Sample records for heterophils

  1. Avian Heterophils in Inflammation and Disease Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BARRY G. HARMON

    Heterophils are the predominate granu- lated leukocyte in the acute inflammatory response in gallinaceous birds. Heterophils are highly phagocytic and are capable of a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. They accumulate in inflamed tissue, causing tissue damage and forming heterophil granulomas that are morphologically similar to inflammatory lesions in reptiles. The avian heterophil lacks myeloperoxidase and depends primarily on nonoxidative

  2. Ontogeny of heterophil function in neonatal chicks by administration of Salmonella enteritidis-immune lymphokines 

    E-print Network

    Genovese, Lacy Lynne

    1998-01-01

    whether decreased heterophil function plays a role in the susceptibility of young chicks to Salmonella infections. Results demonstrated the ability of the heterophil to phagocytose Salmonella enteritidis did not change on Day 1 or Day 4, but then doubled...

  3. INFLAMMATORY AGONIST STIMULATION AND SIGNAL PATHWAY OF OXIDATIVE BURST IN NEONATAL CHICKEN HETEROPHILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fluorescence microplate assay was adapted to examine the oxidative response by heterophils from neonatal chicks following in vitro stimulation with various inflammatory agonists. Both nonopsonized formalin-killed Salmonella enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus stimulated significant heterophil o...

  4. RP33 ACTIVATES BACTERIAL KILLING BY CHICKEN PERIPHERAL BLOOD HETEROPHILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella immune lymphokine (SILK), produced by stimulated splenic T cells from Salmonella enteritidis (SE)-immunized chickens, has been shown to confer protection against Salmonella infection in day old chicks. The SILK induced protection is mediated through a heterophil response and the protecti...

  5. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  6. Genetic and dietary effects on chicken heterophil function and immune response to Salmonella enteritidis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Beth Redmond

    2010-01-01

    The function of the chicken innate immune system against pathogens is affected by genetic background and immune modulating diet. Heterophils from broiler, Leghorn, and Fayoumi birds showed differential expression of immune genes when stimulated with Salmonella enteritidis (SE) bacteria, a zoonotic pathogen. Heterophils from Fayoumi chickens increased expression of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines following stimulation, while the broiler and

  7. A novel heterophilic antibody interaction involves IgG4.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Kitahara, K; Umemura, T; Ota, M; Shimozuru, Y; Kawa, S; Bahram, S

    2010-02-01

    IgG4 has been implicated in a diverse set of complex pathologies - e.g. autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), idiopathic membranous nephropathy - and carries unique features including lack of activation of the classical complement pathway and a dynamic Fab-arm exchange. We recently showed that the rheumatoid factor (RF)-like activity of IgG4 is achieved through a hitherto unknown, Fc-Fc (and not Fab-Fc as is the case in classical RF; CRF) interaction; hence the name, novel RF (NRF). Here, we further explore the resemblance/difference between CRF and NRF. As heterophilic interactions of human IgM RF (CRF) are well known, we checked whether this is the case for IgG4. Human IgG4 showed variable reactivity to animal IgGs: reacting intensely with rabbit and mouse IgGs, but weakly with others. The binding to rabbit IgG was not through the Fab (as in CRF) but via the Fc piece, as was recently shown for human IgG (NRF). This binding correlates with the IgG4 concentration per se and could therefore be of diagnostic usage and incidentally explain some observed interferences in biological assays. In conclusion, here is defined a novel heterophilic antibody interaction and is established the universality of the unique Fc-Fc binding, both involving IgG4. PMID:20384862

  8. Heterophilic antibodies as a source of error in immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, L.; Witkin, M.; Shuler, S.; Neely, H.; Gilbert, S.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies directed against IgG used in an immunoassay, when present in patient serum, may lead to erroneous estimates of analyte by combining with the primary antibody and effectively reducing its concentration. In two patients with anti-rabbit IgG the authors obtained apparently elevated TSH, LH, and FSH estimates using competitive, second antibody kits Dilutional parallelism could not be demonstrated using these kits. Normal TSH estimates were obtained using one of several IRMAs and a competitive assay which included rabbit IgG in the buffer. Normal LH and FSH estimates (including dilutional parallelism) were obtained using competitive assay kits which included rabbit IgG in the buffer. The authors were not able to repair the antibody-limited kits by adding rabbit IgG, as the second antibody concentration was inadequate to precipitate the added IgG Heterophilic antibody directed against the assay antibody presents a significant potential problem in immunoassay. This problem is most pronounced in antibody limited systems and may be avoided by the addition of same-species IgG. The laboratory user may not be able to make this addition unless the separation step is reoptomized. Antibody excess (IRMA) systems are effected if the offending antibody is present in concentrations sufficient to saturate the extracting antibody. Practically, a heterophilic antibody must be suspected by demonstrating nonparallelism. This potential problem should be more widely appreciated.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of chicken and turkey heterophil peptides CHP1, CHP2, THP1, and THP3

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ellen W. Evans; F. Gwen Beach; Kristi M. Moore; Mark W. Jackwood; John R. Glisson; Barry G. Harmon

    1995-01-01

    Four avian heterophil antimicrobial cationic peptides (Chicken Heterophil Peptides 1 and 2, and Turkey Heterophil Peptides 1 and 3) were evaluated for in vitro microbicidal activity against selected avian pathogens and human pathogens which are harbored by birds. At concentrations of 16-2 ?g\\/ml, all four avian peptides effected a greater than 90% reduction in the survival of Candida albicans, Salmonella

  10. Transitions between homophilic and heterophilic modes of cooperation

    E-print Network

    Ichinose, Genki; Sayama, Hiroki; Bersini, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation is ubiquitous in biological and social systems. Previous studies revealed that a preference toward similar appearance promotes cooperation, a phenomenon called tag-mediated cooperation or communitarian cooperation. This effect is enhanced when a spatial structure is incorporated, because space allows agents sharing an identical tag to regroup to form locally cooperative clusters. In spatially distributed settings, one can also consider migration of organisms, which has a potential to further promote evolution of cooperation by facilitating spatial clustering. However, it has not yet been considered in spatial tag-mediated cooperation models. Here we show, using computer simulations of a spatial model of evolutionary games with organismal migration, that tag-based segregation and homophilic cooperation arise for a wide range of parameters. In the meantime, our results also show another evolutionarily stable outcome, where a high level of heterophilic cooperation is maintained in spatially well-mixe...

  11. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    SciTech Connect

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  12. Direct screening identifies mature beta-defensin 2 in avian heterophils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used to screen avian heterophils in the m/z range of 1-20 kDa with an objective to identify the cell associated peptides that may be reflective of their functional physiology. The MALDI-TOF-MS profiles ...

  13. Functional Annotation of Proteomic Data from Chicken Heterophils and Macrophages Induced by Carbon Nanotube Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun-Ze; Cheng, Chung-Shi; Chen, Chao-Jung; Li, Zi-Lin; Lin, Yao-Tung; Chen, Shuen-Ei; Huang, San-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    With the expanding applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedicine and agriculture, questions about the toxicity and biocompatibility of CNT in humans and domestic animals are becoming matters of serious concern. This study used proteomic methods to profile gene expression in chicken macrophages and heterophils in response to CNT exposure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified 12 proteins in macrophages and 15 in heterophils, with differential expression patterns in response to CNT co-incubation (0, 1, 10, and 100 ?g/mL of CNT for 6 h) (p < 0.05). Gene ontology analysis showed that most of the differentially expressed proteins are associated with protein interactions, cellular metabolic processes, and cell mobility, suggesting activation of innate immune functions. Western blot analysis with heat shock protein 70, high mobility group protein, and peptidylprolyl isomerase A confirmed the alterations of the profiled proteins. The functional annotations were further confirmed by effective cell migration, promoted interleukin-1? secretion, and more cell death in both macrophages and heterophils exposed to CNT (p < 0.05). In conclusion, results of this study suggest that CNT exposure affects protein expression, leading to activation of macrophages and heterophils, resulting in altered cytoskeleton remodeling, cell migration, and cytokine production, and thereby mediates tissue immune responses. PMID:24823882

  14. COMPARISON OF HETEROPHIL FUNCTIONS OF MODERN COMMERCIAL AND WILD-TYPE RIO GRANDE TURKEYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the functional differences in peripheral blood heterophils isolated from a commercial turkey line to wild-type Rio Grande turkeys. The phagocytosis of Salmonella, oxidative burst [production of reactive oxygen species;(OXB)] and degranulation [release...

  15. Genetic control of chicken heterophil function in advanced intercross lines: associations with novel and with known Salmonella resistance loci and a likely mechanism for cell death in extracellular trap production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah B. Redmond; Phongsakorn Chuammitri; Claire B. Andreasen; Dušan Pali?; Susan J. Lamont

    2011-01-01

    Heterophils, the avian polymorphonuclear leukocyte and the counterpart of mammalian neutrophils, generate the primary innate\\u000a response to pathogens in chickens. Heterophil performance against pathogens is associated with host disease resistance, and\\u000a heterophil gene expression and function are under genetic control. To characterize the genomic basis of heterophil function,\\u000a heterophils from F13 advanced intercross chicken lines (broiler × Leghorn and broiler

  16. Effects of avian triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-A1) activation on heterophil functional activities.

    PubMed

    Kogut, M H; Genovese, K J; Nerren, J R; He, H

    2012-01-01

    A class of innate receptors called the triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) has been discovered and shown to be involved in innate inflammatory responses. The TREM family has been found in the chicken genome and consists of one activating gene (TREM-A1) and two inhibitory genes (TREM-B1 and TREM-B2). However, to date, there have been no reports on the effects of activating the TREM molecules on the functional activity of the primary avian polymorphonuclear cell, the heterophil. To characterize the activation of avian heterophils, we evaluated the effect of receptor ligation on heterophil effector functions. A specific agonistic antibody (Ab) was generated against the peptide sequence of chicken TREM-A1 38-51aa (YNPRQQRWREKSWC). To study TREM-A1 mediated activation, purified peripheral blood heterophils were incubated with various concentrations of the anti-TREM-A1 Ab or control Ab against an irrelevant antigen. Activation via TREM-A1 induces a significant increase in phagocytosis of Salmonella enteritidis, a rapid degranulation, and a dramatic up-regulation in gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-6, and the inflammatory chemokine, CXCLi2. However, we found no direct TREM-A1 stimulation of the heterophil oxidative burst. Like mammalian TREM, avian TREM-A1 ligation synergizes with the activation of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) ligand, LPS. In addition, the synergistic activity of LPS and TREM-A1 resulted in a significantly (p?0.05) increased production of an oxidative burst. Taken together, these results suggest, unlike in mammalian neutrophils, TREM-A1 engagement activates a differential functional activation of avian heterophils, but like mammalian neutrophils, acts in synergy with TLR agonists. These results provide evidence of the function of TREM-A1 in heterophil biology and avian innate immunity. PMID:21767563

  17. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS MEDIATING OXIDATIVE BURST BY CHICKEN HETEROPHILS IN RESPONSE TO STIMULATION WITH SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS LIPOTEICHOIC ACID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been previously shown to mediate oxidative burst in chicken heterophils. This study was conducted to determine which molecular pathways are involved in TLR mediated oxidative burst. Peripheral blood heterophils from neonatal chicks were isolated and exposed to known...

  18. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS MEDIATING OXIDATIVE BURST BY CHICKEN HETEROPHILS IN RESPONSE TO STIMULATION WITH LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE AND LIPOTEICHOIC ACID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been previously shown to mediate oxidative burst in chicken heterophils. This study was conducted to begin to map the molecular pathways that regulate TLR-mediated oxidative burst. Peripheral blood heterophils from neonatal chicks were isolated and exposed to known ...

  19. COMPARISON OF ERK 1/2, P38 MAPK, AND PTK KINASE ACTIVITY IN HETEROPHILS FROM WILD-TYPE TURKEYS TO ACTIVITY IN HETEROPHILS FROM A COMMERCIAL TURKEY LINE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterophils isolated from wild-type Rio Grande turkeys and a commercial line of turkeys (Line A) on days 4 and 7 post-hatch were stimulated for 1 hr with either nonopsonized Salmonella enteritidis (SE) or opsonized SE (OPSE). After stimulation, cell supernatants were tested for erk 1/2, p38 MAPK...

  20. Impact of heterophil granulocyte depletion caused by 5-fluorouracil on infectious bursal disease virus infection in specific pathogen free chickens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne Kabell; Botond-Zoltán Igyártó; Attila Magyar; Zoltán Hajdú; Éva Biró; Magne Bisgaard; Imre Oláh

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the cytostatic drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which causes depletion of heterophil granulocytes, on clinical symptoms and histological lesions during the progress of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) infection in chickens. The aim was to disclose the mechanism behind the clinical disease symptoms. Three groups of specific pathogen free chickens were

  1. Severe histiolymphocytic and heterophilic bronchopneumonia as a reaction to in ovo fowlpox vaccination in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Williams, S M; Smith, J A; Garcia, M; Brinson, D; Kiupel, M; Hofacre, C

    2010-01-01

    Broiler chickens on several farms from a single poultry company experienced neurological signs and mortality in chicks between 3 days and 10 days of age over a 3-week period after use of a fowlpox-vectored infectious laryngotracheitis virus vaccine in ovo. At necropsy the lungs contained numerous tan or gray, opaque to translucent, 0.5- to 2.0-mm nodules in the parenchyma. Microscopic lesions were a multifocal severe lymphohistiocytic and heterophilic bronchopneumonia. Immunohistochemistry was positive for fowlpox virus in macrophages and lymphocytes, and polymerase chain reaction on paraffin-embedded lung tissues was positive for a fowlpox vector virus commonly used as a vaccine. The cause of the neurological signs was not determined. PMID:20080499

  2. Chicken heterophils from commercially selected and non-selected genetic lines express cytokines differently after in vitro exposure to Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Sarah B; Chuammitri, Phongsakorn; Andreasen, Claire B; Pali?, Dusan; Lamont, Susan J

    2009-12-15

    Resistance to pathogens such as Salmonella enteritidis (SE) is a heritable trait important in maintaining the health of chickens and reducing bacterial contamination of poultry products. In chickens, heterophils act as the first responders to bacterial infections and are, therefore, responsible for initiating the immune response against SE challenge. This study measured mRNA expression of several immune response genes [interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta4 (TGF-beta4), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4)] by heterophils from broiler, Leghorn, and Fayoumi chickens, either non-stimulated or stimulated in vitro with SE using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR. We found that heterophils of commercially selected broiler and Leghorn birds had differing early heterophil responses to SE in comparison with the native Fayoumi line. Heterophil stimulation with SE in vitro increased expression of pro- (IL-6 and GM-CSF) and anti-inflammatory cytokine mRNA (IL-10 and TGF-beta4) in the Fayoumi line, while the broiler and Leghorn line heterophils had decreased or no changes in the cytokine gene expression levels. The unique response of the Fayoumi line is in contrast to the lines with a history of genetic selection to increase growth or reproduction, a process which may favor reduced or suppressed inflammatory responses. The findings illustrate the potential value of native lines to provide biodiversity to enhance innate health in commercially selected poultry. PMID:19505732

  3. Proportion of circulating chicken heterophils and CXCLi2 expression in response to Salmonella enteritidis are affected by genetic line and immune modulating diet.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Sarah B; Chuammitri, Phongsakorn; Andreasen, Claire B; Pali?, Dušan; Lamont, Susan J

    2011-04-15

    Genetic line and diet affect chicken heterophil activity and gene expression, and the combination of these factors can enhance disease resistance. This study evaluated the effects of immune modulating diets on heterophil/lymphocyte (H/L) ratio and heterophil chemokine expression in distinct genetic lines. Fayoumi and Leghorn chickens were fed a basal diet or immune modulating diets enhanced with ?-glucans, ascorbic acid, or corticosterone. H/L ratios and heterophil gene expression in response to in vitro stimulation with Salmonella enteritidis (SE) were evaluated on days 1, 3, 7, and 21 of diet treatment. The stress-mimicking corticosterone diet influenced H/L ratio in the Leghorn line, but not the Fayoumi line, suggesting resistance to stress-induced immunosuppression in the Fayoumi line. Leghorn line H/L ratios were increased on days 1 and 3 of corticosterone diet treatment, but not days 7 or 21. Expression of CXCLi2 by SE stimulated heterophils was higher in the Leghorn line, suggesting that Leghorns rely more heavily on inflammatory response than do Fayoumis. Corticosterone diet was associated with reduced CXCLi2 expression in heterophils from both lines. Dietary ?-glucan or ascorbic acid did not affect H/L ratio or CXCLi2 expression, suggesting that benefits of these immunomodulators may not be evident in healthy birds. PMID:21295352

  4. Structure of a Heterophilic Adhesion Complex between the Human CD2 and CD58 (LFA-3) Counterreceptors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jia-huai Wang; Alex Smolyar; Kemin Tan; Jin-huan Liu; Mikyung Kim; Zhen-yu J Sun; Gerhard Wagner; Ellis L Reinherz

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between CD2 and its counterreceptor, CD58 (LFA-3), on opposing cells optimizes immune recognition, facilitating contacts between helper T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells as well as between cytolytic effectors and target cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of the heterophilic adhesion complex between the amino-terminal domains of human CD2 and CD58. A strikingly asymmetric, orthogonal, face-to-face interaction involving the

  5. Antimicrobial activity of chicken and turkey heterophil peptides CHP1, CHP2, THP1, and THP3.

    PubMed

    Evans, E W; Beach, F G; Moore, K M; Jackwood, M W; Glisson, J R; Harmon, B G

    1995-12-01

    Four avian heterophil antimicrobial cationic peptides (Chicken Heterophil Peptides 1 and 2, and Turkey Heterophil Peptides 1 and 3) were evaluated for in vitro microbicidal activity against selected avian pathogens and human pathogens which are harbored by birds. At concentrations of 16-2 micrograms/ml, all four avian peptides effected a greater than 90% reduction in the survival of Candida albicans, Salmonella enteriditis, and Campylobacter jejuni. None of the peptides, including the known antimicrobial peptide protamine (used as a positive control), were able to reduce the survival of Pasteurella multocida by 90% at the maximum peptide concentration (16 micrograms/ml) tested. At 16 micrograms/ml, the turkey peptide THP3 did not effect a 90% reduction in survival of Bordetella avium, Escherichia coli, or Salmonella typhimurium, while all of the other peptides tested were effective at this concentration or less. This peptide, THP3, does not share the same homologous amino acid sequence shared by the other three peptides. Under our experimental conditions, none of the peptides neutralized Infectious Bronchitis Virus, an enveloped coronavirus of chickens. PMID:8748545

  6. Evaluation of six commercially available kits using purified heterophile antigen for the rapid diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis compared with Epstein-Barr virus-specific serology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fredrik Elgh; Mats Linderholm

    1996-01-01

    Background: Novel commercial kits based on antibody reactivity to purified heterophile antigens have recently been introduced for the diagnosis of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-associated infectious mononucleosis (IM). It is important to determine possible improvements in the performance and reliability of such tests for the diagnosis of IM.Objective: To evaluate the reliability of six commercially available kits for the rapid diagnosis of

  7. Heterophile Antibodies and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Taichman, Norton S.; Pulver, Wayne H.; Schönbaum, Eduard

    1973-01-01

    Platelets appear to be pathogenetic determinants in the development of lethal Forssman shock, which was provoked in guinea pigs by an intravenous injection of rabbit antiserum to sheep erythrocyte stromata. Within moments, circulating platelets (prelabeled with 14C-serotonin) were removed from the blood stream and impacted in the lungs, where they liberated 14C into the tissues. When animals were depleted of platelets prior to the production of shock, they survived for prolonged periods of time or were protected against death. Pretreatment with antiinflammatory compounds capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation and release phenomena had a similar protective influence. It would appear, therefore, that Forssman shock is a convenient and accessible model for investigating the mechanisms whereby platelets mediate immune vascular damage. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5 PMID:4740636

  8. Expression of the avian-specific toll-like receptor 15 in chicken heterophils is mediated by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, but not TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Nerren, Jessica R; He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth; Kogut, Michael H

    2010-07-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a critical component of the innate immune response of mammalian and avian species. While most mammalian TLRs have been well characterized, the chicken-specific TLR15 has not been extensively studied. We recently demonstrated that TLR15 is differentially expressed between Salmonella-susceptible-and-resistant chickens, indicating a potential role in the innate immune response to infection with Salmonella. The aim of the present study was to gain better insight into the nature of the ligand for TLR15 by characterizing gene expression patterns of TLR15 by heterophils in response to numerous bacterial-derived TLR agonists LPS, flagellin, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, lipotechoic acid (LTA), peptidoglycan (PGN), and Pam3CSK4 (PAM), stimulation with live Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE-used as a positive control), chicken isolates of Escherichia coli (EC) and Enterococcus gallinarum (EG), the equine-specific pathogen Rhodococcus equi, and stimulation with heat-killed, and formalin-killed SE, EC, and EG. TLR15 expression increased significantly in response to stimulation with live, heat-killed and formalin-killed SE, EC, and EG, but was unaffected by stimulation with known TLR agonists and R. equi. Overall, these observations demonstrate that the individual TLR agonists are not the ligand for TLR15, and that TLR15 recognizes a unique, non-secreted, heat-stabile component of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in and/or capable of causing disease in chickens. PMID:20303182

  9. Implications of heterophile antigens in immunological infertility in males.

    PubMed

    Eyquem, A; Heuze, D; Schwartz, J; Languillat, G

    1978-05-01

    Immunological study was conducted on serum and hydrocel fluids from males belonging to an equatorial African population heavily contaiminated by Filaria and Schistosoma. Anti-spermatozoa antibodies were detected by agglutination in 31 of 64 sera and 24 of 60 fluids, and by cytotoxicity in 19 of 64 sera and 8 of 60 fluids. Antinuclear antibodies were detected in 21 of 64 sera and 8 of 60 fluids. However, the titers of these antibodies were low, as were the frequency and titers of other tissues antibodies. The appearance of antispermatozoa antibodies is also correlated with extensive skin burns and infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa or severe Candidiasis. PMID:310662

  10. The influence of naturally occurring heterophilic anti-immunoglobulin antibodies on direct measurement of serum proteins using sandwich ELISAs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Hennig; Lothar Rink; Ursula Fagin; Wolfram J Jabs; Holger Kirchner

    2000-01-01

    Sandwich ELISAs have become a widely used method for the quantitative detection of serum proteins. However, they can be biased by a variety of interfering substances. As reported recently, we observed false-positive levels of interferon (IFN)-? and -? in up to 27% of sera from healthy blood donors using commercial ELISAs. We now demonstrate that two different groups of naturally

  11. Human antibodies recognizing the envelope glycoprotein of the baboon endogenous virus BaEV are of heterophil origin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorothee Wernicke; Reinhard Kurth

    1981-01-01

    Human sera were previously shown to possess antibodies capable of recognizing purified retrovirus envelope glycoproteins. In an extension of earlier studies we investigated sera from various groups of patients for an immune reaction against purified glycoprotein of the baboon endogenous virus BaEV. Reproducible demonstrations of oncovirus-like particles in human teratocarcinomas focused our main interest on sera from patients with testicular

  12. Relationships Between Bilateral Asymmetry and Tonic Immobility Reaction or Heterophil to Lymphocyte Ratio in Five Breeds of Chickens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Campo; M. Garcia Gil; I. Munoz; M. Alonso

    Bilateral asymmetry of several morpholog- ical traits, tonic immobility reaction, and leucocyte ratio were studied in hens and cocks from four Spanish breeds of chickens (Castellana, Buff Prat, Red Villafranquina, and Barred Red Vasca) and an F2 cross between Castellana and Buff Prat (C × BP - F2). Any two or all three types of bilateral asymmetry (fluctuating asymmetry, directional

  13. OXIDATIVE BURST MEDIATED BY TOLL LIKE RECEPTORS (TLR) AND CD14 ON AVIAN HETEROPHILS STIMULATED WITH BACTERIAL TOLL AGONISTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), which are found in the cell walls of gram negative and gram-positive bacteria, respectively. This study was conducted to determine if TLRs are present on...

  14. [Heterophile interference: an experimental method of depleting rheumatoid factor from sera in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire].

    PubMed

    N'Guessan, K; Dassé, S R; Yébouah, O R; Kouacou, A P V; Séka, S J

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid factor (RF) is a major source of interference in immunoassays. Several methods have been proposed to eliminate interference. We experimented with a new technique based on the depletion of rheumatoid factor from serum samples. Our study included 150 samples, 64 of them positive for RF. Depletion was performed by the adsorption of RF from the sample by latex beads sensitized with human IgG anti-RF. After precipitation of the complexes formed, the supernatant was tested for RF. Finally, we assessed the performance of this RF depletion method with two tests: ELISA Enzygnost Enzygnost anti-HBs micro-Behring and IFI falciparum Ref 75521 Biomerieux. We compared the percentages of false-negative and false-positive results of these tests before and after depletion of the RF-positive serum samples. Efficiency index is 92.2% and the performance of the two immunoassay tests improved significantly by a factor of 2 to 25 after depletion. In addition, this technique is easy, inexpensive, fast, and suitable to our limited resources as a developing country. It should be extended to other immunological tests for validation of the results. PMID:25370047

  15. AVIAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR CELLS CONTRIBUTE TO A DIFFERENTIAL INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSE IN GENETICALLY DEFINED CHICKENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterophils, the primary polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) in chickens, are the avian counterpart to mammalian neutrophils. Heterophils modulate acute innate responses through phagocytosis, respiratory burst, and degranulation. We have been characterizing the heterophil-mediated innate immune response ...

  16. Neurofascin induces neurites by heterophilic interactions with axonal NrCAM while NrCAM requires F11 on the axonal surface to extend neurites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Volkmer; Ute Zacharias; Fritz G. Rathjen

    1996-01-01

    Neurofascin and NrCAM are two axon-asso- ciated transmembrane glycoproteins belonging to the L1 subgroup of the Ig superfamily. In this study, we have analyzed the interaction of both proteins using neurite outgrowth and binding assays. A neurofascin- Fc chimera was found to stimulate the outgrowth of tectal cells when immobilized on an inert surface but not as a soluble form

  17. THE USE OF SELECTIVE PHARMACOLOGICAL INHIBITORS TO DELINEATE SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS ACTIVATED DURING COMPLEMENT RECEPTOR-MEDIATED DEGRANULATION IN CHICKEN HETEROPHILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complement receptors (CR), along with Fc receptors, play a primary role in the removal of bacterial pathogens in poultry. The binding of serum-opsonized bacteria to CR results in the secretion of both toxic oxygen metabolites and anti-bacterial granules. We have previously shown that the stimulati...

  18. Differential mRNA expression of the avian-specific toll-like receptor 15 between heterophils from Salmonella -susceptible and -resistant chickens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica R. Nerren; Christina L. Swaggerty; Kathryn M. MacKinnon; Kenneth J. Genovese; Haiqi He; Igal Pevzner; Michael H. Kogut

    2009-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are essential for recognition of conserved molecular constituents found on infectious\\u000a microbes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a critical component of the PRR repertoire and are coupled to downstream production\\u000a of cytokines, chemokines, and antimicrobial peptides by TLR adaptor proteins. Our laboratory previously demonstrated a role\\u000a for TLR function in the differential innate response of two lines

  19. Mononucleosis spot test

    MedlinePLUS

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  20. Quantification of the interaction of neuronal adhesion molecules by flow cytometry using microbeads

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Atilla Tarnok; Ursel Noehrenberg; Stephan Schuhmacher; Hans-Juergen Volkmer

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal adhesion molecules expressed during embryogenesis are essential for axonal pathfinding and development of neural connections and can interact by homophilic or heterophilic adhesion. We used and further developed a simple flow cytometric (FCM) microbead method to assess these interactions. This method allows the detection of homo- or heterophilic interactions and gives estimates of the binding affinity. It is possible

  1. Patterns of variation in leucocyte counts of female tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor: Repeatability over time and relationships with condition and costs of reproduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Courtney L. Ochs; Russell D. Dawson

    2008-01-01

    The heterophil to lymphocyte (HL) ratio in the peripheral blood is increasingly being recognized as a reliable indicator of stress in birds. In this study we examined whether HL ratio, as well as the proportion of heterophils and lymphocytes, varied systematically with sampling time, date, age, climate conditions or with measures of maternal investment in female tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor)

  2. Oxygen radical production by avian leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, P; Smith, D; Gowlett, T

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen radical production by heterophils of red-tailed hawks and chickens, and by neutrophils of calves, was evaluated in a chemiluminescence microassay. Leukocytes were isolated by centrifugation of blood in capillary tubes and then challenged with opsonized zymosan in the presence of luminol. Avian heterophils produced significantly fewer oxygen radicals than did bovine neutrophils. PMID:1884301

  3. THE FEATHERING GENE IS LINKED TO DEGRANULATION AND OXIDATIVE BURST NOT CYTOKINE/CHEMOKINE MRNA EXPRESSION LEVELS OR SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS ORGAN INVASION IN BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the past, we showed differences in heterophil function between parental broilers Lines A (fast [F] feathering)>B (slow [S] feathering) and their F1 reciprocal crosses (Line D [F]>C [S]), indicating the feathering gene is associated with heterophil function. In the present study, we evaluated the...

  4. Immunomodulatory Effects of Probiotic and Anticoccidial Treatments in Broiler Chickens 

    E-print Network

    Stringfellow, Kendre

    2012-10-19

    Four experiments evaluated the impact of probiotic administration on the immune response of broilers vaccinated with a live coccidiosis vaccine. Experiment one showed that probiotic administration increased heterophil and monocyte oxidative burst...

  5. Introduction Plumage coloration is commonly thought to be a sex-

    E-print Network

    Figuerola, Jordi

    was negatively correlated to the relative proportion of lymphocytes and positively correlated to the relative with the absolute number of leucocytes and the relative presence of heterophils. Only some of these relationships

  6. Identification and comparison of residues critical for cell- adhesion activities of two neutrophil CD66 antigens, CEACAM6 and CEACAM8

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motomu Kuroki; Hironori Abe; Takayuki Imakiirei; Shaoxi Liao; Hiroko Uchida; Yasushi Yamauchi; Shinzo Oikawa; Masahide Kuroki

    CEACAM6 (CD66c) and CEACAM8 (CD66b) are cell-adhesion proteins on neutrophils that belong to the human carcinoembryonic anti- gen (CEA) family. CEACAM6 reveals homophilic adhesion and heterophilic adhesion to other CEACAM family antigens including CEACAM8, CEACAM1, and CEA, whereas CEACAM8 exhibits only heterophilic adhesion to CEACAM6. Here, we investigated and compared structural require- ments for the homophilic adhesion of CEACAM6 and

  7. Quantification of the interaction of neuronal adhesion molecules by flow cytometry using microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Noehrenberg, Ursel; Schuhmacher, Stephan; Volkmer, Hans-Juergen

    1998-05-01

    Neuronal adhesion molecules expressed during embryogenesis are essential for axonal pathfinding and development of neural connections and can interact by homophilic or heterophilic adhesion. We used and further developed a simple flow cytometric (FCM) microbead method to assess these interactions. This method allows the detection of homo- or heterophilic interactions and gives estimates of the binding affinity. It is possible to determine binding domains of a molecule using site specific antibodies or protein fragments. Adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin-superfamily or the tenascin (TN)-family isolated from chick brain were analyzed. Purified molecules were covalently or non-covalently coupled to microbeads. For investigation of heterophilic interactions different molecules were coupled to beads of different colors. Measurements were done on single laser FCM with UV or 488 nm excitation. From the measured particle numbers the numbers of beads in homo- and/or heterophilic aggregates were determined. From these values the percentage of beads in aggregates and the aggregate size was calculated. Homophilic interaction was found for the molecules NCAM, NgCAM and NrCAM. Heterophilic interaction were detected e.g. for: NrCAM/F11, TN-R/F11 and CALEB/TN-C and CALEB/TN-R. Using fragments of TN-R we found, that the third of 8 fibronectin type III domains bound to F11. The FCM results were confirmed by neurite outgrowth assays. Our data demonstrate that FCM analysis of microbead aggregation is an easy and reliable method to characterize protein interactions.

  8. What is your diagnosis? Blood smear from an injured red-tailed hawk.

    PubMed

    Johns, Jennifer L; Luff, Jennifer A; Shooshtari, Mahrokh P; Zehnder, Ashley M; Borjesson, Dori L

    2009-06-01

    An injured juvenile red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) was evaluated at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California, Davis. The hawk was quiet, alert, and emaciated, and had a closed comminuted, mid-diaphyseal ulnar fracture. CBC results included heterophilia with a left shift, monocytosis, and increased plasma fibrinogen concentration. The blood smear included rare heterophils containing small, dark blue inclusions approximately 1-2 mum in diameter that ranged from round to coccobacillary in shape and formed variably shaped aggregates; the morphology of the inclusions was suspicious for Chlamydophila or Ehrlichia spp. pathogens. The hawk died, and histopathologic examination of tissues obtained at necropsy found severe multifocal histiocytic and heterophilic splenitis in addition to chronic hepatitis, myocarditis and epicarditis, meningoencephalitis, and airsacculitis. Using immunohistochemistry the presence of Chlamydia/Chlamydophila spp. antigen within multiple tissues was confirmed. Chlamydophila psittaci DNA was demonstrated in whole blood and fresh splenic tissue via real-time PCR. Direct fluorescent antibody staining of air-dried blood smears was positive in rare leukocytes for Chlamydia/Chlamydophila spp. antigen, and immunocytochemical staining of blood smears for Chlamydia/Chlamydophila spp. antigen was focally positive in rare heterophils. These findings may represent the first reported diagnosis of natural avian C. psittaci infection by visualization of organisms in peripheral blood heterophils. Immunocytochemical evaluation of blood smears was valuable in confirming the diagnosis and may be a useful antemortem test to discriminate between bacteria and other inclusions within heterophils. PMID:19228359

  9. HEMATOLOGICAL AND BLOOD CHEMICAL VALUES OF MALLARD, Anas p. platyrhynchos, DRAKES BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER REMIGE MOULT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. DRIVER

    Hematological and blood chemical values were determined for wild and captive mallards, Anas p. platyrhynchos, for the late spring period prior to remige moult through early fall migration. Hemoglobin, packed cell volume, erythrocyte and total leukocyte counts, as well as the number of heterophils and lymphocytes, declined significantly during and after remige moult compared to values recorded prior to remige

  10. Analysis of Interactions of the Adhesion Molecule TAG1 and Its Domains with Other Immunoglobulin Superfamily Members

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ourania Pavlou; Kostas Theodorakis; Julien Falk; Michael Kutsche; Melitta Schachner; Catherine Faivre-Sarrailh; Domna Karagogeos

    2002-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily promote cell aggregation and neurite outgrowth via homophilic and heterophilic interactions. The transient axonal glycoprotein TAG-1 induces cell aggregation through homophilic interaction of its fibronectin repeats. We investigated the domains responsible for the neurite outgrowth promoting activity of TAG-1 as well as its interactions with other cell adhesion molecules. Binding experiments with Fc-chimeric

  11. Patterns of variation in leucocyte counts of female tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor: repeatability over time and relationships with condition and costs of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Courtney L; Dawson, Russell D

    2008-07-01

    The heterophil to lymphocyte (HL) ratio in the peripheral blood is increasingly being recognized as a reliable indicator of stress in birds. In this study we examined whether HL ratio, as well as the proportion of heterophils and lymphocytes, varied systematically with sampling time, date, age, climate conditions or with measures of maternal investment in female tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) over three breeding seasons. We found that HL ratios showed significant annual variation, which appeared to be driven by annual changes in the proportion of heterophils. HL ratios were higher among those females laying larger clutches, suggesting a potential cost of reproduction. Variation in body condition also appeared to affect stress levels of females, as decreases in body condition were associated with elevated HL ratios. Among females that we sampled over multiple breeding seasons, we were unable to detect significant repeatability for both HL ratios and proportion of heterophils, although proportion of lymphocytes showed low but significant repeatability within individuals. We therefore suggest that caution should be exercised in using these measures for illustrating the inherent quality or health of individuals over time frames beyond the current breeding attempt, or as predictors of future reproductive potential. PMID:18485771

  12. Ultrastructural visualization of sulphated complex carbohydrates in blood and epithelial cells with the high iron diamine procedure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. S. Spicer; J. H. Hardin; M. E. Setser

    1978-01-01

    Synopsis  The high iron diamine (HID) method has been found to impart density at the ultrastructural level selectively to sites known to contain sulphated complex carbohydrates. Thus, immature primary granules in rabbit heterophils, immature précrystalloid granules in rabbit eosinophils, all granules of rabbit basophils, mouse and rat mast cells and the nucleoids of -granules of rabbit platelets were stained by HID.

  13. Immune Function and Organochlorine Pollutants in Arctic Breeding Glaucous Gulls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. O. Bustnes; S. A. Hanssen; I. Folstad; K. E. Erikstad; D. Hasselquist; J. U. Skaare

    2004-01-01

    Organochlorine contaminants (OCs) are known to affect the immune systems of wildlife, and in this study we assessed the relationship between blood concentration of different OCs and measurements relevant to immune status and function in arctic breeding glaucous gulls ( Larus hyperboreus). In 1997 and 2001, we counted white blood cells (heterophils and lymphocytes) from blood smears, and in 2000

  14. DIFFERENTIAL NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION BY CHICKEN IMMUNE CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitric oxide is a rapidly reacting free radical which has cytotoxic effects during inflammatory responses and regulatory effects as a component of signal transduction cascades. We quantified the production of nitrite, a stable metabolite of nitric oxide, in chicken heterophils, monocytes and macrop...

  15. A Case for the Underestimated, Informal Side of Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    Residents of a rural Australian community identified people considered informal teachers. Informal learning was characterized as arising through natural social interactions and involving interpersonal relationships and information exchange. Informal teachers were discovered through heterophilous contacts and had experience and expertise. (Contains…

  16. Identification and structural characterization of avian beta-defensin 2 peptides from pheasant and quail

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheasant and quail orthologues of avian ß-defensin 2 (AVBD2) were identified in methanol extracts of heterophil and bone marrow using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). We used comparative pattern profiling before and after reduction/alkyla...

  17. Studies on an ascitic syndrome in young broilers 1. haematology and pathology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Maxwell; G. W. Robertson; S. Spence

    1986-01-01

    In the present investigation, the haematology and pathology of young broiler chicks with an ascitic syndrome were examined.Gross changes included cardiomegaly, ascites, congested lungs, shrunken livers, enlarged kidneys, dark breast muscle and congested intestines. Many blood parameters were significantly raised including the packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb), red (Rbc) and white blood cell (Wbc) counts. The heterophils and monocytes

  18. Haematological findings in healthy and sick African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CM Hawkey; MG Hart; JA Knight; JH Samour; DM Jones

    1982-01-01

    Full blood counts and fibrinogen estimations were carried out on 11 clinically normal, adult African grey parrots. Reference values derived from these tests were used to identify abnormalities in the blood counts of 11 sick parrots thought to be suffering from bacterial infections. All sick birds showed higher than normal heterophil counts, paralleled in some cases by lymphocytosis, monocytosis, thrombocytosis

  19. Phagocytic and oxidative burst activity of chicken thrombocytes to Salmonella, Escherichia coli and other bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Wigley; Scott D. Hulme; Paul A. Barrow

    1999-01-01

    The potential role of chicken thrombocytes in immune responses to Salmonella, Escherichia coli and other bacteria was investigated by in vitro assays of phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity. Thrombocytes were found to phagocytose bacteria, but were found to be less phagocytic than heterophils. Oxidative burst activity was generated upon challenge of thrombocytes with various Salmonella strains, E. coli, three other

  20. Geographic variation in hematological variables in adult and prefledgling herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and possible associations with organochlorine exposure.

    PubMed

    Grasman, K A; Scanlon, P F; Fox, G A

    2000-02-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to describe variation in hematological values found in adult and prefledgling herring gulls (Larus argentatus) over a large geographic area, (2) to investigate relationships between hematological variables and other physiological indices, and (3) to examine potential associations between exposure to organochlorines and hematological variables. During 1991-93, we sampled 160 breeding adult gulls from 13 colonies and 101 4-week-old gulls from 11 colonies. All colonies were in the Great Lakes ecosystem, except for two colonies on Lake Winnipeg and the Atlantic coast. The hematological values measured in this study were similar to published values for herring gulls and related species. Significant intersite differences were found in hematological variables. Sex had little or no influence on leukocyte variables. Adults had lower total leukocyte counts and higher heterophil to lymphocyte ratios than chicks. PCV was lower in adult females than males. In adults, total leukocyte and total heterophil numbers were negatively associated with liver activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and concentrations of highly carboxylated porphyrins (HCPs), two biomarkers of organochlorine exposure. Total leukocyte and total heterophil numbers were positively associated with liver concentrations of DDE (1, 1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene), and total lymphocytes were associated positively with PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) and HCP concentrations. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio was negatively associated with liver EROD activity and HCPs. In chicks, there was a positive association between the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio and HG-TEQs (dioxin toxicity equivalents calculated using herring gull-specific equivalency factors). PCV was associated with some measures of contaminant exposure in adults and chicks. Additional research is needed to elucidate causal relationships between hematological indices and such factors as contaminants, disease, and nutrition. PMID:10629288

  1. Gender and Personality Differences in Response to Social Stressors in Great Tits (Parus major).

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Esther; van Oers, Kees

    2015-01-01

    In response to stressors, animals can increase the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, resulting in elevated glucocorticoid concentrations. An increase in glucocorticoids results in an increase in heterophils and a decrease in lymphocytes, which ratio (H/L-ratio) is an indicator of stress in birds. The physiological response to a stressor can depend on individual characteristics, like dominance rank, sex and personality. Although the isolated effects of these characteristics on the response to a stressor have been well studied, little is known about the response in relation to a combination of these characteristics. In this study we investigate the relationship between social stress, dominance rank, sex and exploratory behaviour as a validated operational measure of personality in great tits (Parus major). Great tits show consistent individual differences in behaviour and physiology in response to stressors, and exploratory behaviour can be classified as fast or slow exploring. We group-housed four birds, two fast and two slow explorers, of the same sex that were previously singly housed, in an aviary and compared the H/L-ratio, lymphocyte and heterophil count before and after group housing. After experiencing the social context all birds increased their H/L-ratio and heterophil count. Females showed a stronger increase in H/L-ratio and heterophil count than males, which seemed to be related to a higher number of agonistic interactions compared to males. Dominance rank and exploration type did not affect the H/L-ratio or heterophil count. Contrary to our expectations, all birds increased their lymphocyte count. However, this increase was slower for fast than for slow explorers. Our study suggests that personality and sex related differences, but not dominance rank, are associated with changes in an individual's physiological response due to a social context. PMID:26011633

  2. Gender and Personality Differences in Response to Social Stressors in Great Tits (Parus major)

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Esther; van Oers, Kees

    2015-01-01

    In response to stressors, animals can increase the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, resulting in elevated glucocorticoid concentrations. An increase in glucocorticoids results in an increase in heterophils and a decrease in lymphocytes, which ratio (H/L-ratio) is an indicator of stress in birds. The physiological response to a stressor can depend on individual characteristics, like dominance rank, sex and personality. Although the isolated effects of these characteristics on the response to a stressor have been well studied, little is known about the response in relation to a combination of these characteristics. In this study we investigate the relationship between social stress, dominance rank, sex and exploratory behaviour as a validated operational measure of personality in great tits (Parus major). Great tits show consistent individual differences in behaviour and physiology in response to stressors, and exploratory behaviour can be classified as fast or slow exploring. We group-housed four birds, two fast and two slow explorers, of the same sex that were previously singly housed, in an aviary and compared the H/L-ratio, lymphocyte and heterophil count before and after group housing. After experiencing the social context all birds increased their H/L-ratio and heterophil count. Females showed a stronger increase in H/L-ratio and heterophil count than males, which seemed to be related to a higher number of agonistic interactions compared to males. Dominance rank and exploration type did not affect the H/L-ratio or heterophil count. Contrary to our expectations, all birds increased their lymphocyte count. However, this increase was slower for fast than for slow explorers. Our study suggests that personality and sex related differences, but not dominance rank, are associated with changes in an individual's physiological response due to a social context. PMID:26011633

  3. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    PubMed

    Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Taha, Abid Sharif; Watson, Ryan William; Steinmetz, Hanspeter; Bürkle, Marcellus; Hammer, Sven

    2007-12-01

    The Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) is considered the world's most endangered parrot, with the last wild bird disappearing in 2001 and only 74 birds in captivity. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to look for differences relative to sex, age, and season, we obtained blood samples from 46 captive Spix's macaws (23 male, 23 female) housed in aviaries at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Adult and juvenile birds differed in mean concentrations of glucose, total protein, amylase, cholesterol, and phosphorus; in percentages of heterophils and lymphocytes; and in the absolute lymphocyte count. Total protein, cholesterol, and phosphorus concentrations; hematocrit; and heterophil and lymphocyte counts differed significantly by season. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this highly endangered species. PMID:18351006

  4. Acute Kidney Injury Complicated Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Ozgurhan, Gamze; Ozcetin, Mustafa; Vehapoglu, Aysel; Karakaya, Zeynep; Aygun, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is an acute lymphoproliferative disorder caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and seen most commonly in children and young adults. Clinical presentation of the disease is characterized by fever, tonsillopharyngitis, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly, whereas serological findings of this benign disorder include positive heterophilic antibody formation (transient increase in heterophilic antibodies) and prominence of hematological lymphocytosis of more than 10% of atypical lymphocytes. An EBV infection is usually asymptomatic in childhood, but acute kidney injury can be a rare complication during its course. Most cases recover from the disease completely. Early recognition of EBV infection and estimation of its complication are important for its prognosis. In light of previous literature, we discuss the case evaluated as an EBV infection complicated by acute kidney injury in early childhood and results of tubulointerstitial nephritis shown on a renal biopsy that was later diagnosed as an EBV infection by serological examination.

  5. F3\\/contactin, a neuronal cell adhesion molecule implicated in axogenesis and myelination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julien Falk; Carine Bonnon; Jean-Antoine Girault; Catherine Faivre-Sarrailh

    2002-01-01

    A general feature of the cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin family (Ig-CAMs) is to display a modular structure that provides a framework for multiple binding sites for other recognition molecules. Among this family, F3\\/contactin is a glycan phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-anchored molecule expressed by neurons that displays the distinctiveness to exert heterophilic but no homophilic binding activities. The Ig domains

  6. Fulminant Cytomegalovirus Myocarditis in an Immunocompetent Host: Resolution with Oral Valganciclovir

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anupam; Padala, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of fulminant myocarditis after a primary cytomegalovirus infection, in a previously healthy 72-year-old woman. The infection underwent clinical and immunologic resolution consequent to treatment with oral valganciclovir. In an immunocompetent host, the primary cytomegalovirus infection is usually asymptomatic or manifests itself as a heterophile-negative mononucleosis-like syndrome. Cytomegalovirus myocarditis is uncommon in immunocompetent patients. After presenting our case, we review the literature on cytomegalovirus myocarditis in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:25425988

  7. Primary Structure of the Leukocyte Function-associated Molecule1 Subunit: an Integrin with an Embedded Domain Defining a Protein Superfamily

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard S. Larson; Angel L. Corbi; Lisa Berman; Timothy Springer

    1989-01-01

    The leukocyte function-associated molecule 1 (LFA-1, CDlla\\/CD18) is a membrane glycoprotein which functions in cell-cell adhesion by heterophilic interaction with intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). LFA-1 consists of an ot subunit (Mr = 180,000) and a ~ subunit (Mr = 95,000). We report the molecular biology and protein sequence of the a subunit. Overlapping cDNAs containing 5,139 nucleo- tides were

  8. Hematological stress indices reveal no effect of radio-transmitters on wintering Hermit Thrushes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew K. Davis; Nora E. Diggs; Robert J. Cooper; Peter P. Marra

    2008-01-01

    Radio-telemetry is often used to track birds, and several investigators have examined the possible effects of radio-transmitters on birds. One approach to this question is to determine if transmitters induce physiological stress. Using hematological indicators of stress (heterophil-lymphocyte (H\\/L) ratios), studies of captive birds have revealed no evidence that radio-transmitters cause stress. However, studies in captivity may not reflect conditions

  9. Fluorescence of the natural dye saffron: Selective reaction with eosinophil leucocyte granules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clara Isabel Trigoso; Juan Carlos Stockert

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of methanol-fixed chicken, rat, horse and human blood smears with saturated solutions of saffron in borate buffer at pH 10 results in a bright yellow-green fluorescence reaction of the acidophilic cytoplasm granules in mammalian eosinophils and chicken heterophils under violet-blue exciting light. Spectral characteristics of saffron (emission peak at 543 nm under 436 nm excitation) and its selective fluorescence

  10. Determination of Cell Adhesion Sites of Neuropilin-1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masayuki Shimizu; Yasunori Murakami; Fumikazu Suto; Hajime Fujisawa

    2000-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 is a type 1 membrane protein with three distinct functions. First, it can mediate cell adhesion via a heterophilic molecular interaction. Sec- ond, in neuronal cells, neuropilin-1 binds the class 3 semaphorins, which are neuronal chemorepellents, and plays a role in the directional guidance of axons. Neuro- pilin-1 is expected to form complexes with the plexinA subfamily members and

  11. Haematology and red cell enzymes of the Australian orange-bellied parrot, Neophema chrysogaster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. D. Melrose; P. B. Brown; M. C. Holdsworth; S. L. Bryant

    1995-01-01

    The haematology, red cell enzymes, and haemoglobin electrophoresis of twelve captive bred Australian orange-bellied parrots (Neophema chrysogaster) were studied. The means of the haematological parameters were: haemoglobin 15.3 g\\/dl, PCV 54%, red cell count 3.4 × 1012\\/l, MCV 138.0 fl, MCH 44.7 pg, leucocyte count 7.2 × 109\\/l, heterophils 61%, lymphocytes 24%, monocytes 6.3%, eosinophils 0.7% and basophils 6.8%. The

  12. Leucocytes in adult burrowing parrots Cyanoliseus patagonus in the wild: variation between contrasting breeding seasons, gender, and individual condition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Plischke; Petra Quillfeldt; Thomas Lubjuhn; Santiago Merino; Juan F. Masello

    2010-01-01

    Wild birds exposed to stressors may modulate their investment in immunity. We studied the leucocytes of breeding burrowing\\u000a parrots (Cyanoliseus patagonus) in Patagonia during five breeding seasons, during which global climate events such as a strong La Niña and a weak El Niño\\u000a occurred. We observed strong inter-annual variation in the ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes (H\\/L), with higher H\\/L

  13. Clinical pathology results from cranes with experimental West Nile Virus infection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    2011-01-01

    Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) were vaccinated for and then challenged with West Nile virus. Resulting titers demonstrated protection in the vaccinated-challenged cranes as compared to the unvaccinated-challenged cranes. Clinical pathology results showed challenged cranes, whether vaccinated or not, had a decrease in their hematocrits and an elevation of 2.5-fold in their white blood cell counts as compared to unchallenged control sandhill cranes. No differences were apparent in the differential counts of heterophils and lymphocytes.

  14. Antibody responses to herpesviruses (EBV, HSV and CMV) in cancer patients given cultured lymphoblastoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Minowada, J.; Moore, G. E.; Gerner, R. E.; Matheisz, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Infusion of cultured human lymphoblastoid cells into ten patients with advanced malignancies resulted in a significant rise in antibody titre to Epstein-Barr virus in all ten. There was a significant rise in antibody titre to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in six of the ten patients. The four patients who did not respond in their antibody to HSV had no detectable HSV antibody before the cell infusion. In contrast, four patients had detectable antibody titre to cytomegalovirus (CMV) prior to the cell infusion; none of the ten showed a rise in CMV antibody after cell infusion. Observed antibody responses to EBV and HSV occurred regardless of the presence or absence of detectable herpesviruses in the lymphoblastoid cell lines infused. Six of the ten patients, negative for the heterophile antibody before cell infusion, developed a significant titre of the heterophile antibody after infusion. Except for the heterophile antibody response, the failure to detect IgM antibody to Epstein-Barr virus and to induce antibody to herpes simplex virus in the nonimmune patients suggests that the observed antibody responses are secondary responses. PMID:4338950

  15. H/L ratio as a measurement of stress in laying hens - methodology and reliability.

    PubMed

    Lentfer, T L; Pendl, H; Gebhardt-Henrich, S G; Fröhlich, E K F; Von Borell, E

    2015-04-01

    Measuring the ratio of heterophils and lymphocytes (H/L) in response to different stressors is a standard tool for assessing long-term stress in laying hens but detailed information on the reliability of measurements, measurement techniques and methods, and absolute cell counts is often lacking. Laying hens offered different sites of the nest boxes at different ages were compared in a two-treatment crossover experiment to provide detailed information on the procedure for measuring and the difficulties in the interpretation of H/L ratios in commercial conditions. H/L ratios were pen-specific and depended on the age and aviary system. There was no effect for the position of the nest. Heterophiles and lymphocytes were not correlated within individuals. Absolute cell counts differed in the number of heterophiles and lymphocytes and H/L ratios, whereas absolute leucocyte counts between individuals were similar. The reliability of the method using relative cell counts was good, yielding a correlation coefficient between double counts of r > 0.9. It was concluded that population-based reference values may not be sensitive enough to detect individual stress reactions and that the H/L ratio as an indicator of stress under commercial conditions may not be useful because of confounding factors and that other, non-invasive, measurements should be adopted. PMID:25622692

  16. Infectious mononucleosis: immunoglobulin synthesis by cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Glade, Philip R.; Chessin, Lawrence N.

    1968-01-01

    Immunoglobulin synthesis by 16 long-term suspension cultures of mononuclear cells derived from peripheral blood of nine patients with heterophile-positive infectious mononucleosis (IM) has been demonstrated by radioimmunoelectrophoretic techniques. All cell lines synthesized molecules with IgG (?) heavy chain specificity. 14 cell lines produced molecules with IgM (?) heavy chain specificity and 11 cell lines produced molecules with IgA (?) heavy chain specificity. No detectable synthesis of molecules with IgD (?) heavy chain specificity was observed by these cell lines derived from peripheral blood of patients with IM. 13 cell lines produced molecules with type K (?) light chain specificity and 6 cell lines produced molecules with type L (?) light chain specificity. Of interest, 9 of 16 lines produced IgG (?), IgA (?), and IgM (?) heavy chain molecules and 5 of these cell lines produced molecules with type K (?) and type L (?) light chain specificity as well. Further characterization by combined polyacrylamide gel filtration, immunodiffusion, and radioautography indicated the presence of newly synthesized immunoglobulin molecules with both heavy and light polypeptide chains in close association as well as free light polypeptide chain synthesis. Investigation of the localization of immunoglobulin in single cells by immunofluorescent techniques revealed that 5-22% of cells in these lines were strongly reactive with a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated rabbit antisera directed against the antigenic determinants of human IgG and cross-reactive with the determinants common to IgA and IgM. No heterophile antibody, heteroagglutinin, or hemolytic antibody could be demonstrated in these cell lines derived from peripheral blood of patients with heterophile-positive infectious mononucleosis. Images PMID:4175543

  17. p53 protein is absent from the serum of patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, M. A.; D'Costa, M.; Diamandis, E. P.

    1996-01-01

    p53 protein, which accumulates intracellularly in over half of all human tumours, has also been reported to be present in the sera of patients with various malignancies, including lung cancer. Using a quantitative immunoassay, we measured p53 protein concentrations in 216 sera from 114 lung cancer patients of whom 75 provided matched lung tumour tissues, which were also assayed for p53 protein. p53 protein levels above the detection limit of 0.04 ng ml-1 were detected in only two sera from lung cancer patients (0.14 ng ml-1 and 0.27 ng ml-1), but not in any of 13 sera from non-malignant lung disease patients or in 100 sera from normal non-diseased individuals. The presence of these apparent traces of serum p53 protein concentrations could not be related either to the p53 protein expression status of the primary lung tumours or to the tumour stage, grade or histological type. By pretreating these two sera with anti-p53 antibody linked to solid phase, and by the addition of mouse serum to neutralise possible heterophilic antibodies, the signals arising from these sera were shown to be non-specific and possibly caused by heterophilic antibodies. We conclude that our data do not support previous reports of p53 protein in the sera of lung cancer patients. Since immunoassays are subject to numerous sources of interference in serum, including heterophilic antibodies, we suggest that the results of p53 protein analysis of serum specimens should be interpreted with caution. PMID:8912541

  18. Immunological evaluation of captive green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) with ulcerative dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fernando Alberto; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Romero-Rojas, Andrés; Gonzalez-Ballesteros, Erik; Work, Thierry M; Villaseñor-Gaona, Hector; Estrada-Garcia, Iris

    2013-12-01

    Ulcerative dermatitis (UD) is common in captive sea turtles and manifests as skin erosions and ulcers associated with gram-negative bacteria. This study compared clinically healthy and UD-affected captive turtles by evaluating hematology, histopathology, immunoglobulin levels, and delayed-type hypersensitivity assay. Turtles with UD had significantly lower weight, reduced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses, and higher heterophil:lymphocyte ratios. This study is the first to assay DTH in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and suggests that UD is associated with immunosuppression. PMID:24450041

  19. The Identification of Loci for Immune Traits in Chickens Using a Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Peng; Liu, Ranran; Zheng, Maiqing; Sun, Yan; Wu, Dan; Hu, Yaodong; Wen, Jie; Zhao, Guiping

    2015-01-01

    The genetic improvement of disease resistance in poultry continues to be a challenge. To identify candidate genes and loci responsible for these traits, genome-wide association studies using the chicken 60k high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array for six immune traits, total serum immunoglobulin Y (IgY) level, numbers of, and the ratio of heterophils and lymphocytes, and antibody responses against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV) and Sheep Red Blood Cell (SRBC), were performed. RT-qPCR was used to quantify the relative expression of the identified candidate genes. Nine significantly associated SNPs (P < 2.81E-06) and 30 SNPs reaching the suggestively significant level (P < 5.62E-05) were identified. Five of the 10 SNPs that were suggestively associated with the antibody response to SRBC were located within or close to previously reported QTL regions. Fifteen SNPs reached a suggestive significance level for AIV antibody titer and seven were found on the sex chromosome Z. Seven suggestive markers involving five different SNPs were identified for the numbers of heterophils and lymphocytes, and the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio. Nine significant SNPs, all on chromosome 16, were significantly associated with serum total IgY concentration, and the five most significant were located within a narrow region spanning 6.4kb to 253.4kb (P = 1.20E-14 to 5.33E-08). After testing expression of five candidate genes (IL4I1, CD1b, GNB2L1, TRIM27 and ZNF692) located in this region, changes in IL4I1, CD1b transcripts were consistent with the concentrations of IgY, while abundances of TRIM27 and ZNF692 showed reciprocal changes to those of IgY concentrations. This study has revealed 39 SNPs associated with six immune traits (total serum IgY level, numbers of, and the ratio of heterophils and lymphocytes, and antibody responses against AIV and SRBC) in Beijing-You chickens. The narrow region spanning 247kb on chromosome 16 is an important QTL for serum total IgY concentration. Five candidate genes related to IgY level validated here are novel and may play critical roles in the modulation of immune responses. Potentially useful candidate SNPs for marker-assisted selection for disease resistance are identified. It is highly likely that these candidate genes play roles in various aspects of the immune response in chickens. PMID:25822738

  20. Pathogenicity of Mycoplasma lipofaciens strain ML64, isolated from an egg of a Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis), for chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Lierz, M; Stark, R; Brokat, S; Hafez, H M

    2007-04-01

    Some Mycoplasma species are well-known avian pathogens and are of importance in poultry breeder flocks due to their pathogenic potential for embryos. Mycoplasmas are regularly detected in birds of prey, and a strain of Mycoplasma lipofaciens that was isolated from an egg of a Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) was examined for its pathogenicity in specific pathogen free chicken embryos since birds of prey eggs were not available for this purpose. The strain was found to be pathogenic, causing a high mortality as well as dwarfing, curled toes and infiltrations of heterophils in the liver, kidney, intestine and chorioallantoic membrane. PMID:17479376

  1. Leucocytozoonosis in nestling bald eagles in Michigan and Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Stuht, J N; Bowerman, W W; Best, D A

    1999-07-01

    Thirteen of 21 nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) examined for blood parasites in Michigan and Minnesota (USA) during June and July 1997 had patent infections of Leucocytozoon toddi. No other parasites were seen. The degree of parasitemia was light and varied from 1 to 2 on the Ashford Scale. Several of the infected nestlings appeared to have elevated levels of heterophils in their peripheral circulating blood. One of the infected nestlings also showed signs of severe anemia. We believe this is the first report of L. toddi in the bald eagle. PMID:10479102

  2. West Nile Virus in Farmed Alligators

    PubMed Central

    Mauel, Michael J.; Baldwin, Charles; Burtle, Gary; Ingram, Dallas; Hines, Murray E.; Frazier, Kendal S.

    2003-01-01

    Seven alligators were submitted to the Tifton Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory for necropsy during two epizootics in the fall of 2001 and 2002. The alligators were raised in temperature-controlled buildings and fed a diet of horsemeat supplemented with vitamins and minerals. Histologic findings in the juvenile alligators were multiorgan necrosis, heterophilic granulomas, and heterophilic perivasculitis and were most indicative of septicemia or bacteremia. Histologic findings in a hatchling alligator were random foci of necrosis in multiple organs and mononuclear perivascular encephalitis, indicative of a viral cause. West Nile virus was isolated from submissions in 2002. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results on all submitted case samples were positive for West Nile virus for one of four cases associated with the 2001 epizootic and three of three cases associated with the 2002 epizootic. RT-PCR analysis was positive for West Nile virus in the horsemeat collected during the 2002 outbreak but negative in the horsemeat collected after the outbreak. PMID:12890319

  3. Natural antibodies to human lymphocytes and erythrocytes in the serum of Orcinus orca killer whale.

    PubMed

    Gerard, D; Cohen, E; Cunningham, R; Fitzpatrick, J E; Godsell, C

    1987-01-01

    The existence of naturally occurring heterophile antibodies to antigenic determinants on human blood cell membranes has long been known. It has been shown that the serum of Orcinus orca (Killer whale) does contain similar antibody. Absorption techniques in concert with either microagglutination or complement-dependent microcytotoxicity assays revealed at least three antibody specificities erythrocyte (RBC), B-lymphocyte and T-lymphocyte. Human erythrocyte specificity has been separated from other mammalian RBC specificity, and higher microagglutination titers and/or scores were observed with human group A RBC's than with group B,O, or AB. Tests run at 4 degrees, 20 degrees and 37 degrees C). Higher microcytotoxicity and microagglutination activity was demonstrated with B versus T lymphocytes. It is hoped that the characterization of the antigenic specificity of these heterophile agglutinins will prove to be useful as a biological reagent-tool which may be applied to the identification of a new receptor on human lymphocytes and/or erythrocytes. Also, if isolated, these agglutinins could be useful in the study of the occurrence and presence of specific receptors on cell membranes and give insight as to how these receptors change in health, disease and malignancy. PMID:3678562

  4. The effects of propolis on antibody production by laying hens.

    PubMed

    Freitas, J A; Vanat, N; Pinheiro, J W; Balarin, M R S; Sforcin, J M; Venancio, E J

    2011-06-01

    Propolis is a honeybee product showing several biological properties that enhance the immune response, depending on the concentration and intake period. Because propolis possesses an immunomodulatory action on mammals, the objective of our study was to investigate the effects of propolis on the humoral immune response of laying hens by evaluating antibody production. Laying hens (ISA Brown) were divided into 5 groups with 7 birds each. Group 1 was a nonimmunized control, whereas birds in group 2 were immunized intravenously with SRBC, and those in groups 3, 4, and 5 were treated intraperitoneally with propolis (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, respectively) on 3 consecutive days and then inoculated intravenously with SRBC. Hematological and serological analyses were carried out on d 0, 3, and 38. Natural and specific antibody levels were determined by hemagglutination with rabbit red blood cells and SRBC, respectively. Propolis-treated birds (50 mg/kg) showed a significant decline in heterophils and in the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. After SRBC immunization, significant increases in levels of IgG were observed in groups 4 and 5. Furthermore, higher levels of natural antibodies were observed in propolis-treated laying hens. The administration of propolis to laying hens increased the production of IgG specific to SRBC and natural antibodies, and could be used to increase antigen-specific antibody responses to vaccines. PMID:21597063

  5. Friendship and natural selection.

    PubMed

    Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2014-07-22

    More than any other species, humans form social ties to individuals who are neither kin nor mates, and these ties tend to be with similar people. Here, we show that this similarity extends to genotypes. Across the whole genome, friends' genotypes at the single nucleotide polymorphism level tend to be positively correlated (homophilic). In fact, the increase in similarity relative to strangers is at the level of fourth cousins. However, certain genotypes are also negatively correlated (heterophilic) in friends. And the degree of correlation in genotypes can be used to create a "friendship score" that predicts the existence of friendship ties in a hold-out sample. A focused gene-set analysis indicates that some of the overall correlation in genotypes can be explained by specific systems; for example, an olfactory gene set is homophilic and an immune system gene set is heterophilic, suggesting that these systems may play a role in the formation or maintenance of friendship ties. Friends may be a kind of "functional kin." Finally, homophilic genotypes exhibit significantly higher measures of positive selection, suggesting that, on average, they may yield a synergistic fitness advantage that has been helping to drive recent human evolution. PMID:25024208

  6. Epizootic podoknemidokoptiasis in American robins.

    PubMed

    Pence, D B; Cole, R A; Brugger, K E; Fischer, J R

    1999-01-01

    Epizootics of scaly leg disease caused by infection with the submacroscopic mite Knemidokoptes jamaicensis (Acari: Knemidokoptidae) in migratory American robins (Turdus migratorius) from a residential area of Tulsa (Oklahoma, USA) are documented during the winters (December through February) of 1993-94 and 1994-95. Estimates of 60 to > 80% of the birds in several different flights arriving in the area had lesions consistent with knemidokoptic mange. Epizootic occurrence of K. jamaicensis also is confirmed incidentally in American robins from Georgia (USA) in 1995 and 1998 and in Florida (USA) in 1991. These are the first confirmed epizootics of scaly leg attributed to infections with mites specifically identified as K. jamaicensis in North America. Severity of observed lesions in American robins ranged from scaly hyperkeratosis of the feet and legs to extensive proliferative lesions with loss of digits or the entire foot in some birds. Histologically, there was severe diffuse hyperkeratosis of the epidermis which contained numerous mites and multifocal aggregates of degranulating to degenerating eosinophilic heterophils; there was mild to severe superficial dermatitis with aggregates of eosinophilic heterophils and some mononuclear cells. Based on limited data from affected captive birds in Florida, we questioned the efficacy of ivermectin as an effective acaricide for knemidokoptiasis and propose that conditions associated with captivity may exacerbate transmission of this mite among caged birds. While knemidokoptic mange apparently can result in substantial host morbidity and possibly mortality, the ultimate impact of these epizootics on American robin populations presently is unknown. PMID:10073340

  7. NTB-A Receptor Crystal Structure: Insights into Homophilic Interactions in the Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Receptor Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Ramagopal, U.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Yan, Q.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; Nathenson, S.; Almo, S.

    2006-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family includes homophilic and heterophilic receptors that regulate both innate and adaptive immunity. The ectodomains of most SLAM family members are composed of an N-terminal IgV domain and a C-terminal IgC2 domain. NK-T-B-antigen (NTB-A) is a homophilic receptor that stimulates cytotoxicity in natural killer (NK) cells, regulates bactericidal activities in neutrophils, and potentiates T helper 2 (Th2) responses. The 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the complete NTB-A ectodomain revealed a rod-like monomer that self-associates to form a highly kinked dimer spanning an end-to-end distance of {approx}100 {angstrom}. The NTB-A homophilic and CD2-CD58 heterophilic dimers show overall structural similarities but differ in detailed organization and physicochemical properties of their respective interfaces. The NTB-A structure suggests a mechanism responsible for binding specificity within the SLAM family and imposes physical constraints relevant to the colocalization of SLAM-family proteins with other signaling molecules in the immunological synapse.

  8. Clinical pathology and parasitologic evaluation of free-living nestlings of the Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    PubMed

    Allgayer, M C; Guedes, N M R; Chiminazzo, C; Cziulik, M; Weimer, T A

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated the health status and established hematologic and serum biochemistry parameters for free-living nestlings of the Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) from the Brazilian Pantanal (19 degrees 51'-19 degrees 58'S; 56 degrees 17'-56 degrees 24'W), for four consecutive years (from December 2003 through December 2006). Physical examinations indicated that all the birds were in good health. Endoparasites and blood parasites were not detected in any of the nestlings, and ectoparasites seemed to be limited to Philornis sp. (Diptera: Muscidae). Significantly higher levels of total white blood cells and heterophils, glucose, total protein, triglycerides, and phosphorus were observed in females. In females, higher cholesterol levels and packed cell volumes were observed in older birds, and total white blood cell and heterophil counts were higher in young animals. In males, uric acid levels were higher in older individuals. Wild Pantanal Hyacinth Macaws feed on only two species of palm nuts (Acrocomia totai and Scheelea phalerta). This limited food habit has a strong impact on population size and may alter the clinical pathology parameters of these birds. Therefore, knowledge of blood levels in normal individuals is essential to assess the physiologic and pathologic condition of wild macaws, to assess the effects of environmental changes on their health, and to contribute to conservation strategies of this endangered species. PMID:19901373

  9. Friendship and natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

    2014-01-01

    More than any other species, humans form social ties to individuals who are neither kin nor mates, and these ties tend to be with similar people. Here, we show that this similarity extends to genotypes. Across the whole genome, friends’ genotypes at the single nucleotide polymorphism level tend to be positively correlated (homophilic). In fact, the increase in similarity relative to strangers is at the level of fourth cousins. However, certain genotypes are also negatively correlated (heterophilic) in friends. And the degree of correlation in genotypes can be used to create a “friendship score” that predicts the existence of friendship ties in a hold-out sample. A focused gene-set analysis indicates that some of the overall correlation in genotypes can be explained by specific systems; for example, an olfactory gene set is homophilic and an immune system gene set is heterophilic, suggesting that these systems may play a role in the formation or maintenance of friendship ties. Friends may be a kind of “functional kin.” Finally, homophilic genotypes exhibit significantly higher measures of positive selection, suggesting that, on average, they may yield a synergistic fitness advantage that has been helping to drive recent human evolution. PMID:25024208

  10. NrCAM, cerebellar granule cell receptor for the neuronal adhesion molecule F3, displays an actin-dependent mobility in growth cones.

    PubMed

    Faivre-Sarrailh, C; Falk, J; Pollerberg, E; Schachner, M; Rougon, G

    1999-09-01

    The neuronal adhesion glycoprotein F3 is a multifunctional molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily that displays heterophilic binding activities. In the present study, NrCAM was identified as the functional receptor mediating the inhibitory effect of F3 on axonal elongation from cerebellar granule cells. F3Fc-conjugated microspheres binding to neuronal growth cones resulted from heterophilic interaction with NrCAM but not with L1. Time-lapse video-microscopy indicated that F3Fc beads bind at the leading edge and move retrogradely to reach the base of the growth cone within a lapse of 30-60 seconds. Such velocity (5.7 microm/minute) is consistent with a coupling between F3 receptors and the retrograde flow of actin filaments. When actin filaments were disrupted by cytochalasin B, the F3Fc beads remained immobile at the leading edge. The retrograde mobility appeared to be dependent on NrCAM clustering since it was induced upon binding with cross-linked but not dimeric F3Fc chimera. These data indicate that F3 may control growth cone motility by modulating the linkage of its receptor, NrCAM, to the cytoskeleton. They provide further insights into the mechanisms by which GPI-anchored adhesion molecules may exert an inhibitory effect on axonal elongation. PMID:10462518

  11. Cryptosporidium sp.-associated enteritis without gastritis in rough green snakes (Opheodrys aestivus) and a common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis).

    PubMed

    Brower, A I; Cranfield, M R

    2001-03-01

    An epizootic of severe Cryptosporidium sp.-associated enteritis occurred in a group of 15 wild-caught juvenile rough green snakes (Opheodrys aestivus) at the Baltimore Zoo quarantine facility. All of the animals died with no premonitory signs. Histopathologic examination of the small and proximal large intestine of eight of the green snakes showed moderate to severe Cryptosporidium sp. infection and enteritis characterized by dense heterophilic and lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrates throughout the lamina propria with epithelial necrosis. Cryptosporidium sp. was also found in feces of an adult common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) that was wild caught on zoo grounds and held in quarantine during the epizootic. After euthanasia, histologic examination of the garter snake showed a severe small intestinal Cryptosporidium sp. infection with only mild enteritis consisting of sparse heterophilic and lymphocytic infiltrates. There was no gross or histologic evidence of Cryptosporidium sp. gastritis in the nine snakes evaluated, and this is the first report of Cryptosporidium sp.-associated enteritis in snakes without gastric lesions. PMID:12790403

  12. Flagellin from Recombinant Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Reveals a Fundamental Role in Chicken Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhiming; Cong, Qiuxia; Geng, Shizhong; Fang, Qiang; Kang, Xilong; You, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines have been extensively studied, with a focus on eliciting specific immune responses against foreign antigens. However, very little is known about the innate immune responses, particularly the role of flagellin, in the induction of innate immunity triggered by recombinant attenuated Salmonella in chickens. In the present report, we describe two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strains, wild-type (WT) or flagellin-deficient (flhD) Salmonella, both expressing the fusion protein (F) gene of Newcastle disease virus. We examined the bacterial load and spatiotemporal kinetics of expression of inflammatory cytokine, chemokine, and Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) genes in the cecum, spleen, liver, and heterophils following oral immunization of chickens with the two Salmonella strains. The flhD mutant exhibited an enhanced ability to establish systemic infection compared to the WT. In contrast, the WT strain induced higher levels of interleukin-1? (IL-1?), CXCLi2, and TLR5 mRNAs in cecum, the spleen, and the heterophils than the flhD mutant at different times postinfection. Collectively, the present data reveal a fundamental role of flagellin in the innate immune responses induced by recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines in chickens that should be considered for the rational design of novel vaccines for poultry. PMID:22237893

  13. Epizootic podoknemidokoptiasis in American robins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pence, Danny B.; Cole, Rebecca A.; Brugger, Kristin E.; Fischer, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Epizootics of scaly leg disease caused by infection with the submacroscopic mite Knemidokoptes jamaicensis (Acari: Knemidokoptidae) in migratory American robins (Turdus migratorius) from a residential area of Tulsa (Oklahoma, USA) are documented during the winters (December through February) of 1993–94 and 1994–95. Estimates of 60 to >80% of the birds in several different flights arriving in the area had lesions consistent with knemidokoptic mange. Epizootic occurrence of K. jamaicensis also is confirmed incidentally in American robins from Georgia (USA) in 1995 and 1998 and in Florida (USA) in 1991. These are the first confirmed epizootics of scaly leg attributed to infections with mites specifically identified as K. jamaicensis in North America. Severity of observed lesions in American robins ranged from scaly hyperkeratosis of the feet and legs to extensive proliferative lesions with loss of digits or the entire foot in some birds. Histologically, there was severe diffuse hyperkeratosis of the epidermis which contained numerous mites and multifocal aggregates of degranulating to degenerating eosinophilic heterophils; there was mild to severe superficial dermatitis with aggregates of eosinophilic heterophils and some mononuclear cells. Based on limited data from affected captive birds in Florida, we questioned the efficacy of ivermectin as an effective acaricide for knemidokoptiasis and propose that conditions associated with captivity may exacerbate transmission of this mite among caged birds. While knemidokoptic mange apparently can result in substantial host morbidity and possibly mortality, the ultimate impact of these epizootics on American robin populations presently is unknown.

  14. FLRT Structure: Balancing Repulsion and Cell Adhesion in Cortical and Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; del Toro, Daniel; Nagel, Daniel; Cop, Florian; Härtl, Ricarda; Ruff, Tobias; Seyit-Bremer, Gönül; Harlos, Karl; Border, Ellen Clare; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Klein, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Summary FLRTs are broadly expressed proteins with the unique property of acting as homophilic cell adhesion molecules and as heterophilic repulsive ligands of Unc5/Netrin receptors. How these functions direct cell behavior and the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely unclear. Here we use X-ray crystallography to reveal the distinct structural bases for FLRT-mediated cell adhesion and repulsion in neurons. We apply this knowledge to elucidate FLRT functions during cortical development. We show that FLRTs regulate both the radial migration of pyramidal neurons, as well as their tangential spread. Mechanistically, radial migration is controlled by repulsive FLRT2-Unc5D interactions, while spatial organization in the tangential axis involves adhesive FLRT-FLRT interactions. Further, we show that the fundamental mechanisms of FLRT adhesion and repulsion are conserved between neurons and vascular endothelial cells. Our results reveal FLRTs as powerful guidance factors with structurally encoded repulsive and adhesive surfaces. PMID:25374360

  15. An adolescent girl with Crohn's disease, fever, and sore throat.

    PubMed

    Garg, Richa; Rusciolelli, Colleen; Gerber, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    An adolescent female with a past medical history significant for Crohn's disease presented with fevers, tonsillitis without exudate, and tender posterior cervical lymphadenopathy. Laboratory results showed transaminitis, leukocytosis with a left shift, and atypical lymphocytes on a blood smear. The patient did not respond to supportive care or dexamethasone, necessitating a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. Although her presentation was consistent with infectious mononucleosis, diagnosis was not confirmed until Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from tonsillar tissue was positive. False-negative results on the heterophile antibody test are common in pediatric populations and the detection of EBV antibodies is further complicated in immunocompromised patients. Studies indicate PCR is a more sensitive test, although there is no consensus regarding ideal material to use or quantitative levels necessitating intervention. PMID:25621629

  16. The systemic multiplication of Gallibacterium anatis in experimentally infected chickens is promoted by immunosuppressive drugs which have a less specific effect on the depletion of leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Surya; Hess, Claudia; Wernsdorf, Patricia; Käser, Tobias; Meitz, Sarah; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Hess, Michael; Liebhart, Dieter

    2015-07-15

    The progression of Gallibacterium anatis infection in immunosuppressed versus immunocompetent chickens was investigated. Before experimental infection, birds were treated with corticosterone for general immunosuppression, or 5-fluorouracil, cyclosporine-A, cyclophosphamide for depletion of specific leukocyte populations. Necropsy and sampling were performed at 0, 3, 7, 10 and 28 days post infection. The used drugs did not cause selected depletion of B cells, T cells, heterophils and monocytes/macrophages, as determined by quantification of leukocytes in blood and lymphoid organs using different technologies. Bacterial re-isolation and counts of colony forming units (CFU) showed that G. anatis colonization pattern in various organs, and the numbers of bacteria in trachea were not affected by immunosuppression. However, the treatments acutely increased CFU counts derived from the spleen, which demonstrates that chemically induced immunosuppression intensifies systemic multiplication of G. anatis in chickens. PMID:26004945

  17. TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma: benefits of pre-operative octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Healy, E; Cooke, R S; Ellis, P K; Harper, R; Hunter, S J

    2015-01-01

    Summary TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas are rare and the optimal investigation and management is uncertain. We describe a case of a 43 year-old woman with a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma, highlighting diagnostic testing and our use, pre-operatively of somatostatin analogue therapy, which induced biochemical euthyroidism and a reduction in tumour size. Learning points The differential diagnosis of the syndrome of inappropriate TSH secretion is non-thyroidal illness, medications, assay interference due to heterophilic antibodies, thyroid hormone resistance and TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma.TRH stimulation test and triiodothyronine suppression test assist in differentiating thyroid hormone resistance and TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma.Somatostatin analogue therapy can induce biochemical euthyroidism and reduce tumour size. PMID:26113979

  18. Relating tumor score to hematology in green turtles with fibropapillomatosis in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between hematologic status and severity of tumor affliction in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) with fibropapillomatosis (FP) was examined. During 1 wk periods in July 1997 and July 1998, we bled 108 free-ranging green turtles from Pala'au (Molokai, Hawaii, USA) where FP is endemic. Blood was analyzed for hematocrit, estimated total solids, total white blood cell (WBC) count and differential WBC count. Each turtle was assigned a subjective tumor score ranging from 0 (no visible external tumors) to 3 (heavily tumored) that indicated the severity of FP. There was a progressive increase in monocytes and a decrease in all other hematologic parameters except heterophils and total numbers of white blood cells as tumor score increased. These data indicate that tumor score can relate to physiologic status of green turtles afflicted with FP, and that tumor score is a useful field monitor of severity of FP in this species.

  19. Relating tumor score to hematology in green turtles with fibropapillomatosis in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Work, T M; Balazs, G H

    1999-10-01

    The relationship between hematologic status and severity of tumor affliction in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) with fibropapillomatosis (FP) was examined. During 1 wk periods in July 1997 and July 1998, we bled 108 free-ranging green turtles from Pala'au (Molokai, Hawaii, USA) where FP is endemic. Blood was analyzed for hematocrit, estimated total solids, total white blood cell (WBC) count and differential WBC count. Each turtle was assigned a subjective tumor score ranging from 0 (no visible external tumors) to 3 (heavily tumored) that indicated the severity of FP. There was a progressive increase in monocytes and a decrease in all other hematologic parameters except heterophils and total numbers of white blood cells as tumor score increased. These data indicate that tumor score can relate to physiologic status of green turtles afflicted with FP, and that tumor score is a useful field monitor of severity of FP in this species. PMID:10574546

  20. Alice in Wonderland syndrome as a presenting symptom of EBV infection.

    PubMed

    Liaw, S B; Shen, E Y

    1991-01-01

    Four Chinese patients (2 boys, 2 girls), ages 4-9 years, who had episodes of perception error of body schema and objects are reported. The metamorphopsia, which had been named Alice in Wonderland syndrome, is the major presentation. All of them were proved to have acute Epstein-Barr virus infection, as documented by positive heterophil antibody test and/or positive IgM antibody to Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen. The duration of the perception disorder ranged from 1 week to 3 months. We believe that any young child presenting with Alice in Wonderland syndrome should undergo examination for Epstein-Barr virus infection; complete recovery from the disorder can be expected. PMID:1665694

  1. Intestinal brush border assembly driven by protocadherin-based intermicrovillar adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, Scott W.; Shifrin, David A.; Grega-Larson, Nathan E.; McConnell, Russell E.; Benesh, Andrew E.; Mao, Suli; Zheng, Yuxi; Zheng, Qing Yin; Nam, Ki Taek; Millis, Bryan A.; Kachar, Bechara; Tyska, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Transporting epithelial cells build apical microvilli to increase membrane surface area and enhance absorptive capacity. The intestinal brush border provides an elaborate example, with tightly packed microvilli that function in nutrient absorption and host defense. Although the brush border is essential for physiological homeostasis, its assembly is poorly understood. We found that brush border assembly is driven by the formation of Ca2+-dependent adhesion links between adjacent microvilli. Intermicrovillar links are composed of protocadherin-24 and mucin-like protocadherin, which target to microvillar tips and interact to form a trans heterophilic complex. The cytoplasmic domains of microvillar protocadherins interact with the scaffolding protein, harmonin, and myosin-7b, which promote localization to microvillar tips. Finally, a mouse model of Usher syndrome lacking harmonin exhibits microvillar protocadherin mislocalization and severe defects in brush border morphology. These data reveal an adhesion-based mechanism for brush border assembly and illuminate the basis of intestinal pathology in Usher syndrome patients. PMID:24725409

  2. Pathogenicity of Haemoproteus danilewskyi, Kruse, 1890, in blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Mary C; Homer, Bruce L; Greiner, Ellis C

    2003-01-01

    Although the impact of blood parasite infections on passerine birds is potentially great, little is known of their pathologic effects. We studied Haemoproteus danilewskyi in experimentally infected captive and naturally infected free-ranging blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) to determine patterns of infection and examine the pathologic effects of the parasite on the host. Physiologic changes, such as elevated numbers of lymphocytes, heterophils, basophils, eosinophils, and monocytes and decreased packed cell volume in the peripheral blood were associated with the erythrocytic phase of experimental infections of captive juvenile jays. Sublethal pathologic changes associated with the pre-erythrocytic phase of infections were observed in the liver, lung, and spleen. Schizonts were observed in the pulmonary capillaries of a 1 yr old jay necropsied 31 days post-inoculation, but not in 20 juvenile jays necropsied 57 days post-inoculation. In free-ranging naturally infected jays plasma protein concentration increased with density of natural infections. PMID:12685080

  3. Haematology and serum biochemistry of golden eagle ( Aquila chrysaetos) in Iran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Nazifi; A. Nabinejad; M. Sepehrimanesh; S. L. Poorbaghi; F. Farshneshani; M. Rahsepar

    2008-01-01

    Haematological and serum biochemical values were estimated in blood samples collected from 21 apparently adult golden eagles\\u000a (Aquila chrysaetos) of both sexes. The mean values of red blood cells, packed cell volume, haemoglobin, white blood cells, heterophils, lymphocytes,\\u000a monocytes and eosinophils were 1.63?±?0.11?×?1012\\/l, 0.47?±?0.009 l\\/l, 91.73?±?1.52 g\\/l, 24.31?±?1.97?×?109\\/l, 4.40?±?0.22?×?109\\/l, 16.81?±?0.65?×?109\\/l, 0.99?±?0.19?×?109\\/l and 2.10?±?0.30?×?109\\/l, respectively. The leucocytes had 69.14%, 4.09%, 18.12% and 8.65%

  4. NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM: cell adhesion molecule with a role in neuronal compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Winther, Malene; Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2012-03-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecules 2 (NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM), is a paralog of NCAM1. The protein exists in a transmembrane and a lipid-anchored isoform, and has an ectodomain consisting of five immunoglobulin modules and two fibronectin type 3 homology modules. Structural models of the NCAM2 ectodomain reveal that it facilitates cell adhesion through reciprocal interactions between the membrane-distal immunoglobulin modules. There are no known heterophilic NCAM2 binding partners, and NCAM2 is not glycosylated with polysialic acid, a posttranslational modification known to be a major modulator of NCAM1-mediated processes. This suggests that NCAM2 has a function or mode of action distinctly different from that of NCAM1. NCAM2 is primarily expressed in the brain, where it is believed to stimulate neurite outgrowth and to facilitate dendritic and axonal compartmentalization. PMID:22155300

  5. Cutaneous mucinosis in a strain of brown-egg laying chickens.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Anthenill, L; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous mucinosis is a cutaneous disorder described in humans, dogs, and rarely cats but never reported in birds. Twenty-six brown egg-laying chickens between ages 43 and 46 weeks had a history of feather loss, scaly, dry skin, weight loss, and decreased egg production. Microscopic findings in the skin included fragmentation of collagen bundles and interstitial, periadnexal, and perivascular dermal accumulation of wispy, mildly basophilic material that was also occasionally observed within the follicular epithelium. A moderate lymphoplasmacytic and heterophilic perivascular dermatitis was also observed. The wispy to granular material was diffusely Alcian blue positive and periodic acid-Schiff negative (consistent with mucin), suggesting a diagnosis of primary or secondary cutaneous mucinosis. The cause of this condition could not be determined. PMID:24942711

  6. Morphologic and cytochemical characteristics of green turtle (Chelonia mydas) blood cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Raskin, R.E.; Balazs, G.H.; Whittaker, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Objective - To identify and characterize blood cells from free-ranging Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas. Sample Population - 26 green turtles from Puako on the island of Hawaii and Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu. Procedure - Blood was examined, using light and electron microscopy and cytochemical stains that included benzidine peroxidase, chloroacetate esterase, alpha naphthyl butyrate esterase, acid phosphatase, Sudan black B, periodic acid-Schiff, and toluidine blue. Results - 6 types of WBC were identified: lymphocytes, monocytes, thrombocytes, heterophils, basophils, and eosinophils (small and large). Morphologic characteristics of mononuclear cells and most granulocytes were similar to those of cells from other reptiles except that green turtles have both large and small eosinophils. Conclusions - Our classification of green turtle blood cells clarifies imporoper nomenclature reported previously and provides a reference for future hematologic studies in this species.

  7. Hemograms for and nutritional condition of migrant bald eagles tested for exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Wayland, M E; Bortolotti, G R

    2001-07-01

    Plasma proteins, hematocrit, differential blood counts were examined and nutritional condition was estimated for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) trapped (n = 66) during antumn migration, 1994-95 at Galloway Bay (Saskatchewan, Canada), for the purposes of estimating prevalence of exposure to lead. Sex and age differences in hematocrit and plasma proteins were not observed; however, female eagles exhibited larger median absolute heterophil counts than males. Hematologic values were similar to those previously reported from eagles in captivity. Departures from expected hematological values from a healthy population of eagles were not observed in birds with elevated levels of blood lead (> or =0.200 microg/ml). Similarly, nutritional condition was not related to blood-lead concentrations. Therefore, it appears that lead exposure in this population was below a threshold required to indicate toxicological alteration in the hematological values and index of nutritional condition that we measured. PMID:11504222

  8. Delayed false elevation of circulating tacrolimus concentrations after cord blood transplantation in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kiyohito; Tasaka, Taizo; Hirose, Tadashi; Furukawa, Satoko; Kohguchi, Katsunori; Matsuhashi, Yoshiko; Wada, Hideho; Tohyama, Kaoru; Sugihara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We herein describe the case of a 60-year-old man with a history of Behçet's disease and myelodysplastic syndrome who received cord blood transplantation (CBT). The patient was given anti-thymocyte globulin conditioning and tacrolimus to prevent graft-versus-host disease. Two months after CBT, his blood Tac concentration measured by an antibody-conjugated magnetic immunoassay (ACMIA) was found to have increased >4-fold, even after the Tac treatment was stopped. This false response was caused by the interference of endogenous heterophilic antibodies with ACMIA. Therefore, physicians must be aware of possible false ACMIA results for patients with a history of autoimmune disease and/or treated by xenogeneic antibody therapy. PMID:25400189

  9. Hematology and plasma biochemistry values for the giant garter snake (Thamnophis gigas) and valley garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis fitchi) in the Central Valley of California.

    PubMed

    Wack, Raymund F; Hansen, Eric; Small, Marilyn; Poppenga, Robert; Bunn, David; Johnson, Christine K

    2012-04-01

    Hematology and plasma biochemistry parameters are useful in the assessment and management of threatened and endangered species. Although reference ranges are readily available for many mammalian species, reference ranges for snakes are lacking for most species. We determined hematology and plasma biochemistry reference ranges for giant garter snakes (Thamnophis gigas) and valley garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis fitchi) living in four management areas in the Central Valley of California. White blood cell, heterophil, lymphocyte, and azurophil counts in giant garter snakes were approximately twice the values of valley garter snakes. Statistically significant differences in aspartate aminotransferase, globulin, and potassium between the two species did not appear clinically significant. No significant differences were found in the measured parameters between male and female giant garter snakes. Some differences were found among collection sites. These reference ranges provide baseline data for comparisons over time and between collection sites. PMID:22493106

  10. Salt gland adenitis as only cause of stranding of loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta.

    PubMed

    Orós, J; Camacho, M; Calabuig, P; Arencibia, A

    2011-06-16

    The present study describes pathological and microbiological findings in 9 stranded loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta, whose only observed lesion was bilateral purulent salt gland adenitis. Histological lesions ranged from the presence of abundant eosinophilic material associated with bacterial colonies in the lumen of the central ducts of the glandular lobules to the destruction of the glandular tissue and presence of abundant eosinophilic material composed of heterophils and cell debris, lined by multinucleated giant cells. Aeromonas hydrophila, Staphylococcus sp., and Vibrio alginolyticus were the bacteria most frequently isolated. Plasma concentrations of sodium and chloride and plasma osmolality from 2 turtles suffering from salt gland adenitis were, respectively 45.7, 69.2, and 45.7% higher than the mean value for healthy turtles. These cases suggest that failure to maintain homeostasis due to severe lesions in the salt glands can cause stranding and/or death of loggerhead sea turtles. PMID:21848124

  11. Crystal structure of murine coronavirus receptor sCEACAM1a[1,4],a member of the carcinoembtyonic antigen family

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Zelus, B. D.; Meijers, R.; Liu, J.-H.; Bergelson, J. M.; Zhang, R.; Duke, N.; Joachimiak, A.; Holmes, K. V.; Wang, J.-H.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School; Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center; Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    CEACAM1 is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family. Isoforms of murine CEACAM1 serve as receptors for mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Here we report the crystal structure of soluble murine sCEACAM1a[1,4], which is composed of two Ig-like domains and has MHV neutralizing activity. Its N-terminal domain has a uniquely folded CC' loop that encompasses key virus-binding residues. This is the first atomic structure of any member of the CEA family, and provides a prototypic architecture for functional exploration of CEA family members. We discuss the structural basis of virus receptor activities of murine CEACAM1 proteins, binding of Neisseria to human CEACAM1, and other homophilic and heterophilic interactions of CEA family members.

  12. Effect of exposure to operant-controlled microwaves on certain blood and immunological parameters in the young chick

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, L.A.; Morrison, W.D.; Bate, L.; Otten, L.; Hunter, B.; Pei, D.C. (Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Guelph, Ontario (Canada))

    1991-03-01

    Twenty-two 1-wk-old broiler chicks (Gallus domesticus) were housed at 16 C and operantly conditioned to activate either a 250-W infrared bulb (control) or a microwave generator delivering 13 mW/cm2 (treated). Plasma corticosterone concentration did not differ between groups (P greater than .05) at 4 wk of age. At that time the birds were killed, and post-mortem examination revealed no treatment differences in gross morphology of the chicks or in weights of spleen and bursa of Fabricius (P greater than .05). Histological study of comparable segments of spleen, bursa, adrenal, and thyroid tissue did not show differences in any of the chosen parameters (P greater than .05). Heterophil:lymphocyte ratios, packed cell volume, and total plasma protein content were similar between groups (P greater than .05). These results suggest that operant exposure to low density microwave radiation did not result in stress or immunological disturbances.

  13. Immune Responses in Broiler Chicks Fed Propolis Extraction Residue-supplemented Diets

    PubMed Central

    Eyng, C.; Murakami, A. E.; Santos, T. C.; Silveira, T. G. V.; Pedroso, R. B.; Lourenço, D. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of propolis extraction residue in the feed of broilers from 1 to 21 d of age on phagocytic activity of macrophages, cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin, antibody production against Newcastle disease, lymphoid organ weight and hematological profile and to determine the optimal level of inclusion. 120 chicks, reared in metabolism cages until 21 days of age, were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% of propolis residue) and six replications. The relative weight of thymus and monocyte percentage were affected by propolis residue, with a quadratic response (p<0.05) and lowest values estimated at 2.38% and 2.49%, respectively. Changes in relative weight of cloacal bursa and spleen, percentage of lymphocyte, heterophil, basophil, eosinophil, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, antibody production against Newcastle disease, phagocytic activity of macrophages and the average number of phagocytosed erythrocytes were not observed. The nitric oxide production with regard to positive control (macrophages+erythrocytes) decreased linearly (p<0.05) with increased doses of propolis residue. The remaining variables of nitric oxide production (negative control – macrophages, and difference between the controls) were not affected by propolis residue. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin as determined by the increase in interdigital skin thickness exhibited a quadratic response (p<0.05), which predicted a lower reaction response at a dose of 2.60% of propolis residue and highest reaction response after 43.05 hours of phytohemagglutinin injection. The inclusion of 1% to 4% of propolis extraction residue in broiler diets from 1 to 21 days of age was not able to improve the immune parameters, despite the modest changes in the relative weight in thymus, blood monocyte percentage, nitric oxide concentration, and interdigital reaction to phytohemagglutinin. PMID:25557685

  14. Influence of hen age on the response of turkey poults to cold stress, Escherichia coli challenge, and treatment with a yeast extract antibiotic alternative.

    PubMed

    Huff, G R; Huff, W E; Rath, N C; Solis de Los Santos, F; Farnell, M B; Donoghue, A M

    2007-04-01

    Two battery experiments were conducted to evaluate a commercial yeast extract feed supplement, Alphamune, in a cold stress-Escherichia coli challenge of 1-wk-old turkeys. Experiment 1 used 1-d-old male poults that were the progeny of 33-wk-old hens in their second week of lay. Experiment 2 used male poults of the same genetic line from 40-wk-old hens in their eighth week of lay. Poults were fed a standard unmedicated turkey starter diet or the same diet with either a low level (504 g/t) or a high level (1,008 g/t) of yeast extract. Challenged birds were exposed to intermittent cold stress during wk 1 to 3 and to a respiratory E. coli challenge at 1 wk of age. In both experiments, BW at wk 1 was increased by feeding yeast extract. In experiment 1, challenged, control-fed birds had decreased BW at wk 3 and feed conversion was protected by both levels of yeast extract supplementation. In experiment 2, challenge had no effect on control-fed birds; however, yeast extract decreased the BW of challenged birds. In experiment 1, total leukocyte numbers were decreased by challenge of control-fed birds only, and there was no effect of challenge on the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio. In experiment 2, total leukocyte numbers were decreased and the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio was increased in challenged, control-fed birds. Percentage mortality was not affected by challenge in experiment 1; however, in experiment 2, mortality was increased by challenge of control-fed birds and those fed the lower level of yeast extract. These results suggest that hen age should be considered when designing studies to evaluate antibiotic alternatives and in making decisions for incorporating such alternatives into production. PMID:17369533

  15. Changes in selected biochemical indices, leukocyte profile, and pterins as biomarkers of immune system activity due to antipecking measures in pheasants.

    PubMed

    Voslarova, E; Bedanova, I; Pistekova, V; Marsalek, P; Chloupek, J

    2013-07-01

    The physiological changes in response to beak trimming and spectacle usage as antipecking measures were monitored in 10-mo-old common pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). Short-term analysis conducted before the beginning of the laying period showed immediate increases of plasma corticosterone (P < 0.05) and lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.001) concentrations and decrease of plasma triglycerides (P < 0.01) levels in response to both beak trimming and the application of spectacles. Beak-trimmed pheasants exhibited higher plasma corticosterone concentrations than pheasants fitted with spectacles (P < 0.001). To assess long-term changes, blood samples for biochemical (neopterin and biopterin determination) and hematological (leukocyte profile determination) examinations were taken from beak-trimmed, spectacles-fitted, and control pheasant hens housed in cages during their laying period. At the end of the laying period, hens fitted with spectacles exhibited lower concentrations of plasma neopterin (P = 0.005) and biopterin (P = 0.005) than beak-trimmed pheasant hens. Our findings suggest that the immune system was suppressed in spectacles-fitted pheasant hens as a result of chronic stress, as also indicated by the higher heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (P = 0.001) compared with beak-trimmed hens. Our study found a negative correlation (r = -0.31, P = 0.019) between the heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and plasma neopterin concentration. This study demonstrated that both beak trimming and use of spectacles are not only stressful procedures for pheasants, but long-term effects may also include a negative impact on the immune system. PMID:23776255

  16. Immune function and organochlorine pollutants in Arctic breeding glaucous gulls.

    PubMed

    Bustnes, J O; Hanssen, S A; Folstad, I; Erikstad, K E; Hasselquist, D; Skaare, J U

    2004-11-01

    Organochlorine contaminants (OCs) are known to affect the immune systems of wildlife, and in this study we assessed the relationship between blood concentration of different OCs and measurements relevant to immune status and function in arctic breeding glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus). In 1997 and 2001, we counted white blood cells (heterophils and lymphocytes) from blood smears, and in 2000 and 2001 we injected two novel nonpathogenic antigens (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids) into the pectoral muscle of gulls and measured the primary antibody responses. We then related these measurements to the blood concentrations of three pesticides (hexachlorobenzene [HCB], oxychlordane, and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene) and seven different polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCB 101, 99, 118, 153, 138, 180, and 170). There were significant or near significant positive relationships (0.1 > p > 0.001) between most persistent OCs and the levels of heterophils in the blood for both sexes in 1997 and for male gulls in 2001. Similarly, levels of all persistent OCs and lymphocytes were positively related (0.1 > p > 0.001) in both sexes in 1997. This suggests that OCs are causing alterations to immune systems, which may decrease their efficiency and make the birds more susceptible to parasites and diseases. In female gulls, the antibody response to the diphtheria toxoid was significant and negative for HCB (p < 0.01) and weaker, but significant, for oxychlordane (p < 0.05), suggesting that OCs were causing an impairment of the humoral immunity. Various OCs have been linked to negative effects in our study population, including decreased survival and reproduction, and this study suggests that such compounds also affect immune status and function. PMID:15499504

  17. Selection of broilers with improved innate immune responsiveness to reduce on-farm infection by foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, Christina L; Pevzner, Igal Y; He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Nisbet, David J; Kaiser, Pete; Kogut, Michael H

    2009-09-01

    Economic pressure on the modern poultry industry has directed the selection process towards fast-growing broilers that have a reduced feed conversion ratio. Selection based heavily on growth characteristics could adversely affect immune competence leaving chickens more susceptible to disease. Since the innate immune response directs the acquired immune response, efforts to select poultry with an efficient innate immune response would be beneficial. Our laboratories have been evaluating the innate immune system of two parental broiler lines to assess their capacity to protect against multiple infections. We have shown increased in vitro heterophil function corresponds with increased in vivo resistance to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial infections. Additionally, there are increased mRNA expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in heterophils isolated from resistant lines compared to susceptible lines. Collectively, all data indicate there are measurable differences in innate responsiveness under genetic control. Recently, a small-scale selection trial was begun. We identified sires within a broiler population with higher and/or lower-than-average pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression levels and subsequently utilized small numbers of high-expressing and low-expressing sires to produce progeny with increased or decreased, respectively, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine profiles. This novel approach should allow us to improve breeding stock by improving the overall immunological responsiveness. This will produce a line of chickens with an effective pro-inflammatory innate immune response that should improve resistance against diverse pathogens, improve responses to vaccines, and increase livability. Ongoing work from this project is providing fundamental information for the development of poultry lines that will be inherently resistant to colonization by pathogenic and food-poisoning microorganisms. Utilization of pathogen-resistant birds by the poultry production industry would significantly enhance the microbiological safety of poultry products reaching the consumer. PMID:19737057

  18. Interaction of transport distance and body weight on preslaughter stress and breast meat quality of broilers.

    PubMed

    Yalçin, S; Güler, H C

    2012-01-01

    1. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of transport distance on blood metabolites and breast meat quality of broilers slaughtered at different weights. 2. The study was conducted on Ross 308 broilers from 27 different flocks reared under similar conditions. Slaughter weight was classified as <2·0?kg, 2·0-2·4?kg, and >2·4?kg. Transport distance was categorised as short (65?km), medium (115?km) and long (165?km) distance representing 90, 155 and 220?minutes at an average 45?km/h speed, for each slaughter weight. 3. Higher heterophils and heterophil:lymphocyte (H/L) ratios were obtained for broilers transported over a long distance. Long distance transport increased blood albumin, glucose, and triglycerides levels for <2·0?kg broilers, which did not differ from broilers slaughtered at >2·4?kg after long-distance transport. 4. Broilers slaughtered at >2·4?kg after long-distance transport had lower pH(u), and paler and tougher breast meat, than those broilers slaughtered at <2·0?kg after long-distance transport. 5. A negative correlation was obtained between pH(u) and L*, thawing loss and texture. The L* value was negatively correlated with a*; and positively correlated with b*, thawing and cooking losses. 6. It was concluded that the effect of transport distance could not be evaluated independently of slaughter weight. The interaction between transport distance and slaughter weight contributes to preslaughter stress and meat quality. PMID:22646782

  19. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators yields chickens with increased resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, Christina L; Pevzner, Igal Y; Kogut, Michael H

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella is a leading cause of foodborne illness and can be transmitted through consumption of contaminated poultry; therefore, increasing a flock's natural resistance to Salmonella could improve food safety. Previously, we characterized the heterophil-mediated innate immune response of 2 parental broiler lines and F1 reciprocal crosses and showed that increased heterophil function and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators corresponds with increased resistance against diverse pathogens. A preliminary selection trial showed that individual sires had varying inherent levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and selection based on a high or low phenotype was passed onto progeny. Based on these results, we hypothesized selection of broilers for higher levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6, CXCLi2, and CCLi2 would produce progeny with increased resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis. Peripheral blood leukocytes were isolated from 75 commercial broiler sires, screened, and 10 naturally high and low expressing sires were selected and mated to randomly selected dams to produce the first generation of "high" and "low" progeny. The mRNA expression of CXCLi2 and CCLi2 were significantly (P ? 0.02) higher in the high progeny and were more resistant to liver and spleen organ invasion by Salmonella Enteritidis compared with low progeny. Production of the second generation yielded progeny that had differences (P ? 0.03) in all 3 mediators and further improved resistance against Salmonella Enteritidis. Feed conversion ratio and percent breast meat yield were calculated and were equal, whereas the high birds weighed slightly, but significantly, less than the low birds. These data clearly demonstrate that selection based on a higher phenotype of key pro-inflammatory mediators is a novel means to produce broilers that are naturally more resistant to Salmonella, one of the most important foodborne pathogens affecting the poultry industry. PMID:24604845

  20. Hematology of healthy Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Harr, K.E.; Murphy, D.; Walsh, M.T.; Nolan, E.C.; Bonde, R.K.; Pate, M.G.; Deutsch, C.J.; Edwards, H.H.; Clapp, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hematologic analysis is an important tool in evaluating the general health status of free-ranging manatees and in the diagnosis and monitoring of rehabilitating animals. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate diagnostically important hematologic analytes in healthy manatees (Trichechus manatus) and to assess variations with respect to location (free ranging vs captive), age class (small calves, large calves, subadults, and adults), and gender. Methods: Blood was collected from 55 free-ranging and 63 captive healthy manatees. Most analytes were measured using a CELL-DYN 3500R; automated reticulocytes were measured with an ADVIA 120. Standard manual methods were used for differential leukocyte counts, reticulocyte and Heinz body counts, and plasma protein and fibrinogen concentrations. Results: Rouleaux, slight polychromasia, stomatocytosis, and low numbers of schistocytes and nucleated RBCs (NRBCs) were seen often in stained blood films. Manual reticulocyte counts were higher than automated reticulocyte counts. Heinz bodies were present in erythrocytes of most manatees. Compared with free-ranging manatees, captive animals had slightly lower MCV, MCH, and eosinophil counts and slightly higher heterophil and NRBC counts, and fibrinogen concentration. Total leukocyte, heterophil, and monocyte counts tended to be lower in adults than in younger animals. Small calves tended to have higher reticulocyte counts and NRBC counts than older animals. Conclusions: Hematologic findings were generally similar between captive and free-ranging manatees. Higher manual reticulocyte counts suggest the ADVIA detects only reticulocytes containing large amounts of RNA. Higher reticulocyte and NRBC counts in young calves probably reflect an increased rate of erythropoiesis compared with older animals. ?? 2009 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  1. Response to dietary supplementation of L-glutamine and L-glutamate in broiler chickens reared at different stocking densities under hot, humid tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, M; Zulkifli, I; Soleimani, A F; O'Reilly, E L; Eckersall, P D; Anna, A A; Kumari, S; Abdullah, F F J

    2014-11-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether supplementing AminoGut (a commercial dietary supplement containing a mixture of l-glutamine and l-glutamic acid) to broiler chickens stocked at 2 different densities affected performance, physiological stress responses, foot pad dermatitis incidence, and intestinal morphology and microflora. A randomized design in a factorial arrangement with 4 diets [basal diet, basal diet + 0.5% AminoGut from d 1 to 21, basal diet + 0.5% AminoGut from d 1 to 42, and basal diet + virginiamycin (0.02%) for d 1 to 42] and 2 stocking densities [0.100 m(2)/bird (23 birds/pen; LD) or 0.067 m(2)/bird (35 birds/pen; HD)]. Results showed that villi length and crypt depth were not changed by different dietary treatments. However, birds in the HD group had smaller villi (P = 0.03) compared with those of the LD group. Regardless of diet, HD consistently increased the serum concentrations of ceruloplasmin, ?-1 acid glycoprotein, ovotransferin, and corticosterone (P = 0.0007), and elevated heterophil to lymphocyte ratio (0.0005). Neither AminoGut supplementation nor stocking density affected cecal microflora counts. In conclusion, under the conditions of this study, dietary supplementation of AminoGut, irrespective of stocking density, had no beneficial effect on growth performance, intestinal morphology, and physiological adaptive responses of broiler chickens raised under hot and humid tropical conditions. However, AminoGut supplementation from d 1 to 42 was beneficial in reducing mortality rate. Also, the increased serum concentrations of a wide range of acute phase proteins together with elevated corticosterone and heterophil to lymphocyte ratio suggested that high stocking density induced an acute phase response either indirectly as a result of increased incidence of inflammatory diseases such as foot pad dermatitis or possibly as a direct physiological response to the stress of high stocking density. PMID:25143595

  2. Immune Responses in Broiler Chicks Fed Propolis Extraction Residue-supplemented Diets.

    PubMed

    Eyng, C; Murakami, A E; Santos, T C; Silveira, T G V; Pedroso, R B; Lourenço, D A L

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of propolis extraction residue in the feed of broilers from 1 to 21 d of age on phagocytic activity of macrophages, cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin, antibody production against Newcastle disease, lymphoid organ weight and hematological profile and to determine the optimal level of inclusion. 120 chicks, reared in metabolism cages until 21 days of age, were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% of propolis residue) and six replications. The relative weight of thymus and monocyte percentage were affected by propolis residue, with a quadratic response (p<0.05) and lowest values estimated at 2.38% and 2.49%, respectively. Changes in relative weight of cloacal bursa and spleen, percentage of lymphocyte, heterophil, basophil, eosinophil, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, antibody production against Newcastle disease, phagocytic activity of macrophages and the average number of phagocytosed erythrocytes were not observed. The nitric oxide production with regard to positive control (macrophages+erythrocytes) decreased linearly (p<0.05) with increased doses of propolis residue. The remaining variables of nitric oxide production (negative control - macrophages, and difference between the controls) were not affected by propolis residue. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin as determined by the increase in interdigital skin thickness exhibited a quadratic response (p<0.05), which predicted a lower reaction response at a dose of 2.60% of propolis residue and highest reaction response after 43.05 hours of phytohemagglutinin injection. The inclusion of 1% to 4% of propolis extraction residue in broiler diets from 1 to 21 days of age was not able to improve the immune parameters, despite the modest changes in the relative weight in thymus, blood monocyte percentage, nitric oxide concentration, and interdigital reaction to phytohemagglutinin. PMID:25557685

  3. Infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Balfour, Henry H; Dunmire, Samantha K; Hogquist, Kristin A

    2015-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is a clinical entity characterized by pharyngitis, cervical lymph node enlargement, fatigue and fever, which results most often from a primary Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. EBV, a lymphocrytovirus and a member of the ?-herpesvirus family, infects at least 90% of the population worldwide, the majority of whom have no recognizable illness. The virus is spread by intimate oral contact among adolescents, but how preadolescents acquire the virus is not known. During the incubation period of approximately 6 weeks, viral replication first occurs in the oropharynx followed by viremia as early as 2 weeks before onset of illness. The acute illness is marked by high viral loads in both the oral cavity and blood accompanied by the production of immunoglobulin M antibodies against EBV viral capsid antigen and an extraordinary expansion of CD8+ T lymphocytes directed against EBV-infected B cells. During convalescence, CD8+ T cells return to normal levels and antibodies develop against EBV nuclear antigen-1. A typical clinical picture in an adolescent or young adult with a positive heterophile test is usually sufficient to make the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis, but heterophile antibodies are not specific and do not develop in some patients especially young children. EBV-specific antibody profiles are the best choice for staging EBV infection. In addition to causing acute illness, long-term consequences are linked to infectious mononucleosis, especially Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple sclerosis. There is no licensed vaccine for prevention and no specific approved treatment. Future research goals are development of an EBV vaccine, understanding the risk factors for severity of the acute illness and likelihood of developing cancer or autoimmune diseases, and discovering anti-EBV drugs to treat infectious mononucleosis and other EBV-spurred diseases. PMID:25774295

  4. Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum buffers the effects of acute stress on innate immunity in house finches.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Melanie; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    When wild animals become infected, they still must cope with the rigors of daily life, and, thus, they still can be exposed to acute stressors. The suite of physiological responses to acute stress includes modifying the innate immune system, but infections can also cause similar changes. We examined the effects of an acute stressor (capture stress) on leukocyte abundance and bacteria-killing ability (BKA) in wild birds (house finches Haemorhous mexicanus) with and without a naturally occurring infection (Mycoplasma gallisepticum) to determine whether infection alters the typical immune response to stress. Birds were captured and bled within 3 min (baseline sample) and then held in paper bags for 2 h and bled again (stress sample). From blood smears made at both time points, we obtained estimates of total white blood cell (WBC) counts and relative numbers of each cell. We also measured BKA of plasma at both time points. In uninfected birds (n = 26), total WBC count decreased by 30% over time, while in infected birds (n = 9), it decreased by 6%. Relative numbers of heterophils did not change over time in uninfected birds but increased in infected birds. Combined with a reduction in lymphocyte numbers, this led to a threefold increase in heterophil-lymphocyte values in infected birds after the stressor, compared to a twofold increase in uninfected birds. There was a nonsignificant tendency for BKA to decline with stress in uninfected birds but not in diseased birds. Collectively, these results suggest that infections can buffer the negative effects of acute stress on innate immunity. PMID:24642543

  5. Changes in haematological profile of common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) induced by transit to pheasantry.

    PubMed

    Voslarova, E; Bedanova, I; Vecerek, V; Pistekova, V; Chloupek, P; Suchy, P

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess haematological changes in hand-reared pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) transported from intensive housing facilities to a pheasantry. Selected haematological parameters were monitored in a group of 100 pheasants (50 males and 50 females) aged of 9 weeks that were transported for 4 hours by a covered lorry in crates, with a total body weight of 12 +/- 0.5 kg per crate (Group C12 - floor space: 290 cm2/kg) and with a total body weight of 18 +/- 0.5 kg per crate (Group C18 - floor space: 195 cm2/kg). Blood samples were taken from 10 randomly selected males and 10 females before transport (CON group) and 20 hours after transport (C12 and C18 groups). Examinations consisted in determining the total erythrocyte and leukocyte counts, haematocrit values, haemoglobin levels and differential leukocyte counts, whereby the proportions of heterophil, basophil and eosinophil granulocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes of the total leukocytes were computed. The changes in the parameters of red blood cell count were manifested by an increase (P < 0.01) in the haemoglobin level, MCH (mean cell haemoglobin) and MCHC (mean cell haemoglobin concentration) values and a decrease (P < 0.01) in the total erythrocyte count and haematocrit level in both C12 and C18 pheasants, when compared with the control group of non-transported pheasants. C18 pheasants exhibited also a significant increase (P < 0.05) in MCV (mean cell value) value. When analyzing differential leukocyte counts, C18 pheasants showed a decrease (P < 0.01) in heterophil counts and H/L ratio, whereas values in C12 pheasants did not differ from the non-transported control group. Individual counts of lymphocytes were decreased (P < 0.05) in C12 pheasants, whereas basophil counts were increased (P < 0.01) in both C12 and C18 pheasants. Total leukocyte count was decreased (P < 0.01) in C12 and C18 pheasants. In conclusion, the specific requirements of pheasants, as primarily wild animals, for the density in crates should be respected during transportation and they should be transported at lower densities than other poultry species, at least 290 cm2/kg live weight should be provided. PMID:17078531

  6. Relationship of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response with hematological and serum biochemical values in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Soria, Mario Alberto; Bonnet, María Agustina; Bueno, Dante Javier

    2015-06-15

    There are few studies about the blood serum of laying hens infected with Salmonella. The differential leukocyte count and blood chemistry values are an important aid in the diagnosis of human diseases, but blood parameters in the avian species are not well known. On the other hand, invasive forms of bacterial gastroenteritis, like Salmonella, often cause intestinal inflammation so this study was undertaken to find a biomarker of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response in the hematological or serum biochemical parameters in laying hens. Furthermore, we evaluated the association of some farm characteristics with Salmonella infection and fecal leukocytes (FL). A fecal sample with at least one fecal leukocyte per field was considered positive for inflammatory intestinal response. False positive serum reactions for Salmonella infection, by serum plate agglutination (SPA) test, were reduced by heating the sample to 56°C for 30min and then diluting it 5-fold. The range of hematological and biochemical parameter values was very wide, in addition, there was a poor agreement between the SPA and FL results. Comparison of the positive and negative samples in SPA and FL showed that 1.3% and 79.8% of the laying hens were positive and negative in both tests, respectively. Hens with a positive SPA result showed a higher percentage of monocytes than those with a negative SPA result. Hens with a positive FL test had a higher percentage of heterophils, ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes and aspartate aminotransferase values, while the percentage of lymphocytes was significantly lower (P<0.05) than those with a negative FL test. The risk of Salmonella infection increased when the age of laying hens and the number of hens per poultry house was greater than or equal to 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, compared to less than 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, respectively. On the other hand, the risk of inflammatory intestinal response was higher in laying hens ?18 months old than in hens <18 months old. Despite the fact that we did not find any specific biomarker of Salmonella infection, this is the first report about the change of Salmonella infection and inflammatory response in hematological/serum biochemical values for laying hens. PMID:25912484

  7. Bilateral acute pyogenic conjunctivitis with iritis induced by unilateral topical application of bacterial peptidoglycan muramyl dipeptide in adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Langford, Marlyn P; Foreman, Bridgett D; Srur, Lana; Ganley, James P; Redens, Thomas B

    2013-11-01

    The factors responsible for the conjunctivitis and iritis associated with acute ocular infection and post enteric inflammatory disease are not fully known. The pro-inflammatory activity of unilateral topical application of muramyl dipeptide (MDP; the smallest bio-active Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component) was investigated in adult rabbits. The resultant bilateral conjunctivitis/iritis and pyogenic responses were characterized. Bilateral symptoms were graded by slit lamp examinations; tear fluid, Schirmer tests (tear production), blood and aqueous humor (AH) samples were obtained from MDP-treated and untreated rabbits. MDP concentration, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity (GGT; key enzyme in glutathione recapture, xenobiotic detoxification, eicosanoid synthesis and neutrophil function), protein concentration, and tear cell density, cytology, and immunofluorescent antibody reactivity to GGT and calreticulin (CRT; MDP-binding protein) were determined. MDP was cleared from ipsilateral tears and serum by 6 h, but was undetected in mock-treated contralateral tears. Bilateral signs of acute transient pyogenic conjunctivitis, characterized by tearing, lid edema, conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis and leukocytic infiltrate with iritis (erythema and aqueous flare) were detected. Milder symptoms occurred in the mock-treated contralateral eyes. Bilateral symptoms, tear production, tear protein, GGT activity, and mucopurulent discharge (containing up to 2.5-5.0 × 10(6) cells/mL) were elevated 4-8 h post MDP and resolved to near pre-treatment levels by 24 h. Tear GGT activity and protein levels were higher in MDP-treated and mock-treated contralateral eyes than in eyes of untreated adult rabbits (p's < 0.001). Elevated tear GGT activity was associated with histopathology and increased vascular and epithelial permeability to serum protein, GGT-positive epithelia cells, macrophages and heterophils. Repeat MDP applications induced recurrent induction and resolution patterns of bilateral conjunctivitis/iritis and tear GGT activity, but ipsilateral GGT responses were lower. The results suggest unilateral topical MDP application to adult rabbit eyes induces a bilateral acute pyogenic conjunctivitis/iritis (PCI) characterized by increased vascular and epithelial permeability similar to acute bacterial conjunctivitis in man. The detection of CRT/GGT positive heterophils in tears suggests efferocytosis (phagocytosis of dead/dying cells). Tear GGT activity may be a useful means to quantify MDP-induced toxicity and extraocular inflammation. PMID:24135297

  8. Embryonic exposure to lead: comparison of immune and cellular responses in unchallenged and virally stressed chickens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Naqi, Syed A; Kao, Elizabeth; Dietert, Rodney R

    2002-01-01

    Lead, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been shown to modulate various functions of the immune system and decrease host resistance to infectious disease. However, limited information is available concerning the direct effects of lead on the host immune response to an infectious agent after developmental exposure. The current study utilized chickens to examine the effect of embryonic lead exposure on immune and cellular responses during viral challenge. Sublethal doses of lead were introduced into fertilized Cornell K Strain White Leghorn chicken eggs via the air sac at day 5 or day 12 of embryonic development (designated as E5 and E12, respectively). Four-week-old female chickens were inoculated with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strain M41. Antibody titer to IBV, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response against bovine serum albumin (BSA), the absolute number and percentage of leukocyte subpopulations, and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-like cytokine production by splenocytes were evaluated at 5-6 weeks of age. While antibody response to IBV in juvenile chicks was unaffected by the in ovo lead exposure, IFN-gamma-like cytokine production by splenocytes was significantly depressed following lead exposure at both developmental stages. In contrast with this pattern, the DTH response against BSA was unaffected following E5 exposure, but was significantly decreased after E12 exposure to lead. These changes were similar to those previously reported in chickens not exposed to IBV. While lead exposure at E5 induced significant changes in the percentage of circulating heterophils at 1 day postinfection (dpi), lead did not cause any change in relative leukocyte counts after E12 exposure. At 7 dpi, E5 lead exposure resulted in decreased absolute number and percentage of circulating lymphocytes, while total leukocyte counts, and the absolute number and percentage of circulating monocytes and heterophils were significantly reduced in E12 lead-exposed chickens. These results suggest that low-level exposure to lead has a direct effect on the developing chicken immune system, which is evident even during a postnatal infection. Furthermore, some of the changes were observed only when chicks were stressed by the viral infection. It appears that lead exposure during different stages of embryonic development is likely to result in different immunotoxic outcomes in juveniles. PMID:11876505

  9. Akhirin regulates the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in intact and injured mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Abdulhaleem M, Felemban Athary; Song, Xiaohong; Kawano, Rie; Uezono, Naohiro; Ito, Ayako; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Hossain, Mahmud; Nakashima, Kinichi; Tanaka, Hideaki; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2015-05-01

    Although the central nervous system is considered a comparatively static tissue with limited cell turnover, cells with stem cell properties have been isolated from most neural tissues. The spinal cord ependymal cells show neural stem cell potential in vitro and in vivo in injured spinal cord. However, very little is known regarding the ependymal niche in the mouse spinal cord. We previously reported that a secreted factor, chick Akhirin, is expressed in the ciliary marginal zone of the eye, where it works as a heterophilic cell-adhesion molecule. Here, we describe a new crucial function for mouse Akhirin (M-AKH) in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of progenitors in the mouse spinal cord. During embryonic spinal cord development, M-AKH is transiently expressed in the central canal ependymal cells, which possess latent neural stem cell properties. Targeted inactivation of the AKH gene in mice causes a reduction in the size of the spinal cord and decreases BrdU incorporation in the spinal cord. Remarkably, the expression patterns of ependymal niche molecules in AKH knockout (AKH-/-) mice are different from those of AKH+/+, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we provide evidence that AKH expression in the central canal is rapidly upregulated in the injured spinal cord. Taken together, these results indicate that M-AKH plays a crucial role in mouse spinal cord formation by regulating the ependymal niche in the central canal. PMID:25331329

  10. Chronic myelogenous leukemia in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jennifer L; Whittington, Julia K; Wilmes, Christine M; Messick, Joanne B

    2009-03-01

    A free-ranging adult female great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was presented to the Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois after being observed with anorexia and decreased activity. A severe leukocytosis (212 400 cells/microl), primarily comprised of mature heterophils, was found at presentation. Results of various diagnostic tests including radiographs, Chlamydophila serologic testing, measurement of Aspergillus antibody and antigen titers, plasma protein electrophoresis, fecal culture and acid-fast staining, coelioscopy, endoscopy, tracheoscopy, exploratory coelomotomy, nuclear scintigraphy, tissue cultures, bone marrow biopsy, and histopathology revealed no underlying cause for the persistent leukocytosis. No response to treatment with antibiotics or antifungal agents was observed, although a transient, significant decrease in the leukocyte count (6200 cells/microl) was observed after treatment with fenbendazole. A presumptive diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia was made based on 3 factors: disease duration of greater than 3 months, a lack of identifiable foci of inflammation, and a lack of response to conventional therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed based on postmortem examination and testing 177 days after initial presentation. PMID:19530405

  11. Immune function, sex ratios, and gonadal histopathology in double-crested cormorant chicks

    SciTech Connect

    Burull, E.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Sileo, L. [National Biological Survey, Madison, WI (United States). National Wildlife Health Research Center; Dale, T.; Allen, P.D.; Stromborg, K.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Green Bay, WI (United States); Larson, J.X. [Northeast Technical College, Green Bay, WI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Fry, D.M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept of Avian Sciences

    1994-12-31

    There is evidence that environmental contaminants may be associated with endocrine and reproductive system abnormalities in colonial water birds. Little information is available on immune system response in chicks. Two double-crested cormorant (Phalocrocrozax auritus) colonies were monitored in 1993 for a comparative immune function study. Higher concentrations of organochlorines occurred in one colony. Parameters measured included: CBC, T and B-cell function, heterophil phagocytosis, lymphoid organ size and histopathology, and selected serum hormone analysis. Significant differences at the contaminated site included marked dysplasia and hypertrophy of thyroid gland, higher T3, lower cortisol, lower eosinophil counts, and increase phagocytosis at the contaminated site. Gonads of 101 deformed (cross-bill) chicks, siblings, and normal control chicks collected in 1992 and 1993 were examined microscopically because a sex-ration skewed towards females had been noted. Cross-billed chicks aged 12 to 15 days had disorganized or delayed follicular development which normalized by 20 days of age. Cross-billed or otherwise abnormal chicks aged 18 to 23 days had hypertrophic seminiferous tubules, a decreased interstitium, and decreased evidence of active Leydig cells.

  12. Localization of hematopoietic cells in the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus).

    PubMed

    de Abreu Manso, Pedro Paulo; de Brito-Gitirana, Lycia; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2009-08-01

    Amphibians represent the first phylogenetic group to possess hematopoietic bone marrow. However, adult amphibian hematopoiesis has only been described in a few species and with conflicting data. Bone marrow, kidney, spleen, liver, gut, stomach, lung, tegument, and heart were therefore collected from adult Lithobates catesbeianus and investigated by light microscopy and immunohistochemical methods under confocal laser microscopy. Our study demonstrated active hematopoiesis in the bone marrow of vertebrae, femur, and fingers and in the kidney, but no hematopoietic activity inside other organs including the spleen and liver. Blood cells were identified as a heterogeneous cell population constituted by heterophils, basophils, eosinophils, monocytes, erythrocytic cells, lymphocytes, and their precursors. Cellular islets of the thrombocytic lineage occurred near sinusoids of the bone marrow. Antibodies against CD34, CD117, stem cell antigen, erythropoietin receptor, and the receptor for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor identified some cell populations, and some circulating immature cells were seen in the bloodstream. Thus, on the basis of these phylogenetic features, we propose that L. catesbeianus can be used as an important model for hematopoietic studies, since this anuran exhibits hematopoiesis characteristics both of lower vertebrates (renal hematopoiesis) and of higher vertebrates (bone marrow hematopoiesis). PMID:19449034

  13. Metal accumulation and evaluation of effects in a freshwater turtle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuangying; Halbrook, Richard S; Sparling, Donald W; Colombo, Robert

    2011-11-01

    A variety of contaminants have been detected in aquatic and terrestrial environments around the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky. The presence of these contaminants at the PGDP may pose a risk to biota, yet little is known about the bioaccumulation of contaminants and associated effects in wildlife, especially in aquatic turtles. The current study was initiated to evaluate: (1) the accumulation of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Hg) in aquatic ecosystems associated with the PGDP using red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) as biomonitors; (2) maternal transfer of heavy metals; and (3) potential hematological and immunological effects resulting from metal accumulation. A total of 26 turtles were collected from 7 ponds located south, adjacent, and north of the PGDP. Liver Cu concentrations were significantly different among ponds and Cu concentrations in eggs were positively correlated with female Cu concentrations in kidney. The concentrations of heavy metals measured in turtle tissues and eggs were low and, based on previous studies of reptiles and established avian threshold levels of heavy metals, did not appear to have adverse effects on aquatic turtles inhabiting ponds near the PGDP. However, total white blood cell counts, heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, and phytohemagglutinin stimulation index were correlated with metal concentrations. Because other factors may affect the hematological and immunological indices, further investigation is needed to determine if these effects are associated with metal exposure, other contaminants, or disease. PMID:21688058

  14. Accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and evaluation of hematological and immunological effects of PCB exposure on turtles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuangying; Halbrook, Richard S; Sparling, Donald W

    2012-06-01

    Concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Aroclor 1260, and 26 congeners were measured in liver, fat, and eggs of red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) collected from ponds near or on the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky, USA. Concentrations of total PCBs (wet mass) ranged from 0.002 to 0.480 mg/kg, 0.028 to 0.839 mg/kg, and 0.001 to 0.011 mg/kg in liver, fat, and eggs, respectively. Concentrations of Arochlor 1260 did not exceed 0.430, 0.419, and 0.007 mg/kg in liver, fat, and eggs, respectively. Exposure to PCBs in red-eared sliders collected from the PGDP is characterized by low concentrations of moderately chlorinated mono-ortho and di-ortho congeners (PCB 153, 180, and 118). Although PCB concentrations measured in the current study were low, chronic exposure to PCBs may have altered hematology and immunity of the turtles examined. Total white blood cell count and number of heterophils were negatively correlated with concentrations of total PCBs and Arochlor 1260, respectively. However, disease and other contaminants in the study area may influence the results. Because little is known regarding the influence of PCBs on hematology and immune function in turtles, additional study is needed to better evaluate results observed in the current study. PMID:22430883

  15. Contactins: structural aspects in relation to developmental functions in brain disease.

    PubMed

    Zuko, Amila; Bouyain, Samuel; van der Zwaag, Bert; Burbach, J Peter H

    2011-01-01

    The contactins are members of a protein subfamily of neural immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing cell adhesion molecules. Their architecture is based on six N-terminal Ig domains, four fibronectin type III domains, and a C-terminal glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor to the extracellular part of the cell membrane. Genetics of neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly autism spectrum disorders, have pinpointed contactin-4, -5, and -6 (CNTN4, -5, and -6) as potential disease genes in neurodevelopmental disorders and suggested that they participate in pathways important for appropriate brain development. These contactins have distinct but overlapping patterns of brain expression, and null-mutation causes subtle morphological and functional defects in the brain. The molecular basis of their neurodevelopmental functions is likely conferred by heterophilic protein interactions. Cntn4, -5, and -6 interact with protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor gamma (Ptptg) using a shared binding site that spans their second and third Ig repeats. Interactions with amyloid precursor protein (APP), Notch, and other IgCAMs have also been indicated. The present data indicate that Cntn4, -5, and -6 proteins may be part of heteromeric receptor complexes as well as serve as ligands themselves. PMID:21846565

  16. Recent human-to-poultry host jump, adaptation, and pandemic spread of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lowder, Bethan V.; Guinane, Caitriona M.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Weinert, Lucy A.; Conway-Morris, Andrew; Cartwright, Robyn A.; Simpson, A. John; Rambaut, Andrew; Nübel, Ulrich; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2009-01-01

    The impact of globalization on the emergence and spread of pathogens is an important veterinary and public health issue. Staphylococcus aureus is a notorious human pathogen associated with serious nosocomial and community-acquired infections. In addition, S. aureus is a major cause of animal diseases including skeletal infections of poultry, which are a large economic burden on the global broiler chicken industry. Here, we provide evidence that the majority of S. aureus isolates from broiler chickens are the descendants of a single human-to-poultry host jump that occurred approximately 38 years ago (range, 30 to 63 years ago) by a subtype of the worldwide human ST5 clonal lineage unique to Poland. In contrast to human subtypes of the ST5 radiation, which demonstrate strong geographic clustering, the poultry ST5 clade was distributed in different continents, consistent with wide dissemination via the global poultry industry distribution network. The poultry ST5 clade has undergone genetic diversification from its human progenitor strain by acquisition of novel mobile genetic elements from an avian-specific accessory gene pool, and by the inactivation of several proteins important for human disease pathogenesis. These genetic events have resulted in enhanced resistance to killing by chicken heterophils, reflecting avian host-adaptive evolution. Taken together, we have determined the evolutionary history of a major new animal pathogen that has undergone rapid avian host adaptation and intercontinental dissemination. These data provide a new paradigm for the impact of human activities on the emergence of animal pathogens. PMID:19884497

  17. Hematobiochemical and pathological alterations due to chronic chlorpyrifos intoxication in indigenous chicken

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Shameem Ara; Upadhyaya, Tirtha Nath; Rahman, Taibur; Pathak, Debesh Chandra; Sarma, Kavita; Barua, Chandana Choudhury; Bora, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigates the effect of oral administration of chlorpyrifos (CPF) in indigenous chicken. Materials and Methods: The birds were divided into two groups I and II. Group I served as control and group II was treated with CPF (0.36 mg/kg) orally daily up to 12 weeks. Blood samples were assayed for hemoglobin (Hb), total erythrocyte count (TEC), total leukocyte count (TLC), differential leukocyte count, and biochemical constituents like alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), cholinesterase (CHE), total protein and uric acid. Representative pieces of tissues from liver and kidney were collected weekly for histopathological examination. Results: A significant (P < 0.01) increase of Hb, TEC, TLC, and heterophil percent and decrease of lymphocyte percent was observed. Serum ALP, AST, ALT, and uric acid increased significantly and CHE values decreased significantly in CPF treated birds. The protein level remained similar. Uric acid level was found to be increased significantly in the treated group. The results indicate that chronic CPF intoxication produces hematological, biochemical, and pathological changes in treated birds. PMID:25878384

  18. Crystal structure of the V domain of human Nectin-like molecule-1/Syncam3/Tsll1/Igsf4b, a neural tissue-specific immunoglobulin-like cell-cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiuhua; Xu, Feng; Gong, Yanhua; Gao, Jing; Lin, Peng; Chen, Tao; Peng, Ying; Qiang, Boqin; Yuan, Jiangang; Peng, Xiaozhong; Rao, Zihe

    2006-04-14

    Nectins are Ca(2+)-independent immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily proteins that participate in the organization of epithelial and endothelial junctions. Nectins have three Ig-like domains in the extracellular region, and the first one is essential in cell-cell adhesion and plays a central role in the interaction with the envelope glycoprotein D of several viruses. Five Nectin-like molecules (Necl-1 through -5) with similar domain structures to those of Nectins have been identified. Necl-1 is specifically expressed in neural tissue, has Ca(2+)-independent homophilic and heterophilic cell-cell adhesion activity, and plays an important role in the formation of synapses, axon bundles, and myelinated axons. Here we report the first crystal structure of its N-terminal Ig-like V domain at 2.4 A, providing insight into trans-cellular recognition mediated by Necl-1. The protein crystallized as a dimer, and the dimeric form was confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography and chemical cross-linking experiments, indicating this V domain is sufficient for homophilic interaction. Mutagenesis work demonstrated that Phe(82) is a key residue for the adhesion activity of Necl-1. A model for homophilic adhesion of Necl-1 at synapses is proposed based on its structure and previous studies. PMID:16467305

  19. Afadin requirement for cytokine expressions in keratinocytes during chemically induced inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Iwata, Takanori; Takai, Yoshimi; Birchmeier, Walter; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Afadin is a filamentous actin-binding protein and a mediator of nectin signaling. Nectins are Ig-like cell adhesion molecules, and the nectin family is composed of four members, nectin-1 to nectin-4. Nectins show homophilic and heterophilic interactions with other nectins or proteins on adjacent cells. Nectin signaling induces formation of cell–cell junctions and is required for the development of epithelial tissues, including skin. This study investigated the role of afadin in epithelial tissue development and established epithelium-specific afadin-deficient (CKO) mice. Although showing no obvious abnormality in the skin development and homeostasis, the mice showed the reduced neutrophil infiltration into the epidermis during chemical-induced inflammation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the expression levels of cytokines including Cxcl2, Il-1? and Tnf-? were reduced in CKO keratinocytes compared with control keratinocytes during TPA-induced inflammation. Primary-cultured skin keratinocytes from CKO mice also showed reduced expression of these cytokines and weak activation of Rap1 compared with those from control mice after the TPA treatment. These results suggested a remarkable function of afadin, which was able to enhance cytokine expression through Rap1 activation in keratinocytes during inflammation. PMID:25297509

  20. The effects of hurricane Rita and subsequent drought on alligators in southwest Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Lance, Valentine A; Elsey, Ruth M; Butterstein, George; Trosclair, Phillip L; Merchant, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Hurricane Rita struck the coast of southwest Louisiana in September 2005. The storm generated an enormous tidal surge of approximately four meters in height that inundated many thousands of acres of the coastal marsh with full strength seawater. The initial surge resulted in the deaths of a number of alligators and severely stressed those who survived. In addition, a prolonged drought (the lowest rainfall in 111 years of recorded weather data) following the hurricane resulted in highly saline conditions that persisted in the marsh for several months. We had the opportunity to collect 11 blood samples from alligators located on Holly Beach less than a month after the hurricane, but were unable to collect samples from alligators on Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge until February 2006. Conditions at Rockefeller Refuge did not permit systematic sampling, but a total of 201 samples were collected on the refuge up through August 2006. The blood samples were analyzed for sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolality, and corticosterone. Blood samples from alligators sampled on Holly Beach in October 2005, showed a marked elevation in plasma osmolality, sodium, chloride, potassium, corticosterone, and an elevated heterophil/lymphocyte ratio. Blood samples from alligators on Rockefeller Refuge showed increasing levels of corticosterone as the drought persisted and elevated osmolality and electrolytes. After substantial rainfall in July and August, these indices of osmotic stress returned to within normal limits. PMID:19937751

  1. Ecological immunology in a fluctuating environment: an integrative analysis of tree swallow nestling immune defense.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, Gabriel; Bélisle, Marc; Garant, Dany; Cohen, Alan A; Pelletier, Fanie

    2013-04-01

    Evolutionary ecologists have long been interested by the link between different immune defenses and fitness. Given the importance of a proper immune defense for survival, it is important to understand how its numerous components are affected by environmental heterogeneity. Previous studies targeting this question have rarely considered more than two immune markers. In this study, we measured seven immune markers (response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), hemolysis capacity, hemagglutination capacity, plasma bactericidal capacity, percentage of lymphocytes, percentage of heterophils, and percentage of eosinophils) in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) nestlings raised in two types of agro-ecosystems of contrasted quality and over 2 years. First, we assessed the effect of environmental heterogeneity (spatial and temporal) on the strength and direction of correlations between immune measures. Second, we investigated the effect of an immune score integrating information from several immune markers on individual performance (including growth, mass at fledging and parasite burden). Both a multivariate and a pair-wise approach showed variation in relationships between immune measures across years and habitats. We also found a weak association between the integrated score of nestling immune function and individual performance, but only under certain environmental conditions. We conclude that the ecological context can strongly affect the interpretation of immune defenses in the wild. Given that spatiotemporal variations are likely to affect individual immune defenses, great caution should be used when generalizing conclusions to other study systems. PMID:23610646

  2. Ecological immunology in a fluctuating environment: an integrative analysis of tree swallow nestling immune defense

    PubMed Central

    Pigeon, Gabriel; Bélisle, Marc; Garant, Dany; Cohen, Alan A; Pelletier, Fanie

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary ecologists have long been interested by the link between different immune defenses and fitness. Given the importance of a proper immune defense for survival, it is important to understand how its numerous components are affected by environmental heterogeneity. Previous studies targeting this question have rarely considered more than two immune markers. In this study, we measured seven immune markers (response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), hemolysis capacity, hemagglutination capacity, plasma bactericidal capacity, percentage of lymphocytes, percentage of heterophils, and percentage of eosinophils) in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) nestlings raised in two types of agro-ecosystems of contrasted quality and over 2 years. First, we assessed the effect of environmental heterogeneity (spatial and temporal) on the strength and direction of correlations between immune measures. Second, we investigated the effect of an immune score integrating information from several immune markers on individual performance (including growth, mass at fledging and parasite burden). Both a multivariate and a pair-wise approach showed variation in relationships between immune measures across years and habitats. We also found a weak association between the integrated score of nestling immune function and individual performance, but only under certain environmental conditions. We conclude that the ecological context can strongly affect the interpretation of immune defenses in the wild. Given that spatiotemporal variations are likely to affect individual immune defenses, great caution should be used when generalizing conclusions to other study systems. PMID:23610646

  3. Physiological indices of stress in wild and captive garter snakes: correlations, repeatability, and ecological variation.

    PubMed

    Sparkman, Amanda M; Bronikowski, Anne M; Williams, Shelby; Parsai, Shikha; Manhart, Whitney; Palacios, Maria G

    2014-08-01

    Glucocorticoids and leukocyte ratios have become the most widespread variables employed to test hypotheses regarding physiological stress in wild and captive vertebrates. Little is known, however, regarding how these two indices of stress covary in response to stressors, their repeatability within individuals, and differences in response time upon capture. Furthermore, few studies compare stress indices between captive and wild populations, to assess potential alteration of stress physiology in captivity. To address these issues, we examined corticosterone (CORT) and heterophil to lymphocyte (H:L) ratios in two ecotypes of the garter snake Thamnophis elegans. We found that CORT and H:L ratios were not correlated within individuals, and both variables showed little or no repeatability over a period of months. CORT levels, but not H:L ratios, were higher for individuals sampled after 10min from the time of capture. However, both variables showed similar patterns of ecotypic variation, and both increased over time in gravid females maintained in captivity for four months. We suggest that CORT and H:L ratios are both useful, but disparate indices of stress in this species, and may show complex relationships to each other and to ecological and anthropogenic variables. PMID:24713520

  4. Clinical and pathological findings of concurrent poxvirus lesions and aspergillosis infection in canaries

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Kheirandish; Nasrin, Askari; Mahmoud, Salehi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate clinical, pathological and mycological findings in canaries, in which pox lesions and Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) infection were observed simultaneously. Methods This study was performed on a breeding colony (about 100 canaries) affected by fatal wasting disease. Necropsy was undertaken on 10 severely affected canaries, and gross lesions were recorded. Samples from internal organs displaying lesions were obtained for histopathological evaluation. Tracheal swap samples of internal organs of the all infected animals with lesions at necropsy were cultured in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar for mycological examination. Results At necropsy, caseous foci were determined in the lungs, on the air sacs, liver, spleen, heart. Swelling of the eyelids, diffuse hemorrhages in the subcutaneous tissue with small papular lesions of the skin were other typical necropsy findings. Histopathologically, pathognomonic eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, which called Bollinger bodies, in both skin cells and vacuolated air way epithelial cells confirmed canary pox infection. Moreover, histopathological examination of the white-yellowish caseous foci revealed necrotic granulomatous reaction consisting of macrophages, heterophil leukocytes and giant cells encapsulated with a fibrous tissue. After the culture of the tissue samples, the formation of bluish green colonies confirmed A. fumigatus infection. Conclusions Canary pox has been known as the disease that can result in high losses in a short time, as a re-emerging disease that has not been present during recent years in canary flocks in Iran. So, the current paper provides useful information to prevent misdiagnosed of canary pox disease which can cause secondary mycotic infection. PMID:23620834

  5. Ultrastructural Comparison of the Nasal Epithelia of Healthy and Naturally Affected Rabbits with Pasteurella multocida A

    PubMed Central

    Esquinas, Paula; Botero, Lucía; Patiño, María del Pilar; Iregui, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An ultrastructural comparison between the nasal cavities of healthy rabbits and those suffering from two forms of spontaneous infection with Pasteurella multocida was undertaken. Twelve commercially produced rabbits of different ages and respiratory health status were divided into four groups: healthy from 0 to 21 days (G1, n = 2); healthy from 23 to 49 days (G2, n = 2); healthy from 51 to 69 days (G3, n = 2); diseased rabbits with septicemia and the rhinitic form of P. multocida infection (G4, n = 3). The main ultrastructural changes observed were a widening of the interepithelial spaces, increased activity and number of goblet cells, the formation of two types of vacuoles in epithelial cells, the degranulation and migration of heterophils between the epithelial cells, and the association of this migration with some of the other changes. No bacteria were observed adhering to the epithelium, and very few were observed free in the mucus. Scant inter-epithelial spaces were found in healthy rabbits, but they were not as large and numerous as those found in diseased animals. We discuss the origin and meaning of these changes but, we focus on the significance of the inter-epithelial spaces and goblet cells for the defense of the upper respiratory airways against the bacterium and its lipopolysaccharide. PMID:23577280

  6. Discospondylitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus in an African black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus).

    PubMed

    Field, Cara L; Beaufrère, Hugues; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Rademacher, Nathalie; MacLean, Robert

    2012-12-01

    A 22-year-old female African black-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus), housed indoors with other African and rockhopper penguins, was presented acutely with lethargy, ataxia, and hind limb weakness after a molt. The penguin would assume a hunched position and, when resting, sat on its hocks or lay on its keel. Physical and neurologic examination revealed hind limb paraparesis, proprioceptive deficits, and tiptoe walking. Results of a complete blood cell count and biochemical analysis revealed mild heterophilic leukocytosis, anemia, mild hypoalbuminemia, hypokalemia, and hyperuricemia. Results of whole-body radiographs and coelioscopy were unremarkable. Two computed tomographies of the spine at a 3-month interval revealed a lesion at the mobile thoracic vertebra proximal to the synsacrum with associated spinal cord compression. The penguin was treated with itraconazole, doxycycline, and meloxicam, and it initially improved with return to near normal gait and behavior. However, 5 months after the onset of clinical signs, the penguin was euthanatized after a relapse with worsening of the neurologic signs. Postmortem and histopathologic examination revealed focal granulomatous discospondylitis at the penultimate mobile thoracic vertebra, with intralesional bacteria from which Staphylococcus aureus was cultured. PMID:23409435

  7. SCHOLARLY TAILGATING DEFINED: A DIVERSE, GIANT NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    Adegbola, Maxine

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly tailgating and developmental relationships can soar professional identity, advance one’s scholarly career and foster cultural diversity in healthcare. This paper provides the definition and basis of scholarly tailgating for scholars who wish to propel their careers and help enable diverse cultural approaches. Scholarly tailgating is for those who wish to succeed and capitalize on the culturally diverse expertise and reciprocal network relationships from others in their web of influence. The concept of scholarly tailgating explains the use of homophilic and diverse, multidisciplinary network relationships to foster an intellectual community in healthcare in general and to benefit healthcare consumers and all being served. Scholars can benefit from standing on the shoulders of giants and allowing the aerodynamic wind to propel them to soaring career heights. Prudent scholars, apart from utilizing homophilic relationships and balancing these relationships with diverse heterophilic relationships, are able to lead in the professional academy, and become innovators who practice with cultural relevance. Multi-ethnic, diverse scholars working collaboratively can assist in igniting conversation and actions that reduce disparities, which are indigenous to those who are most vulnerable. Purposeful strategic planning and development of diverse networks that support scholarly advancement can best achieve these career accomplishments. PMID:23589967

  8. Afadin requirement for cytokine expressions in keratinocytes during chemically induced inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Iwata, Takanori; Takai, Yoshimi; Birchmeier, Walter; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-11-01

    Afadin is a filamentous actin-binding protein and a mediator of nectin signaling. Nectins are Ig-like cell adhesion molecules, and the nectin family is composed of four members, nectin-1 to nectin-4. Nectins show homophilic and heterophilic interactions with other nectins or proteins on adjacent cells. Nectin signaling induces formation of cell-cell junctions and is required for the development of epithelial tissues, including skin. This study investigated the role of afadin in epithelial tissue development and established epithelium-specific afadin-deficient (CKO) mice. Although showing no obvious abnormality in the skin development and homeostasis, the mice showed the reduced neutrophil infiltration into the epidermis during chemical-induced inflammation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the expression levels of cytokines including Cxcl2, Il-1? and Tnf-? were reduced in CKO keratinocytes compared with control keratinocytes during TPA-induced inflammation. Primary-cultured skin keratinocytes from CKO mice also showed reduced expression of these cytokines and weak activation of Rap1 compared with those from control mice after the TPA treatment. These results suggested a remarkable function of afadin, which was able to enhance cytokine expression through Rap1 activation in keratinocytes during inflammation. PMID:25297509

  9. Associations between Organochlorine Contaminant Concentrations and Clinical Health Parameters in Loggerhead Sea Turtles from North Carolina, USA

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Jennifer M.; Kucklick, John R.; Stamper, M. Andrew; Harms, Craig A.; McClellan-Green, Patricia D.

    2004-01-01

    Widespread and persistent organochlorine (OC) contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides, are known to have broad-ranging toxicities in wildlife. In this study we investigated, for the first time, their possible health effects on loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Nonlethal fat biopsies and blood samples were collected from live turtles for OC contaminant analysis, and concentrations were compared with clinical health assessment data, including hematology, plasma chemistry, and body condition. Concentrations of total PCBs (?PCBs), ?DDTs, ?chlordanes, dieldrin, and mirex were determined in 44 fat biopsies and 48 blood samples. Blood concentrations of ?chlordanes were negatively correlated with red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, and hematocrit, indicative of anemia. Positive correlations were observed between most classes of OC contaminants and white blood cell counts and between mirex and ?TCDD-like PCB concentrations and the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, suggesting modulation of the immune system. All classes of OCs in the blood except dieldrin were correlated positively with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity, indicating possible hepatocellular damage. Mirex and ?TCDD-like PCB blood concentrations were negatively correlated with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Significant correlations to levels of certain OC contaminant classes also suggested possible alteration of protein (?blood urea nitrogen, ?albumin:globulin ratio), carbohydrate (?glucose), and ion (?sodium, ?magnesium) regulation. These correlations suggest that OC contaminants may be affecting the health of loggerhead sea turtles even though sea turtles accumulate lower concentrations of OCs compared with other wildlife. PMID:15238280

  10. Flow cytometry as a tool in the evaluation of blood leukocyte function in Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758) (Testudines, Cheloniidae).

    PubMed

    Rossi, S; Sá-Rocha, V M; Kinoshita, D; Genoy-Puerto, A; Zwarg, T; Werneck, M R; Sá-Rocha, L C; Matushima, E R

    2009-08-01

    Chelonia mydas is a sea turtle that feeds and nests on the Brazilian coast and a disease called fibropapillomatosis is a threat to this species. Because of this, it is extremely necessary to determine a methodology that would enable the analysis of blood leukocyte function in these sea turtles. In order to achieve this aim, blood samples were collected from C. mydas with or without fibropapillomas captured on the São Paulo north coast. Blood samples were placed in tubes containing sodium heparin and were transported under refrigeration to the laboratory in sterile RPMI 1640 cell culture medium. Leukocytes were separated by density gradient using Ficoll-PaqueTM Plus, Amershan Biociences. The following stimuli were applied in the assessment of leukocyte function: Phorbol Miristate-Acetate (PMA) for oxidative burst activity evaluation and Zymosan A (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Bio Particles, Alexa Fluor 594 conjugate for phagocytosis evaluation. Three cell populations were identified: heterophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. Monocytes were the cells responsible for phagocytosis and oxidative burst. PMID:19802451

  11. Expression and adhesive ability of gicerin, a cell adhesion molecule, in the pock lesions of chorioallantoic membranes infected with an avian poxvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Y; Kotani, T; Hiroi, S; Egawa, M; Ogawa, K; Sasaki, F; Taira, E

    2001-01-01

    The expression and adhesive activities of gicerin, a cell adhesion protein, in the pock lesions on chicken chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) infected with an avian poxvirus were studied. In normal CAMs, gicerin was found on the flattened epithelial cells, and neurite outgrowth factor (NOF) was in the basement membrane. However, in the pock lesions on infected CAMs, gicerin was overexpressed on the cell membranes of hyperplastic epithelial cells forming thick epithelial layers. Neurite outgrowth factor was also found mainly in the basement membrane, but occasionally showed aberrant expression among hyperplastic cells. In vitro analyses, using the dissociated cells from pock lesions, demonstrated that an anti-gicerin polyclonal antibody inhibit cell aggregation activity and cell adhesion to NOF. These results suggest that gicerin might promote the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix protein bindings of the hyperplastic epithelial cells by its homophilic and heterophilic adhesive activities, and contribute to pock formation on the infected CAMs. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 5. PMID:11768132

  12. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of chatelicidin-like peptides in granulocytes of normal and regenerating lizard tissues.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The presence and localization of cathelicidin anti-microbial peptides in the lizard, Anolis carolinensis, were investigated by immunocytochemistry. The study showed that immunoreactivity for cathelicidins 1 and 2 was only present in large granules of heterophilic-basophilic granulocytes, rarely found in the dermis and sub-dermal muscle in normal and more frequently in wound and regenerating skin tissues or in the blood. Some immunopositive granulocytes were also observed among the keratinocytes of the wound epithelium covering the tail stump and occasionally in the regenerating epidermis of the tail. Immunolabeling for cathelicidins was also seen in low electrondense amorphous material present on the surface of the wound epidermis and on the plasma membrane of bacteria present on the surface of corneocytes of the epidermis. Immunolabeling for cathelicidins was absent in the other cell types and in control sections. The study suggests that cathelicidins are normally stored in granulocytes in the blood or in connective tissues, while keratinocytes can be stimulated to produce and possibly release these molecules only after injury or microbial invasion. PMID:24139311

  13. Ultrastructural immunolocalization of beta-defensin-27 in granulocytes of the dermis and wound epidermis of lizard suggests they contribute to the anti-microbial skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2013-12-01

    The high resistance to infections in lizard wounds suggests that these reptiles possess effective antimicrobial peptides in their tissues. The present immunocytochemical study shows the cellular localization of beta-defensin 27 in tail tissues and in the blood, a defensin previously identified in the lizard Anolis carolinensis through biomolecular methods. Beta-defensin-27 immunoreactivity is only observed in some large granules mainly contained in heterophilic granulocytes that are sparse within the dermis of the skin or in the isolated blood. This peptide is absent in other cell types of the skin, in keratinocytes and in subdermal muscle tissue of the tail in normal conditions. Pre-corneous keratinocytes of the regenerating tail epidermis are unlabeled or show a weak labeling for the peptide only in sparse cytoplasmic areas or in the extracellular spaces among corneocytes of the wound and regenerating epidermis. The study suggests that beta-defensin 27 is normally stored in granulocytes present in the blood or in connective tissues while in the epidermis keratinocytes do not show the presence of this peptide unless these cells are stimulated from injury to produce and likely release beta-defensins. PMID:24386597

  14. Clinical observation and neurological outcomes in "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ho, C S; Shen, E Y; Liaw, S B; Huang, F Y

    1992-01-01

    Ten patients, aged from 3 to 10 years, who had either had attacks of perception errors of body schema and objects or had visual hallucination were enrolled from 1987 to 1990. Seven were boys and three, girls. The metamorphopsia or visual hallucination that has been named the "Alice in Wonderland syndrome" (AIWS) were the leading presentations. All the patients had preceding episodes of upper respiratory tract infection (URI) from two days to four weeks previously except for one who had had chickenpox within the immediate three days of being seen. Among these patients, six had received serological studies for Epstein-Barr (EB) virus infection. Two patients were indeed victims of acute EB virus infection as documented by positive IgM antibody against EB virus capsid antigen, the other three patients were highly suspected of having had recent EB virus infection as suggested by positive Heterophil antibody test and high IgG antibody titer against EB virus capsid antigen (1:320X). The duration of perception disorder ranged from four days to three months. All cases recovered completely, without sequelae. It is emphasized that any young children who present as acute episodes of AIWS should undergo examination for EB virus infection. The neurological outcome of AIWS seems to be good. PMID:1325095

  15. Jamb and Jamc Are Essential for Vertebrate Myocyte Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Gareth T.; Wright, Gavin J.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular fusion is required in the development of several tissues, including skeletal muscle. In vertebrates, this process is poorly understood and lacks an in vivo-validated cell surface heterophilic receptor pair that is necessary for fusion. Identification of essential cell surface interactions between fusing cells is an important step in elucidating the molecular mechanism of cellular fusion. We show here that the zebrafish orthologues of JAM-B and JAM-C receptors are essential for fusion of myocyte precursors to form syncytial muscle fibres. Both jamb and jamc are dynamically co-expressed in developing muscles and encode receptors that physically interact. Heritable mutations in either gene prevent myocyte fusion in vivo, resulting in an overabundance of mononuclear, but otherwise overtly normal, functional fast-twitch muscle fibres. Transplantation experiments show that the Jamb and Jamc receptors must interact between neighbouring cells (in trans) for fusion to occur. We also show that jamc is ectopically expressed in prdm1a mutant slow muscle precursors, which inappropriately fuse with other myocytes, suggesting that control of myocyte fusion through regulation of jamc expression has important implications for the growth and patterning of muscles. Our discovery of a receptor-ligand pair critical for fusion in vivo has important implications for understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for myocyte fusion and its regulation in vertebrate myogenesis. PMID:22180726

  16. Interactions by the Fungal Flo11 Adhesin Depend on a Fibronectin Type III-like Adhesin Domain Girdled by Aromatic Bands.

    PubMed

    Kraushaar, Timo; Brückner, Stefan; Veelders, Maik; Rhinow, Daniel; Schreiner, Franka; Birke, Raphael; Pagenstecher, Axel; Mösch, Hans-Ulrich; Essen, Lars-Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbors a family of GPI-anchored cell wall proteins for interaction with its environment. The flocculin Flo11, a major representative of these fungal adhesins, confers formation of different types of multicellular structures such as biofilms, flors, or filaments. To understand these environment-dependent growth phenotypes on a molecular level, we solved the crystal structure of the N-terminal Flo11A domain at 0.89-Å resolution. Besides a hydrophobic apical region, the Flo11A domain consists of a ? sandwich of the fibronectin type III domain (FN3). We further show that homophilic Flo11-Flo11 interactions and heterophilic Flo11-plastic interactions solely depend on the Flo11A domain and are strongly pH dependent. These functions of Flo11A involve an apical region with its surface-exposed aromatic band, which is accompanied by acidic stretches. Together with electron microscopic reconstructions of yeast cell-cell contact sites, our data suggest that Flo11 acts as a spacer-like, pH-sensitive adhesin that resembles a membrane-tethered hydrophobin. PMID:25960408

  17. Pathomorphological, immunohistochemical and bacteriological findings in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) naturally infected with S. Gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Tunca, R; Toplu, N; K?rkan, S; Avci, H; Aydo?an, A; Epikmen, E T; Tekbiyik, S

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the pathological and bacteriological findings and diagnosis by immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescence methods in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) naturally infected with Salmonella gallinarum obtained from three commercial budgerigar rearing farms. The course of the disease in young budgerigars was peracute or acute, whereas in adult budgerigars the disease was acute or chronic. Clinically, yellow-white diarrhoea was observed in the young budgerigars with the acute form. In the adult budgerigars with the acute and chronic forms, a decrease in feed and water consumption with loss in body condition together with greenish-yellow diarrhoea was generally noted. Peritonitis and pericarditis were the most common findings in young budgerigars at necropsy, while in adult budgerigars scattered grey-white necrotic foci were found in the livers. Histopathologically, the lesions in young budgerigars were characterized with fibrinonecrotic peritonitis and/or pericarditis and necrotic hepatitis. In adult budgerigars with acute infection, hepatic necrosis with focal heterophil infiltration was present; whilst lesions in the chronic cases were granulomatous in nature with the infiltration of macrophages, lymphocytes and histiocytes. For the detection of S. Gallinarum in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex and immunofluorescence methods were used. Both methods showed bacteria to be localized in the liver, kidney, peritoneum, heart, spleen and intestines of both young and adult budgerigars. The results of the present study indicate that the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex method was more sensitive than the immunofluorescence method in the detection of the bacteria. PMID:22515538

  18. Mercury levels, reproduction, and hematology in western grebes from three California Lakes, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Elbert, R.A.; Anderson, D.W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology

    1998-02-01

    Twenty-three healthy adult western and Clark`s grebes (Aechmorphorus occidentalis and Aechmorphorus clarkii) were collected at three study sites in California, USA, in 1992: Clear Lake, Lake County; Eagle Lake, Lassen County; and Tule Lake, Siskiyou County. Liver, kidney, breast muscle, and brain were analyzed for total mercury (Hg) concentration (ppm wet weight), and blood was analyzed for various blood parameters. Clear Lake birds had greater Hg concentrations in kidney, breast muscle, and brain than birds from the other two lakes whereas liver concentrations were not statistically different. Average concentrations for Clear Lake birds were 2.74 ppm for liver, 2.06 ppm for kidney, 1.06 ppm for breast muscle, and 0.28 ppm for brain. The tissue levels of kidney, breast muscle, and brain at the other two study sites were one half the levels found at Clear Lake. These mean tissue levels were near, but below, those known to cause adverse effects. When data from all sites were merged, kidney, breast muscle, and brain concentrations are positively correlated to each other. Liver concentrations were not correlated to any other value. Brain Hg concentrations were also negatively correlated to blood potassium and blood phosphorus levels. Kidney Hg levels were positively correlated to percent blood heterophils and negatively correlated to percent eosinophils, suggesting that mercury levels might be affecting immune function. These biomarkers could not be related to any obvious ecological effects.

  19. Structural and energetic determinants of adhesive binding specificity in type I cadherins

    PubMed Central

    Vendome, Jeremie; Felsovalyi, Klara; Song, Hang; Yang, Zhongyu; Jin, Xiangshu; Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J.; Ahlsen, Goran; Bahna, Fabiana; Kaczynska, Anna; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Edmond, Darwin; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Type I cadherin cell-adhesion proteins are similar in sequence and structure and yet are different enough to mediate highly specific cell–cell recognition phenomena. It has previously been shown that small differences in the homophilic and heterophilic binding affinities of different type I family members can account for the differential cell-sorting behavior. Here we use a combination of X-ray crystallography, analytical ultracentrifugation, surface plasmon resonance and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify the molecular determinants of type I cadherin dimerization affinities. Small changes in sequence are found to produce subtle structural and dynamical changes that impact relative affinities, in part via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, and in part through entropic effects because of increased conformational heterogeneity in the bound states as revealed by DEER distance mapping in the dimers. These findings highlight the remarkable ability of evolution to exploit a wide range of molecular properties to produce closely related members of the same protein family that have affinity differences finely tuned to mediate their biological roles. PMID:25253890

  20. A guinea pig model of bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Morck, D W; Costerton, J W; Bolingbroke, D O; Ceri, H; Boyd, N D; Olson, M E

    1990-01-01

    The induction of pneumonic pasteurellosis in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) was examined. Specific pathogen free male guinea pigs were anesthetized and a tracheostomy performed to introduce 10(5), 10(4) or 10(3) Pasteurella haemolytica-A1 into the left principal bronchus. The surgical site was closed with tissue adhesive and staples and the animals were monitored for signs of respiratory tract infection. Within 24 hours after inoculation they became depressed, anorectic, pyretic and dyspneic. Fibrinous pleuropneumonia with prominent areas of necrosis and hemorrhage was present. Pericardial effusion was a frequent finding. There was infiltration of the pleura and alveoli with degenerate heterophils and macrophages, a hyperplastic mesothelium and fibrin exudation on the pleura and within alveoli. Hemorrhage, congestion, consolidation, edema and fibrin exudation were prominent in the hilar region of the lungs. Bacterial colonies were evident in all airways. More bacteria were recovered from infected lungs than were inoculated (p less than 0.05) indicating P. haemolytica was actively multiplying in the lungs. Hematological and clinical chemistry data were consistent with fibrinous pneumonia, however, blood cultures were positive for P. haemolytica in 61% (11/18) of animals sampled. Examination of pneumonic pasteurellosis in guinea pigs may be useful in studying pathogenetic and pathological features applicable to bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis (shipping fever pneumonia). Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2306663

  1. Reproductive investment compromises maternal health in three species of freshwater turtle.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Anthony R; Scheelings, T Franciscus; Foley, Laura J; Johnstone, Christopher P; Reina, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that a trade-off in the allocation of resources between different physiological systems exists because resources are finite. As a result, females investing heavily in reproduction may compromise their future health. We used hematology, serum biochemistry, mass, and morphometric measurements as indicators of physiological health state to investigate whether reproductive investment altered subsequent maternal health in three Australian freshwater turtles: the oblong turtle (Chelodina oblonga; n = 12), the Macquarie turtle (Emydura macquarii; n = 9), and the eastern long-necked turtle (Chelodina longicollis; n = 8). Maternal health was impaired in turtles that produced larger and heavier eggs and clutches. In C. oblonga and E. macquarii, increased reproductive investment generally resulted in negative changes to the hematology and serum biochemistry profile of maternal blood. Generally, increases in heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, aspartate transaminase, creatine kinase, calcium/phosphorus ratio, and albumin/globulin ratio were observed following reproduction, in addition to a decrease in glucose and total protein. These findings agree with the physiological constraint hypothesis and highlight the connection between life-history evolution and animal physiology by documenting, for the first time, how measures of physiological health state relate to reproductive investment in Australian freshwater turtles. Additionally, our findings suggest that body condition, a readily used morphological biomarker, is a poor predictor of health in turtles. Our results emphasize the need to investigate how maternal health is influenced by the reproductive process in different species. PMID:24769705

  2. Different roles of cadherins in the assembly and structural integrity of the desmosome complex

    PubMed Central

    Lowndes, Molly; Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Shafraz, Omer; Borghi, Nicolas; Harmon, Robert M.; Green, Kathleen J.; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Nelson, W. James

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adhesion between cells is established by the formation of specialized intercellular junctional complexes, such as desmosomes. Desmosomes contain isoforms of two members of the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, desmocollins (Dsc) and desmogleins (Dsg), but their combinatorial roles in desmosome assembly are not understood. To uncouple desmosome assembly from other cell–cell adhesion complexes, we used micro-patterned substrates of Dsc2aFc and/or Dsg2Fc and collagen IV; we show that Dsc2aFc, but not Dsg2Fc, was necessary and sufficient to recruit desmosome-specific desmoplakin into desmosome puncta and produce strong adhesive binding. Single-molecule force spectroscopy showed that monomeric Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, formed Ca2+-dependent homophilic bonds, and that Dsg2 formed Ca2+-independent heterophilic bonds with Dsc2a. A W2A mutation in Dsc2a inhibited Ca2+-dependent homophilic binding, similar to classical cadherins, and Dsc2aW2A, but not Dsg2W2A, was excluded from desmosomes in MDCK cells. These results indicate that Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, is required for desmosome assembly through homophilic Ca2+- and W2-dependent binding, and that Dsg2 might be involved later in regulating a switch to Ca2+-independent adhesion in mature desmosomes. PMID:24610950

  3. Different roles of cadherins in the assembly and structural integrity of the desmosome complex.

    PubMed

    Lowndes, Molly; Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Shafraz, Omer; Borghi, Nicolas; Harmon, Robert M; Green, Kathleen J; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi; Nelson, W James

    2014-05-15

    Adhesion between cells is established by the formation of specialized intercellular junctional complexes, such as desmosomes. Desmosomes contain isoforms of two members of the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, desmocollins (Dsc) and desmogleins (Dsg), but their combinatorial roles in desmosome assembly are not understood. To uncouple desmosome assembly from other cell-cell adhesion complexes, we used micro-patterned substrates of Dsc2aFc and/or Dsg2Fc and collagen IV; we show that Dsc2aFc, but not Dsg2Fc, was necessary and sufficient to recruit desmosome-specific desmoplakin into desmosome puncta and produce strong adhesive binding. Single-molecule force spectroscopy showed that monomeric Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, formed Ca(2+)-dependent homophilic bonds, and that Dsg2 formed Ca(2+)-independent heterophilic bonds with Dsc2a. A W2A mutation in Dsc2a inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent homophilic binding, similar to classical cadherins, and Dsc2aW2A, but not Dsg2W2A, was excluded from desmosomes in MDCK cells. These results indicate that Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, is required for desmosome assembly through homophilic Ca(2+)- and W2-dependent binding, and that Dsg2 might be involved later in regulating a switch to Ca(2+)-independent adhesion in mature desmosomes. PMID:24610950

  4. Effects of in vivo exposure to Roundup® on immune system of Caiman latirostris.

    PubMed

    Latorre, María Agustina; López González, Evelyn Cecilia; Larriera, Alejandro; Poletta, Gisela Laura; Siroski, Pablo Ariel

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of Roundup(®) (RU, glyphosate-based formulation) on some parameters of the immune system and growth of Caiman latirostris. Seventy-two caimans (20-day-old) from Proyecto Yacaré (Gob. Santa Fe/MUPCN) were used. Two groups were exposed for 2 months to different concentrations of RU (11 or 21?mg/L; taking into account the concentration recommended for its application in the field), while one group was maintained as control. The RU concentration was progressively decreased through the exposure period to simulate glyphosate degradation in water. Animals were measured and weighed at the beginning and end of the experiment, and blood samples taken after exposure to determine total and differential white blood cell (WBC) counts as well as total protein concentration (TPC), and for performing protein electrophoresis. The results showed that, compared against control hosts, there was a decrease in WBC counts, a higher percentage of heterophils, a higher TPC (with a low percentage of F2 protein fraction), and a negative effect on growth in the young caimans exposed to RU. These results demonstrate that in vivo exposure to RU induced alterations in the selected immune parameters, plasma proteins, and growth of caimans, thereby providing relevant information about the effects of this type of pesticide in this important species in the Argentinian wetlands. PMID:23244546

  5. Leukocyte profiles for western fence lizards, Sceloporus occidentalis, naturally infected by the malaria parasite Plasmodium mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Motz, Victoria L; Lewis, William D; Vardo-Zalik, Anne M

    2014-10-01

    Plasmodium mexicanum is a malaria parasite that naturally infects the western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis , in northern California. We set out to determine whether lizards naturally infected with this malaria parasite have different leukocyte profiles, indicating an immune response to infection. We used 29 naturally infected western fence lizards paired with uninfected lizards based on sex, snout-to-vent length, tail status, and the presence-absence of ectoparasites such as ticks and mites, as well as the presence-absence of another hemoparasite, Schellackia occidentalis. Complete white blood cell (WBC) counts were conducted on blood smears stained with Giemsa, and the proportion of granulocytes per microliter of blood was estimated using the Avian Leukopet method. The abundance of each WBC class (lymphocytes, monocytes, heterophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in infected and uninfected lizards was compared to determine whether leukocyte densities varied with infection status. We found that the numbers of WBCs and lymphocytes per microliter of blood significantly differed (P < 0.05) between the 2 groups for females but not for males, whereas parasitemia was significantly correlated with lymphocyte counts for males, but not for females. This study supports the theory that infection with P. mexicanum stimulates the lizard's immune response to increase the levels of circulating WBCs, but what effect this has on the biology of the parasite remains unclear. PMID:24945903

  6. Fertility and behavioral responses of roosters to diets differing in protein and calcium.

    PubMed

    Cherry, J A; Nir, I; Dunnington, E A; Jones, D E; Gross, W B; Siegel, P B

    1984-05-01

    Diets differing in calcium (approximately 3.2 and .9%) and protein (15 and 12%) were fed to assess their effects on fertility, behavior, and physiological traits of White Leghorn males from lines selected for high (HA) and low (LA) antibody titers in response to the administration of sheep erythrocytes. Two trials, terminated when the males were 721 and 380 days of age, respectively, were conducted. In Trial 1, the HA males consumed significantly more feed than the LA males and those fed the low protein diets consumed more feed than those fed the high protein diets. No significant differences in feed intake were observed in Trial 2. Neither line, calcium level, nor protein level had a consistent effect on body weight in either trial. There were no significant first or second order interactions between main effects. Comparisons within ages and trials for percentage and duration of fertility revealed no significant differences between lines, protein level, or calcium level. Although the HA males produced significantly more antibodies to canine erythrocytes, dietary effects on antibody titers, heterophil: lymphocyte ratios, and plasma corticosterone were not significant. Thus, there was no indication that dietary treatments were inducing physiological adaptation. Behavioral adaptations, however, were observed; differences were significant for fear, territoriality, air pecking, and head shaking. It was concluded that behavioral responses symptomatic of nutrient deficiencies occur when no overt deficiency is present; this infers that an animal's well-being cannot be assessed strictly on the basis of behavioral consequences. PMID:6728794

  7. Cardiac repair and regenerative potential in the goldfish (Carassius auratus) heart?

    PubMed Central

    Roell, Julia; Das, Tanmoy L.; Brown, Evelyn; Burns, Alan R.; Lafontant, Pascal J.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable ability of the heart to regenerate has been demonstrated in the zebrafish and giant danio, two fish members of the cyprinid family. Here we use light and electron microscopy to examine the repair response in the heart of another cyprinid, the goldfish (Carassius auretus), following cautery injury to a small portion of its ventricular myocardium. We observed a robust inflammatory response in the first two weeks consisting primarily of infiltrating macrophages, heterophils, and melanomacrophages. These inflammatory cells were identified in the lumen of the spongy heart, within the site of the wound, and attached to endocardial cells adjacent to the site of injury. Marked accumulation of collagen fibers and increased connective tissue were also observed during the first and second week in a transition zone between healthy and injured myocardium as well as in adjacent sub-epicardial regions. The accumulation of collagen and connective tissue however did not persist. The presence of capillaries was also noted in the injured area during repair. The replacement of the cauterized region of the ventricle by myocardial tissue was achieved by 6 weeks. The presence of ethynyl deoxyuridine-positive cardiac myocytes and partially differentiated cardiac myocytes during repair suggest effective cardiac myocyte driven regeneration mechanisms also operate in the injured goldfish heart, and are similar to those observed in zebrafish and giant danio. Our data suggest the ability for cardiac regeneration may be widely conserved among cyprinids. PMID:24548889

  8. Histopathology of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to hydroxylated fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Jovanovi?, Boris; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Pali?, Dušan

    2014-11-01

    Hydroxylated fullerenes are reported to be very strong antioxidants, acting to quench reactive oxygen species, thus having strong potential for important and widespread applications in innovative therapies for a variety of disease processes. However, their potential for toxicological side effects is still largely controversial and unknown. Effects of hydroxylated fullerenes C60(OH)24 on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were investigated microscopically after a 72-hour (acute) exposure by intraperitoneal injection of 20 ppm of hydroxylated fullerenes per gram of body mass. Cumulative, semi-quantitative histopathologic evaluation of brain, liver, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, skin, coelom, gills and the vestibuloauditory system revealed significant differences between control and hydroxylated fullerene-treated fish. Fullerene-treated fish had much higher cumulative histopathology scores. Histopathologic changes included loss of cellularity in the interstitium of the kidney, a primary site of haematopoiesis in fish, and loss of intracytoplasmic glycogen in liver. In the coelom, variable numbers of leukocytes, including many macrophages and fewer heterophils and rodlet cells, were admixed with the nanomaterial. These findings raise concern about in vivo administration of hydroxylated fullerenes in experimental drugs and procedures in human medicine, and should be investigated in more detail. PMID:23883179

  9. The desmosome and pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Desmosomes are patch-like intercellular adhering junctions (“maculae adherentes”), which, in concert with the related adherens junctions, provide the mechanical strength to intercellular adhesion. Therefore, it is not surprising that desmosomes are abundant in tissues subjected to significant mechanical stress such as stratified epithelia and myocardium. Desmosomal adhesion is based on the Ca2+-dependent, homo- and heterophilic transinteraction of cadherin-type adhesion molecules. Desmosomal cadherins are anchored to the intermediate filament cytoskeleton by adaptor proteins of the armadillo and plakin families. Desmosomes are dynamic structures subjected to regulation and are therefore targets of signalling pathways, which control their molecular composition and adhesive properties. Moreover, evidence is emerging that desmosomal components themselves take part in outside-in signalling under physiologic and pathologic conditions. Disturbed desmosomal adhesion contributes to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases such as pemphigus, which is caused by autoantibodies against desmosomal cadherins. Beside pemphigus, desmosome-associated diseases are caused by other mechanisms such as genetic defects or bacterial toxins. Because most of these diseases affect the skin, desmosomes are interesting not only for cell biologists who are inspired by their complex structure and molecular composition, but also for clinical physicians who are confronted with patients suffering from severe blistering skin diseases such as pemphigus. To develop disease-specific therapeutic approaches, more insights into the molecular composition and regulation of desmosomes are required. PMID:18386043

  10. Carotenoids, sexual signals and immune function in barn swallows from Chernobyl.

    PubMed Central

    Camplani, A; Saino, N; Møller, A P

    1999-01-01

    Carotenoids have been hypothesized to facilitate immune function and act as free-radical scavengers, thereby minimizing the frequency of mutations. Populations of animals exposed to higher levels of free radicals are thus expected to demonstrate reduced sexual coloration if use of carotenoids for free-radical scavenging is traded against use for sexual signals. The intensity of carotenoid-based sexual coloration was compared among three populations of barn swallows Hirundo rustica differing in exposure to radioactive contamination. Lymphocyte and immunoglobulin concentrations were depressed, whereas the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, an index of stress, was enhanced in Chernobyl swallows compared to controls. Spleen size was reduced in Chernobyl compared to that of two control populations. Sexual coloration varied significantly among populations, with the size of a secondary sexual character (the length of the outermost tail feathers) being positively related to coloration in the two control populations, but not in the Chernobyl population. Thus the positive covariation between coloration and sexual signalling disappeared in the population subject to intense radioactive contamination. These findings suggest that the reliable signalling function of secondary sexual characters breaks down under extreme environmental conditions, no longer providing reliable information about the health status of males. PMID:10406129

  11. Bacterial orchitis and epididymo-orchitis in broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Monleon, Rafael; Martin, Michael P; John Barnes, H

    2008-12-01

    Two cases of orchitis and epididymo-orchitis in broiler breeders are described. The first case occurred in a 62-week-old rooster showing signs of breeding inactivity. Grossly, the left testis was abnormally shaped and had multiple yellow foci, prominent blood vessels, and a gelatinous mass on the surface. The right testis and other tissues appeared normal. A pure, heavy growth of Staphylococcus aureus was obtained on bacterial culture, and intralesional Gram-positive cocci were numerous on histopathology. The second case occurred in a 28-week-old rooster that was found dead. Both testes were abnormally shaped, swollen, firm, and had irregular, dark, depressed areas, prominent vessels, and multiple petechial haemorrhages. Epididymides were enlarged and nodular. Other lesions in this rooster included poor nutritional condition, distended cloaca, and urate scalding of the abdominal skin below the vent. Microscopically, there was extensive, severe heterophilic intratubular orchitis and epididymitis with intralesional Gram-negative bacteria. A heavy, pure growth of Escherichia coli was obtained from the testes and epididymides. In both cases, the findings suggested that the most probable route of infection was ascending via the ductus deferens. PMID:19023758

  12. Hematological and plasma biochemical reference ranges of Alaskan seabirds: Their ecological significance and clinical importance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, S.H.; Piatt, J.F.; White, J.

    1997-01-01

    Blood was analyzed from 151 pelagic marine birds to establish reference ranges for hematological and plasma biochemical parameters from healthy, wild populations of Pacific seabirds. Of the 13 species examined, 9 were from the Family Alcidae (N = 122 individuals) and the remainder (N = 29) from the Families Phalacrocoracidae, Laridae, and Procellariidae. Three of 8 hematological parameters (total white blood cell count, lymphocyte count and eosinophil count) differed significantly among species, as did 9 of 13 plasma biochemical parameters (alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, cholesterol, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase, total bilirubin, total protein and field total protein). There were no differences among species for packed cell volume, buffy coat, cell counts of heterophils, monoqtes and basophils, or for concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, triglycerides, uric acid and calcium. Plasma calcium concentration, triglyceride levels and field total protein varied significantly between sexes, with females having higher mean concentrations of all 3 parameters. However, no significant relationships between measures of breeding condition (brood patch size, subcutaneous and mesenteric fat deposits, or ovarian follicle size and ovary weight) and calcium or alkaline phosphatase concentrations in female birds could be identified. Alanine aminotransferase and uric acid were the only analytes which did not differ significantly between species or sexes.

  13. Use of rapid cytochemical staining to characterize fish blood granulocytes in species of special concern and determine potential for function testing.

    PubMed

    Pali?, Dušan; Beck, Linda S; Pali?, Jelena; Andreasen, Claire B

    2011-02-01

    Studies of innate immunity in fish species of special concern are essential for better understanding of their health status during hatchery rearing conditions. The cytochemical and morphological characterizations of blood granulocytes have been used to provide information about phylogenetic differences and determine the potential use of neutrophil function assays. Rapid, simple, cytochemical staining kits used routinely for staining mammalian granulocytes have been used to characterize granulocytes from blood of four fish species: Arctic grayling, cutthroat trout, June sucker, and shovelnose sturgeon. Blood smears were stained with Peroxidase 391 (myeloperoxidase, MPO), alkaline phosphatase (AP), Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) and Diff-quick stain; examined using bright field and differential interference contrast microscopy. Granulocytes on blood smears were evaluated based on the cell morphology, and presence or absence of the specific chromogen. Presence of lymphocytes, monocytes, platelets/thrombocytes and granulocytes was determined in all fish species. Arctic grayling, June sucker, and cutthroat trout had MPO positive granulocytes, while shovelnose sturgeon heterophils had positive reaction for leukocyte AP, but not MPO. Presence of MPO indicated potential to measure oxidative burst and degranulation of neutrophil primary granules in Arctic grayling, cutthroat trout and June sucker. Absence of MPO in shovelnose sturgeon suggested use of different enzyme marker (AP) in degranulation assay for this species. Standardization of cytochemical techniques allowed for rapid screening of leukocyte types, reducing the number of fish, time and effort to select adequate neutrophil function assays to be used in studies of health status in species of special concern. PMID:21199672

  14. Low temperatures reduce skin healing in the Jacaré do Pantanal (Caiman yacare, Daudin 1802).

    PubMed

    Pressinotti, Leandro Nogueira; Borges, Ricardo Moraes; Alves De Lima, Angela Paula; Aleixo, Victor Manuel; Iunes, Renata Stecca; Borges, João Carlos Shimada; Cogliati, Bruno; Cunha Da Silva, José Roberto Machado

    2013-01-01

    Studies of skin wound healing in crocodilians are necessary given the frequent occurrence of cannibalism in intensive farming systems. Air temperature affects tissue recovery because crocodilians are ectothermic. Therefore, the kinetics of skin wound healing in Caiman yacare were examined at temperatures of 33°C and 23°C. Sixteen caiman were selected and divided into two groups of eight maintained at 23°C or 33°C. The studied individuals' scars were photographed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of the experimental conditions, and samples were collected for histological processing after 3, 7, 15 and 30 days. Macroscopically, the blood clot (heterophilic granuloma) noticeably remained in place covering the wound longer for the caiman kept at 23°C. Microscopically, the temperature of 23°C slowed epidermal migration and skin repair. Comparatively, new blood vessels, labeled using von Willebrand factor (vWF) antibody staining, were more frequently found in the scars of the 33°C group. The collagen fibers in the dermis were denser in the 33°C treatment. Considering the delayed healing at 23°C, producers are recommended to keep wounded animals at 33°C, especially when tanks are cold, to enable rapid wound closure and better repair of collagen fibers because such lesions tend to compromise the use of their skin as leather. PMID:24244853

  15. Effects of forest patch size on physiological stress and immunocompetence in an area-sensitive passerine, the Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris): an experiment.

    PubMed Central

    Suorsa, Petri; Helle, Heikki; Koivunen, Vesa; Huhta, Esa; Nikula, Ari; Hakkarainen, Harri

    2004-01-01

    We manipulated the primary brood size of Eurasian treecreepers (Certhia familiaris) breeding in different sized forest patches (0.5-12.8 ha) in moderately fragmented landscapes. We examined the effects of brood size manipulation (reduced, control, enlarged) and forest patch size on physiological stress (heterophil-lymphocyte ratios; H/L), body condition and cell-mediated immunocompetence (phytohaemagglutinin test). Nestlings' H/L ratios were negatively related to forest patch area in control and enlarged broods, whereas no effects were found in reduced broods. The effects of forest patch area were strongest in enlarged broods, which had, in general, twofold higher H/L ratios than control and reduced broods. The elevated H/L ratios were positively related to nestling mortality and negatively correlated with body-condition indices suggesting that the origin of stress in nestlings was mainly nutritional. Cell-mediated immunity of nestlings was not related to brood manipulation or to forest patch size. Also, the H/L ratios of adults were not related to brood manipulation or forest patch size. In addition, parental H/L ratios and body condition were not related to nestling H/L ratios. Our results suggest that during the breeding period the deleterious effects of habitat loss are seen explicitly in growing young. PMID:15101703

  16. Cryptosporidium baileyi--infection in Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) ducklings from a zoological garden.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christoph; Kämmerling, Jens; Kutzer, Peter; Engelhardt, Andreas; Richter, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Infection of the Bursa of Fabricius with Cryptosporidium baileyi was diagnosed in a group of hand reared Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) ducklings during one breeding season in a German zoological garden.The birds had died in an emaciated and anaemic state after problems with spontaneous feeding. The bursae were infected with moderate to high numbers of cryptosporidia, which were associated with hyperplasia, degeneration and sloughing of the affected epithelial cells and mild heterophilic bursitis, lesions typically seen in bursal cryptosporidiosis in other avian species. In addition, lymphatic tissue was nearly absent, which was probably caused by chronic stress and malnutrition related to the rearing of these highly stress-sensitive birds in an artificial environment. Companion ducklings from stress-resistant, spontaneously feeding species from the zoological collection were used to calm the Mergansers, but may have introduced the cryptosporidia into the rearing boxes. Another possible source for the introduction of C. baileyi were adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), which were used to increase the hatching rate by a phase of natural breeding in the middle third of the incubation period of the Merganser eggs. PMID:23045806

  17. Blood parasitaemia in a high latitude flexible breeder, the white-winged crossbill, Loxia leucoptera: contribution of seasonal relapse versus new inoculations.

    PubMed

    Deviche, P; Fokidis, H B; Lerbour, B; Greiner, E

    2010-02-01

    We measured seasonal changes in the prevalence of haematozoa (Leucocytozoon fringillinarum, Haemoproteus fringillae, and Trypanosoma avium) in free-ranging White-winged Crossbills, Loxia leucoptera, over 1.5 year in Fairbanks, Alaska, USA. This prevalence was low during early winter. L. fringillinarum prevalence increased in late winter/early spring, in the absence of vectors, suggesting relapse of latent infection. By contrast, the prevalence of T. avium and H. fringillae did not increase until mid-spring, coincident with the emergence of putative vectors and suggestive of new inoculations. The winter breeding period was not associated with lower body condition or elevated blood heterophil/lymphocyte ratios than the summer post-breeding period. Thus, birds unlikely perceived their breeding effort as particularly stressful. Adult males in May and June had low plasma testosterone and their blood prevalence of L. fringillinarum, but not other haemoparasites, was higher than in adult females. This difference may have resulted from sex differences in behaviour and/or plumage colouration - bright red in males, dull green/yellow in females. Species in which reproduction and vector abundance are seasonally dissociated may constitute important models for investigating the respective contribution of reproductive hormones, breeding effort, and vector abundance to patent and latent hemoparasitic infections and to new inoculations. PMID:19849885

  18. Variation in stress and innate immunity in the tree lizard (Urosaurus ornatus) across an urban-rural gradient

    PubMed Central

    French, Susannah S.; Fokidis, H. Bobby; Moore, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The urban environment presents new and different challenges to wildlife, but also potential opportunities depending on the species. As urban encroachment onto native habitats continues, understanding the impact of this expansion on native species is vital to conservation. A key physiological indicator of environmental disturbance is the vertebrate stress response, involving increases in circulating glucocorticoids (i.e., corticosterone), which exert influence on numerous physiological parameters including energy storage, reproduction, and immunity. We examined how urbanization in Phoenix, Arizona influences corticosterone levels, blood parasitism, and innate immunity in populations of tree lizards (Urosaurus ornatus) to determine whether urbanization may be detrimental or beneficial to this species. Both baseline and stress-induced corticosterone concentrations were significantly lower in urban lizards relative to the rural ones, however, the magnitude of the increase in corticosterone with stress did not differ across populations. Urban lizards also had a lower ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes, but elevated overall leukocyte count, as compared to lizards from the natural site. Urban and rural lizards did not differ in their prevalence of the blood parasite, Plasmodium mexicanum. Taken together, these results suggest that urban tree lizards may have suppressed overall corticosterone concentrations possibly from down-regulation as a result of frequent exposure to stressors, or increased access to urban resources. Also, urban lizards may have bolstered immunocompetence possibly from increased immune challenges, such as wounding, in the urban environment, or from greater energetic reserves being available as a result of access to urban resources. PMID:18594834

  19. Reference intervals, longitudinal analyses, and index of individuality of commonly measured laboratory variables in captive bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael P; Arheart, Kristopher L; Cray, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine reference intervals, perform longitudinal analyses, and determine the index of individuality (IoI) of 8 hematologic, and 13 biochemical and electrophoretic variables for a group of captive bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Reference intervals were determined from blood samples collected during annual wellness examinations for 41 eagles (23 male and 18 female) with ages ranging between 6 and 43 years (18.7 +/- 7.4, mean +/- SD) at the time of sample collection. Longitudinal analyses and IoI were determined for measured hematologic, biochemical, and protein electrophoretic variables, both individually and as a group, for a subset of 16 eagles (10 male and 6 female) during a 12-year period. This smaller group of eagles ranged in age between 2 and 20 years at the start of the study period, and between 14 and 32 years (21.9 +/- 5.0, mean +/- SD) at the end of the study period. Significant increases with age within the group of 16 eagles were observed only for red blood cells, percent heterophils, total protein, and beta-globulin protein fraction, while albumin:globulin decreased significantly with age. A low IoI (> or = 1.4) was determined for all hematologic and biochemical variables except gamma globulins, which had high IoI (< or = 0.6) for 3 individuals within the subset of 16. PMID:25115040

  20. Avian blood parasite infection during the non-breeding season: an overlooked issue in declining populations?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathogens and parasites can have major impacts on host population dynamics, both through direct mortality and via indirect effects. Both types of effect may be stronger in species whose populations are already under pressure. We investigated the potential for blood parasites to impact upon their hosts at the immunological, physiological and population level during the non-breeding season using a declining population of yellowhammers Emberiza citrinella as a model. Results Yellowhammers infected by Haemoproteus spp. showed both a reduced heterophil to lymphocyte (H:L) ratio, and an elevated standardised white blood cell (WBC) count compared to uninfected birds, indicating an immunological response to infection. Infected birds had shorter wings during the first winter of sampling but not during the second, colder, winter; survival analysis of 321 birds sampled across four winters indicated that increased wing length conferred a survival advantage. Conclusions We suggest that the potential impacts of blood parasite infections on over-wintering birds may have been underestimated. Further research should consider the potential impacts of sub-clinical parasite infections on the dynamics of vulnerable populations, and we suggest using declining populations as model systems within which to investigate these relationships as well as examining interactions between sub-clinical disease and other environmental stressors. JEL Code Q5 PMID:24011390

  1. Comparison of selected diagnostic parameters in African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) with normal plumage and those exhibiting feather damaging behavior.

    PubMed

    Clubb, Susan L; Cray, Carolyn; Arheart, Kristopher L; Goodman, Michelle

    2007-12-01

    Feather damaging behavior is a common problem in African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus). To determine if differences in clinical test results could be detected in parrots with feather damaging behavior (FDB), we studied 51 parrots, including 24 with FDB, with a variety of diagnostic tests. A predictable stress hemogram was found after administration of thyroid-stimulating hormone in both normal birds and birds with FDB. Birds with FDB had significantly lower lymphocyte counts and higher heterophil: lymphocyte ratios after thyroid-stimulating hormone injection than did normal birds. Although resting thyroxine (T4) levels were not different between the 2 groups, the magnitude of the post-thyroid-stimulating-hormone increase in T4 was significantly less in the FDB group. Alpha-1 and alpha-2 globulin fractions were significantly higher and gamma globulin fractions were significantly lower in birds with FDB. Birds with FDB also had higher Aspergillus antibody titers. No significant differences were found in Aspergillus antigen levels, Candida antibody titers, or blood concentrations of histamine, serotonin, or corticosterone. The clinical significance of these differences is not known. PMID:18351004

  2. Mucocele in a spectacled owl (Pusilatrix perspicillata).

    PubMed

    Huynh, Minh; Brandão, João; Sabater, Mikel; Stidworthy, Mark F; Forbes, Neil A

    2014-03-01

    A 6-year-old breeding female spectacled owl (Pusilatrix perspicillata) was presented for a soft, fluid-filled, spherical mass under the neck that had been increasing in size over the previous 3 days. Results of a fine-needle aspirate of the mass showed clear, pale-yellow fluid with a total protein of 12.6 g/L. Cytologic examination revealed erythrocytes, moderate numbers of heterophils, and numerous foamy mononuclear cells against a mucoid background. Macroscopically, the mass appeared to be attached firmly to the esophagus. The mass was excised surgically and submitted for histopathologic examination. The lesion comprised a circumscribed, fibrous-encapsulated multilocular cyst, lined by plump, goblet-type, cuboidal epithelial cells lying in abundant mucinous matrix. Findings were consistent with a mucocele of the esophageal mucosal gland. Excision was considered curative based on follow-up 6 months after initial presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this condition in Strigiformes and indicates that mucocele should be included in the differential diagnosis of cervical masses in birds. PMID:24881153

  3. Scholarly tailgating defined: A diverse, giant network.

    PubMed

    Adegbola, Maxine

    2013-01-01

    Scholarly tailgating and developmental relationships can soar professional identity, advance one's scholarly career and foster cultural diversity in healthcare. This paper provides the definition and basis of scholarly tailgating for scholars who wish to propel their careers and help enable diverse cultural approaches. The concept of scholarly tailgating explains the use of homophilic and diverse, multidisciplinary network relationships to foster an intellectual community in healthcare, and to benefit healthcare consumer. Scholars can benefit from standing on the shoulders of giants and allowing the aerodynamic wind to propel them to soaring career heights. Prudent scholars, apart from utilizing homophilic relationships and balancing these relationships with diverse heterophilic relationships, are able to lead in the professional academy, and become innovators who practice with cultural relevance. Multi-ethnic, diverse scholars working collaboratively can assist in igniting conversation and actions that reduce disparities, which are indigenous to those who are most vulnerable. Purposeful strategic planning and development of diverse networks that support scholarly advancement can best achieve these career accomplishments. PMID:23589967

  4. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy identifies oncolytic adenovirus responders.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, O; Immonen, R; Närväinen, J; Kipar, A; Paasonen, J; Jokivarsi, K T; Yli-Ollila, H; Soininen, P; Partanen, K; Joensuu, T; Parvianen, S; Pesonen, S K; Koski, A; Vähä-Koskela, M; Cerullo, V; Pesonen, S; Gröhn, O H; Hemminki, A

    2014-06-15

    At present, it is not possible to reliably identify patients who will benefit from oncolytic virus treatments. Conventional modalities such as computed tomography (CT), which measure tumor size, are unreliable owing to inflammation-induced tumor swelling. We hypothesized that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) might be useful in this regard. However, little previous data exist and neither oncolytic adenovirus nor immunocompetent models have been assessed by MRS. Here, we provide evidence that in T2-weighted MRI a hypointense core area, consistent with coagulative necrosis, develops in immunocompetent Syrian hamster carcinomas that respond to oncolytic adenovirus treatment. The same phenomenon was observed in a neuroblastoma patient while he responded to the treatment. With relapse at a later stage, however, the tumor of this patient became moderately hyperintense. We found that MRS of taurine, choline and unsaturated fatty acids can be useful early indicators of response and provide detailed information about tumor growth and degeneration. In hamsters, calprotectin-positive inflammatory cells (heterophils and macrophages) were found in abundance; particularly surrounding necrotic areas in carcinomas and T cells were significantly increased in sarcomas, when these had been treated with a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-producing virus, suggesting a possible link between oncolysis, necrosis (seen as a hypointense core in MRI) and/or immune response. Our study indicates that both MRI and MRS could be useful in the estimation of oncolytic adenovirus efficacy at early time points after treatment. PMID:24248808

  5. Humoral and cell-mediated immune function in adult Japanese Quail following exposure to 2. 45-GHz microwave radiation during embryogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Galvin, M.J.; McRee, D.I.; Hall, C.A.; Thaxton, J.P.; Parkhurst, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    Japanese quail, Coturnix coturnix japonica, eggs were subjected to 2.45-GHz CW microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2 (SAR . 4.03 mW/g) during the first 12 days of embryogeny. Following hatching the exposed embryos, as well as nonexposed controls, were reared to 22 weeks of age. Humoral immune potential, as indicated by comparable anti-CRBC antibody, IgM and IgG, levels at 0, 4, and 7 days postimmunization in both exposed and control quail was not affected significantly. However, cell-mediated immune potential, measured by the reaction to intradermal injection of phytohemagglutinin-P in the wing web, was reduced in the exposed females, but not in the exposed males. Additionally, total leukocyte numbers and absolute circulating numbers of lymphocytes, monocytes, and heterophils were increased significantly only in the exposed females. These data show that exposure of Japanese quail during embryogenesis reduced cell mediated immune potential and induced a general leukocytosis in females.

  6. Pharmacology of Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kiryushko, Darya; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play a pivotal role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system under normal conditions. They also are involved in numerous pathological processes such as inflammation, degenerative disorders, and cancer, making them attractive targets for drug development. The majority of CAMs are signal transducing receptors. CAM-induced intracellular signalling is triggered via homophilic (CAM-CAM) and heterophilic (CAM - other counter-receptors) interactions, which both can be targeted pharmacologically. We here describe the progress in the CAM pharmacology focusing on cadherins and CAMs of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, such as NCAM and L1. Structural basis of CAM-mediated cell adhesion and CAM-induced signalling are outlined. Different pharmacological approaches to study functions of CAMs are presented including the use of specific antibodies, recombinant proteins, and synthetic peptides. We also discuss how unravelling of the 3D structure of CAMs provides novel pharmacological tools for dissection of CAM-induced signalling pathways and offers therapeutic opportunities for a range of neurological disorders. PMID:19305742

  7. State-dependent physiological maintenance in a long-lived ectotherm, the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta).

    PubMed

    Schwanz, Lisa; Warner, Daniel A; McGaugh, Suzanne; Di Terlizzi, Roberta; Bronikowski, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Energy allocation among somatic maintenance, reproduction and growth varies not only among species, but among individuals according to states such as age, sex and season. Little research has been conducted on the somatic (physiological) maintenance of long-lived organisms, particularly ectotherms such as reptiles. In this study, we examined sex differences and age- and season-related variation in immune function and DNA repair efficiency in a long-lived reptile, the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta). Immune components tended to be depressed during hibernation, in winter, compared with autumn or spring. Increased heterophil count during hibernation provided the only support for winter immunoenhancement. In juvenile and adult turtles, we found little evidence for senescence in physiological maintenance, consistent with predictions for long-lived organisms. Among immune components, swelling in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and control injection increased with age, whereas basophil count decreased with age. Hatchling turtles had reduced basophil counts and natural antibodies, indicative of an immature immune system, but demonstrated higher DNA repair efficiency than older turtles. Reproductively mature turtles had reduced lymphocytes compared with juvenile turtles in the spring, presumably driven by a trade-off between maintenance and reproduction. Sex had little influence on physiological maintenance. These results suggest that components of physiological maintenance are modulated differentially according to individual state and highlight the need for more research on the multiple components of physiological maintenance in animals of variable states. PMID:21147972

  8. NPPD: A Protein-Protein Docking Scoring Function Based on Dyadic Differences in Networks of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Amino Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Edward S. C.; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking (PPD) predictions usually rely on the use of a scoring function to rank docking models generated by exhaustive sampling. To rank good models higher than bad ones, a large number of scoring functions have been developed and evaluated, but the methods used for the computation of PPD predictions remain largely unsatisfactory. Here, we report a network-based PPD scoring function, the NPPD, in which the network consists of two types of network nodes, one for hydrophobic and the other for hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the nodes are connected when the residues they represent are within a certain contact distance. We showed that network parameters that compute dyadic interactions and those that compute heterophilic interactions of the amino acid networks thus constructed allowed NPPD to perform well in a benchmark evaluation of 115 PPD scoring functions, most of which, unlike NPPD, are based on some sort of protein-protein interaction energy. We also showed that NPPD was highly complementary to these energy-based scoring functions, suggesting that the combined use of conventional scoring functions and NPPD might significantly improve the accuracy of current PPD predictions. PMID:25811640

  9. rFN/Cad-11-Modified Collagen Type II Biomimetic Interface Promotes the Adhesion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zhengsheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Kang, Xia; Wen, Can; Yan, Yanfei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the cell-material interface are determining factors in the successful function of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Currently, cell adhesion is commonly promoted through the use of polypeptides; however, due to their lack of complementary or modulatory domains, polypeptides must be modified to improve their ability to promote adhesion. In this study, we utilized the principle of matrix-based biomimetic modification and a recombinant protein, which spans fragments 7–10 of fibronectin module III (heterophilic motif?) and extracellular domains 1–2 of cadherin-11 (rFN/Cad-11) (homophilic motif?), to modify the interface of collagen type II (Col II) sponges. We showed that the designed material was able to stimulate cell proliferation and promote better chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro than both the FN modified surfaces and the negative control. Further, the Col II/rFN/Cad-11-MSCs composite stimulated cartilage formation in vivo; the chondrogenic effect of Col II alone was much less significant. These results suggested that the rFN/Cad-11-modified collagen type II biomimetic interface has dual biological functions of promoting adhesion and stimulating chondrogenic differentiation. This substance, thus, may serve as an ideal scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing repair of injured cartilage in vivo. PMID:23919505

  10. Empirical evidence of cold stress induced cell mediated and humoral immune response in common myna (Sturnus tristis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Mansur A.; Zaib, Anila; Anjum, Muhammad S.; Qayyum, Mazhar

    2015-02-01

    Common myna (Sturnus tristis) is a bird indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that has invaded many parts of the world. At the onset of our investigation, we hypothesized that the immunological profile of myna makes it resistant to harsh/new environmental conditions. In order to test this hypothesis, a number of 40 mynas were caught and divided into two groups, i.e., 7 and 25 °C for 14 days. To determine the effect of cold stress, cell mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed. The macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly (P < 0.05) higher at 25 °C rather than 7 °C either co-incubated with opsonized or unopsonized sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Macrophage engulfment/cell and nitric oxide production behaved in a similar manner. However, splenic cells plaque formation, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio, and serum IgM or IgG production remained non-significant. There was a significant increase of IgG antibody production after a second immunization by SRBC. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been reported in the progression of this bird's invasion in frosty areas of the world. The results revealed a strengthened humoral immune response of myna and made this bird suitable for invasion in the areas of harsh conditions.

  11. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies.

  12. Network bipartivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik; Edling, Christofer R.; Kim, Beom Jun

    2003-11-01

    Systems with two types of agents with a preference for heterophilous interaction produce networks that are more or less close to bipartite. We propose two measures quantifying the notion of bipartivity. The two measures—one well known and natural, but computationally intractable, and the other computationally less complex, but also less intuitive—are examined on model networks that continuously interpolate between bipartite graphs and graphs with many odd circuits. We find that the bipartivity measures increase as we tune the control parameters of the test networks to intuitively increase the bipartivity, and thus conclude that the measures are quite relevant. We also measure and discuss the values of our bipartivity measures for empirical social networks (constructed from professional collaborations, Internet communities, and field surveys). Here we find, as expected, that networks arising from romantic online interaction have high, and professional collaboration networks have low, bipartivity values. In some other cases, probably due to low average degree of the network, the bipartivity measures cannot distinguish between romantic and friendship oriented interaction.

  13. Low temperatures reduce skin healing in the Jacaré do Pantanal (Caiman yacare, Daudin 1802)

    PubMed Central

    Pressinotti, Leandro Nogueira; Borges, Ricardo Moraes; Alves De Lima, Angela Paula; Aleixo, Victor Manuel; Iunes, Renata Stecca; Borges, João Carlos Shimada; Cogliati, Bruno; Cunha Da Silva, José Roberto Machado

    2013-01-01

    Summary Studies of skin wound healing in crocodilians are necessary given the frequent occurrence of cannibalism in intensive farming systems. Air temperature affects tissue recovery because crocodilians are ectothermic. Therefore, the kinetics of skin wound healing in Caiman yacare were examined at temperatures of 33°C and 23°C. Sixteen caiman were selected and divided into two groups of eight maintained at 23°C or 33°C. The studied individuals' scars were photographed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of the experimental conditions, and samples were collected for histological processing after 3, 7, 15 and 30 days. Macroscopically, the blood clot (heterophilic granuloma) noticeably remained in place covering the wound longer for the caiman kept at 23°C. Microscopically, the temperature of 23°C slowed epidermal migration and skin repair. Comparatively, new blood vessels, labeled using von Willebrand factor (vWF) antibody staining, were more frequently found in the scars of the 33°C group. The collagen fibers in the dermis were denser in the 33°C treatment. Considering the delayed healing at 23°C, producers are recommended to keep wounded animals at 33°C, especially when tanks are cold, to enable rapid wound closure and better repair of collagen fibers because such lesions tend to compromise the use of their skin as leather. PMID:24244853

  14. Amalgam is a ligand for the transmembrane receptor neurotactin and is required for neurotactin-mediated cell adhesion and axon fasciculation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Frémion, F.; Darboux, I.; Diano, M.; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R.; Seeger, M.A.; Piovant, M.

    2000-01-01

    Neurotactin (NRT), a member of the cholinesterase-homologous protein family, is a heterophilic cell adhesion molecule that is required for proper axon guidance during Drosophila development. In this study, we identify amalgam (AMA), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, as a ligand for the NRT receptor. Using transfected Schneider 2 cells and embryonic primary cultures, we demonstrate that AMA is a secreted protein. Furthermore, AMA is necessary for NRT-expressing cells both to aggregate with themselves and to associate with embryonic primary culture cells. Aggregation assays performed with truncated NRT molecules reveal that the integrity of the cholinesterase-like extracellular domain was not required either for AMA binding or for adhesion, with only amino acids 347–482 of the extracellular domain being necessary for both activities. Moreover, the NRT cytoplasmic domain is required for NRT-mediated adhesion, although not for AMA binding. Using an ama-deficient stock, we find that ama function is not essential for viability. Pupae deficient for ama do exhibit defasciculation defects of the ocellar nerves similar to those found in nrt mutants. PMID:10970840

  15. The Cell Adhesion Molecules Roughest, Hibris, Kin of Irre and Sticks and Stones Are Required for Long Range Spacing of the Drosophila Wing Disc Sensory Sensilla

    PubMed Central

    Linneweber, Gerit Arne; Winking, Mathis; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Most animal tissues and organ systems are comprised of highly ordered arrays of varying cell types. The development of external sensory organs requires complex cell-cell communication in order to give each cell a specific identity and to ensure a regular distributed pattern of the sensory bristles. This involves both long and short range signaling mediated by either diffusible or cell anchored factors. In a variety of processes the heterophilic Irre Cell Recognition Module, consisting of the Neph-like proteins: Roughest, Kin of irre and of the Nephrin-like proteins: Sticks and Stones, Hibris, plays key roles in the recognition events of different cell types throughout development. In the present study these proteins are apically expressed in the adhesive belt of epithelial cells participating in sense organ development in a partially exclusive and asymmetric manner. Using mutant analysis the GAL4/UAS system, RNAi and gain of function we found an involvement of all four Irre Cell Recognition Module-proteins in the development of a highly structured array of sensory organs in the wing disc. The proteins secure the regular spacing of sensory organs showing partial redundancy and may function in early lateral inhibition events as well as in cell sorting processes. Comparisons with other systems suggest that the Irre Cell Recognition module is a key organizer of highly repetitive structures. PMID:26053791

  16. Retrobulbar adenocarcinoma in an Amazon parrot (Amazona autumnalis).

    PubMed

    Watson, Victoria E; Murdock, Jessica H; Cazzini, Paola; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Divers, Stephen J; Sakamoto, Kaori

    2013-03-01

    Retrobulbar neoplasms are not common in mammals and are even more infrequently seen in nonmammalian species. The current report describes a retrobulbar mass creating exophthalmia and neurologic signs in a red-lored Amazon parrot (Amazona autumnalis). A 27-year-old female parrot presented for a 3-day history of anorexia and a 2-week history of periocular soft tissue swelling and exophthalmia of the right eye. Physical examination revealed 9% dehydration and right eye exophthalmia with inability to retropulse the globe. A fine-needle aspirate was performed, and cytologic evaluation revealed necrotic debris with scattered clusters of epithelial cells, moderate numbers of macrophages, and few heterophils. Given the possibility of neoplasia and paucity of treatment options, the owners elected euthanasia and submitted the body for necropsy. A large, fluctuant, friable, red, retrobulbar mass with multiple areas of hemorrhage, on cut surface, was noted at necropsy. Histologically, the mass was composed of neoplastic, cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells, forming rosette-like glandular structures, admixed with abundant necrotic debris. The neoplastic cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3) by immunohistochemistry. Based on histopathology and immunohistochemistry, the mass was diagnosed as an adenocarcinoma. PMID:23404475

  17. Habitat and sex differences in physiological condition of breeding Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, J.C.; Sogge, M.K.; Kern, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter "flycatcher") is a federally listed endangered species that breeds in densely vegetated riparian habitats dominated by native and exotic plants, including introduced monotypic saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima). Some workers have theorized that saltcedar is unsuitable habitat for the flycatcher, primarily because it generally supports a smaller and less diverse invertebrate community (the flycatcher's food base) than native habitats (e.g. Salix spp.). However, differences in insect communities between native and saltcedar habitats are not proof that saltcedar habitats are inferior. The only way to evaluate whether the habitats differ in dietary or energetic quality is to document actual food limitation or its manifestations. Measurements of an individual's body condition and metabolic state can serve as indicators of environmental stressors, such as food limitation and environmental extremes. We captured 130 flycatchers breeding in native and saltcedar habitats in Arizona and New Mexico and measured 12 variables of physiological condition. These variables included body mass, fat level, body condition index, hematocrit, plasma triglycerides, plasma free fatty acids and glycerol, plasma glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate, plasma uric acid, total leukocyte count, and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. We found substantial sex-based differences in the condition of male and female flycatchers. Ten of the 12 measures of physiological condition differed significantly between the sexes. In all cases where male and female condition differed (except mass), the differences suggest that males were in poorer condition than females. We found few habitat-based differences in flycatcher condition. Only 3 of the 12 physiological condition indices differed significantly between habitats. Our data show that, at least in some parts of the flycatcher's range, there is no evidence that flycatchers breeding in saltcedar habitats exhibit poorer nutritional condition or are suffering negative physiological affects. ?? The American Ornithologists' Union, 2005.

  18. Hematologic and plasma biochemistry reference intervals of healthy adult barn owls (Tyto alba).

    PubMed

    Szabo, Zoltan; Klein, Akos; Jakab, Csaba

    2014-06-01

    Hematologic and plasma biochemistry parameters of barn owls (Tyto alba) were studied in collaboration by the Exotic Division of the Faculty of Veterinary Science of the Szent Istvan University and the Eötvös Loránd University, both in Budapest, Hungary. Blood samples were taken from a total of 42 adult barn owls kept in zoos and bird repatriation stations. The following quantitative and qualitative hematologic values were determined: packed cell volume, 46.2 +/- 4%; hemoglobin concentration, 107 +/- 15 g/L; red blood cell count, 3.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(12)/L; white blood cell count, 13.7 +/- 2.7 x 10(9)/L; heterophils, 56.5 +/- 11.5% (7.8 +/- 2 x 10(9)/L); lymphocytes, 40.3 +/- 10.9% (5.5 +/- 1.9 x 10(9)/L); monocytes, 1.8 +/- 2.1% (0.3 +/- 0.3 x 10(9)/ L); eosinophils, 1 +/- 1% (0.1 +/- 0.1 x 10(9)/L); and basophils, 0.6 +/- 0.5% (0.1 +/- 0.1 x 10(9)/L). The following plasma biochemistry values also were determined: aspartate aminotransferase, 272 +/- 43 U/L; L-gamma-glutamyltransferase, 9.5 +/- 4.7 U/L; lipase, 31.7 +/- 11.1 U/L; creatine kinase, 2228 +/- 578 U/L; lactate dehydrogenase, 1702 +/- 475 U/L; alkaline phosphatase, 358 +/- 197 U/L; amylase, 563 +/- 114 U/L; glutamate dehydrogenase, 7.5 +/- 2.5 U/L; total protein, 30.6 +/- 5.3 g/L; uric acid, 428 +/- 102 micromol/L; and bile acids, 43 +/- 18 micromol/L. These results provide reliable reference values for the clinical interpretation of hematologic and plasma biochemistry results for the species. PMID:25055626

  19. Quantification of Proteins Using Peptide Immunoaffinity Enrichment Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Matthew E.; Kuhn, Eric; Jackson, Angela; Anderson, N. Leigh; Pearson, Terry W.; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2011-01-01

    There is a great need for quantitative assays in measuring proteins. Traditional sandwich immunoassays, largely considered the gold standard in quantitation, are associated with a high cost, long lead time, and are fraught with drawbacks (e.g. heterophilic antibodies, autoantibody interference, 'hook-effect').1 An alternative technique is affinity enrichment of peptides coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry, commonly referred to as SISCAPA (Stable Isotope Standards and Capture by Anti-Peptide Antibodies).2 In this technique, affinity enrichment of peptides with stable isotope dilution and detection by selected/multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM/MRM-MS) provides quantitative measurement of peptides as surrogates for their respective proteins. SRM/MRM-MS is well established for accurate quantitation of small molecules 3, 4 and more recently has been adapted to measure the concentrations of proteins in plasma and cell lysates.5-7 To achieve quantitation of proteins, these larger molecules are digested to component peptides using an enzyme such as trypsin. One or more selected peptides whose sequence is unique to the target protein in that species (i.e. "proteotypic" peptides) are then enriched from the sample using anti-peptide antibodies and measured as quantitative stoichiometric surrogates for protein concentration in the sample. Hence, coupled to stable isotope dilution (SID) methods (i.e. a spiked-in stable isotope labeled peptide standard), SRM/MRM can be used to measure concentrations of proteotypic peptides as surrogates for quantification of proteins in complex biological matrices. The assays have several advantages compared to traditional immunoassays. The reagents are relatively less expensive to generate, the specificity for the analyte is excellent, the assays can be highly multiplexed, enrichment can be performed from neat plasma (no depletion required), and the technique is amenable to a wide array of proteins or modifications of interest.8-13 In this video we demonstrate the basic protocol as adapted to a magnetic bead platform. PMID:21841765

  20. Atypical lymphocytes and leukocytes in the peripheral circulation of caged hens.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Paul F

    2015-07-01

    Lymphocytes comprise a family of cells descended from bursa and thymus progenitors whose differentiation is not possible by standard hematology. However, if they are small with a nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio near 1, they are "resting" at least in the microscopic sense. Activation, increases their size, and decreases the nuclear:cytoplasmic (N:C) ratio. Reactive cells are infrequent in healthy animal blood. Their presence indicates an immune response in progress, inflammation, stress, or other pathology. Here the purpose is to describe unusual leukocytes and lymphocytes found in the periphery of commercial hens. Samples of Wright stained blood films obtained from commercial hens housed in modern cages are the data source. Photomicroscopy used an Olympus CX41 light microscope equipped with an Infinity-2 1.4 megapixel charge-coupled device (CCD) Universal Serial Bus (USB) 2.0 camera, at 100× (oil) magnification. Collectively these cells illustrate a continuum between mildly "reactive" to grossly "atypical" states. The description begins with normal resting cells, proceeds to mildly atypical, and concludes with grossly abnormal cells. Bone marrow cells, a source of plasmacytes, are included for comparison. Examples of circulating plasmacytes, large plasmacytoid lymphocytes (LPL), foam cells, and cells expressing properties of more than one lineage are included. The importance of these observations lies in their contribution to cytology, hematology, and immunology. Last, because of the wide use of heterophil:lymphocyte ratios (H:L) as a stress measure they bear directly the welfare issues of caged animals. When cells similar to the types described here are in blood, they indicate stress independent of H:L or other standard measures. PMID:26038581

  1. Physiological responses of broiler chickens to heat stress and dietary electrolyte balance (sodium plus potassium minus chloride, milliequivalents per kilogram).

    PubMed

    Borges, S A; Fischer da Silva, A V; Majorka, A; Hooge, D M; Cummings, K R

    2004-09-01

    Individually caged male Cobb broilers (24), 44 d of age, were used to evaluate effects of heat stress (1 d of data collection) and dietary electrolyte balance (DEB; Na + K - Cl, mEq/kg from 1 d of age). During summer rearing, mortality was variable, but DEB 240 improved growth, feed conversion ratio, water intake, and water:feed ratio vs. DEB 0. The temperature sequence for heat stress was 24 to 32 degrees C in 30 min, 32 to 36 degrees C in 30 min, 36 to 37 degrees C in 15 min, and 37 to 41 degrees C in 45 min. Maximum temperature was held for 15, 60, 90, or 360 min for data collection (relative humidity averaged 42 +/- 7%). Results from the same room before and after heat stress were analyzed by DEB (1-factor ANOVA) and before vs. after heat stress compared across DEB (2-sample t-test). Heat stress decreased blood Na, K, and pCO2, and lymphocytes but increased heterophils. Blood HCO3 rose, Cl declined, and hematocrit gave a concave pattern (lowest at DEB 120) as DEB increased. After heat stress, DEB 0 decreased blood Na and K, and DEB 0 and 120 levels decreased blood HCO3. After heat stress blood pCO2 and hemoglobin decreased with DEB 240, but it had highest pCO2, a key factor. The DEB 120 gave longest times to panting and prostration with DEB 0 and 240 results lower but similar statistically. In heat stress, DEB 360 was excessive, DEB 120 and 240 were favorable, and DEB 0 was intermediate based on hematology, panting, and prostration responses. PMID:15384907

  2. Gelatinase Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Endocarditis Caused by Enterococcus faecalis?

    PubMed Central

    Thurlow, Lance R.; Thomas, Vinai Chittezham; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Olson, Sally; Fleming, Sherry D.; Hancock, Lynn E.

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Enterococcus faecalis is a leading agent of nosocomial infections, including urinary tract infections, surgical site infections, and bacteremia. Among the infections caused by E. faecalis, endocarditis remains a serious clinical manifestation and unique in that it is commonly acquired in a community setting. Infective endocarditis is a complex disease, with many host and microbial components contributing to the formation of bacterial biofilm-like vegetations on the aortic valve and adjacent areas within the heart. In the current study, we compared the pathogenic potential of the vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis V583 and three isogenic protease mutants (?gelE, ?sprE, and ?gelE ?sprE mutants) in a rabbit model of enterococcal endocarditis. The bacterial burdens displayed by GelE? mutants (?gelE and ?gelE ?sprE mutants) in the heart were significantly lower than those of V583 or the SprE? mutant. Vegetations on the aortic valve infected with GelE? mutants (?gelE and ?gelE ?sprE mutants) also showed a significant increase in deposition of fibrinous matrix layer and increased chemotaxis of inflammatory cells. In support of a role for proteolytic modulation of the immune response to E. faecalis, we also demonstrate that GelE can cleave the anaphylatoxin complement C5a and that this proteolysis leads to decreased neutrophil migration in vitro. In vivo, a decreased heterophil (neutrophil-like cell) migration was observed at tissue sites infected with GelE-producing strains but not at those infected with SprE-producing strains. Taken together, these observations suggest that of the two enterococcal proteases, gelatinase is the principal mediator of pathogenesis in endocarditis. PMID:20713628

  3. Localization of neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) immunoreactivity in adult rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Filiz, S; Dalcik, H; Yardimoglu, M; Gonca, S; Ceylan, S

    2002-05-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) mediates homophilic adhesion between cells and heterophilic adhesion between cells and extracellular matrix in a Ca2+-independent manner. N-CAM is widely expressed during development and plays a crucial role in cell division, migration, and differentiation, but its expression is restricted in adults. The distribution of N-CAM immunoreactivity in adult rat tissues was investigated in the present study. N-CAM immunoreactivity was present in the nervous system in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, ependymal cells surrounding the central canal, axons of the white matter, and in Lamina X of the gray matter of the spinal cord. N-CAM immunoreactivity also was found in autonomic nerves. In the digestive system, N-CAM immunoreactivity was found in the stratified squamous epithelium and nerve plexus of the esophagus, glandular cells of the stomach and pylorus, lamina propria, and epithelium of the villi of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. N-CAM immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the secretory cells of the adenohypophysis, islets of Langerhans, and acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas. Alveolar cells of the lung were also N-CAM immunoreactive. In the urinary system, N-CAM immunoreactivity was seen in the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney. In the male reproductive system, N-CAM immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the nerve plexus around the urethral epithelium and in the nerve fibers around the smooth muscle cells of the corpus cavernosum penis. In the visual system, N-CAM immunoreactivity was seen in the epithelial cells of the corpus ciliaris. Cornea and lens epithelium also showed positive immunoreactivity. Our results suggest that cells in many tissues and organs of the adult rat synthesize N-CAM. PMID:12229933

  4. Variation with land use of immune function and prevalence of avian pox in Galapagos finches.

    PubMed

    Zylberberg, Maxine; Lee, Kelly A; Klasing, Kirk C; Wikelski, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Introduced disease has been implicated in recent wildlife extinctions and population declines worldwide. Both anthropogenic-induced change and natural environmental features can affect pathogen spread. Furthermore, environmental disturbance can result in changes in stress physiology, nutrition, and social structure, which in turn can suppress immune system function. However, it remains unknown whether landscape variation results in heterogeneity in host resistance to pathogens. Avian pox virus, a pathogen implicated in avian declines and extinctions in Hawaii, was introduced to the Galapagos in the 1890 s, and prevalence (total number of current infections) has increased recently in finches. We tested whether prevalence and recovery trends in 7 species of Galapagos finches varied by elevation or human land use. To do so, we used infection data obtained from 545 wild-caught birds. In addition, we determined whether annual changes in 4 aspects of innate immune function (complement protein activity, natural antibody activity, concentration of PIT54 protein, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio) varied by elevation or land use. Prevalence and recovery rates did not vary by elevation from 2008 to 2009. Avian pox prevalence and proportion of recovered individuals in undeveloped and urban areas did not change from 2008 to 2009. In agricultural areas, avian pox prevalence increased 8-fold (from 2% to 17% of 234 individuals sampled) and proportion of recovered individuals increased (11% to 19%) from 2008 to 2009. These results suggest high disease-related mortality. Variation in immune function across human land-use types correlated with variation in both increased prevalence and susceptibility, which indicates changes in innate immune function may underlie changes in disease susceptibility. Our results suggest anthropogenic disturbance, in particular agricultural practices, may underlie immunological changes in host species that themselves contribute to pathogen emergence. PMID:23082926

  5. Carotenoid-based bill and eye ring coloration as honest signals of condition: an experimental test in the red-legged partridge ( Alectoris rufa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Viñuela, Javier

    2008-09-01

    Carotenoid pigments cannot be synthesized by vertebrates but must be ingested through the diet. As they seem to be a limited resource, carotenoid-based ornaments are particularly interesting as possible honest signals of individual quality, in particular of foraging efficiency and nutritional status. Some studies have demonstrated the condition dependence of carotenoid-based plumage in birds. However, many other carotenoid-pigmented bare parts (i.e. skin, caruncles, bills, cere, and tarsi) are present in birds but, in comparison with plumage, little is known about these traits as indicators of individual quality. Here, we show that the eye ring pigmentation and bill redness of the red-legged partridge ( Alectoris rufa) are positively associated to body condition and recent changes in body mass. Also, we found a negative relationship between these two traits and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, an indicator of physiological stress (the relationship with bill redness being significant only for males). In an experiment, we found that after a period of reduction in food intake (with the consequent loss of body mass), food-restricted birds showed lower eye ring pigmentation than ad-libitum-fed birds. Therefore, different ornaments seem to reflect changes in body condition but at different speeds or intensities (eye ring, a fleshy ornament, appears to respond more rapidly to changes in the nutritional status than a keratinized structure as the bill). These results indicate that carotenoid-based ornaments are condition-dependent traits in the red-legged partridge, being therefore susceptible to be employed as honest signals of quality in sexual selection.

  6. Effects of radiation on the production of immunoglobulins in children subsequent to the Chernobyl disaster.

    PubMed

    Titov, L P; Kharitonic, G D; Gourmanchuk, I E; Ignatenko, S I

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the immediate and long-term effects of radiation on the B-system immunity of children who were affected by radiation after the Chernobyl disaster (from 1986-1992) are summarized in this paper. Complete clinical and immunological examination of more than 6000 children have been carried out. The dynamics of the immune system, with ongoing reactions of cell proliferation and differentiation, gene amplification, transcription, translation, biosynthesis and switching production of isotypes and subclasses of immunoglobulins, as well as specific and nonspecific (natural) antibodies, make it highly susceptible to the action of radiation in addition to other ecological factors. B-system of immunity (B-cel level, concentration of immunoglobulins-M, G, A, E; subclasses of IgG (IgG1-IgG4) in the serum and saliva, and the level of nonspecific heterophilic autoantibodies (RF, antithyroglobulin) were investigated in children of differing ages and sex living in the territories of the Republic of Belarus contaminated with radionuclides. Research showed decreased levels of B-cell and IgM and IgG isotopes 40-50 days after the disaster and increased levels of IgA immunoglobulins at that time. Long-term effects of low doses of radiation showed increased concentrations of IgM and IgG, correlating changes in the B-system of immunity with the level of 137Cs contamination in the territory of residence and also with the amount of 137Cs found in the children. PMID:8566726

  7. Immune status of free-ranging green turtles with fibropapillomatosis from Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.; Balazs, G.H.; Cray, C.; Chang, S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune status of free-ranging green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Hawaii (USA) with and without fibropapillornatosis (FP) were assessed. Tumored and non-tumored turtles from Kaneohe Bay (KB) on the island of Oahu and from FP-free areas on the west (Kona/Kohala) coast of the island of Hawaii were sampled from April 1998 through February 1999. Turtles on Oahu were grouped (0-3) for severity of tumors with 0 for absence of tumors, 1 for light, 2 for moderate, and 3 for most severe. Turtles were weighed, straight carapace length measured and the regression slope of weight to straight carapace length compared between groups (KB0, KB1, KB2, KB3, Kona). Blood was assayed for differential white blood cell count, hematocrit, in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation in the presence of concanavalin A (ConA) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), and protein electrophoresis. On Oahu, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio increased while eosinophil/monocyte ratio decreased with increasing tumors score. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation indices for ConA and PHA were significantly lower for turtles with tumor scores 2 and 3. Tumor score 3 turtles (KB3) had significantly lower hematocrit, total protein, alpha 1, alpha 2, and gamma globulins than the other four groups. No significant differences in immune status were seen between non-tumored (or KB1) turtles from Oahu and Hawaii. There was no significant difference between groups in regression slopes of body condition to carapace length. We conclude that turtles with severe FP are imunosuppressed. Furthermore, the lack of significant difference in immune status between non-tumored (and KB1) turtles from Oahu and Kona/Kohala indicates that immunosuppression may not be a prerequisite for development of FP.

  8. Immune status of free-ranging green turtles with fibropapillomatosis from Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Work, T M; Rameyer, R A; Balazs, G H; Cray, C; Chang, S P

    2001-07-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune status of free-ranging green turtles (Chelonia mydas) in Hawaii (USA) with and without fibropapillornatosis (FP) were assessed. Tumored and non-tumored turtles from Kaneohe Bay (KB) on the island of Oahu and from FP-free areas on the west (Kona/Kohala) coast of the island of Hawaii were sampled from April 1998 through February 1999. Turtles on Oahu were grouped (0-3) for severity of tumors with 0 for absence of tumors, 1 for light, 2 for moderate, and 3 for most severe. Turtles were weighed, straight carapace length measured and the regression slope of weight to straight carapace length compared between groups (KB0, KB1, KB2, KB3, Kona). Blood was assayed for differential white blood cell count, hematocrit, in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation in the presence of concanavalin A (ConA) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), and protein electrophoresis. On Oahu, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio increased while eosinophil/monocyte ratio decreased with increasing tumors score. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation indices for ConA and PHA were significantly lower for turtles with tumor scores 2 and 3. Tumor score 3 turtles (KB3) had significantly lower hematocrit, total protein, alpha 1, alpha 2, and gamma globulins than the other four groups. No significant differences in immune status were seen between non-tumored (or KB1) turtles from Oahu and Hawaii. There was no significant difference between groups in regression slopes of body condition to carapace length. We conclude that turtles with severe FP are imunosuppressed. Furthermore, the lack of significant difference in immune status between non-tumored (and KB1) turtles from Oahu and Kona/Kohala indicates that immunosuppression may not be a prerequisite for development of FP. PMID:11504232

  9. Evidence for a human-specific mechanism for diet and antibody-mediated inflammation in carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Maria; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Varki, Nissi M.; Varki, Ajit

    2008-01-01

    Patients with cancer have circulating heterophile antibodies that agglutinate animal red cells via recognition of the mammalian cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), which was long considered an oncofetal antigen in humans. However, humans are genetically deficient in Neu5Gc production and instead metabolically accumulate Neu5Gc from dietary sources, particularly red meats and milk products. Moreover, mice with a human-like defect showed no alternate pathway for Neu5Gc synthesis and even normal humans express anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. We show here that human tumors accumulate Neu5Gc that is covalently attached to multiple classes of glycans. The paradox of human tumor Neu5Gc accumulation in the face of circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies was hypothesized to be due to facilitation of tumor progression by the resulting low-grade chronic inflammation. Indeed, murine tumors expressing human-like levels of Neu5Gc show accelerated growth in syngeneic mice with a human-like Neu5Gc deficiency, coincident with the induction of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies and increased infiltration of inflammatory cells. Transfer of polyclonal monospecific syngeneic mouse anti-Neu5Gc serum also enhanced growth of transplanted syngeneic tumors bearing human-like levels of Neu5Gc, with tumors showing evidence for antibody deposition, enhanced angiogenesis and chronic inflammation. These effects were suppressed by a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, a drug type known to reduce human carcinoma risk. Finally, affinity-purified human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies also accelerate growth of Neu5Gc-containing tumors in Neu5Gc-deficient mice. Taken together, the data suggest that the human propensity to develop diet-related carcinomas is contributed to by local chronic inflammation, resulting from interaction of metabolically-accumulated dietary Neu5Gc with circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. PMID:19017806

  10. Antibody response to Epstein-Barr virus in infectious mononucleosis.

    PubMed Central

    Nikoskelainen, J; Hänninen, P

    1975-01-01

    Altogether 171 serum specimens from 58 patients with heterophil antibody-positive infectious monomucleosis were studied for antibody response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The sera were tested for fluorescent immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM gel-precipitating (GP) and complement-fixing (CF) antibodies to EBV. All 58 patients had IgG and IgM antibodies to EBV. Both IgG and IgM antibodies developed rapidly; the IgM antibodies disappeared within 8 to 10 weeks, whereas the IgG antibodies remained at an almost constant level. The development of IgG antibodies was so rapid that a fourfold or greater rise in titers was noted only in 22% of the patients. Both GP and CF antibodies to EBV (crude P3HR-1 Burkitt cell antigen) developed slowly; the mean titers kept rising for more than 12 weeks. The micro GP technique seemed to be more sensitive than the CF method, because 86% of the patients with infectious mononucleosis had GP antibodies compared with 72% having CF antibodies. In patients with infectious mononucleosis, a seroconversion or significant rise in GP antibodies was noted in 57%, whereas only 19% had a similar change in CF antibodies. The most promising of these antibody assays in the diagnosis of recent infections was the EBV-specific IgM antibody technique, which enables one to make the diagnosis on the basis of only one serum specimen. In cases where the acute-phase serum specimen is missing, the diagnosis can be made later by using the GP and CF techniques. Images PMID:163790

  11. Mycoplasma corogypsi associated polyarthritis and tenosynovitis in black vultures (Coragyps atratus)

    PubMed Central

    Van Wettere, A. J.; Ley, D. H.; Scott, D. E.; Buckanoff, H. D.; Degernes, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Three wild American black vultures (Coragyps atratus) were presented to rehabilitation centers with swelling of multiple joints, including elbows, stifles, hocks, and carpal joints, and of the gastrocnemius tendons. Cytological examination of the joint fluid exudate indicated heterophilic arthritis. Radiographic examination in 2 vultures demonstrated periarticular soft tissue swelling in both birds and irregular articular surfaces with subchondral bone erosion in both elbows in 1 bird. Prolonged antibiotic therapy administered in 2 birds did not improve the clinical signs. Necropsy and histological examination demonstrated a chronic lymphoplasmacytic arthritis involving multiple joints and gastrocnemius tenosynovitis. Articular lesions varied in severity and ranged from moderate synovitis and cartilage erosion and fibrillation to severe synovitis, diffuse cartilage ulceration, subchondral bone loss and/or sclerosis, pannus, synovial cysts, and epiphyseal osteomyelitis. No walled bacteria were observed or isolated from the joints. However, mycoplasmas polymerase chain reactions were positive in at least 1 affected joint from each bird. Mycoplasmas were isolated from joints of 1 vulture that did not receive antibiotic therapy. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from joint samples and the mycoplasma isolate identified Mycoplasma corogypsi in 2 vultures and was suggestive in the third vulture. Mycoplasma corogypsi identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of mycoplasma isolates. This report provides further evidence that M. corogypsi is a likely cause of arthritis and tenosynovitis in American black vultures. Cases of arthritis and tenosynovitis in New World vultures should be investigated for presence of Mycoplasma spp, especially M. corogypsi. PMID:22903399

  12. How salinity and temperature combine to affect physiological state and performance in red knots with contrasting non-breeding environments.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Jorge S; Soriano-Redondo, Andrea; Dekinga, Anne; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Masero, José A; Piersma, Theunis

    2015-08-01

    Migratory shorebirds inhabit environments that may yield contrasting salinity-temperature regimes-with widely varying osmoregulatory demands, even within a given species-and the question is: by which physiological means and at which organisational level do they show adjustments with respect to these demands? Red knots Calidris canutus winter in coastal areas over a range of latitudes. The nominal subspecies winters in salty areas in the tropics, whereas the subspecies Calidris canutus islandica winters in north-temperate regions of comparatively lower salinities and temperatures. In this study, both subspecies of red knot were acclimated to different salinity (28/40 ‰)-temperature (5/35 °C) combinations for 2-week periods. We then measured food/salt intakes, basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass and temperature, fat and salt gland scores, gizzard mass, heat-shock proteins, heterophils/lymphocytes (H/L) ratio and plasma Na(+) to assess the responses of each taxon to osmoregulatory challenges. High salinity (HS)-warm-acclimated birds reduced food/salt intake, BMR, body mass, fat score and gizzard mass, showing that salt/heat loads constrained energy acquisition rates. Higher salt gland scores in saltier treatments indicated that its size was adjusted to higher osmoregulatory demands. Elevated plasma Na(+) and H/L ratio in high-salinity-warm-acclimated birds indicated that salt/heat loads might have a direct effect on the water-salt balance and stress responses of red knots. Subspecies had little or no effect on most measured parameters, suggesting that most adjustments reflect phenotypic flexibility rather than subspecific adaptations. Our results demonstrate how salinity and temperature affect various phenotypic traits in a migrant shorebird, highlighting the importance of considering these factors jointly when evaluating the environmental tolerances of air-breathing marine taxa. PMID:25851406

  13. Does Exurban Housing Development Affect the Physiological Condition of Forest-Breeding Songbirds? A Case Study of Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus) in the Largest Protected Area in the Contiguous United States.

    PubMed

    Seewagen, Chad L; Glennon, Michale; Smith, Susan B

    2015-01-01

    Exurban development (low-density development in rural areas) can significantly alter wildlife community composition, but it is largely unknown whether it also affects wildlife at the individual level. We investigated individual-level impacts of exurban development in New York State's Adirondack Park by comparing the physiological condition of 62 male ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus) breeding in forests with low-density housing development with those in contiguous forests. We used hematocrit (HCT) volume and plasma triglyceride (TRIG) levels to compare energetic condition, plasma uric acid (UA) and total plasma protein (TPP) levels to compare diet quality, and heterophil?lymphocyte ratios (H?L) to compare chronic stress. HCT was the only parameter to differ, with birds near houses exhibiting lower values. The comparable TRIG, UA, and TPP that we found between treatment types suggest that ovenbird food quality and availability are unaffected by exurban development in our study area. Similar H?L suggests that homeowner activities do not significantly change chronic stressors faced by breeding male ovenbirds. We also found no difference in body mass, body size, or age ratio to indicate that habitats in either treatment type were in higher demand or more difficult to acquire. Although our results suggest that exurban development does not reduce habitat quality for male ovenbirds in a way that affects their condition, we caution that it may still ultimately reduce fitness by attracting synanthropic predators. Further work is needed to better understand the impacts of exurban development on wildlife at all levels and provide science-based information needed to meet conservation challenges in rapidly developing exurban areas. PMID:26052638

  14. Matrix Intensification Affects Body and Physiological Condition of Tropical Forest-Dependent Passerines

    PubMed Central

    Deikumah, Justus P.; McAlpine, Clive A.; Maron, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Matrix land-use intensification is a relatively recent and novel landscape change that can have important influences on the biota within adjacent habitat patches. While there are immediate local changes that it brings about, the influences on individual animals occupying adjacent habitats may be less evident initially. High-intensity land use could induce chronic stress in individuals in nearby remnants, leading ultimately to population declines. We investigated how physiological indicators and body condition measures of tropical forest-dependent birds differ between forest adjacent to surface mining sites and that near farmlands at two distances from remnant edge in southwest Ghana. We used mixed effects models of several condition indices including residual body mass and heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratios (an indicator of elevated chronic stress) to explore the effect of matrix intensity on forest-dependent passerines classed as either sedentary area-sensitive habitat specialists or nomadic generalists. Individual birds occupying tropical forest remnants near surface mining sites were in poorer condition, as indicated by lower residual body mass and elevated chronic stress, compared to those in remnants near agricultural lands. The condition of the sedentary forest habitat specialists white-tailed alethe, Alethe diademata and western olive sunbird, Cyanomitra obscura was most negatively affected by high-intensity surface mining land-use adjacent to remnants, whereas generalist species were not affected. Land use intensification may set in train a new trajectory of faunal relaxation beyond that expected based on habitat loss alone. Patterns of individual condition may be useful in identifying habitats where species population declines may occur before faunal relaxation has concluded. PMID:26107179

  15. Acute inflammatory response to cowpox virus infection of the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, T N; Sechler, J M; Palumbo, G J; Albert, J; Khairallah, L H; Buller, R M

    1992-04-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane was used to study the acute inflammatory response in the absence of contributions from the immune system. In preliminary experiments, lesions of wild-type cowpox virus strain Brighton (CPV-BR) and a 38K gene deletion mutant of CPV-BR (CPV-BR.D1) were compared with vaccinia virus (strains WR and Copenhagen), fowlpox virus, laryngotracheitis virus, and infectious tenosynovitis virus, and were ranked for degree of induced inflammation. The maximal and minimal inflammatory responses were observed with CPV-BR.D1 and CPV-BR viruses, respectively. CPV-BR.D1 lacks a 38K gene which encodes an anti-inflammatory 38-kDa protein that has homology to SERPINs. The kinetics and character of the inflammatory response were examined further in the wild-type CPV-BR and mutant CPV-BR.D1 infections using cell counts, electron microscopy, and assays for inflammatory cell activation. CPV-BR virus infection rapidly spread through the ectoderm, uniformly infecting all cells with the production of large amounts of virions and viral-induced cytopathic effect, but evoking little or no inflammatory response until 144 hr p.i. The CPV-BR.D1 infection, on the other hand, was rapidly contained by a dexamethasone-sensitive inflammatory response mainly of activated heterophils which was advanced by 36 hr p.i. Both infections resulted in disseminated disease with similar numbers of liver lesions and only a slight difference in the LD50, with the CPV-BR.D1 values being higher than that for CPV-BR virus. In this model, the acute inflammatory response alone is unable to prevent disseminated disease and associated mortality. PMID:1312273

  16. Feeding a diet contaminated with ochratoxin A for chickens at the maximum level recommended by the EU for poultry feeds (0.1 mg/kg). 1. Effects on growth and slaughter performance, haematological and serum traits.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, L; Salamano, G; Mellia, E; Gennero, M S; Doglione, L; Cavallarin, L; Tarantola, M; Forneris, G; Schiavone, A

    2013-05-01

    The European Commission Recommendation 2006/576/EC, suggests that the maximum level of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in poultry feeds should be set at 0.1 mg OTA/kg. Thirty-six one-day-old male Hubburd broiler chickens were divided into two groups, a Control (basal diet) and an Ochratoxin A (basal diet + 0.1 mg OTA/kg) group. The growth and slaughter performance traits were recorded. The liver, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and thymus weights were measured. The erythrocyte and leukocyte numbers were assayed in blood samples, and the heterophils to lymphocytes (H/L) ratio was determined. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), lysozyme, the total protein and the electrophoretic pattern were evaluated in serum samples. Liver enzymes (alanino aminotransferase, ALT and aspartate aminotransferase, AST) and kidney function parameters (uric acid and creatinine) were quantified. The results revealed that feeding a 0.1 mg OTA/kg contaminated diet to chicks caused a decrease in the absolute thymus weight (p < 0.05) and a lower total protein (p < 0.01), albumin (p < 0.01), alpha (p < 0.05), beta (p = 0.001) and gamma (p = 0.001) globulins serum concentration in the Ochratoxin A group. Moreover, the albumin-to-globulin (A/G) ratio of the OTA-treated animals resulted to be higher (p < 0.05). Feeding broiler chickens, a diet contaminated with the maximum level admitted by the European Commission Recommendation (0.1 mg OTA/kg), did not affect the animal performance, slaughter traits, organ weights, haematological parameters, liver enzyme or renal function parameters concentrations but had an overall immunosuppressant effect, with reduction in the thymus weight and of the total serum protein, albumin, alpha, beta and gamma globulins concentration. PMID:23639013

  17. Pathogenicity of frog virus 3-like virus in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) at two environmental temperatures.

    PubMed

    Allender, M C; Mitchell, M A; Torres, T; Sekowska, J; Driskell, E A

    2013-01-01

    Ranaviral disease has affected several species of reptiles, but disease progression and mortality in relation to environmental temperature has yet to be determined. In this study, two separate trials challenged adult female red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) with a ranavirus (frog virus 3-like virus; FV3) isolate at environmental temperatures of 22 °C (n = 4) and 28 °C (n = 4). The mortality rates in the turtles in the 22 °C and 28 °C trials were 100% and 50%, respectively. Median survival time for turtles exposed to FV3 at 22 °C was 24 days, while it was 30 days in the group kept at 28 °C. Consistent microscopical lesions were observed only in the group inoculated at 22 °C and included fibrinoid necrosis of vessels in the spleen, vascular and sinusoidal thrombi in the liver, necrotizing myositis and a mild heterophilic interstitial pneumonia. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction, targeting a conserved portion of the major capsid protein, was able to detect virus copies in whole blood, oral and cloacal swabs, tongue, skeletal muscle, lung, heart, liver, spleen, ovary and kidney. Viral copy number in ante-mortem clinical samples was non-significantly highest in whole blood, while kidney had the highest viral copy number in post-mortem samples. All samples had higher virus copy number in turtles exposed to FV3 at 22 °C compared with 28 °C. This study determined that environmental temperature affects the survival and disease progression in ranavirus-infected red-eared slider turtles, which will aid in managing animals in a clinical or free-ranging setting. PMID:23582975

  18. Dominant Negative Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL) Receptor 4 on TRAIL Receptor 1 Signaling by Formation of Heteromeric Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Simon; Hasenauer, Jan; Pollak, Nadine; Scheurich, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The cytokine TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its cell membrane receptors constitute an elaborate signaling system fulfilling important functions in immune regulation and tumor surveillance. Activation of the death receptors TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 can lead to apoptosis, whereas TRAILR3 and TRAILR4 are generally referred to as decoy receptors, which have been shown to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Alike other members of the TNF receptor superfamily, TRAIL receptors contain a pre-ligand binding assembly domain (PLAD) mediating receptor oligomerization. Still, the stoichiometry of TRAIL receptor oligomers as well as the issue of whether the PLAD mediates only homotypic or also heterotypic interactions remained inconclusive until now. Performing acceptor-photobleaching FRET studies with receptors 1, 2, and 4, we demonstrate interactions in all possible combinations. Formation of dimers was shown by chemical cross-linking experiments for interactions of TRAILR2 and heterophilic interactions between the two death receptors or between either of the death receptors and TRAILR4. Implications of the demonstrated receptor-receptor interactions on signaling were investigated in suitable cellular models. Both apoptosis induction and activation of the transcription factor NF?B were significantly reduced in the presence of TRAILR4. Our experimental data combined with mathematical modeling show that the inhibitory capacity of TRAILR4 is attributable to signaling-independent mechanisms, strongly suggesting a reduction of signaling competent death receptors through formation heteromeric receptor complexes. In summary, we propose a model of TRAIL receptor interference driven by PLAD-mediated formation of receptor heterodimers on the cell membrane. PMID:24764293

  19. Is oxidative status influenced by dietary carotenoid and physical activity after moult in the great tit (Parus major)?

    PubMed

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Decencière, Beatriz; Perret, Samuel; Karadas, Filiz; Meylan, Sandrine; Biard, Clotilde

    2015-07-01

    In the context of sexual and natural selection, an allocation trade-off for carotenoid pigments may exist because of their obligate dietary origin and their role both in the antioxidant and immune systems and in the production of coloured signals in various taxa, particularly birds. When birds have expended large amounts of carotenoids to feather growth such as after autumn moult, bird health and oxidative status might be more constrained. We tested this hypothesis in a bird species with carotenoid-based plumage colour, by manipulating dietary carotenoids and physical activity, which can decrease antioxidant capacity and increase reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) concentration. Great tits were captured after moult and kept in aviaries, under three treatments: physical handicap and dietary supplementation with carotenoids, physical handicap and control diet, and no handicap and control diet. We measured plasma composition (antioxidant capacity, ROM concentration, and vitamin A, vitamin E and total carotenoid concentrations), immune system activation (blood sedimentation) and stress response (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio) and predicted that handicap treatment should influence these negatively and carotenoid supplementation positively. Coloration of yellow feathers was also measured. Carotenoid supplementation increased total plasma carotenoid concentration, decreased feather carotenoid chroma and marginally increased ROM concentration. Handicap increased blood sedimentation only in males but had no clear influence on oxidative stress, which contradicted previous studies. Further studies are needed to investigate how physical activity and carotenoid availability might interact and influence oxidative stress outside the moult period, and their combined potential influence on attractiveness and reproductive investment later during the breeding season. PMID:25964421

  20. Mechanism of Fc? receptor-mediated trogocytosis-based false-positive results in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Sakiko; Iwasaki, Sari; Tomaru, Utano; Sato, Juri; Kawakami, Ai; Ichijo, Kana; Sogo, Sayuri; Baba, Tomohisa; Katsumata, Kazuaki; Kasahara, Masanori; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The whole blood erythrocyte lysis method is the most common protocol of sample preparation for flow cytometry (FCM). Although this method has many virtues, our recent study has demonstrated false-positive results when surface markers of monocytes were examined by this method due to the phenomenon called Fc? receptor (Fc?R)-mediated trogocytosis. In the present study, similar Fc?R-mediated trogocytosis-based false-positive results have been demonstrated when granulocytes were focused on instead of monocytes. These findings indicated that not only monocytes but also granulocytes, the largest population with Fc?R expression in peripheral blood, could perform Fc?R-mediated trogocytosis. Since the capacity of Fc?R-mediated trogocytosis was different among blood samples, identification of factors that could regulate the occurrence of Fc?R-mediated trogocytosis should be important for the quality control of FCM. Our studies have suggested that such factors are present in the serum. In order to identify the serum factors, we employed the in vitro model of Fc?R-mediated trogocytosis using granulocytes. Investigation with this model determined the serum factors as heat-labile molecules with molecular weight of more than 100 kDa. Complements in the classical pathway were initially assumed as candidates; however, the C1 inhibitor did not yield an obvious influence on Fc?R-mediated trogocytosis. On the other hand, although immunoglobulin ought to be resistant to heat inactivation, the inhibitor of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) effectively blocked Fc?R-mediated trogocytosis. Moreover, the inhibition rates were significantly higher in HAMA(high) serum than HAMA(low) serum. The collective findings suggested the involvement of heterophilic antibodies such as HAMA in the mechanism of false-positive results in FCM due to Fc?R-mediated trogocytosis. PMID:23300821

  1. West Nile virus in raptors from Virginia during 2003: clinical, diagnostic, and epidemiologic findings.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Priscilla H; Kelly, Sean; Shreve, Allison A; Snead, Sarah E; Sleeman, Jonathan M; Pettit, Denise A

    2006-04-01

    Sixty-one birds of prey admitted to The Wildlife Center of Virginia (WCV; Waynesboro, Virginia, USA) from June to November 2003 were tested for West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Choanal and/or cloacal swabs were obtained and submitted to Virginia's Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services (Richmond, Virginia, USA) for analysis with real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Forty birds of prey were positive for WNV by RT-PCR. Five avian families and nine species of raptors were represented, with great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) most frequently affected. Presenting clinical signs were consistent with previous reports of WNV infection in raptors; however, these differed between species. Of WNV positive birds, nonspecific signs of illness were the most common clinical findings, particularly in red-tailed hawks; signs included dehydration (n = 20), emaciation (n = 18), and depression (n = 15). Neurologic abnormalities were frequently identified, especially in great horned owls, and included head tremors (n = 17), ataxia (n = 13), head incoordination (n = 7), torticollis (n = 3), nystagmus (n = 3), and head tilt (n = 3). Great horned owls exhibited anemia and leukocytosis with heterophilia, eosinophilia, and monocytosis consistent with chronic inflammation. Red-tailed hawks were anemic with a heterophilic leukocytosis and regenerative left shift. The majority of WNV cases occurred during August and September; there was a marked increase in the number of raptors admitted to WCV during these months followed by a marked decrease during October, November, and December. This pattern differed from mean monthly admissions during the previous 10 years and suggests a negative impact on local raptor populations. The effects of WNV on avian populations are largely unknown; however, because of their ecological importance, further investigation of the effects of WNV on raptor populations is warranted. PMID:16870856

  2. Insights on the host stress, fear and growth responses to the deoxynivalenol feed contaminant in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, Khaled; Awad, Wageha A; Sid-Ahmed, Omer E; Böhm, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins pose an important danger to human and animal health. Poultry feeds are frequently contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin. It is thus of great importance to evaluate the effects of DON on the welfare related parameters in poultry industry. In the present study, the effects of contamination of broiler diet with 10 mg DON/kg feed on plasma corticosterone and heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio as indicators of stress, tonic immobility duration as an index for fear response and growth performance of broiler chickens were studied. In addition, the effect of a microbial feed additive either alone or in combination with DON contamination on these different aspects was also evaluated. The results showed that DON feeding significantly affected the welfare related parameters of broiler chickens. The feeding of DON contaminated diet resulted in an elevation of plasma corticosterone, higher H/L ratio and increased the fear levels as indicated by longer duration of tonic immobility reaction. Furthermore, DON reduced the body weight and body weight gain during the starter phase definitely at the second and third week. However, during grower phase, feeding of DON decreased the body weight at the fourth week and reduced the body gain at the fifth week. Addition of the microbial feed additive, a commercial antidote for DON mycotoxin, was able to overcome DON effects on stress index (H/L ratio), fearfulness and growth parameters of broilers. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that the DON feeding increased the underlying fearfulness and physiological stress responses of broilers and resulted in a reduction in the welfare status as indicated by higher plasma corticosterone, higher H/L ratio and higher fearfulness. Additionally, feeding the microbial feed additive was effective in reducing the adverse effects of DON on the bird's welfare and can improve the performance of broiler chickens. PMID:24498179

  3. Insights on the Host Stress, Fear and Growth Responses to the Deoxynivalenol Feed Contaminant in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ghareeb, Khaled; Awad, Wageha A.; Sid-Ahmed, Omer E.; Böhm, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins pose an important danger to human and animal health. Poultry feeds are frequently contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin. It is thus of great importance to evaluate the effects of DON on the welfare related parameters in poultry industry. In the present study, the effects of contamination of broiler diet with 10 mg DON/kg feed on plasma corticosterone and heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio as indicators of stress, tonic immobility duration as an index for fear response and growth performance of broiler chickens were studied. In addition, the effect of a microbial feed additive either alone or in combination with DON contamination on these different aspects was also evaluated. The results showed that DON feeding significantly affected the welfare related parameters of broiler chickens. The feeding of DON contaminated diet resulted in an elevation of plasma corticosterone, higher H/L ratio and increased the fear levels as indicated by longer duration of tonic immobility reaction. Furthermore, DON reduced the body weight and body weight gain during the starter phase definitely at the second and third week. However, during grower phase, feeding of DON decreased the body weight at the fourth week and reduced the body gain at the fifth week. Addition of the microbial feed additive, a commercial antidote for DON mycotoxin, was able to overcome DON effects on stress index (H/L ratio), fearfulness and growth parameters of broilers. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that the DON feeding increased the underlying fearfulness and physiological stress responses of broilers and resulted in a reduction in the welfare status as indicated by higher plasma corticosterone, higher H/L ratio and higher fearfulness. Additionally, feeding the microbial feed additive was effective in reducing the adverse effects of DON on the bird's welfare and can improve the performance of broiler chickens. PMID:24498179

  4. Neonatal handling of Amazon parrots alters the stress response and immune function.

    PubMed

    Collette; Millam; Klasing; Wakenell

    2000-03-01

    The influence of neonatal handling on behavior and immune function was assessed in Orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica). Chicks (n=11) were gently handled daily from 25 days of age until 38 days post-fledging, while control chicks (n=9) were not handled. At 10 days post-fledging ( approximately 66 days of age), chicks were given tests to evaluate tameness (e.g., willingness to perch on an offered finger). They were then restrained for 10 min, either by being held while perching (handled group) or, because they would not perch, by being restrained in a towel (nonhandled group). Serum corticosterone levels were measured and immune status was assessed by: the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to phytohemagglutinin-P (PH-P) injection; the humoral response to a killed Newcastle disease virus (NDV) challenge; and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio (H:L). Handled chicks were tamer by all measures of tameness. DTH was greater in nonhandled chicks (P

  5. A Key Role for Nectin-1 in the Ventral Hippocampus in Contextual Fear Memory

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Jocelyn; Krummenacher, Claude; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Nectins are cell adhesion molecules that are widely expressed in the brain. Nectin expression shows a dynamic spatiotemporal regulation, playing a role in neural migratory processes during development. Nectin-1 and nectin-3 and their heterophilic trans-interactions are important for the proper formation of synapses. In the hippocampus, nectin-1 and nectin-3 localize at puncta adherentia junctions and may play a role in synaptic plasticity, a mechanism essential for memory and learning. We evaluated the potential involvement of nectin-1 and nectin-3 in memory consolidation using an emotional learning paradigm. Rats trained for contextual fear conditioning showed transient nectin-1—but not nectin-3—protein upregulation in synapse-enriched hippocampal fractions at about 2 h posttraining. The upregulation of nectin-1 was found exclusively in the ventral hippocampus and was apparent in the synaptoneurosomal fraction. This upregulation was induced by contextual fear conditioning but not by exposure to context or shock alone. When an antibody against nectin-1, R165, was infused in the ventral-hippocampus immediately after training, contextual fear memory was impaired. However, treatment with the antibody in the dorsal hippocampus had no effect in contextual fear memory formation. Similarly, treatment with the antibody in the ventral hippocampus did not interfere with acoustic memory formation. Further control experiments indicated that the effects of ventral hippocampal infusion of the nectin-1 antibody in contextual fear memory cannot be ascribed to memory non-specific effects such as changes in anxiety-like behavior or locomotor behavior. Therefore, we conclude that nectin-1 recruitment to the perisynaptic environment in the ventral hippocampus plays an important role in the formation of contextual fear memories. Our results suggest that these mechanisms could be involved in the connection of emotional and contextual information processed in the amygdala and dorsal hippocampus, respectively, thus opening new venues for the development of treatments to psychopathological alterations linked to impaired contextualization of emotions. PMID:23418609

  6. Periodic usage of low-protein methionine-fortified diets in broiler chickens under high ambient temperature conditions: effects on performance, slaughter traits, leukocyte profiles and antibody response.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Ghasemi, Rohollah; Torki, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of adding methionine supplements to low-protein diets and subsequent re-feeding with a normal diet on the productive performance, slaughter parameters, leukocyte profiles and antibody response in broiler chickens reared under heat stress conditions.During the whole experimental period (6-49 days), the birds were raised in battery cages located in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. A total of 360 6-day-old male chickens were divided into six treatments in six replicates with ten chicks each. Six isoenergetic diets, with similar total sulfur amino acids levels, were formulated to provide 100 and 100 (control), 85 and 100 (85S), 70 and 100 (70S), 85 and 85 (85SG), 70 and 85 (70S85G), and 70 and 70% (70SG) of National Research Council recommended levels for crude protein during the starter (6-21 day) and grower (22-42 day) periods, respectively. Subsequently, all groups received a diet containing the same nutrients during the finisher period (43-49 day). The results showed that, under heat stress conditions, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio and performance index from day 6 to 49, breast and thigh yields and antibody titer against Newcastle disease in the birds fed diets 85S, 70S and 85SG were similar to those of birds fed control diet, whereas feeding diets 70S85G and 70SG significantly decreased the values of above-mentioned parameters. Additionally, diets 85S, 70S and 85SG significantly decreased mortality rate and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio compared with the control diet. In conclusion, the results indicate that supplementation of methionine to diets 85S, 70S and 85SG, and then re-feeding with a conventional diet is an effective tool to maintain productive performance and to improve health indices and heat resistance in broilers under high ambient temperature conditions. PMID:24122339

  7. Pathology and Pathophysiology of Inhalational Anthrax in a Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Savransky, Vladimir; Sanford, Daniel C.; Syar, Emily; Austin, Jamie L.; Tordoff, Kevin P.; Anderson, Michael S.; Stark, Gregory V.; Barnewall, Roy E.; Briscoe, Crystal M.; Lemiale-Biérinx, Laurence; Park, Sukjoon; Ionin, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) and rabbits are the animal models most commonly used to evaluate the efficacy of medical countermeasures against anthrax in support of licensure under the FDA's “Animal Rule.” However, a need for an alternative animal model may arise in certain cases. The development of such an alternative model requires a thorough understanding of the course and manifestation of experimental anthrax disease induced under controlled conditions in the proposed animal species. The guinea pig, which has been used extensively for anthrax pathogenesis studies and anthrax vaccine potency testing, is a good candidate for such an alternative model. This study was aimed at determining the median lethal dose (LD50) of the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain in guinea pigs and investigating the natural history, pathophysiology, and pathology of inhalational anthrax in this animal model following nose-only aerosol exposure. The inhaled LD50 of aerosolized Ames strain spores in guinea pigs was determined to be 5.0 × 104 spores. Aerosol challenge of guinea pigs resulted in inhalational anthrax with death occurring between 46 and 71 h postchallenge. The first clinical signs appeared as early as 36 h postchallenge. Cardiovascular function declined starting at 20 h postexposure. Hematogenous dissemination of bacteria was observed microscopically in multiple organs and tissues as early as 24 h postchallenge. Other histopathologic findings typical of disseminated anthrax included suppurative (heterophilic) inflammation, edema, fibrin, necrosis, and/or hemorrhage in the spleen, lungs, and regional lymph nodes and lymphocyte depletion and/or lymphocytolysis in the spleen and lymph nodes. This study demonstrated that the course of inhalational anthrax disease and the resulting pathology in guinea pigs are similar to those seen in rabbits and NHPs, as well as in humans. PMID:23357384

  8. Immune response to an endotoxin challenge involves multiple immune parameters and is consistent among the annual-cycle stages of a free-living temperate zone bird.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Arne; Matson, Kevin D; Versteegh, Maaike A; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Tieleman, B Irene

    2013-07-15

    Trade-offs between immune function and other physiological and behavioural processes are central in ecoimmunology, but one important problem is how to distinguish a reallocation of resources away from the immune system from a reallocation or redistribution within the immune system. While variation in baseline values of individual immune parameters is well established, studies in wild animals on multiple parameters during an immune response are lacking. It also remains to be tested whether and how immune responses correlate with baseline values that vary, for example, over the course of an annual cycle. We studied immunological responses to an endotoxin challenge in skylarks (Alauda arvensis), a partial migrant bird breeding in temperate zones. We compared birds injected with the endotoxin LPS with un-injected controls, characterizing immunological responses with leukocyte profiles, titres of lytic enzymes and natural antibodies, and concentrations of haptoglobin and heat shock proteins. We did this in five annual-cycle stages to test whether the response varied throughout the year. The endotoxin challenge affected six of 10 measured parameters. Lysis titres and proportions of heterophils increased; haptoglobin concentrations and proportions of lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils decreased. The variable effects on different immune components demonstrate the complexity of an immune response. We found no evidence that the response differed between annual-cycle stages. The response was independent of baseline measures taken directly upon capture in the field, indicating that birds were facing no immunological ceiling when mounting an immune response. Values of five parameters collected under field conditions were significantly related to values taken under standardized laboratory conditions. We conclude that multiple parts of the immune system are modulated during an immunological response and that responses are not re-organized throughout the annual cycle. PMID:23531817

  9. Effects of double ligation of Stensen's duct on the rabbit parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Maria, O M; Maria, S M; Redman, R S; Maria, A M; Saad El-Din, T A; Soussa, E F; Tran, S D

    2014-04-01

    Salivary gland duct ligation is an alternative to gland excision for treating sialorrhea or reducing salivary gland size prior to tumor excision. Duct ligation also is used as an approach to study salivary gland aging, regeneration, radiotherapy, sialolithiasis and sialadenitis. Reports conflict about the contribution of each salivary cell population to gland size reduction after ductal ligation. Certain cell populations, especially acini, reportedly undergo atrophy, apoptosis and proliferation during reduction of gland size. Acini also have been reported to de-differentiate into ducts. These contradictory results have been attributed to different animal or salivary gland models, or to methods of ligation. We report here a bilateral double ligature technique for rabbit parotid glands with histologic observations at 1, 7, 14, 30, 60 days after ligation. A large battery of special stains and immunohistochemical procedures was employed to define the cell populations. Four stages with overlapping features were observed that led to progressive shutdown of gland activities: 1) marked atrophy of the acinar cells occurred by 14 days, 2) response to and removal of the secretory material trapped in the acinar and ductal lumens mainly between 30 and 60 days, 3) reduction in the number of parenchymal (mostly acinar) cells by apoptosis that occurred mainly between 14-30 days, and 4) maintenance of steady-state at 60 days with a low rate of fluid, protein, and glycoprotein secretion, which greatly decreased the number of leukocytes engaged in the removal of the luminal contents. The main post- ligation characteristics were dilation of ductal and acinar lumens, massive transient infiltration of mostly heterophils (rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes), acinar atrophy, and apoptosis of both acinar and ductal cells. Proliferation was uncommon except in the larger ducts. By 30 days, the distribution of myoepithelial cells had spread from exclusively investing the intercalated ducts pre-ligation to surrounding a majority of the residual duct-like structures, many of which clearly were atrophic acini. Thus, both atrophy and apoptosis made major contributions to the post-ligation reduction in gland size. Structures also occurred with both ductal and acinar markers that suggested acini differentiating into ducts. Overall, the reaction to duct ligation proceeded at a considerably slower pace in the rabbit parotid glands than has been reported for the salivary glands of the rat. PMID:24053197

  10. Dietary vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol acetate) and selenium supplementation from different sources: performance, ascites-related variables and antioxidant status in broilers reared at low and optimum temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, S; Malayo?lu, H Basmacio?lu; Yalçin, S; Karadas, F; Koçtürk, S; Cabuk, M; Oktay, G; Ozdemir, S; Ozdemir, E; Ergül, M

    2007-10-01

    1. This study compared the effect of dietary supplementation with organic or inorganic selenium (Se) sources plus control amounts or large amounts of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol acetate) in broilers raised at control (20 to 24 degrees C) or low (14.5 to 16.8 degrees C) temperatures after 2 weeks of age. 2. The following dietary treatments were used from one day old. Diet 1, the control diet, comprised a commercial diet containing 0.15 mg/kg inorganic Se and 50 mg vitamin E/kg feed. Diet 2 was the same as diet 1, supplemented with 0.15 mg/kg inorganic Se. Diet 3 was the same as diet 2 but was supplemented with 200 mg/kg vitamin E. Diet 4 was the same as diet 1, but inorganic Se was replaced with 0.30 mg/kg organic Se. Diet 5 was the same as diet 4, supplemented with 200 mg/kg vitamin E. 3. Low temperature reduced the growth rate of broilers; however, at 6 weeks, there were no differences in the body weights of birds fed on organic Se supplemented diets housed at low or control temperature. The feed conversion ratio was significantly affected by low temperature but not by diet. The heterophil/lymphocyte ratio was higher in chicks after one week in the cold, indicating mild stress. Blood triiodothyronine levels were significantly higher in birds after 1 and 4 weeks in the cold but thyroxin was not affected. 4. Organic Se supplementation increased relative lung weight at the control temperature, which might lead to greater respiratory capacity. Relative spleen weight significantly decreased in broilers fed diets supplemented with inorganic Se under cold conditions, a possible indication of chronic oxidative stress. 5. At the low temperature, supplementation with organic Se alone, or with inorganic Se and vitamin E increased glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activity and glutathione (GSH) concentration in the liver of broilers, which may indicate increased activity of birds' antioxidant defence against suboptimal environments. PMID:17952730

  11. Effects of dietary selenium and vitamin E on immune response and biological blood parameters of broilers reared under thermoneutral or heat stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibian, Mahmood; Ghazi, Shahab; Moeini, Mohammad Mehdi; Abdolmohammadi, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    A study was conducted using 360 broiler chickens to evaluate the effects of dietary vitamin E (0, 125 and 250 mg/kg), selenium (Se, 0, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg), or their different combinations on immune response and blood biological parameters of broilers raised under either thermoneutral (TN, 23.9 °C constant) or heat stress (HS, 23.9 to 37 °C cycling) conditions. Humoral immunity was assessed by intravenous injection of 7 % sheep red blood cell (SRBC) followed by evaluation of serum for antibody titers in primary and secondary responses. Heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio also determined as an indicator of stress. Furthermore, at the end of the experiment, birds were bled for determination of some biological parameters. There was a significant reduction in body weight and feed intake, but the feed conversion ratio increased when the birds were exposed to HS ( P < 0.05). Body weight and feed intake were not influenced significantly by dietary vitamin E and Se ( P > 0.05), whereas feed conversion was improved significantly by 125 mg/kg vitamin E ( P < 0.05). The liver and lymphoid organ weights as well as IgM and IgG, antibody titers for primary and secondary antibody responses to SRBC were reduced significantly under HS ( P < 0.05). Heat stress also resulted in a significant increase in H/L ratio ( P < 0.05). Dietary vitamin E resulted in improvement of primary and secondary antibody responses both in TN and HS broilers ( P < 0.05). The HS birds also showed an improved antibody titer in secondary response with high concentration of Se ( P < 0.05). Vitamin E and Se had interactive effects on anti-SRBC titers; however, no consistent differences were found between dietary levels during the study. The H/L ratio decreased by feeding vitamin E at both levels either under HS or TN conditions ( P < 0.05). The serum concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol were increased but serum HDL-cholesterol decreased in HS broilers ( P < 0.05).

  12. The putative sponge aggregation receptor. Isolation and characterization of a molecule composed of scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains and short consensus repeats.

    PubMed

    Blumbach, B; Pancer, Z; Diehl-Seifert, B; Steffen, R; Münkner, J; Müller, I; Müller, W E

    1998-09-01

    Porifera (sponges) are the oldest extant metazoan phylum. Dissociated sponge cells serve as a classic system to study processes of cell reaggregation. The reaggregation of dissociated cells is mediated by an extracellularly localized aggregation factor (AF), based on heterophilic interactions of the third order; the AF bridges two cells by ligating a cell-surface-bound aggregation receptor (AR). In the present study we report cloning, expression and immunohistochemical localization of a polypeptide from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium, which very likely represents the AR. The presumed AR gene gives rise to at least three forms of alternatively spliced transcripts of 6.5, 4.9 and 3.9 kb, as detected by northern blotting. Two cDNA clones corresponding to the shorter forms were already reported earlier; here we present an analysis of the largest. All three putative polypeptides feature scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains. The largest form, SRCR-SCR-Car, is a cell-surface receptor of molecular mass 220 kDa, which is assumed to be the cell-adhesion receptor AR; the second form, SRCR-Re, is also a putative receptor of 166 kDa, while the third form, SRCR-Mo, is a soluble molecule of 129 kDa. The SRCR-SCR-Car molecule consists of fourteen SRCR domains, six short consensus repeats (SCRs), a C-terminal transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic tail; its fourteenth SRCR domain features an Arg-Gly-Asp tripeptide. To obtain monoclonal antibodies, a 170-amino-acid-long polypeptide that is found in all three forms of the SRCR-containing proteins was expressed in E. coli. In a western blot of sponge cells lysate the monoclonal antibody raised against the recombinant polypeptide recognized two major immuno-reacting polypeptides (220 and 117 kDa) and two minor bands (36 and 32 kDa). The antibody was found to react with antigen(s) predominantly localized on the plasma membranes of cells, especially those of spherulous cells. In a functional assay Fab' fragments of the antibodies suppressed AF-mediated cell-cell reaggregation. Additionally, a recombinant SRCR-soluble fragment effectively inhibited AF-mediated cell-cell reaggregation. We conclude that the 220 kDa SRCR-containing protein of the sponge G. cydonium is very likely the AR. PMID:9701562

  13. A note on protein expression changes in chicken breast muscle in response to time in transit before slaughtering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aims of the research were to devise a proteome map of the chicken Pectoralis superficialis muscle, as resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and to characterize protein expression changes in the soluble protein fraction in commercial conditions due to age and to time in transit before slaughtering. Broilers were reared under commercial conditions until they reached a mean 1.8 kg and 36 d, or 2.6 kg and 46 d of age. Transport to the slaughterhouse took 90 or 220 minutes. Transport-induced stress was assessed from blood metabolites and leukocyte cell counts, revealing significant changes in albumin, glucose and triglyceride concentrations, in heterophils and leukocyte counts for chickens in transit for longer, and in glucose depending mainly on age. The sarcoplasmic protein fractions were extracted from a total of 39 breast muscle samples, collected 15 min post mortem, for analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Image and statistical analyses enabled us to study the qualitative and quantitative differences between the samples. Twelve up- or down-regulated protein spots were detected (P?

  14. CEACAM1 regulates TIM–3–mediated tolerance and exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hwa; Zhu, Chen; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Anderson, Ana C.; Gandhi, Amit; Russell, Andrew; Dougan, Stephanie K.; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Melum, Espen; Pertel, Thomas; Clayton, Kiera L.; Raab, Monika; Chen, Qiang; Beauchemin, Nicole; Yazaki, Paul J.; Pyzik, Michal; Ostrowski, Mario A.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Rudd, Christopher E.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Franke, Andre; Petsko, Gregory A.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-3 (TIM-3, also known as HAVCR2) is an activation-induced inhibitory molecule involved in tolerance and shown to induce T-cell exhaustion in chronic viral infection and cancers1–5. Under some conditions, TIM-3 expression has also been shown to be stimulatory. Considering that TIM-3, like cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1), is being targeted for cancer immunotherapy, it is important to identify the circumstances under which TIM-3 can inhibit and activate T-cell responses. Here we show that TIM-3 is co-expressed and forms a heterodimer with carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), another well-known molecule expressed on activated T cells and involved in T-cell inhibition6–10. Biochemical, biophysical and X-ray crystallography studies show that the membrane-distal immunoglobulin-variable (IgV)-like amino-terminal domain of each is crucial to these interactions. The presence of CEACAM1 endows TIM-3 with inhibitory function. CEACAM1 facilitates the maturation and cell surface expression of TIM-3 by forming a heterodimeric interaction in cis through the highly related membrane-distal N-terminal domains of each molecule. CEACAM1 and TIM-3 also bind in trans through their N-terminal domains. Both cis and trans interactions between CEACAM1 and TIM-3 determine the tolerance-inducing function of TIM-3. In a mouse adoptive transfer colitis model, CEACAM1-deficient T cells are hyper-inflammatory with reduced cell surface expression of TIM-3 and regulatory cytokines, and this is restored by T-cell-specific CEACAM1 expression. During chronic viral infection and in a tumour environment, CEACAM1 and TIM-3 mark exhausted T cells. Co-blockade of CEACAM1 and TIM-3 leads to enhancement of anti-tumour immune responses with improved elimination of tumours in mouse colorectal cancer models. Thus, CEACAM1 serves as a heterophilic ligand for TIM-3 that is required for its ability to mediate T-cell inhibition, and this interaction has a crucial role in regulating autoimmunity and anti-tumour immunity. PMID:25363763

  15. Evaluation of the soft tissue biocompatibility of MgCa0.8 and surgical steel 316L in vivo: a comparative study in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown the potential suitability of magnesium alloys as biodegradable implants. The aim of the present study was to compare the soft tissue biocompatibility of MgCa0.8 and commonly used surgical steel in vivo. Methods A biodegradable magnesium calcium alloy (MgCa0.8) and surgical steel (S316L), as a control, were investigated. Screws of identical geometrical conformation were implanted into the tibiae of 40 rabbits for a postoperative follow up of two, four, six and eight weeks. The tibialis cranialis muscle was in direct vicinity of the screw head and thus embedded in paraffin and histologically and immunohistochemically assessed. Haematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to identify macrophages, giant cells and heterophil granulocytes as well as the extent of tissue fibrosis and necrosis. Mouse anti-CD79? and rat anti-CD3 monoclonal primary antibodies were used for B- and T-lymphocyte detection. Evaluation of all sections was performed by applying a semi-quantitative score. Results Clinically, both implant materials were tolerated well. Histology revealed that a layer of fibrous tissue had formed between implant and overlying muscle in MgCa0.8 and S316L, which was demarcated by a layer of synoviocyte-like cells at its interface to the implant. In MgCa0.8 implants cavities were detected within the fibrous tissue, which were surrounded by the same kind of cell type. The thickness of the fibrous layer and the amount of tissue necrosis and cellular infiltrations gradually decreased in S316L. In contrast, a decrease could only be noted in the first weeks of implantation in MgCa0.8, whereas parameters were increasing again at the end of the observation period. B-lymphocytes were found more often in MgCa0.8 indicating humoral immunity and the presence of soluble antigens. Conversely, S316L displayed a higher quantity of T-lymphocytes. Conclusions Moderate inflammation was detected in both implant materials and resolved to a minimum during the first weeks indicating comparable biocompatibility for MgCa0.8 and S316L. Thus, the application of MgCa0.8 as biodegradable implant material seems conceivable. Since the inflammatory parameters were re-increasing at the end of the observation period in MgCa0.8 it is important to observe the development of inflammation over a longer time period in addition to the present study. PMID:20974008

  16. Genotype, dietary manipulation and food allocation affect indices of welfare in broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Jones, E K M; Zaczek, V; MacLeod, M; Hocking, P M

    2004-12-01

    1. An experiment was performed to compare the welfare of three broiler breeder genotypes (Label Rouge (LA), experimental dwarf (ER) and standard (SR)) fed on a Control or high Fibre diet. The LA birds were fed ad libitum and the other groups were reared to their recommended body weight targets. A group of standard broiler breeders was also fed a restricted amount of food, but to a lesser degree than SR, to achieve the same proportion of body weight (SE) as ER relative to ad libitum-fed dwarfs based on previous research. LA, ER, SR and SE are referred to as 'groups' in the text. 2. Welfare was assessed by comparing time budgets and heterophil-lymphocyte ratios (HL ratios) at 5, 10 and 15 weeks and immune responses at 15 weeks of age. In addition the weight and water content of the gastrointestinal tract at 4-h intervals at the end of the experiment were studied in LA and SR fed on both diets. 3. Body weights of LA, ER and SR fed on the Fibre diets were depressed and LA ate less of the Fibre than the Control diet. The coefficient of variation of body weight at 15 weeks was 7.9% in LA and similar (10.8 to 11.6%) in the other groups. 4. Drinking, litter-directed behaviour, resting and standing were affected by a group x age interaction with restricted birds showing increased drinking over time and less time spent resting compared to LA. The behaviour of ER birds was similar to SE. 5. HL ratios were within the normal biological range although all restricted-fed birds had an elevated HL ratio at 10 weeks of age relative to week 5 whereas LA birds had a reduced HL ratio at 15 weeks relative to 5 and 10 weeks of age. Immune responses were lower in ER and SE and the highest response was in SR. 6. No effects of diet were identified on behaviour, white blood cell counts or HL ratio. 7. With the exception of the crop, the dry weights of digesta in each section of the gut were similar in LA and SR birds. The results suggest that drinker-directed activity might be a substitute for foraging rather than an attempt to increase gut fill. 8. It is concluded that the replacement of standard with dwarf broiler breeders may improve the welfare of commercial flocks of broiler breeders by decreasing the degree of food restriction resulting in favourable changes in behaviour, for example, reduced 'drinker-directed' behaviour. PMID:15697011

  17. Relationships between dietary carotenoids, body tissue carotenoids, parasite burden, and health state in wild mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; McGraw, Kevin J

    2010-12-01

    While rodents and other mammals have traditionally served as models for studying carotenoid physiology, many wild animals from a variety of other taxa utilize carotenoids for self-maintenance and reproduction and accumulate far greater concentrations than those found in mammals. Though we have basic understandings of the control and value of carotenoids in some wild animal systems, many gaps remain. For example, parasites and pathogens impose severe survival constraints on free-ranging organisms, but little is known of how carotenoids work in concert with the immune system to combat natural infectious challenges. Furthermore, due to the high mortality rate from which many young animals suffer, health and carotenoid status during the early stages of development may be critical to survival. The relative importance of dietary versus physiological mechanisms for carotenoid uptake has also been understudied in the wild. To begin to shed light on these issues, we studied relationships between dietary and tissue carotenoids, hematological immune parameters, and endoparasitism of wild mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings at a variety of ages. Lutein, zeaxanthin, ?-cryptoxanthin, ?-carotene, and canthaxanthin were the most common carotenoids in liver, plasma, and gut contents. We found that, early in development (when food intake is limited), carotenoids were comparatively concentrated in internal tissue (e.g., liver), presumably a carry-over from maternal contributions in yolk, but as ducklings approached independence (and increasingly fed on their own) concentrations were greatest in gut contents. Canthaxanthin concentrations were lower in the plasma and liver of older individuals compared to younger ducklings, even though gut canthaxanthin concentration did not change with age. Additionally, ?-carotene was nearly absent from circulation, despite moderate levels within the gut, suggesting a high rate of conversion to retinol. Using principal components analysis, we revealed a correlation between an increased ability to assimilate dietary carotenoids and lower levels of chronic stress (as assessed by lower heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios) and a correlation between a reduced carotenoid status and increased investment in the immune system (as assessed by higher total leukocyte count). We also found that individuals without parasites had an overall reduced carotenoid status. Thus, we demonstrate age-specific differences in carotenoid allocation in growing animals from a precocial bird species and provide correlational evidence that parasitism and health in wild animals are related to carotenoid status and assimilation ability. PMID:20637173

  18. Arginine and vitamin E improve the immune response after a Salmonella challenge in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Byrd, J A; Farnell, M; Ruiz-Feria, C A

    2014-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of Arg, vitamin E (VE), and mannanoligosaccharide (MOS) on the immune response and clearance of Salmonella in broiler chickens. In each experiment, 1-d-old chicks (n = 160) were randomly distributed into 4 groups: antibiotic-free diet (negative control, CTL-), antibiotic-supplemented diet (positive control, CTL+), antibiotic free-diet plus Arg and VE (AVE), or antibiotic-free diet plus Arg, VE, and MOS (AVM). Birds were orally challenged with 10(6) cfu of a novobiocyn and nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain at d 7 (experiment 1) or at d 3 (experiment 2). Heterophil- (HOB) and monocyte- (MOB) oxidative burst and lymphocyte proliferation (LPR), antibody titers, and Salmonella content in the ceca were measured at several intervals postinfection (PI). In experiment 1, both AVM and AVE decreased HOB compared with the controls 5 and 9 d PI, but increased LPR 9 d PI. In the same experiment, birds fed the AVE diet had higher MOB than birds fed CTL+ or the AVM diet at 7 d PI, whereas 9 d PI birds fed the AVM diet had the highest MOB. In experiment 2, birds fed the AVE diet had higher MOB, HOB, and LPR than birds in the other treatments 7 and 14 d PI, except at 7 d PI, when MOB was not different among treatments. Birds fed the AVM diet had the highest IgA antibody titer, and a higher IgM antibody titer than the CTL+ birds. In experiment 1, Salmonella Typhimurium content in the ceca was lower in birds fed the AVM diet compared with birds fed the CTL- diet 3 d PI, but later on (10 and 17 d PI), and in experiment 2 (7, 14, and 21 d PI), Salmonella Typhimurium concentrations were not different among treatments. Thus, Arg and VE improved immune response after a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge in young chicks, and although they did not reduce Salmonella Typhimurium concentrations in the ceca, they may improve bacterial resistance against other pathogens in commercial growing conditions. PMID:24706965

  19. Dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianzhuang; Liu, Shasha; Guo, Yuming; Applegate, Todd J; Eicher, Susan D

    2014-04-28

    In the present study, two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation on the inflammatory response and innate immunity of broiler chickens. Expt 1 was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n 8 cages/treatment; n 6 birds/cage) with three dietary Arg concentrations (1.05, 1.42 and 1.90%) and two immune treatments (injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline) given at an interval of 48 h between 14 and 21 d of age. In Expt 2, correlation between dietary Arg concentration (0.99, 1.39, 1.76, 2.13 or 2.53%) and percentage of circulating B cells (percentage of circulating lymphocytes) was determined. In Expt 1, LPS injection decreased body-weight gain and feed intake and increased feed conversion ratio of the challenged broilers (14-21 d; P< 0.05). LPS injection suppressed (P< 0.05) the percentages of splenic CD11+ and B cells (percentages of splenic lymphocytes) and phagocytic activity of splenic heterophils and macrophages; Arg supplementation linearly decreased the percentages of CD11+, CD14+ and B cells in the spleen (P< 0.10). LPS injection increased (P< 0.05) the expression of IL-1? and IL-6 mRNA in the spleen and caecal tonsils. Arginine supplementation decreased (P< 0.05) the expression of IL-1?, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and PPAR-? mRNA in the spleen and IL-1?, IL-10, TLR4 and NF-?B mRNA in the caecal tonsils. In Expt 2, increasing dietary Arg concentrations linearly and quadratically reduced the percentage of circulating B cells (P< 0.01). Collectively, Arg supplementation attenuated the overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines probably through the suppression of the TLR4 pathway and CD14+ cell percentage. Furthermore, excessive Arg supplementation (1.76%) suppressed the percentages of circulating and splenic B cells. PMID:24330949

  20. Thermal manipulation of the embryo modifies the physiology and body composition of broiler chickens reared in floor pens without affecting breast meat processing quality.

    PubMed

    Loyau, T; Berri, C; Bedrani, L; Métayer-Coustard, S; Praud, C; Duclos, M J; Tesseraud, S; Rideau, N; Everaert, N; Yahav, S; Mignon-Grasteau, S; Collin, A

    2013-08-01

    Selection in broiler chickens has increased muscle mass without similar development of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, resulting in limited ability to sustain high ambient temperatures. The aim of this study was to determine the long-lasting effects of heat manipulation of the embryo on the physiology, body temperature (Tb), growth rate and meat processing quality of broiler chickens reared in floor pens. Broiler chicken eggs were incubated in control conditions (37.8°C, 56% relative humidity; RH) or exposed to thermal manipulation (TM; 12 h/d, 39.5°C, 65% RH) from d 7 to 16 of embryogenesis. This study was planned in a pedigree design to identify possible heritable characters for further selection of broiler chickens to improve thermotolerance. Thermal manipulation did not affect hatchability but resulted in lower Tb at hatching and until d 28 post-hatch, with associated changes in plasma thyroid hormone concentrations. At d 34, chickens were exposed to a moderate heat challenge (5 h, 32°C). Greater O2 saturation and reduced CO2 partial pressure were observed (P < 0.05) in the venous blood of TM than in that of control chickens, suggesting long-term respiratory adaptation. At slaughter age, TM chickens were 1.4% lighter and exhibited 8% less relative abdominal fat pad than controls. Breast muscle yield was enhanced by TM, especially in females, but without significant change in breast meat characteristics (pH, color, drip loss). Plasma glucose/insulin balance was affected (P < 0.05) by thermal treatments. The heat challenge increased the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio in controls (P < 0.05) but not in TM birds, possibly reflecting a lower stress status in TM chickens. Interestingly, broiler chickens had moderate heritability estimates for the plasma triiodothyronine/thyroxine concentration ratio at d 28 and comb temperature during the heat challenge on d 34 (h(2) > 0.17). In conclusion, TM of the embryo modified the physiology of broilers in the long term as a possible adaptation for heat tolerance, without affecting breast meat quality. This study highlights the value of 2 new heritable characters involved in thermoregulation for further broiler selection. PMID:23736053

  1. A novel hypothesis for the etiology of Graves' disease: TSAb may be thyroid stimulating animal IgG-like hormone and TBAb may be the precursor of TSAb.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Yukio; Kajita, Yoshihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Hamaoki, Masaru

    2012-06-01

    There are doubtful points about the theory that autoimmunity with auto-antibody (Ab) to TSH receptor (R) causes hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease (GD). A main doubtful point is no curative effect of corticosteroid on Graves' hyperthyroidism in spite of curative effect of corticosteroid for all autoimmune diseases. Recently we demonstrated the immunological similarity of TSAb and TBAb-IgG to animal IgGs, except for human (h)IgG, by neutralization and purification of TSAb and TBAb-IgG using (1) heterophilic Ab to animal IgG in GD sera and (2) experimentally generated anti-animal IgG Abs [such as dog (d), bovine (b), porcine (p), and rabbit (rb)]. Furthermore, greater immunological similarity of Fab- and F(ab')(2)-portion of TSAb- and TBAb-IgG to bovine Fab, compared to hFab, was demonstrated using goat anti-bovine F(ab')(2) Ab. Existence of b and p TSH-like portions in the LATS-IgG molecule (probably Fab portion) was suggested by a previous report of neutralization of LATS activity by anti-b- or anti-p-TSH Ab. We suggested the existence of a mammalian animal-TSH-like structure, excepting hTSH, in the TSAb-IgG molecule (probably Fab portion), by discovery of anti-mammalian TSH Ab (such as d, b, p, guinea-pig, rat, whale, except h) in sera of GD. Lately, similar TSHR binding of H- and L-chain of human stimulating monoclonal TSHR Ab (M22)-Fab with TSH-? and-? subunit was reported. This evidence suggests that Fab portion of TSAb has a structure like mammalian TSH, but not hTSH. IgG-? type of d, horse, b, p, goat, ovine is 95% and IgG-? type is 5%, while human ? and ? chain is 60:40. Previous report that LATS (TSAb)-IgG composed of predominant ? type is supporting evidence that TRAb-IgG has immunological similarity with these animal IgGs compared to hIgG. We speculate that TSAb-IgG may be referred as a mermaid consisted in face (Fab) and trunk-leg (Fc). Face may be a kind of hormone with animal TSH-like structure and trunk-leg has animal IgG-like structure (in spite of no antibody function). There are many reports for co-existence of TSAb and TBAb-IgG in sera of GD. We reported conversion from TBAb (non-thyroid stimulating type IgG) to TSAb by co-incubation of anti-hIgG Ab (containing anti-animal IgG Ab as a cross-reaction) with TBAb-bound porcine thyroid cells. Thus, we suggest that TBAb may be the precursor form of TSAb. PMID:22472575

  2. Testing a West Nile virus vaccine in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Miller, K.; Docherty, D.; Sileo, L.

    2005-01-01

    Eight sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) were vaccinated with a commercial equine West Nile virus vaccine (Fort Dodge Animal Health, Fort Dodge, Iowa, USA) at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, USA. Three doses of the vaccine were given, the first dose (day 0) was followed by a second 21 days later and the third dose 7 days after the second day 28 after the first dose). All doses were 0.50 ml. In addition, 5 sandhill cranes were given injections of similar amounts of sterile water on the same schedule. Blood for complete blood counts, serum chemistries, and serological testing was collected at weekly intervals. Ten weeks after the first injection of the vaccine and 6 weeks after the last of the 3 injections of the vaccine, the cranes were shipped to the USGS National Wildlife Heath Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. After a two-week adjustment period, 11 of these cranes were injected intramuscularly with one mosquito dose of West Nile virus. Two of the vaccinated cranes were not challenged and acted as uninfected controls. One week post challenge the only abnormal findings were slight weight loss (average 6% loss since the time of challenge with West Nile virus) and elevated white blood cell counts (heterophilic leukocytosis). There were no deaths and no clinically ill cranes (unvaccinated or vaccinated cranes) among the 11 challenged birds. All cranes were euthanized 6 weeks post challenge, and necropsies were performed. Pre-challenge titers showed no titer response to the vaccinations. However, when challenged, vaccinated cranes developed titers more quickly (within 7-10 days), and were viremic and shed virus via the cloaca for a shorter period of time than the unvaccinated cranes (2-7 days for vaccinated cranes versus 2-10 days for unvaccinated cranes). No remarkable lesions were noted in any of the cranes during the necropsy examinations. Histopathological findings are available for only four of the cranes at this time. Three of those had mild to moderate encephalitis, myelitis, and myocarditis. Initial histopathological findings also indicated a difference in the lesions found in the brains of the vaccinated versus unvaccinated cranes. The fourth crane was a vaccinated unchallenged control that had none of the lesions described. We concluded, based on the findings of no adverse reactions and the higher titers and reduced viremia seen in the cranes, that, indeed, the vaccine is safe for use in cranes and can be effective in reducing the severity of a natural infection. We would recommend this vaccine for use in adult cranes. A companion study is looking at the safety and efficacy of the vaccine for crane chicks as young as 7-10 days of age and that will be reported at a later date.