

  14. Whole Blood Activation Results in Enhanced Detection of T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production by Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Crucian, Brian E.

    2001-01-01

    An excellent monitor of the immune balance of peripheral circulating cells is to determine their cytokine production patterns in response to stimuli. Using flow cytometry a positive identification of cytokine producing cells in a mixed culture may be achieved. Recently, the ability to assess cytokine production following a wholeblood activation culture has been described. We compared whole blood culture to standard PBMC culture and determined the individual cytokine secretion patterns for both T cells and monocytes via flow cytometry. For T cells cytokine assessment following PMA +ionomycin activation: (1) a significantly greater percentages of T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 were observed following whole-blood culture; (2) altered T cell cytokine production kinetics were observed by varying whole blood culture times. In addition, a four-color cytometric analysis was used to allow accurate phenotyping and quantitation of cytokine producing lymphocyte populations. Using this technique we found IFNgamma production to be significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8+ T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8- population following five hours of whole blood activation. Conversely, IL-2 and IL-10 production were significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8- T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8+ population. Monocyte cytokine production was assessed in both culture systems following LPS activation for 24 hours. A three-color flow cytometric was used to assess two cytokines in conjunction with CD 14. The cytokine pairs used for analysis were IL-1a/IL-12, and IL-10ITNFa. Nearly all monocytes were stimulated to produce IL-1a, IL-12 and TNFalpha equally well in both culture systems. Monocyte production of IL-10 was significantly elevated following whole blood culture as compared to PBMC culture. IL-12 producing monocytes appeared to be a distinct subpopulation of the IL-1a producing set, whereas IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes were largely mutually exclusive. IL-10 and

  15. Altered cytokine production by specific human peripheral blood cell subsets immediately following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was used to positively identify the specific lymphocyte subsets exhibiting space flight-induced alterations in cytokine production. Whole blood samples were collected from 27 astronauts at three points (one preflight, two postflight) surrounding four space shuttle missions. Assays performed included serum/urine stress hormones, white blood cell (WBC) phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following space flight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of T cells, whereas percentages of B cells and natural killer (NK) cells remained unchanged after flight. Nearly all the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Assessment of naive (CD45RA+) vs. memory (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was ambiguous, and subjects tended to group within specific missions. Although no significant trend was seen in absolute monocyte levels, a significant decrease in the percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocytes was seen following space flight in all subjects tested. T cell (CD3+) production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly decreased after space flight, as was IL-2 production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered by space flight for the CD8+ cell subset, but there was a significant decrease in IFN-gamma production for the CD4+ T cell subset. Serum and urine stress hormone analysis indicated significant physiologic stresses in astronauts following space flight. Altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, altered serum and urine stress hormone levels, and altered T cell cytokine secretion profiles were all observed postflight. In addition, there appeared to be differential susceptibility to space flight regarding cytokine secretion by T cell subsets. These alterations may be the

  16. Diclofenac enhances proinflammatory cytokine-induced nitric oxide production through NF-{kappa}B signaling in cultured astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kakita, Hiroki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi Hussein, Mohamed Hamed; Kato, Shin; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ito, Tetsuya; Togari, Hajime; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2009-07-01

    Recently, the number of reports of encephalitis/encephalopathy associated with influenza virus has increased. In addition, the use of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac sodium (DCF), is associated with a significant increase in the mortality rate of influenza-associated encephalopathy. Activated astrocytes are a source of nitric oxide (NO), which is largely produced by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in response to proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, we investigated whether DCF enhances nitric oxide production in astrocytes stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines. We stimulated cultured rat astrocytes with three cytokines, interleukin-1{beta}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interferon-{gamma}, and then treated the astrocytes with DCF or acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol: APAP). iNOS and NO production in astrocyte cultures were induced by proinflammatory cytokines. The addition of DCF augmented NO production, but the addition of APAP did not. NF-{kappa}B inhibitors SN50 and MG132 inhibited iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes with or without DCF. Similarly, NF-{kappa}B p65 Stealth small interfering RNA suppressed iNOS gene expression in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes with or without DCF. LDH activity and DAPI staining showed that DCF induces cell damage in cytokine-stimulated astrocytes. An iNOS inhibitor, L-NMMA, inhibited the cytokine- and DCF-induced cell damage. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that iNOS and NO are induced in astrocyte cultures by proinflammatory cytokines. Addition of DCF further augments NO production. This effect is mediated via NF-{kappa}B signaling and leads to cell damage. The enhancement of DCF on NO production may explain the significant increase in the mortality rate of influenza-associated encephalopathy in patients treated with DCF.

  17. β-Glucan attenuates TLR2- and TLR4-mediated cytokine production by microglia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vaibhav B.; Williams, David L.; Keshvara, Lakhu

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are activated in response to any kind of CNS injury, and their activation is critical for maintaining homeostasis within the CNS. However, during inflammatory conditions, sustained microglial activation results in damage to surrounding neuronal cells. β-Glucans are widely recognized immunomodulators, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their immunomodulatory actions have not been fully explored. We previously reported that β-glucans activate microglia through Dectin-1 without inducing significant amount of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we show that particulate β-glucans attenuate cytokine production in response to TLR stimulation; this inhibitory activity of β-glucan is mediated by Dectin-1 and does not require particle internalization. At the molecular level, β-glucan suppressed TLR-mediated NF-κB activation, which may be responsible for the diminished capacity of microglia to produce cytokines in response to TLR stimulation. Overall, these results suggest that β-glucans may be used to prevent or treat excessive microglial activation during chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19393720

  18. Combined immunomodulator and antimicrobial therapy eliminates polymicrobial sepsis and modulates cytokine production in combined injured mice

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Thomas B.; Bolduc, David L.; Ledney, G. David; Kiang, Juliann G.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Romaine, Patricia L. P.; Newman, Victoria L.; Singh, Vijay K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A combination therapy for combined injury (CI) using a non-specific immunomodulator, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate and monophosphoryl lipid A (STDCM-MPL), was evaluated to augment oral antimicrobial agents, levofloxacin (LVX) and amoxicillin (AMX), to eliminate endogenous sepsis and modulate cytokine production. Materials and methods: Female B6D2F1/J mice received 9.75 Gy cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and wound. Bacteria were isolated and identified in three tissues. Incidence of bacteria and cytokines were compared between treatment groups. Results: Results demonstrated that the lethal dose for 50% at 30 days (LD50/30) of B6D2F1/J mice was 9.42 Gy. Antimicrobial therapy increased survival in radiation-injured (RI) mice. Combination therapy increased survival after RI and extended survival time but did not increase survival after CI. Sepsis began five days earlier in CI mice than RI mice with Gram-negative species predominating early and Gram-positive species increasing later. LVX plus AMX eliminated sepsis in CI and RI mice. STDCM-MPL eliminated Gram-positive bacteria in CI and most RI mice but not Gram-negative. Treatments significantly modulated 12 cytokines tested, which pertain to wound healing or elimination of infection. Conclusions: Combination therapy eliminates infection and prolongs survival time but does not assure CI mouse survival, suggesting that additional treatment for proliferative-cell recovery is required. PMID:25994812

  19. beta-Glucan attenuates TLR2- and TLR4-mediated cytokine production by microglia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vaibhav B; Williams, David L; Keshvara, Lakhu

    2009-07-24

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, are activated in response to any kind of CNS injury, and their activation is critical for maintaining homeostasis within the CNS. However, during inflammatory conditions, sustained microglial activation results in damage to surrounding neuronal cells. beta-Glucans are widely recognized immunomodulators, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their immunomodulatory actions have not been fully explored. We previously reported that beta-glucans activate microglia through Dectin-1 without inducing significant amount of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we show that particulate beta-glucans attenuate cytokine production in response to TLR stimulation; this inhibitory activity of beta-glucan is mediated by Dectin-1 and does not require particle internalization. At the molecular level, beta-glucan suppressed TLR-mediated NF-kappaB activation, which may be responsible for the diminished capacity of microglia to produce cytokines in response to TLR stimulation. Overall, these results suggest that beta-glucans may be used to prevent or treat excessive microglial activation during chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19393720

  20. Thioredoxin Ameliorates Cutaneous Inflammation by Regulating the Epithelial Production and Release of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Ono, Ryusuke; Nishigori, Chikako; Yodoi, Junji

    2013-01-01

    Human thioredoxin-1 (TRX) is a 12-kDa protein with redox-active dithiol in the active site -Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration and transgenic overexpression of TRX ameliorate inflammation in various animal models, but its anti-inflammatory mechanism is not well characterized. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of topically applied recombinant human TRX (rhTRX) in a murine irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) induced by croton oil. Topically applied rhTRX was distributed only in the skin tissues under both non-inflammatory and inflammatory conditions, and significantly suppressed the inflammatory response by inhibiting the production of cytokines and chemokines, such as TNF-α, Il-1β, IL-6, CXCL-1, and MCP-1. In an in vitro study, rhTRX also significantly inhibited the formation of cytokines and chemokines produced by keratinocytes after exposure to croton oil and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. These results indicate that TRX prevents skin inflammation via the inhibition of local formation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. As a promising new approach, local application of TRX may be useful for the treatment of various skin and mucosal inflammatory disorders. PMID:24058364

  1. Methyl Protodioscin from the Roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Inhibiting Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hee; Lim, Hun Jai; Lee, Chan Woo; Son, Kun-Ho; Son, Jong-Keun; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to find pharmacologically active compound against airway inflammation from the roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis. The 70% ethanol extract of the roots of A. cochinchinensis (ACE) was found to inhibit IL-6 production from IL-1β-treated lung epithelial cells (A549) and the major constituent, methyl protodioscin (MP), also strongly inhibited the production of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α from A549 cells at 10–100 μM. This downregulating effect of proinflammatory cytokine production was found to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun activation pathway. When examined on an in vivo model of airway inflammation in mice, lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury, ACE, and MP significantly inhibited cell infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by the oral treatment at doses of 100–400 mg/kg and 30–60 mg/kg, respectively. MP also inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β in lung tissue. All of these findings provide scientific evidence supporting the role of A. cochinchinensis as a herbal remedy in treating airway inflammation and also suggest a therapeutic value of MP on airway inflammatory disorders. PMID:26379748

  2. Methyl Protodioscin from the Roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Inhibiting Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hee; Lim, Hun Jai; Lee, Chan Woo; Son, Kun-Ho; Son, Jong-Keun; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to find pharmacologically active compound against airway inflammation from the roots of Asparagus cochinchinensis. The 70% ethanol extract of the roots of A. cochinchinensis (ACE) was found to inhibit IL-6 production from IL-1β-treated lung epithelial cells (A549) and the major constituent, methyl protodioscin (MP), also strongly inhibited the production of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α from A549 cells at 10-100 μM. This downregulating effect of proinflammatory cytokine production was found to be mediated, at least in part, via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun activation pathway. When examined on an in vivo model of airway inflammation in mice, lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury, ACE, and MP significantly inhibited cell infiltration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by the oral treatment at doses of 100-400 mg/kg and 30-60 mg/kg, respectively. MP also inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β in lung tissue. All of these findings provide scientific evidence supporting the role of A. cochinchinensis as a herbal remedy in treating airway inflammation and also suggest a therapeutic value of MP on airway inflammatory disorders. PMID:26379748

  3. Airway epithelial cells activate Th2 cytokine production in mast cells via IL-1 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkar, Deepti R.; Poposki, Julie A.; Comeau, Michael R.; Biyasheva, Assel; Avila, Pedro C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway epithelial cells are important regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. Although mast cells are known to play a central role in manifestations of allergic inflammation and are found in the epithelium in Th2-related diseases, their role is incompletely understood. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the role of airway epithelial cells in production of Th2 cytokines in mast cells. Methods Normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) were stimulated with TNF, IL-4, IFN-γ, IL -17A and dsRNA alone or in combination. Human mast cells were stimulated with epithelial cell-derived supernatants, or co-cultured with NHBE. Th2 cytokine responses were blocked with neutralizing antibodies. Results Supernatants from IL-4 and dsRNA stimulated NHBE significantly enhanced Th2 cytokine production from mast cells. The combination of IL-4 and dsRNA itself or supernatants from NHBE stimulated with other cytokines did not activate mast cells, suggesting that mast cell responses were induced by epithelial cell factors that were only induced by IL-4 and dsRNA. Epithelial supernatant-dependent Th2 cytokine production in mast cells was suppressed by anti-IL-1 and anti-TSLP, and was enhanced by anti-IL-1Ra. Similar results were observed in co-culture experiments. Finally, we found dsRNA-dependent production of IL-1, TSLP, and IL-1Ra in NHBE was regulated by Th cytokines, and their ratio in NHBE correlated with Th2 cytokine production in mast cells. Conclusions Pathogens producing dsRNA, such as respiratory viral infections, may amplify local Th2 inflammation in asthmatics via the production of TSLP and IL-1 by epithelial cells and subsequent activation of Th2 cytokine production by mast cells in the airways. PMID:22633328

  4. Cytokine responses during mycobacterial and schistosomal antigen-induced pulmonary granuloma formation. Production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and relative contribution of tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Chensue, S. W.; Warmington, K.; Ruth, J.; Lincoln, P.; Kuo, M. C.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    Synchronized pulmonary granulomas (GRs) were induced in presensitized mice by intravenous embolization of polymer beads bound with purified protein derivative (PPD) of Mycobacteria tuberculosis or soluble antigens derived from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (SEA). Uncoated beads served as a foreign body control (CON). Antigen-coated beads elicited GRs with characteristic epithelioid macrophages and multinucleate giant cells by 4 days after embolization. Unlike PPD GR, SEA bead lesions contained eosinophils, whereas CON beads elicited only a limited mononuclear infiltrate. GRs and draining lymph nodes (LN) were assessed on days 2, 4, and 8 for Th1-(interleukin-2 [IL-2], interferon-gamma[IFN] and Th2-type (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) cytokines. CON GR produced only a small amount of IFN-gamma on day 2 and failed to induce a significant response in draining LN. In contrast, both PPD and SEA antigen-coated beads induced reactive lymphoid hyperplasia but differed greatly in local and regional cytokine profiles. PPD GR produced IFN-gamma on day 2 and the draining LN produced predominantly Th1 cytokines on days 2 and 4. In contrast, SEA beads GRs were dominated by Th2 cytokines. The corresponding LN produced IL-2 and IL-4 on day 2; IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma, and IL-10 on day 4; then IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-4 on day 8, probably reflecting maturational changes of T cells. Macrophages (MP) from bead GR also showed different patterns of IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production. Compared with CON GR, MPs from PPD GR were weak sources of IL-6, whereas those of SEA GR showed enhanced and accelerated production. In contrast, MP of PPD GR had augmented TNF-producing capacity, whereas those of SEA GR showed delayed TNF production. In vivo depletion of TNF, respectively, caused 40 and 10% decreases in PPD GR and SEA GR but had no effect on CON GR area, indicating that TNF contributed to a greater degree to the PPD response. These data show that depending on the inciting agent, GR can be

  5. Histone lysine methyltransferase Ezh1 promotes TLR-triggered inflammatory cytokine production by suppressing Tollip.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiqi; Zhang, Qian; Ding, Yuanyuan; Li, Xia; Zhao, Dezhi; Zhao, Kai; Guo, Zhenhong; Cao, Xuetao

    2015-03-15

    Histone modifications play critical roles in the regulation of gene expression; however, their roles in the regulation of the innate response remain to be fully investigated. Using transcriptome analysis of mouse immature dendritic cells (DCs) and LPS-induced mature DCs, we identified that Ezh1 was the most upregulated histone methyltransferase during DC maturation. In this study, we investigated the role of Ezh1 in regulating the innate immune response. We found that silencing of Ezh1 significantly suppressed TLR-triggered production of cytokines, including IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-β, in DCs and macrophages. Accordingly, TLR-activated signaling pathways were impaired in Ezh1-silenced macrophages. By transcriptome analysis of Ezh1-silenced macrophages, we found that Toll-interacting protein (Tollip), one well-known negative regulator of TLR signaling, was upregulated. Silencing of Tollip rescued TLR-triggered cytokine production in Ezh1-silenced macrophages. The SET domain of Ezh1 is essential for its enhancing effect on the TLR-triggered innate immune response and downstream signaling, indicating that Ezh1 promotes a TLR-triggered innate response through its lysine methyltransferase activity. Finally, Ezh1 was found to suppress the transcription of Tollip by directly targeting the proximal promoter of tollip and maintaining the high level of trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 there. Therefore, Ezh1 promotes TLR-triggered inflammatory cytokine production by suppressing the TLR negative regulator Tollip, contributing to full activation of the innate immune response against invading pathogens. PMID:25687760

  6. Oxidative products from alcohol metabolism differentially modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Wenliang; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2016-09-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a vital role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic steatohepatitis. The present study was to determine the role of alcohol-induced oxidative stress in modulating cytokine production. A rat model of alcohol consumption was used to determine alcohol-induced hepatic cytokine expression. Chronic alcohol exposure caused lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the livers of Wistar rats. The role of oxidative stress in regulating cell type-specific cytokine production was further dissected in vitro. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependently upregulated TNF-α, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and CINC-1 in Kupffer cells-SV40, whereas TNF-α dose-dependently induced CINC-1, IP-10, and MIP-2 expression in H4IIEC3 hepatoma cells. An additive effect on cytokine production was observed in both Kupffer cells-SV40 and hepatocytes when combined hydrogen peroxide with LPS or TNF-α, respectively, which was associated with NF-κB activation and histone H3 hyper-acetylation. Unexpectedly, an inhibitory effect of 4-hydroxynonenal on cytokine production was revealed in LPS-treated Kupffer cells-SV40. Mechanistic study showed that 4-hydroxynonenal significantly enhanced mRNA degradation of TNF-α, MCP-1, and MIP-1α, and decreased the protein levels of MCP-1 in LPS-stimulated Kupffer cells-SV40 through reducing the phosphorylation of mRNA binding proteins. This study suggests that Kupffer cells and hepatocytes express distinct pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in response to alcohol intoxication, and oxidative products (4-hydroxynonenal) differentially modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production via NF-κB signaling, histone acetylation, and mRNA stability. PMID:27314544

  7. Effect of perceived stress on cytokine production in healthy college students.

    PubMed

    Sribanditmongkol, Vorachai; Neal, Jeremy L; Patrick, Thelma E; Szalacha, Laura A; McCarthy, Donna O

    2015-04-01

    Chronic psychological stress impairs antibody synthesis following influenza vaccination. Chronic stress also increases circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids in elders and caregivers, which can impair antibody synthesis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether psychological stress increases ex vivo cytokine production or decreases glucocorticoid sensitivity (GCS) of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy college students. A convenience sample of Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) students completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Whole blood was incubated in the presence of influenza vaccine and dexamethasone to evaluate production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Multiple regression models controlling for age, gender, and grade point average revealed a negative relationship between PSS and GCS for vaccine-stimulated production of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. These data increase our understanding of the complex relationship between chronic stress and immune function. PMID:25125502

  8. Necroptosis suppresses inflammation via termination of TNF- or LPS-induced cytokine and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, C J; Cullen, S P; Tynan, G A; Henry, C M; Clancy, D; Lavelle, E C; Martin, S J

    2015-01-01

    TNF promotes a regulated form of necrosis, called necroptosis, upon inhibition of caspase activity in cells expressing RIPK3. Because necrosis is generally more pro-inflammatory than apoptosis, it is widely presumed that TNF-induced necroptosis may be detrimental in vivo due to excessive inflammation. However, because TNF is intrinsically highly pro-inflammatory, due to its ability to trigger the production of multiple cytokines and chemokines, rapid cell death via necroptosis may blunt rather than enhance TNF-induced inflammation. Here we show that TNF-induced necroptosis potently suppressed the production of multiple TNF-induced pro-inflammatory factors due to RIPK3-dependent cell death. Similarly, necroptosis also suppressed LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Consistent with these observations, supernatants from TNF-stimulated cells were more pro-inflammatory than those from TNF-induced necroptotic cells in vivo. Thus necroptosis attenuates TNF- and LPS-driven inflammation, which may benefit intracellular pathogens that evoke this mode of cell death by suppressing host immune responses. PMID:25613374

  9. Laquinimod dampens hyperactive cytokine production in Huntington's disease patient myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Lucianne; Träger, Ulrike; Farmer, Ruth; Hayardeny, Liat; Loupe, Pippa; Hayden, Michael R; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2016-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by pathology in the brain and peripheral tissues. Hyperactivity of the innate immune system, due in part to NFκB pathway dysregulation, is an early and active component of HD. Evidence suggests targeting immune disruption may slow disease progression. Laquinimod is an orally active immunomodulator that down-regulates proinflammatory cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in the brain down-regulates astrocytic and microglial activation by modulating NFκB signalling. Laquinimod had beneficial effects on inflammation, brain atrophy and disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) in two phase III clinical trials. This study investigated the effects of laquinimod on hyperactive proinflammatory cytokine release and NFκB signalling in HD patient myeloid cell cultures. Monocytes from manifest (manHD) and pre-manifest (preHD) HD gene carriers and healthy volunteers (HV) were treated with laquinimod and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. After 24 h pre-treatment with 5 μM laquinimod, manHD monocytes released lower levels of IL-1β, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13 and TNFα in response to stimulation. PreHD monocytes released lower levels of IL-8, IL-10 and IL-13, with no reduction observed in HV monocytes. The effects of laquinimod on dysfunctional NFκB signalling in HD was assessed by inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) degradation kinetics, nuclear translocation of NFκB and interactions between IκB kinase (IKK) and HTT, in HD myeloid cells. No differences were observed between laquinimod-treated and untreated conditions. These results provide evidence that laquinimod dampens hyper-reactive cytokine release from manHD and preHD monocytes, with a much reduced effect on HV monocytes. Evidence suggests targeting CNS and peripheral immune disruption may slow Huntington's disease (HD) neurodegenerative processes. The effects of laquinimod, an orally active immunomodulator, on

  10. Changes in Production of Cytokines by C57Bl/6J Mouse Spleen during Aggression Provoked by Social Stress.

    PubMed

    Idova, G V; Markova, E V; Gevorgyan, M M; Alperina, E L; Zhukova, E N

    2016-03-01

    The effect of aggressive behavior shaped under social stress of various durations on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by splenic cells was examined on C57BL/6J mice. Aggressive mice were characterized by enhanced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ (released by T helper type 1 cells) and reduced secretion of TNF-α, whose major producers are monocytes and macrophages. Elevation of IL-2 and IFN-γ in aggressive mice resulted from enhancement of spontaneous and Con A-stimulated production, the most pronounced effect was demonstrated by the with a longer period (20 days) of victories. In contrast, spontaneous production of TNF-α was similar in control and aggressive mice, although LPS-stimulated production of this cytokine decreased after 10- and 20-day stress. The possible mechanisms of the changes in cytokine production are discussed. PMID:27021091

  11. Effect of polyclonal activators on cytokine production by blood cells and by malignant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kunts, T A; Karpukhina, K V; Mikhaylova, E S; Marinkin, I O; Varaksin, N A; Autenshlyus, A I; Lyakhovich, V V

    2016-01-01

    The production of cytokines by peripheral blood cells and biopsy specimens of tumors stimulated by polyclonal activators (PAs) was evaluated in 34 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Positive correlation between the stimulation index of polyclonal activators (SIPA) for IL-18 production by the tumor and the relative content of poorly differentiated cells was revealed. The latter, in turn, was positively correlated with the numbers of normal and pathologic mitoses and the degree of malignancy. Cancer cells can produce IL-18, which is involved in the process of angiogenesis, stimulates invasion and metastasis. Decrease in SIPA for the production of IL-6 and GCSF by peripheral blood cells could serve as an indicator of malignant progression in invasive ductal breast carcinoma. PMID:27021370

  12. Effect of Chemotherapy with Praziquantel on the Production of Cytokines and Morbidity Associated with Schistosomiasis Mansoni▿

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Leite, P.; Gazzinelli, G.; Alves-Oliveira, L. F.; Gazzinelli, A.; Malaquias, L. C. C.; Correa-Oliveira, R.; Teixeira-Carvalho, A.; Silveira, A. M. S.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni with praziquantel can alter significantly the immune response of patients and generate a reversal of the level of fibrosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples were collected from, and abdominal ultrasound examinations conducted on, volunteers infected with Schistosoma mansoni and living in an area where the disease is endemic, both prior to and one year after treatment with praziquantel. Subjects were classified into groups according to the level of pathology (i.e., absent, incipient, moderate, or severe fibrosis). PBMCs were stimulated with schistosome soluble egg antigens (SEA), and the levels of production of the cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor β, and interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, and IL-13 were determined. The chemotherapy was effective in reducing morbidity, particularly for individuals presenting with severe fibrosis. When levels of cytokine production in posttreatment PBMC cultures stimulated by SEA were categorized as low or high, significant differences in the distribution of IL-13 levels between groups presenting with or not presenting with fibrosis were established. Comparison of pre- and posttreatment SEA-induced cytokine levels in individuals who had experienced no change in the grade of fibrosis following chemotherapy revealed that the level of IFN-γ decreased in subjects with fibrosis whereas that of IL-10 decreased in individuals with and without fibrosis. The data suggest that chemotherapy is effective in reducing the morbidity of the disease and that the level of IL-13 may be a useful indicator of the persistence of fibrosis following treatment. PMID:18519730

  13. The synergistic effect of ethanol and shock insults on Caco-2 cytokine production and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Parth B; Diebel, Lawrence N; Liberati, David M

    2008-05-01

    Gut epithelial cells are important in orchestrating immunoinflammatory responses in the gut and may impact systemic immunocompetent cells after shock and trauma. Ethanol (EtOH) intoxication is an important etiological factor in trauma and may increase the likelihood of posttraumatic septic complications. Both EtOH and gut I/R impair intestinal barrier function. However, their combined effects on intestinal epithelial cell function and barrier integrity are unknown. Confluent CaCO2 cell monolayers were grown in a two-chamber culture system and exposed to 0.1% EtOH and/or Escherichia coli C-25 under normoxic (21% O2) or hypoxia (5% O2) followed by reoxygenation (H/R). Apical and basal compartment supernatants were collected, and TNF and IL-6 were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (picograms per milliliter). CaCO2 cell integrity was indexed by apoptosis and monolayer permeability. TNF-alpha production by CaCO2 cells are greatest when incubated with EtOH and then exposed to H/R group. The apical levels of TNF production are consistently higher than basal levels, although the trend toward increased cytokine production is similar in both compartments. IL-6 production by the CaCO2 cell is also greatest when CaCO2 cells incubated with EtOH undergoes H/R. Lastly, the findings in apoptosis mirror the data of the TNF production in the apical compartment. Ethanol and H/R have a synergistic effect on cytokine production and barrier dysfunction in this model. They may also contribute to increased infectious complications and posttraumatic organ failure. PMID:18414237

  14. Multiple effects of TRAIL in human carcinoma cells: Induction of apoptosis, senescence, proliferation, and cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Levina, Vera; Marrangoni, Adele M.; DeMarco, Richard; Gorelik, Elieser; Lokshin, Anna E.

    2008-04-15

    TRAIL is a death ligand that induces apoptosis in malignant but not normal cells. Recently the ability of TRAIL to induce proliferation in apoptosis-resistant normal and malignant cells was reported. In this study, we analyzed TRAIL effects in apoptosis sensitive MCF7, OVCAR3 and H460 human tumor cell lines. TRAIL at low concentrations preferentially induced cell proliferation. At 100 ng/ml, apoptotic death was readily observed, however surviving cells acquired higher proliferative capacity. TRAIL-stimulated production of several cytokines, IL-8, RANTES, MCP-1 and bFGF, and activation of caspases 1 and 8 was essential for this effect. Antibodies to IL-8, RANTES, and bFGF blocked TRAIL-induced cell proliferation and further stimulated apoptosis. For the first time, we report that high TRAIL concentrations induced cell senescence as determined by the altered morphology and expression of several senescence markers: SA-{beta}-gal, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1}, p16{sup INK4a}, and HMGA. Caspase 9 inhibition protected TRAIL-treated cells from senescence, whereas inhibition of caspases 1 and 8 increased the yield of SLP cells. In conclusion, in cultured human carcinoma cells, TRAIL therapy results in three functional outcomes, apoptosis, proliferation and senescence. TRAIL-induced proapoptotic and prosurvival responses correlate with the strength of signaling. TRAIL-induced cytokine production is responsible for its proliferative and prosurvival effects.

  15. Potassium humate inhibits complement activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Naude, P.J.

    2009-08-15

    The effects of brown coal derived potassium humate on lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and complement activation were investigated in vitro. Potassium humate increased lymphocyte proliferation of phytohaemaglutinin A (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated mononuclear lymphocytes (MNL) in vitro from concentrations of 20 to 80 {mu} g/ml, in a dose dependant manner. On the other hand potassium humate, at 40 {mu} g/ml, significantly inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 by PHA stimulated MNL. Regarding complement activation it was found that potassium humate inhibits the activation of both the alternative and classical pathways without affecting the stability of the red blood cell membranes. These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory potential of potassium humate could be partially due to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for the initiation of these reactions as well as inhibition of complement activation. The increased lymphocyte proliferation observed, might be due to increased IL-2 production as previously been documented.

  16. Sequential production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in response to live bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed Central

    Sander, B; Skansén-Saphir, U; Damm, O; Håkansson, L; Andersson, J; Andersson, U

    1995-01-01

    Causes of individual variation in susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases are only partly understood. An efficient cell-mediated immune response is crucial for resistance. Macrophages and T cells interact to eliminate the mycobacteria, partially through the effects of secreted cytokines. A vigorous anti-bacterial inflammatory response is sometimes accompanied by severe tissue damage, while immunosuppression leads to progressive infection. Here, live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), was used as a model antigen to study cytokine production at the single-cell level in response to mycobacteria. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals were challenged in vitro and the kinetics and frequencies of cytokine-producing cells were studied by immunofluorescent visualization of intracellular cytokines. Fourteen cytokines were assayed; interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). A sequential production of T helper-1 (Th1) and T helper-2 (Th2) cytokines was induced by BCG. Early, at days 1-2 after stimulation, the response was dominated by monokines and a low IFN-gamma and TNF-beta production. At days 4-5 there was a marked production of Th1 lymphokines, with approximately 6% IFN-gamma+ cells, 4% TNF-beta+ cells and 2% IL-2+ cells. Late in the reaction, at days 10-12, a Th2 response with IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 was detected, while the synthesis of Th1 lymphokines and monokines declined. Overall, our results provide further evidence of IFN-gamma as the major cytokine induced by mycobacteria in healthy individuals, but also suggest that Th2 cytokines participate in the response. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8567014

  17. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H; Guns, Emma S; McNagny, Kelly M; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%- 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  18. Diet-induced obesity attenuates cytokine production following an immune challenge

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarner, Katherine M.; Setti, Sharay; Diaz, Carolyn; Littlefield, Alyssa; Jones, Amanda; Kohman, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity increases susceptibility for numerous diseases and neurological disorders including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. One factor that may contribute to the increased risk for these conditions is the development of chronic inflammation. The current study evaluated whether diet-induced obesity (DIO) affects cognitive performance by increasing neuroinflammation and prolonging the behavioral and inflammatory response to an immune challenge. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat (60% fat) or control diet (10% fat) for 2 or 5 months. After consuming their respective diets for two months, sickness associated behaviors were assessed 4 and 24 hours after a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline injection. In a separate experiment, DIO and control mice were tested for spatial learning in the water maze and challenged with LPS one month later. Peripheral cytokine production was assessed in adipose and spleen samples and the neuroinflammatory response was assessed in hippocampal, cortical, and brain samples. DIO impaired acquisition of a spatial learning task relative to control mice. However, these deficits are unlikely to be related to inflammation as DIO showed no changes in basal cytokine levels within the periphery or brain. Further, in response to LPS DIO mice showed comparable or attenuated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 relative to control mice. DIO also reduced hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the pre-synaptic marker synaptophysin. Presently, the data indicate that DIO suppresses aspects of the immune response and that cognitive deficits associated with DIO may be related to reduced neurotrophic support rather than inflammation. PMID:24657736

  19. Enhanced cytokine production and collagen synthesis of gingival fibroblasts from patients with denture fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Nakao, K; Yoneda, K; Osaki, T

    1995-04-01

    The mechanisms of denture-induced gingival hypertrophy remain to be explored. Since fibroblast proliferation and bone resorption characterize this disorder, the possible involvement of cytokines was investigated. Gingival fibroblasts were obtained from six patients with denture fibromatosis (Den-Fb) and six healthy persons (Nor-Fb). Cells were compared for proliferation, collagen synthesis, and cytokine production. Incorporation of [3H]thymidine (TdR) was increased in 3 Den-Fb and 3 Nor-Fb lines in the presence of interleukin-1-beta (IL-1 beta) (10 U/mL) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) (from 10 to 100 U/mL). Proline incorporation in Den-Fb was higher than that in Nor-Fb, and the mean collagen synthesis level in Den-Fb was significantly higher than that in Nor-Fb. Although there was no difference between the up-regulation of protein synthesis in Den-Fb and Nor-Fb induced by IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha, the receptors for these cytokines were expressed at higher levels in cell lines which exhibited higher protein synthesis. Between Nor-Fb and Den-Fb, there was no difference in the generation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, most Den-Fb produced more GM-CSF and IL-6 in the presence of TNF-alpha. Enhancement of IL-6 generation by GM-CSF was also more prominent in Den-Fb. GM-CSF and IL-6 were synergistically generated after co-culture of the fibroblasts with gingival keratinocytes. GM-CSF and IL-6 generation of Den-Fb was markedly enhanced by co-culture of Den-Fb with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), especially PBMC from patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7782537

  20. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R.; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H.; Guns, Emma S.; McNagny, Kelly M.; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%– 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  1. Phototherapy-treated apoptotic tumor cells induce pro-inflammatory cytokines production in macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuixia; Wei, Yanchun; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that as a mitochondria-targeting cancer phototherapy, high fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) induces mitochondrial superoxide anion burst, resulting in oxidative damage to tumor cells. In this study, we further explored the immunological effects of HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic tumor cells. When macrophages were co-incubated with apoptotic cells induced by HF-LPLI, we observed the increased levels of TNF-α secretion and NO production in macrophages. Further experiments showed that NF-κB was activated in macrophages after co-incubation with HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic cells, and inhibition of NF-κB activity by pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid (PDTC) reduced the elevated levels of TNF-α secretion and NO production. These data indicate that HF-LPLI-induced apoptotic tumor cells induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, which may be helpful for better understanding the biological effects of cancer phototherapy.

  2. Effects of the Commercial Flame Retardant Mixture DE-71 on Cytokine Production by Human Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mynster Kronborg, Thit; Frohnert Hansen, Juliana; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Ramhøj, Louise; Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although production of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) is now banned, release from existing products will continue for many years. The PBDEs are assumed to be neurotoxic and toxic to endocrine organs at low concentrations. Their effect on the immune system has not been investigated thoroughly. We aimed to investigate the influence of DE-71 on cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with Escherichia Coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phytohaemagglutinin-L (PHA-L). Material and Methods PBMCs isolated from healthy donors were pre-incubated with DE-71 at various concentrations and subsequently incubated with the monocyte stimulator LPS, or the T-cell activator PHA-L. Interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17A, and IL-17F were quantified in the supernatants by Luminex kits. Results At non-cytotoxic concentrations (0.01–10 μg/mL), DE-71 significantly enhanced secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and TNF-α (p<0.001–0.019; n = 6) from LPS-stimulated PBMCs. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A, and IL-17F (p = <0.001–0.043; n = 6) secretion were enhanced from PHA-L-stimulated PBMCs as well. Secretion of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IL-8 and IL-6 was not significantly affected by DE-71. Conclusions We demonstrate an enhancing effect of DE-71 on cytokine production by normal human PBMCs stimulated with LPS or PHA-L ex vivo. PMID:27128973

  3. The role of stress mediators in modulation of cytokine production by ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, Mitzi; Cheng Bing; Fan Ruping; Pruett, Stephen

    2009-08-15

    Acute ethanol exposure in humans and in animal models activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS); the resultant increases in concentration of neuroendocrine mediators contribute to some of the immunosuppressive effects of ethanol. However, the role of these mediators in the ethanol-induced inhibition of inflammatory responses is not clear. This is complicated by the fact that most inflammatory stimuli also activate the HPA axis and SNS, and it has not been determined if ethanol plus an inflammatory stimulus increases these stress responses. Addressing this issue is the major focus of the study described herein. Complementary approaches were used, including quantitative assessment of the stress response in mice treated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C, as an inflammatory stimulus) and inhibition of the production or action of key HPA axis and SNS mediators. Treatment of mice with ethanol shortly before treatment with poly I:C yielded a significant increase in the corticosterone response as compared to the response to poly I:C alone, but the increase was small and not likely sufficient to account for the anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol. Inhibition of catecholamine and glucocorticoid production by adrenalectomy, and inhibition of catecholamine action with a sustained release antagonist (nadalol) supported this conclusion and revealed that 'excess' stress responses associated with ethanol treatment is not the mechanism of suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, but stress-induced corticosterone does regulate production of several of these cytokines, which has not previously been reported.

  4. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces the Production and Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Canine Synovial Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Straubinger, Alix F.; Summers, Brian A.; Erb, Hollis N.; Härter, Luc; Appel, Max J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Canine synovial membrane explants were exposed to high- or low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Spirochetes received no treatment, were UV light irradiated for 16 h, or were sonicated prior to addition to synovial explant cultures. In explant tissues, mRNA levels for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, and IL-8 were surveyed semiquantitatively by reverse transcription-PCR. Culture supernatants were examined for numbers of total and motile (i.e., viable) spirochetes, TNF-like and IL-1-like activities, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis-inducing activities, and IL-8. During exposure to synovial explant tissues, the total number of spirochetes in the supernatants decreased gradually by ∼30%, and the viability also declined. mRNAs for TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 were up-regulated in synovial explant tissues within 3 h after infection with untreated or UV light-irradiated B. burgdorferi, and mRNA levels corresponded to the results obtained with bioassays. During 24 h of coincubation, cultures challenged with untreated or UV light-irradiated spirochetes produced similar levels of TNF-like and IL-1-like activities. In contrast, explant tissues exposed to untreated B. burgdorferi generated significantly higher levels of chemotactic factors after 24 h of incubation than did explant tissues exposed to UV light-treated spirochetes. In identical samples, a specific signal for IL-8 was identified by Western blot analysis. High- and low-passage borreliae did not differ in their abilities to induce proinflammatory cytokines. No difference in cytokine induction between untreated and sonicated high-passage spirochetes was observed, suggesting that fractions of the organism can trigger the production and release of inflammatory mediators. The titration of spirochetes revealed a dose-independent cytokine response, where 103 to 107 B. burgdorferi organisms induced similar TNF

  5. IL-10 reduces Th2 cytokine production and eosinophilia but augments airway reactivity in allergic mice.

    PubMed

    van Scott, M R; Justice, J P; Bradfield, J F; Enright, E; Sigounas, A; Sur, S

    2000-04-01

    We investigated the effects of interleukin (IL)-10 administration on allergen-induced Th2 cytokine production, eosinophilic inflammation, and airway reactivity. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of ragweed (RW) adsorbed to Alum and challenged by intratracheal instillation of the allergen. Sensitization and challenge with RW increased concentrations of IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from undetectable levels to 60 pg/ml over 72 h. Intratracheal instillation of 25 ng of recombinant murine IL-10 at the time of RW challenge further elevated BAL fluid IL-10 concentration to 440 pg/ml but decreased BAL fluid IL-4, IL-5, and interferon-gamma levels by 40-85% and eosinophil numbers by 70% (P < 0.0001). Unexpectedly, the same IL-10 treatment increased airway reactivity to methacholine in spontaneously breathing mice that had been sensitized and challenged with RW (P < 0.001). IL-10 treatment in naive animals or RW-sensitized mice challenged with PBS failed to increase airway reactivity, demonstrating that IL-10 induces an increase in airway reactivity only when it is administered in conjunction with allergic sensitization and challenge. The results demonstrate that IL-10 reduces Th2 cytokine levels and eosinophilic inflammation but augments airway hyperreactivity. Thus, despite its potent anti-inflammatory activity, IL-10 could contribute to the decline in pulmonary function observed in asthma. PMID:10749743

  6. Cytokine production by mononuclear cells following stimulation with a peptide-containing, endotoxin-free Escherichia coli extract.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, A; Loppnow, H

    1995-05-01

    The beneficial effects of the E. coli extract Colibiogen inj. N (Cb) observed in therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases, allergies, or gastrointestinal tumors are possibly mediated by the induction of cytokines in human leukocytes or vascular cells. Thus, the induction of the cytokines interleukin 1 (IL1), IL6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in human mononuclear cells (MNC) and vascular cells was investigated in vitro. Various administration forms of the extract (including Cb-inj. N, Cb-oral, and Cb-infantibus N) induced the release of IL1 and IL6 from MNC. The compounds stimulated TNF production less potently, possibly due to a lower sensitivity of the TNF assay system, as compared to the IL1 and IL6 detection system. The MNC produced the cytokines with a kinetics similar to that observed with other stimuli. Monospecific antibodies abolished the respective cytokine activity in the biological assays. Addition of submaximal amounts of endotoxin potently enhanced the IL1- and IL6-inducing activity of the bacterial extract, indicating synergism of the extract and endotoxin. These results provide evidence that cytokines produced by MNC following administration of the tested bacterial extract may contribute to the regulation of the immune response during therapy of gastrointestinal tumors. At present the in vivo production of cytokines following treatment with the bacterial extract tested is under investigation in a phase III study. PMID:7612070

  7. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers Enhance the Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines by the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Morgan R.; Klimova, Natalia G.; Arita, Yuko; Gurzenda, Ellen M.; Murthy, Amitasrigowri; Chawala, Kiranpreet; Lerner, Veronica; Richardson, Jason; Hanna, Nazeeh

    2012-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether(s) (PBDE) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that bind and cross the placenta but their effects on pregnancy outcome are unclear. It is possible that environmental contaminants increase the risk of inflammation-mediated pregnancy complications such as preterm birth by promoting a proinflammatory environment at the maternal-fetal interface. We hypothesized that PBDE would reduce IL-10 production and enhance the production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with preterm labor/birth by placental explants. Second trimester placental explants were cultured in either vehicle (control) or 2 μM PBDE mixture of congers 47, 99 and 100 for 72 h. Cultures were then stimulated with 106 CFU/ml heat-killed Escherichia coli for a final 24 h incubation and conditioned medium was harvested for quantification of cytokines and PGE2. COX-2 content and viability of the treated tissues were then quantified by tissue ELISA and MTT reduction activity, respectively. PBDE pre-treatment reduced E. coli-stimulated IL-10 production and significantly increased E. coli-stimulated IL-1β secretion. PBDE exposure also increased basal and bacteria-stimulated COX-2 expression. Basal, but not bacteria-stimulated PGE2, was also enhanced by PBDE exposure. No effect of PBDE on viability of the explants cultures was detected. In summary, pre-exposure of placental explants to congers 47, 99, and 100 enhanced the placental proinflammatory response to infection. This may increase the risk of infection-mediated preterm birth by lowering the threshold for bacteria to stimulate a proinflammatory response(s). PMID:22749501

  8. Inflammatory cytokines in vitro production are associated with Ala16Val superoxide dismutase gene polymorphism of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Montano, Marco Aurélio Echart; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Krewer, Cristina da Costa; da Rocha, Maria Izabel de Ugalde Marques; Mânica-Cattani, Maria Fernanda; Soares, Felix Alexandre Antunes; Rosa, Guilherme; Maris, Angélica Francesca; Battiston, Francielle Garghetti; Trott, Alexis; Lera, Juan Pablo Barrio

    2012-10-01

    Obesity is considered a chronic low-grade inflammatory state associated with a chronic oxidative stress caused by superoxide production (O(2)(-)). The superoxide dismutase manganese dependent (SOD2) catalyzes O(2)(-) in H(2)O(2) into mitochondria and is encoded by a single gene that presents a common polymorphism that results in the replacement of alanine (A) with a valine (V) in the 16 codon. This polymorphism has been implicated in a decreased efficiency of SOD2 transport into targeted mitochondria in V allele carriers. Previous studies described an association between VV genotype and metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. However, the causal mechanisms to explain this association need to be more elucidated. We postulated that the polymorphism could influence the inflammatory response. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated the in vitro cytokines production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) carrier's different Ala16Val-SOD2 genotypes (IL-1, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ). Additionally, we evaluated if the culture medium glucose, enriched insulin, could influence the cytokine production. Higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines were observed in VV-PBMCs when compared to AA-PBMCs. However, the culture medium glucose and enriched insulin did not affect cytokine production. The results suggest that Ala16Val-SOD2 gene polymorphism could trigger the PBMCs proinflammatory cytokines level. However, discerning if a similar mechanism occurs in fat cells is an open question. PMID:22688013

  9. Interferon-γ constrains cytokine production of group 2 innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Fujimi; Ikutani, Masashi; Seki, Yoichi; Otsubo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Dohi, Taeko; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Nakae, Susumu; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Takaki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) produce a significant amount of interleukin-5 (IL-5), which supports eosinophil responses in various tissues; they also produce IL-13, which induces mucus production and contributes to tissue repair or fibrosis. The ILC2s are activated by alarmins, such as IL-33 released from epithelia, macrophages and natural killer T (NKT) cells in response to infection and allergen exposure, leading to epithelial injury. We examined gene expression in lung ILC2s and found that ILC2s expressed Ifngr1, the receptor for interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Interferon-γ severely inhibited IL-5 and IL-13 production by lung and kidney ILC2s. To evaluate the effects in vivo, we used α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) to induce NKT cells to produce IL-33 and IFN-γ. Intraperitoneal injection of α-GalCer in mice induced NKT cell activation resulting in IL-5 and IL-13 production by ILC2s. Administration of anti-IFN-γ together with α-GalCer significantly enhanced the production of IL-5 and IL-13 by ILC2s in lung and kidney. Conversely, cytokine production from ILC2s was markedly suppressed after injection of exogenous IL-33 in Il33(-/-) mice pre-treated with α-GalCer. Hence, IFN-γ induced or already present in tissues can impact downstream pleiotropic functions mediated by ILC2s, such as inflammation and tissue repair. PMID:26425820

  10. Cytokine production in arthritis susceptible and resistant rats: a study with arthritogenic and non-arthritogenic Lactobacillus cell walls.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2001-02-01

    The basis of the different susceptibility to bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis between Lewis and Fischer rats is unclear. Likewise, it is not known why cell walls of some species of Lactobacillus are arthritogenic and those of others are not. With these two questions in mind, we investigated the role of anti-inflammatory (interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4) and proinflammatory (tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-1 beta) cytokines in Lewis and Fischer rats injected intraperitoneally with cell walls from arthritogenic or nonarthritogenic species of Lactobacillus. Cytokine levels in the serum and in vitro production by peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes were studied. The results obtained indicate that the differences in the production of IL-10, IL-4, TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta do not explain the difference in the arthritis susceptibility between Lewis and Fischer rats. Likewise, the arthritogenicity of different Lactobacillus cell walls appears not to be dependent on their capacity to stimulate cytokine production. PMID:11169216

  11. Antioxidant Defenses of Francisella tularensis Modulate Macrophage Function and Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Rabadi, Seham M; Sanchez, Belkys C; Varanat, Mrudula; Ma, Zhuo; Catlett, Sally V; Melendez, Juan Andres; Malik, Meenakshi; Bakshi, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-03-01

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of a fatal human disease known as tularemia, has been used in the bioweapon programs of several countries in the past, and now it is considered a potential bioterror agent. Extreme infectivity and virulence of F. tularensis is due to its ability to evade immune detection and to suppress the host's innate immune responses. However, Francisella-encoded factors and mechanisms responsible for causing immune suppression are not completely understood. Macrophages and neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species as a defense mechanism for the clearance of phagocytosed microorganisms. ROS serve a dual role; at high concentrations they act as microbicidal effector molecules that destroy intracellular pathogens, and at low concentrations they serve as secondary signaling messengers that regulate the expression of various inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that the antioxidant defenses of F. tularensis maintain redox homeostasis in infected macrophages to prevent activation of redox-sensitive signaling components that ultimately result in suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and macrophage microbicidal activity. We demonstrate that antioxidant enzymes of F. tularensis prevent the activation of redox-sensitive MAPK signaling components, NF-κB signaling, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the accumulation of ROS in infected macrophages. We also report that F. tularensis inhibits ROS-dependent autophagy to promote its intramacrophage survival. Collectively, this study reveals novel pathogenic mechanisms adopted by F. tularensis to modulate macrophage innate immune functions to create an environment permissive for its intracellular survival and growth. PMID:26644475

  12. Effect of endothelin antagonism on the production of cytokines in eosinophilic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Finsnes, F; Lyberg, T; Christensen, G; Skjønsberg, O H

    2001-04-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 has been launched as an important mediator in bronchial asthma, which is an eosinophilic airway inflammation. However, the interplay between ET-1 and other proinflammatory mediators during the development of airway inflammation has not been elucidated. We wanted to study 1) whether the production of ET-1 precedes the production of other proinflammatory mediators and 2) whether ET-1 stimulates the production of these mediators within the airways. These hypotheses were studied during the development of an eosinophilic airway inflammation in rats. The increase in ET-1 mRNA level in lung tissue preceded the increase in mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-8. Treatment of the animals with the ET receptor antagonist bosentan resulted in a substantial decrease in the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-4, IL-1beta, interferon-gamma, and ET-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In conclusion, the synthesis of ET-1 as measured by increased mRNA level precedes the synthesis of other proinflammatory cytokines of importance for the development of an eosinophilic airway inflammation, and ET antagonism inhibits the production of these mediators within the airways. Whether treatment with ET antagonists will prove beneficial for patients with eosinophilic airway inflammations like bronchial asthma is not yet known. PMID:11238005

  13. Cytokine regulation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production by human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crane, I J; Kuppner, M C; Mckillop-Smith, S; Wallace, C A; Forrester, J V

    1999-01-01

    GM-CSF is an important regulator of macrophage, granulocyte and dendritic cell behaviour and function. These cell types have been implicated in the retinal damage characteristic of endogenous posterior uveitis. Dendritic cells in the choroid have access to retinal antigens processed by the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the blood–retinal barrier and are thought to be candidates for the presentation of antigen in uveoretinitis. We therefore investigated the production of GM-CSF and its regulation in human RPE cells. IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) all stimulated GM-CSF production by RPE cells and a combination of these cytokines increased GM-CSF production over five-fold compared with that with the individual cytokines alone. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) rapidly down-regulated these responses. IFN-γ did not appear to be acting directly on IL-1β or via the synthesis of another protein. GM-CSF mRNA expression showed the same pattern of response to these cytokines, indicating transcriptional or pre-transcriptional regulation, and there was no evidence that IFN-γ was acting by destabilizing GM-CSF mRNA. These results are generally important in understanding the ways in which cytokine regulation differs between different cell types and also more specifically for determining ways in which a cytokine with a significant role in the development of autoimmune uveoretinitis may be manipulated. PMID:9933455

  14. PCT-233, a novel modulator of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    BISSONNETTE, E Y; PROULX, L-I; TURMEL, V; DROUIN, R; PURCELL, M

    2004-01-01

    Plant extracts have been implicated in various immunoregulatory effects that are poorly understood. Thus, we investigated the modulatory activity of PureCell Complex (PCT)-233, an active molecular complex from mesophyll tissue of Spinacia oleacea on the inflammatory process. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were treated with PCT-233 and/or budesonide, a well-known anti-inflammatory agent, before or after being stimulated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10, respectively, were measured in cell-free supernatants at different times after the treatment. PCT-233 increased unstimulated AM release of both TNF and IL-10, whereas heat- and light-inactivated PCT-233 stimulated only the release of TNF without affecting IL-10 production, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the modulation of TNF and IL-10 release by PCT-233. The presence of LPS did not modify PCT-233-stimulated TNF production, but the ratio TNF/IL-10 production by LPS-stimulated AM was reduced significantly in the presence of PCT-233. Pretreatment of AM with PCT-233 and budesonide before LPS stimulation reduced TNF production at both protein and mRNA levels, whereas IL-10 production was increased. Moreover, TNF/IL-10 ratio was reduced further with the combination PCT-233/budesonide. Interestingly, AM treatment with PCT-233 and budesonide 18 h after LPS stimulation did not modulate TNF release significantly but it did increase IL-10 production, and a synergistic effect was observed with the combination PCT-233/budesonide. These exciting data suggest that PCT-233 possesses some anti-inflammatory properties, even when added during the inflammatory process, and could potentiate the effect of other anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:15008976

  15. Propolis Ethanol Extract Stimulates Cytokine and Chemokine Production through NF-κB Activation in C2C12 Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Kohei; Kobayashi, Mao; Saito, Natsuko; Amagasa, Misato; Kitamura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Myoblast activation is a triggering event for muscle remodeling. We assessed the stimulatory effects of propolis, a beehive product, on myoblasts. After an 8 h treatment with 100 μg/mL of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract, expression of various chemokines, including CCL-2 and CCL-5, and cytokines, such as IL-6, increased. This propolis-induced cytokine production appears to depend on NF-κB activation, because the IKK inhibitor BMS-345541 repressed mRNA levels of CCL-2 by ~66%, CCL-5 by ~81%, and IL-6 by ~69% after propolis treatment. Supernatant from propolis-conditioned C2C12 cells upregulated RAW264 macrophage migration. The supernatant also stimulated RAW264 cells to produce angiogenic factors, including VEGF-A and MMP-12. Brazilian green propolis therefore causes myoblasts to secrete cytokines and chemokines, which might contribute to tissue remodeling of skeletal muscle. PMID:26604971

  16. Cytokine Production and Antigen Recognition by Human Mucosal Homing Conjunctival Effector Memory CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geraint P.; Pachnio, Annette; Long, Heather M.; Rauz, Saaeha; Curnow, S. John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Conjunctival epithelial T cells are dominated by CD3+CD56-TCRαβ+CD8αβ+ lymphocytes. In this study we explored the antigen experience status, mucosal homing phenotype, cytokine expression, and viral antigen recognition of conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells from healthy individuals. Methods. Following ocular surface impression cytology, conjunctival cells were recovered by gentle agitation and analyzed by flow cytometry for cell surface markers, cytokine production (stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA]/ionomycin), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunodominant epitope recognition using major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptide tetramers. Results. In contrast to peripheral blood, conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells were dominantly CD45RA−CCR7− effector memory cells, and the vast majority expressed the mucosal homing integrin αEβ7. Conjunctival memory CD8+ T cells maintained effector functions with the ability to secrete IFN-γ and expression of Granzyme B, although they expressed significantly reduced amounts per cell compared to peripheral blood T cells. Interestingly, herpetic virus-specific CD8+ T cells recognizing epitopes derived from EBV and CMV could be detected in the conjunctival cells of healthy virus carriers, although they were generally at lower frequencies than in the peripheral blood of the same donor. Virus-specific conjunctival CD8+ T cells were dominated by CD45RA−CCR7− effector memory cells that expressed αEβ7. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that the majority of conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells are mucosal homing αEβ7+ effector memory T cells, which can recognize viral epitopes and are capable of secreting Granzyme B and IFN-γ. PMID:25395484

  17. Smoke exposure of human macrophages reduces HDAC3 activity, resulting in enhanced inflammatory cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Aaron R; Nocka, Karl N; Williams, Cara M M

    2012-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating condition resulting from exposure to pollutants such as cigarette smoke. Pulmonary macrophages secrete a plethora of inflammatory mediators that are increased in the lungs of COPD patients, but whether this phenotype results directly from smoke exposure remains unknown. Using an in vitro model for alveolar macrophages (AM) derived from human peripheral blood monocytes with granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-MØ), we analyzed the mechanistic connection between cigarette smoke exposure and histone deacetylase (HDAC) regulation, hypothesized to be a contributing factor in COPD pathophysiology. Here we show that acute smoke exposure inhibits HDAC enzymatic activity in GM-MØ. Analysis of mRNA and total cellular proteins for expression of class I (1, 2, 3 and 8), class II (4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10), and class IV (11) HDAC revealed no effect of smoke exposure, whereas nuclear HDAC3 protein content was reduced. To better understand the physiological significance of reduced HDAC3 activity, we utilized siRNA to knockdown HDAC1, 2 and 3 individually. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated reduction of HDAC3 resulted in increased production of IL8 and IL1β in response to LPS stimulation, while HDAC2 knockdown had no effect on either cytokine. Lower nuclear content of HDAC3 in the context of equivalent total HDAC protein levels following smoke exposure may reflect increased nuclear export of HDAC3, allowing increased nuclear factor kappa b (NF-κB ) driven cytokine expression that can contribute to inflammation. PMID:22613758

  18. Muramyl dipeptide enhances thermal injury-induced inflammatory cytokine production and organ function injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Song, Xue-Min; Wu, Xiao-Jing; Li, Jian-Guo; Han, Yi; Wang, Yan-Lin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Zong-Ze; Le, Lin-Li; Xu, Yang

    2014-08-01

    The bacterial infection following thermal injury is a very important factor of excessive inflammatory response and multiple organ damage. Muramyl dipeptide (MDP) is the key structure of gram-positive bacteria and gram-negative bacteria triggering the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of MDP on thermal injury-induced inflammatory responses, organ function injury, and mortality in rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawlay rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal control group, scald group, and MDP group. Scald group only suffered 20% total body surface area third-degree thermal injury. Muramyl dipeptide 5 mg·kg was administered through the femoral vein at 24 h after thermal injury in the MDP group. Plasma inflammatory cytokine levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An additional 90 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups to observe the survival rate in 72 h. Plasma levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, interferon-γ, and high-mobility group box 1; the white blood cell counts; the serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, creatine kinase isoenzyme-MB, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine; and the activity of lung tissue myeloperoxidase significantly increased after thermal injury alone. Compared with the scald group, MDP led to more serious inflammatory responses and organ function damage and higher mortality (P < 0.05, respectively). These data indicate that MDP exacerbates thermal injury-induced inflammatory cytokine production, accompanied by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and high mortality in rats. PMID:24667616

  19. Tacrolimus does not alter the production of several cytokines and antimicrobial peptide in Malassezia furfur-infected-keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Balato, Anna; Paoletti, Iole; De Gregorio, Vincenza; Cantelli, Mariateresa; Ayala, Fabio; Donnarumma, Giovanna

    2014-03-01

    Topical immunosuppressant therapy is widely used in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Besides its beneficial therapeutic effects, application of topical anti-inflammatory drugs may render the epidermis more vulnerable to invading pathogens by suppressing innate immune responses in keratinocytes (KCs). Cytokines, chemokines and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by epithelial cells enable them to participate in innate and acquired immune responses. The aim of the present work was to study the influence of tacrolimus (FK506) on KCs infected with Malassezia furfur (M. furfur), evaluating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6, chemokine IL-8, anti-inflammatory cytokines transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) and IL-10 and AMP β-defensin-2. Human KCs were obtained from surgical specimens of normal adult skin. The expression of mRNAs in KCs: FK506-treated, FK506-treated and M. furfur-infected as well as only M. furfur-infected was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Next, the production of the AMP β-defensin-2 and of the above-mentioned pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines was evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this study, FK506 did not alter cytokine and AMP production by KCs; this led us to hypothesise that it may not enhance the risk of mycotic skin infections. PMID:24512536

  20. Expression analysis of cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 in B cells during pregnancy and their role on cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, M L; Muzzio, D O; Ehrhardt, J; Franchi, A M; Zygmunt, M; Jensen, F

    2016-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists in a family of lipids that binds to and activates cannabinoid receptors. There are two receptors so far described, the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2). In the context of pregnancy, the endocannabinoid system was shown participates in different key aspects of reproductive events. B-lymphocytes are pleiotropic cells belonging to the adaptive arm of the immune system. Besides immunoglobulin production, B-lymphocytes were recently shown to be actively involved in antigen presentation as well as cytokine production, thus playing a central role in immunity. In this study we first aimed to characterize the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in B cells during pregnancy and then analyze the impact of their activation in term of cytokine production by B cells from pregnant and non-pregnant mice. We observed that the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in B-lymphocytes is differentially regulated during pregnancy. While CB2 expression is down regulated CB1 is augmented in B-lymphocytes of pregnant mice. Additionally, the treatment of activated B-lymphocytes with specific CB1 and CB2 agonists, showed a different response in term of cytokine production. Particularly, CB1 against boosted the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by activated B-lymphocytes from pregnant mice. PMID:27163857

  1. Th17 cytokines differentiate obesity from obesity-associated type 2 diabetes and promote TNFα production

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Blanche; Cilfone, Nicholas; Belkina, Anna C.; DeFuria, Jason; Jagannathan-Bogdan, Madhumita; Zhu, Min; Kuchibhatla, Ramya; McDonnell, Marie E.; Xiao, Qiang; Kepler, Thomas B.; Apovian, Caroline M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective T cell inflammation plays pivotal roles in obesity-associated type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The identification of dominant sources of T cell inflammation in humans remains a significant gap in understanding disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized that cytokine profiles from circulating T cells identify T cell subsets and T cell cytokines that define T2DM-associated inflammation. Methods We used multiplex analyses to quantify T cell-associated cytokines in αCD3/αCD28-stimulated PBMCs, or B cell-depleted PBMCs, from subjects with T2DM or BMI-matched controls. We subjected cytokine measurements to multivariate (principal component and partial least squares) analyses. Flow cytometry detected intracellular TNFα in multiple immune cells subsets in the presence/absence of antibodies that neutralize T cell cytokines. Results T cell cytokines were generally higher in T2DM samples, but Th17 cytokines are specifically important for classifying individuals correctly as T2DM. Multivariate analyses indicated that B cells support Th17 inflammation in T2DM but not control samples, while monocytes supported Th17 inflammation regardless of T2DM status. Partial least squares regression analysis indicated that both Th17 and Th1 cytokines impact %HbA1c. Conclusions Among various T cell subsets, Th17 cells are major contributors to inflammation and hyperglycemia, and are uniquely supported by B cells in obesity-associated T2DM. PMID:26576827

  2. Velutin reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory cytokine TNFa and IL-6 production by inhibiting NF-Kappa B activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have shown that some flavonoids are modulators of proinflammatory cytokine expression. Velutin, an uncommon flavone isolated from acai (Euterpe oleraceas) berry, was tested for the effects in reducing LPS-induced TNFa and IL-6 production in RAW 264.7 peripheral macrophages and periton...

  3. Beta-glucan activates microglia without inducing cytokine production in Dectin-1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vaibhav B; Huang, Yongcheng; Keshwara, Rohan; Ozment-Skelton, Tammy; Williams, David L; Keshvara, Lakhu

    2008-03-01

    Microglia are the resident mononuclear phagocytic cells that are critical for innate and adaptive responses within the CNS. Like other immune cells, microglia recognize and are activated by various pathogen-associated molecular patterns. beta-glucans are pathogen-associated molecular patterns present within fungal cell walls that are known to trigger protective responses in a number of immune cells. In an effort to better understand microglial responses to beta-glucans and the underlying response pathways, we sought to determine whether Dectin-1, a major beta-glucan receptor recently identified in leukocytes, plays a similar role in beta-glucan-induced activation in microglia. In this study, we report that Dectin-1 is indeed expressed on the surface of murine primary microglia, and engagement of the receptor with particulate beta-glucan resulted in an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase, a hallmark feature of the Dectin-1 signaling pathway. Moreover, phagocytosis of beta-glucan particles and subsequent intracellular production of reactive oxygen species were also mediated by Dectin-1. However, unlike in macrophages and dendritic cells, beta-glucan-mediated microglial activation did not result in significant production of cytokines or chemokines; thus, the interaction of microglial Dectin-1 with glucan elicits a unique response. Our results suggest that the Dectin-1 pathway may play an important role in antifungal immunity in the CNS. PMID:18292498

  4. A Novel Compound C12 Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Protects from Inflammatory Injury In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yong; Li, Jianling; Zhang, Yali; Ye, Faqing; Yang, Shulin; Zhang, Hui; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases. Although steroids and cyclooxygenase inhibitors are main anti-inflammatory therapeutical agents, they may cause serious side effects. Therefore, developing non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents is urgently needed. A novel hydrosoluble compound, C12 (2,6-bis(4-(3-(dimethylamino)-propoxy)benzylidene)cyclohexanone), has been designed and synthesized as an anti-inflammatory agent in our previous study. In the present study, we investigated whether C12 can affect inflammatory processes in vitro and in vivo. In mouse primary peritoneal macrophages, C12 potently inhibited the production of the proinflammatory gene expression including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and PGE synthase. The activity of C12 was partly dependent on inhibition of ERK/JNK (but p38) phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. In vivo, C12 suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in plasma and liver, attenuated lung histopathology, and significantly reduced mortality in endotoxemic mice. In addition, the pre-treatment with C12 reduced the inflammatory pain in the acetic acid and formalin models and reduced the carrageenan-induced paw oedema and acetic acid-increased vascular permeability. Taken together, C12 has multiple anti-inflammatory effects. These findings, coupled with the low toxicity and hydrosolubility of C12, suggests that this agent may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:21931698

  5. Production of antibodies to canine IL-1beta and canine TNF to assess the role of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Vannozza; Ott, Fabienne; Fischer, René W; Gram, Hermann; Peele, John; Spreng, David; Schmökel, Hugo; Jungi, Thomas W

    2005-08-15

    IL-1 and TNF are important proinflammatory cytokines implicated in both antimicrobial host defense and pathogenesis of diseases with an immune-mediated and/or inflammatory component. Respective studies in the dog have been hampered by the unavailability of reagents allowing the specific measurement of canine cytokine proteins and the effect of canine cytokine neutralization by Ab. Starting with recombinant canine (rcan) IL-1beta and rcanTNF, four polyclonal antisera and 22 mAb specific for rcanIL-1beta and rcanTNF were generated. Their usefulness in neutralization assays was determined. Using cytokine-containing supernatants of canine cells in bioassays, polyclonal antisera neutralized either canine IL-1beta or TNF. TNF was also neutralized by three antibodies developed in this study and one commercial mAb. The usefulness of monoclonal and polyclonal Ab in canine cytokine-specific Ab capture ELISA's was assessed. This resulted in the identification of a commercial mAb combination and one pair developed in this study allowing low levels of TNF to be detected by antibody capture ELISA. The detection limit was 141 pg/ml rcanTNF for both combinations. Using rcanIL-1beta as an antigen allowed the detection of lower concentrations of rcanIL-1beta (20 pg/ml, on the average) by a pair of polyclonal antisera than when monoclonals were used. By using such IL-1beta-specific and TNF-specific ELISA's, the respective cytokines were detected in supernatants of canine PBMC stimulated with LPS or heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes and interferon-gamma combined. Thus, monoclonal and polyclonal reagents were identified allowing the quantitation of canine IL-1beta and TNF production in vitro, and the neutralization of these cytokines. PMID:15982477

  6. IL-1β (interleukin-1β) stimulates the production and release of multiple cytokines and chemokines by human preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Alomar, Suliman Y; Gentili, Alessandra; Zaibi, Mohamed S; Kępczyńska, Malgorzata A; Trayhurn, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The effect of IL-1β on cytokine and chemokine production by human preadipocytes has been examined. Preadipocytes were incubated with IL-1β, and cytokine and chemokine release was measured at 24 h by protein arrays, while the expression of cytokine/chemokine genes was assessed by qPCR at 4 and 24 h. IL-1β stimulated the secretion of multiple cytokines/chemokines, including IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, MCP-4, TNFα and IP-10. IL-10 was not released by un-stimulated preadipocytes, while IL-6 exhibited the greatest response to IL-1β (453-fold increase). IL-16 and IL-12p40 did not respond to IL-1β. qPCR demonstrated that IL-1β markedly stimulated CCL3, CSF3 and CXCL10 expression at 4 h (>900-fold mRNA increase). A time-course indicated that while CCL13 (encoding MCP-4) exhibited minimal basal expression in preadipocytes, expression increased progressively following differentiation. Human preadipocytes are highly sensitive to IL-1β, the cytokine stimulating a major inflammatory response in these cells similar to that in mature adipocytes. PMID:26890442

  7. Borrelia-induced cytokine production is mediated by spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) but is Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 independent.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Marije; Buffen, Kathrin; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Verschueren, Ineke C; Koentgen, Frank; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2015-12-01

    Although it is known that Borrelia species express sugar-like structures on their outer surface, not much is known about the role of these structures in immune recognition by host cells. Fungi, like Candida albicans, are mainly recognized by C-type lectin receptors, in specific Dectin-1 and Dectin-2. In this study we assessed the role of Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 in the recognition process of Borrelia spirochetes. Using specific inhibitors against these receptors on human cells did not influenced cytokine production. Individuals carrying a SNP leading to an early stop codon in the DECTIN-1 gene also did not lead to differential induction of Borrelia-dependent cytokines. After injection of live Borrelia into knee joints of Dectin-2 deficient mice a trend towards lower inflammation was observed. Inhibition of Syk in human cells resulted in lower cytokine production after Borrelia stimulation. In conclusion, Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 seem not to play a major role in Borrelia recognition or Borrelia-induced inflammation. However, Syk seems to be involved in Borrelia-induced cytokine production. PMID:26297607

  8. Dose-Dependent Suppression of Cytokine production from T cells by a Novel Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Delta Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Way, Emily E.; Trevejo-Nunez, Giraldina; Kane, Lawrence P.; Steiner, Bart H.; Puri, Kamal D.; Kolls, Jay K.; Chen, Kong

    2016-01-01

    There remains a significant need for development of effective small molecules that can inhibit cytokine-mediated inflammation. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) is a direct upstream activator of AKT, and plays a critical role in multiple cell signaling pathways, cell cycle progression, and cell growth, and PI3K inhibitors have been approved or are in clinical development. We examined novel PI3Kdelta inhibitors, which are highly selective for the p110delta isoform of in CD3/CD28 stimulated T-cell cytokine production. In vitro generated CD4+ T effector cells stimulated in the presence of a PI3Kdelta inhibitor demonstrated a dose-dependent suppression of cytokines produced by Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells. This effect was T-cell intrinsic, and we observed similar effects on human PBMCs. Th17 cells expressing a constitutively activated form of AKT were resistant to PI3Kdelta inhibition, suggesting that the inhibitor is acting through AKT signaling pathways. Additionally, PI3Kdelta inhibition decreased IL-17 production in vivo and decreased neutrophil recruitment to the lung in a murine model of acute pulmonary inflammation. These experiments show that targeting PI3Kdelta activity can modulate T-cell cytokine production and reduce inflammation in vivo, suggesting that PI3Kdelta inhibition could have therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:27461849

  9. Stearic acid induces proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongming; Chen, Liang; Hao, Lijun; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Yujuan; Ruan, Zhihua; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics stress and chronic inflammation in obesity are causally linked to osteoarthritis. However, the metabolic factors mediating obesity-related osteoarthritis are still obscure. Here we scanned and identified at least two elevated metabolites (stearic acid and lactate) from the plasma of diet-induced obese mice. We found that stearic acid potentiated LDH-a-dependent production of lactate, which further stabilized HIF1α protein and increased VEGF and proinflammatory cytokine expression in primary mouse chondrocytes. Treatment with LDH-a and HIF1α inhibitors notably attenuated stearic acid-or high fat diet-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, positive correlation of plasma lactate, cartilage HIF1α and cytokine levels with the body mass index was observed in subjects with osteoarthritis. In conclusion, saturated free fatty acid induced proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of a novel lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes. Our findings hold promise of developing novel clinical strategies for the management of obesity-related diseases such as osteoarthritis. PMID:26271607

  10. Cytokine production of the neutrophils and macrophages in time of phagocytosis under influence of infrared low-level laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudik, Dmitry V.; Tikhomirova, Elena I.; Tuchina, Elena S.

    2006-08-01

    Influence of infrared low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on induction of synthesis of some cytokines such as interleykin-1 (Il-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (INF-γ), interleykin-8 (Il-8) and interleykin-4 (Il-4) by the neutrophils and macrophages in time of bacterial cells phagocytosis that was searched. As the object of analysis we used peritoneal macrophages from white mice and neutrophils from peripheral blood of healthy donors. We used the laser diod with spectrum maximum of 850 nm with doses 300, 900 and 1500 mJ (exposition -60, 180 and 300 s respectively; capacity - 5 mW). We carried out the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay (ELISA) to determine cytokine content during phagocytosis after 3 h and 6 h. We found dynamics in production of the cytokines, which was different for the neutrophils and macrophages. We showed that the infrared LLLI has significant stimulating activity on the proinflammatory cytokines production by neutrophils and macrophages. Moreover we revealed dynamics changing in the Il-8 and Il-4 production.

  11. Selective effects of Lactobacillus casei Shirota on T cell activation, natural killer cell activity and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Dong, H; Rowland, I; Tuohy, K M; Thomas, L V; Yaqoob, P

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of host immunity is an important potential mechanism by which probiotics confer health benefits. This study was designed to investigate the effects of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS), on immune function using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro. In addition, the role of monocytes in LcS-induced immunity was also explored. LcS promoted natural killer (NK) cell activity and preferentially induced expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD8+ and CD56+ subsets in the absence of any other stimulus. LcS also induced production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-12 and IL-10 in the absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the presence of LPS, LcS enhanced IL-1β production but inhibited LPS-induced IL-10 and IL-6 production, and had no further effect on TNF-α and IL-12 production. Monocyte depletion reduced significantly the impact of LcS on lymphocyte activation, cytokine production and natural killer (NK) cell activity. In conclusion, LcS activated cytotoxic lymphocytes preferentially in both the innate and specific immune systems, which suggests that LcS could potentiate the destruction of infected cells in the body. LcS also induced both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production in the absence of LPS, but in some cases inhibited LPS-induced cytokine production. Monocytes play an important role in LcS-induced immunological responses. PMID:20456417

  12. Altered Cytokine Production By Specific Human Peripheral Blood Cell Subsets Immediately Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Cubbage, Michael L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we have attempted to combine standard immunological assays with the cellular resolving power of the flow cytometer to positively identify the specific cell types involved in spaceflight-induced immune alterations. We have obtained whole blood samples from 27 astronauts collected at three timepoints (L-10, R+0 and R+3) surrounding four recent space shuttle missions. The duration of these missions ranged from 10 to 18 days. Assays performed included serum/urine cortisol, comprehensive subset phenotyping, assessment of cellular activation markers and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following spaceflight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated trends towards a decreased percentage of T cells and an increased percentage of B cells. Nearly all of the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, which was dramatic in some individuals. Assessment of memory (CD45RA+) vs. naive (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was more ambiguous, with subjects tending to group more as a flight crew. All subjects from one mission demonstrated an increased CD45RA:CD45RO ratio, while all subjects from another Mission demonstrated a decreased ratio. While no significant trend was seen in the monocyte population as defined by scatter, a decreased percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset was seen following spaceflight in all subjects tested. In general, most of the cellular changes described above which were assessed at R+O and compared to L-10 trended to pre-flight levels by R+3. Although no significant differences were seen in the expression of the cellular activation markers CD69 and CD25 following exposure to microgravity, significant alterations were seen in cytokine production in response to mitogenic activation for specific subsets. T cell (CD3+) production of IL-2 was significantly decreased

  13. Cytokine production in patients with papillary thyroid cancer and associated autoimmune Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zivancevic-Simonovic, Snezana; Mihaljevic, Olgica; Majstorovic, Ivana; Popovic, Suzana; Markovic, Slavica; Milosevic-Djordjevic, Olivera; Jovanovic, Zorica; Mijatovic-Teodorovic, Ljiljana; Mihajlovic, Dusan; Colic, Miodrag

    2015-08-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most frequent thyroid autoimmune disease, while papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common endocrine malignancies. A few patients with HT also develop PTC. The aim of this study was to analyze cytokine profiles in patients with PTC accompanied with autoimmune HT in comparison with those in patients with PTC alone or HT alone and healthy subjects. Cytokine levels were determined in supernatants obtained from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated whole blood cultures in vitro. The concentrations of selected cytokines: Th1-interferon gamma (IFN-γ); Th2-interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 5 (IL-5), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interleukin 13 (IL-13); Th9-interleukin 9 (IL-9); and Th17-interleukin 17 (IL-17A) were measured using multiplex cytokine detection systems for human Th1/Th2/Th9/Th17/Th22. We found that PTC patients with HT produced significantly higher concentrations of IL-4, IL-6, IL-9, IL-13 and IFN-γ than PTC patients without HT. In conclusion, autoimmune HT affects the cytokine profile of patients with PTC by stimulating secretion of Th1/Th2/Th9 types of cytokines. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratios in PTC patients with associated autoimmune HT indicate a marked shift toward Th2 immunity. PMID:25971541

  14. Suppressed cytokine production in whole blood cultures is related to iron status and is partially corrected following weight reduction in morbidly obese pre-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assess ex vivo whole-blood cytokine production and its association with iron status in obese versus non-obese women. Determine the change in ex vivo whole-blood cytokine production six months after restrictive bariatric surgery in the obese group. Subjects were 17 obese (BMI: 46.6 ±7.9 kg/m2) and 1...

  15. Molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of cytokine production by muramyl dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Windheim, Mark; Lang, Christine; Peggie, Mark; Plater, Lorna A.; Cohen, Philip

    2007-01-01

    MDP (muramyl dipeptide), a component of peptidoglycan, interacts with NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2) stimulating the NOD2–RIP2 (receptor-interacting protein 2) complex to activate signalling pathways important for antibacterial defence. Here we demonstrate that the protein kinase activity of RIP2 has two functions, namely to limit the strength of downstream signalling and to stabilize the active enzyme. Thus pharmacological inhibition of RIP2 kinase with either SB 203580 [a p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) inhibitor] or the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2 induces a rapid and drastic decrease in the level of the RIP2 protein, which may explain why these RIP2 inhibitors block MDP-stimulated downstream signalling and the production of IL-1β (interleukin-1β) and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor-α). We also show that RIP2 induces the activation of the protein kinase TAK1 (transforming-growth-factor-β-activated kinase-1), that a dominant-negative mutant of TAK1 inhibits RIP2-induced activation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p38α MAPK, and that signalling downstream of NOD2 or RIP2 is reduced by the TAK1 inhibitor (5Z)-7-oxozeaenol or in TAK1-deficient cells. We also show that MDP activates ERK1 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1)/ERK2 and p38α MAPK in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells and that the activity of both MAPKs and TAK1 are required for MDP-induced signalling and production of IL-1β and TNFα in these cells. Taken together, our results indicate that the MDP–NOD2/RIP2 and LPS (lipopolysaccharide)–TLR4 (Toll-like receptor 4) signalling pathways converge at the level of TAK1 and that many subsequent events that lead to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines are common to both pathways. PMID:17348859

  16. Involvement of proton-sensing TDAG8 in extracellular acidification-induced inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production in peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mogi, Chihiro; Tobo, Masayuki; Tomura, Hideaki; Murata, Naoya; He, Xiao-dong; Sato, Koichi; Kimura, Takao; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Sasaki, Takehiko; Sato, Takashi; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Harada, Akihiro; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2009-03-01

    Extracellular acidification inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha protein production, which was associated with an inhibition of TNF-alpha mRNA expression, in mouse peritoneal macrophages. The LPS-induced cytokine production was also inhibited by G(s) protein-coupled receptor agonists prostaglandin E(1) and isoproterenol. Among OGR1 family proton-sensing GTP-binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors, TDAG8, OGR1, and G2A are expressed in the cells. The inhibitory action by acidic pH on TNF-alpha production was significantly attenuated in macrophages from TDAG8(Tp/Tp) mice but not in those from OGR1(geo/geo) mice. Moreover, small interfering RNA specific to TDAG8, but not to G2A, clearly attenuated the acidification-induced inhibition of TNF-alpha production. On the other hand, the down-regulation or deficiency of TDAG8 hardly affected prostaglandin E(1)- or isoproterenol-induced actions. LPS-induced IL-6 production was also inhibited by extracellular acidification in a manner that was sensitive to TDAG8 expression. The acidic pH-induced inhibitory action on the cytokine production was significantly reversed either by a small interfering RNA specific to G(s) proteins or by a protein kinase A (PKA)-specific inhibitor H89. Indeed, a PKA-specific cAMP derivative inhibited LPS-induced cytokine production. Moreover, acidification induced cAMP accumulation in a TDAG8-specific way. We conclude that TDAG8, at least partly, mediates the extracellular acidification-induced inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production through the G(s) protein/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in mouse macrophages. PMID:19234222

  17. Characterization of cytokine production in infectious mononucleosis studied at a single-cell level in tonsil and peripheral blood.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, J; Andersson, U

    1993-01-01

    Cytokine profile and production was studied at a single-cell level in cells obtained from 14 patients with acute infectious mononucleosis (IM), with less than 7 days of symptomatic disease, by use of cytokine-specific MoAbs and indirect immunofluorescence technique. In producer cells, all the studied cytokines, except IL-1, accumulated in the Golgi system, which resulted in a characteristic morphology of the staining. Less than one in a thousand mononuclear cells obtained directly from IM blood and stained within 2 h of sampling produced IL-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or TNF-beta, spontaneously. However, these cells were induced to cytokine synthesis by T cell receptor ligation in vitro using immobilized anti-CD3 MoAbs for 2-3 h restimulation under conditions which did not activate normal cells. By this approach 168 +/- 120 cells/10,000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells produced IFN-gamma as compared with 10 +/- 8 cells/10,000 non-stimulated cultured cells obtained from IM patients (P < 0.001) and 1/10,000 cells obtained from healthy controls, respectively. No induced production of IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, GM-CSF or TNF-beta was detected in IM cells obtained from peripheral blood by this restimulation. In contrast, a spontaneous cytokine production was evident in tonsil material obtained from four IM patients tonsilectomized because of respiratory obstruction. From this site 160 +/- 40 cells/10,000 cells produced IL-2, 40 +/- 30 cells IL-6, 30 +/- 30 cells TNF-beta and 35 +/- 25 cells IFN-gamma, respectively. No such spontaneous IL-2, IL-6, TNF-beta or IFN-gamma production was evident in control cells obtained from patients tonsilectomized because of chronic tonsil hyperplasia. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8467566

  18. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca2+ elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca2+ elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca2+ entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  19. Induction of Inhibitory Receptors on T Cells During Plasmodium vivax Malaria Impairs Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro A C; Leoratti, Fabiana M S; Figueiredo, Maria M; Tada, Mauro S; Pereira, Dhelio B; Junqueira, Caroline; Soares, Irene S; Barber, Daniel L; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Antonelli, Lis R V

    2015-12-15

    The function and regulation of the immune response triggered during malaria is complex and poorly understood, and there is a particular paucity of studies conducted in humans infected with Plasmodium vivax. While it has been proposed that T-cell-effector responses are crucial for protection against blood-stage malaria in mice, the mechanisms behind this in humans remain poorly understood. Experimental models of malaria have shown that the regulatory molecules, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte attenuator-4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), and programmed death-1 (PD-1) are involved in the functional impairment of T cells during infection. Our goal was to define the role of these molecules during P. vivax malaria. We demonstrate that infection triggers the expression of regulatory molecules on T cells. The pattern of expression differs in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Higher frequencies of CD4(+) express more than 1 regulatory molecule compared to CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, lower proportions of CD4(+) T cells coexpress regulatory molecules, but are still able to proliferate. Importantly, simultaneously blockade of the CLTA-4, PD-1, and T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin-3 signaling restores the cytokine production by antigen-specific cells. These data support the hypothesis that upregulation of inhibitory receptors on T cells during P. vivax malaria impairs parasite-specific T-cell effector function. PMID:26019284

  20. Cytokine and Eicosanoid Production by Cultured Human Monocytes Exposed to Titanium Particulate Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Timothy M.; Manley, Paul A.; Sims, Paul A.; Albrecht, Ralph; Darien, Benjamin J.

    1999-10-01

    Phagocytosis of particulate wear debris from arthroplasties by macrophages induces an inflammatory response that has been linked to implant loosening and premature failure of artificial joints. Inflammatory mediators released by phagocytic macrophages such as tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-[alpha]), interleukin-1[beta] (IL-1[beta]), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening. The objective of this study was to characterize titanium alloy particulates that closely match wear debris found around joint arthroplasties and to study their effects on the biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators by cultured monocytes. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human volunteers. Monocytes were cultured in 96-well plates for 24 h, washed, and exposed to three concentrations of titanium particulates and controls from 18Ð24 h. Supernatants were assayed for TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], IL-6, and PGE2 activity. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) verified the titanium alloy to be Ti6A14V. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed significant titanium particulate heterogeneity with approximately 95% of the particles <1 micrometer in diameter. SEM and EDX technology was useful in the characterization of the titanium particulates utilized for in vitro models of titanium-induced cytokine release by monocytes. Incubation of titanium particulates (in concentrations similar to those found around loosened prosthetic joints) with cultured monocytes significantly increased their production of TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], and PGE2.

  1. Role of antigen presentation in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in obese adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Majdoubi, Abdelilah; Kishta, Osama A; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Type II diabetes regroups different physiological anomalies that ultimately lead to low-grade chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and loss of pancreatic β-cells. Obesity is one of the best examples of such a condition that can develop into Metabolic Syndrome, causing serious health problems of great socio-economic consequences. The pathological outcome of obesity has a genetic basis and depends on the delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory effectors of the immune system. The causal link between obesity and inflammation is well established. While innate immunity plays a key role in the development of a pro-inflammatory state in obese adipose tissues, it has now become clear that adaptive immune cells are also involved and participate in the cascade of events that lead to metabolic perturbations. The efficacy of some immunotherapeutic protocols in reducing the symptoms of obesity-driven metabolic syndrome in mice implicated all arms of the immune response. Recently, the production of pathogenic immunoglobulins and pro-inflammatory cytokines by B and T lymphocytes suggested an auto-immune basis for the establishment of a non-healthy obese state. Understanding the cellular landscape of obese adipose tissues and how immune cells sustain chronic inflammation holds the key to the development of targeted therapies. In this review, we emphasize the role of antigen-presenting cells and MHC molecules in obese adipose tissue and the general contribution of the adaptive arm of the immune system in inflammation-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26854212

  2. α-(-)-bisabolol reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production and ameliorates skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Anil K; Singh, Monika; Dubey, Vijaya; Srivastava, Suchita; Luqman, Suaib; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar U

    2014-01-01

    α-(-)-bisabolol is a natural monocyclic sesquiterpene present in the essential oil has generated considerable interest in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and currently in use in various formulations, mainly in cosmetics. This study was undertaken to evaluate its therapeutic profile against skin inflammation using in-vitro, in-vivo and in-silico assays. Lipopolysachharide (LPS) and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) in macrophage cells as well as in TPA-induced skin inflammation in mice was significantly inhibited by α-(-)-bisabolol. TPA-induced ear thickness, ear weight and lipid peroxidation and histopathological damage in the ear tissue were also significantly inhibited by topical application of α-(-)-bisabolol in a dose dependent manner. In-vitro and in-vivo toxicity profiles indicate that it is safe for topical application on skin. Molecular docking study also revealed its strong binding affinity to the active site of the pro-inflammatory proteins. These findings suggested that α-(-)-bisabolol may be a useful therapeutic candidate for the treatment of skin inflammation. PMID:24894548

  3. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  4. Contribution of IPS-1 to polyI:C-induced cytokine production in conjunctival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Mayumi; Kawai, Taro; Yokoi, Norihiko; Akira, Shizuo; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ocular surface epithelium expressed TLR3 and that its ligand, polyI:C, stimulation induced the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and type I IFN. It was recently reported that RIG-I and MDA5 also recognize viral dsRNA mimicking polyI:C. In this study, we investigated whether RIG-I and/or MDA5 contribute to polyI:C-inducible responses in conjunctival epithelium. The expression of RIG-I, MDA5, and TLR3 in human conjunctival epithelium was examined by RT-PCR and their up-regulation after polyI:C stimulation by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. Human conjunctival epithelial cells also expressed RIG-I, MDA5 and TLR3 mRNA and protein. The expression of RIG-I and MDA5, but not of TLR3, was markedly up-regulated upon polyI:C stimulation. We also examined the function of IPS-1 (an adaptor molecule common to RIG-I and/or MDA5) and TLR3 in conjunctival epithelium using IPS-1 KO and TLR3 KO mice. To analyze in vivo murine conjunctival epithelial cells, 10 μl of a 100 μg/ml polyI:C solution were delivered subconjunctivally and as eye drops, then conjunctival epithelial cells were subjected to gene expression analysis. We focused on 10 transcripts up-regulated in murine conjunctival epithelium upon polyI:C stimulation. Cxcl10, Mx1, Ifi44, Ifi203, Iigp2 and Rtp4 were dominantly regulated by IPS-1, Ccl5 by TLR3, and Rsad2, Mx2 and Cmpk2 were regulated by TLR3 and IPS-1. Our results showed that conjunctival epithelial cells express RIG-I and MDA5, and IPS-1, an adaptor molecule common to RIG-I and MDA5, contributes to polyI:C-inducible cytokine production in conjunctival epithelial cells. PMID:21130742

  5. Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria Do Not Trigger Monocytic Cytokine Production through Similar Intracellular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rabehi, Lila; Irinopoulou, Théano; Cholley, Béatrice; Haeffner-Cavaillon, Nicole; Carreno, Marie-Paule

    2001-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in human monocyte activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Staphylococcus aureus Cowan (SAC), suggesting that gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria may trigger similar intracellular events. Treatment with specific kinase inhibitors prior to cell stimulation dramatically decreased LPS-induced cytokine production. Blocking of the p38 pathway prior to LPS stimulation decreased interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1ra, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production, whereas blocking of the ERK1/2 pathways inhibited IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1ra but not TNF-α production. When cells were stimulated by SAC, inhibition of the p38 pathway did not affect cytokine production, whereas only IL-1α production was decreased in the presence of ERK kinase inhibitor. We also demonstrated that although LPS and SAC have been shown to bind to CD14 before transmitting signals to TLR4 and TLR2, respectively, internalization of CD14 occurred only in monocytes triggered by LPS. Pretreatment of the cells with SB203580, U0126, or a mixture of both inhibitors did not affect internalization of CD14. Altogether, these results suggest that TLR2 signaling does not involve p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways, indicating that divergent pathways are triggered by gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, thereby inducing cytokine production. PMID:11402003

  6. Transmissible Plasmid Containing Salmonella enterica Heidelberg Isolates Modulate Cytokine Production During Early Stage of Interaction with Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Khare, Sangeeta; Williams, Katherine; Foley, Steven L

    2016-08-01

    The variation in cytokine production during bacterial invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) is a contributing factor for progression of the infection. A few Salmonella enterica Heidelberg strains isolated from poultry products harbor transmissible plasmids (TPs), including those that encode a type-IV secretion system. Earlier, we showed that these TPs are responsible for increased virulence during infection. This study examines the potential role of these TPs in cytokine production in IECs. This study showed that S. Heidelberg strains containing TPs (we refer as virulent strains) caused decreased interleukin (IL)-10 production in IECs after 1 h infection. The virulent strains induced a high level of tumor necrosis factor-α production under identical conditions. The virulent strains of S. Heidelberg also altered the production of IL-2, IL-17, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor compared to an avirulent strain. As a part of infection, bacteria cross the epithelial barrier and encounter intestinal macrophages. Hence, we examined the cytotoxic mechanism of strains of S. Heidelberg in macrophages. Scanning electron microscopy showed cell necrosis occurs during the early stage of infection. In conclusion, virulent S. Heidelberg strains were able to modify the host cytokine profile during the early stages of infection and also caused necrosis in macrophages. PMID:27082282

  7. Time dependent production of cytokines and eicosanoids by human monocytic leukaemia U937 cells; effects of glucocorticosteroids.

    PubMed Central

    Garrelds, I M; van Hal, P T; Haakmat, R C; Hoogsteden, H C; Saxena, P R; Zijlstra, F J

    1999-01-01

    In the present study the human monoblast cell line U937 has been used as a model to study the function of human mononuclear phagocytes in asthma. The kinetics of the production of eicosanoids and cytokines, which are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, were studied. In addition, the effects of glucocorticosteroids were investigated, as these drugs are of great importance for the treatment of asthmatic patients. After stimulation with phorbol-12 myristate acetate (PMA) for 24 h, U937 cells were cultured in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS: 1 and 5 microg ml(-1)) and glucocorticosteroids (budesonide, fluticasone propionate and prednisolone: 10(-11), 10(-9) and 10(-7) M) for 96 h. The production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) gradually increased in time after stimulation with LPS, whereas the transient production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) reached its maximum between 6 and 12 h. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were not detectable. All three glucocorticosteroids (budesonide, fluticasone propionate and prednisolone) completely inhibited the production of both eicosanoids and cytokines. The production of eicosanoids was more sensitive to these glucocorticoids than the production of cytokines. The observed differences in the kinetics of the production of eicosanoids and cytokines stress the importance of time course experiments in studies on the effect of drugs on mononuclear cells. PMID:10704077

  8. Modulation of immunoglobulin production and cytokine mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, M; Zhang, X; Petrosian, A; Galera, O A; Wang, S J; Jordan, S C

    1994-05-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has the potential to regulate Ig production, but the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect is unknown. In experiments reported here, we examined the ability of IVIG to regulate Ig production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with pokeweed mitogen (PWM). IVIG (2-10 mg/ml) showed a potent (80-85%) inhibition of PWM-stimulated IgG, IgM, and IgA production. To determine more precisely how IVIG mediated the inhibition of Ig production, we studied Ig promoting cytokine gene expression after PWM stimulation with or without IVIG (2 and 10 mg/ml) using dot-blot techniques. RNA was isolated from PBMCs at predetermined time points and probed with cDNAs specific for human cytokines (IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, gamma-IFN, and TNF-alpha). IL-6 mRNA accumulation was maximal at 4.5 hr post-PWM stimulation and was inhibited 64-75% when IVIG (10 mg/ml) was present. gamma-IFN mRNA levels peaked at 72 hr poststimulation and were also 68-75% inhibited by IVIG. IL-2 mRNA levels peaked at 4.5 hr and were 23-46% inhibited by IVIG. The inhibitory effect of IVIG on production of these cytokines (IL-6 and gamma-IFN) was also observed at the protein level in sonicated PBMCs after incubation with PWM and IVIG. The mRNA levels for other cytokines were not or only minimally inhibited by IVIG. Addition of IL-6, gamma-IFN, or IL-2 partially restored Ig production in IVIG-treated PWM-stimulated cultures, suggesting that inhibition of other cytokines or another mechanism(s) independent of cytokine inhibition might also be involved, although inhibition of IL-6, gamma-IFN, and IL-2 may be one of the critical factors in the suppression of Ig production by IVIG. PMID:7523434

  9. An ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. Inhibits human macrophage cytokine production induced by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Kooltheat, Nateelak; Sranujit, Rungnapa Pankla; Chumark, Pilaipark; Potup, Pachuen; Laytragoon-Lewin, Nongnit; Usuwanthim, Kanchana

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (MO) has been reported to harbor anti-oxidation and anti-inflammatory activity and useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, despite these findings there has been little work done on the effects of MO on immune cellular function. Since macrophages, TNF and related cytokines play an important pathophysiologic role in lung damage induced by cigarette smoke, we examined the effects of MO on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cytokine production by human macrophages. An ethyl acetate fraction of MO (MOEF) was prepared from fresh leaves extract of Moringa and shown to consist of high levels of phenolic and antioxidant activities. Human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) pre-treated with varying concentrations of MOEF showed decreased production of TNF, IL-6 and IL-8 in response to both LPS and CSE. The decrease was evident at both cytokine protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, the extract inhibited the expression of RelA, a gene implicated in the NF-κB p65 signaling in inflammation. The findings highlight the ability of MOEF to inhibit cytokines (IL-8) which promote the infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs and others (TNF, IL-6) which mediate tissue disease and damage. PMID:24553063

  10. Forced expression of stabilized c-Fos in dendritic cells reduces cytokine production and immune responses in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ryoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Sakaguchi, Ryota; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Kimura, Akihiro; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Shiraishi, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Kouji; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos produced less inflammatory cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos activated T cells less efficiently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transgenic mice expressing stabilized c-Fos were resistant to EAE model. -- Abstract: Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) suppresses innate immunity by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytic cells. We have shown that the transcription factor c-Fos is responsible for cAMP-mediated suppression of inflammatory cytokine production, and that c-Fos protein is stabilized by IKK{beta}-mediated phosphorylation. We found that S308 is one of the major phosphorylation sites, and that the S308D mutation prolongs c-Fos halflife. To investigate the role of stabilized c-Fos protein in dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, we generated CD11c-promoter-deriven c-FosS308D transgenic mice. As expected, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from these Tg mice produced smaller amounts of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-{alpha}, IL-12, and IL-23, but higher levels of IL-10, in response to LPS, than those from wild-type (Wt) mice. When T cells were co-cultured with BMDCs from Tg mice, production of Th1 and Th17 cytokines was reduced, although T cell proliferation was not affected. Tg mice demonstrated more resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) than did Wt mice. These data suggest that c-Fos in DCs plays a suppressive role in certain innate and adaptive immune responses.

  11. Probiotic supplement consumption alters cytokine production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a preliminary study using healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, N J; Garaiova, I; Williams, E A; Michael, D R; Plummer, S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of daily probiotic supplementation upon the immune profile of healthy participants by the assessment of ex vivo cytokine production. Twenty healthy adult volunteers received a multi-strain probiotic supplement consisting of two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus (CUL60 and CUL21), Bifidobacterium lactis (CUL34) and Bifidobacterium bifidum (CUL20) and fructooligosaccharide for 12 weeks. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and cultured ex vivo in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide and cytokine production was assessed. Postintervention, a significant decrease in the production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β was apparent when PBMCs were incubated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide, whilst a significant increase in IL-10 and transforning growth factor-β production was seen when the cells were incubated without an additional stimulus. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of a multi-strain probiotic supplement to alter the immune response as demonstrated by changes in ex vivo cytokine production. Such results demonstrate the potential benefit of probiotic supplementation for healthy individuals and warrants further investigation. PMID:24311314

  12. Effects of FK506 and cyclosporin A on cytokine production studied in vitro at a single-cell level.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, J; Nagy, S; Groth, C G; Andersson, U

    1992-01-01

    Mononuclear cells obtained from human blood were mitogen or antigen activated in vitro in the presence or absence of FK506 or cyclosporin A (CsA). Cytokine production was studied at a single-cell level by ultraviolet (UV) microscopy of fixed permeabilized cells using cytokine-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Phenotypic characterization of the monokine-producing cells was achieved by two-colour immunofluorescent staining. Cytokine production after antigen activation with Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A (SEA) was significantly reduced. FK506 or CsA inhibited SEA-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production both in monocytes (P less than 0.01) and in lymphocytes (P less than 0.001), at a drug concentration of 1-25 ng/ml for FK506 and 100-500 ng/ml for CsA. Lymphocyte synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and TNF-beta after SEA activation was also significantly reduced by either of the drugs. In contrast, endotoxin-induced monokine production (TNF-alpha and IL-6) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation was unaffected by FK506 or CsA even when added in concentrations as high as 1000 ng/ml. When the cells were stimulated by phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA) plus calcium ionophore (ionomycin), FK506 and CsA inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for FK506 or CsA on the cellular synthesis of the various cytokines varied between 0.6 and 1.0 ng/ml and 20 and 60 ng/ml, respectively. Further stimulation by addition of anti-CD28 mAb to the cultures resulted in an augmented IL-2 and IFN-gamma production which was resistant to both FK506 and CsA. This report delineates extensive similarities between the two drugs in mechanisms of immunosuppression by blockade of identical interleukin production. Depending on the mode of cell activation the two drugs inhibited not only cytokine production in lymphocytes but

  13. Dysregulated Cytokine Production by Dendritic Cells Modulates B Cell Responses in the NZM2410 Mouse Model of Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Allison; Zheng, Ying-Yi; Yin, Yiming; Dozmorov, Igor; Li, Hao; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Mountz, John D.; Morel, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown in tolerance of autoreactive B cells in the lupus-prone NZM2410-derived B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (TC) mice results in the secretion of autoantibodies. TC dendritic cells (DCs) enhance B cell proliferation and antibody secretion in a cytokine-dependent manner. However, the specific cytokine milieu by which TC DCs activate B cells was not known. In this study, we compared TC and C57BL/6 (B6) control for the distribution of DC subsets and for their production of cytokines affecting B cell responses. We show that TC DCs enhanced B cell proliferation through the production of IL-6 and IFN-γ, while antibody secretion was only dependent on IL-6. Pre-disease TC mice showed an expanded PDCA1+ cells prior to disease onset that was localized to the marginal zone and further expanded with age. The presence of PDCA1+ cells in the marginal zone correlated with a Type I Interferon (IFN) signature in marginal zone B cells, and this response was higher in TC than B6 mice. In vivo administration of anti-chromatin immune complexes upregulated IL-6 and IFN-γ production by splenic DCs from TC but not B6 mice. The production of BAFF and APRIL was decreased upon TC DC stimulation both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that these B cell survival factors do not play a role in B cell modulation by TC DCs. Finally, TC B cells were defective at downregulating IL-6 expression in response to anti-inflammatory apoptotic cell exposure. Overall, these results show that the TC autoimmune genetic background induces the production of B cell-modulating inflammatory cytokines by DCs, which are regulated by the microenvironment as well as the interplay between DC. PMID:25093822

  14. Effects of breast milk from allergic and non-allergic mothers on mitogen- and allergen-induced cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Malin F; Fredriksson, Jenny; Hellquist, Anna; Jenmalm, Maria C

    2003-02-01

    Breast milk contains several components that provide specific immunity and affect the maturation of the infant's immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of breast milk, on mitogen- and allergen-induced cytokine production from cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC), and if those effects differ between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The cells were incubated for 96 h with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), ovalbumin or cat dander in the presence of various dilutions of colostrum. Colostrum inhibited both mitogen- and cat-induced IFN-gamma and mitogen-induced interleukin-4 (IL-4) production. The inhibition on IFN-gamma production was to some extent caused by TGF-beta, as the effect was modified when an anti-TGF-beta antibody was added to the cultures. In contrast, colostrum enhanced allergen-induced production of the Th2-like cytokines IL-5 and IL-13, and this was accompanied with increased production of IL-10. No differences were found between allergic and non-allergic mothers. The inhibitory effect of breast milk on IFN-gamma production, which was partly due to the high levels of TGF-beta, together with the enhancing effect on IL-10 secretion, confirm that breast milk is anti-inflammatory. Although the production of IL-5 and IL-13 was enhanced by colostrum, this was accompanied with an increased production of IL-10. Together with the high levels of TGF-beta in breast milk and inhibitory effect of colostrum on IL-4 production, this suggests a possible mechanism whereby breast-feeding may protect against the development of allergy. Despite differences in the composition of breast milk between allergic and non-allergic mothers, the effects of breast milk on cytokine production from CBMC were independent of the atopic status of the mothers. PMID:12603708

  15. Distinct TLR-mediated cytokine production and immunoglobulin secretion in human newborn naïve B cells.

    PubMed

    Pettengill, Matthew A; van Haren, Simon D; Li, Ning; Dowling, David J; Bergelson, Ilana; Jans, Jop; Ferwerda, Gerben; Levy, Ofer

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal innate immunity is distinct from that of adults, which may contribute to increased susceptibility to infection and limit vaccine responses. B cells play critical roles in protection from infection and detect PAMPs via TLRs, that, when co-activated with CD40, can drive B-cell proliferation and Ab production. We characterized the expression of TLRs in circulating B cells from newborns and adults, and evaluated TLR- and CD40-mediated naïve B-cell class-switch recombination (CSR) and cytokine production. Gene expression levels of most TLRs was similar between newborn and adult B cells, except that newborn naïve B cells expressed more TLR9 than adult naïve B cells. Neonatal naïve B cells demonstrated impaired TLR2- and TLR7- but enhanced TLR9-mediated cytokine production. Significantly fewer newborn naïve B cells underwent CSR to produce IgG, an impairment also noted with IL-21 stimulation. Additionally, co-stimulation via CD40 and TLRs induced greater cytokine production in adult B cells. Thus, while newborn naïve B cells demonstrate adult-level expression of TLRs and CD40, the responses to stimulation of these receptors are distinct. Relatively high expression of TLR9 and impaired CD40-mediated Ig secretion contributes to distinct innate and adaptive immunity of human newborns and may inform novel approaches to early-life immunization. PMID:27252169

  16. Cytokine regulation of human lung fibroblast hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) production. Evidence for cytokine-regulated hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) degradation and human lung fibroblast-derived hyaluronidase.

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, P M; Rochester, C L; Freundlich, B; Elias, J A

    1992-01-01

    We characterized the mechanisms by which recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IFN-gamma, and IL-1, alone and in combination, regulate human lung fibroblast hyaluronic acid (HA) production. Each cytokine stimulated fibroblast HA production. The combination of rTNF and rIFN-gamma resulted in a synergistic increase in the production of high molecular weight HA. This was due to a synergistic increase in hyaluronate synthetase activity and a simultaneous decrease in HA degradation. In contrast, when rTNF and rIL-1 were combined, an additive increase in low molecular weight HA was noted. This was due to a synergistic increase in hyaluronate synthetase activity and a simultaneous increase in HA degradation. Human lung fibroblasts contained a hyaluronidase that, at pH 3.7, depolymerized high molecular weight HA to 10-40 kD end products of digestion. However, hyaluronidase activity did not correlate with fibroblast HA degradation. Instead, HA degradation correlated with fibroblast-HA binding, which was increased by rIL-1 plus rTNF and decreased by rIFN-gamma plus rTNF. Recombinant IL-1 and rTNF weakly stimulated and rIL-1 and rTNF in combination further augmented the levels of CD44 mRNA in lung fibroblasts. In contrast, rIFN-gamma did not significantly alter the levels of CD44 mRNA in unstimulated or rTNF stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that rIL-1, rTNF, and rIFN-gamma have complex effects on biosynthesis and degradation which alter the quantity and molecular weight of the HA produced by lung fibroblasts. They also show that fibroblast HA degradation is mediated by a previously unrecognized lysosomal-type hyaluronidase whose function may be regulated by altering fibroblast-HA binding. Lastly, they suggest that the CD44 HA receptor may be involved in this process. Images PMID:1401082

  17. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 2 Regulates Proinflammatory Cytokine Production and Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) couples with the Gi, Gq, and G12/13 group of proteins, which modulate an array of cellular signaling pathways and affect immune responses to multiple stimuli. In this study, we demonstrated that knockdown of S1PR2 by a specific S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector significantly inhibited IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α protein levels induced by oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) in murine bone marrow-derived monocytes and macrophages (BMMs) compared with controls. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 by the S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector suppressed p-PI3K, p-ERK, p-JNK, p-p38, and p-NF-κBp65 protein expressions induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Furthermore, bone marrow cells treated with the S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector inhibited osteoclastogenesis induced by RANKL compared with controls. The S1PR2 shRNA suppressed the mRNA levels of six osteoclastogenic factors including nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (Ctsk), acid phosphatase 5 (Acp5), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cells specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), and osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp) in bone marrow cells. We conclude that S1PR2 plays an essential role in modulating proinflammatory cytokine production and osteoclastogenesis. Blocking S1PR2 signaling might be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat inflammatory bone loss diseases. PMID:27224249

  18. Carnosol and Related Substances Modulate Chemokine and Cytokine Production in Macrophages and Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwager, Joseph; Richard, Nathalie; Fowler, Ann; Seifert, Nicole; Raederstorff, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic diterpenes present in Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis have anti-inflammatory and chemoprotective effects. We investigated the in vitro effects of carnosol (CL), carnosic acid (CA), carnosic acid-12-methylether (CAME), 20-deoxocarnosol and abieta-8,11,13-triene-11,12,20-triol (ABTT) in murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) and human chondrocytes. The substances concentration-dependently reduced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production in LPS-stimulated macrophages (i.e., acute inflammation). They significantly blunted gene expression levels of iNOS, cytokines/interleukins (IL-1α, IL-6) and chemokines including CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP-10. The substances modulated the expression of catabolic and anabolic genes in chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353 and in primary human chondrocytes that were stimulated by IL-1β (i.e., chronic inflammation In SW1353, catabolic genes like MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4 that contribute to cartilage erosion were down-regulated, while expression of anabolic genes including Col2A1 and aggrecan were shifted towards pre-pathophysiological homeostasis. CL had the strongest overall effect on inflammatory mediators, as well as on macrophage and chondrocyte gene expression. Conversely, CAME mainly affected catabolic gene expression, whereas ABTT had a more selectively altered interleukin and chemokine gene exprssion. CL inhibited the IL-1β induced nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65, suggesting that it primarily regulated via the NF-κB signalling pathway. Collectively, CL had the strongest effects on inflammatory mediators and chondrocyte gene expression. The data show that the phenolic diterpenes altered activity pattern of genes that regulate acute and chronic inflammatory processes. Since the substances affected catabolic and anabolic gene expression in cartilage cells in vitro, they may beneficially act on the aetiology of osteoarthritis. PMID:27070563

  19. Impact of lithium alone and in combination with antidepressants on cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petersein, Charlotte; Sack, Ulrich; Mergl, Roland; Schönherr, Jeremias; Schmidt, Frank M; Lichtblau, Nicole; Kirkby, Kenneth C; Bauer, Katrin; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    Lithium is an important psychopharmacological agent for the treatment of unipolar as well as bipolar affective disorders. Lithium has a number of side effects such as hypothyroidism and aggravation of psoriasis. On the other hand, lithium has pro-inflammatory effects, which appear beneficial in some disorders associated with immunological deficits, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, immunological characteristics of lithium may be an important consideration in individualized therapeutic decisions. We measured the levels of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-22, IL-17 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the stimulated blood of thirty healthy subjects supplemented with lithium alone, the antidepressants citalopram, escitalopram or mirtazapine alone, the combination of each antidepressant with lithium, and a no drug control. These drugs were tested under three blood stimulant conditions: murine anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3 and the 5C3 monoclonal antibody (OKT3/5C3), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and unstimulated blood. Lithium, alone and in combination with any of the tested antidepressants, led to a consistent increase of IL-1ß, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the unstimulated as well as the stimulated blood. In the OKT3/5C3- and PHA-stimulated blood, IL-17 production was significantly enhanced by lithium. Lithium additionally increased IL-2 concentrations significantly in PHA-stimulated blood. The data support the view that lithium has pro-inflammatory properties. These immunological characteristics may contribute to side effects of lithium, but may also explain its beneficial effects in patients suffering from HIV infection or SLE. PMID:25377522

  20. Modulation of Cytokines Production by Indomethacin Acute Dose during the Evolution of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Luciana Boffoni; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, Nicolle; Massoco, Cristina de Oliveira; Fecchio, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of a nonselective COX1/COX2 inhibitor (indomethacin) on tumor growth of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) in mice, using as parameters the tumor growth and cytokine profile. Mice were inoculated with EAT cells and treated with indomethacin. After 1, 3, 6, 10, and 13 days the animals were evaluated for the secretion of TNFα, IL-1α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13 and PGE2 level in peritoneal cavity. The results have shown that EAT induces PGE2 production and increases tumor cells number from the 10th day. The cytokine profile showed EAT induces production of IL-6 from 10th day and of IL-2 on 13th day; the other studied cytokines were not affected in a significant way. The indomethacin treatment of EAT-bearing mice inhibited the tumor growth and PGE2 synthesis from the 10th day. In addition, the treatment of EAT-bearing mice with indomethacin has stimulated the IL-13 production and has significantly inhibited IL-6 in the 13th day of tumor growth. Taken together, the results have demonstrated that EAT growth is modulated by PGE2 and the inhibition of the tumor growth could be partly related to suppression of IL-6 and induction of IL-13. PMID:26347589

  1. Antigen-specific CD4{sup +} effector T cells: Analysis of factors regulating clonal expansion and cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuki, Kazunobu; Watanabe, Yuri; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Watanabe, Shiho; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kotani, Motoko; Kozono, Haruo; Tanabe, Kazunari; Abe, Ryo

    2009-03-20

    In order to fully understand T cell-mediated immunity, the mechanisms that regulate clonal expansion and cytokine production by CD4{sup +} antigen-specific effector T cells in response to a wide range of antigenic stimulation needs clarification. For this purpose, panels of antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cell clones with different thresholds for antigen-induced proliferation were generated by repeated stimulation with high- or low-dose antigen. Differences in antigen sensitivities did not correlate with expression of TCR, CD4, adhesion or costimulatory molecules. There was no significant difference in antigen-dependent cytokine production by TG40 cells transfected with TCR obtained from either high- or low-dose-responding T cell clones, suggesting that the affinity of TCRs for their ligands is not primary determinant of T cell antigen reactivity. The proliferative responses of all T cell clones to both peptide stimulation and to TCR{beta} crosslinking revealed parallel dose-response curves. These results suggest that the TCR signal strength of effector T cells and threshold of antigen reactivity is determined by an intrinsic property, such as the TCR signalosome and/or intracellular signaling machinery. Finally, the antigen responses of high- and low-peptide-responding T cell clones reveal that clonal expansion and cytokine production of effector T cells occur independently of antigen concentration. Based on these results, the mechanisms underlying selection of high 'avidity' effector and memory T cells in response to pathogen are discussed.

  2. Lactobacillus reuteri modulates cytokines production in exhaled breath condensate of children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Miniello, Vito Leonardo; Brunetti, Luigia; Tesse, Riccardina; Natile, Miria; Armenio, Lucio; Francavilla, Ruggiero

    2010-05-01

    We measured the concentration of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 in the exhaled breath condensate of children with atopic and nonallergic dermatitis receiving a probiotic supplementation (Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730) or placebo for 8 weeks. We demonstrated that the levels of these cytokines increased and decreased respectively only in atopic subjects receiving active treatment. Our data suggest that the oral administration of a specific probiotic strain in patients with atopic dermatitis can modulate in vivo the cytokine pattern at a different site from intestine. PMID:20639717

  3. Glycine regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lean and monosodium glutamate-obese mice.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Aguilar, F J; Almanza-Perez, Julio; Blancas, Gerardo; Angeles, Selene; Garcia-Macedo, Rebeca; Roman, Ruben; Cruz, Miguel

    2008-12-01

    Fat tissue plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Increased visceral fat has been associated with a higher production of cytokines that triggers a low-grade inflammatory response, which eventually may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether glycine, an amino acid that represses the expression in vitro of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Kupffer and 3T3-L1 cells, can affect in vivo cytokine production in lean and monosodium glutamate-induced obese mice (MSG/Ob mice). Our data demonstrate that glycine treatment in lean mice suppressed TNF-alpha transcriptional expression in fat tissue, and serum protein levels of IL-6 were suppressed, while adiponectin levels were increased. In MSG/Ob mice, glycine suppressed TNF-alpha and IL-6 gene expression in fat tissue and significantly reduced protein levels of IL-6, resistin and leptin. To determine the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) in the modulation of this inflammatory response evoked by glycine, we examined its expression levels in fat tissue. Glycine clearly increased PPAR-gamma expression in lean mice but not in MSG/Ob mice. Finally, to identify alterations in glucose metabolism by glycine, we also examined insulin levels and other biochemical parameters during an oral glucose tolerance test. Glycine significantly reduced glucose tolerance and raised insulin levels in lean but not in obese mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that glycine suppresses the pro-inflammatory cytokines production and increases adiponectin secretion in vivo through the activation of PPAR-gamma. Glycine might prevent insulin resistance and associated inflammatory diseases. PMID:18930730

  4. Remote ischaemic preconditioning does not alter perioperative cytokine production in high-risk cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jenni M; Young, Paul; Pilcher, Janine; Weatherall, Mark; Miller, John Holmes; Beasley, Richard; La Flamme, Anne Camille

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a novel cardioprotective strategy that uses brief intermittent limb ischaemia to protect the myocardium and other organs from perioperative ischaemic damage. The precise mechanism through which this protective effect occurs is unknown, but potentially could be related to changes in blood-borne mediators such as cytokines. Objective To determine whether RIPC alters inflammatory cytokine expression in a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial of patients undergoing high-risk cardiac surgery. Methods and results Serum interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels from 95 patients randomised to RIPC (n=47) or control treatment (n=48) were measured preoperatively, and 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 h after cross-clamp removal. Systemic concentrations of all cytokines were increased from baseline following surgery, and, compared with simple procedures, complex surgeries were associated with significantly higher release of IL-6 (ratio of mean area under the curves 1.54 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.34), p=0.04) and IL-10 (1.97 (1.16 to 3.35), p=0.012). No significant difference in mean cytokine levels between the RIPC and control groups was detected at any time point, irrespective of the type of surgery undergone. Conclusions High levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 are produced during high-risk cardiac surgery, and RIPC does not alter these elevated perioperative cytokine concentrations. Identification of factors that influence the ability to induce RIPC-mediated cardioprotection should be the priority of future research. Trial registration is in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.anzctr.org.au; ACTRN12609000965202)

  5. Effects of Omega-3-Rich Harp Seal Oil on the Production of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Myungwon; Ju, Jaehyun; Suh, Jae Soo; Park, Kun-Young; Kim, Kwang Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, is an essential fatty acid necessary for human health, and it protects against cardiovascular disease, inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of omega-3-rich harp seal oil (HSO) on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-(IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) in peritoneal macrophages of mice. The culture supernatants of murine macrophages exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HSO, or HSO+LPS were harvested to assay IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) cytokines and NO. TNF-α, IL-1 β, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) levels, except IL-6, were lower in the culture supernatants of mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to LPS plus HSO than those of the groups exposed to LPS alone. These observations demonstrate that omega-3-rich harp seal oil downregulates the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40). These results suggest that HSO could be potentially used as a preventive agent or as an adjunct in anti-inflammatory therapy, if more research results were accumulated. PMID:26175994

  6. Posttraumatic stress disorder is associated with an enhanced spontaneous production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with an enhanced risk for cardiovascular and other inflammatory diseases. Chronic low-level inflammation has been suggested as a potential mechanism linking these conditions. Methods We investigated plasma cytokine levels as well as spontaneous and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a group of 35 severely traumatized PTSD patients compared to 25 healthy controls. Results Spontaneous production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α by isolated PBMCs was significantly higher in the PTSD compared to the control group and even correlated with PTSD symptom severity within the PTSD group. In contrast, circulating plasma levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, or monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 were not significantly altered in PTSD patients compared to healthy controls. Conclusions Our findings indicate that PBMCs of PTSD patients are already pre-activated in vivo, providing further evidence for low-grade inflammation in PTSD. This might possibly represent one psychobiological pathway from PTSD to poor physical health. PMID:23360282

  7. Effects of Omega-3-Rich Harp Seal Oil on the Production of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myungwon; Ju, Jaehyun; Suh, Jae Soo; Park, Kun-Young; Kim, Kwang Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    Omega-3, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, is an essential fatty acid necessary for human health, and it protects against cardiovascular disease, inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of omega-3-rich harp seal oil (HSO) on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-(IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) in peritoneal macrophages of mice. The culture supernatants of murine macrophages exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HSO, or HSO+LPS were harvested to assay IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) cytokines and NO. TNF-α, IL-1 β, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40) levels, except IL-6, were lower in the culture supernatants of mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to LPS plus HSO than those of the groups exposed to LPS alone. These observations demonstrate that omega-3-rich harp seal oil downregulates the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-12/IL-23 (p40). These results suggest that HSO could be potentially used as a preventive agent or as an adjunct in anti-inflammatory therapy, if more research results were accumulated. PMID:26175994

  8. The Retinoic Acid Receptor-α mediates human T-cell activation and Th2 cytokine and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Harry D; Collins, Gary; Pyle, Robert; Key, Michael; Taub, Dennis D

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recently demonstrated that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis RA) promote IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis, while decreasing IFN-γ and TNF-α expression by activated human T cells and reduces the synthesis of IL-12p70 from accessory cells. Here, we have demonstrated that the observed effects using ATRA and 9-cis RA are shared with the clinically useful RAR ligand, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA), and the retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α)-selective agonist, AM580 but not with the RAR-β/γ ligand, 4-hydroxyphenylretinamide (4-HPR). Results The increase in type 2 cytokine production by these retinoids correlated with the expression of the T cell activation markers, CD69 and CD38. The RAR-α-selective agonist, AM580 recapitulated all of the T cell activation and type 2 cytokine-inducing effects of ATRA and 9-cis-RA, while the RAR-α-selective antagonist, RO 41–5253, inhibited these effects. Conclusion These results strongly support a role for RAR-α engagement in the regulation of genes and proteins involved with human T cell activation and type 2 cytokine production. PMID:18416830

  9. Inhibition of NF-kB activation and cytokines production in THP-1 monocytes by 2-styrylchromones.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana; Capela, João P; Ribeiro, Daniela; Freitas, Marisa; Silva, Artur M S; Pinto, Diana C G A; Santos, Clementina M M; Cavaleiro, José A S; Lima, José L F C; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) is one of the most important transcription factors whose modulation triggers a cascade of signaling events, namely the expression of many cytokines, enzymes, chemokines, and adhesion molecules, some of which being potential key targets for intervention in the treatment of inflammatory conditions. The 2-styrylchromones (2-SC) designation represents a well-recognized group of natural and synthetic chromones, vinylogues of flavones (2-phenylchromones). Several 2-SC were recently tested for their anti-inflammatory potential, regarding the arachidonic acid metabolic cascade, showing some motivating results. In addition, several flavones with structural similarities to 2-SC have shown NF-kB inhibitory properties. Hence, the aim of the present work was to continue the investigation on the interference of 2-SC in inflammatory pathways. Herein we report their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-kB activation and consequent production of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokine, using a human monocytic cell line (THP-1). From the twelve 2-SC tested, three of them were able to significantly inhibit the NF-kB activation and to reduce the production of the proinflammatory cytokines/chemokine. The compound 3',4',5-trihydroxy-2- styrylchromone stood up as the most active in both assays, being a promising candidate for an anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:25665653

  10. SARM is required for neuronal injury and cytokine production in response to central nervous system viral infection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying-Ju; Banerjee, Rebecca; Thomas, Bobby; Nathan, Carl; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Ding, Aihao; Uccellini, Melissa B

    2013-07-15

    Four of the five members of the Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor family are required for signaling downstream of TLRs, promoting innate immune responses against different pathogens. However, the role of the fifth member of this family, sterile α and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing 1 (SARM), is unclear. SARM is expressed primarily in the CNS where it is required for axonal death. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have also shown a role for SARM in innate immunity. To clarify the role of mammalian SARM in innate immunity, we infected SARM(-/-) mice with a number of bacterial and viral pathogens. SARM(-/-) mice show normal responses to Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus, but show dramatic protection from death after CNS infection with vesicular stomatitis virus. Protection correlates with reduced CNS injury and cytokine production by nonhematopoietic cells, suggesting that SARM is a positive regulator of cytokine production. Neurons and microglia are the predominant source of cytokines in vivo, supporting a role for SARM as a link between neuronal injury and innate immunity. PMID:23749635

  11. Glibenclamide reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production by neutrophils of diabetes patients in response to bacterial infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Utispan, Kusumawadee; Suwannasaen, Duangchan; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for melioidosis, which is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our previous study has shown that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from diabetic subjects exhibited decreased functions in response to B. pseudomallei. Here we investigated the mechanisms regulating cytokine secretion of PMNs from diabetic patients which might contribute to patient susceptibility to bacterial infections. Purified PMNs from diabetic patients who had been treated with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker for anti-diabetes therapy), showed reduction of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 secretion when exposed to B. pseudomallei. Additionally, reduction of these pro-inflammatory cytokines occurred when PMNs from diabetic patients were treated in vitro with glibenclamide. These findings suggest that glibenclamide might be responsible for the increased susceptibility of diabetic patients, with poor glycemic control, to bacterial infections as a result of its effect on reducing IL-1β production by PMNs.

  12. Role of nitric oxide in depressed lymphoproliferative responses and altered cytokine production following thermal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Masson, I; Mathieu, J; Nolland, X B; De Sousa, M; Chanaud, B; Strzalko, S; Chancerelle, Y; Kergonou, J F; Giroud, J P; Florentin, I

    1998-06-15

    Immunodeficiency follows extensive burns. We investigated some underlying mechanisms in rats, 10 days after a full-thickness skin burn affecting 20% of total body surface area. In both normal and burned rats the splenocyte proliferative response to Con A was linearly and negatively correlated with nitric oxide (NO) production. In all burned rats, the proliferative response was depressed by more than 80% and NO production corresponded to a nitrite concentration above 20 microM. Proliferative responses in burned rats were fully restored in the presence of 250 microM NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA). A time course study of NO production in response to Con A, LPS, anti-CD3, and IFN-gamma showed that splenic macrophages from burned rats responded to direct and indirect stimuli more rapidly and more intensively than normal macrophages. In the second part of this work, the effect of the overproduction of NO on the synthesis of immunoregulatory and proinflammatory cytokines was investigated. Although it was inhibited, IFN-gamma production by splenocytes from burned rats remained sufficient for NO synthase induction and was restored by NMMA. Concomitantly, IL-2 concentration was enhanced but returned to normal in the presence of NMMA. TNF production was halved after burn injury and NMMA partially restored it. In contrast, IL-6 production was enhanced and increased further in the presence of NMMA. Therefore, cytokines were differently affected by burn injury and variously regulated by NO. PMID:9665754

  13. Dose-dependent modulation of the in vitro cytokine production of human immune competent cells by lead salts.

    PubMed

    Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Emmrich, Frank; Adham, Khadiga; Wichmann, Gunnar; Lehmann, Irina; El-Massry, Azza; Ghoneim, Hossam; Lehmann, Jörg; Sack, Ulrich

    2005-07-01

    Lead pollution constitutes a major health problem that has been intensively debated. To reveal its effects on the immune response, the influence of lead on the in vitro cytokine production of human peripheral mononuclear blood cells was investigated. Isolated cells were exposed to lead acetate or lead chloride for 24 h in the presence of either heat-killed Salmonella enteritidis (hk-SE) or monoclonal antibodies (anti-CD3, anti-CD28, anti-CD40) as cell activators. Our results showed that while higher lead doses are toxic, lower ones evoke immunomodulatory effects. All tested lead doses significantly reduced cell vitality and/or proliferation and affected secretion of proinflammatory, T helper cell type (T(H))1 and T(H)2 cytokines. Expression of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was reduced at lower lead doses in both models of cell stimulation. Although hk-SE failed to induce detectable IL-4 levels, monoclonal antibody-induced IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion increased in the presence of lower lead doses. Also, levels of hk-SE-induced IL-10 and IL-6 secretion were increased at lower lead doses. Thus, exposure to lower doses leads to suppression of the T(H)1 cytokine IFN-gamma and the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. The elevated production of IL-4 and/or IL-10 can induce and maintain a T(H)2 immune response and might contribute to increased susceptibility to pathologic agents as well as the incidence of allergic hypersensitivity and/or T(H)2-dominated autoimmune diseases. PMID:15843504

  14. Do mechanical strain and TNF-α interact to amplify pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human annulus fibrosus cells?

    PubMed

    Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Torre, Olivia M; Gruen, Jadry; Walter, Benjamin A; Hecht, Andrew C; Iatridis, James C

    2016-05-01

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) injury and degeneration, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells experience large mechanical strains in a pro-inflammatory milieu. We hypothesized that TNF-α, an initiator of IVD inflammation, modifies AF cell mechanobiology via cytoskeletal changes, and interacts with mechanical strain to enhance pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Human AF cells (N=5, Thompson grades 2-4) were stretched uniaxially on collagen-I coated chambers to 0%, 5% (physiological) or 15% (pathologic) strains at 0.5Hz for 24h under hypoxic conditions with or without TNF-α (10ng/mL). AF cells were treated with anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-6. ELISA assessed IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 production and immunocytochemistry measured F-actin, vinculin and α-tubulin in AF cells. TNF-α significantly increased AF cell pro-inflammatory cytokine production compared to basal conditions (IL-1β:2.0±1.4-84.0±77.3, IL-6:10.6±9.9-280.9±214.1, IL-8:23.9±26.0-5125.1±4170.8pg/ml for basal and TNF-α treatment, respectively) as expected, but mechanical strain did not. Pathologic strain in combination with TNF-α increased IL-1β, and IL-8 but not IL-6 production of AF cells. TNF-α treatment altered F-actin and α-tubulin in AF cells, suggestive of altered cytoskeletal stiffness. Anti-TNF-α (infliximab) significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production while anti-IL-6 (atlizumab) did not. In conclusion, TNF-α altered AF cell mechanobiology with cytoskeletal remodeling that potentially sensitized AF cells to mechanical strain and increased TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Results suggest an interaction between TNF-α and mechanical strain and future mechanistic studies are required to validate these observations. PMID:26924657

  15. Quantification and characterization of specific T-cells by antigen-specific cytokine production using ELISPOT assay or intracellular cytokine staining.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Anne; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2003-10-01

    The novel generation of sensitive T-cell assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of specific T-cell responses. Functional T-cell assays such as the ELISPOT assay and the intracellular cytokine cytometry (ICC) employ the antigen-specific induction of cytokines to detect specific T-cells on a single cell level. ICC has the advantage that the simultaneous phenotypic characterization of the antigen-specific T-cells is possible. There is evidence now from clinical cancer vaccination trials, that there is a relationship between the detection of vaccine-induced T-cells by cytokine-based assays and clinical responses. As these assays become increasingly relevant in clinical practice to suggest issues of assay validation and quality control become of major importance. PMID:12957572

  16. The effects of vitamin A supplementation with measles vaccine on leucocyte counts and in vitro cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Fisker, Ane Bærent; Andersen, Andreas; Sartono, Erliyani; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Aaby, Peter; Erikstrup, Christian; Benn, Christine Stabell

    2016-02-28

    As WHO recommends vitamin A supplementation (VAS) at vaccination contacts after age 6 months, many children receive VAS together with measles vaccine (MV). We aimed to investigate the immunological effect of VAS given with MV. Within a randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the effect on overall mortality of providing VAS with vaccines in Guinea-Bissau, we conducted an immunological sub-study of VAS v. placebo with MV, analysing leucocyte counts, whole blood in vitro cytokine production, vitamin A status and concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP). VAS compared with placebo was associated with an increased frequency of CRP ≥ 5 mg/l (28 v. 12%; P=0·005). Six weeks after supplementation, VAS had significant sex-differential effects on leucocyte, lymphocyte, monocyte and basophil cell counts, decreasing them in males but increasing them in females. Mainly in females, the effect of VAS on cytokine responses differed by previous VAS: in previous VAS recipients, VAS increased the pro-inflammatory and T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses, whereas VAS decreased these responses in previously unsupplemented children. In previous VAS recipients, VAS was associated with increased IFN-γ responses to phytohaemagglutinin in females (geometric mean ratio (GMR): 3·97; 95% CI 1·44, 10·90) but not in males (GMR 0·44; 95% CI 0·14, 1·42); the opposite was observed in previously unsupplemented children. Our results corroborate that VAS provided with MV has immunological effects, which may depend on sex and previous VAS. VAS may increase the number of leucocytes, but also repress both the innate and lymphocyte-derived cytokine responses in females, whereas this repression may be opposite if the females have previously received VAS. PMID:26678511

  17. Fluoxetine stimulates anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine production and attenuates sensory deficits in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; de Maistre, Sébastien; Lambrechts, Kate; Abraini, Jacques; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Vallée, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Despite "gold standard" hyperbaric oxygen treatment, 30% of patients suffering from neurological decompression sickness still exhibit incomplete recovery, including sensory impairments. Fluoxetine, a well-known antidepressant, is recognized as having anti-inflammatory effects in the setting of cerebral ischemia. In this study, we focused on the assessment of sensory neurological deficits and measurement of circulating cytokines after decompression in rats treated or not with fluoxetine. Seventy-eight rats were divided into a clinical (n = 38) and a cytokine (n = 40) group. In both groups, the rats were treated with fluoxetine (30 mg/kg po, 6 h beforehand) or with a saccharine solution. All of the rats were exposed to 90 m seawater for 45 min before staged decompression. In the clinical group, paw withdrawal force after mechanical stimulation and paw withdrawal latency after thermal stimulation were evaluated before and 1 and 48 h after surfacing. At 48 h, a dynamic weight-bearing device was used to assess postural stability, depending on the time spent on three or four paws. For cytokine analysis, blood samples were collected from the vena cava 1 h after surfacing. Paw withdrawal force and latency were increased after surfacing in the controls, but not in the fluoxetine group. Dynamic weight-bearing assessment highlighted a better stability on three paws for the fluoxetine group. IL-10 levels were significantly decreased after decompression in the controls, but maintained at baseline level with fluoxetine. This study suggests that fluoxetine has a beneficial effect on sensory neurological recovery. We hypothesize that the observed effect is mediated through maintained anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production. PMID:26494447

  18. Nicotinic receptor activation negatively modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Reale, Marcella; Di Bari, Maria; Di Nicola, Marta; D'Angelo, Chiara; De Angelis, Federica; Velluto, Lucia; Tata, Ada Maria

    2015-11-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) and its receptors of muscarinic and nicotinic types are involved in the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. In present work we have characterized the nicotinic receptors expression in PBMC of RR-MS patients and healthy donors (HD) and their ability to modulate pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here we report that the IL-1β e IL-17 levels are significantly increased in serum of RR-MS patients in respect to HD and that the PBMC stimulation with PHA caused a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels both in RR-MS and HD subjects, with higher increase of protein release in RR-MS patients than in HD. The PBMC treatment with PHA plus nicotine produced a significant decrease of IL-1β e IL-17 both as transcript and as protein, confirming that the PBMC of the patients respond to the cholinergic stimulation more than PBMC of HD. By real time PCR and western blot analysis we have also demonstrated that in particular α7 receptor subtype appeared expressed at comparable levels both in RR-MS patients and HD. The PHA stimulation results to inhibit the α7 subunit expression while the nicotine causes a significant increase in α7 transcripts but only in MS patients. The data obtained highlight the role of α7 receptor subtype in the modulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines also in MS. Moreover the ability of nicotine to up-regulate the expression of α7 receptor subtype in RR-MS patients, indicates that nicotinic receptor stimulation may contribute to down-modulate the inflammation occurred in MS by a positive feedback control of its expression. PMID:26209886

  19. Primary dengue virus infections induce differential cytokine production in Mexican patients

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz Hernández, Sergio Isaac; Puerta-Guardo, Henry Nelson; Flores Aguilar, Hilario; González Mateos, Silvia; López Martinez, Irma; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Ludert, Juan E; del Angel, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Severe dengue pathogenesis is not fully understood, but high levels of proinflammatory cytokines have been associated with dengue disease severity. In this study, the cytokine levels in 171 sera from Mexican patients with primary dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) from dengue virus (DENV) 1 (n = 116) or 2 (n = 55) were compared. DF and DHF were defined according to the patient’s clinical condition, the primary infections as indicated by IgG enzymatic immunoassay negative results, and the infecting serotype as assessed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Samples were analysed for circulating levels of interleukin (IL)-12p70, interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and IL-8 using a commercial cytometric bead array. Significantly higher IFN-γ levels were found in patients with DHF than those with DF. However, significantly higher IL-12p70, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels were associated with DHF only in patients who were infected with DENV2 but not with DENV1. Moreover, patients with DF who were infected with DENV1 showed higher levels of IL-12p70, TNF-α, and IL-6 than patients with DHF early after-fever onset. The IL-8 levels were similar in all cases regardless of the clinical condition or infection serotype. These results suggest that the association between high proinflammatory cytokine levels and dengue disease severity does not always stand, and it once again highlights the complex nature of DHF pathogenesis. PMID:27008374

  20. Primary dengue virus infections induce differential cytokine production in Mexican patients.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz Hernández, Sergio Isaac; Puerta-Guardo, Henry Nelson; Flores Aguilar, Hilario; González Mateos, Silvia; López Martinez, Irma; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Ludert, Juan E; Del Angel, Rosa María

    2016-03-01

    Severe dengue pathogenesis is not fully understood, but high levels of proinflammatory cytokines have been associated with dengue disease severity. In this study, the cytokine levels in 171 sera from Mexican patients with primary dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) from dengue virus (DENV) 1 (n = 116) or 2 (n = 55) were compared. DF and DHF were defined according to the patient's clinical condition, the primary infections as indicated by IgG enzymatic immunoassay negative results, and the infecting serotype as assessed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Samples were analysed for circulating levels of interleukin (IL)-12p70, interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and IL-8 using a commercial cytometric bead array. Significantly higher IFN-γ levels were found in patients with DHF than those with DF. However, significantly higher IL-12p70, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels were associated with DHF only in patients who were infected with DENV2 but not with DENV1. Moreover, patients with DF who were infected with DENV1 showed higher levels of IL-12p70, TNF-α, and IL-6 than patients with DHF early after-fever onset. The IL-8 levels were similar in all cases regardless of the clinical condition or infection serotype. These results suggest that the association between high proinflammatory cytokine levels and dengue disease severity does not always stand, and it once again highlights the complex nature of DHF pathogenesis. PMID:27008374

  1. DNAs from Brucella strains activate efficiently murine immune system with production of cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Zahra; Ardestani, Sussan K; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi; Kariminia, Amina; Zahraei Salehi, Taghi; Tavassoli, Nasser

    2009-09-01

    Brucellosis is an infectious disease with high impact on innate immune responses which is induced partly by its DNA. In the present study the potential differences of wild type and patients isolates versus attenuated vaccine strains in terms of cytokines, ROS and NO induction on murine splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. This panel varied in base composition and included DNA from B. abortus, B. melitensis, B.abortus strain S19 and melitensis strain Rev1, as attenuated live vaccine. Also we included Escherichia coli DNA, calf thymus DNA (a mammalian DNA), as controls. These DNA were evaluated for their ability to stimulate IL-12, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IFN-gamma and ROS production from spleenocytes as well as NO production from peritoneal macrophages. Spleen cells were cultured in 24 well at a concentration of 106 cells/ ml with subsequent addition of 10 microg/ml of Brucella or Ecoli DNAs. These cultures were incubated at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2 for 5 days. Supernatants were harvested and cytokines, ROS and NOx were evaluated. It was observed that TNF-alpha was induced in days 1,3,5 by all Brucella strains DNAs and E. coli DNA, IL-10 only was induced in day 1, IFN- gamma was induced only in day 5 and IL-12 not induced. ROS and NOx were produced by all strains; however, we observed higher production of NOx which were stimulated by DNA of B. melitensis. PMID:20124603

  2. MicroRNA-124 mediates the cholinergic anti-inflammatory action through inhibiting the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Li, Qi; Gui, Huan; Xu, Dong-Ping; Yang, Yi-Li; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The vagus nerve can control inflammatory response through a 'cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway', which is mediated by the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) on macrophages. However, the intracellular mechanisms that link α7nAChR activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production remain not well understood. In this study, we found that miR-124 is upregulated by cholinergic agonists in LPS-exposed cells and mice. Utilizing miR-124 mimic and siRNA knockdown, we demonstrated that miR-124 is a critical mediator for the cholinergic anti-inflammatory action. Furthermore, our data indicated that miR-124 modulates LPS-induced cytokine production by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) to decrease IL-6 production and TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) to reduce TNF-α release. These results also indicate that miR-124 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23979021

  3. Inhibition of Age-Related Cytokines Production by ATGL: A Mechanism Linked to the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Lettieri Barbato, Daniele; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    Ageing is characterized by the expansion and the decreased vascularization of visceral adipose tissue (vAT), disruption of metabolic activities, and decline of the function of the immune system, leading to chronic inflammatory states. We previously demonstrated that, in vAT of mice at early state of ageing, adipocytes mount a stress resistance response consisting in the upregulation of ATGL, which is functional in restraining the production of inflammatory cytokines. Here, we found that, in the late phase of ageing, such an adaptive response is impaired. In particular, 24-months-old mice and aged 3T3-L1 adipocytes display affected expression of ATGL and its downstream PPARα-mediated lipid signalling pathway, leading to upregulation of TNFα and IL-6 production. We show that the natural polyphenol compound resveratrol (RSV) efficiently suppresses the expression of TNFα and IL-6 in an ATGL/PPARα dependent manner. Actually, adipocytes downregulating ATGL do not show a restored PPARα expression and display elevated cytokines production. Overall the results obtained highlight a crucial function of ATGL in inhibiting age-related inflammation and reinforce the idea that RSV could represent a valid natural compound to limit the onset and/or the exacerbation of the age-related inflammatory states. PMID:24817795

  4. Inhibition of age-related cytokines production by ATGL: a mechanism linked to the anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Lettieri Barbato, Daniele; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria R

    2014-01-01

    Ageing is characterized by the expansion and the decreased vascularization of visceral adipose tissue (vAT), disruption of metabolic activities, and decline of the function of the immune system, leading to chronic inflammatory states. We previously demonstrated that, in vAT of mice at early state of ageing, adipocytes mount a stress resistance response consisting in the upregulation of ATGL, which is functional in restraining the production of inflammatory cytokines. Here, we found that, in the late phase of ageing, such an adaptive response is impaired. In particular, 24-months-old mice and aged 3T3-L1 adipocytes display affected expression of ATGL and its downstream PPARα-mediated lipid signalling pathway, leading to upregulation of TNFα and IL-6 production. We show that the natural polyphenol compound resveratrol (RSV) efficiently suppresses the expression of TNFα and IL-6 in an ATGL/PPARα dependent manner. Actually, adipocytes downregulating ATGL do not show a restored PPARα expression and display elevated cytokines production. Overall the results obtained highlight a crucial function of ATGL in inhibiting age-related inflammation and reinforce the idea that RSV could represent a valid natural compound to limit the onset and/or the exacerbation of the age-related inflammatory states. PMID:24817795

  5. Inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinases differentially regulate costimulated T cell cytokine production and mouse airway eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Chialda, Ligia; Zhang, Meixia; Brune, Kay; Pahl, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Background T cells play a dominant role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Costimulation of T cells is necessary to fully activate them. An inducible costimulator (ICOS) of T cells is predominantly expressed on Th2 cells. Therefore, interference of signaling pathways precipitated by ICOS may present new therapeutic options for Th2 dominated diseases such as asthma. However, these signaling pathways are poorly characterized in vitro and in vivo. Methods Human primary CD4+ T cells from blood were activated by beads with defined combinations of surface receptor stimulating antibodies and costimulatory receptor ligands. Real-time RT-PCR was used for measuring the production of cytokines from activated T cells. Activation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways leading to cytokine synthesis were investigated by western blot analysis and by specific inhibitors. The effect of inhibitors in vivo was tested in a murine asthma model of late phase eosinophilia. Lung inflammation was assessed by differential cell count of the bronchoalveolar lavage, determination of serum IgE and lung histology. Results We showed in vitro that ICOS and CD28 are stimulatory members of an expanding family of co-receptors, whereas PD1 ligands failed to co-stimulate T cells. ICOS and CD28 activated different MAPK signaling cascades necessary for cytokine activation. By means of specific inhibitors we showed that p38 and ERK act downstream of CD28 and that ERK and JNK act downstream of ICOS leading to the induction of various T cell derived cytokines. Using a murine asthma model of late phase eosinophilia, we demonstrated that the ERK inhibitor U0126 and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited lung inflammation in vivo. This inhibition correlated with the inhibition of Th2 cytokines in the BAL fluid. Despite acting on different signaling cascades, we could not detect synergistic action of any combination of MAPK inhibitors. In contrast, we found that the p38 inhibitor SB203580

  6. Herbal medicine Gamgungtang down-regulates autoimmunity through induction of TH2 cytokine production by lymphocytes in experimental thyroiditis model.

    PubMed

    Sa, Eun-Ho; Jin, Un-Ho; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kang, Bong-Seok; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, June-Ki; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2007-02-12

    The crude herbal formulation, Gamgungtang (GGT), has been shown to protect animals against a wide range of spontaneously developing or induced autoimmune diseases. We have previously reported that GGT shows marked down-regulation of several experimental autoimmune diseases. Although very effective at preventing thyroid infiltrates in mice immunized with mouse deglycosylated thyroglobulin and complete Freund's adjuvant and in spontaneous models of thyroiditis, it completely failed to modify experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) induced in mice immunized with mouse thyroglobulin and lipopolysaccharide. In this study, in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms by which GGT suppresses EAT, and autoimmunity in general, we investigated the in vivo effects of this drug on the Th1/Th2 lymphocyte balance, which is important for the induction or inhibition of autoreactivity. Naive SJL/J mice were treated orally for 5 days with GGT (80 mg/(kg day)). Spleen cells were obtained at various time points during the treatment period and were stimulated in vitro with concanavalin A. Interleukins IL-4, IL-10 and IL-12, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) cytokine production was evaluated at the protein levels of the cytokines in the medium and mRNA expressions. A significant upregulation of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-beta was observed following treatment with GGT, which peaked at day 5 (IL-10) or day 10 (IL-4). On the other hand, IL-12 and IFN-gamma production were either unchanged or decreased. It seems therefore that GGT induces in vivo a shift towards Th2 lymphocytes which may be one of the mechanisms of down-regulation of the autoimmune reactivity in EAT. Our observations indicate that down-regulation of TH1 cytokines (especially IL-12) and enhancement of Th2 cytokine production may play an important role in the control of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. These data may contribute to the design of new immunomodulating treatments for a group of

  7. Myeloid STAT3 inhibits T-cell–mediated hepatitis by regulating T helper 1 cytokine and interleukin-17 production

    PubMed Central

    Lafdil, Fouad; Wang, Hua; Park, Ogyi; Zhang, Weici; Moritoki, Yuki; Yin, Shi; Fu, Xin Yuan; Gershwin, M. Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Gao, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims T-cell–mediated hepatitis is a leading cause of acute liver failure; there is no effective treatment and the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are obscure. The aim of this study was to investigate the immune-cell signaling pathways involved—specifically the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)—in T-cell–mediated hepatitis in mice. Methods T-cell–mediated hepatitis was induced in mice by injection of concanavalin A (Con A). Mice with myeloid cell-specific and T-cell–specific deletion of STAT3 were generated. Results STAT3 was activated in myeloid and T cells following Con A injection. Deletion of STAT3 specifically from myeloid cells exacerbated T-cell hepatitis and induced STAT1-dependent production of a Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ), and to a lesser extent of Th17 cytokines (IL-17 and IL-22), in a STAT1-independent manner. In contrast, deletion of STAT3 in T cells reduced T-cell mediated hepatitis and IL-17 production. Furthermore, deletion of IFN-γ completely abolished Con A-induced T-cell hepatitis whereas deletion of IL-17 slightly but significantly reduced such injury. In vitro experiments indicated that IL-17 promoted liver inflammation but inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis. Conclusion Myeloid STAT3 activation inhibits T-cell–mediated hepatitis via suppression of a Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) in a STAT1-dependent manner whereas STAT3 activation in T cells promotes T-cell hepatitis to a lesser extent, via induction of IL-17. Therefore, activation of STAT3 in myeloid cells could be a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with T-cell hepatitis. PMID:19686746

  8. Comparison of the potency of a variety of β-glucans to induce cytokine production in human whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Noss, Ilka; Doekes, Gert; Thorne, Peter S; Heederik, Dick J.J.; Wouters, Inge M.

    2014-01-01

    Beta-glucans are components of fungal cell walls and potent stimulants of innate immunity. The majority of research on biological activities of glucans has focused on β-(1,3)-glucans, which have been implicated in relation with fungal exposure-associated respiratory symptoms, and as important stimulatory agents in anti-fungal immune responses. Fungi - and bacteria and plants - produce a wide variety of glucans with vast differences in proportion and arrangement of their 1,3-, 1,4-, and 1,6-β-glycosidic linkages. Thus far the proinflammatory potential of different β-glucans has not been studied within the same experimental model. Therefore, we compared the potency of 13 different glucan preparations to induce in vitro production of IL1β, IL6, IL8 and TNF-α in human whole blood cultures. The strongest inducers of all cytokines were pustulan (β-(1,6)-glucan), lichenan (β-(1,3)-(1,4)-glucan), xyloglucan (β-(1,4)-glucan), and pullulan (α-(1,4)-(1,6)-glucan). Moderate to strong cytokine production was observed for curdlan (β-(1,3)-glucan), baker’s yeast glucan (β-(1,3)-(1,6)-glucan), and barley glucan (β-(1,3)-(1,4)-glucan), while all other glucan preparations induced only low or no detectable levels of cytokines. We therefore conclude that innate immunity reactions are not exclusively induced by β-(1,3)-glucans, but also by β-(1,6)- and β-(1,4)-structures. Thus, not only β-(1,3)-glucan, but also other β-glucans and particularly β-(1,6)-glucans should be considered in future research. PMID:22653750

  9. [Activation of peripheral T lymphocytes in children with epilepsy and production of cytokines].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Hu, Chongkang; Jiang, Xun

    2016-09-01

    Objective To study the state of peripheral T lymphocytes and cytokine levels in children with epilepsy. Methods Twenty children with epilepsy and 20 healthy age-matched children were recruited and their peripheral blood was collected. The activation of T lymphocytes was evaluated by detecting the expressions of CD25, CD69 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-assicated antigen 4 (CTLA4). The function of T lymphocytes was evaluated by detecting the expressions of interferon γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), IL-17A and IL-6. The activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) was evaluated by detecting the expression of IL-10. Results Children with epilepsy had higher expressions of CD25, CD69 and CTLA-4 in T lymphocytes than the controls did. The expressions of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 in T lymphocytes of children with epilepsy were higher than those of the controls. Frequency of Tregs producing IL-10 was higher in children with epilepsy as compared with the controls. Conclusion Peripheral T lymphocytes of children with epilepsy are activated and produce cytokines. PMID:27609580

  10. CDCP1 Identifies a CD146 Negative Subset of Marrow Fibroblasts Involved with Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Mineo; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Wayner, Elizabeth A.; Carter, William G.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro expanded bone marrow stromal cells contain at least two populations of fibroblasts, a CD146/MCAM positive population, previously reported to be critical for establishing the stem cell niche and a CD146-negative population that expresses CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1)/CD318. Immunohistochemistry of marrow biopsies shows that clusters of CDCP1+ cells are present in discrete areas distinct from areas of fibroblasts expressing CD146. Using a stromal cell line, HS5, which approximates primary CDCP1+ stromal cells, we show that binding of an activating antibody against CDCP1 results in tyrosine-phosphorylation of CDCP1, paralleled by phosphorylation of Src Family Kinases (SFKs) Protein Kinase C delta (PKC-δ). When CDCP1 expression is knocked-down by siRNA, the expression and secretion of myelopoietic cytokines is increased. These data suggest CDCP1 expression can be used to identify a subset of marrow fibroblasts functionally distinct from CD146+ fibroblasts. Furthermore the CDCP1 protein may contribute to the defining function of these cells by regulating cytokine expression. PMID:25275584

  11. Effects of acute ethanol exposure on cytokine production by primary airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kaphalia, Lata; Kalita, Mridul; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Calhoun, William J

    2016-02-01

    Both chronic and binge alcohol abuse can be significant risk factors for inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, metabolic basis of alcohol-related lung disease is not well defined, and may include key metabolites of ethanol [EtOH] in addition to EtOH itself. Therefore, we investigated the effects of EtOH, acetaldehyde [ACE], and fatty acid ethyl esters [FAEEs] on oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and nuclear translocation of phosphorylated (p)-NF-κB p65 in primary human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells stimulated to produce cytokines using LPS exposure. Both FAEEs and ACE induced evidence of cellular oxidative stress and ER stress, and increased p-NF-κB in nuclear extracts. EtOH and its metabolites decreased p-AMPKα activation, and induced expression of fatty acid synthase, and decreased expression of sirtuin 1. In general, EtOH decreased secretion of IP-10, IL-6, eotaxin, GCSF, and MCP-1. However, FAEEs and ACE increased these cytokines, suggesting that both FAEEs and ACE as compared to EtOH itself are proinflammatory. A direct effect of EtOH could be consistent with blunted immune response. Collectively, these two features of EtOH exposure, coupled with the known inhibition of innate immune response in our model might explain some clinical manifestations of EtOH exposure in the lung. PMID:26721307

  12. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Increases Cytokine Production and Cutaneous Inflammation in Response to Ultraviolet Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Abaseri, Taghrid Bahig; Repertinger, Susan K.; Hansen, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is activated in cutaneous keratinocytes upon ultraviolet (UV) exposure and has been implicated in ultraviolet-(UV-)induced inflammation and skin tumorigenesis. Egfr mutant mice and EGFR inhibitors were used to investigate the hypothesis that EGFR activation augments inflammation following UV irradiation. Topical treatment of mouse skin with the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 before UV exposure suppressed UV-induced erythema, edema, mast cell infiltration, and neutrophil infiltration. Genetic ablation of Egfr and EGFR inhibition by AG1478 also suppressed the increase in the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α, KC (murine IL-8), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) after UV exposure of cultured keratinocytes. Finally, genetic ablation of inhibition of EGFR in cultured keratinocytes decreased p38 activation after UV, while inhibition of p38 kinase reduced COX-2 expression after UV. These data demonstrate that EGFR regulates multiple aspects of UV-induced inflammation and suggest activation of p38 kinase leading to increased COX-2 and cytokine expression as one mechanism through which it acts. PMID:23878744

  13. Insulin-induced cytokine production in macrophages causes insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Manowsky, Julia; Camargo, Rodolfo Gonzalez; Kipp, Anna P; Henkel, Janin; Püschel, Gerhard P

    2016-06-01

    Overweight and obesity are associated with hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and a low-grade inflammation. Although hyperinsulinemia is generally thought to result from an attempt of the β-cell to compensate for insulin resistance, there is evidence that hyperinsulinaemia itself may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and possibly the low-grade inflammation. To test this hypothesis, U937 macrophages were exposed to insulin. In these cells, insulin induced expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, CCL2, and OSM. The insulin-elicited induction of IL-1β was independent of the presence of endotoxin and most likely mediated by an insulin-dependent activation of NF-κB. Supernatants of the insulin-treated U937 macrophages rendered primary cultures of rat hepatocytes insulin resistant; they attenuated the insulin-dependent induction of glucokinase by 50%. The cytokines contained in the supernatants of insulin-treated U937 macrophages activated ERK1/2 and IKKβ, resulting in an inhibitory serine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate. In addition, STAT3 was activated and SOCS3 induced, further contributing to the interruption of the insulin receptor signal chain in hepatocytes. These results indicate that hyperinsulinemia per se might contribute to the low-grade inflammation prevailing in overweight and obese patients and thereby promote the development of insulin resistance particularly in the liver, because the insulin concentration in the portal circulation is much higher than in all other tissues. PMID:27094035

  14. Effects of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Infection on Cytokine Production in SPF Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Shi, Xingming; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Hu, Shunlei; Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Infection with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), a gammaretrovirus in the Retroviridae family, can result in immunosuppression and subsequent increased susceptibility to secondary infections. The effects of REV infection on expression of mRNA for cytokine genes in chickens have not been completely elucidated. In this study, using multiplex branched DNA (bDNA) technology, we identified molecular mediators that participated in the regulation of the immune response during REV infection in chickens. Cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression levels were evaluated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Expression levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-13 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were significantly up-regulated while interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-1β,IL-2, IL-3, IL-15, IL-17F, IL-18 and colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1 were markedly decreased in PBMCs at all stages of infection. Compared with controls, REV infected chickens showed greater expression levels of IL-8 in PBMCs 21 and 28 days post infection. In addition, REV regulates host immunity as a suppressor of T cell proliferative responses. The results in this study will help us to understand the host immune response to virus pathogens. PMID:24358317

  15. Influence of Hydration Status on Changes in Plasma Cortisol, Leukocytes, and Antigen-Stimulated Cytokine Production by Whole Blood Culture following Prolonged Exercise.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Ida S; Killer, Sophie C; Gleeson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Elevated antigen-stimulated anti-inflammatory cytokine production appears to be a risk factor for upper respiratory tract illness in athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged exercise and hydration on antigen-stimulated cytokine production. Twelve healthy males cycled for 120 min at 60% [Formula: see text] on two occasions, either euhydrated or moderately hypohydrated (induced by fluid restriction for 24 h). Blood samples were collected before and after exercise and following 2 h recovery for determination of cell counts, plasma cortisol, and in vitro antigen-stimulated cytokine production by whole blood culture. Fluid restriction resulted in mean body mass loss of 1.3% and 3.9% before and after exercise, respectively. Exercise elicited a significant leukocytosis and elevated plasma cortisol, with no differences between trials. IL-6 production was significantly reduced 2 h postexercise (P < 0.05), while IL-10 production was elevated postexercise (P < 0.05). IFN- γ and IL-2 production tended to decrease postexercise. No significant effect of hydration status was observed for the measured variables. Prolonged exercise appears to result in augmented anti-inflammatory cytokine release in response to antigen challenge, possibly coupled with acute suppression of proinflammatory cytokine production, corresponding with studies using mitogen or endotoxin as stimulant. Moderate hypohydration does not appear to influence these changes. PMID:24967270

  16. MicroRNA-155 regulates inflammatory cytokine production in tumor-associated macrophages via targeting C/EBPbeta.

    PubMed

    He, Min; Xu, Zhenqun; Ding, Tong; Kuang, Dong-Ming; Zheng, Limin

    2009-10-01

    Macrophages (Mphi) are prominent components of solid tumors and exhibit distinct phenotypes in different microenvironments. We have recently found that tumors can alter the normal developmental process of Mphi to trigger transient activation of monocytes, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we showed that the protein expression of transcription factor C/EBPbeta was markedly elevated in tumor-associated Mphi both in vitro and human tumors in situ. The expression of C/EBP protein correlated with cytokine production in tumor-activated monocytes. Moreover, we found that C/EBPbeta expression was regulated at the post-transcriptional level and correlated with sustained reduction of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in tumor-activated monocytes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that C/EBPbeta is a potential target of miR-155 and luciferase assay confirmed that C/EBPbeta translation is suppressed by miR-155 through interaction with the 3'UTR of C/EBPbeta mRNA. Further analysis showed that induction of miR-155 suppressed C/EBPbeta protein expression as well as cytokine production in tumor-activated monocytes, an effect which could be mimicked by silencing of C/EBPbeta. These results indicate that tumor environment causes a sustained reduction of miR-155 in monocytes/Mphi, which in turn regulates the functional activities of monocytes/Mphi by releasing the translational inhibition of transcription factor C/EBPbeta. PMID:19887047

  17. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced cytokine production and cytotoxicity of PAMAM dendrimers in J774A.1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naha, Pratap C.; Davoren, Maria; Lyng, Fiona M.; Byrne, Hugh J.

    2010-07-15

    The immunotoxicity of three generations of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (G-4, G-5 and G-6) was evaluated in mouse macrophage cells in vitro. Using the Alamar blue and MTT assays, a generation dependent cytotoxicity of the PAMAM dendrimers was found whereby G-6 > G-5 > G-4. The toxic response of the PAMAM dendrimers correlated well with the number of surface primary amino groups, with increasing number resulting in an increase in toxic response. An assessment of intracellular ROS generation by the PAMAM dendrimers was performed by measuring the increased fluorescence as a result of intracellular oxidation of Carboxy H{sub 2}DCFDA to DCF both quantitatively using plate reader and qualitatively by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The inflammatory mediators macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6, (IL-6) were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) following exposure of mouse macrophage cells to PAMAM dendrimers. A generation dependent ROS and cytokine production was found, which correlated well with the cytotoxicological response and therefore number of surface amino groups. A clear time sequence of increased ROS generation (maximum at {approx} 4 h), TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 secretion (maximum at {approx} 24 h), MIP-2 levels and cell death ({approx} 72 h) was observed. The intracellular ROS generation and cytokine production induced cytotoxicity point towards the mechanistic pathway of cell death upon exposure to PAMAM dendrimers.

  18. Lipoteichoic Acid Isolated from Weissella cibaria Increases Cytokine Production in Human Monocyte-Like THP-1 Cells and Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi-Fan; Lee, Yoon-Doo; Park, Jae-Yeon; Kim, Seongjae; Lee, Youn-Woo; Jeon, Boram; Jagdish, Deepa; Kim, Hangeun; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-07-28

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have beneficial effects on intestinal health and skin diseases. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria, is known to induce the production of several cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 and affect the intestinal microflora, anti-aging, sepsis, and cholesterol level. In this study, Weissella cibaria was isolated from Indian dairy products, and we examined its immune-enhancing effects. Live and heatkilled W. cibaria did not induce the secretion of immune-related cytokines, whereas LTA isolated from W. cibaria (cLTA) significantly increased the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. cLTA increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappalight-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases in THP-1 cells. The secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 was also increased in the cLTA-treated mouse splenocytes. These results suggest that cLTA, but not W. cibaria whole cells, has immune-boosting potential and can be used to treat immunosuppression diseases. PMID:27012236

  19. Oligonol, a lychee fruit-derived low-molecular form of polyphenol mixture, suppresses inflammatory cytokine production from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Naeun; Shin, Min Sun; Kang, Youna; Park, Kieyoung; Maeda, Takahiro; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hajime; Kang, Insoo

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α that are involved in autoimmunity, inflammatory diseases, cardiovascular disease and obesity. Therapies targeting IL-6 and TNF-α have been utilized in treating chronic inflammatory diseases. Oligonol is a lychee fruit-derived low-molecular form of polyphenol mixture, typically catechin-type monomers and oligomers of proanthocyanidins, which are produced by an oligomerization process. Although previous studies reported anti-inflammatory properties of Oligonol, it is unknown whether and how Oligonol suppresses IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes. The results of our study demonstrate that Oligonol (25μg/ml) decreases the production of IL-6 and TNF-α from human primary monocytes as measured by flow cytometry and ELISA. Such an anti-cytokine effect was likely mediated by the suppression of NF-κB activation without inducing cell death. Our findings raise the possibility of exploring the benefits of Oligonol in controlling inflammatory conditions, especially those associated with monocytes, in humans. PMID:27079270

  20. Helminth Products Protect against Autoimmunity via Innate Type 2 Cytokines IL-5 and IL-33, Which Promote Eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Conor M; Stefanska, Anna M; Walsh, Kevin P; Kelly, Patrick J; Boon, Louis; Lavelle, Ed C; Walsh, Patrick T; Mills, Kingston H G

    2016-01-15

    Epidemiologic studies in humans have demonstrated that infection with helminth parasites is associated with a reduced risk of developing autoimmune diseases. Mechanistic studies in mice have linked the protective effect of helminths on autoimmunity to the suppressive activity of helminth-induced regulatory T cells (Tregs) or Th2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment of mice with Fasciola hepatica excretory-secretory products (FHES) attenuated the clinical signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Protection was associated with a significant reduction in the infiltration of pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells into the brain. Although FHES enhanced anti-inflammatory cytokine and Th2 responses, protection against EAE was independent of IL-4, IL-10, and Tregs. However, administration of FHES induced production of the type 2 cytokines IL-33 and IL-5, which promoted accumulation of eosinophils. FHES-induced expansion of eosinophils and protection against EAE was lost in IL-33(-/-) mice and upon neutralization of IL-5. Furthermore, transfer of FHES-induced or IL-33-induced eosinophils conferred protection against EAE. In addition, treatment of mice with recombinant IL-33 attenuated autoimmunity, and this was dependent on IL-5. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a role for helminth-induced IL-5 and IL-33 in protection against autoimmunity. PMID:26673140

  1. Vanillic Acid Inhibits Inflammatory Pain by Inhibiting Neutrophil Recruitment, Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production, and NFκB Activation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Calixto-Campos, Cássia; Carvalho, Thacyana T; Hohmann, Miriam S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Manchope, Marília F; Zarpelon, Ana C; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-08-28

    Vanillic acid (1) is a flavoring agent found in edible plants and fruits. It is an oxidized form of vanillin. Phenolic compounds form a substantial part of plant foods used as antioxidants with beneficial biological activities. These compounds have received considerable attention because of their role in preventing human diseases. Especially, 1 presents antibacterial, antimicrobial, and chemopreventive effects. However, the mechanisms by which 1 exerts its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo are incompletely understood. Thus, the effect of 1 was evaluated in murine models of inflammatory pain. Treatment with 1 inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone, the second phase of the formalin test, and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Treatment with 1 also inhibited carrageenan- and CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of 1 involved the inhibition of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and NFκB activation in the carrageenan model. The present study demonstrated 1 presents analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in a wide range of murine inflammation models, and its mechanisms of action involves antioxidant effects and NFκB-related inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:26192250

  2. Upregulated LINE-1 Activity in the Fanconi Anemia Cancer Susceptibility Syndrome Leads to Spontaneous Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Brégnard, Christelle; Guerra, Jessica; Déjardin, Stéphanie; Passalacqua, Frank; Benkirane, Monsef; Laguette, Nadine

    2016-06-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by elevated cancer susceptibility and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Using SLX4(FANCP) deficiency as a working model, we questioned the trigger for chronic inflammation in FA. We found that absence of SLX4 caused cytoplasmic DNA accumulation, including sequences deriving from active Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1), triggering the cGAS-STING pathway to elicit interferon (IFN) expression. In agreement, absence of SLX4 leads to upregulated LINE-1 retrotransposition. Importantly, similar results were obtained with the FANCD2 upstream activator of SLX4. Furthermore, treatment of FA cells with the Tenofovir reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTi), that prevents endogenous retrotransposition, decreased both accumulation of cytoplasmic DNA and pro-inflammatory signaling. Collectively, our data suggest a contribution of endogenous RT activities to the generation of immunogenic cytoplasmic nucleic acids responsible for inflammation in FA. The additional observation that RTi decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine production induced by DNA replication stress-inducing drugs further demonstrates the contribution of endogenous RTs to sustaining chronic inflammation. Altogether, our data open perspectives in the prevention of adverse effects of chronic inflammation in tumorigenesis. PMID:27428429

  3. Early stage drug treatment that normalizes proinflammatory cytokine production attenuates synaptic dysfunction in a mouse model that exhibits age-dependent progression of Alzheimer's disease-related pathology.

    PubMed

    Bachstetter, Adam D; Norris, Christopher M; Sompol, Pradoldej; Wilcock, Donna M; Goulding, Danielle; Neltner, Janna H; St Clair, Daret; Watterson, D Martin; Van Eldik, Linda J

    2012-07-25

    Overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines in the CNS has been implicated as a key contributor to pathophysiology progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and extensive studies with animal models have shown that selective suppression of excessive glial proinflammatory cytokines can improve neurologic outcomes. The prior art, therefore, raises the logical postulation that intervention with drugs targeting dysregulated glial proinflammatory cytokine production might be effective disease-modifying therapeutics if used in the appropriate biological time window. To test the hypothesis that early stage intervention with such drugs might be therapeutically beneficial, we examined the impact of intervention with MW01-2-151SRM (MW-151), an experimental therapeutic that selectively attenuates proinflammatory cytokine production at low doses. MW-151 was tested in an APP/PS1 knock-in mouse model that exhibits increases in AD-relevant pathology progression with age, including increases in proinflammatory cytokine levels. Drug was administered during two distinct but overlapping therapeutic time windows of early stage pathology development. MW-151 treatment attenuated the increase in microglial and astrocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production in the cortex and yielded improvement in neurologic outcomes, such as protection against synaptic protein loss and synaptic plasticity impairment. The results also demonstrate that the therapeutic time window is an important consideration in efficacy studies of drugs that modulate glia biological responses involved in pathology progression and suggest that such paradigms should be considered in the development of new therapeutic regimens that seek to delay the onset or slow the progression of AD. PMID:22836255

  4. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces cytokine and chemokine production via NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yujun; Lü, Xuena; Man, Chaoxin; Han, Linlin; Shan, Yi; Qu, Xingguang; Liu, Ying; Yang, Shiqin; Xue, Yuqing; Zhang, Yinghua

    2012-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells can respond to certain bacteria by producing an array of cytokines and chemokines which are associated with host immune responses. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is a characterized probiotic, originally isolated from human feces. This study aimed to test the ability of L. acidophilus NCFM to stimulate cytokine and chemokine production in intestinal epithelial cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their upregulation. In experiments using intestinal epithelial cell lines and mouse models, we observed that L. acidophilus NCFM could rapidly but transiently upregulate a number of effector genes encoding cytokines and chemokines such as interleukin 1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, CCL2, and CCL20 and that cytokines showed lower expression levels with L. acidophilus NCFM treatment than chemokines. Moreover, L. acidophilus NCFM could activate a pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), in intestinal epithelial cell lines. The phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in intestinal epithelial cell lines was also enhanced by L. acidophilus NCFM. Furthermore, inhibitors of NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate [PDTC]) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) significantly reduced cytokine and chemokine production in the intestinal epithelial cell lines stimulated by L. acidophilus NCFM, suggesting that both NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling pathways were important for the production of cytokines and chemokines induced by L. acidophilus NCFM. PMID:22357649

  5. Oral Administration of p-Hydroxycinnamic Acid Attenuates Atopic Dermatitis by Downregulating Th1 and Th2 Cytokine Production and Keratinocyte Activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Choi, Eun-Ju; Lee, Kyung-Sik; Kim, Hye-Ran; Na, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Min-Sung; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Eun Young; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex disease that is caused by various factors, including environmental change, genetic defects, and immune imbalance. We previously showed that p-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) isolated from the roots of Curcuma longa inhibits T-cell activation without inducing cell death. Here, we demonstrated that oral administration of HCA in a mouse model of ear AD attenuates the following local and systemic AD manifestations: ear thickening, immune-cell infiltration, production of AD-promoting immunoregulatory cytokines in ear tissues, increased spleen and draining lymph node size and weight, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production by draining lymph nodes, and elevated serum immunoglobulin production. HCA treatment of CD4+ T cells in vitro suppressed their proliferation and differentiation into Th1 or Th2 and their Th1 and Th2 cytokine production. HCA treatment of keratinocytes lowered their production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines that drive either Th1 or Th2 responses in AD. Thus, HCA may be of therapeutic potential for AD as it acts by suppressing keratinocyte activation and downregulating T-cell differentiation and cytokine production. PMID:26959360

  6. Oral Administration of p-Hydroxycinnamic Acid Attenuates Atopic Dermatitis by Downregulating Th1 and Th2 Cytokine Production and Keratinocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Choi, Eun-Ju; Lee, Kyung-Sik; Kim, Hye-Ran; Na, Bo-Ra; Kwon, Min-Sung; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Choi, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Eun Young; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex disease that is caused by various factors, including environmental change, genetic defects, and immune imbalance. We previously showed that p-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) isolated from the roots of Curcuma longa inhibits T-cell activation without inducing cell death. Here, we demonstrated that oral administration of HCA in a mouse model of ear AD attenuates the following local and systemic AD manifestations: ear thickening, immune-cell infiltration, production of AD-promoting immunoregulatory cytokines in ear tissues, increased spleen and draining lymph node size and weight, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production by draining lymph nodes, and elevated serum immunoglobulin production. HCA treatment of CD4+ T cells in vitro suppressed their proliferation and differentiation into Th1 or Th2 and their Th1 and Th2 cytokine production. HCA treatment of keratinocytes lowered their production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines that drive either Th1 or Th2 responses in AD. Thus, HCA may be of therapeutic potential for AD as it acts by suppressing keratinocyte activation and downregulating T-cell differentiation and cytokine production. PMID:26959360

  7. Ts6 and Ts2 from Tityus serrulatus venom induce inflammation by mechanisms dependent on lipid mediators and cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; Sorgi, Carlos Artério; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators are thought to be involved in the systemic and local immune response induced by the Tityus serrulatus scorpion envenomation. New functional aspects of lipid mediators have recently been described. Here, we examine the unreported role of lipid mediators in cell recruitment to the peritoneal cavity after an injection with Ts2 or Ts6 toxins isolated from the T. serrulatus scorpion venom. In this report, we demonstrate that following a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Ts2 or Ts6 (250 μg/kg) in mice, there was an induction of leukocytosis with a predominance of neutrophils observed at 4, 24, 48 and 96 h. Moreover, total protein, leukotriene (LT)B(4), prostaglandin (PG)E(2) and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were increased. We also observed an increase of regulatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-10, after the Ts2 injection. Finally, we observed that Ts2 or Ts6 injection in 5-lipoxygenase (LO) deficient mice and in wild type (WT) 129sv mice pre-treated with LTs and PGs inhibitors (MK-886 and celecoxib, respectively) a reduction the influx of leukocytes occurs in comparison to WT. The recruitment of these cells demonstrated a phenotype characteristic of neutrophils, macrophages, CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes expressing GR1+, F4/80+, CD3+/CD4+ and CD3+/CD8+, respectively. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that Ts2 and Ts6 induce inflammation by mechanisms dependent on lipid mediators and cytokine production. Ts2 may play a regulatory role whereas Ts6 exhibits pro-inflammatory activity exclusively. PMID:23085190

  8. Specific effect of the HLDF differentiation factor on the cytokine production potential of immunocompetent blood cells in stomach adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Autenshlyus, A I; Kunts, T A; Mikhaylova, E S; Varaksin, N A; Bogachuk, A P; Lipkin, V M

    2016-07-01

    The cytokine production potential of immunocompetent cells from the blood of stomach adenocarcinoma patients was analyzed after the pretreatment of cells with the HLDF differentiation factor with subsequent exposure to polyclonal activators (HLDF+PA). IL-1β, IL-1Ra, TNFα, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IL-18, IL-18BPa, IFNγ, G-CSF, and GM-CSF were quantified in the supernatants after precipitation of the cells. Specific effects of HLDF+PA were manifested as an increase in the production of IL-8, IL-17, and GM-CSF due to suppression of Th1-dependent immune reactions in a Th17-mediated mechanism that is a part of a broader functional antagonism of Th1 and Th17 lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:27595831

  9. CD14-dependent and -independent cytokine and chemokine production by human THP-1 monocytes stimulated by Streptococcus suis capsular type 2

    PubMed Central

    SEGURA, M; VADEBONCOEUR, N; GOTTSCHALK, M

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 is an important aetiologic agent of swine meningitis, and it has been highlighted as a cause of occupational disease leading to meningitis and fulminant sepsis in humans. The objective of the present work was to study the ability of S. suis type 2 to induce the release of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein one (MCP-1) by human monocytic THP-1 cells. The induction of these five cytokines was dose- and incubation time-dependent, and it was significantly enhanced by pre-treatment of cells with interferon gamma. IL-8 levels were markedly higher compared with those obtained with the other cytokines. However, elevated levels of MCP-1 and IL-6 were also observed. Levels of cytokine induced by heat-killed or live bacteria were similar. Pre-treatment of cells with anti-CD14 monoclonal antibodies suggested that this important host receptor is partially implicated in TNF, IL-1, IL-6 andMCP-1 production, while CD14-independent pathways seem to be responsible for IL-8 production after S. suis stimulation. In addition, blocking studies with anti-TNF and anti-IL-1 antibodies revealed that these cytokines are involved in amplification of the S. suis-induced cytokine cascade. When several different S. suis strains of human or porcine origin were compared, a very heterogeneous pattern of cytokine production was observed. Human strains did not exhibit a clear tendency to induce higher cytokine release by human THP-1 monocytes. The synergistic effect of the up-regulation of cytokines during S. suis meningitis may mediate many of the inflammatory reactions, including the sequestration of leucocytes at the site of infection. PMID:11876746

  10. Activation of T cell death-associated gene 8 regulates the cytokine production of T cells and macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Onozawa, Yoshiko; Fujita, Yoshifumi; Kuwabara, Harumi; Nagasaki, Miyuki; Komai, Tomoaki; Oda, Tomiichiro

    2012-05-15

    An orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, T cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) which has been reported to be a proton sensor, inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by extracellular acidification. Recently, we have found that TDAG8 knockout mice showed significant exacerbation in various immune-mediated inflammation disease models. To elucidate the role of TDAG8, we screened an in-house library to find compounds which have a profile as a TDAG8 agonist using a cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate assay. Among the screening hits, we focused on (3-[(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)thio]-1,6-dimethyl-5,6-dihydro-1H-pyridazino[4,5-e][1,3,4]thiadiazin-5-one) (named BTB09089). BTB09089 did not act on other proton sensing G-protein-coupled receptors such as G-protein-coupled receptor 4 (GPR4) nor ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1). Moreover, BTB09089 increased cAMP level in the splenocytes from wild-type littermates but not from TDAG8-deficient mice. Thus, BTB09089 was found to be a TDAG8 specific agonist. We then investigated the effects of BTB09089 on T cells and macrophages in vitro. In splenocytes, BTB09089 suppressed the production of IL-2 stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. In peritoneal exuded macrophages induced by thioglycollate, BTB09089 suppressed the production of TNF-α and IL-6 while it increased that of IL-10 when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were observed in cells from wild type mice, but not those from TDAG8 knockout mice. These results indicate that activation of TDAG8 attenuates immune-mediated inflammation by regulating the cytokine production of T cells and macrophages. PMID:22445881

  11. Chronic Ethanol consumption modulates growth factor release, mucosal cytokine production and microRNA expression in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Asquith, Mark; Pasala, Sumana; Engelmann, Flora; Haberthur, Kristen; Meyer, Christine; Park, Byung; Grant, Kathleen A.; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic alcohol consumption has been associated with enhanced susceptibility to both systemic and mucosal infections. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this enhanced susceptibility remain incompletely understood. METHODS Using a nonhuman primate model of ethanol self-administration, we examined the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on immune homeostasis, cytokine and growth factor production in peripheral blood, lung and intestinal mucosa following twelve months of chronic ethanol exposure. RESULTS Ethanol exposure inhibited activation-induced production of growth factors HGF, G-CSF and VEGF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Moreover, ethanol significantly reduced the frequency of colonic Th1 and Th17 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, we did not observe differences in lymphocyte frequency or soluble factor production in the lung of ethanol-consuming animals. To uncover mechanisms underlying reduced growth factor and Th1/Th17 cytokine production, we compared expression levels of microRNAs in PBMC and intestinal mucosa. Our analysis revealed ethanol-dependent upregulation of distinct microRNAs in affected tissues (miR-181a and miR-221 in PBMC; miR-155 in colon). Moreover, we were able to detect reduced expression of the transcription factors STAT3 and ARNT, which regulate expression of VEGF, G-CSF and HGF and contain targets for these microRNAs. To confirm and extend these observations, PBMC were transfected with either mimics or antagomirs of miR181 and 221and protein levels of the transcription factors and growth factors were determined. Transfection of microRNA mimics led to a reduction in both STAT-3/ARNT as well as VEGF/HGF/G-CSF levels. The opposite outcome was observed when microRNA antagomirs were transfected CONCLUSION Chronic ethanol consumption significantly disrupts both peripheral and mucosal immune homeostasis, and this dysregulation may be mediated by changes in microRNA expression. PMID:24329418

  12. Inhibitory effects of diallyl disulfide on the production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-activated BV2 microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye Young; Kim, Nam Deuk; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Byung-Woo; Kim, Wun Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2012-07-15

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a main organosulfur component responsible for the diverse biological effects of garlic, displays a wide variety of internal biological activities. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying DADS' anti-inflammatory activity remain poorly understood. In this study, therefore, the anti-inflammatory effects of DADS were studied to investigate its potential therapeutic effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. We found that pretreatment with DADS prior to treatment with LPS significantly inhibited excessive production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was associated with down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. DADS also attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by suppressing the expression of mRNAs for these proteins. The mechanism underlying this protective effect might be related to the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB, Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway activation in LPS-stimulated microglial cells. These findings indicated that DADS is potentially a novel therapeutic candidate for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. -- Highlights: ► DADS attenuates production of NO and PGE2 in LPS-activated BV2 microglia. ► DADS downregulates levels of iNOS and COX-2. ► DADS inhibits production and expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. ► DADS exhibits these effects by suppression of NF-κB, PI3K/Akt and MAPKs pathways.

  13. MAPK-dependent regulation of IL-1- and β-adrenoreceptor-induced inflammatory cytokine production from mast cells: Implications for the stress response

    PubMed Central

    Chi, David S; Fitzgerald, S Matthew; Pitts, Shannon; Cantor, Karen; King, Ellis; Lee, Steven A; Huang, Shau-Ku; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2004-01-01

    Background Catecholamines, such as epinephrine, are elaborated in stress responses, and mediate vasoconstriction to cause elevation in systemic vascular resistance and blood pressure. Our previous study has shown that IL-1 can induce mast cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines which are involved in atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of epinephrine on IL-1-induced proatherogenic cytokine production from mast cells. Results Two ml of HMC-1 (0.75 × 106 cells/ml) were cultured with epinephrine (1 × 10-5 M) in the presence or absence of IL-1β (10 ng/ml) for 24 hrs. HMC-1 cultured alone produced none to trace amounts of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-13. IL-1β significantly induced production of these cytokines in HMC-1, while epinephrine alone did not. However, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-13 production induced by IL-1β were significantly enhanced by addition of epinephrine. The enhancing effect appears to involve NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. Flow cytometry showed the presence of β1 and β2 adrenoreceptors on resting mast cells. The enhancing effect of proatherogenic cytokine production by epinephrine was down regulated by the β1 and β2 adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol, but not by the β1 adrenoceptor antagonist, atenolol, suggesting the effect involved β2 adrenoceptors. The enhancing effect of epinephrine on proatherogenic cytokine production was also down regulated by the immunosuppressive drug, dexamethasone. Conclusions These results not only confirm that an acute phase cytokine, IL-1β, regulates mast cell function, but also show that epinephrine up regulates the IL-1β induction of proatherogenic cytokines in mast cells. These data provide a novel role for epinephrine, a stress hormone, in inflammation and atherogenesis. PMID:15383152

  14. Sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) oligopeptides: immunomodulatory effects based on stimulating Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Bin; Chen, Qi-He; Liu, Rui; Ren, Jin-Wei; Wang, Jun-Bo; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immunomodulating activity of small molecule oligopeptides from sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) (SOP) in mice. Seven assays were performed to determine the immunomodulatory effects, including splenic lymphocyte proliferation and delayed-type hypersensitivity assays (cell-mediated immunity), IgM antibody response of spleen to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and serum hemolysin level assays (humoral immunity), the carbon clearance assay and the phagocytic capacity of peritoneal cavity phagocytes assay (macrophage phagocytosis), and the NK cell activity assay. Spleen T lymphocyte subpopulations, multiplex sandwich immunoassays of serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for small intestinal secretory immunoglobulin were performed to study the mechanism by which SOP affects the immune system. We found that SOP could improve immune functions in mice, which may be due to the enhancement of the functions of cell-mediated immunity, humoral immunity, macrophage phagocytosis and NK cell activity. From the cellular and molecular assays, we postulated that the immunomodulatory effects are most likely attributed to the stimulation of Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production. PMID:26838796

  15. [Production of recombinant human interleukin-38 and its inhibitory effect on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in THP-1 cells].

    PubMed

    Yuan, X L; Li, Y; Pan, X H; Zhou, M; Gao, Q Y; Li, M C

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-38 is the latest member of the IL-1 cytokine family. However, as a result of lacking efficient method to generate relatively large quantity of IL-38, its precise functions are poorly understood. In the present study, the cloning, expression, purification, and activity analysis of recombinant human IL-38 was described. Human IL-38 cDNA was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-44. The recombinant IL-38 containing a C-hexahistidine tag was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) which induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside. The expressed fusion protein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. IL-38 protein was largely found in the soluble fraction. The purified IL-38 appeared a single band on SDS-PAGE, the yield of IL-38 was 4 mg from 1 L of bacterial culture, and the purity was more than 98% with low endotoxin level (<0.1 EU/μg). Western blotting confirmed the identity of the purified protein. Activity analysis showed that IL-38 can inhibit effectively the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in lipopolysaccharide-activated THP-1 cells. The production and characterization of biologically active IL-38 will be beneficial for its potential role in clinical applications. PMID:27414784

  16. Dengue virus NS1 enhances viral replication and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Alayli, Farah; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Dengue virus (DV) has become the most prevalent arthropod borne virus due to globalization and climate change. It targets dendritic cells during infection and leads to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Several DV non-structural proteins (NS) modulate activation of human dendritic cells. We investigated the effect of DV NS1 on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mo-DCs) during dengue infection. NS1 is secreted into the serum of infected individuals where it interacts with various immune mediators and cell types. We purified secreted DV1 NS1 from supernatants of 293T cells that over-express the protein. Upon incubation with mo-DCs, we observed NS1 uptake and enhancement of early DV1 replication. As a consequence, mo-DCs that were pre-exposed to NS1 produced more pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to subsequent DV infection compared to DCs exposed to heat-inactivated NS1 (HNS1). Therefore the presence of exogenous NS1 is able to modulate dengue infection in mo-DCs. PMID:27348054

  17. O-glycosylation in cell wall proteins in Scedosporium prolificans is critical for phagocytosis and inflammatory cytokines production by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xisto, Mariana I D S; Bittencourt, Vera C B; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; Haido, Rosa M T; Mendonça, Morena S A; Sassaki, Guilherme; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T; Romanos, Maria Teresa V; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the importance of O-linked oligosaccharides present in peptidorhamnomannan (PRM) from the cell wall of the fungus Scedosporium prolificans for recognition and phagocytosis of conidia by macrophages. Adding PRM led to a dose-dependent inhibition of conidia phagocytosis, whereas de-O-glycosylated PRM did not show any effect. PRM induced the release of macrophage-derived antimicrobial compounds. However, O-linked oligosaccharides do not appear to be required for such induction. The effect of PRM on conidia-induced macrophage killing was examined using latex beads coated with PRM or de-O-glycosylated PRM. A decrease in macrophage viability similar to that caused by conidia was detected. However, macrophage killing was unaffected when beads coated with de-O-glycosylated PRM were used, indicating the toxic effect of O-linked oligosaccharides on macrophages. In addition, PRM triggered TNF-α release by macrophages. Chemical removal of O-linked oligosaccharides from PRM abolished cytokine induction, suggesting that the O-linked oligosaccharidic chains are important moieties involved in inflammatory responses through the induction of TNF-α secretion. In summary, we show that O-glycosylation plays a role in the recognition and uptake of S. prolificans by macrophages, killing of macrophages and production of pro- inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25875427

  18. p62/SQSTM1 Enhances NOD2-Mediated Signaling and Cytokine Production through Stabilizing NOD2 Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangwook; Ha, Soon-Duck; Coleman, Macon; Meshkibaf, Shahab; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2013-01-01

    NOD2 is a cytosolic pattern-recognition receptor that senses muramyl dipeptide of peptidoglycan that constitutes the bacterial cell wall, and plays an important role in maintaining immunological homeostasis in the intestine. To date, multiple molecules have shown to be involved in regulating NOD2 signaling cascades. p62 (sequestosome-1; SQSTM1) is a multifaceted scaffolding protein involved in trafficking molecules to autophagy, and regulating signal cascades activated by Toll-like receptors, inflammasomes and several cytokine receptors. Here, we show that p62 positively regulates NOD2-induced NF-κB activation and p38 MAPK, and subsequent production of cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α. p62 associated with the nucleotide binding domain of NOD2 through a bi-directional interaction mediated by either TRAF6-binding or ubiquitin-associated domains. NOD2 formed a large complex with p62 in an electron-dense area of the cytoplasm, which increased its signaling cascade likely through preventing its degradation. This study for the first time demonstrates a novel role of p62 in enhancing NOD2 signaling effects. PMID:23437331

  19. O-Glycosylation in Cell Wall Proteins in Scedosporium prolificans Is Critical for Phagocytosis and Inflammatory Cytokines Production by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xisto, Mariana I. D. S.; Bittencourt, Vera C. B.; Liporagi-Lopes, Livia Cristina; Haido, Rosa M. T.; Mendonça, Morena S. A.; Sassaki, Guilherme; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Romanos, Maria Teresa V.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the importance of O-linked oligosaccharides present in peptidorhamnomannan (PRM) from the cell wall of the fungus Scedosporium prolificans for recognition and phagocytosis of conidia by macrophages. Adding PRM led to a dose-dependent inhibition of conidia phagocytosis, whereas de-O-glycosylated PRM did not show any effect. PRM induced the release of macrophage-derived antimicrobial compounds. However, O-linked oligosaccharides do not appear to be required for such induction. The effect of PRM on conidia-induced macrophage killing was examined using latex beads coated with PRM or de-O-glycosylated PRM. A decrease in macrophage viability similar to that caused by conidia was detected. However, macrophage killing was unaffected when beads coated with de-O-glycosylated PRM were used, indicating the toxic effect of O-linked oligosaccharides on macrophages. In addition, PRM triggered TNF-α release by macrophages. Chemical removal of O-linked oligosaccharides from PRM abolished cytokine induction, suggesting that the O-linked oligosaccharidic chains are important moieties involved in inflammatory responses through the induction of TNF-α secretion. In summary, we show that O-glycosylation plays a role in the recognition and uptake of S. prolificans by macrophages, killing of macrophages and production of pro- inflammatory cytokines. PMID:25875427

  20. Fumigaclavine C, an fungal metabolite, improves experimental colitis in mice via downregulating Th1 cytokine production and matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Fei, Ming-Jian; Shu, Ren-Geng; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Xu, Qiang

    2005-09-01

    In the present paper, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on experimental colitis was examined. Fumigaclavine C, when administered intraperitoneally once a day, significantly reduced the weight loss and mortality rate of mice with experimental colitis induced by intrarectally injection of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). This compound also markedly alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic appearances of colitis. Furthermore, Fumigaclavine C, given both in vivo and in vitro, showed a marked inhibition on the expression of several inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-12alpha, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha as well as MMP-9 in sacral lymph node cells, colonic patch lymphocytes and colitis tissues from the TNBS colitis mice. Meanwhile, the compound caused a dose-dependent reduction in IL-2 and IFN-gamma from the lymphocytes at the protein level and MMP-9 activity. These results suggest that Fumigaclavine C may alleviate experimental colitis mainly via down-regulating the production of Th1 cytokines and the activity of matrix metalloproteinase. PMID:16023606

  1. Leukotriene E4 activates human Th2 cells for exaggerated proinflammatory cytokine production in response to prostaglandin D2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Luzheng; Barrow, Anna; Fleming, Vicki M; Hunter, Michael G; Ogg, Graham; Klenerman, Paul; Pettipher, Roy

    2012-01-15

    PGD(2) exerts a number of proinflammatory responses through a high-affinity interaction with chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2) and has been detected at high concentrations at sites of allergic inflammation. Because cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are also produced during the allergic response, we investigated the possibility that cysLTs may modulate the response of human Th2 cells to PGD(2). PGD(2) induced concentration-dependent Th2 cytokine production in the absence of TCR stimulation. Leukotrienes D(4) and E(4) (LTE(4)) also stimulated the cytokine production but were much less active than PGD(2). However, when combined with PGD(2), cysLTs caused a greater than additive enhancement of the response, with LTE(4) being most effective in activating Th2 cells. LTE(4) enhanced calcium mobilization in response to PGD(2) in Th2 cells without affecting endogenous PGD(2) production or CRTH2 receptor expression. The effect of LTE(4) was inhibited by montelukast but not by the P2Y(12) antagonist methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate. The enhancing effect was also evident with endogenous cysLTs produced from immunologically activated mast cells because inhibition of cysLT action by montelukast or cysLT synthesis by MK886, an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein, reduced the response of Th2 cells to the levels produced by PGD(2) alone. These findings reveal that cysLTs, in particular LTE(4), have a significant proinflammatory impact on T cells and demonstrate their effects on Th2 cells are mediated by a montelukast-sensitive receptor. PMID:22174450

  2. Interactions between Adipocytes and Breast Cancer Cells Stimulate Cytokine Production and Drive Src/Sox2/miR-302b-Mediated Malignant Progression.

    PubMed

    Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Pan, Chendong; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Jang, Kibeom; Besser, Alexandra H; Zhao, Dekuang; Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Kim, Minsoon; Ince, Tan A; Azzam, Diana J; Wander, Seth A; Wang, Bin; Ergonul, Burcu; Datar, Ram H; Cote, Richard J; Howard, Guy A; El-Ashry, Dorraya; Torné-Poyatos, Pablo; Marchal, Juan A; Slingerland, Joyce M

    2016-01-15

    Consequences of the obesity epidemic on cancer morbidity and mortality are not fully appreciated. Obesity is a risk factor for many cancers, but the mechanisms by which it contributes to cancer development and patient outcome have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the effects of coculturing human-derived adipocytes with established and primary breast cancer cells on tumorigenic potential. We found that the interaction between adipocytes and cancer cells increased the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Prolonged culture of cancer cells with adipocytes or cytokines increased the proportion of mammosphere-forming cells and of cells expressing stem-like markers in vitro. Furthermore, contact with immature adipocytes increased the abundance of cancer cells with tumor-forming and metastatic potential in vivo. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that cancer cells cultured with immature adipocytes or cytokines activated Src, thus promoting Sox2, c-Myc, and Nanog upregulation. Moreover, Sox2-dependent induction of miR-302b further stimulated cMYC and SOX2 expression and potentiated the cytokine-induced cancer stem cell-like properties. Finally, we found that Src inhibitors decreased cytokine production after coculture, indicating that Src is not only activated by adipocyte or cytokine exposures, but is also required to sustain cytokine induction. These data support a model in which cancer cell invasion into local fat would establish feed-forward loops to activate Src, maintain proinflammatory cytokine production, and increase tumor-initiating cell abundance and metastatic progression. Collectively, our findings reveal new insights underlying increased breast cancer mortality in obese individuals and provide a novel preclinical rationale to test the efficacy of Src inhibitors for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26744520

  3. Human MAIT-cell responses to Escherichia coli: activation, cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana; Sobkowiak, Michał J.; Sandberg, Johan K.; Leeansyah, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T cells are a large and relatively recently described innate-like antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. These cells recognize riboflavin metabolites from a range of microbes presented by evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex, class I-related molecules. Given the innate-like characteristics of mucosa-associated invariant T cells and the novel type of antigens they recognize, new methodology must be developed and existing methods refined to allow comprehensive studies of their role in human immune defense against microbial infection. In this study, we established protocols to examine a range of mucosa-associated invariant T-cell functions as they respond to antigen produced by Escherichia coli. These improved and dose- and time-optimized experimental protocols allow detailed studies of MR1-dependent mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to Escherichia coli pulsed antigen-presenting cells, as assessed by expression of activation markers and cytokines, by proliferation, and by induction of apoptosis and death in major histocompatibility complex, class I-related–expressing target cells. The novel and optimized protocols establish a framework of methods and open new possibilities to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell immunobiology, using Escherichia coli as a model antigen. Furthermore, we propose that these robust experimental systems can also be adapted to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to other microbes and types of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27034405

  4. Sertoli cells have a functional NALP3 inflammasome that can modulate autophagy and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Hayrabedyan, Soren; Todorova, Krassimira; Jabeen, Asma; Metodieva, Gergana; Toshkov, Stavri; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Mincheff, Milcho; Fernández, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Sertoli cells, can function as non-professional tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells, and sustain the blood-testis barrier formed by their tight junctions. The NOD-like receptor family members and the NALP3 inflammasome play a key role in pro-inflammatory innate immunity signalling pathways. Limited data exist on NOD1 and NOD2 expression in human and mouse Sertoli cells. Currently, there is no data on inflammasome expression or function in Sertoli cells. We found that in primary pre-pubertal Sertoli cells and in adult Sertoli line, TLR4\\NOD1 and NOD2 crosstalk converged in NFκB activation and elicited a NALP3 activation, leading to de novo synthesis and inflammasome priming. This led to caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion. We demonstrated this process was controlled by mechanisms linked to autophagy. NOD1 promoted pro-IL-1β restriction and autophagosome maturation arrest, while NOD2 promoted caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and autophagy maturation. NALP3 modulated NOD1 and pro-IL-1β expression, while NOD2 inversely promoted IL-1β. This study is proof of concept that Sertoli cells, upon specific stimulation, could participate in male infertility pathogenesis via inflammatory cytokine induction. PMID:26744177

  5. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  6. Acute Hypoxia Decreases E. coli LPS-Induced Cytokine Production and NF-κB Activation in Alveolar Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Matuschak, George M.; Nayak, Ravi; Doyle, Timothy M.; Lechner, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Reductions in alveolar oxygenation during lung hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury are common after gram-negative endotoxemia. However, the effects of H/R on endotoxin-stimulated cytokine production by alveolar macrophages are unclear and may depend upon thresholds for hypoxic oxyradical generation in situ. Here TNF-α and IL-β production were determined in rat alveolar macrophages stimulated with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, serotype O55:B5) while exposed to either normoxia for up to 24 h, to brief normocarbic hypoxia (1.5 h at an atmospheric PO2 = 10 ± 2 mm Hg), or to combined H/R. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-β were reduced at the peak of hypoxia and by reoxygenation in LPS + H/R cells (P < 0.01) compared with normoxic controls despite no changes in reduced glutathione (GSH) or in PGE2 production. Both TNF-α mRNA and NF-κB activation were reduced by hypoxia that suppressed superoxide anion generation. Thus, dynamic reductions in the ambient PO2 of alveolar macrophages that do not deplete GSH suppress LPS-induced TNF-α expression, IL-β production, and NF-κB activation even as oxyradical production is decreased. PMID:20470909

  7. The potential role of the osteoblast in the development of periprosthetic osteolysis: review of in vitro osteoblast responses to wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Vermes, C; Glant, T T; Hallab, N J; Fritz, E A; Roebuck, K A; Jacobs, J J

    2001-12-01

    Limited information is available on the responses of osteoblasts to wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and on the roles of altered osteoblast functions in the development of periprosthetic bone loss. Wear debris-challenged osteoblasts exhibit altered functions resulting in the loss of their capacity to produce bone matrix and to replace the resorbed bone. Also, osteoblasts may secrete cytokines, which act in a paracrine fashion to recruit inflammatory cells into the periprosthetic space and to stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption. These effects may be mediated in part by ionic metal dissolution products. We review the mechanisms by which altered osteoblast functions, in response to particulate wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and growth factors, may contribute to the development and the progression of periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:11742458

  8. Immunomodulatory effect of mushrooms on cytotoxic activity and cytokine production of intestinal lamina propria leukocytes does not necessarily depend on β-glucan contents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Sung; Oka, Kohsuke; Watanabe, Osamu; Hara, Hiroshi; Ishizuka, Satoshi

    2011-06-15

    We evaluated the effects of seven mushroom extracts (Grifola frondosa, Pholiota nameko, Panellus serotinus, Hypsizygus marmoreus, Pleurotus cornucopiae, Armillaria mellea, and Flammulina velutipes) on cytotoxic activity and cytokine production of lamina propria leukocytes (LPLs) isolated from rat small (S) and large (L) intestinal mucosa. Boiling water extracts from seven species of mushrooms showed no direct cytotoxicity against the YAC-1 target cells. However, prominent increases of cytotoxicity were observed in S- and L-LPLs co-cultured with P. serotinus extract. Cytokine production (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-12 p70, and IL-4) of S- and L-LPLs was stimulated in response to P. cornucopiae extract. Mushroom extracts contributed to target cell adhesion and/or cytokine production in the effector cells. The promotion of cytotoxic activity in S- and L-LPLs was not necessarily related to β-glucan content of the mushroom. PMID:25213921

  9. Coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from two cases of toxic shock syndrome lack superantigenic activity, but induce cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Lina, G; Fleer, A; Etienne, J; Greenland, T B; Vandenesch, F

    1996-01-01

    Two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated from patients with toxic shock symptoms have been reported to carry genes related to S. aureus enterotoxins B and C by dot-blot hybridisation, although the corresponding superantigenic toxins were not detected immunologically. We here show that these strains produce no superantigens capable of stimulating proliferation of human mononuclear leukocytes or rabbit splenocytes, and that no DNA homologous to the seb or sec genes can be detected by PCR. However, stimulation of human monocytes by whole killed bacteria induced dose-dependent production of the cytokines TNF alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6, which may be responsible for the clinical symptoms in these patients. PMID:8821402

  10. Increased Proinflammatory Cytokine Production and Decreased Cholesterol Efflux Due to Downregulation of ABCG1 in Macrophages Exposed to Indoxyl Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Koji; Yamamoto, Suguru; Wakamatsu, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Kawamura, Kazuko; Kaneko, Yoshikatsu; Goto, Shin; Kazama, Junichiro J.; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-01-01

    One of the possible causes of enhanced atherosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the accumulation of uremic toxins. Since macrophage foam cell formation is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, we examined the direct effect of indoxyl sulfate (IS), a representative uremic toxin, on macrophage function. Macrophages differentiated from THP-1 cells were exposed to IS in vitro. IS decreased the cell viability of THP-1 derived macrophages but promoted the production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IS 1.0 mM: 101.8 ± 21.8 pg/mL vs. 0 mM: 7.0 ± 0.3 pg/mL, TNF-α, IS 1.0 mM: 96.6 ± 11.0 pg/mL vs. 0 mM: 15.1 ± 3.1 pg/mL) and reactive oxygen species. IS reduced macrophage cholesterol efflux (IS 0.5 mM: 30.3% ± 7.3% vs. 0 mM: 43.5% ± 1.6%) and decreased ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 expression. However, lipid uptake into cells was not enhanced. A liver X receptor (LXR) agonist, T0901317, improved IS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines as well as reduced cholesterol efflux. In conclusion, IS induced inflammatory reactions and reduced cholesterol efflux in macrophages. Both effects of IS were improved with activation of LXR. Direct interactions of uremic toxins with macrophages may be a major cause of atherosclerosis acceleration in patients with CKD. PMID:26287243

  11. Specific Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 8 Reduces Gene Expression and Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suzhao; Fossati, Gianluca; Marchetti, Carlo; Modena, Daniela; Pozzi, Pietro; Reznikov, Leonid L.; Moras, Maria Luisa; Azam, Tania; Abbate, Antonio; Mascagni, Paolo; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    ITF2357 (generic givinostat) is an orally active, hydroxamic-containing histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor with broad anti-inflammatory properties, which has been used to treat children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. ITF2357 inhibits both Class I and II HDACs and reduces caspase-1 activity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the secretion of IL-1β and other cytokines at 25–100 nm; at concentrations >200 nm, ITF2357 is toxic in vitro. ITF3056, an analog of ITF2357, inhibits only HDAC8 (IC50 of 285 nm). Here we compared the production of IL-1β, IL-1α, TNFα, and IL-6 by ITF2357 with that of ITF3056 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-killed Candida albicans, or anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies. ITF3056 reduced LPS-induced cytokines from 100 to 1000 nm; at 1000 nm, the secretion of IL-1β was reduced by 76%, secretion of TNFα was reduced by 88%, and secretion of IL-6 was reduced by 61%. The intracellular levels of IL-1α were 30% lower. There was no evidence of cell toxicity at ITF3056 concentrations of 100–1000 nm. Gene expression of TNFα was markedly reduced (80%), whereas IL-6 gene expression was 40% lower. Although anti-CD3/28 and Candida stimulation of IL-1β and TNFα was modestly reduced, IFNγ production was 75% lower. Mechanistically, ITF3056 reduced the secretion of processed IL-1β independent of inhibition of caspase-1 activity; however, synthesis of the IL-1β precursor was reduced by 40% without significant decrease in IL-1β mRNA levels. In mice, ITF3056 reduced LPS-induced serum TNFα by 85% and reduced IL-1β by 88%. These data suggest that specific inhibition of HDAC8 results in reduced inflammation without cell toxicity. PMID:25451941

  12. Aberrant cytokine production by non-malignant cells in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative tumors and response to JAK inhibitor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Belver, Laura; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Kleppe, Kwak, and collegues use detailed cytokine profiling analyses to investigate the role of aberrant pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Their analyses implicate constitutive activation of STAT3 in both malignant and non-malignant bone marrow cell populations as a driver of aberrant cytokine secretion and as a cellular target mediating the therapeutic activity of ruxolitinib. PMID:25749974

  13. Central P2Y12 receptor blockade alleviates inflammatory and neuropathic pain and cytokine production in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Gergely; Gölöncsér, Flóra; Csölle, Cecilia; Király, Kornél; Andó, Rómeó D.; Baranyi, Mária; Koványi, Bence; Máté, Zoltán; Hoffmann, Kristina; Algaier, Irina; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E.; Von Kügelgen, Ivar; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2014-01-01

    In this study the role of P2Y12 receptors (P2Y12R) was explored in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain and in acute thermal nociception. In correlation with their activity to block the recombinant human P2Y12R, the majority of P2Y12R antagonists alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia dose-dependently, following intraplantar CFA injection, and after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve in rats. They also caused an increase in thermal nociceptive threshold in the hot plate test. Among the six P2Y12R antagonists evaluated in the pain studies, the selective P2Y12 receptor antagonist PSB-0739 was most potent upon intrathecal application. P2Y12R mRNA and IL-1β protein were time-dependently overexpressed in the rat hind paw and lumbar spinal cord following intraplantar CFA injection. This was accompanied by the upregulation of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 in the hind paw. PSB-0739 (0.3 mg/kg i.t.) attenuated CFA-induced expression of cytokines in the hind paw and of IL-1β in the spinal cord. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist MLA occluded the effect of PSB-0739 (i.t.) on pain behavior and peripheral cytokine induction. Denervation of sympathetic nerves by 6-OHDA pretreatment did not affect the action of PSB-0739. PSB-0739, in an analgesic dose, did not influence motor coordination and platelet aggregation. Genetic deletion of the P2Y12R in mice reproduced the effect of P2Y12R antagonists on mechanical hyperalgesia in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models, on acute thermal nociception and on the induction of spinal IL-1β. Here we report the robust involvement of the P2Y12R in inflammatory pain. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of P2Y12R antagonism could be mediated by the inhibition of both central and peripheral cytokine production and involves α7-receptor mediated efferent pathways. PMID:24971933

  14. Unique cytokine production profile following stimulation with DNA in macrophages from NZB/W F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshiyuki; Yoshinaga, Takaharu; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Nucleosome is the major autoantigen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as macrophages (M Phis) and dendritic cells (DCs), play the central roles in the acquisition of Ag-specific immune responses and activation of such APCs is required for the efficient Ag-presentation. Therefore, adjuvant activity of DNA in nucleosomes would cause the prominent effects on the production of anti-nucleosome antibodies. In this study, we report that elicited peritoneal M Phis from New Zealand Black/White F1 (NZB/W) mice showed a unique cytokine production profile following stimulation with DNA. M Phis from 5-week old NZB/W mice produced a higher amount of IL-6 and about a half amount of TNF-alpha after stimulation with DNA complexed with cationic liposomes compared with those from control ICR mice. These results suggest that M Phis of NZB/W mice have altered responsiveness to DNA and this might elevate the antigenicity of nucleosomes to induce the production of anti-nucleosome antibodies. PMID:18520062

  15. Exercise improves the Th1 response by modulating cytokine and NO production in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Terra, R; Alves, P J F; Gonçalves da Silva, S A; Salerno, V P; Dutra, P M L

    2013-07-01

    Physical exercise can improve health and may lead to changes in the functionality of the immune system. Moderate intensity exercise can reduce the risk of infection by shifting the overall immune response towards a T helper type 1 pattern. This study investigates the effect of 12 weeks of swimming on the cytokine profile of lymph node cells and macrophages and of the nitric oxide production by these cells. BALB/c mice were divided into 2 groups. The exercise group was subjected to swimming exercise. Lymph node cells culture showed that concentrations of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α were higher in the exercised group, while levels of interleukine-4 and interleukine-10 were significantly decreased in this group. The interleukine-10/interferon-γ ratio tended towards a T helper type 1 profile. Moreover, macrophages isolated from exercised mice produced more interleukine-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α following lipopolysaccharide stimulus. Challenging these macrophages with Leishmania major resulted in higher interleukine-12 production than was observed with macrophages from the control group. Nitric oxide production was increased in macrophages isolated from exercised group following lipopolysaccharide stimulus but not following infection with Leishmania major. These data suggest that exercise biases the immune system towards a T helper type 1 response profile. PMID:23258605

  16. MiR-150 impairs inflammatory cytokine production by targeting ARRB-2 after blocking CD28/B7 costimulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Sang, Wei; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Dianzheng; Sun, Cai; Niu, Mingshan; Zhang, Zhe; Wei, Xiangyu; Pan, Bin; Chen, Wei; Yan, Dongmei; Zeng, Lingyu; Loughran, Thomas P; Xu, Kailin

    2016-04-01

    MiR-150, a major modulator negatively regulating the development and differentiation of various immune cells, is widely involved in orchestrating inflammation. In transplantation immunity, miR-150 can effectively induce immune tolerance, although the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we found that miR-150 is elevated after blocking CD28/B7 co-stimulatory signaling pathway and impaired IL-2 production by targeting ARRB2. Further investigation suggested that miR-150 not only repressed the level of ARRB2/PDE4 directly but also prevented AKT/ARRB2/PDE4 trimer recruitment into the lipid raft by inhibiting the activities of PI3K and AKT through the cAMP-PKA-Csk signaling pathway. This leads to the interruption of cAMP degradation and subsequently results in inhibition of the NF-kB pathway and reduced production of both IL-2 and TNF. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that miR-150 can effectively prevent CD28/B7 co-stimulatory signaling transduction, decrease production of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-2 and TNF, and elicit the induction of immune tolerance. Therefore, miR-150 could become a novel potential therapeutic target in transplantation immunology. PMID:26549736

  17. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of GV1001 Mediated by the Downregulation of ENO1-induced Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jiyea; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Yejin; Jang, Mirim; Jeon, Jane; Hwang, Young-il; Shon, Won Jun; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Wang Jae

    2015-01-01

    GV1001 is a peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) sequence that is reported to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. Enolase1 (ENO1) is a glycolytic enzyme, and stimulation of this enzyme induces high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from concanavalin A (Con A)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ENO1-expressing monocytes in healthy subjects, as well as from macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Therefore, this study investigated whether GV1001 downregulates ENO1-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines as an anti-inflammatory peptide. The results showed that GV1001 does not affect the expression of ENO1 in either Con A-activated PBMCs or RA PBMCs. However, ENO1 stimulation increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6, and these cytokines were downregulated by pretreatment with GV1001. Moreover, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were activated when ENO1, on the surface of Con A-activated PBMCs and RA PBMCs, was stimulated, and they were successfully suppressed by pre-treatment with GV1001. These results suggest that GV1001 may be an effective anti-inflammatory peptide that downregulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the suppression of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation following ENO1 stimulation. PMID:26770183

  18. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of GV1001 Mediated by the Downregulation of ENO1-induced Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiyea; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Yejin; Jang, Mirim; Jeon, Jane; Hwang, Young-Il; Shon, Won Jun; Song, Yeong Wook; Kang, Jae Seung; Lee, Wang Jae

    2015-12-01

    GV1001 is a peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) sequence that is reported to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects. Enolase1 (ENO1) is a glycolytic enzyme, and stimulation of this enzyme induces high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from concanavalin A (Con A)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ENO1-expressing monocytes in healthy subjects, as well as from macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Therefore, this study investigated whether GV1001 downregulates ENO1-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines as an anti-inflammatory peptide. The results showed that GV1001 does not affect the expression of ENO1 in either Con A-activated PBMCs or RA PBMCs. However, ENO1 stimulation increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6, and these cytokines were downregulated by pretreatment with GV1001. Moreover, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were activated when ENO1, on the surface of Con A-activated PBMCs and RA PBMCs, was stimulated, and they were successfully suppressed by pre-treatment with GV1001. These results suggest that GV1001 may be an effective anti-inflammatory peptide that downregulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines through the suppression of p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation following ENO1 stimulation. PMID:26770183

  19. Cytokines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Thorpe, R

    1994-01-01

    Although the immunopathology of most autoimmune diseases has been well defined, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown of self-tolerance and which lead to the development of systemic and organ-specific autoaggression are still unclear. Evidence has accumulated which supports a role for a disregulated production of cytokines by leucocytes and possibly other cells in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cytokine effects in the regulation of the immune response, it is difficult to determine whether abnormalities in the patterns of cytokine production are primary or secondary to the pathological process. Confusion is also caused by the fact that the biological activities of cytokines are multiple and often overlapping, and consequently it is difficult to focus on a unique effect of any one cytokine. Characterization of the potential and actual involvement of cytokines is important not only for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions, but particularly because of the implications for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the diseases. PMID:8149655

  20. Blueberries reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and IL-6 production in mouse macrophages by inhibiting NF Kappa B activation and the MAPK pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) have been reported to attenuate atherosclerosis in apoE deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of BB in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production in mouse macrophages. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G diet (CD) or CD formulated to contain 1% fre...

  1. Polysaccharides from Inonotus obliquus sclerotia and cultured mycelia stimulate cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro and their chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangqun; Li, Juan; Hu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    Inonotus obliquus is an edible and medicinal mushroom to treat many diseases. In the present study, polysaccharides and fractions were isolated and purified by DEAE-52 and Sephadex G-200 chromatography from I. obliquus wild sclerotia, culture broth and cultured mycelia under submerged fermentation. The extracts and fractions could significantly induce the secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-2 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and showed no toxicity to PBMCs. The stimulation effect of the six extracts and eight fractions on the four-cytokine production was dose-dependent. Sclerotial polysaccharides were more effective in the four-cytokine production at 150 μg/ml while exopolysaccharides and endopolysacchrides showed a much better effect on IL-1β production at 30 μg/ml. Purified fractions from exopolysaccharides and endopolysaccharides were more effective than the fraction from sclerotia in most cytokine production. These heteropolysaccharide-protein conjugates mainly contained glucose, galactose, and mannose. Protein content, molecular weight, monosaccharide molar ratio, and anomeric carbon configuration differed from each other and had effects on the cytokine induction activity of the polysaccharides to some extent. PMID:24867795

  2. Inhibitory effects of geranium essential oil and its major component, citronellol, on degranulation and cytokine production by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuko; Sato, Harumi; Yorita, Mika; Nakayama, Hiroto; Miyazato, Hironari; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Jippo, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of geranium essential oil (GEO) on anaphylaxis. GEO can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, but its roles in allergic reactions are incompletely understood. Here, we used mouse cells to show that GEO inhibited the degranulation of cultured mast cells (CMCs). Citronellol is the major component of GEO and inhibited CMC degranulation. The l-enantiomer of citronellol more effectively suppressed CMC degranulation than did d-citronellol. We also examined whether citronellol could inhibit the immunoglobulin (Ig) E-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Treatment with various concentrations of citronellol before CMC activation with IgE significantly inhibited the induction of TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, citronellol suppressed the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK), which is critical for ERK activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. These findings suggest that citronellol may represent a candidate compound for the effective treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:26927807

  3. Hyaluronan stimulates ex vivo B lymphocyte chemotaxis and cytokine production in a murine model of fungal allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A; Wanjara, Steve B; Carlson, Jennifer; McCarthy, James B; Dorsam, Glenn P; Schuh, Jane M

    2015-07-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by excessive eosinophilic and lymphocytic inflammation with associated changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in airway wall remodeling. Hyaluronan (HA) is a nonsulfated glycosaminoglycan ECM component that functions as a structural cushion in its high molecular mass (HMM) but has been implicated in metastasis and other disease processes when it is degraded to smaller fragments. However, relatively little is known about the role HA in mediating inflammatory responses in allergy and asthma. In the present study, we used a murine Aspergillus fumigatus inhalational model to mimic human disease. After observing in vivo that a robust B cell recruitment followed a massive eosinophilic egress to the lumen of the allergic lung and corresponded with the detection of low molecular mass HA (LMM HA), we examined the effect of HA on B cell chemotaxis and cytokine production in the ex vivo studies. We found that LMM HA functioned through a CD44-mediated mechanism to elicit chemotaxis of B lymphocytes, while high molecular mass HA (HMM HA) had little effect. LMM HA, but not HMM HA, also elicited the production of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in these cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a critical role for ECM components in mediating leukocyte migration and function which are critical to the maintenance of allergic inflammatory responses. PMID:25698348

  4. T-cell activation is enhanced by targeting IL-10 cytokine production in toll-like receptor-stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Walk, Ryan M; Elliott, Steven T; Blanco, Felix C; Snyder, Jason A; Jacobi, Ashley M; Rose, Scott D; Behlke, Mark A; Salem, Aliasger K; Vukmanovic, Stanislav; Sandler, Anthony D

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists represent potentially useful cancer vaccine adjuvants in their ability to stimulate antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and subsequently amplify the cytotoxic T-cell response. The purpose of this study was to characterize APC responses to TLR activation and to determine the subsequent effect on lymphocyte activation. We exposed murine primary bone marrow-derived macrophages to increasing concentrations of agonists to TLRs 2, 3, 4, and 9. This resulted in a dose-dependent increase in production of not only tumor necrosis factor–alpha (TNF-α), a surrogate marker of the proinflammatory response, but also interleukin 10 (IL-10), a well-described inhibitory cytokine. Importantly, IL-10 secretion was not induced by low concentrations of TLR agonists that readily produced TNF-α. We subsequently stimulated lymphocytes with anti-CD3 antibody in the presence of media from macrophages activated with higher doses of TLR agonists and observed suppression of interferon gamma release. Use of both IL-10 knockout macrophages and IL-10 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) ablated this suppressive effect. Finally, IL-10 siRNA was successfully used to suppress CpG-induced IL-10 production in vivo. We conclude that TLR-mediated APC stimulation can induce a paradoxical inhibitory effect on T-cell activation mediated by IL-10.

  5. T cells from CLL patients exhibit features of T-cell exhaustion but retain capacity for cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jeffrey K.; McClanahan, Fabienne; Fatah, Rewas; Iqbal, Sameena; Agrawal, Samir; Ramsay, Alan G.; Gribben, John G.

    2013-01-01

    T-cell exhaustion, originally described in chronic viral infections, was recently reported in solid and hematologic cancers. It is not defined whether exhaustion contributes to T-cell dysfunction observed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We investigated the phenotype and function of T cells from CLL patients and age-matched controls. CD8+ and CD4+ T cells from CLL patients had increased expression of exhaustion markers CD244, CD160, and PD1, with expansion of a PD1+BLIMP1HI subset. These molecules were most highly expressed in the expanded population of effector T cells in CLL. CLL CD8+ T cells showed functional defects in proliferation and cytotoxicity, with the cytolytic defect caused by impaired granzyme packaging into vesicles and nonpolarized degranulation. In contrast to virally induced exhaustion, CLL T cells showed increased production of interferon-γ and TNFα and increased expression of TBET, and normal IL2 production. These defects were not restricted to expanded populations of cytomegalovirus (CMV)–specific cells, although CMV seropositivity modulated the distribution of lymphocyte subsets, the functional defects were present irrespective of CMV serostatus. Therefore, although CLL CD8+ T cells exhibit features of T-cell exhaustion, they retain the ability to produce cytokines. These findings also exclude CMV as the sole cause of T-cell defects in CLL. PMID:23247726

  6. Blocking of cell proliferation, cytokines production and genes expression following administration of Chinese herbs in the human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y C; Sun, C M; Tsai, W J; Ou, J C; Chen, W P; Lin, C Y

    1999-01-01

    In the hope of identifying agents of therapeutic value in immuoglobulin A nephropathy (IgA-N), we tested crude methanol extracts of 15 Chinese herbs for their effect on human mesangial cell proliferation. The results indicated that 4 out of the 15 crude extracts inhibited human cells proliferation activated by IL-1beta and IL-6. The extracts and their median inhibitory concentrations were as follows (in microg/ml): Ludwiga octovalvis (MLS-052), 49.9 +/- 1.8; Rhus semialata (MLS-053), 31.2 +/- 1.6; Tabernaemontana divaricata (MLS-054), 50.0 +/- 2.1; Amepelopsis brevipedunculata (MLS-059), 42.9 +/- 1.1. These findings indicate that human mesangial cells were most sensitive to MLS-053 treatment. These herbs also decreased interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Moreover, IL- 1beta mRNA expression was inhibited by Rhus semialata (R. semialata; MLS-053). It is unlikely that cytotoxicity was involved, because no cell deaths were observable. We hypothesize that the inhibitory mechanisms of these Chinese herbs may be related to the impairments of gene expression and production of cytokines in human mesangial cells. Plans are underway for the isolation of pure compounds from these Chinese herbs and the elucidation of their mechanisms of action. PMID:10372651

  7. Progesterone and estradiol exert an inhibitory effect on the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by activated MZ B cells.

    PubMed

    Bommer, I; Muzzio, D O; Zygmunt, M; Jensen, F

    2016-08-01

    The main message of this work is the fact that female sex hormones, progesterone and estradiol, whose levels significantly rise during pregnancy, inhibit the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 with no apparent effect on pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α by activated MZ B cells. This is an important piece of information and helps to better understand how the maternal immune system controls the balance between immune tolerance and immune activation during pregnancy leading to the simultaneously acceptance of the semi-allogeneic fetus and the proper defense of the mother against pathogens during this critical period of time. PMID:27317920

  8. Helicobacter pylori DNA decreases pro-inflammatory cytokine production by dendritic cells and attenuates DSS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Jay; Owyang, Stephanie Y.; Takeuchi, Tomomi; Cole, Tyler; Zhang, Min; Liu, Maochang; Erb-Downward, John; Rubenstein, Joel H.; Kao, John Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Recently there has been emerging epidemiological data to suggest Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) may protect against certain chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the mechanism for the observed inverse association between H. pylori and IBD has not been described. Methods The frequency of immunoregulatory (IRS) to immunostimulatory (ISS) sequences within the genome of various bacteria was calculated using MacVector software. The induction of type I IFN and IL-12 responses by DNA-pulsed murine bone marrow–derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) was analyzed by cytokine production. The effect of H. pylori DNA on E. coli DNA production of type I IFN and IL-12 was assessed. The in vivo significance of H. pylori DNA suppression was assessed in a DSS-model of colitis. The systemic levels of type I IFN were assessed in H. pylori-colonized and non-colonized patients. Results We showed that H. pylori DNA has a significantly elevated IRS:ISS ratio. In vitro experiments revealed the inability of H. pylori DNA to stimulate type I IFN or IL-12 production from mouse BMDCs or human pDCs. Additionally, H. pylori DNA was able to suppress E. coli-DNA production of type I IFN and IL-12. Administration of H. pylori DNA prior to the induction of DSS colitis significantly ameliorated the severity of colitis as compared to E. coli DNA or vehicle control in both an acute and chronic model. Finally, the systemic levels of type I IFN were found to be lower in H. pylori-colonized patients versus non-colonized controls. Conclusions Overall, our study indicates that H pylori DNA has the ability to down-regulate pro-inflammatory responses from DCs and this may in part explain the inverse association between H. pylori and IBD. PMID:21471567

  9. Effect of 17β-oestradiol on cytokine-induced nitric oxide production in rat isolated aorta

    PubMed Central

    Kauser, Katalin; Sonnenberg, Dagmar; Diel, Patrick; Rubanyi, Gabor M

    1998-01-01

    Studies were performed on isolated aortic rings without endothelium to investigate the effect of 17β-oestradiol on cytokine-induced nitric oxide production by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).Treatment of the isolated aortic rings with interleukin-1β (IL-1β, 20 μ ml−1) led to the expression of iNOS mRNA and protein, as well as significant nitrite accumulation in the incubation media and suppression of phenylephrine (1 nM–10 μM)-evoked contraction.Cycloheximide (1 μM), a protein synthesis inhibitor, prevented iNOS protein expression, nitrite accumulation and the suppression of contractility by IL-1β on the isolated aortic rings. 17β-oestradiol (1 nM–10 μM) and the partial oestrogen receptor agonist 4-OH-tamoxifen (1 nM–10 μM) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of IL-1β-induced nitrite accumulation and restored vasoconstrictor responsiveness to phenylephrine, similar to the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (100 μM).Semiquantitative PCR demonstrated decreased iNOS mRNA in the IL-1β-induced and 17β-oestradiol-treated rings. Western blot analysis of rat aorta homogenates revealed that 17β-oestradiol treatment resulted in a reduction in IL-1ß-induced iNOS protein level.Incubation with tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα, 1 ng ml−1) resulted in significant nitrite accumulation in the incubation media and suppression of the smooth muscle contractile response to phenylephrine, similar to IL-1β. The effects of TNFα were also inhibited by co-incubation of the rings with 17β-oestradiol and 4-OH-tamoxifen (1 μM).The anti-transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) antibody, which inhibited TGF-β1-induced suppression of nitrite production from IL-1β-treated vascular rings, did not affect the inhibitory action of 17β-oestradiol, suggesting that the effect of oestrogen on iNOS inhibition was not mediated by TGF-β1.These results show that the ovarian sex steroid, 17β-oestradiol is a modulator of cytokine

  10. Effect of surfactant protein A (SP-A) on the production of cytokines by human pulmonary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Arias-Diaz, J; Garcia-Verdugo, I; Casals, C; Sanchez-Rico, N; Vara, E; Balibrea, J L

    2000-09-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is thought to play a role in the modulation of lung inflammation during acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, SP-A has been reported both to stimulate and to inhibit the proinflammatory activity of pulmonary macrophages (Mphi). Because of the interspecies differences and heterogeneity of Mphi subpopulations used may have influenced previous controversial results, in this study, we investigated the effect of human SP-A on the production of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators by two well-defined subpopulations of human pulmonary Mphi. Surfactant and both alveolar (aMphi) and interstitial (iMphi) macrophages were obtained from multiple organ donor lungs by bronchoalveolar lavage and enzymatic digestion. Donors with either recent history of tobacco smoking, more than 72 h on mechanical ventilation, or any radiological pulmonary infiltrate were discarded. SP-A was purified from isolated surfactant using sequential butanol and octyl glucoside extractions. After 24-h preculture, purified Mphi were cultured for 24 h in the presence or absence of LPS (10 microg/mL), SP-A (50 microg/mL), and combinations. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide (CO) generation (pmol/microg protein), cell cGMP content (pmol/microg protein), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6 release to the medium (pg/microg protein) were determined. SP-A inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced TNFalpha response of both interstitial and alveolar human Mphi, as well as the IL-1 response in iMphi. The SP-A effect on TNFalpha production could be mediated by a suppression in the LPS-induced increase in intracellular cGMP. In iMphi but not in aMphi, SP-A also inhibited the LPS-induced IL-1 secretion and CO generation. These data lend further credit to a physiological function of SP-A in regulating alveolar host defense and inflammation by suggesting a fundamental role of this apoprotein in limiting excessive proinflammatory