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1

'You are not yourself': exploring masculinities among heterosexual African men living with HIV in London.  

PubMed

It is now clear that gender is an essential factor shaping the narratives of men as well as women. However, there have been few studies of the daily lives or sexual activities of heterosexual men. Hence, strategies developed to prevent the spread of the HIV virus are rarely based on detailed knowledge of the men whose behaviours they are intended to change; this is especially evident in the developing world where the epidemic is most severe. Nor do we know very much about those men who have already been diagnosed as HIV positive. Around 13 million men are now living with HIV of whom around 96% are in low or middle income countries. Migrants from developing countries also make up the majority of positive people in a number of developed countries. In the UK, for example, heterosexual activity is now responsible for about half of all new HIV diagnoses with the majority of those involved being of African origin. But almost nothing is known about the ways in which different constructions of masculinity affect their experiences of illness. This study used qualitative methods to explore the experiences of a sample of black African men who defined themselves as heterosexual and were receiving treatment for HIV and/or AIDS in London. It explored their feelings, their needs, their hopes and their desires as they negotiated their lives in the diaspora. PMID:19299059

Doyal, Lesley; Anderson, Jane; Paparini, Sara

2009-05-01

2

Differences in testing, stigma, and perceived consequences of stigmatization among heterosexual men and women living with HIV in Bengaluru, India.  

PubMed

Approximately 2.4 million people in India are living with HIV. Gender inequality affects HIV prevention, detection, and management. The purpose of this paper was to describe gender differences in the experience of living with HIV in Bengaluru, India. A subsample of n = 313 (159 men and 154 women) from a larger cohort was used for these analyses. Participants were recruited through AIDS service organizations. They completed an interviewer-administered survey assessing HIV testing experience, types of stigma, and perceived consequences of stigmatization. The majority of men (67%) reported getting HIV tested because of illness, while women were more likely to be tested after learning their spouse's HIV-positive status (42%). More men (59%) than women (45%, p<0.05) were tested in private care settings. Men reported significantly higher mean levels of internalized stigma (men: M=0.71, SD = 0.63; women: M=0.46, SD = 0.55; p<0.001), whereas the women reported significantly higher scores for enacted stigma (men: M=1.30, SD = 1.69; women: M=2.10, SD = 2.17; p<0.001). These differences remained significant after controlling for potential socio-demographic covariates. Following their diagnosis, more women reported moving out of their homes (men: 16%; women: 26%; p<0.05). More men (89%) than women (66%; p<0.001) reported to have modified their sexual behavior after being diagnosed. These findings suggest that the experience of living with HIV and HIV stigma varies by gender in this population. Suggestions for a gender-based approach to HIV prevention and stigma reduction are provided. PMID:23869716

Malavé, S; Ramakrishna, J; Heylen, E; Bharat, S; Ekstrand, M L

2014-01-01

3

Differences in testing, stigma, and perceived consequences of stigmatization among heterosexual men and women living with HIV in Bengaluru, India  

PubMed Central

Approximately 2.4 million people in India are living with HIV. Gender inequality affects HIV prevention, detection, and management. The purpose of this paper was to describe gender differences in the experience of living with HIV in Bengaluru, India. A subsample of n = 313 (159 men and 154 women) from a larger cohort was used for these analyses. Participants were recruited through AIDS service organizations. They completed an interviewer-administered survey assessing HIV testing experience, types of stigma, and perceived consequences of stigmatization. The majority of men (67%) reported getting HIV tested because of illness, while women were more likely to be tested after learning their spouse’s HIV-positive status (42%). More men (59%) than women (45%, p <0.05) were tested in private care settings. Men reported significantly higher mean levels of internalized stigma (men: M = 0.71, SD = 0.63; women: M = 0.46, SD=0.55; p<0.001), whereas the women reported significantly higher scores for enacted stigma (men: M = 1.30, SD = 1.69; women: M = 2.10, SD = 2.17; p <0.001). These differences remained significant after controlling for potential socio-demographic covariates. Following their diagnosis, more women reported moving out of their homes (men: 16%; women: 26%; p <0.05). More men (89%) than women (66%; p <0.001) reported to have modified their sexual behavior after being diagnosed. These findings suggest that the experience of living with HIV and HIV stigma varies by gender in this population. Suggestions for a gender-based approach to HIV prevention and stigma reduction are provided. PMID:23869716

Malavé, S.; Ramakrishna, J.; Heylen, E.; Bharat, S.; Ekstrand, M.L.

2014-01-01

4

Understanding heterosexual condom use among homeless men.  

PubMed

This study uses an event-based approach to examine individual, relationship, and contextual correlates of heterosexual condom use among homeless men. Structured interviews were conducted with a predominantly African American sample of 305 men recruited from meal lines in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Men reported on their most recent heterosexual event involving vaginal or anal intercourse. Adjusting for demographic characteristics only, condom use was more likely when men had higher condom use self-efficacy, greater HIV knowledge, or talked to their partner about condoms prior to sex. Condom use was less likely when men held more negative attitudes towards condoms, the partner was considered to be a primary/serious partner, hard drug use preceded sex, or sex occurred in a public setting. Condom attitudes, self-efficacy, partner type, and communication were the strongest predictors of condom use in a multivariate model that included all of the above-mentioned factors. Associations of unprotected sex with hard drug use prior to sex and having sex in public settings could be accounted for by lower condom self-efficacy and/or less positive condom attitudes among men having sex under these conditions. Results suggest that it may be promising to adapt existing, evidence-based IMB interventions for delivery in non-traditional settings that are frequented by men experiencing homelessness to achieve HIV risk reduction and thus reduce a significant point of disparity for the largely African American population of homeless men. PMID:22392155

Tucker, Joan S; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Ewing, Brett; Wertheimer, Samuel

2013-06-01

5

Patterns of Sexual Arousal in Homosexual, Bisexual, and Heterosexual Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if self-identified bisexual, heterosexual, and homosexual men show differential\\u000a genital and subjective arousal patterns to video presentations of bisexual, heterosexual, male homosexual, and lesbian sexual\\u000a interactions. It was predicted that, relative to heterosexual and homosexual stimuli, bisexual men would show the highest\\u000a levels of sexual arousal to bisexual erotic material, while this

Jerome A. Cerny; Erick Janssen

2011-01-01

6

Recollections of Sexual Socialisation among Marginalised Heterosexual Black Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the sexual socialisation process of marginalised, drug-using heterosexual black men, focusing primarily on the sources and content of sexual information. Analysing qualitative interview data, we discovered that the men in our sample both learn about sex and become sexually active at an early age. They most often learn about…

Dunlap, Eloise; Benoit, Ellen; Graves, Jennifer L.

2013-01-01

7

Recollections of sexual socialisation among marginalised heterosexual black men  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the sexual socialisation process of marginalised, drug-using heterosexual black men, focusing primarily on the sources and content of sexual information. Analysing qualitative interview data, we discovered that the men in our sample both learn about sex and become sexually active at an early age. They most often learn about sex from the media and least often learn about sex from family members. The content of sexual information varies in specifics, but overall tends to equate sex with pleasure, encourage sexual activity with multiple partners, and emphasise using protection. Our goal is to use this data to better understand how sexual socialisation contributes to the prevalence of multiple sexual partners and high rates of HIV among heterosexual black men in order to inform future risk-reduction intervention programmes. PMID:24482611

Dunlap, Eloise; Benoit, Ellen; Graves, Jennifer L.

2013-01-01

8

Knowing is not enough: a qualitative report on HIV testing among heterosexual African-American men  

PubMed Central

Despite having higher rates of HIV testing than all other racial groups, African-Americans continue to be disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic in the United States. Knowing one’s status is the key step to maintaining behavioral changes that could stop the spread of the virus, yet little is known about the individual- and socio-structural-level barriers associated with HIV testing and communication among heterosexual African-American men. To address this and inform the development of an HIV prevention behavioral intervention for heterosexual African-American men, we conducted computerized, structured interviews with 61 men, focus group interviews with 25 men in 5 different groups, and in-depth qualitative interviews with 30 men living in high HIV prevalence neighborhoods in New York City. Results revealed that HIV testing was frequent among the participants. Even with high rates of testing, the men in the study had low levels of HIV knowledge; perceived little risk of HIV; and misused HIV testing as a prevention method. Factors affecting HIV testing, included stigma, relationship dynamics and communication, and societal influences, suggesting that fear, low perception of risk, and HIV stigma may be the biggest barriers to HIV testing. These results also suggest that interventions directed toward African-American heterosexual men must address the use of “testing as prevention” as well as correct misunderstandings of the window period and the meaning of HIV test results, and interventions should focus on communicating about HIV. PMID:25298014

Bond, Keosha T.; Frye, Victoria; Taylor, Raekiela; Williams, Kim; Bonner, Sebastian; Lucy, Debbie; Cupid, Malik; Weiss, Linda; Koblin, Beryl A.

2015-01-01

9

Knowing is not enough: a qualitative report on HIV testing among heterosexual African-American men.  

PubMed

Despite having higher rates of HIV testing than all other racial groups, African-Americans continue to be disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic in the United States. Knowing one's status is the key step to maintaining behavioral changes that could stop the spread of the virus, yet little is known about the individual- and socio-structural-level barriers associated with HIV testing and communication among heterosexual African-American men. To address this and inform the development of an HIV prevention behavioral intervention for heterosexual African-American men, we conducted computerized, structured interviews with 61 men, focus group interviews with 25 men in 5 different groups, and in-depth qualitative interviews with 30 men living in high HIV prevalence neighborhoods in New York City. Results revealed that HIV testing was frequent among the participants. Even with high rates of testing, the men in the study had low levels of HIV knowledge; perceived little risk of HIV; and misused HIV testing as a prevention method. Factors affecting HIV testing, included stigma, relationship dynamics and communication, and societal influences, suggesting that fear, low perception of risk, and HIV stigma may be the biggest barriers to HIV testing. These results also suggest that interventions directed toward African-American heterosexual men must address the use of "testing as prevention" as well as correct misunderstandings of the window period and the meaning of HIV test results, and interventions should focus on communicating about HIV. PMID:25298014

Bond, Keosha T; Frye, Victoria; Taylor, Raekiela; Williams, Kim; Bonner, Sebastian; Lucy, Debbie; Cupid, Malik; Weiss, Linda; Koblin, Beryl A

2015-01-01

10

Fertility in the mothers of firstborn homosexual and heterosexual men.  

PubMed

This study tested the balancing selection hypothesis, that is, genes predisposing men to homosexuality escape elimination from the population because the decreased fertility of men with the heritable form of homosexuality is offset by an increased fertility among biological relatives who carry the same genetic variants. The index subjects (probands) were 40,197 firstborn heterosexual men and 4,784 firstborn homosexual men retrieved from six archival data sets, all of which had previously been used in published research. The measure of familial (specifically, parental) fertility was the proband's number of younger siblings. The results directly contradicted the prediction of the balancing selection hypothesis. In four of the six samples, the homosexual probands had significantly fewer younger siblings; in the other two samples, the means were not significantly different. It is possible that mothers who produce a homosexual son at their first delivery include a biologically distinct subpopulation of mothers of homosexual sons. PMID:22187029

Blanchard, Ray

2012-06-01

11

"Straight Talk" for African-American heterosexual men: results of a single-arm behavioral intervention trial.  

PubMed

In the United States, heterosexual transmission is the second leading cause of HIV/AIDS, and two-thirds of all heterosexually acquired cases diagnosed between 2005 and 2008 occurred among African-Americans. Few HIV prevention interventions have been designed specifically for African-American heterosexual men not seeking clinical treatment. Here we report results of a single-arm intervention trial of a theory-based HIV prevention intervention designed to increase condom use, reduce concurrent partnering and increase HIV testing among heterosexually active African-American men living in high HIV prevalence areas of New York City. We tested our hypothesis using McNemar discordant pairs exact test for binary variables and paired t-tests for continuous variables. We observed statistically significant declines in mean number of total and new female partners, unprotected sex partners, and partner concurrency in both primary and nonprimary sex partnerships between baseline and 3 months postintervention. PMID:23005899

Frye, Victoria; Henny, Kirk; Bonner, Sebastian; Williams, Kim; Bond, Keosha T; Hoover, Donald R; Lucy, Debbie; Greene, Emily; Koblin, Beryl A

2013-01-01

12

Straight talk: HIV prevention for African-American heterosexual men: theoretical bases and intervention design.  

PubMed

In the United States, racial disparities in HIV/AIDS are stark. Although African Americans comprise an estimated 14% of the U.S. population, they made up 52% of new HIV cases among adults and adolescents diagnosed in 2009. Heterosexual transmission is now the second leading cause of HIV in the United States. African Americans made up a full two-thirds of all heterosexually acquired HIV/AIDS cases between 2005 and 2008. Few demonstrated efficacious HIV prevention interventions designed specifically for adult, African-American heterosexual men exist. Here, we describe the process used to design a theory-based HIV prevention intervention to increase condom use, reduce concurrent partnering, and increase HIV testing among heterosexually active African-American men living in high HIV prevalence areas of New York City. The intervention integrated empowerment, social identity, and rational choices theories and focused on four major content areas: HIV/AIDS testing and education; condom skills training; key relational and behavioral turning points; and masculinity and fatherhood. PMID:23016501

Frye, Victoria; Bonner, Sebastian; Williams, Kim; Henny, Kirk; Bond, Keosha; Lucy, Debbie; Cupid, Malik; Smith, Stephen; Koblin, Beryl A

2012-10-01

13

Love, Sex, and Masculinity in Sociocultural ContextHIV Concerns and Condom Use among African American Men in Heterosexual Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

African American men in heterosexual relationships are virtually invisible in the theoretical and empirical psychological HIV\\/AIDS literature. This article posits that two theoretical frameworks—masculinity ideologies (MI) and sociocultural context—are important for comprehending Black men’s condom use. Qualitative methods, although relatively rare in U.S. psychology, are critical to understanding the context of lived experience, particularly with under researched populations and topics.

Lisa Bowleg

2004-01-01

14

Heterosexuals' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men: Correlates and gender differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the basis for differences among heterosexuals in their reactions to gay people, with special emphasis on the issue of gender differences. Three studies conducted with students at six different universities revealed a consistent tendency for heterosexual males to express more hostile attitudes than heterosexual females, especially toward gay men. The same social psychological variables appear to underlie

Gregory M. Herek

1988-01-01

15

Age and Embodied Masculinities: Mid-Life Gay and Heterosexual Men Talk about their Bodies  

PubMed Central

This article integrates critical gerontology and masculinities theories to examine how midlife gay and heterosexual men experience their bodies in relation to cultural discourses of aging. Analyses of in-depth interviews with 15 gay and 15 heterosexual men ages 40–60 reveal that while both groups of men describe their bodies as deteriorating or declining in terms of functionality and are often distressed by these changes, midlife gay men also articulate a concern with a perceived decline in bodily appearance. Both gay and heterosexual midlife men frame their bodies as fundamentally different from women’s, possibly in an attempt to protect a masculine identity in response to the threat that aging bodies pose to that identity. We argue that midlife men’s embodied experiences are shaped by a discourse of midlife decline as well as inequalities between gay and heterosexual men. We also discuss the implications of embodiment for midlife men’s well-being. PMID:23849420

Lodge, Amy C.; Umberson, Debra

2013-01-01

16

‘Tits and ass and porn and fighting’Male heterosexuality in magazines for men  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the presentation of male heterosexuality in British soft-core pornographic and men’s lifestyle magazines, looking across these formats at the range of conventions and discourses they share. It maps out the key features of male heterosexuality in these publications, focusing on a sample of British magazines collected in June 2003 across both soft core and lifestyle formats, and

Feona Attwood

2005-01-01

17

Sex Trade Behavior Among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men  

PubMed Central

Sex trade behavior is fairly common among homeless adults and may contribute to higher rates of HIV/AIDS in this population. This study provides a detailed examination of the sex trade-related attitudes and behaviors of homeless men by: (1) determining the prevalence of sex trade-related behaviors, including sex with female sex workers (FSWs); (2) identifying risk factors for having sex with FSWs; and (3) comparing men's relationships with FSWs and non-FSWs in terms of relationship qualities and HIV-related risk behaviors, such as condom use. Structured interviews were conducted with a probability sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men recruited from meal lines in Los Angeles. Recent sex with a FSW was reported by 26% of men, and more likely among those who were older, used crack cocaine, had more sex partners, believed that sometimes men just need to have sex no matter what, and were embedded in networks that were denser and where risky sex was more normative. Compared to non-FSW partners, men with FSW partners felt less emotionally close to them, were more likely to believe the partner had never been tested for HIV, and were more likely to have sex with them under the influence of drugs or alcohol; however, they were not more likely to talk about using condoms or to use condoms with FSWs. Whether the relationship was considered “serious” was a stronger correlate of condom use than whether the partner was a FSW. Implications of these findings for HIV prevention efforts among homeless adults are discussed. PMID:23720137

Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Kennedy, David P.; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett

2013-01-01

18

Dating, Marriage, and Parenthood for HIV-Positive Heterosexual Puerto Rican Men: Normalizing Perspectives on Everyday Life With HIV  

PubMed Central

HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV. PMID:24794822

Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M.; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

2014-01-01

19

Dating, marriage, and parenthood for HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men: normalizing perspectives on everyday life with HIV.  

PubMed

HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV. PMID:24794822

Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

2015-03-01

20

Do Lesbians Differ from Heterosexual Men and Women in Levinsonian Phases of Adult Development?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research conducted on heterosexual women has been generalized to lesbians. However, the question remains whether lesbians differ in their adult development from heterosexual men and women. This article reviews results of 10 one-on-one life story interviews conducted with self-identified lesbians between the ages of 35 and 45. Information from…

Wheeler-Scruggs, Kathy S.

2008-01-01

21

Age, Sex-Role Categorization, and Psychological Health in American Homosexual and Heterosexual Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

An examination (N = 569) was made of the following hypotheses: (a) Homosexuals would be classified as androgynous more frequently than heterosexuals, and (b) age would have a more negative impact on self-concept, as measured by self-esteem and depression scores, in homosexual males than in heterosexual males. Results showed that homosexual men and women were more frequently androgynous than were

Helena M. Carlson; Joanne Steuer

1985-01-01

22

Heterosexual women's perceptions of their marriages to bisexual or homosexual men.  

PubMed

Twenty-one heterosexual women who were or had been married to bisexual or homosexual men and had children by them responded to a 28-page questionnaire that explored their experiences as wives and mothers. All of the married women expected a lasting, monogamous marriage. Only three had partial knowledge of their husband's sexual orientation before marriage. All of them went through a painful grief reaction when they learned that their husbands had emotional or sexual, or both, attachments to other men. The suffering was aggravated by feeling deceived or stupid for not having guessed the truth. What made it difficult for them to seek support from family and friends was the fear of encountering social disapproval or ostracism. They were afraid for themselves, their husbands, and their children. At the time of the study 11 of the 21 women were still married and living with their husbands, but most of them felt unsure that the marriage would last. Ten were in transition, separated, or divorced. Only three of the still married wives had complete confidence in the future stability of their relationships. These marriages were characterized by good communications, husbands who considered themselves bisexual, and an open marriage contract whereby wives could have heterosexual affairs. Findings cannot be generalized from this small convenience sample, but will hopefully encourage further research. The writers are also soliciting more subjects to enlarge the sample. PMID:2794500

Hays, D; Samuels, A

1989-01-01

23

Examination of muscularity and body fat depictions in magazines that target heterosexual and gay men.  

PubMed

Previous content analyses of magazine images have typically examined within genres but failed to include comparisons between publications intended for various populations. The purpose of this study was to examine depictions of muscularity and thinness of male images in several widely distributed magazines that target male audiences from a variety of genres. Twenty-three magazine titles with the highest circulation rates that targeted heterosexual men, gay men, and general audiences were selected for image analyses. We found that magazines that target gay male audiences depicted images of men who were thinner in comparison to magazines targeting heterosexual men. Both gay and heterosexual magazines depicted male images with greater muscularity than magazines intended for general audiences. Differences in male image depictions in magazines may contribute to the promotion of an unattainable body ideal in some subgroups of gay culture. PMID:23352323

Lanzieri, Nicholas; Cook, Brian J

2013-03-01

24

Rethinking Gender, Heterosexual Men, and Women's Vulnerability to HIV/AIDS  

PubMed Central

Most HIV prevention literature portrays women as especially vulnerable to HIV infection because of biological susceptibility and men's sexual power and privilege. Conversely, heterosexual men are perceived as active transmitters of HIV but not active agents in prevention. Although the women's vulnerability paradigm was a radical revision of earlier views of women in the epidemic, mounting challenges undermine its current usefulness. We review the etiology and successes of the paradigm as well as its accruing limitations. We also call for an expanded model that acknowledges biology, gender inequality, and gendered power relations but also directly examines social structure, gender, and HIV risk for heterosexual women and men. PMID:20075321

Hoffman, Susie; Dworkin, Shari L.

2010-01-01

25

Biodemographic comparisons of homosexual and heterosexual men in the kinsey interview data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between sexual orientation and several biodemographic variables previously reported to differentiate between homosexual\\u000a and heterosexual men were examined. Subjects were 4948 white, postpubertal males, who were never reared in foster homes, orphanages,\\u000a or other institutions, and were never arrested or convicted on criminal charges. These were dichotomously classified as homosexual\\u000a (n=844) or heterosexual (n=4104). Data came from survey interviews

Ray Blanchard; Anthony F. Bogaert

1996-01-01

26

Mate Retention Behavior of Men and Women in Heterosexual and Homosexual Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comparing the behavior of heterosexual and homosexual persons can provide insight into the origins of heterosexual sex differences\\u000a in psychology. Evidence indicates that, aside from sexual partner preference, the mating psychology of homosexual men is sex-typical\\u000a whereas that of homosexual women tends to be more sex-atypical. The current study examined one aspect of mating psychology,\\u000a mate retention behavior, and tested

Doug P. VanderLaan; Paul L. Vasey

2008-01-01

27

Beyond the sex machine? Sexual practices and masculinity in adult men's heterosexual accounts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The processes of reproduction and change of adult masculinities through everyday sexual practices remain largely invisible to research. Our attempt is to shed light upon these processes by investigating middle-aged Italian men's accounts of their heterosexual, sexual biographies on the basis of 36 in-depth interviews. These cohorts of men have experienced structural transformations in gender relations and changes in the

Chiara Bertone; Raffaella Ferrero Camoletto

2009-01-01

28

The Association between Sexual Aggression and HIV Risk Behavior in Heterosexual Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perpetrating sexual coercion and rape can be conceptualized as a form of sexual risk taking. In this study, the authors evaluated the relationship between sexual aggression and other risky sexual behaviors (e.g., intercourse without a condom) using an online convenience sample of 1,240 heterosexual men. Sexually aggressive men engaged in more…

Peterson, Zoe D.; Janssen, Erick; Heiman, Julia R.

2010-01-01

29

Effects of Incestuous Heterosexual Childhood Seduction on Three Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three male patients who were incestuously heterosexually abused in childhood are presented. The effects of these experiences are described with an attempt to draw some general conclusions from them. This kind of sexual abuse in boys is rarely described and reported in the trauma-abuse literature. Perhaps more attention needs to be focused on mother-son relationships in order to prevent these

Richard C. Robertiello

1998-01-01

30

Developmental origins of antihomosexual prejudice in heterosexual men and women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antihomosexual prejudice, popularly referred to as “homophobia,” is a complex phenomenon whose roots traditionally have been traced to the cultural context. However, such theoretical explanations fall short of accounting for the power and endurance of this bias. By locating the threat of homophobia in the development of male core gender identity and female heterosexual object choice, the author suggests that

Laura Reiter

1991-01-01

31

In Search of Looks, Status, or Something Else? Partner Preferences Among Butch and Femme Lesbians and Heterosexual Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research posited that butch lesbians are physiologically similar to heterosexual men, and by implication, femme lesbians\\u000a physiologically resemble heterosexual women. The current study sought to compare partner preferences among butch and femme\\u000a lesbians, as well as heterosexual women and men. More than 600 personal advertisements from newspapers and websites across\\u000a the United States were examined. Forty-seven percent of advertisers

Christine A. Smith; Julie A. Konik; Melanie V. Tuve

2011-01-01

32

Canonical Beauty: Heterosexual Men Express Highly Similar Preferences for Female, but Not Male Models  

E-print Network

not to look at images of male models for as long as they choose to look at female models. · But they rateCanonical Beauty: Heterosexual Men Express Highly Similar Preferences for Female, but Not Male = 27.46 ± 8.70 years) Stimuli 80 faces from four categories: Female Beautiful (FB), Female Average (FA

Vessel, Edward A.

33

Interpersonal contact and heterosexuals’ attitudes toward gay men: Results from a national survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between heterosexuals’ attitudes toward gay men and their interpersonal contact experiences with a lesbian or gay person was examined with data from a national AIDS telephone survey with a probability sample of English?speaking adults in the United States (n = 937). When asked whether any friends or relatives had “let you know that they were homosexual,” approximately one?third

Gregory M. Herek; Eric K. Glunt

1993-01-01

34

Condom Use among Heterosexual Immigrant Latino Men in the Southeastern United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Latinos in the United States have been disproportionately affected by the intersecting epidemics of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). We examined correlates of condom use among adult heterosexual Latino men who are members of a large multicounty soccer league in rural North Carolina. Of 222 participants, the mean (plus or minus SD) age…

Knipper, Emily; Rhodes, Scott D.; Lindstrom, Kristen; Bloom, Fred R.; Leichliter, Jami S.; Montano, Jaime

2007-01-01

35

Strategies to prevent HIV transmission among heterosexual African-American men  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: As part of qualitative research for developing a culturally sensitive and developmentally appropriate videotape-based HIV prevention intervention for heterosexual African- American men, six focus groups were conducted with thirty African-American men to determine their perceptions of AIDS as a threat to the African-American community, characteristics of past situations that have placed African Americans at risk for HIV infection, their

Ekere J Essien; Angela F Meshack; Ronald J Peters; Gbadebo O Ogungbade; Nora I Osemene

2005-01-01

36

Attitudes Toward Gay Men and Lesbians Among Heterosexual Male and Female Student-Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes toward lesbians and gay men among 371 heterosexual male and female collegiate\\u000a student-athletes in the USA. Attitudes were assessed in relationship to the student-athletes’ gender, sport and contact. Participants\\u000a completed a demographic form and the Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gay Men (ATLG-S) Scale (Herek in Journal of Homosexuality\\u000a 10:39–51, 1984, Journal

Emily A. Roper; Erin Halloran

2007-01-01

37

Sexual scripts and sexual risk behaviors among black heterosexual men: development of the sexual scripts scale.  

PubMed

Sexual scripts are widely shared gender and culture-specific guides for sexual behavior with important implications for HIV prevention. Although several qualitative studies document how sexual scripts may influence sexual risk behaviors, quantitative investigations of sexual scripts in the context of sexual risk are rare. This mixed methods study involved the qualitative development and quantitative testing of the Sexual Scripts Scale (SSS). Study 1 included qualitative semi-structured interviews with 30 Black heterosexual men about sexual experiences with main and casual sex partners to develop the SSS. Study 2 included a quantitative test of the SSS with 526 predominantly low-income Black heterosexual men. A factor analysis of the SSS resulted in a 34-item, seven-factor solution that explained 68 % of the variance. The subscales and coefficient alphas were: Romantic Intimacy Scripts (? = .86), Condom Scripts (? = .82), Alcohol Scripts (? = .83), Sexual Initiation Scripts (? = .79), Media Sexual Socialization Scripts (? = .84), Marijuana Scripts (? = .85), and Sexual Experimentation Scripts (? = .84). Among men who reported a main partner (n = 401), higher Alcohol Scripts, Media Sexual Socialization Scripts, and Marijuana Scripts scores, and lower Condom Scripts scores were related to more sexual risk behavior. Among men who reported at least one casual partner (n = 238), higher Romantic Intimacy Scripts, Sexual Initiation Scripts, and Media Sexual Socialization Scripts, and lower Condom Scripts scores were related to higher sexual risk. The SSS may have considerable utility for future research on Black heterosexual men's HIV risk. PMID:24311105

Bowleg, Lisa; Burkholder, Gary J; Noar, Seth M; Teti, Michelle; Malebranche, David J; Tschann, Jeanne M

2015-04-01

38

HIV-Prevention-Related Sexual Health Promotion for Heterosexual Men in the United States: Pitfalls and Recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the male condom remains the most commonly used method of HIV prevention, sexual health promotion interventions directed toward heterosexuals in the United States have focused primarily on women. In this paper, we discuss limitations of the utility of various HIV-prevention-related sexual health promotion messages as they pertain to the sexual behavior of heterosexual men. We also present several key

DavidWyatt Seal; Anke A. Ehrhardt

2004-01-01

39

Gym exercising patterns, lifestyle and high-risk sexual behaviour in men who have sex with men and in heterosexual men  

PubMed Central

Objective Lifestyle may be associated with risk behaviours. This study compares gym exercise and sexual risk behaviour between men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual men. The research was based on the assumption that men who become muscular and physically attractive increase their number of sex partners and consequently their risk of HIV or other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Setting Five gyms in central Tel Aviv, Israel. Participants In 2012, a sample of 182 (48%) MSM and 197 (52%) heterosexual men who train in gyms completed anonymous questionnaires regarding their training, health and sexual behaviours. Outcomes Participants in this cross-sectional study who exercised more than the median number of anaerobic training hours were defined as performing intensive anaerobic training (IAT), and those who had performed more than one act of unprotected anal/vaginal intercourse in the preceding 6?months with a partner whose HIV status was unknown were defined as high risk. Results MSM showed a stronger desire to become muscular than heterosexual men, were more likely to perform IAT, and used protein powders or anabolic steroids. They reported that improving their body shape and increasing their self-confidence were their main reasons for training, whereas heterosexual men indicated weight loss and health improvement as the main reasons for training. MSM engaged in riskier sexual behaviour than heterosexual men. Of all the high-risk men, 61.9% (N=70) performed IAT, while 38.1% (N=43) performed moderate anaerobic training (p<0.01). The association between IAT and sexual risk was stronger in MSM than in heterosexual men (p<0.01 vs p=0.05, respectively). The interaction between MSM and IAT in high-risk participants was multiplicative. Conclusions MSM practised more IAT than heterosexual men, and their interaction between IAT and sexual risk was multiplicative. The MSM community could benefit from a holistic approach to sexual health and its association with body image and IAT. The gym MSM culture demonstrates how internal dynamics and social norms are possible factors driving MSM to high-risk behaviour for HIV/STI. Study registration The study was approved by the Wolfson Hospital Review Board, Holon, Israel (WOMC-0058-09). PMID:25421336

Mor, Z; Parfionov, K; Davidovitch, N; Grotto, I

2014-01-01

40

Preference for attractiveness and thinness in a partner: influence of internalization of the thin ideal and shape/weight dissatisfaction in heterosexual women, heterosexual men, lesbians, and gay men.  

PubMed

This study assesses whether characteristics of one's own body image influences preferences of attractiveness in a partner. The role of gender and sexual orientation is also considered. Heterosexual women (n=67), lesbian women (n=73), heterosexual men (n=61) and gay men (n=82) participated in an internet survey assessing attitudes towards the body and preferences of attractiveness in a partner. Men in particular were found to prefer attractive partners, regardless of sexual orientation. Weight/shape dissatisfaction was found to be a negative predictor for heterosexual men and women. For gay men, preferences were better explained by internalization and weight/shape dissatisfaction. No such associations were found in the lesbian group. Levels of weight/shape dissatisfaction and internalization of socio-cultural slenderness ideals influence expectations of thinness and attractiveness in a partner with this effect being modified by gender and sexual orientation. PMID:19443281

Legenbauer, Tanja; Vocks, Silja; Schäfer, Corinna; Schütt-Strömel, Sabine; Hiller, Wolfgang; Wagner, Christof; Vögele, Claus

2009-06-01

41

Marketing HIV prevention for heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women: the Hombres Sanos campaign.  

PubMed

This article describes the development process of Hombres Sanos, a social marketing campaign to promote HIV testing and condom use for heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women. The steps included qualitative formative research and a social marketing analytic framework to understand our target audience better, identify incentives and barriers to risk reduction, guide product development, define an optimal promotional campaign, and inform the selection of campaign platforms. A better grasp of the authors' target beneficiaries' needs and values led to an innovative dual strategy for audience segmentation and targeting. The campaign had consumer-centered, culturally sensitive, and theory-driven communication materials. The authors found communication materials and events to be appealing and effective. The campaign was well received among the wider community, and evaluation showed promising results among Latino men in general and among heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women in particular. The authors provide a step-by-step overview of the project's formative research, including research methods and findings, and how these were translated into a social marketing campaign. In addition, the authors discuss the challenges encountered in this process and the potential of social marketing to reduce HIV risk among Latinos. PMID:22500921

Fernández Cerdeño, Araceli; Martínez-Donate, Ana P; Zellner, Jennifer A; Sañudo, Fernando; Carrillo, Héctor; Engelberg, Moshe; Sipan, Carol; Hovell, Melbourne

2012-01-01

42

Trends in chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity among heterosexual men and men who have sex with men attending a large urban sexual health service in Australia, 2002-2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  To determine whether chlamydia positivity among heterosexual men (MSW) and chlamydia and gonorrhea positivity among men who\\u000a have sex with men (MSM), are changing.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Computerized records for men attending a large sexual health clinic between 2002 and 2009 were analyzed. Chlamydia and gonorrhea\\u000a positivity were calculated and logistic regression used to assess changes over time.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  17769 MSW and 8328 MSM

Lenka A Vodstrcil; Christopher K Fairley; Glenda Fehler; David Leslie; Jennifer Walker; Catriona S Bradshaw; Jane S Hocking

2011-01-01

43

Condoms and Contexts: Profiles of Sexual Risk and Safety Among Young Heterosexually Active Men.  

PubMed

Heterosexual men's sexual safety behavior is important to controlling the U.S. epidemic of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). While sexual safety is often treated as a single behavior, such as condom use, it can also be conceptualized as resulting from multiple factors. Doing so can help us achieve more nuanced understandings of sexual risk and safety within partner-related contexts. We used latent class analysis with data collected online from 18- to 25-year-old heterosexually active U.S. men (n = 432) to empirically derive a typology of the patterns of sexual safety strategies they employed. Indicators were sexual risk-reduction strategies used in the past year with the most recent female sex partner: condom use, discussing sexual histories, STI testing, agreeing to be monogamous, and discussing birth control. We identified four subgroups: Risk Takers (12%), Condom Reliers (25%), Multistrategists (28%), and Relationship Reliers (35%). Partner-related context factors-number of past-year sex partners, relationship commitment, and sexual concurrency-predicted subgroup membership. Findings support tailoring STI prevention to men's sexual risk-safety subgroups. Interventions should certainly continue to encourage condom use but should also include information on how partner-related context factors and alternate sexual safety strategies can help men reduce risk for themselves and their partners. PMID:25256019

Masters, N Tatiana; Casey, Erin; Beadnell, Blair; Morrison, Diane M; Hoppe, Marilyn J; Wells, Elizabeth A

2014-09-25

44

Women live longer than men.  

PubMed

In most parts of the world women live longer. This gender gap in life expectancy (LE) is remarkable and it has challenged scientific research for decades. Closer analysis of geographic differences related to such gender gap and attempts to recognize its cause may provide a powerful tool to understand the basic process of aging and to device preventive health care strategies. In countries with established socio-economic order women live on the average 4-7 years longer. The main contributing factor is higher cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality in men. In the European established democracies male mortality is on decline and the gender gap in LE is becoming smaller. Current trends in Iceland and in other Scandinavian countries indicate that by the year 2050 men will live as long as women. Unfortunately, the gender gap continues to grow in the countries of the former Soviet influence where it represents up to 13 years. Dependence of the gender gap on the socio-economic order of a particular society points out the importance of environmental factors. Other mechanisms influencing the gender difference are the different hormonal and genetic function (Fig. 6, Ref. 23). PMID:23331196

Ginter, E; Simko, V

2013-01-01

45

Violence Victimization of Young Men in Heterosexual Relationships: Does Alcohol Outlet Density Influence Outcomes?  

PubMed Central

This study examined whether alcohol outlet density is associated with male physical and sexual victimization by a female partner. Data were from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). A total of 3,179 young adult men identified a current heterosexual relationship and had complete intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization data. Almost 16% of this sample reported being the victim of physical only IPV in their relationship over the previous 12 months; an additional 6.4% were victims of sexual only or sexual and physical IPV. Multivariate analyses indicated high alcohol outlet density was associated with greater odds of experiencing physical IPV only (odds ratio [OR] = 2.07). Heavy drinkers experienced increased odds of physical and sexual IPV victimization. Alcohol outlet density should be addressed in prevention efforts. PMID:22978073

Waller, Martha W.; Iritani, Bonita J.; Flewelling, Robert L.; Christ, Sharon L.; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Moracco, Kathryn E.

2012-01-01

46

“What Does it Take to be a Man? What is a Real Man?”: Ideologies of masculinity and HIV sexual risk among Black heterosexual men  

PubMed Central

Research documents the link between traditional ideologies of masculinity and sexual risk among multi-ethnic male adolescents and White male college students, but similar research with Black heterosexual men is scarce. This exploratory study addressed this gap through six focus groups with 41 Black, low to middle income heterosexual men aged 19 to 51 years in Philadelphia, PA. Analyses highlighted two explicit ideologies of masculinity: that Black men should have sex with multiple women, often concurrently; and that Black men should not be gay or bisexual. Analyses also identified two implicit masculinity ideologies: the perception that Black heterosexual men cannot decline sex, even risky sex; and that women are primarily responsible for condom use. The study’s implications for HIV prevention with Black heterosexual men are discussed. PMID:21390949

Bowleg, Lisa; Teti, Michelle; Massie, Jenné S.; Patel, Aditi; Malebranche, David J.; Tschann, Jeanne M.

2011-01-01

47

Body image, eating disorders, and the drive for muscularity in gay and heterosexual men: the influence of media images.  

PubMed

This Internet research project examined the relationship between consumption of muscle and fitness magazines and/or various indices of pornography and body satisfaction in gay and heterosexual men. Participants (N = 101) were asked to complete body satisfaction questionnaires that addressed maladaptive eating attitudes, the drive for muscularity, and social physique anxiety. Participants also completed scales measuring self-esteem, depression, and socially desirable responding. Finally, respondents were asked about their consumption of muscle and fitness magazines and pornography. Results indicated that viewing and purchasing of muscle and fitness magazines correlated positively with levels of body dissatisfaction for both gay and heterosexual men. Pornography exposure was positively correlated with social physique anxiety for gay men. The limitations of this study and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:15451703

Duggan, Scott J; McCreary, Donald R

2004-01-01

48

The effect of condoms on penile vibrotactile sensitivity thresholds in young, heterosexual men  

PubMed Central

Introduction Investigating the ways in which barrier methods such as condoms may affect penile sensory thresholds has potential relevance to the development of interventions in men who experience negative effects of condoms on sexual response and sensation. A quantitative, psychophysiological investigation examining the degree to which sensations are altered by condoms has, to date, not been conducted. Aim The objective of this study was to examine penile vibrotactile sensitivity thresholds in both flaccid and erect penises with and without a condom, while comparing men who do and those who do not report condom-associated erection problems (CAEP). Methods Penile vibrotactile sensitivity thresholds were assessed among a total of 141 young, heterosexual men using biothesiometry. An incremental two-step staircase method was used and repeated three times for each of four conditions. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for all vibratory assessments. Penile vibratory thresholds were compared using a mixed-model Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Main Outcome Measures Penile vibrotactile sensitivity thresholds with and without a condom, erectile function measured by International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire (IIEF), and self-reported degree of erection. Results Significant main effects of condoms (yes/no) and erection (yes/no) were found. No main or interaction effects of CAEP were found. Condoms were associated with higher penile vibrotactile sensitivity thresholds (F(1, 124)=17.11, p<.001). Penile vibrotactile thresholds were higher with an erect than with a flaccid penis (F(1, 124)=4.21, p=.042). Conclusion The current study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring penile vibratory thresholds with and without a condom in both erect and flaccid experimental conditions. As might be expected, condoms increased penile vibrotactile sensitivity thresholds. Interestingly, erections were associated with the highest thresholds. Thus, this study was the first to document that erect penises are less sensitive to vibrotactile stimulation than flaccid penises. PMID:24168347

Hill, Brandon J.; Janssen, Erick; Kvam, Peter; Amick, Erick E.; Sanders, Stephanie A.

2013-01-01

49

Fatherhood and Men's Lives at Middle Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article uses data on 2,024 men who were followed through the third wave of the National Survey of Families and Households to examine the implications of fatherhood experiences for men's involvement in altruistic social activities at middle age. We find that middle-aged men (ages 45-65) who at some point in their lives become fathers are…

Eggebeen, David J.; Dew, Jeffrey; Knoester, Chris

2010-01-01

50

Maintaining distinctions under threat: heterosexual men endorse the biological theory of sexuality when equality is the norm.  

PubMed

According to social identity theory, group members sometimes react to threats to their group's distinctiveness by asserting the distinctiveness of their group. In four studies (n = 261) we tested the hypothesis that heterosexual men with a greater propensity to be threatened by homosexuality would react to egalitarian norms by endorsing biological theories of sexuality. Heterosexual men, but not women, with narrow prototypes of their gender in-group endorsed biological theories the most (Study 1). Heterosexual men with higher gender self-esteem, with heterosexist attitudes, who endorsed traditional gender roles, and with narrow prototypes of their gender in-group, endorsed the biological theories more when egalitarian norms rather than anti-egalitarian norms (Studies 2 and 3) or pro-minority ideologies that emphasized group differences (Study 4) were made salient. These findings show group-level reactive distinctiveness among members of a high-status group in a context of threat to the unique privileges that they once enjoyed. PMID:24131397

Falomir-Pichastor, Juan M; Hegarty, Peter

2014-12-01

51

Neural activation during anticipation of opposite-sex and same-sex faces in heterosexual men and women.  

PubMed

Psychobiological accounts of face processing predict that greater salience is attributed to faces matching a viewer's sexual preference than to faces that do not. However, behaviorally, this effect could only be demonstrated in tasks assessing reward 'wanting' (e.g. work-per-view-tasks) but not in tasks assessing 'liking' (e.g. facial attractiveness ratings), and has been found to be more pronounced in heterosexual men than women, especially with regard to very attractive faces. Here, we addressed the question if sex differences at the level of 'wanting' persist if participants are uninformed about the attractiveness of an anticipated male or female face. Seventeen heterosexual men and 13 heterosexual women (all single) participated in a social incentive delay task (SID). Participants were required to react on simple graphical cues in order to view a smiling face. Cues provided a priori information on the level of smile intensity (low/medium/high) as well as sex of the face (male/ female). A significant interaction of sex-of-face and sex-of-participant was observed in a priori defined regions of interest in the brain reward system (including ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex), reflecting enhanced activation to cues signaling opposite-sex faces relative to same-sex faces in both, men and women. Women additionally recruited the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) during processing of opposite- vs. same-sex cues, suggesting stronger incorporation of social cognition processes in women than men. The findings speak against a general male bias for opposite-sex faces. Instead they provide preliminary evidence that men and women recruit different brain circuits during reward value assessment of facial stimuli. PMID:23128082

Spreckelmeyer, Katja N; Rademacher, Lena; Paulus, Frieder M; Gründer, Gerhard

2013-02-01

52

Physical victimization and high-risk sexual partners among illicit drug-using heterosexual men in New York City.  

PubMed

Physical victimization has been linked to high-risk sexual partnerships in women. Although illicit drug-using heterosexual men are at high-risk of physical victimization, the association between violence and high-risk partners in heterosexual men has received little attention in the published literature. We examined the association between experience of severe physical victimization and acquisition of a high-risk sexual partner (i.e., a partner who injected drugs or participated in transactional sex) 1 year later among illicit drug-using men in New York City (2006-2009) using secondary cross-sectional data. Injection and non-injection drug-using men (n?=?280) provided a retrospectively recalled history of risk behavior and violence for each year over the past 4 years. Our primary outcome was acquisition of a high-risk sexual partner in any year following the baseline year. Our primary exposure was severe physical victimization (i.e., threatened with a knife or gun, beaten up, shot, or stabbed) in the prior year. Frequency of cocaine, heroin, and crack use and sexual victimization were also assessed. Log-binomial logistic regression with generalized estimating equation (GEE) methods was used to account for repeated measures for up to four time points. After adjustment for important covariates, participants that experienced physical victimization were significantly more likely to have acquired a high-risk sexual partner 1 year later (relative risk (RR), 3.73; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.55-8.97). Our study challenges gender-based stereotypes surrounding physical victimization and provides support for multidisciplinary programs that address both violence and HIV risk among illicit drug-using heterosexual men. PMID:25256949

Turner, Alezandria K; Jones, Kandice C; Rudolph, Abby; Rivera, Alexis V; Crawford, Natalie; Lewis, Crystal Fuller

2014-10-01

53

Turn it off! the effects of exposure to male-male erotic imagery on heterosexuals' attitudes toward gay men.  

PubMed

Despite the recent proliferation of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) thematic content in U.S. media, there have been relatively few empirical investigations examining its impact on heterosexuals' attitudes toward LGB individuals. This study examined the effect of one type of content, male-male homoerotic imagery, on male and female heterosexuals' attitudes toward, stereotypes about, and affective reactions to gay men. One hundred ninety-eight undergraduate students were assigned to either a male-male or male-female erotica condition, and their corresponding attitudes toward gay men were assessed. Results revealed that the effect of erotic imagery (male-male vs. male-female) on participants' stereotype and affect scores differed for men and women at varying levels of sexual anxiety. The implications of these findings are discussed in light of the literature on exposure to erotic imagery and attitudes toward gay men. In particular, the study highlights the need for additional research that acknowledges within-gender heterogeneity with respect to antigay attitude valence, extremity, and function. PMID:21253924

Golom, Frank D; Mohr, Jonathan J

2011-01-01

54

Exploring the health behavior disparities of gay men in the United States: comparing gay male university students to their heterosexual peers.  

PubMed

Little is known about the health disparities that affect gay men in the United States. Using data collected from an online Internet-based assessment, we sought to compare health-compromising behaviors of gay male university students to their heterosexual peers. Participants included 1,014 self-reported males. Mean age was 20 years (+/-2.5; range 17-30). Of these men, 43 (4.2%) self identified as gay and 971 (95.8%) self identified as heterosexual. After adjusting for age, race, academic classification, residence type, and clustering within university, gay men had higher odds of reporting inconsistent condom use; reporting multiple partners within the past 30 days; reporting a lifetime history of illicit drug use. Understanding the health behavior disparities between gay and heterosexual men is crucial to identifying associated factors and intervening upon them using appropriate and meaningful tailored strategies to reduce these disparities and improve health outcomes. PMID:18029312

Rhodes, Scott D; McCoy, Thomas; Hergenrather, Kenneth C; Omli, Morrow R; Durant, Robert H

2007-01-01

55

“It’s an Uphill Battle Everyday”: Intersectionality, Low-Income Black Heterosexual Men, and Implications for HIV Prevention Research and Interventions  

PubMed Central

This interview study, the initial qualitative phase of a larger mixed methods HIV prevention study focused on Black heterosexual men, used intersectionality as a theoretical framework to explore: (1) How a sample of Black heterosexual men describe and experience the multiple intersections of race, gender, and SES; and (2) How these descriptions reflected interlocking systems of social inequality for Black men at the social-structural level. Participants were 30 predominantly low-income self-identified Black heterosexual men between the ages of 18 and 44. Analyses highlighted four themes that demonstrate how participants’ individual-level experiences as Black men reflect macro social-structural inequality: (1) racial discrimination and microaggressions; (2) unemployment; (3) incarceration; and (4) police surveillance and harassment. We discuss the study’s findings within the context of social-structural factors that disproportionately and adversely impact Black men. We also highlight the implications of the intersectionality perspective for HIV prevention research and interventions for Black heterosexual men. PMID:23482810

Bowleg, Lisa; Teti, Michelle; Malebranche, David J.; Tschann, Jeanne M.

2012-01-01

56

Straight Talk: HIV Prevention for African-American Heterosexual Men--Theoretical Bases and Intervention Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the United States, racial disparities in HIV/AIDS are stark. Although African Americans comprise an estimated 14% of the U.S. population, they made up 52% of new HIV cases among adults and adolescents diagnosed in 2009. Heterosexual transmission is now the second leading cause of HIV in the United States. African Americans made up a full…

Frye, Victoria; Bonner, Sebastian; Williams, Kim; Henny, Kirk; Bond, Keosha; Lucy, Debbie; Cupid, Malik; Smith, Stephen; Koblin, Beryl A.

2012-01-01

57

Men in the lives of children.  

PubMed

This article examines the ways in which men have an impact on the lives of young children and illustrates how educating men about the needs of children and getting them more involved in the programming process can strengthen programs for young children. Strategies to increase men's awareness about young children are offered. A review of the published studies on the ways in which fathers are directly involved with their families and the ways fathers contribute to the family materially shows that fathers can use appropriate interactions to positively affect their children's development. For example, the level and type of involvement that a father has with his child can affect the child's scores on intelligence tests and school behavior. However, a crosscultural study has shown that four-year-olds spend very little time alone with their fathers. In many parts of the world, fathers are entirely absent from the household. The relationship between fathers and mothers can also affect the father-child relationship. While men contribute to the material well-being of families, women do so also and allocate their funds to meet the needs of the children. The role of women must be considered when programs are designed to expand the involvement of fathers or others in a child's life. The role that men play in their children's lives is affected by changes in men's ability to give their family economic support, by changes in women's ability to provide economic support, by society's changing expectations, and by men's desire to change their roles. The impact that men can have on children as teachers, healers, community leaders, religious leaders, and policymakers is also shown to be significant. Strategies to increase the involvement of men with children include 1) expanding the understanding of men in power of the importance of the early years, 2) working with men on direct parenting skills, 3) providing men with child development and parenting information, 4) providing appropriate role models, 5) supporting men in their fathering role, and 6) improving the economic environment. A series of recommended questions for consideration in the situational analysis process which can lead to policy and programming efforts to increase and improve the involvement of men ends this article. PMID:12290119

Evans, J L

1995-01-01

58

Masturbation and Pornography Use Among Coupled Heterosexual Men With Decreased Sexual Desire: How Many Roles of Masturbation?  

PubMed

The relation between masturbation and sexual desire has not been systematically studied. The present study assessed the association between masturbation and pornography use and the predictors and correlates of frequent masturbation (several times a week or more often) among coupled heterosexual men who reported decreased sexual desire. Analyses were carried out on a subset of 596 men with decreased sexual desire (mean age = 40.2 years) who were recruited as part of a large online study on male sexual health in 3 European countries. A majority of the participants (67%) reported masturbating at least once a week. Among men who masturbated frequently, 70% used pornography at least once a week. A multivariate assessment showed that sexual boredom, frequent pornography use, and low relationship intimacy significantly increased the odds of reporting frequent masturbation among coupled men with decreased sexual desire. These findings point to a pattern of pornography-related masturbation that can be dissociated from partnered sexual desire and can fulfill diverse purposes. Clinical implications include the importance of exploring specific patterns of masturbation and pornography use in the evaluation of coupled men with decreased sexual desire. PMID:25189834

Carvalheira, Ana; Træen, Bente; Stulhofer, Aleksandar

2014-09-01

59

Prejudice-Related Events and Traumatic Stress Among Heterosexuals and Lesbians, Gay Men and Bisexuals  

PubMed Central

This mixed-methods study examined associations between prejudice events and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 382 lesbians, gays, and bisexuals (LGB) and 126 heterosexuals. Using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, we assessed PTSD but relaxed Criterion A1, that is, allowed prejudice events that did not involve threat to life or physical integrity to also qualify as traumatic. First, we tested whether exposure to prejudice events differed with respect to sexual orientation and race. White LGBs were more likely than White heterosexuals to encounter a prejudice event, but Black and Latino LGBs were no more likely than White LGBs to experience a prejudice event. Second, we used qualitative analysis to examine the prejudice events that precipitated relaxed Criterion A1 PTSD among 8 participants. Two specific themes emerged: the need to make major changes and compromised sense of safety and security following exposure to the prejudice event. PMID:24348008

Alessi, Edward J.; Martin, James I.; Gyamerah, Akua; Meyer, Ilan H.

2013-01-01

60

Recalled Parent—Child Relations and need for approval of homosexual and heterosexual men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Young adult male homosexuals were recruited from a homosexual group and were given the Roe-Siegelman Parent—Child Relations questionnaire and the Marlowe-Crowne social desirability scale. Compared to a control group of heterosexuals, the homosexual group rated their mothers significantly more rejecting and their fathers less loving and more rejecting. The Love—Reject factor also showed the between-groups difference for the ratings of

Johanna H. Milic; Douglas P. Crowne

1986-01-01

61

Heterosexual Risk for HIV Among Black Men in the United States: A Call to Action Against a Neglected Crisis in Black Communities  

PubMed Central

Recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention demonstrate that 1 in 16 Black men in the United States will be infected with HIV in their lifetime. Furthermore, the long-standing HIV disparity in Black communities is actually increasing for Black men. National efforts to curb the epidemic among U.S. Black men focus primarily on men who have sex with men and injection drug users. Black men at heterosexual risk for HIV have largely been neglected by research, program, and policy. This article presents epidemiologic data documenting that heterosexual risk for HIV among Black men is a major concern for Black communities and is likely additional evidence among growing indications of a generalized epidemic in low-income and urban Black communities. The authors offer a call to action to increase support for research, program, and policies that can improve HIV prevention and testing among heterosexual Black men in the United States, as part of the national agenda to reduce rates of HIV in Black communities. PMID:21831928

Raj, Anita; Bowleg, Lisa

2012-01-01

62

Using Intervention Mapping to develop a programme to prevent sexually transmittable infections, including HIV, among heterosexual migrant men  

PubMed Central

Background There is little experience with carefully developed interventions in the HIV/STI prevention field aimed at adult heterosexual target groups in the Netherlands. The ability to apply intervention development protocols, like Intervention Mapping, in daily practice outside of academia, is a matter of concern. An urgent need also exists for interventions aimed at the prevention of STI in migrant populations in the Netherlands. This article describes the theory and evidence based development of HIV/STI prevention interventions by the Municipal Public Health Service Rotterdam Area (MPHS), the Netherlands, for heterosexual migrant men with Surinamese, Dutch-Caribbean, Cape Verdean, Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds. Methods First a needs assessment was carried out. Then, a literature review was done, key figures were interviewed and seven group discussions were held. Subsequently, the results were translated into specific objectives ("change objectives") and used in intervention development for two subgroups: men with an Afro-Caribbean background and unmarried men with a Turkish and Moroccan background. A matrix of change objectives was made for each subgroup and suitable theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected. Culturally-tailored interventions were designed and were pre-tested among the target groups. Results This development process resulted in two interventions for specific subgroups that were appreciated by both the target groups and the migrant prevention workers. The project took place in collaboration with a university center, which provided an opportunity to get expert advice at every step of the Intervention Mapping process. At relevant points of the development process, migrant health educators and target group members provided advice and feedback on the draft intervention materials. Conclusion This intervention development project indicates that careful well-informed intervention development using Intervention Mapping is feasible in the daily practice of the MPHS, provided that sufficient time and expertise on this approach is available. Further research should test the effectiveness of these interventions. PMID:17615052

Wolfers, Mireille EG; van den Hoek, Caty; Brug, Johannes; de Zwart, Onno

2007-01-01

63

Chlamydia trachomatis strains show specific clustering for men who have sex with men compared to heterosexual populations in Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United States.  

PubMed

High-resolution genotyping of Chlamydia trachomatis improves the characterization of strains infecting different patient groups and sexual networks. In this study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and ompA sequence determination were used for an analysis of C. trachomatis strains from 203 men who have sex with men (MSM) from Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United States. The results obtained were compared with data from 153 heterosexual women from Sweden and the Netherlands. The overlap in MLST/ompA profiles between MSM from Sweden and the Netherlands was 68%, while the overlap between heterosexual populations from these countries was only 18%. The distribution of genotypes in MSM from the United States was less similar to that in MSM from the European countries, with 45% and 46% overlaps for MSM in Sweden and the Netherlands, respectively. Minimum-spanning-tree analysis of MLST/ompA sequence types identified two large clusters that contained almost exclusively samples from MSM and comprised 74% of all MSM samples. Three other clusters were predominated by samples from women but also contained MSM specimens. Of 19 detected variants of the MLST target CT144, three variants were highly associated with MSM. Our study supports the hypotheses of both tissue tropism as well as epidemiological network structures as explanations for the linkage between specific genetic variants and sexual orientation. PMID:22915612

Christerson, Linus; Bom, Reinier J M; Bruisten, Sylvia M; Yass, Resha; Hardick, Justin; Bratt, Göran; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Morré, Servaas A; Herrmann, Björn

2012-11-01

64

Sexual and affective responses to same- and opposite-sex stimuli in heterosexual and homosexual men: assessment and manipulation of visual attention.  

PubMed

Affective and cognitive factors play an important role in the activation and regulation of men's sexual arousal. Barlow (1986) argued that initial affective reactions determine the allocation of attention to sexual stimuli. We applied Barlow's model to our understanding of the role of sexual arousal in sexual orientation, where sexual arousal patterns have consistently been found to be congruent with self-reported orientation in men, but not in women. Visual attention of 28 heterosexual and 22 homosexual men to same- and opposite-sex erotic stimuli was assessed and experimentally-directed by means of a newly developed software application, while genital (penile rigidity) and affective responses (self-reported and physiological) were measured. In line with previous research, we found "category specificity" in men's sexual arousal, in that sexual responses were strongest to orientation-congruent stimuli. Also, both homosexual and heterosexual men experienced stronger sexual responses to conditions in which their attention was directed to sexual versus nonsexual content of orientation-congruent stimuli. Only homosexual men manifested higher sexual responses when their visual attention was directed towards the sexual content of orientation-incongruent stimuli. Heterosexual men experienced weaker positive and stronger negative affective responses to orientation-incongruent content, suggestive of potential avoidance or inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:24473940

Samson, Lelia; Janssen, Erick

2014-07-01

65

Correlates of condom-associated erection problems in young, heterosexual men: condom fit, self-efficacy, perceptions, and motivations.  

PubMed

Questionnaire data from 479 heterosexual men 18-24 years old were analyzed for correlates of CAEP during application (CAEP-Application) and CAEP during penile-vaginal intercourse (CAEP-PVI). Potential correlates were self-efficacy (condom application, product selection, and maintaining arousal), condom perceptions (condom worry/distraction, negative condom perceptions, concerns about application speed), condom fit, and motivation to use condoms. We conclude that (1) experiencing CAEP may become a repeating cycle, both affecting and being affected by, worry and distraction related to losing erections and maintaining arousal while using a condom (2) poorly fitting condoms may contribute to CAEP, and (3) CAEP may decrease motivation to use condoms. PMID:23404098

Sanders, Stephanie A; Hill, Brandon J; Crosby, Richard A; Janssen, Erick

2014-01-01

66

Prejudice Events and Traumatic Stress among Heterosexuals and Lesbians, Gay Men and Bisexuals  

PubMed Central

This mixed-methods study examined associations between prejudice events and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 382 lesbians, gays, and bisexuals (LGB) and 126 heterosexuals. Using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, we assessed PTSD with a relaxed Criterion A1; that is, we allowed events that did not involve threat to life or physical integrity to also qualify as traumatic. We first assessed whether exposure to prejudice-related qualifying events differed with respect to participants’ sexual orientation and race. We found that White LGBs were more likely than White heterosexuals to encounter a prejudice-related qualifying event, and among LGBs, Black and Latino LGBs were no more likely than White LGBs to experience this type of event. We then used qualitative analysis of participants’ brief narratives to examine prejudice events that precipitated Relaxed Criterion A1 PTSD among 8 participants. Two themes emerged: (a) the need to make major changes and (b) compromised sense of safety and security following exposure to the prejudice event. PMID:24415898

Alessi, Edward J.; Martin, James I.; Gyamerah, Akua; Meyer, Ilan H.

2013-01-01

67

Behavioral Health and Social Normative Influence: Correlates of Concurrent Sexual Partnering Among Heterosexually-Active Homeless Men  

PubMed Central

Sexual concurrency poses significant HIV/STI transmission risk. The correlates of concurrency have not been examined among homeless men. A representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men utilizing meal programs in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles reported on their mental health, substance use, and social network characteristics. Nearly 40% of men reported concurrency with one of their four most recent sex partners. Results indicated that HIV seropositivity (OR = 4.39, CI: 1.10, 17.46; p = 0.04), PTSD (OR = 2.29, CI: 1.05, 5.01; p = 0.04), hard drug use (OR = 2.45, CI: 1.07, 5.58; p = 0.03), and the perception that network alters engage in risky sex (OR = 3.72, CI: 1.49, 9.30; p = 0.01) were associated with increased odds of concurrency. Programs aimed at reducing HIV/STI transmission in this vulnerable population must take into account the roles that behavioral health and social networks may play in sexual concurrency. PMID:22001933

Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Hsu, Hsun-Ta; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S.; Kennedy, David P.; Green, Harold D.; Ewing, Brett

2011-01-01

68

High risk human papillomavirus viral load and persistence among heterosexual HIV-negative and HIV-positive men  

PubMed Central

Objectives High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) viral load is associated with HR-HPV transmission and HR-HPV persistence in women. It is unknown whether HR-HPV viral load is associated with persistence in HIV-negative or HIV-positive men. Methods HR-HPV viral load and persistence were evaluated among 703 HIV-negative and 233 HIV-positive heterosexual men who participated in a male circumcision trial in Rakai, Uganda. Penile swabs were tested at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 months for HR-HPV using the Roche HPV Linear Array, which provides a semi-quantitative measure of HPV shedding by hybridization band intensity (graded:1–4). Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) were used to estimate the association between HR-HPV viral load and persistent detection of HR-HPV. Results HR-HPV genotypes with high viral load (grade:3–4) at baseline were more likely to persist than HR-HPV genotypes with low viral load (grade:1–2) among HIV-negative men (month 6: adjPRR=1.83, 95%CI:1.32–2.52; month 12: adjPRR=2.01, 95%CI:1.42–3.11), and HIV-positive men (month 6: adjPRR=1.33, 95%CI:1.06–1.67; month 12: adjPRR=1.73, 95%CI:1.18–2.54). Long-term persistence of HR-HPV was more frequent among HIV-positive men compared to HIV-negative men (month 24: adjPRR=2.27, 95%CI: 1.47–3.51). Persistence of newly detected HR-HPV at the 6 and 12 month visits with high viral load were also more likely to persist to 24 months than HR-HPV with low viral load among HIV-negative men (adjPRR=1.67, 95%CI 0.88–3.16). Conclusions HR-HPV genotypes with high viral load are more likely to persist among HIV-negative and HIV-positive men, though persistence was more common among HIV-positive men overall. The results may explain the association between high HR-HPV viral load and HR-HPV transmission. PMID:24482488

Grabowski, Mary K.; Gray, Ronald H; Serwadda, David; Kigozi, Godfrey; Gravitt, Patti E.; Nalugoda, Fred; Reynolds, Steven J.; Wawer, Maria J.; Watya, Stephen; Quinn, Thomas C.; Tobian, Aaron A. R.

2014-01-01

69

Effects of Traditional Gender Role Norms and Religious Fundamentalism on Self-Identified Heterosexual Men's Attitudes, Anger, and Aggression Toward Gay Men and Lesbians  

PubMed Central

Sexual prejudice and antigay anger were examined as mediators of the associations between traditional male gender norms, religious fundamentalism, and aggression toward gay men and lesbians. Participants were 201 self-identified heterosexual men recruited from the community to complete computer-administered measures of adherence to traditional male gender norms (i.e., status, toughness, antifemininity), religious fundamentalism, sexual prejudice, and frequency of aggression toward gay men and lesbians. Additionally, participants completed a structured interview designed to assess anger in response to a vignette depicting a male-male intimate relationship (i.e., partners saying “I love you,” holding hands, kissing). Results showed that sexual prejudice and antigay anger partially mediated the effect of antifemininity on aggression and fully mediated the effect of religious fundamentalism on aggression. Sexual prejudice alone fully mediated the effect of status on aggression and neither sexual prejudice nor antigay anger mediated the effect of toughness on aggression. Further, results suggested that religious fundamentalism is a multifaceted construct of which some aspects increase risk for aggression toward gay men and lesbians, whereas other aspects decrease this risk. These data provide multivariate evidence from a nonprobability, community-based sample that extreme internalization of dominant cultural values can set the stage for violence toward marginalized groups. Implications for intervention programming and future research are reviewed. PMID:22081759

Vincent, Wilson; Parrott, Dominic J.; Peterson, John L.

2011-01-01

70

The use of erection enhancing medication and party drugs among men living with HIV in Europe.  

PubMed

Studies have shown more erectile dysfunction (ED) in men living with HIV (MLHIV), relative to age matched HIV-negative men. Erection enhancing medication (EEM) is more frequently used by HIV-positive men than in the general male population. Increased sexually transmitted infection has been described in HIV-positive men with ED using EEM. This study investigated the use of EEM and party drugs (methyleendioxymethamfetamine (XTC), gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) "fluid XTC" and alkyl nitrites "poppers") among MLHIV. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed consecutively to all patients attending 17 European HIV treatment centers. The sample included 1118 HIV-positive men, among whom 74.5% men having sex with men (MSM). The use of EEM was more frequent in MSM than in heterosexual men (odds ratio (OR) 3.33, p<0.001) and was associated with increased sexual risk behavior (OR 3.27, p<0.001). Nonmedically indicated use of EEM was linked to increased use of party drugs (OR 2.30, p=0.01). Physicians taking care of MLHIV need to be aware of the high prevalence of (nonmedical) use of EEM and party drugs. Medical provision of EEM should be combined with a discussion on safer sex behavior and the risk related to concomitant use of party drugs and illegal EEM. PMID:23244618

De Ryck, Iris; Van Laeken, David; Noestlinger, Christiana; Platteau, Tom; Colebunders, Robert

2013-08-01

71

Men's and Women's Interpretation and Endorsement of Items Measuring Self-Reported Heterosexual Aggression.  

PubMed

Early research on sexual aggression (e.g., sexual coercion, sexual assault, and rape) mainly focused on men as perpetrators and women as victims; more recently, researchers have begun to investigate women as perpetrators of sexual aggression as well. However, most measures of sexual aggression perpetration were designed for use with men and have not been well validated with women. This study sought to examine two different measures of sexual aggression perpetration in terms of their convergent validity for both men and women and to examine gender differences and similarities in item interpretation using open-ended inquiries. Participants were 590 individuals (395 women, 195 men) with a mean age of 25 years (SD = 8.1) recruited from an undergraduate psychology subject pool and an online convenience sample. The majority of the sample was White (65.4%) and Black (20.3%). All measures were completed online anonymously. Results suggested that convergent validity for the two measures was less than optimal, particularly for women. Further, item interpretation analyses revealed that, compared to men, more than twice the percentage of women provided a false-positive response to one of the measures, suggesting that women may be more likely than men to endorse self-report perpetration items incorrectly. PMID:25369522

Buday, Sarah K; Peterson, Zoë D

2014-11-01

72

Social Dominance Orientation Predicts Heterosexual Men's Adverse Reactions to Romantic Rejection.  

PubMed

We examined the role of social dominance orientation (SDO) as a predictor of men's reactions to romantic rejection and attitudes toward female sexuality. In Study 1 (n = 158), we found that men who scored higher in SDO were more likely to blame women for romantic rejection, and report having responded to women's past rejection with persistence and manipulation (e.g., convincing her to "give him another chance"), as well as with aggression and threats of violence. In Study 2 (n = 398), we replicated these findings, and further found that men higher in SDO were more likely to endorse rape myths (e.g., believing that sometimes a woman's barriers need to be "broken down" in order to attain sex), and to want to lower the legal age of sexual consent in women. Two mediators explained this relationship, hostile sexism and the belief that insubordinate women need to be disciplined. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:25224507

Kelly, Ashleigh J; Dubbs, Shelli L; Barlow, Fiona Kate

2015-05-01

73

Racial differences in sexual prejudice and its correlates among heterosexual men.  

PubMed

Previous research has consistently found sexual prejudice to be a predictor of antigay aggression and has also revealed specific correlates and antecedents of sexual prejudice. However, extant literature reveals mixed findings about potential racial group differences in sexual prejudice, and few studies have examined racial differences in the correlates of sexual prejudice. The aims of this descriptive study were to determine whether there are (a) racial group differences in reports of sexual prejudice and (b) racial group differences in previously identified correlates of sexual prejudice. Participants were 195 heterosexual males, ages 18 to 30 (98 Blacks and 97 Whites), recruited from a large metropolitan city in the southeastern United States. Based on cultural differences in the influence of religion and in attitudes about male sexuality, it was hypothesized that Black participants would report higher sexual prejudice than White participants. Additionally, based on cultural differences in racial views on masculinity and in sociocultural experiences of male gender roles, it was hypothesized that Blacks would report greater endorsement of religious fundamentalism and the traditional male role norm of status than Whites. Results confirmed all of the hypothesized racial differences and revealed additional differences, including a differential effect of the traditional male role norm of status on sexual prejudice, which explains, at least in part, the racial differences found in sexual prejudice. These findings may reflect underlying cultural differences between Black and White males and may aid in the development of future efforts to reduce sexual prejudice and consequently antigay aggression toward sexual minorities. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25602467

Daboin, Irene; Peterson, John L; Parrott, Dominic J

2015-04-01

74

Building heteronormativity: the social and material reconstruction of men's public toilets as spaces of heterosexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper concerns changes in the spatial structure of British public toilets for men over the last ten years from secluded, indistinctly public\\/private spaces towards open, largely public structures. It examines a number of past and present toilet spaces in the British city of Manchester using spatial syntax analysis to consider how spaces have been adapted and policed differently in

Dharman Jeyasingham

2010-01-01

75

Condom use by Dutch men with commercial heterosexual contacts: determinants and considerations.  

PubMed

We report responses from 559 clients of female prostitutes, with a view to determining to what extent previously identified factors play a part in condom use. To increase the response rate to advertisements in daily and weekly newspapers, interviews were held by phone. This procedure had the advantage of ensuring the anonymity many clients demanded. Of those clients having vaginal or anal contact (91%), 14% had not always used condoms in the previous year. Compared with consistent condom users, these men were less highly educated, had twice as many commercial contacts, and had more contacts with "steady" prostitutes. They were either more emotionally motivated to visit prostitutes than were consistent condom users or exhibited a stronger need for sexual variation. They showed a more compulsive attitude toward visiting prostitutes, had a more negative attitude toward prostitution in general, evaluated condoms more negatively, had a higher personal efficacy to achieve unsafe contacts, and had a higher general risk assessment, commensurate with their behavior. Men with only safe contacts had either an intrinsic or an extrinsic motivation for condom use. Among extrinsically motivated men, their behavior change was more recent and had not yet taken root: They still envisioned unsafe commercial sex to be possible in the future. Education aimed at the small group of men practicing unsafe contacts will not easily and directly lead to behavior change. But these educational activities may support prostitutes to persist in (consistent) condom use, regardless of clients' pressure to do otherwise. PMID:9391657

de Graaf, R; van Zessen, G; Vanwesenbeeck, I; Straver, C J; Visser, J H

1997-10-01

76

Results of an enhanced-outreach programme of hepatitis B vaccination in the Netherlands (1998–2000) among men who have sex with men, hard drug users, sex workers and heterosexual persons with multiple partners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: The Dutch Ministry of Health funded a pilot vaccination project targeting groups at high risk for sex- and drug-related hepatitis B transmission.Methods: In seven Municipal Health Service (MHS) areas, three-part hepatitis B vaccination was offered free to men who have sex with men (MSM), drug users (DUs), and heterosexuals with multiple partners, including sex workers (SWs). Four intervention areas

Jim E van Steenbergen; A THEWORKINGGROUPVACCINATIONHIGHRISK

2002-01-01

77

Mediation effects of problem drinking and marijuana use on HIV sexual risk behaviors among childhood sexually abused South African heterosexual men?  

PubMed Central

HIV/AIDS prevalence in South Africa is one of the highest in the world with heterosexual, transmission predominantly promoting the epidemic. The goal of this study is to examine whether, marijuana use and problem drinking mediate the relationship between histories of childhood sexual, abuse (CSA) and HIV risk behaviors among heterosexual men. Participants were 1181 Black men aged, 18–45 from randomly selected neighborhoods in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Audio computer assisted, self-interviewing was used to assess self-reported childhood sexual abuse, problem drinking, and marijuana (dagga) use, and HIV sexual transmission behavior with steady and casual partners. Data were analyzed using multiple meditational modeling. There was more support for problem, drinking than marijuana use as a mediator. Findings suggest that problem drinking and marijuana use, mediate HIV sexual risk behaviors in men with histories of CSA. Focusing on men with histories of CSA, and their use of marijuana and alcohol may be particularly useful for designing strategies to reduce, HIV sexual transmission in South Africa. PMID:24041455

Icard, Larry D.; Jemmott, John B.; Teitelman, Anne; O'Leary, Ann; Heeren, G. Anita

2013-01-01

78

BARBERSHOP TALK WITH BROTHERS: USING COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH TO DEVELOP AND PILOT TEST A PROGRAM TO REDUCE HIV RISK AMONG BLACK HETEROSEXUAL MEN  

PubMed Central

There is a need for feasible, evidence-based interventions that support HIV risk reduction among heterosexual Black men. In this article, we describe the process for development of the Barbershop Talk With Brothers (BTWB) program and evaluation. The BTWB program is a theoretically grounded and community-based HIV prevention program that seeks to improve individual skills and motivation to decrease sexual risk, and that builds men’s interest in and capacity for improving their community’s health. Formative data collection included barbershop observations and barber focus groups, brief behavioral risk assessments of men in barbershops, and focus groups and individual interviews. Based on this information and in consultation with our steering committee, we developed the BTWB program and accompanying program evaluation. From April through November 2011, 80 men were recruited and completed a baseline assessment of a pilot test of the program; 78 men completed the program and 71 completed a 3-month assessment. The pilot evaluation procedures were feasible to implement, and assessments of pre- and post-test measures indicate that key behavioral outcomes and proposed mediators of those outcomes changed in hypothesized directions. Specifically, attitudes and self-efficacy toward consistent condom use improved, and respondents reported lower levels of sexual risk behavior from baseline to follow-up (all p < 0.05). Perceptions of community empowerment also increased (p = 0.06). While HIV stigma decreased, this difference did not reach statistical significance. Our approach to community-engaged program development resulted in an acceptable, feasible approach to reaching and educating heterosexual Black men about HIV prevention in community settings. PMID:25299804

Wilson, Tracey E.; Fraser-White, Marilyn; Williams, Kim M.; Pinto, Angelo; Agbetor, Francis; Camilien, Brignel; Henny, Kirk; Browne, Ruth C.; Gousse, Yolene; Taylor, Tonya; Brown, Humberto; Taylor, Raekiela; Joseph, Michael A.

2014-01-01

79

A systematic review of behavioral interventions to prevent HIV infection and transmission among heterosexual, adult men in low-and middle-income countries.  

PubMed

Prevention of new HIV infections needs to move to the forefront in the fight against HIV and AIDS. In the current economic crisis, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) should invest limited resources to amass reliable evidence-based information about behavioral prevention efforts, and on behaviors that are driving the epidemic among people who are engaging in those behaviors. This paper aims to provide a systematic review and synthesis of behavioral interventions among a group of people in high HIV-burden countries: heterosexual men in LMICs. The review includes articles published between January 2001 and May 2010 that evaluated behavioral prevention interventions among heterosexual males aged 18+ years in LMICs. The studies were evaluated using the quality assessment tool for quantitative studies developed by the Effective Public Health Practice Project. The review identified 19 articles that met the review's inclusion criteria. Most studies were conducted in South Africa (n=6); two each in Uganda and Thailand; and one in each of Angola, Brazil, Bulgaria, India, Nigeria, the Philippines, Russia, Ukraine and Zimbabwe. Eight of 19 interventions increased condom use among their respective populations. Those interventions that sought to reduce the number of sexual partners had little effect, and those that addressed alcohol consumption and intimate partner violence had mixed effects. There was no evidence for any specific format of intervention that impacted best on any of the targeted risk behaviors. The paucity of evaluated interventions for heterosexual men in LMICs suggests that adult men in these countries remain underrepresented in HIV prevention efforts. PMID:23111548

Townsend, Loraine; Mathews, Catherine; Zembe, Yanga

2013-02-01

80

The views of general practitioners and practice nurses towards the barriers and facilitators of proactive, internet-based chlamydia screening for reaching young heterosexual men  

PubMed Central

Background Chlamydia trachomatis is a common bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI), which disproportionately affects young people under 25 years. Commonly, more women are offered screening than men. This study obtained the views of general practitioners and practice nurses towards Internet-based screening and assessed levels of support for the development of proactive screening targeting young heterosexual men via the Internet. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews with 10 general practitioners and 8 practice nurses, across Central Scotland. Topics covered: experience of screening heterosexual men for chlamydia, views on the use of the Internet as a way to reach young men for chlamydia screening, beliefs about the potential barriers and facilitators to Internet-based screening. Transcripts from audio recordings were analysed with Framework Analysis, using QSR NVivo10. Results Experiences of chlamydia screening were almost exclusively with women, driven by the nature of consultations and ease of raising sexual health issues with female patients; few practice nurses reported seeing men during consultations. All participants spoke in favour of Internet-based screening for young men. Participants reported ease of access and convenience as potential facilitators of an Internet-based approach but anonymity and confidentiality could be potential barriers and facilitators to the success of an Internet approach to screening. Concerns over practical issues as well as those pertaining to gender and socio-cultural issues were raised. Conclusions Awareness of key barriers and facilitators, such as confidentiality, practicality and socio-cultural influences, will inform the development of an Internet-based approach to screening. However, this approach may have its limits in terms of being able to tackle wider social and cultural barriers, along with shifts in young people’s and health professionals’ attitudes towards screening. Nevertheless, employing innovative efforts as part of a multi-faceted approach is required to ensure effective interventions reach the policy agenda. PMID:24972919

2014-01-01

81

Barbershop Talk With Brothers: using community-based participatory research to develop and pilot test a program to reduce HIV risk among Black heterosexual men.  

PubMed

There is a need for feasible, evidence-based interventions that support HIV risk reduction among heterosexual Black men. In this article, we describe the process for development of the Barbershop Talk With Brothers (BTWB) program and evaluation. The BTWB program is a theoretically grounded and community-based HIV prevention program that seeks to improve individual skills and motivation to decrease sexual risk, and that builds men's interest in and capacity for improving their community's health. Formative data collection included barbershop observations and barber focus groups, brief behavioral risk assessments of men in barbershops, and focus groups and individual interviews. Based on this information and in consultation with our steering committee, we developed the BTWB program and accompanying program evaluation. From April through November 2011, 80 men were recruited and completed a baseline assessment of a pilot test of the program; 78 men completed the program and 71 completed a 3-month assessment. The pilot evaluation procedures were feasible to implement, and assessments of pre- and post-test measures indicate that key behavioral outcomes and proposed mediators of those outcomes changed in hypothesized directions. Specifically, attitudes and self-efficacy toward consistent condom use improved, and respondents reported lower levels of sexual risk behavior from baseline to follow-up (all p < 0.05). Perceptions of community empowerment also increased (p = 0.06). While HIV stigma decreased, this difference did not reach statistical significance. Our approach to community-engaged program development resulted in an acceptable, feasible approach to reaching and educating heterosexual Black men about HIV prevention in community settings. PMID:25299804

Wilson, Tracey E; Fraser-White, Marilyn; Williams, Kim M; Pinto, Angelo; Agbetor, Francis; Camilien, Brignel; Henny, Kirk; Browne, Ruth C; Gousse, Yolene; Taylor, Tonya; Brown, Humberto; Taylor, Raekiela; Joseph, Michael A

2014-10-01

82

Heterosexual fronteras: Immigrant mexicanos, sexual vulnerabilities, and survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the busy street corners of many U.S. cities, day laborers, known as jornaleros, wait patiently on sidewalks for someone to offer them work. These men remain invisible, however, in sexuality research with\\u000a Latin American immigrant populations. Based on in-depth individual interviews with 20 self-identified heterosexual Mexican\\u000a immigrant men living in Los Angeles, this article examines two ways in which

Gloria González-López

2006-01-01

83

An assessment of brief group interventions to increase condom use by heterosexual crack smokers living with HIV infection.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of brief group interventions, the positive choices intervention (PCI) and a standard intervention (SI), to increase condom use and intention to use condoms and to change condom use attitudes and beliefs. The design of the study was a randomized comparative trial. Participants were 347 heterosexual African American crack cocaine users living with HIV infection. Data were collected at intake and at three and nine months after intake. Behavioral and sociocognitive data were collected. Although both brief interventions achieved positive results, there were significant differences in outcomes between the interventions groups. The mean number of sex partners was significantly lower in the PCI group at three months. The proportion of those assigned to the PCI reporting sex with a paid partner significantly decreased, while the proportion disclosing their serostatus to their partners increased. There were no significant differences on these measures in the SI group. Significant time effects were found on measures of condom use, condom use attitudes, and self-efficacy beliefs. These measures significantly increased from intake to one month for both groups. One significant time-by-group effect was found. The measure of situational self-efficacy significantly increased in the PCI group, but not the SI group. Results also showed significant time-by-time effects. Mean condom use, intention to use condoms, attitudes, and condom use self-efficacy beliefs showed significant difference between three and nine months. However, there was no clear pattern of change. Findings suggest that brief group interventions designed to reduce HIV can help heterosexual drug users living with HIV infection increase condom use and intention to use condoms and change condom use attitudes and beliefs. A significant time-by-group effect was observed only for situational self-efficacy, suggesting limited additional efficacy of the PCI intervention. Given similar positive findings between groups, more research is needed to determine which components of brief interventions produce changes in motivations and risk behaviors. PMID:21780981

Williams, Mark; Bowen, Anne; Atkinson, John S; Nilsson-Schönnesson, Lena; Diamond, Pamela M; Ross, Michael W; Pallonen, Unto E

2012-01-01

84

Gender-transformative interventions to reduce HIV risks and violence with heterosexually-active men: a review of the global evidence.  

PubMed

Emerging out of increased attention to gender equality within HIV and violence prevention programming has been an intensified focus on masculinities. A new generation of health interventions has attempted to shift norms of masculinity to be more gender equitable and has been termed "gender-transformative." We carried out a systematic review of gender-transformative HIV and violence prevention programs with heterosexually-active men in order to assess the efficacy of this programming. After reviewing over 2,500 abstracts in a systematic search, a total of 15 articles matched review criteria. The evidence suggests that gender-transformative interventions can increase protective sexual behaviors, prevent partner violence, modify inequitable attitudes, and reduce STI/HIV, though further trials are warranted, particularly in establishing STI/HIV impacts. In the conclusion, we discuss the promises and limitations of gender-transformative work with men and make suggestions for future research focused on HIV and/or violence prevention. PMID:23934267

Dworkin, Shari L; Treves-Kagan, Sarah; Lippman, Sheri A

2013-11-01

85

A snapshot of how latino heterosexual men promote sexual health within their social networks: process evaluation findings from an efficacious community-level intervention.  

PubMed

Hombres Manteniendo Bienestar y Relaciones Saludables (HoMBReS) was a community-level social network intervention designed to increase sexual health among Latino heterosexual men who were members of a multicounty soccer league. Process data were collected each month during 18 months of intervention implementation from each of 15 trained Latino male lay health advisors (known as Navegantes) to explore the activities that Navegantes conducted to increase condom and HIV testing among their social network members. The Navegantes reported conducting 2,364 activities, for a mean of 8.8 activities per Navegante per month. The most common activity was condom distribution. Most activities were conducted with men; about 2% were conducted with women. Among activities conducted with men, half were conducted with soccer teammates and half with nonteammates. Results suggest that Latino men's social networks can be leveraged to promote sexual health within the community. Innovative methods that reach large numbers of community members are needed given the lack of prevention resources for populations disproportionately impacted by HIV and STDs. PMID:23206201

Rhodes, Scott D; Daniel, Jason; Alonzo, Jorge; Vissman, Aaron T; Duck, Stacy; Downs, Mario; Gilbert, Paul A

2012-12-01

86

The preferred traits of mates in a cross-national study of heterosexual and homosexual men and women: an examination of biological and cultural influences.  

PubMed

BBC Internet survey participants (119,733 men and 98,462 women) chose from a list of 23 traits those they considered first, second, and third most important in a relationship partner. Across all participants, the traits ranked most important were: intelligence, humor, honesty, kindness, overall good looks, face attractiveness, values, communication skills, and dependability. On average, men ranked good looks and facial attractiveness more important than women did (d = 0.55 and 0.36, respectively), whereas women ranked honesty, humor, kindness, and dependability more important than men did (ds = 0.23, 0.22, 0.18, and 0.15). Sexual orientation differences were smaller than sex differences in trait rankings, but some were meaningful; for example, heterosexual more than homosexual participants assigned importance to religion, fondness for children, and parenting abilities. Multidimensional scaling analyses showed that trait preference profiles clustered by participant sex, not by sexual orientation, and by sex more than by nationality. Sex-by-nation ANOVAs of individuals' trait rankings showed that sex differences in rankings of attractiveness, but not of character traits, were extremely consistent across 53 nations and that nation main effects and sex-by-nation interactions were stronger for character traits than for physical attractiveness. United Nations indices of gender equality correlated, across nations, with men's and women's rankings of character traits but not with their rankings of physical attractiveness. These results suggest that cultural factors had a relatively greater impact on men's and women's rankings of character traits, whereas biological factors had a relatively greater impact on men's and women's rankings of physical attractiveness. PMID:17380374

Lippa, Richard A

2007-04-01

87

Do women live longer than men?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity opens with a graph that depicts the life expectancies of men and women born in the United States. Students are asked to estimate the greatest difference between genders in the years between 1920 and 1996. The activity, part of the Figure This! collection of 80 real-world math challenges, introduces trend analysis and explains its utility to market research, radio stations, and manufacturers. The Hint tells students how they should read the graph to determine the life expectancy for a woman born in 1920. Related questions encourage students to think about how the shape of the curve might be affected by changing the scale, as well as variables that affect trends in life expectancy. Answers to all questions and additional resource suggestions are provided. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)

2002-01-01

88

Men and women as perpetrators and victims of sexual aggression in heterosexual and same-sex encounters: a study of first-year college students in Germany.  

PubMed

This study examined the prevalence of sexual aggression and victimization in a large convenience sample of N?=?2,149 first-year college students from different universities in Germany. Participants were asked about both victimization by, and perpetration of, sexual aggression since the age of 14. Both same-sex and heterosexual victim-perpetrator constellations were examined. Prevalence rates were established for different victim-perpetrator relationships (partners, acquaintances, strangers) and for incidents involving alcohol consumption by one or both partners. The overall perpetration rate was 13.2%, for men and 7.6% for women. The overall victimization rate was 35.9% for women and 19.4% for men. A disparity between victimization and perpetration reports was found for both men and women. Perpetration and victimization rates were highest among participants who had sexual contacts with both opposite-sex and same-sex partners. Sexual aggression and victimization rates were higher between current or former partners and acquaintances than between strangers. Alcohol consumption by one or both partners was involved in almost 75% of all victimization and almost 70% of all perpetration incidents. The findings portray a comprehensive picture of the scale of sexual aggression and victimization in college students with different sexual lifestyles. PMID:23629691

Krahé, Barbara; Berger, Anja

2013-01-01

89

A randomized controlled trial of a culturally congruent intervention to increase condom use and HIV testing among heterosexually active immigrant Latino men  

PubMed Central

This randomized controlled trial tested the efficacy of an HIV prevention intervention to increase condom use and HIV testing among Spanish-speaking, heterosexually active immigrant Latino men. A community-based participatory research partnership developed the intervention and selected the study design. Following baseline data collection, 142 immigrant Latino men were randomized to the HIV prevention intervention or the cancer education intervention. Three-month follow-up data were collected from 139 participants, for a 98% retention rate. Mean age of participants was 31.6 years and 60% reported being from Mexico. Adjusting for baseline behaviors, relative to their peers in the cancer education comparison, participants in the HIV prevention intervention were more likely to report consistent condom use and receiving an HIV test. Community-based interventions for immigrant Latino men that are built on state of the art prevention science and developed in partnership with community members can greatly enhance preventive behaviors and may reduce HIV infection. PMID:21301948

Rhodes, Scott D.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Vissman, Aaron T.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Duck, Stacy; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Foley, Kristie Long; Alonzo, Jorge; Bloom, Fred R.; Eng, Eugenia

2012-01-01

90

Age Preferences and Mate Choice Among Homosexuals and Heterosexuals: A Case for Modular Psychological Mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Age preferences expressed by homosexuals and heterosexuals in 783 singles ads were compared. In line with earlier cross-cultural findings, heterosexual women at all ages tend to prefer men from their own age to several years older. Heterosexual men change with age; young men show an interest in both older and younger women, but older men express progressively stronger interest in

Douglas T. Kenrick; Richard C. Keefe; Angela Bryan; Alicia Barr; Stephanie Brown

1995-01-01

91

Anal high-risk human papillomavirus infection and high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia detected in women and heterosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus  

PubMed Central

Background Although anal high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and anal cytological abnormalities are highly prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), there are insufficient data on these abnormalities among HIV-infected heterosexual men (HSM) and women. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of anal HR-HPV, cytological abnormalities, and performance of these screening tests in detecting high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN2+) among our cohort of HIV-infected MSM and non-MSM (HSM and women). Methods A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted with HIV-infected individuals who underwent anal cancer screening with anal cytology and HR-HPV testing from January 2011 to January 31, 2013. Results Screening of 221 HIV-infected individuals for both HR-HPV and anal cytology showed the presence of HR-HPV in 54% (abnormal anal cytology 48%) of MSM, 28% (abnormal anal cytology 28%) of HSM, and 27% (abnormal anal cytology 34%) of women. Among 117 (53%) individuals with abnormal results (HR-HPV-positive and/or cytology was atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or above), 67 underwent high resolution anoscopy. Of these 67 individuals, 22 individuals had AIN2+ (17 MSM, four women, and one HSM). HR-HPV correlated better with AIN2+ than with anal cytology on biopsy in both MSM (r=0.29 versus r=0.10; P=0.05 versus P=0.49) and non-MSM (r=0.36 versus r=?0.34; P=0.08 versus P=0.09). Conclusion Given the presence of AIN2+ in screened HIV-infected HSM and women, routine anal cancer screening in all HIV-infected individuals should be considered. HR-HPV merits further evaluation for anal cancer screening among non-MSM. PMID:25670914

Gandra, Sumanth; Azar, Aline; Wessolossky, Mireya

2015-01-01

92

Liminal identities: Caribbean men who have sex with men in London, UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accounts by 10 Caribbean men who have sex with men living in the UK reveal them to be liminal beings with unstable and unresolved identities. They are between social states: aware they are not heterosexual and not publicly recognised, or in some cases self?accepted, as homosexual. Caribbean?born respondents especially suffer from homophobia, expressing regret and disappointment at their sexuality. They

Moji Anderson; Gillian Elam; Sarah Gerver; Ijeoma Solarin; Kevin Fenton; Phillippa Easterbrook

2009-01-01

93

HIV-positive men who have sex with men: biography, diversity in lifestyles, common experience of living with HIV. ANRS-EN12 VESPA Study, 2003.  

PubMed

The conceptualisation of male who have sex with male (MSM) to account for male homosexual behaviour has been developed to facilitate the endorsement of prevention message since the advent of HIV infection. Population studies performed to understand and monitor sexual and preventive behaviour usually recruit respondents through gay-friendly channels such as media, sexual venues or festivals, leading to recruitment bias. Few studies question possible differences according to varying sexual biography and current behaviour within the MSM population. The random sample of HIV+ individuals treated in specialised outpatient clinics (ANRS-EN12-VESPA study, 2003) provides the opportunity to question the MSM conceptualisation regarding sexual biography, social characteristics, current sexual behaviour, use of condom, living with HIV (quality of life, discrimination and participation in NGOs). Among the 2932 respondents, 1309 men reported a lifetime male sexual partner. Information regarding sexual biography (lifetime and current numbers of male and female sexual partners, lifetime number of male and female stable couples) was computed using cluster analysis and identified five profiles: exclusive gay (53.7%), gay with some bisexuality (21.8%), gay with mixed sexual history (8.1%), bisexual (7.8%) and heterosexual with male-to-male sex (8.6%). The profiles matched self-identification better among the most exclusive homosexuals than among men with current bisexuality. These five subgroups differed regarding demographic and social characteristics (except migration status), their period of diagnosis, age and CD4 count at diagnosis. Sexual activity, steady partnership, number of male and female partners, use of sexual venues and illegal substance use were different across subgroups. Reversely, these groups are homogenous regarding experience of discrimination and involvement in People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) activities. These findings among men living with HIV support the MSM conceptualisation and underscore the role of medicine and HIV activism in shaping the experience of HIV infection. PMID:20390483

Lert, France; Sitta, Rémi; Bouhnik, Anne-Deborah; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Spire, Bruno

2010-01-01

94

Determinants of unprotected casual heterosexual sex in Ghana.  

PubMed

Casual heterosexual sex remains a significant contributor to HIV transmissions in Ghana. The study used data from the 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS) to assess the socio-demographic, economic and spatial factors influencing unprotected casual heterosexual sex among men and women. The results of the binary logistic regression models revealed that women aged 35-44 had significantly higher odds of engaging in unprotected casual heterosexual sex than those aged 15-24, unlike the men. There were significantly lower odds of unprotected casual heterosexual sex for women and men with exposure to print media compared with those without exposure. Compared with men residing in the Western Region, unprotected casual heterosexual sex was significantly less likely among those in the Upper East Region. There is the need for behavioural change campaigns in Ghana that take into consideration the multiplicity of factors that determine unprotected casual heterosexual sex. PMID:23931547

Kumi-Kyereme, Akwasi; Tuoyire, Derek A; Darteh, Eugene K M

2014-05-01

95

Traumatic Revictimization of Men Who Have Sex With Men Living With HIV/AIDS.  

PubMed

Abuse in childhood has been established as a predictor of adult abuse, with the strongest associations found between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and adult sexual victimization. Revictimization has been demonstrated among women, and there is a growing literature on revictimization experiences among men who have sex with men (MSM). No studies have assessed revictimization among MSM living with HIV, despite strong evidence for disproportionately high rates of life span abuse among this group, along with the added vulnerability of living with HIV and sexual minority stress. In this study, we contribute to the literature by exploring associations between multiple types of childhood and adult abuse experiences (physical, sexual, and psychological; perpetrated by partners and non-partner), rather than examining sexual victimization alone. A sample of 166 HIV-positive MSM attending primary HIV health care clinics in Seattle, Washington, completed a one-time questionnaire. Results of regression analyses revealed associations between experiencing CSA and adult sexual abuse, and experiencing childhood physical abuse and adult physical and sexual abuse. Childhood psychological abuse was associated with adult physical and psychological abuse and partner psychological abuse. At higher frequencies, childhood psychological abuse was associated with all forms of adult abuse. These findings suggest that various forms of childhood abuse experiences confer broad vulnerability to adult abuse experiences and point to potentially different pathways to revictimization based on childhood abuse type. PMID:24989040

Pantalone, David W; Horvath, Keith J; Hart, Trevor A; Valentine, Sarah E; Kaysen, Debra L

2015-05-01

96

Living Apart Together” relationships in the United States  

PubMed Central

We use two surveys to describe the demographic and attitudinal correlates of being in “Living Apart Together” (LAT), cohabiting, and marital relationships for heterosexuals, lesbians, and gay men. About one third of U.S. adults not married or cohabiting are in LAT relationships – these individuals would be classified as “single” in conventional studies that focus on co-residential unions. Gay men are somewhat more likely than heterosexual men to be in LAT relationships. For heterosexuals and lesbians, LAT relationships are more common among younger people. Heterosexuals in LAT unions are less likely to expect to marry their partners, but more likely to say that couples should be emotionally dependent than are cohabiters. Regardless of sexual orientation, people in LAT relationships perceive similar amounts of emotional support from partners, but less instrumental support than cohabiters perceive. PMID:21566723

Strohm, Charles Q.; Seltzer, Judith A.; Cochran, Susan D.; Mays, Vickie M.

2009-01-01

97

ORIGINAL PAPER Sex-Dimorphic Face Shape Preference in Heterosexual  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Sex-Dimorphic Face Shape Preference in Heterosexual and Homosexual Men and Women to previous studies, which have gener- ally excluded homosexual participants, we directly compared homosexual and heterosexual male and female preferences for manipulated sexual dimorphism in faces (homosexual males: n = 311

Little, Tony

98

Exploring the invisible: Listening to mid-life women about heterosexual sex  

Microsoft Academic Search

This century has seen a burgeoning of studies on sexual lives. In the late 1970s a withering feminist critique of heterosexuality was launched exposing previously unheeded power inequalities within the heterosexual situation. Empirically, the Women, Risk and AIDS Project has shown such inequalities to be at the root of many young women's inability to conduct their heterosexual lives with any

Marilyn Meadows

1997-01-01

99

Gender, Aids, and Bereavement: A Comparison of Women and Men Living with HIV  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the bereavement experience, psychiatric morbidity, and suicidality in bereaved men and women living with HIV. HIV+ women (n =31) who reported a loss in the recent 12 months were case matched to bereaved HIV+ men (n =62) on the basis of lifetime histories of major depression. Study participants were…

Summers, Jacquelyn; Zisook, Sidney; Sciolla, Andres D.; Patterson, Thomas; Atkinson, J. Hampton

2004-01-01

100

Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Men Historically, men have not been comfortable discussing issues ... and sexual dysfunction with your healthcare team. Explore: Men Men’s Health Month Fear of receiving bad news ...

101

Safe sex practices of Indian immigrant men living in Australia: an exploratory research.  

PubMed

There is a paucity of scientific information about safe sex practices of Indians immigrants living in popular multicultural nations such as Australia. An online survey of adult Indian men living in Australia was conducted to measure the frequency of use of safe sex practices using the Safe Sex Behavior Questionnaire (SSBQ). Among the respondents of the SSBQ (n = 184), 16.8% (n = 31) reported that never insist on condom use, when having sexual intercourse. One in two men surveyed, agreed that it is difficult for them to discuss safe sex issues with their sexual partners. One in two men said that they used alcoholic beverages prior to or during sexual intercourse. There were no significant differences in SSBQ data among Indian men based on their relationship status. The current study has assessed a range of safe sex practices by involving a community sample of Indian men, and provides baseline data for further evaluation and comparison. PMID:25491521

Ramanathan, Vijayasarathi; Sitharthan, Gomathi

2014-01-01

102

Exploring Living-Learning Communities as a Venue for Men's Identity Construction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study explored how male undergraduate students experienced living-learning community environments. Findings revealed that living-learning communities provided men a "safe haven" from rigid gender role expectations, offered a plethora of involvement opportunities, and fostered relationships with faculty and peers. The findings…

Jessup-Anger, Jody E.; Johnson, Brianne N.; Wawrzynski, Matthew R.

2012-01-01

103

Living Arrangements of Older Women and Men in Kuwait  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objectives of this article are toanalyze the correlates of living arrangementsof persons aged 60 or above in the oil-rich,Muslim country of Kuwait and to examine whetheror not patterns of co-residence differ bygender. Data were obtained from a nationallyrepresentative survey of households of Kuwaitinationals, and this paper is based on the 687older Kuwaiti residents of these households.Living arrangements were

Nasra M. Shah; Kathryn M. Yount; Makhdoom A. Shah; Indu Menon

2002-01-01

104

Conceptions of Privacy and the Non-disclosure of Same-Sex Behaviour Among Behaviourally-Bisexual Men in Heterosexual Relationships  

PubMed Central

Little attention has been paid to why some behaviourally-bisexual men (i.e., men who have sex with both men and women) choose not to disclose their same-sex behaviour. Using Communication Privacy Management theory (Petronio 2002), we report on the ways these men conceptualise their same-sex behaviour as private and thus feel justified in not disclosing it to family, friends, and female partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of 203 non-disclosing behaviourally-bisexual men in New York City. The men offered a number of privacy rules to justify their non-disclosure, including: 1) their same-sex behaviours were their own business and nobody else’s; 2) others had no reason to know; 3) the topic of sexual behaviour was too personal; 4) they were private people in general; and 5) it was inappropriate to discuss same-sex behaviour in many contexts. Some privacy rules were used more often to justify non-disclosure to friends and family than to female partners. These findings provide insights into the reasons for non-disclosure among behaviourally-bisexual men, offer support for and extend CPM theory for the management of sexual information, and offer insights into the importance of privacy for the design and delivery of health promotion services for this population. PMID:24597480

Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Downing, Martin J.; Cohn, Daniel J.; Siegel, Karolynn

2014-01-01

105

Conceptions of privacy and the non-disclosure of same-sex behaviour by behaviourally-bisexual men in heterosexual relationships.  

PubMed

Little attention has been paid to why some behaviourally-bisexual men (i.e., men who have sex with both men and women) choose not to disclose their same-sex behaviour. Using Communication Privacy Management (CPM) theory, we report on the ways these men conceptualise their same-sex behaviour as private, and thus feel justified in not disclosing it to family, friends and female partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of 203 non-disclosing behaviourally-bisexual men in New York City. The men offered a number of privacy rules to justify their non-disclosure, including: (1) their same-sex behaviours were their own business and nobody else's, (2) others had no reason to know, (3) the topic of sexual behaviour was too personal, (4) they were private people in general and (5) it was inappropriate to discuss same-sex behaviour in many contexts. Some privacy rules were used more often to justify non-disclosure to friends and family than to female partners. These findings provide insights into the reasons for non-disclosure among behaviourally-bisexual men, offer support for and extend CPM theory for the management of sexual information and offer insights into the importance of privacy for the design and delivery of health-promotion services for this population. PMID:24597480

Schrimshaw, Eric W; Downing, Martin J; Cohn, Daniel J; Siegel, Karolynn

2014-01-01

106

The Preferred Traits of Mates in a Cross-National Study of Heterosexual and Homosexual Men and Women: An Examination of Biological and Cultural Influences  

Microsoft Academic Search

BBC Internet survey participants (119,733 men and 98,462 women) chose from a list of 23 traits those they considered first,\\u000a second, and third most important in a relationship partner. Across all participants, the traits ranked most important were:\\u000a intelligence, humor, honesty, kindness, overall good looks, face attractiveness, values, communication skills, and dependability.\\u000a On average, men ranked good looks and facial

Richard A. Lippa

2007-01-01

107

Childhood family living arrangements and blood pressure in black men: the Howard University Family Study.  

PubMed

Black men have higher blood pressure (BP) levels and consequently higher prevalence of hypertension compared with men from other ethnic groups in the United States. Socio-familial factors in childhood have been found to play an important role in hypertension, but few studies have examined this relationship among black men. We investigated whether childhood family living arrangements are independently associated with mean BP and hypertension in a cross-sectional sample of 515 unrelated black male participants aged ?20 years enrolled in the Howard University Family Study between 2001 and 2008. Black men who lived with both parents compared with the reference group of men who never lived with both parents during their lifetime had lower systolic BP (-4.4 mm Hg [95% confidence interval {CI}, -7.84 to -0.96]), pulse pressure (-3.9 mm Hg [95% CI, -6.28 to -1.51]), and mean arterial BP (-2.0 mm Hg [95% CI, -4.44 to 0.51]). This protective effect was more pronounced among men who lived with both parents for 1 to 12 years of their lives; they had decreased systolic BP (-6.5 mm Hg [95% CI, -10.99 to -1.95]), pulse pressure (-5.4 mm Hg [95% CI, -8.48 to -2.28]), mean arterial pressure (-3.3 mm Hg [95% CI, -6.56 to 0.00]), and a 46% decreased odds of developing hypertension (odds ratio=0.54; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.99). No statistically significant associations were found for diastolic BP. These results provide preliminary evidence that childhood family structure exerts a long-term influence on BP among black men. PMID:24296284

Barrington, Debbie S; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Rotimi, Charles N

2014-01-01

108

[The daily life of men who lives with chronic venous ulcer: phenomenological study].  

PubMed

The chronic venous leg ulcer is the major therapeutic problem of lower limb injuries, which can trigger changes in the daily life of the person affected by it. This study aimed to understand the daily life of men who lives with chronic venous ulcers. A phenomenological study was conducted with eight men, who were interviewed during June and July of 2001. The study asked questions related to: "Restrictions in social life" and "Recovering the skin integrity and restart the activities affected by the wound". The answers revealed that men with these ulcers have social implications in the areas of productivity and sexuality. This leads to restrictions in everyday life with loss in performance of socially established roles for men, leading to anxiety for his return at full performance of his social role. The findings suggest significant experiential aspects that may guide professionals in the planning and implementation of health actions aimed to treat these patients. PMID:24344590

da Silva, Marcelo Henrique; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Oliveira, Deise Moura; Biscotto, Priscilla Ribeiro; Silva, Greyce Pollyne Santos

2013-09-01

109

Constructions of masculinity among a group of South African men living with HIV\\/AIDS: reflections on resistance and change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male sexuality in Africa is often associated with harmful sexual practices, which, in the context of HIV and AIDS, often positions men as central to the spread of the epidemic. Despite this focus on men's practices, there is a lack of research exploring the subject positions of men living with HIV. This study explores how masculinity is constructed by a

Ingrid Lynch; Pierre W. Brouard; Maretha J. Visser

2010-01-01

110

Sociocultural Factors Influencing HIV Disclosure Among Men in South Africa.  

PubMed

In South Africa, more than 2 million people living with HIV are men aged 15 years and older, and heterosexual intercourse remains the predominant mode of HIV transmission. Knowledge of the sociocultural factors that influence men's decisions about whether, when, or how to disclose seropositive status remains incompletely understood. Using the PEN-3 cultural model as a guide, this study explored the sociocultural factors influencing HIV disclosure among men in South Africa. Four focus group discussions with 27 participants were used to determine the perceptions, enabling and nurturing factors that influence how men chose to reveal or conceal knowledge of their seropositive status. The results revealed that notions of male identity in the South African context, family, and community factors contribute to disclosure and nondisclosure of seropositive status among men living with HIV/AIDS. Future interventions should work to address these factors, as they are necessary with supporting disclosure among men living with HIV. PMID:24871161

Iwelunmor, Juliet; Sofolahan-Oladeinde, Yewande; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O

2015-05-01

111

Determinants of family planning use among Turkish married men who live in South East Turkey.  

PubMed

This study assesses the determinants of family planning methods use by Turkish married men in South East Anatolia. A descriptive and cross-sectional survey research design was used among 1,352 men aged 20 to 52 years who lived in South East Turkey. A pilot-tested questionnaire was used to collect data. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and multivariate regression analysis were used. The rate of nonusage of contraceptive methods among the participants was 60.4%. Within the nonusers, 34.9% reported a religious prohibition and 9.4% had misconceptions about family planning. Chi-square analysis determined four factors that were significantly related to the men's usage of contraception. These factors are the following: the men's age, educational level, number of existing children, and their perception of their household income level. These four factors were also subjected to multivariate regression analysis, the results of which were used to compute odds ratios for each value of each factor indicating the likelihood for using contraception by men within each group. Male-specific family planning programs can make an important contribution to the overall efforts to improve the usage of contraceptives by men. It is important to note that family planning services and education programs related to family planning should be appropriate for men. PMID:23303842

Zeynelo?lu, Simge; K?sa, Sezer K?sa; Deliba?, Leyla

2013-05-01

112

Viral subtype and heterosexual acquisition of HIV infections diagnosed in Scotland  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: As at December 1998, 87% of the estimated 33 million people living with HIV throughout the world resided in Africa and South East Asia. In Scotland (and the United Kingdom), a major public health concern has been that non-B subtypes of HIV which predominate in the regions above might enter the country and spread heterosexually among the indigenous population. The authors conducted an investigation to determine if, and to what extent, such transmission had occurred. METHODS: Stored blood samples from people who were diagnosed as HIV positive in central Scotland during 1995-7 and who were reported to have acquired their infection heterosexually, were identified. Sequence data were sought from each sample and, where obtained, viral subtype was assigned. For each case, viral subtype was linked to corresponding epidemiological details on heterosexual risk. RESULTS: Viral sequence was obtained from specimens for 53 of 59 cases. For 43 of the 53 cases, information on region of sexual contact was known. All 19 cases who had a sexual risk in Africa or Asia had a non-B subtype (A, C, or E) while 20 of 24 cases who did not report sexual contact in these regions had a B subtype (p < 0.0001). Of the remaining 10 cases, nine had a subtype B and one a subtype C virus. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence that non-B viral strains from developing countries have yet disseminated appreciably among indigenous heterosexual men and women within Scotland. Continuing to collect both demographic and molecular data from indigenous heterosexuals who are newly diagnosed with HIV would improve the chances of detecting rapidly any appreciable dissemination of non-B subtypes among this population if it were to occur. Such information would be helpful in informing HIV prevention strategies. ??? PMID:10754942

Yirrell, D. L.; Goldberg, D. J.; Whitelaw, J.; McSharry, C.; Raeside, F.; Codere, G.

1999-01-01

113

The MaBwana Black men's study: community and belonging in the lives of African, Caribbean and other Black gay men in Toronto  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Canada, there is a paucity of research aimed at understanding Black gay men and the antecedents to risk factors for HIV. This study is an attempt to move beyond risk factor analysis and explore the role of sexual and ethnic communities in the lives of these men. The study utilized a community-based research and critical race theory approach. Semi-structured

Clemon George; Barry D. Adam; Stanley E. Read; Winston C. Husbands; Robert S. Remis; Lydia Makoroka; Sean B. Rourke

2012-01-01

114

Social Contexts of Heterosexual Transmission of HIV/STI in Liuzhou City, China  

PubMed Central

In this special issue of AIDS and Behavior, we focus on the social contexts of sexual transmission of HIV/STI in one South China city. Our multiple projects grew from partnerships across the social and biomedical sciences, and with public health experts in Liuzhou City, to address critical gaps in knowledge about how social factors drive heterosexual transmission. The eleven articles that comprise this special issue feature multidisciplinary and mixed method approaches, collecting data in Liuzhou from different populations, environments, and social venues where individuals often find sexual partners. They document heterosexual behaviors and their meanings. They investigate the experiences and behaviors of women and men in social venues, exploring the networks of people within these venues, how they relate to one another, share information, and influence each other. The articles also examine the experiences of people living with HIV, again collecting data from multiple levels and sources, and revealing the ongoing power of stigma to shape these lives. Taken together, the articles demonstrate the critical role of social contexts in shaping behaviors and meanings, which are linked to heterosexual transmission of HIV/STI, and which must be taken into account for the development of appropriate and effective public health interventions. PMID:24337698

Maman, Suzanne; Huang, Yingying; Muessig, Kathryn; Pan, Suiming

2014-01-01

115

Living for the moment: men situating risk-taking after the death of a friend.  

PubMed

The primary cause of death for men under the age of 30 is unintentional injury and, despite health-promotion efforts and programme interventions, male injury and death rates have not decreased in recent years. Drawing on 22 interviews from a study of men, risk and grief, we describe how a risk-related tragedy shaped the participants' understandings of and practices of risk-taking. The findings indicate that most participants did not alter their perceptions and engagement in risky practices, which reflected their alignment to masculine ideals within specific communities of practice where risk-taking was normalised and valorised. Continued reliance on risky practices following the death of a friend was predominantly expressed as 'living for the moment,' where caution and safety were framed as conservative practices that undermined and diluted the robustness ideally embodied by this subgroup of young men. Two main themes: living life, accepting death and upping the ante illustrate how risk-taking can persist following a death. A smaller group of participants articulated a different viewpoint; reining in risk practices, to describe their risk management approaches after the death of a male friend. This novel study confirms the ongoing challenge of reducing men's risk-taking practices, even after the death of a friend. PMID:25847532

Creighton, Genevieve M; Oliffe, John L; McMillan, Eva; Saewyc, Elizabeth M

2015-03-01

116

Sexual Dysfunction and the Preservation of Manhood: Experiences of Men with Prostate Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the experiences of men living with sexual dysfunction as a consequence of having been treated for prostate cancer. An ethnoculturally diverse sample of 18 men (14 heterosexual, and four homosexual) participated in a series of four to five in-depth interviews. These one-on-one interviews were designed to elicit information pertaining to their beliefs, values and performances regarding masculinity

Karen D. Fergus; Ross E. Gray; Margaret I. Fitch

2002-01-01

117

Mixing it Up: Integrating Men and Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Prevention Groups  

PubMed Central

Aims The current study was conducted to examine the impact of mixing genders in HIV prevention intervention groups targeted toward HIV positive men and women. Methods Men (N=310) and women (N=126) participated in a randomized clinical trial testing a behavioral risk reduction/ medication adherence intervention versus a general health control condition administered to small mixed gender groups. Gender composition of groups was examined in relation to participant group attendance and group satisfaction measures through correlations and logistic regression. Results Significant regression models were found for men in the risk reduction condition and for women in the general health condition, however, regression models were not significant for women in the risk reduction condition and men in the general health condition. Discussion The findings indicate that mixing genders in risk reduction interventions for men and women living with HIV/AIDS has no negative impact on women’s group satisfaction and may positively impact men’s group satisfaction. This calls into question the assumption that gender sensitive material will always make individuals uncomfortable within mixed gender groups. Implications for practice and policy In practice, mixed gender intervention groups can be a helpful option for delivering programs to diverse populations especially when resources are limited within community-based services providers and AIDS service organizations. Conclusion Although more thorough investigation is needed about the consequences and possible benefits of mixing genders within HIV prevention intervention groups, this study supports the idea that mixing genders may be a viable option, in practice, without sacrificing the integrity of the intervention. PMID:25525414

Pellowski, Jennifer A.; Kalichman, Seth C.

2014-01-01

118

Changes in Diversity Course Student Prejudice and Attitudes toward Heterosexual Privilege and Gay Marriage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined diversity course influence on student prejudice against lesbians and gay men, awareness of heterosexual privilege, and support for gay marriage. The study included heterosexual female students in psychology of women, introduction to women's studies, and nondiversity psychology courses. Students in diversity courses expressed…

Case, Kim A.; Stewart, Briana

2010-01-01

119

Pioneers in Partnership: Lesbian and Gay Male Couples in Civil Unions Compared With Those Not in Civil Unions and Married Heterosexual Siblings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared 212 lesbians and 123 gay men who had civil unions in Vermont during the first year legislation made this available with 166 lesbians and 72 gay men in their friendship network who had not had civil unions, and also with 219 heterosexual married women and 193 heterosexual married men consisting of civil union couples' siblings and their

Sondra E. Solomon; Esther D. Rothblum; Kimberly F. Balsam

2004-01-01

120

Resilience processes demonstrated by young gay and bisexual men living with HIV: implications for intervention.  

PubMed

Given the increasing numbers of young gay/bisexual men (YGBM) diagnosed with HIV, it is important to understand the resilience processes enacted by this population in order to develop interventions that support their healthy development. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 54 YGBM (ages 17 to 24; 57% African American, 22% Latino) living with HIV from four geographically diverse clinics in the United States. Resilience processes clustered into four primary thematic areas: (1) engaging in health-promoting cognitive processes; (2) enacting healthy behavioral practices; (3) enlisting social support from others; and (4) empowering other young gay/bisexual men. These data suggest that YGBM living with HIV demonstrate resilience across multiple dimensions, including intrapersonal-level resilience related to individual cognitions and behaviors, as well as interpersonal-level resilience related to seeking support and providing support to others. Implications for the development of culturally-appropriate and strengths-based secondary prevention and other psychosocial interventions for YGBM living with HIV are discussed. PMID:25329778

Harper, Gary W; Bruce, Douglas; Hosek, Sybil G; Fernandez, M Isabel; Rood, Brian A

2014-12-01

121

Homophobia and Physical Aggression Toward Homosexual and Heterosexual Individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between homophobia (defined as self-reported negative affect, avoidance, and aggression toward homosexuals) and homosexual aggression. Self-identified heterosexual college men were assigned to homophobic (n = 26) and nonhomophobic (n = 26) groups on the basis of their scores on the Homophobia Scale (HS; L. W. Wright, H. E. Adams, & J. A. Bernat, 1999). Physical

Jeffrey A. Bernat; Karen S. Calhoun; Henry E. Adams; Amos Zeichner

2001-01-01

122

Early sexual behavior in adult homosexual and heterosexual males  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sample of 50 men, 28 overt homosexuals and 22 heterosexuals, completed a Life History Questionnaire and an MMPI. The questionnaire contained items on education, occupation, physical and mental health, marital status, and sexual development and current functioning. The 5s were obtained from nonclinical and nonprison populations and were fairly well matched. The homosexual group was significantly higher than the

Martin Manosevitz

1970-01-01

123

Men's Experience with Eating Disorders: Uncommon Lives? A Look at the Experiences of Men with Eating Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine, describe, and explain experiences of men with eating disorders and to gain understanding of the relevant life issues, perceptions, and attitudes. What are some of the contributing factors and experiences of men who suffer from eating disorders despite the widely held assumption that eating disorders are…

Ahonen, Pirkko S.

124

AIDS Educational Videos for Gay and Bisexual Men: A Content Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To systematically describe the content of AIDS educational videos targeting gay and bisexual men, and to compare it to the content of videos for heterosexual African American and Latino audiences. Design: AIDS videos targeting gay\\/bisexual men (n = 35), heterosexual African Americans (n = 14), and heterosexual Latinos (n = 25) were coded for the presence or absence of

Gregory M. Herek; Fred Fead; David Welton

125

Age preferences in dating advertisements by homosexuals and heterosexuals: from sociobiological to sociological explanations.  

PubMed

Current sociobiological thought suggests that significant components of mate selection are based on indicators that correlate with the ability to produce and support offspring. Theorists have suggested that men tend to be attracted to and marry younger women, while women tend to be attracted to and marry older men. This behavior is referred to as age hypergamy. I complicate this picture by using gay men as a population in which to explore alternative components of mate selection as reflected in our behavior. Analyses of 120 dating advertisements from gay men and heterosexual men and women indicated that there exists a good measure of hypergamic age preference that is comparable to the heterosexual population and that relates to subjects' gender presentation. Data suggest that the biological-reproductive theory of age hypergamy is incomplete and support a cultural reproduction model of gender role behavior and preference in both heterosexuals and homosexuals. PMID:23179236

Burrows, Kathryn

2013-02-01

126

An Internet-Based Examination of Sexual Behaviors and Marital Adjustment among Self-Identified Gay and Bisexual Heterosexually Married Male Users of Online Chat Rooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet has drastically changed the ways individuals interact and connect sexually. While there has been significant research on online sexual activities among persons from various populations, little investigation has been done into the behaviors and marital adjustment of self-identified gay and bisexual heterosexually married men. In this article, the results of 342 self-identified gay and bisexual heterosexually married men

Philip Gnilka; Brian J. Dew

2009-01-01

127

Body ideals for heterosexual romantic partners: gender and sociocultural influences.  

PubMed

In the present study, heterosexual college women (N=327) and men (N=160) were asked about their body type preferences for (hypothetical) romantic partners. Participants chose a particular silhouette value as ideal for a romantic partner, and rated how important it was to them for their partner to have this ideal body type. Men placed more importance on the body silhouette they chose for a partner than women did, and men's importance ratings were positively associated with the rated sexual permissiveness of their peer group and their total media use. Consuming sports media and watching reality television were the best media predictors of men's judgments about women's bodies. Less variability was explained in women's preferences for men partners' bodies, but endorsing adversarial sexual attitudes was positively related to judging the ideals chosen for men's bodies as important. Results were interpreted within both evolutionary and sociocultural theoretical frameworks. PMID:25462878

Murnen, Sarah K; Poinsatte, Katherine; Huntsman, Karen; Goldfarb, Jesse; Glaser, Daniel

2015-01-01

128

Childhood trauma and adult prostitution behavior in a multiethnic heterosexual drug-using population.  

PubMed

A cross-sectional study of the association between severity of childhood trauma and adult prostitution behaviors was conducted among 676 heterosexual drug addicts in San Antonio, Texas. Three hundred and fifty eight women and 338 men taking part in a national multisite program for AIDS prevention research completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire as part of a comprehensive risk behavior assessment. Women addicts in the sample were less educated, more likely to be in a common-law relationship, living with someone of the opposite sex or separated, and had lower incomes in comparison to men addicts. Among male subjects,higher educational levels and older age were positively associated with prostitution activities. Single female subjects were three times more likely to engage in selling sex than married subjects. Single women with higher incomes were more likely to be prostituting than single women with lower incomes. Black women reporting severe degrees of emotional abuse, emotional neglect, or physical neglect were more likely to engage in prostitution behavior than Hispanic or white women with similar levels of trauma. Black men with a history of childhood physical abuse were more likely to use prostitutes than Hispanic or white men. PMID:12765216

Medrano, Martha A; Hatch, John P; Zule, William A; Desmond, David P

2003-05-01

129

Feminine gender identity and physical aggressiveness in heterosexual and homosexual pedophiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the differences among six groups of adult males in retrospective self-reports of childhood gender identity and physical aggressiveness. The three groups of homosexual men preferred prepubescent, pubescent, or physically mature sexual partners. The three groups of heterosexual men preferred prepubescent partners, normal sexual interaction with physically mature partners (controls), or anomalous interaction with physically mature partners. Childhood

Kurt Freund; Ray Blanchard

1987-01-01

130

Sex differences in aggression between heterosexual partners: A meta-analytic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meta-analyses of sex differences in physical aggression to heterosexual partners and in its physical consequences are reported. Women were slightly more likely (d = -.05) than men to use one or more act of physical aggression and to use such acts more frequently. Men were more likely (d =. 15) to inflict an injury, and overall, 62% of those injured

John Archer

2000-01-01

131

Attitudes of Heterosexual Students toward Their Gay Male and Lesbian Peers. Research Report #3-95.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined heterosexual college students attitudes toward gay men and lesbians, and in what types of situations were negative feelings expressed toward gay men and lesbians. A random sample of 224 residence hall students at the University of Maryland College Park completed the Situational Attitude Scale Sexual Orientation Survey, which…

Engstrom, Catherine McHugh; Sedlacek, William E.

132

Heterosexual Privilege Awareness, Prejudice, and Support of Gay Marriage among Diversity Course Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most research investigating diversity courses focuses on attitudes toward racial minorities and women, these courses may also influence student attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. The current study assessed student awareness of heterosexual privilege, prejudice against lesbians and gay men, and support for same-sex marriage. Students…

Case, Kim; Stewart, Briana

2010-01-01

133

Sexual Economics: Sex as Female Resource for Social Exchange in Heterosexual Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A heterosexual community can be analyzed as a marketplace in which men seek to ac- quire sex from women by offering other resources in exchange. Societies will therefore define gender roles as if women are sellers and men buyers of sex. Societies will en- dow female sexuality, but not male sexuality, with value (as in virginity, fidelity, chas- tity). The

Roy F. Baumeister; Kathleen D. Vohs

2004-01-01

134

The Balance of Power in Romantic Heterosexual Couples Over Time from “His” and “Her” Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this investigation, the balance of power between men and women in romantic relationships was examined with a sample of 101 heterosexual couples, some of whom were surveyed up to jive times over a four-year period. A majority of the participants (who were primarily Caucasian and middle class) reported some imbalance in power in their relationship (53% of the men

Susan Sprecher; Diane Felmlee

1997-01-01

135

Religion and spirituality among bisexual Black men in the USA  

PubMed Central

Traditionally, religion has been a major source of institutional support and well-being for Black people in the USA. However, when juxtaposed against sexuality, religion's positive effect upon the lives of non-heterosexual individuals is questionable. Research suggests that non-heterosexuals often abandon structured religion for spirituality due to the homonegativity perpetuated through religious institutions. Although studies have examined religion and spirituality among gays and lesbians, few have examined their roles in the lives of bisexuals. In this study, we analyzed qualitative interviews from 28 bisexual Black men who resided in New York City. In addition to church attendance, participants expressed belonging to religious communities through activities such as music ministry. Despite rejection because of their bisexuality, some participants saw other religious individuals as being accepting of them. Others discussed the church as a place where non-heterosexuals interacted, often for meeting sexual partners. Participants evoked beliefs in God in coping with adverse life experiences; some linked faith to family and sexual responsibilities. Drawing upon relevant literature, we discuss the implications of religion and spirituality for the quality of life of bisexual Black men in the USA. PMID:18568870

JEFFRIES, WILLIAM L.; DODGE, BRIAN; SANDFORT, THEO G. M.

2008-01-01

136

Fertility Desires among Men and Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Nairobi Slums: A Mixed Methods Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Fertility desires require new understanding in a context of expanding access to antiretroviral therapy for people living with HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper studies the fertility desires and their rationales, of slum-dwelling Kenyan men and women living with HIV/AIDS who know their serostatus, but have different antiretroviral therapy treatment statuses. It addresses two research questions: How do people living with HIV/AIDS consider their future fertility? What factors contribute to an explanation of fertility desires among people living with HIV/AIDS. Methods A mixed methods study (survey [n?=?513] and in-depth interviews [n?=?41]) with adults living with HIV/AIDS living in Nairobi slums was conducted in 2010. Regression analyses assess independent relationships between fertility desires and socio-demographic factors. Analyses of in-depth interviews are used to interpret the statistical analyses of fertility desires. Results Our analyses show that fertility desires are complex and ambivalent, reflecting tensions between familial and societal pressures to have children versus pressures for HIV (re-)infection prevention. More than a third (34%) of men and women living with HIV expressed future fertility desires; however, this is significantly lower than in the general population. Factors independently associated with desiring a child among people living with HIV/AIDS were age, sex, number of surviving children, social support and household wealth of the respondent. Discussion Increasing access to ART is changing the context of future childbearing for people living with HIV/AIDS. Prevailing values mean that, for many people living with HIV/AIDS, having children is seen as necessary for a “normal” and healthy adult life. However, the social rewards of childbearing conflict with moral imperatives of HIV prevention, presenting dilemmas about the “proper” reproductive behaviour of people living with HIV/AIDS. The health policy and service delivery implications of these findings are explored. PMID:25171593

Wekesa, Eliud; Coast, Ernestina

2014-01-01

137

Sexual Discordance and Sexual Partnering Among Heterosexual Women.  

PubMed

This study examined characteristics of self-identified heterosexual women who were concordant or discordant in their sexual behavior and the association of discordance and sexual partnering among those aged 15-44 years from the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth (n = 7,353). Sexual concordance was defined as reporting a heterosexual identity and no female partners in the past year; discordance was reporting a heterosexual identity and having at least one female partner in the past year. Sexual partnering was defined as being concurrent, serially monogamous or monogamous with a male partner in the previous year. Polytomous logistic regression models evaluated the association between sexual discordance and sexual partnering. Among self-identified heterosexual, sexually active women, 11.2 % reported ever having had a same sex partner. Heterosexually discordant women who had both male and female partners in the previous year were 5.5 times as likely to report having a concurrent relationship (95 % CI 2.77-11.09) and 2.4 times as likely to report engaging in serially monogamous relationships (95 % CI 1.19-4.97) with male partners. Discordance between heterosexual identity and same sex behavior is a factor in risky behaviors. Women who have sex with women and men may act as bridges for the transmission of STDs, particularly to their female partners. Sexual education should include information inclusive of non-heteronormative behaviors and identities to provide sexual minorities with the tools and information they need. Clinical guidelines should ensure that all women are offered counseling and screening for reproductive and sexual health. PMID:24718674

Nield, Jennifer; Magnusson, Brianna; Brooks, Christopher; Chapman, Derek; Lapane, Kate L

2014-04-10

138

Predictors of micronutrient status in men and women over 75 years old living in the community.  

PubMed

Serum ferritin, serum vitamin B12, erythrocyte folate, plasma vitamin C and plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels were measured in 208 men and 197 women, >75 years old and living in the community, in order to assess micronutrient status. Anthropometric measurements (height, weight, demispan and mid-upper arm circumference) were made and a 114-item questionnaire covering a wide range of health and diet-related topics was administered by an interviewer. Only 4 % of subjects had a BMI <20, but the prevalence of marginal deficiency of the micronutrients ranged from 7 % for Fe to 47 % for vitamin D. There was no association between low micronutrient status (defined as being in the lowest third of the distribution of micronutrient status) and having BMI or mid-upper arm circumference in the lowest third of the distribution for any of the nutrients. Leaving food on the plate was strongly associated with both low Fe status and low vitamin D status. Having breakfast cereal less than once per week was strongly associated with low folate status, while having fresh fruit juice less than once per week, having had less than two portions of fruits and vegetables the previous day and believing that food is not important for health were strongly associated with low vitamin C status. Low vitamin D status was strongly associated with a wide range of general health and disability measures. Having a weekly household income of less than pound 150 was associated with low status of Fe, folate, vitamin C and vitamin D. PMID:12425736

McNeill, Geraldine; Vyvyan, Juliet; Peace, Heather; McKie, Linda; Seymour, Gwyn; Hendry, Judith; MacPherson, Isobel

2002-11-01

139

The Prevalence of Lisping in Gay Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated the stereotype that gay men lisp. Two clinicians who were unaware of the specific purpose of the study and the populations involved judged randomized audio-recordings of 175 gay males, 100 heterosexual males and 100 heterosexual females for the presence of lisping during reading of a standardized text. In the gay males a…

Van Borsel, John; De Bruyn, Els; Lefebvre, Evelien; Sokoloff, Anouschka; De Ley, Sophia; Baudonck, Nele

2009-01-01

140

The invisible stereotypes of bisexual men.  

PubMed

Bisexual men have little public visibility, yet previous reports indicate that heterosexuals have specific prejudicial attitudes towards them. This article reports on two studies that examined the stereotypical beliefs of heterosexual men and women regarding bisexual men. In Study 1 (n = 88), we examined awareness of social stereotypes (stereotype knowledge). Most of the participants were unable to describe the various stereotypes of bisexual men. Contrary to previous studies, low-prejudiced participants had more stereotype knowledge than high-prejudiced participants. In Study 2 (n = 232), we examined prejudice in a contextual evaluation task that required no stereotype knowledge. Participants evaluated a single target character on a first date: a bisexual man dating a heterosexual woman, a bisexual man dating a gay man, a heterosexual man dating a heterosexual woman, or a gay man dating a gay man. The findings indicated that participants implemented stereotypical beliefs in their evaluation of bisexual men: compared to heterosexual and gay men, bisexual men were evaluated as more confused, untrustworthy, open to new experiences, as well as less inclined towards monogamous relationships and not as able to maintain a long-term relationship. Overall, the two studies suggest that the stereotypical beliefs regarding bisexual men are prevalent, but often not acknowledged as stereotypes. In addition, the implementation of stereotypes in the evaluations was shown to be dependent on the potential romantic partner of the target. Possible theoretical explanations and implications are discussed. PMID:24558124

Zivony, Alon; Lobel, Thalma

2014-08-01

141

Feasibility, Acceptability, and Preliminary Efficacy of a Live-Chat Social Media Intervention to Reduce HIV Risk Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men.  

PubMed

Given the popularity of social media among young men who have sex with men (YMSM), and in light of YMSM's elevated and increasing HIV rates, we tested the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a live chat intervention delivered on Facebook in reducing condomless anal sex and substance use within a group of high risk YMSM in a pre-post design with no control group. Participants (N = 41; 18-29 years old) completed up to eight one-hour motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral skills-based online live chat intervention sessions, and reported on demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics at baseline and immediately post-intervention. Analyses indicated that participation in the intervention (n = 31) was associated with reductions of days of drug and alcohol use in the past month and instances of anal sex without a condom (including under the influence of substances), as well as increases in knowledge of HIV-related risks at 3-month follow-up. This pilot study argues for the potential of this social media-delivered intervention to reduce HIV risk among a most vulnerable group in the United States, in a manner that was highly acceptable to receive and feasible to execute. A future randomized controlled trial could generate an intervention blueprint for providers to support YMSM's wellbeing by reaching them regardless of their geographical location, at a low cost. PMID:25256808

Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Pachankis, John E; Gamarel, Kristi E; Surace, Anthony; Golub, Sarit A; Parsons, Jeffrey T

2014-09-26

142

Theorizing Alternative Pathways through Adulthood: Unequal Social Arrangements in the Lives of Young Disadvantaged Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This chapter introduces the innovative field-based studies on disadvantaged men that are featured in this volume. Together, these studies of disadvantaged men from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and both urban and nonurban settings complement and extend recent discussions of emerging adulthood, which typically conceptualizes the transition…

Roy, Kevin; Jones, Nikki

2014-01-01

143

The increasing frequency of heterosexually acquired AIDS in the United States, 1983-88.  

PubMed Central

Of 88,510 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) reported in adults in the United States from 1983 through 1988, the percentage attributed to reported heterosexual contact with persons known to be infected or at increased risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has increased steadily from 0.9 percent in the first quarter of 1983 to 4.0 percent in the fourth quarter of 1988, from 0.1 (in 1983) to 1.4 percent (in 1988) among men, and from 13 (in 1983) to 28 percent (in 1988) among women. Among women, the cumulative incidence of AIDS attributable to heterosexual contact per million population is over 11 times greater for Blacks and Hispanics than for Whites. Among men, this incidence is over 10 times greater for Blacks and four times greater for Hispanics than for Whites. The pattern of distribution of heterosexually acquired AIDS parallels the distribution of other heterosexually transmitted diseases, which are also more frequent in Black and Hispanic inner-city populations. Drug use, exchange of sex for drugs or money, and early onset of sexual activity in adolescents are increasingly associated with heterosexually transmitted infections and are likely to be very important in heterosexual transmission of HIV in inner-city US populations. PMID:2356912

Holmes, K K; Karon, J M; Kreiss, J

1990-01-01

144

Heterosexuality and Sex-Typing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research (Bem, 1976) has shown that sex-typed and androgynous persons differ in their behavior in a variety of situations. The present paper describes four studies of the relationship of sex-typing to sexual socialization and to heterosexual attitudes and behavior. This program of research indicates that persons do differ in their sexual…

Allgeier, Elizabeth R.

145

Heterosexual Allies: A Descriptive Profile  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty-six heterosexual members of a college-based gay/straight alliance organization were surveyed to investigate characteristics of students who commit to acting as allies in reducing sexual prejudice. Assessment focused on the students' history of intergroup contact and exposure to sexual prejudice prior to joining the gay/straight alliance,…

Goldstein, Susan B.; Davis, Denise S.

2010-01-01

146

Patterns of sexual mixing with respect to social, health and sexual characteristics among heterosexual couples in England: analyses of probability sample survey data.  

PubMed

Patterns of sexual mixing are major determinants of sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission, in particular the extent to which high-risk populations mix with low-risk populations. However, patterns of mixing in the general population are poorly understood. We analysed data from a national probability sample survey of households, the Health Survey for England 2010. A total of 943 heterosexual couples living together, where at least one partner was aged between 16-44 years, were included. We used correlation coefficients to measure the strength of similarities between partners with respect to demographic characteristics, general health, health behaviours and sexual history. Males were on average 2 years older than their female partners, although this age difference ranged from a median of 0 years in men aged 16-24 years to a median of 2 years in men aged 35-44 years. A positive correlation between partners was found for all demographic characteristics. With respect to general health and health behaviours, a strongly positive correlation was found between men and women in reporting alcohol consumption at ?3 days a week and smoking. Men typically reported greater numbers of sexual partners than their female partner, although men and women with more partners were more likely to mix with each other. We have been able to elucidate the patterns of sexual mixing between men and women living together in England. Mixing based on demographic characteristics was more assortative than sexual characteristics. These data can better inform mathematical models of STI transmission. PMID:25167088

Prah, P; Copas, A J; Mercer, C H; Nardone, A; Johnson, A M

2015-05-01

147

Change in relationship quality for partners from lesbian, gay male, and heterosexual couples.  

PubMed

Growth curves for relationship quality over the first 10 years of cohabitation, controlling for separation, were estimated on the basis of survey data obtained over part or all of this time interval. Participants were both partners from 95 lesbian, 92 gay male, and 226 heterosexual couples living without children, and both partners from 312 heterosexual couples living with children. Relative to other partners, those from lesbian couples showed the highest levels of relationship quality averaged over all assessments. Pattern of change in relationship quality varied by type of couple. Partners from lesbian and gay male couples showed no change, those from heterosexual couples without children showed an early phase of accelerated decline followed by a leveling off, and those from heterosexual couples with children showed an early phase of accelerated decline followed by a 2nd phase of accelerated decline. PMID:18855506

Kurdek, Lawrence A

2008-10-01

148

Emotional Bonds and Social Support Exchange Between Men Living With HIV Infection and Their Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men infected with HIV are often faced with caregiving responsibilities of aging, ill parents, while simultaneously looking for support from their parents in dealing with their own health problems. Unfortunately, the reciprocal roles of HIV-positive adult sons and aging mothers as caregivers have not been examined. To address this gap in the literature, HIV-positive men (n = 118) answered open-ended

Constance R. Uphold; Constance L. Shehan; Joyce McDonald Bender; Bradley S. Bender

2012-01-01

149

Effect of four monthly oral vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation on fractures and mortality in men and women living in the community: randomised double blind controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine the effect of four monthly vitamin D supplementation on the rate of fractures in men and women aged 65 years and over living in the community. Design Randomised double blind controlled trial of 100 000 IU oral vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation or matching placebo every four months over five years. Setting and participants 2686 people (2037 men

Daksha P Trivedi; Richard Doll; Kay Tee Khaw

2003-01-01

150

Socioeconomic position and HIV risk-relevant behavior among lower-income heterosexuals in San Francisco.  

PubMed

We assess whether there is evidence of an association between socioeconomic position (SEP) and HIV risk-relevant behavior among lower income heterosexual men and women in San Francisco. Respondents residing in low income areas with high heterosexual AIDS case burden in San Francisco were recruited through long-chain referral in 2006-2007. Risk measures included unprotected vaginal intercourse, concurrency and exchange sex. SEP was defined as household annual income, per capita income, and employment. Analyses utilized mixed and fixed effects models. A total of 164 men and 286 women were included in the study. SEP was only significant in the case of exchange sex among men: men reporting annual income greater than $30,000 had significantly lower odds of exchange sex relative to other men. Evaluating the connection between economic status and HIV requires additional studies covering diverse populations. Future studies should focus on community economic context as well as individual SEP. PMID:20054633

Arnold, Michael P; Raymond, H Fisher; Fisher, H Raymond; McFarland, Willi

2011-02-01

151

Men living with diagnosed HIV who have sex with men: progress along the continuum of HIV care--United States, 2010.  

PubMed

Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) represent approximately 2% of the United States population, yet are the risk group most affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In 2010, among persons newly infected with HIV, 63% were MSM; among persons living with HIV, 52% were MSM. The three goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy are to reduce new HIV infections, to increase access to care and improve health outcomes for persons living with HIV, and to reduce HIV-related health disparities. In July 2013, the HIV Care Continuum Initiative was established by executive order to mobilize and accelerate federal efforts to increase HIV testing, services, and treatment along the continuum. To meet the 2015 targets of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, 85% of MSM diagnosed with HIV should be linked to care, 80% should be retained in care, and the proportion with an undetectable viral load (VL) should be increased by 20%. To assess progress toward meeting these targets, CDC assessed the level at each step of the continuum of care for MSM by age and race/ethnicity. CDC analyzed data from the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS) and the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) for MSM with diagnosed HIV infection. The results indicated that 77.5% were linked to care, 50.9% were retained in care, 49.5% were prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 42.0% had achieved viral suppression. Younger MSM and black/African American MSM had lower levels of care compared with older MSM and those of all other races/ethnicities. Interventions aimed at MSM are needed that increase linkage to care, retention in care, and ART use, particularly among MSM aged <25 years and black/African American MSM. PMID:25254559

Singh, Sonia; Bradley, Heather; Hu, Xiaohong; Skarbinski, Jacek; Hall, H Irene; Lansky, Amy

2014-09-26

152

Stereotypes of Older Lesbians and Gay Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined stereotypes of older lesbians and gay men. Key findings are that older lesbians and gay men were perceived as similar to older heterosexual women and men with regard to aging stereotypes, such as being judicious. At the same time, sexual minorities were targets of unique stereotypes. Consistent with the implicit inversion…

Wright, Sara L.; Canetto, Silvia Sara

2009-01-01

153

Beyond the Model Minority Myth: Interrogating the Lived Experiences of Korean American Gay Men in College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars have examined the experiences of GLBT students in college and found that gay students often report encountering unwelcoming campus environments, physical or verbal assault, and homophobia. Rarely, however, have the experiences of Asian Pacific Islander (API) or more specifically South Korean gay men been accounted for in the literature. A…

Strayhorn, Terrell L.

2014-01-01

154

Muscularity versus leanness: An examination of body ideals and predictors of disordered eating in heterosexual and gay college students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the current study was to add to the growing body of research on men with eating disorders by examining the association between different types of body dissatisfaction (muscularity and body fat) and disordered eating in heterosexual and gay men. Two hundred four participants (over one-third were gay) completed measures assessing disordered eating, muscularity and body fat dissatisfaction,

April R. Smith; Sean E. Hawkeswood; Lindsay P. Bodell; Thomas E. Joiner

2011-01-01

155

Men Do Matter: Ethnographic Insights on the Socially Supportive Role of the African American Uncle in the Lives of Inner-City African American Male Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the role of the African American uncle as a vital yet overlooked form of social support and social capital in the lives of adolescent African American male sons living in single-female-headed households. Research rarely examines the affective roles and functions of men in Black families; moreover, poor urban Black male youth…

Richardson, Joseph B., Jr.

2009-01-01

156

Correlates of Trading Sex for Methamphetamine in a Sample of HIV-Negative Heterosexual Methamphetamine Users  

Microsoft Academic Search

While many studies have examined correlates of trading sex for money, few have examined factors associated with exclusive trading of sex for drugs. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual men and women who were enrolled in a sexual risk reduction intervention in San Diego, California. Of 342 participants,

Shirley J. Semple; Steffanie A. Strathdee; Jim Zians; Thomas L. Patterson

2011-01-01

157

Opposite sex-linked behaviors and homosexual feelings in the predominantly heterosexual male majority  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whether homosexual feelings are distributed categorically or dimensionally remains controversial. In an earlier series of studies, medical students anonymously reported a dimensional distribution of homosexual feelings, the ratio of homosexual to heterosexual feelings in men correlating with opposite sex-linked behaviors in childhood and adolescence, and, in both sexes, with current degree of opposite sex identity. Prevalence of homosexual feelings was

Nathaniel McConaghy; Neil Buhrich; Derrick Silove

1994-01-01

158

Attitudes of Heterosexual Students toward Their Gay Male and Lesbian Peers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines heterosexual college students' (N=224) stereotypical negative attitudes toward gay men and lesbians. Results indicate that participants reported more negative attitudes toward both gay male and lesbian peers than toward students whose sexual orientation was not disclosed in social, academic, and family situations. Implications of these…

Engstrom, Catherine McHugh; Sedlacek, William

1997-01-01

159

Physical Women, Emotional Men: Gender and Sexual Satisfaction in Midlife  

Microsoft Academic Search

In late midlife, heterosexual women report markedly lower levels of sexual satisfaction than heterosexual men. This article\\u000a explored the social factors contributing to this difference, using data from 1,035 sexually-active heterosexual adults, aged\\u000a 40–59 years, who participated in the National Health and Social Life Survey (NHSLS). Conducted in 1992, NHSLS interviewed\\u000a a nationally representative random sample of U.S. adults about diverse

Laura M. Carpenter; Constance A. Nathanson; Young J. Kim

2009-01-01

160

Does menstrual cycle phase influence the gender specificity of heterosexual women's genital and subjective sexual arousal?  

PubMed

Unlike men, heterosexual women's genital arousal is gender nonspecific, such that heterosexual women show relatively similar genital arousal to sexual stimuli depicting men and women but typically report greater subjective arousal to male stimuli. Based on the ovulatory-shift hypothesis-that women show a mid-cycle shift in preferences towards more masculine features during peak fertility-we predicted that heterosexual women's genital and subjective arousal would be gender specific (more arousal towards male stimuli) during peak fertility. Twenty-two naturally-cycling heterosexual women were assessed during the follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycle to examine the role of menstrual cycle phase in gender specificity of genital and subjective sexual arousal. Menstrual cycle phase was confirmed with salivary hormone assays; phase at the time of first testing was counterbalanced. Women's genital and subjective sexual arousal patterns were gender nonspecific, irrespective of cycle phase. Cycle phase at first testing session did not influence genital or subjective arousal in the second testing session. Similar to previous research, women's genital and subjective sexual arousal varied with cues of sexual activity, but neither genital nor subjective sexual arousal varied by gender cues, with the exception of masturbation stimuli, where women showed higher genital arousal to the stimuli depicting male compared to female actors. These data suggest that menstrual cycle phase does not influence the gender specificity of heterosexual women's genital and subjective sexual arousal. PMID:24379080

Bossio, Jennifer A; Suschinsky, Kelly D; Puts, David A; Chivers, Meredith L

2014-07-01

161

A Case for Including the “Lived Experience” of African American Men in Batterers’ Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Influenced by the national attention that followed the violent episode between pop superstar Rihanna and hip-hop artist Chris\\u000a Brown, this article explores the importance of including the psychosocial experiences of disenfranchised African American\\u000a men in traditional intervention programs for batterers. The article provides an overview of how intimate partner violence\\u000a affects African American women and discusses how racialized stereotypical images

Samuel R. Aymer

162

Homocysteine levels in men and women of different ethnic and cultural background living in England  

Microsoft Academic Search

This population-based cross-sectional study in South London looks at the total homocysteine (tHcy) levels in groups of different ethnic background and the possible role of environmental factors and the 677C?T genetic polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Fasting plasma tHcy was measured in 1392 men and women, age 40–59 years; 475 were white, 465 of African origin (of whom 180

Francesco P. Cappuccio; Rachel Bell; Ivan J Perry; Julie Gilg; Per M. Ueland; Helga Refsum; Giuseppe A. Sagnella; Steve Jeffery; Derek G. Cook

2002-01-01

163

Correlates of Heterosexual Anal Intercourse Among Substance-Using Club-Goers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anal sexual intercourse represents the highest transmission risk for infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),\\u000a yet much of what we know about anal sex is based on men who have sex with men (MSM). Less is known about heterosexual adults\\u000a who practice anal sex, especially those who may be at risk for HIV such as substance users. The present

Gladys E. IbanezSteven; Steven P. Kurtz; Hilary L. Surratt; James A. Inciardi

2010-01-01

164

`Exploring relationships': a study of young people's (hetero)sexual subjectivities, knowledge and practices  

E-print Network

on the basis of this knowledge, Tolman and Higgins argued that this cultural story with its simplistic distinctions, 'may increase girl's vulnerability to sexual coercion and psychological distress and disable them from effectively seeking legal protection... in ways that hegemonic masculinity does not sanction (For example, young men who are homosexual, or those who experience difficulties with erection). Learning about young men's sexual pleasure and desire also offers insight into heterosexual practice...

Allen, Louisa Elizabeth

2000-02-15

165

Gay Men: Negotiating Procreative, Father, and Family Identities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our qualitative study examines the social psychology of gay men's experiences with their procreative, father, and family identities. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 childless gay men and 20 gay men in the United States who have fathered using diverse means excluding heterosexual intercourse. By focusing on men aged 19-55 residing…

Berkowitz, Dana; Marsiglio, William

2007-01-01

166

Sexual and Intimacy Issues for Aging Gay Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors focus on the special issues involved in providing counseling to aging gay men regarding sex and intimacy. Although the stresses of aging experienced by gay men are similar to those of heterosexual men, older gay men face issues of a stigmatized sexual orientation, invisibility, negative stereotypes, and discrimination regarding aging.

Pope, Mark; Wierzalis, Edward A.; Barret, Bob; Rankins, Michael

2007-01-01

167

Views and Attitudes Towards Sexual Functioning in Men Living with Spinal Cord Injury in Kerala, South India  

PubMed Central

Context: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for Indian men living with a spinal cord injury. Few first-hand reports exist about the experience of living with an altered sense of sexual identity and the inability to express sexual concerns. Aims: In this qualitative study, the authors explore views and attitudes towards sexual functioning in men living with a spinal cord injury in Kerala, India. Materials and Methods: Semi-structured and open-ended interviews were conducted with seven participants according to IE Seidman's phenomenological approach. Thematic analysis followed the analytic process outlined by Moustakas (1990). Results: Identification of seven interconnected themes included: Recalling an active sexual life, disconnection with sexual identity, incongruence between emotional and physical capability, spousal isolation, social readjustment of spouse, physical barriers to sexual functioning, coping, and reintegration. Conclusions: Patient's descriptions of suffering demonstrate complexities of experience in sexual functioning. All patients were sexually active prior to the injury. This was now lost causing anxiety, distress, and sadness. A huge gap existed between sexual desire and physical capability. The patient and spouse were now isolated emotionally, socially, and physically. Physical barriers included urinary incontinence and indwelling catheters. While several self-evolved coping strategies were identified, support from palliative care services was not evident. Two important gaps exist in research and practice: (1) Attention to sexual issues and whole-person care. (2) Attention to quality of sexual life. Future qualitative studies on sexual dysfunction could provide a useful adjunct to current literature which is predominantly biomedical in its approach. PMID:25709179

Sunilkumar, MM; Boston, Patricia; Rajagopal, MR

2015-01-01

168

Cancer Among Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Screening Saves Lives eCard More Resources Cancer Among Men Note: The numbers in parentheses are the rates ... the United States. Three Most Common Cancers Among Men Prostate cancer (128.3) First among men of ...

169

Trajectories of Objectively Measured Physical Activity in Free-Living Older Men  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Background The steep decline in physical activity (PA) among the oldest old is not well understood; there is little information about the patterns of change in PA and sedentary behaviour (SB) in older people. Longitudinal data on objectively measured PA data can give insights about how PA and SB change with age. Methods Men age 70–90 yr, from a United Kingdom population-based cohort wore a GT3X accelerometer over the hip annually on up to three occasions (56%, 50%, and 51% response rates) spanning 2 yr. Multilevel models were used to estimate change in activity. Men were grouped according to achieving ?150 min·wk?1 of MVPA in bouts of ?10 min (current guidelines) at two or three time points. Results A total of 1419 ambulatory men had ?600 min wear time on ?3 d at ?2 time points. At baseline, men took 4806 steps per day and spent 72.5% of their day in SB, 23.1% in light PA, and 4.1% in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). Mean change per year was ?341 steps, +1.1% SB, ?0.7% light PA, and ?0.4% MVPA each day (all P < 0.001). A total of 76.3% (n = 1083) never met guidelines (“stable low”), 7.9% (n = 112) consistently met guidelines (“stable high”), 8.2% (n = 116) stopped meeting guidelines by the last occasion (“decreasers”), and 4.9% (n = 69) started meeting guidelines by the last occasion (“increasers”). “Decreasers” spent 69.3% of each day in SB at baseline, which increased by 2% per year (P < 0.005), light activity remained at 23.3% (change, ?0.2% per year; P = 0.4), and total MVPA decreased from 7.1% by ?1.7% per year, (P < 0.001). The number of sedentary bouts >30 min increased from 5.1 by 0.1 per year (P = 0.02). Conclusions Among older adults, the steep decline in total PA occurred because of reductions in MVPA, while light PA is relatively spared and sedentary time and long sedentary bouts increase. PMID:24988411

JEFFERIS, BARBARA J.; SARTINI, CLAUDIO; ASH, SARAH; LENNON, LUCY T.; WANNAMETHEE, S. GOYA; LEE, I-MIN; WHINCUP, PETER H.

2015-01-01

170

On the validity of popular masculinity rating scales with gay men.  

PubMed

During the past decade, greater quantitative attention has been given to how gay men's lives are affected by traditional notions of masculinity. Consequently, it is important that masculinity-related measures that are often used in research are valid for use with gay men. This study examined the factor structures, loadings, and psychometric properties of three commonly used masculinity-related measures: the Gender Role Conflict Scale, the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory, and the Reference Group Identity Dependence Scale. Data were collected via an online survey of 920 self-identified gay men (M(age) = 32.48 years, SD = 11.73). Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that while the goodness of fit statistics did not always indicate the model fit, there were similar endorsements of items across the three masculinity scales and subscale factor loadings consistent with published studies using mostly heterosexual male samples. Implications for future masculinity scale research on gay men are discussed. PMID:25193131

Alt, Marcus; Lewis, Adam M; Liu, William Ming; Vilain, Eric; Sánchez, Francisco J

2014-11-01

171

"It's a Horrible Sin. If They Find Out, I Will Not be Able to Stay": Orthodox Jewish Gay Men's Experiences Living in Secrecy.  

PubMed

This qualitative study examined the intersection of sexual orientation and religion in the Jewish Orthodox community by exploring 22 Orthodox Jewish gay men's experiences living in secrecy. Analysis of in-depth interviews conducted with these men revealed four primary themes: emotional turmoil, ways of coping, impact on family relationships, and importance of the context. Findings from this study describe the daily struggles these men experienced keeping their homosexuality a secret. The findings suggest that in order to design effective interventions with this population, it is crucial to consider the larger community and religious context. PMID:25494720

Itzhaky, Haya; Kissil, Karni

2015-05-01

172

Gender differences regarding preferences for specific heterosexual practices.  

PubMed

Few investigations of sexual attitudes have restricted their focus to individuals' preferences for specific behaviors within a heterosexual relationship. None have examined gender differences in a broad and multidimensional array of such behavioral particulars. As part of an effort to develop a measure of preferred scripts in heterosexual couples, 258 men and women reported how much they agreed or disagreed with 74 statements of preference. A reduced and factor analyzed questionnaire included 38 items and was administered to a second sample (N = 228). Results offer qualified support that, compared to women, men are more erotophilic and show a stronger preference for incorporating erotic materials as well as drugs and alcohol into sexual relations with their partner. These results were more robust in the second sample, in which almost half of the subjects were tested in same-sex groups. Across both samples, women showed stronger preferences for activities reflecting romanticism. No gender differences were evident in sexual conventionality or in preference regarding the general use of contraceptives. However, results suggest that both sexes respond more favorably to a partner-focused or unspecified contraceptive method than to a self-focused method. PMID:7897676

Purnine, D M; Carey, M P; Jorgensen, R S

1994-01-01

173

Heterosexual Gender Relations and Masculinity in Fathers Who Smoke  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this research was to explore the role of masculinity and heterosexual gender relations in new and expectant fathers’ explanations of their continued smoking. We conducted a secondary analysis of in-depth interviews with 20 fathers. Two themes were identified: (1) reconciling with partners to maintain a smoke-free family home; and (2) smoking to self-regulate emotions and maintain relationships. Fathers’ decisions to smoke and changes in smoking behavior were shaped by ideals of masculinity and by partner relationships and family and social contexts, including division of domestic duties and childcare. Recognizing the influence of both masculinity and gender relations could provide new directions for supporting men’s smoking cessation efforts during early parenthood. © 2014 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25155799

Kwon, Jae-Yung; Oliffe, John L; Bottorff, Joan L; Kelly, Mary T

2014-01-01

174

The Role of Drugs in the Sexual Lives of Men Who Have Sex with Men: Continuing Barriers to Researching This Question  

Microsoft Academic Search

Barriers to researching links between drug use among men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV risk fall into three categories: (1) institutional barriers, (2) lack of appropriate theoretical models, and (3) stigmatization of sexual minorities. This paper reviews the status of the progress on the first two issues and presents a historical account of research on the role

David G. Ostrow

2000-01-01

175

Childhood family correlates of heterosexual and homosexual marriages: a national cohort study of two million Danes.  

PubMed

Children who experience parental divorce are less likely to marry heterosexually than those growing up in intact families; however, little is known about other childhood factors affecting marital choices. We studied childhood correlates of first marriages (heterosexual since 1970, homosexual since 1989) in a national cohort of 2 million 18-49 year-old Danes. In multivariate analyses, persons born in the capital area were significantly less likely to marry heterosexually, but more likely to marry homosexually, than their rural-born peers. Heterosexual marriage was significantly linked to having young parents, small age differences between parents, stable parental relationships, large sibships, and late birth order. For men, homosexual marriage was associated with having older mothers, divorced parents, absent fathers, and being the youngest child. For women, maternal death during adolescence and being the only or youngest child or the only girl in the family increased the likelihood of homosexual marriage. Our study provides population-based, prospective evidence that childhood family experiences are important determinants of heterosexual and homosexual marriage decisions in adulthood. PMID:17039403

Frisch, Morten; Hviid, Anders

2006-10-01

176

Pheromonal Influences on Sociosexual Behavior in Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested whether synthesized human male pheromones increase the sociosexual behavior of men. Thirty-eight heterosexual men, ages 26-42, completed a 2-week baseline period and 6-week placebo-controlled, double-blind trial testing a pheromone \\

Winnifred B. Cutler; Erika Friedmann; Norma L. Mccoy

1998-01-01

177

Dietary patterns and health and nutrition outcomes in men living with HIV infection123  

PubMed Central

Background Nutritional status is an important determinant of HIV outcomes. Objective We assessed the association between dietary patterns identified by cluster analysis and change in body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2), CD4 count, and viral load (VL). Design HIV-positive adult male subjects (n = 348) with a BMI ? 20.5 were evaluated by biochemical, body composition, and dietary data. Cluster analysis was performed on 41 designated food groups derived from 3-d food records. Dietary clusters were compared for sociodemographic, nutrient intake, and clinical outcomes. Multivariate linear regression assessed associations between dietary clusters and change in BMI, CD4 count, and VL. Results We observed 3 dietary patterns: juice and soda; fast food and fruit drinks; and fruit, vegetable, and low-fat dairy. Subjects in the fast food and fruit drinks pattern had the lowest fiber intake, highest VL, and lowest CD4 count and had a lower income than did subjects in the other 2 clusters. Subjects in the fruit, vegetable, and low-fat dairy diet pattern had higher intakes of protein, fiber, and micronutrients and the highest BMI and CD4 count. Subjects in the juice and soda pattern had higher energy intakes and lowest BMI. On average, the fast food and fruit drinks cluster and fruit, vegetable, and low-fat dairy cluster gained 0.33 (P = 0.06) and 0.42 (P = 0.02), respectively, more in BMI than the juice and soda cluster across the study interval in a multivariate model. Conclusions In a cohort of HIV-positive men, we identified 3 distinct dietary patterns; each pattern was associated with specific nutrition, demographic, and HIV-related variables. PMID:19064519

Hendricks, Kristy M; Mwamburi, D Mkaya; Newby, PK; Wanke, Christine A

2009-01-01

178

On density differences of some parts of body of men living on hypsometrically contrasting tectonic blocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In microgravity conditions in cosmos above the Earth s surface 100 and more km man diminishes density of its bones losing Ca This phenomenon appears instantaneously after arriving man in orbit If an abrupt hundred km vertical change produces very sharp and prompt result then a smaller vertical difference in terrestrial habitation 1 to 5 km but during thousand and thousand years should have some steady and noticeable results Let us compare some characteristics of man living in two tectonic segments the higher eastern and lower western hemispheres in two tectonic sectors the lower Eurasian and higher Asian sectors in two tectonic granules of Africa Pygmy of the Congolese lowlands and Bushman of the South-African highlands Polynesians of Pacific and Indians of America the western hemisphere have on average higher the Rohrer s index the ratio of body weight to the cube of its height than population of the eastern hemisphere A calf of a Polynesian is 25 longer in circumference than that of Hottentot Hand contraction of a Polynesian on average is stronger than that of a Breton fisherman Crania of the Changos - past Indians of the Atakama desert a very low part of the American continent -- are very strong with thick-bones and with cartilage joining skull bones thickness of skull bones is also a characteristic of other Indians So if an astronaut above loses his calcium an Indian below acquires additional calcium for his bones Composition and quantity of human hairs characteristically changes from uplifted to subsided -

Kochemasov, G. G.

179

Heterosexual Transmission of a Murine AIDS Virus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterosexual transmission of a murine leukemia virus mixture named LP-BM5 MuLV, which is known as the murine AIDS virus, was investigated. Our results indicated that the heterosexual transmission of LP-BM5 MuLV occurs in both directions with high frequency and that the frequencies of virus transmission in the cervix and penis are higher than those in other genital organs. The results

YOSHIAKI OKADA; ERI ABE; KATSUTOSHI KOMURO; TOSHIAKI MIZUOCHI

1998-01-01

180

Relationship Agreements and Willingness to Participate in Couples HIV Testing and Counseling Among Heterosexuals in the U.S.  

PubMed Central

Couples HIV testing and counseling (CHTC) has been used for more than 20 years in African settings and more recently among men who have sex with men in the United States, but little is known about willingness of heterosexuals in the U.S. to use CHTC. We conducted an online survey of heterosexuals in sexual relationships to assess willingness to use CHTC and willingness to discuss relationship agreements within a couples counseling session. We found moderate levels of willingness to use CHTC and somewhat higher levels of willingness to discuss relationship agreements in a couples counseling session. The most frequently cited reason people were not willing was that they did not perceive themselves or their partners to be at risk for HIV. These results will be useful in planning for CHTC implementation for heterosexuals in the U.S. PMID:25553143

Jones, Jeb S; Stephenson, Rob; Wall, Kristin M; Sullivan, Patrick S

2014-01-01

181

Men are much HarderGendered Viewing of Nude Images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on 45 interviews, this article addresses how heterosexual men and women respond to and discuss opposite and same-sex nude images in distinctive ways. Viewing both female and male nudes provides an opportunity to observe the sexual and gender identity work men and women perform when confronted with this cultural object. Both men and women have access to shared, readily

Beth A. Eck

2003-01-01

182

Characteristics of late presentation of HIV infection in MSM and heterosexual adults in Portugal 2011–2013  

PubMed Central

Introduction It is estimated that over half of newly diagnosed HIV infections in Europe present late. An HIV positive individual presenting late to care represents a missed opportunity to benefit from treatment, increasing the risk of morbidity and mortality at an individual level, and onward disease transmission at population level. Reducing late presentation is a strategic priority of the Portuguese HIV/AIDS program. We set out to describe the characteristics of late presentation in the two largest transmission risk groups currently in Portugal to inform HIV prevention and treatment. Methods We extracted details of all notified cases from individuals over 15 years with a laboratory confirmed HIV diagnosis made between January 2011 and December 2013 from the Portuguese HIV surveillance database and selected cases from heterosexuals and men who have sex with men (MSM). We defined late presentation as an initial CD4 count <350 cells/mm3 or presence of AIDS-defining disease at time of HIV diagnosis. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for characteristics associated with late presentation in separate logistic regression for heterosexuals and MSM. Results Of 4219 HIV positive cases notified, 2589 (61%) were heterosexuals and 1220 (29%) were MSM. A total of 1586 (38%) cases presented late of which 1037 (40%) were heterosexual and 328 (27%) were MSM. The median age at late presentation was 40 in heterosexual women, 46 in heterosexual men and 35 in MSM. A total of 1446 (55%) of heterosexual HIV positive adults were unaware of having had a high risk sexual contact. Late presentation among heterosexuals was associated with being male (aOR=1.58 95% CI 1.29–1.93), not knowing a partners’ HIV status (OR=1.59 95% CI 1.35–1.87) and age, increasing the odds of late presentation by a factor of 1.02 per year (95% CI 1.01–1.03). Among MSM, only age was associated with late presentation, increasing by 1.04 (95% CI 1.03–1.05) per year. Conclusions Portuguese HIV prevention programs need to increase the risk awareness of heterosexuals, particularly men, to reduce missed opportunities for early diagnosis. As half of all cases presenting late are aged 40 and over, we recommend that general HIV outreach services and specialist services for MSM review their accessibility and acceptability to both middle and older-aged clients. PMID:25397440

Shivaji, Tara; Diniz, Antonio; Cortes-Martins, Helena

2014-01-01

183

Gender and Binegativity: Men’s and Women’s Attitudes Toward Male and Female Bisexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the influence of gender on attitudes about bisexuals. A total of 164 heterosexual female and 89 heterosexual\\u000a male undergraduates completed the Biphobia Scale (Mulick & Wright, 2002), rewritten to refer to bisexual men and bisexual women and thus re-named the Gender-Specific Binegativity Scale. A mixed-design\\u000a ANOVA revealed an interaction between rater’s sex and target’s sex: women equally

Megan R. YostGenea; Genéa D. Thomas

184

Community and Individual Factors Associated with Cigarette Smoking among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) have higher rates of cigarette smoking than their heterosexual counterparts, yet few studies have examined factors associated with cigarette smoking among YMSM. The present study sought to understand how different types of gay community connection (i.e., gay community identification and involvement, gay bar…

Holloway, Ian W.; Traube, Dorian E.; Rice, Eric; Schrager, Sheree M.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Richardson, Jean; Kipke, Michele D.

2012-01-01

185

Correlates of homophobia, transphobia, and internalized homophobia in gay or lesbian and heterosexual samples.  

PubMed

This research assessed the correlates of homophobia and transphobia in heterosexual and homosexual individuals, based on a theory of different sources of perceived symbolic threat to social status. Compared to 310 heterosexual college students, a sample of 30 gay male and 30 lesbian college students scored lower on homophobia, transphobia, and religious fundamentalism. Mean gender differences were smaller for gay men and lesbians for homophobia, aggressiveness, benevolent sexism, masculinity, and femininity. Fundamentalism, right-wing authoritarianism, and hostile and benevolent sexism were correlated only with homophobia in lesbians, whereas fundamentalism and authoritarianism were correlated only with transphobia in gay men. Correlates of internalized homophobia were different than those found for homophobia and transphobia, which was discussed in terms of gender differences in threats to status based on sexual orientation versus gender identity. PMID:23952924

Warriner, Katrina; Nagoshi, Craig T; Nagoshi, Julie L

2013-01-01

186

The inventory of dyadic heterosexual preferences: development and psychometric evaluation.  

PubMed

This article describes the development and evaluation of an instrument that measures preferences for specific sexual behaviors of heterosexual men and women in a dyadic context. In Study 1, 74 statements of preference were reduced to 46 on the basis of reliability and range of responses. Factor analysis revealed that 27 of the 46 items loaded on 6 factors: Erotophilia, Use of Contraception, Conventionality, Use of Erotica, Use of Drugs/Alcohol, and Romanticism. In Study 2, factor analysis of fresh data from a second sample cross-validated these results. To establish construct validity of the revised 27-item Inventory of Dyadic Heterosexual Preferences (IDHP), relationships between each of its 6 scales and 6 criterion measures were examined. These analyses suggested that the last scale is more accurately characterized by the term Romantic Foreplay. We conclude that the IDHP measures 6 distinct domains of sexual preference with a brief, psychometrically sound instrument. Potential applications of the IDHP, suggestions for future research, and strengths and limitations of the current investigation are discussed. PMID:8871371

Purnine, D M; Carey, M P; Jorgensen, R S

1996-04-01

187

Should We Take Anodyspareunia Seriously? A Descriptive Analysis of Pain During Receptive Anal Intercourse in Young Heterosexual Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anal sex is becoming increasingly prevalent among heterosexual women and men. Although pain related to receptive anal intercourse is not uncommon, little is known about its phenomenology. This article aims to assess the prevalence and correlates of pain during anoreceptive intercourse, including anodyspareunia, its most severe form, among young women. An online survey focusing on anal eroticism was carried out

Aleksandar Štulhofer; Dea Ajdukovi?

2011-01-01

188

Association of social determinants of health with self-rated health among Australian gay and bisexual men living with HIV.  

PubMed

Despite a vast improvement in the survival of people living with HIV (PLHIV) since the introduction of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART), little change in the self-rated health of PLHIV has been observed since the introduction of cART in Australia. Difficulties with attaining employment or achieving financial security have been noted as some of the key challenges still facing PLHIV in the post-cART era. As a result, we investigated the independent association of a number of key social determinants of health with self-rated health among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men in Australia. Data from two recent national, cross-sectional surveys of PLHIV (the HIV Futures 5 and 6 surveys) were used. Logistic regression was used to assess the independent association of ethnicity, region of residence, education level, employment status, after-tax income, experience of HIV-related discrimination, level of social support, relationship status and recent sexual activity with reporting good-excellent self-rated health, after adjusting for clinical factors and other social determinants of health. Multiple imputation was used to estimate missing data for variables with >5% missing data. Of the 1713 HIV-positive gay/bisexual men who responded to the HIV Futures 5 and 6 surveys, information on self-rated health was available for 99.3%. Close to three-quarters of these respondents (72.1%) reported their self-rated health as good or excellent; the remainder (27.9%) reported their self-rated health as poor or fair. In multivariable analysis involving 89.3% of respondents, being employed, reporting recent sexual activity, a greater number of sources of social support and a higher weekly after-tax income were found to be independently associated with reporting good-excellent self-rated health. Despite the inability of this study to detect causal associations, addressing barriers to employment and sexual activity, and mechanisms to increase social support, is likely to have positive health effects for PLHIV in Australia. PMID:23651416

Koelmeyer, Rachel; English, Dallas R; Smith, Anthony; Grierson, Jeffrey

2014-01-01

189

Heterosexual gender relations and masculinity in fathers who smoke.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research was to explore the role of masculinity and heterosexual gender relations in new and expectant fathers' explanations of their continued smoking. We conducted a secondary analysis of in-depth interviews with 20 fathers. Two themes were identified: (1) reconciling with partners to maintain a smoke-free family home; and (2) smoking to self-regulate emotions and maintain relationships. Fathers' decisions to smoke and changes in smoking behavior were shaped by ideals of masculinity and by partner relationships and family and social contexts, including division of domestic duties and childcare. Recognizing the influence of both masculinity and gender relations could provide new directions for supporting men's smoking cessation efforts during early parenthood. PMID:25155799

Kwon, Jae-Yung; Oliffe, John L; Bottorff, Joan L; Kelly, Mary T

2014-10-01

190

Sexual orientation of men with pathological gambling: prevalence and psychiatric comorbidity in a treatment-seeking sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although gay men represent a high-risk group for psychiatric illness and impairment, they are largely an understudied population. The purpose of the present study was to examine the sexual orientation and clinical correlates of men with pathological gambling (PG). Sexual orientation was assessed in 105 men presenting with PG. Gay and bisexual men with PG were compared with heterosexual men

Jon E. Grant; Marc N. Potenza

2006-01-01

191

Dermatophytosis and HIV infection. A study in homosexual men.  

PubMed

Mycological and clinical investigations were carried out in 193 homosexual men, 83 of whom had HIV antibodies, and 117 heterosexual men. Dermatophytes were recovered from the feet in 37.3% of HIV seropositive homosexual men, 31.8% of seronegative homosexual men and 8.6% of heterosexual men. Tinea pedis in homosexual men was significantly more common with increasing age. There was an increased number of sexual partners in the group of homosexual men with tinea pedis. Two dermatophytes were recovered from single samples in 14.5% of homosexual men with dermatophytosis. Dermatophytes were occasionally isolated from clinically normal toe clefts. Present results point to the importance of dermatophytes in nail dystrophy affecting patients with advanced HIV infection. Dermatophytosis in homosexual men was not associated with any changes in counts of blood T lymphocyte subsets or skin reactivity to tuberculin. PMID:2449012

Torssander, J; Karlsson, A; Morfeldt-Månson, L; Putkonen, P O; Wasserman, J

1988-01-01

192

The Pre-Retirement Years: Five Years in the Work Lives of Middle-Aged Men. Volume 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume examines a number of facets of the labor market experience and behavior of middle-aged men. It is based on a unique set of longitudinal data collected by personal interviews among the same sample of men in 1966, 1967, 1969, and 1971. The data contain a complete record of the labor market activity of the men over a five-year period,…

Parnes, Herbert S.; And Others

193

Tal Como Somos/just as we are: an educational film to reduce stigma toward gay and bisexual men, transgender individuals, and persons living with HIV/AIDS.  

PubMed

In this article, the authors describe the development and dissemination of a film-based educational intervention to reduce negative attitudes toward gay and bisexual men, transgender women, and people living with HIV/AIDS in Latino communities, with a focus on youth. The intervention, Tal Como Somos/Just as We Are, is based on stigma and attribution theories, extensive formative research, and community input. Evaluation findings among educators and school youth suggest the film has the potential to effectively influence attitudes toward gay and bisexual men, transgender women, and people living with HIV/AIDS. The film and intervention are being disseminated using diffusion of innovations theory through community-based organizations, schools, television broadcasting, and film festivals. PMID:24377496

Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Kuhns, Lisa M; Manjarrez, Dianna

2014-04-01

194

'I count myself as being in a different world': African gay and bisexual men living with HIV in London. An exploratory study.  

PubMed

The experiences of men from African backgrounds living with HIV who are gay/bisexual have so far been overlooked in the research on HIV in the UK. Little is known about the ways that HIV impacts on this population. We report on an exploratory qualitative study with 8 gay/bisexual men from 7 different African countries living with HIV in London, based on in depth semi structured interviews and a thematic analysis. HIV testing and diagnosis, disclosure to others, social and sexual networks, sexual relationships and practices, use of health services and coping mechanisms emerged as key themes. Men with insecure residency status in the UK and those without work had additional challenges to meet. Men described the constant juggling required to balance the complex and sometimes contradictory realities of life as a gay/bisexual man, an African and an HIV positive person. Actual and perceived stigma was a key barrier to accessing appropriate practical and emotional support from families, social network or religious organisations. PMID:18484332

Paparini, Sara; Doyal, Lesley; Anderson, Jane

2008-05-01

195

The Impact of Relationship Status on the Association Between Sexual Orientation and Disordered Eating in Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sexual orientation has emerged as a consistent and specific risk factor for eating pathology in men, with bisexual and gay (BG) men having higher rates of eating pathology than heterosexual men. One theoretical explanation for this association posits that BG men may feel pressure to obtain a lean physique to attract a male partner, leaving them vulnerable to disordered eating.

Tiffany A Brown

2011-01-01

196

A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction to manage affective symptoms and improve quality of life in gay men living with HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine whether MBSR groups would help gay men living with HIV improve psychosocial functioning and increase mindfulness\\u000a compared to treatment-as-usual (TAU). Methods: 117 participants were randomized 2:1 to MBSR or TAU. No new psychosocial or\\u000a psychopharmacological interventions were initiated within 2 months of baseline. Standardized questionnaires were administered\\u000a pre-, postintervention and at 6 months. An intent-to-treat analysis found significant benefits of

Bill Gayner; Mary Jane Esplen; Peter DeRoche; Jiahui Wong; Scott Bishop; Lynn Kavanagh; Kate Butler

197

Dopamine D2 Receptor Genotype (C957T) and Habitual Consumption of Sugars in a Free-Living Population of Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: The dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) has been implicated in modulating the rewarding effects of foods high in sugar. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a variation in the DRD2 gene affects habitual consumption of sugars in a free-living population. Methods: Caucasian men (n = 96) and women (n = 217) 20–29 years of age completed a

Karen M. Eny; Paul N. Corey; Ahmed El-Sohemy

2009-01-01

198

Parent adjustment over time in gay, lesbian, and heterosexual parent families adopting from foster care.  

PubMed

Although increasing numbers of gay and lesbian individuals and couples are adopting children, gay men and lesbian women continue to face increased scrutiny and legal obstacles from the child welfare system. To date, little research has compared the experiences of gay or lesbian and heterosexual adoptive parents over time, limiting conceptual understandings of the similarities they share and the unique challenges that gay and lesbian adoptive parents may face. This study compared the adoption satisfaction, depressive symptoms, parenting stress, and social support at 2, 12, and 24 months postplacement of 82 parents (60 heterosexual, 15 gay, 7 lesbian) adopting children from foster care in Los Angeles County. Few differences were found between heterosexual and gay or lesbian parents at any of the assessments or in their patterns of change over time. On average, parents in both household types reported significant increases in adoption satisfaction and maintained low, nonclinical levels of depressive symptoms and parenting stress over time. Across all family types, greater parenting stress was associated with more depressive symptoms and lower adoption satisfaction. Results indicated many similarities between gay or lesbian and heterosexual adoptive parents, and highlight a need for services to support adoptive parents throughout the transition to parenthood to promote their well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24826826

Lavner, Justin A; Waterman, Jill; Peplau, Letitia Anne

2014-01-01

199

Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Health-Related Quality of Life Among Older Gay and Bisexual Men Living With HIV Disease  

PubMed Central

Purpose: To identify risk and protective factors associated with mental and physical health-related quality of life, after controlling for key background characteristics, in a population of older gay and bisexual men living with HIV disease. Previous research examining quality of life among persons living with HIV rarely includes older adults. Design and Methods: Survey responses from 226 gay and bisexual men aged 50 and older, and living with HIV disease, which were part of the Caring and Aging with Pride study, were analyzed using multivariate linear regression models. Results: Findings reveal that comorbidity, limitations in activities, and victimization are significant risk factors for decreased physical and mental health-related quality of life. Stigma and HIV progression did not contribute to the overall outcome variables in multivariate models. Social support and self-efficacy serve as protective factors although social support was only significant with mental health-related quality of life. Implications: Comorbidity, functional limitations, and lifetime victimization are risks to quality of life among older gay and bisexual men with HIV disease. Self-efficacy and social support represent intrapersonal and interpersonal resources that can be enhanced through interventions to improve health-related quality of life. PMID:23355449

Emlet, Charles A.

2013-01-01

200

Trust, Respect and Friendship: The Key Attributes of Significant Others in the Lives of Young Working Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of 146 male construction industry apprentices (predominantly young men) in Australia self-reported on their significant relationships, as well as the key attributes of these relationships. The findings indicated that the young men shared events, disclosed confidences and looked for help and support from family, romantic partners and close…

du Plessis, Karin; Corney, Tim

2011-01-01

201

Barriers and Facilitators of HIV Prevention With Heterosexual Latino Couples: Beliefs of Four Stakeholder Groups  

PubMed Central

Although HIV prevention interventions for women are efficacious, long-term behavior change maintenance within power-imbalanced heterosexual relationships has been difficult. To explore the feasibility, content, and format of an HIV intervention for Latino couples, the authors conducted 13 focus groups with HIV/AIDS researchers, service providers, and heterosexual men and women in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Mexico. Reasons that participants thought that men should be involved in prevention efforts included promotion of shared responsibility, creation of a safe environment for open conversation about sex, and increased sexual negotiation skills. Perceived barriers to men’s involvement included cultural taboos, sexual conservatism associated with Catholicism and machismo, and power-imbalanced relationships. Participants stressed the need for recruitment of men within naturally occurring settings or by influential community leaders. Participants indicated that couples-level interventions would be successful if they used strong coed facilitators, included both unigender and mixed-gender discussion opportunities, and addressed personally meaningful topics. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19209976

Pérez-Jiménez, David; Seal, David W.; Serrano-García, Irma

2012-01-01

202

Dream Interpretation with Heterosexual Dating Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the effectiveness of the Hill cognitive–experiential model of dream interpretation for working with male and female partners in heterosexual dating couples. Results showed that female partners who received dream interpretation (N = 20) had greater improvements in relationship well-being, insight, and gains from dream interpretation than female partners in the wait-list control group (N = 20). However, male

Misty R. Kolchakian; Clara E. Hill

2002-01-01

203

Homotolerance and Heterosexuality as Norwegian Values  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, equality between homosexual and heterosexual relationships has increasingly been presented as a marker for Norwegian values. Norwegian schooling encourages tolerance toward homosexuals, and the state shows active interest in counteracting bullying against LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) youth by supporting research…

Rothing, Ase; Svendsen, Stine Helena Bang

2010-01-01

204

Exposing the gaps in awareness, knowledge and estimation of risk for anal cancer in men who have sex with men living with HIV: a cross-sectional survey in Australia  

PubMed Central

Introduction The incidence of anal cancer is significantly higher in men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV when compared to the general population. We aimed to assess their awareness, knowledge and perceived level of personal risk for anal cancer to help inform educational strategies targeting this group. Methods A cross-sectional study of 327 HIV positive MSM in Melbourne, Australia, attending clinical settings (a sexual health centre, tertiary hospital HIV outpatients and high HIV caseload general practices) completed a written questionnaire in 2013/14. Poor knowledge was defined as those who had never heard of anal cancer, or scored 5 or less out of 10 in knowledge questions amongst those who reported ever hearing about anal cancer. Underestimation of risk was defined as considering themselves as having the same or lower risk for anal cancer compared to the general population. Results Of 72% (95% confidence interval (CI): 67–77) who had heard of anal cancer, 47% (95% CI: 41–53) could not identify any risk factors for anal cancer. Of total men surveyed, 51% (95% CI: 46–57) underestimated their risk for anal cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that men who underestimated their risk were older (OR 1.04 (per year increase in age), 95% CI: 1.01–1.07), had poor anal cancer knowledge (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.21–3.51), and more likely to have ever had an anal examination (OR 2.41, 95% CI: 1.18–4.93). They were less likely to consult a physician if they had an anal abnormality (OR 0.54, 95% CI: 0.31–0.96), to have had receptive anal sex (OR 0.12, 95% CI: 0.02–0.59) or speak English at home (OR 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09–0.90). Conclusions This survey of MSM living with HIV demonstrated limited awareness, knowledge level and estimation of risk for anal cancer. Further educational and public health initiatives are urgently needed to improve knowledge and understanding of anal cancer risk in MSM living with HIV. PMID:25828269

Ong, Jason J; Chen, Marcus; Grulich, Andrew; Walker, Sandra; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Bradshaw, Catriona; Garland, Suzanne M; Hillman, Richard; Templeton, David; Hocking, Jane; Eu, Beng; Tee, BK; Fairley, Christopher K

2015-01-01

205

Perceptions of partner sexual satisfaction in heterosexual committed relationships.  

PubMed

Sexual script theory implies that partners' ability to gauge one another's level of sexual satisfaction is a key factor in determining their own sexual satisfaction. However, relatively little research has examined how well partners gauge one another's sexual satisfaction and the factors that predict their accuracy. We hypothesized that the degree of bias in partner judgments of sexual satisfaction would be associated with quality of sexual communication. We further posited that emotion recognition would ameliorate the biases in judgment such that poor communicators with good emotion recognition would make less biased judgments of partner satisfaction. Participants were 84 married or cohabiting heterosexual couples who completed measures of their own and their partners' sexual satisfaction, relationship satisfaction, quality of communication about sexual issues within their relationships, and emotion recognition ability. Results indicated that both men and women tended to be accurate in perceiving their partners' levels of sexual satisfaction (i.e., partner perceptions were strongly correlated with self-reports). One sample t-tests indicated that men's perceptions of their partners' sexual satisfaction were biased such that they slightly underestimated their partners' levels of sexual satisfaction whereas women neither over- nor underestimated their partners' sexual satisfaction. However, the gender difference was not significant. Bias was attenuated by quality of sexual communication, which interacted with emotion recognition ability such that when sexual communication was good, there was no significant association between emotion recognition ability and bias, but when sexual communication was poor, better emotion recognition ability was associated with less bias. PMID:23990145

Fallis, Erin E; Rehman, Uzma S; Purdon, Christine

2014-04-01

206

Living with HIV postdiagnosis: a qualitative study of the experiences of Nairobi slum residents  

PubMed Central

Objectives To characterise the experiences of heterosexual men and women living with HIV postdiagnosis and explain these experiences in relation to their identity and sexuality. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews and a theoretically informed biographic disruption theory. Setting Interviews were conducted in two Nairobi slums (Kenya). Participants 41 HIV-infected heterosexual men and women aged 18?years or older. Results People living with HIV have divergent experiences surrounding HIV diagnosis. Postdiagnosis, there are multiple phases of identity transition, including status (non-)disclosure, and attempts at identity repair and normalcy. For some people, this process involves a transition to a new self-identity, incorporating both HIV and antiretroviral treatment (ART) into their lives. For others, it involves a partial transition, with some aspects of their prediagnosis identity persisting, and for others it involves a rejection of HIV identity. Those people who were able to incorporate HIV/AIDS in their identity, without it being disruptive to their biography, were pursuing safer sexual and reproductive lives. By contrast, those people with a more continuous biography continued to reflect their prediagnosis identity and sexual behaviour. Conclusions People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) had to rework their sense of identity following diagnosis in the context of living in a slum setting. Men and women living with HIV in slums are poorly supported by health systems and services as they attempt to cope with a diagnosis of HIV. Given the availability of ART, health services and professionals need to support the rights of PLWHA to be sexually active if they want to and achieve their fertility goals, while minimising HIV transmission risk. PMID:23645922

Wekesa, Eliud; Coast, Ernestina

2013-01-01

207

Disordered eating behaviors among Italian men: objectifying media and sexual orientation differences.  

PubMed

Objectification theory was tested as a suitable framework for explaining sexual orientation differences in disordered eating behaviors in college-aged Italian men. The theory's applicability to 125 homosexual and 130 heterosexual men was investigated using self-report questionnaires. Gay men scored significantly higher on exposure to sexually objectifying media, body surveillance, body shame, disordered eating behaviors, and depression than heterosexual men. Although path analyses support the theory's applicability to both groups, for gay men the path model demonstrated a better fit to the objectification theory for disordered eating and depression. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:22985233

Dakanalis, Antonios; Di Mattei, Valentina E; Bagliacca, Elena Pagani; Prunas, Antonio; Sarno, Lucio; Riva, Giuseppe; Zanetti, M Assunta

2012-01-01

208

The Role of Monogamy and Duration of Heterosexual Relationships in Human Papillomavirus Transmission  

PubMed Central

Background.?Published data are equivocal about the relative rates of male-to-female and female-to-male human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission. Our objective was to estimate genital HPV incidence among heterosexual partners from a broad age range and to investigate the effects of monogamy and relationship duration on incidence. Methods.?HPV genotyping was conducted for heterosexual partners, aged 18–70 years, from Tampa, Florida, who provided genital exfoliated cell specimens at semiannual visits during a 2-year study. The rate of incident HPV detection was assessed for 99 couples, and transmission incidence was estimated among a subset of 65 discordant couples. We also evaluated the effect of monogamy and relationship duration on transmission incidence. Results.?Couples were followed up for a median of 25 months and had a mean age of 33 years for both sexes. The HPV type-specific transmission incidence rate was 12.3 (95% confidence interval, 7.1–19.6) per 1000 person-months for female-to-male transmission and 7.3 (95% confidence interval, 3.5–13.5) per 1000 person-months for male-to-female transmission. Regardless of monogamy status or relationship duration, there was a similar pattern of increased incident HPV detection among men compared with women. Conclusions.?HPV may be transmitted more often from women to men than from men to women, suggesting a need for prevention interventions, such as vaccination, for men. PMID:24253288

Nyitray, Alan G.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J.; Chang, Mihyun; Menezes, Lynette; Lu, Beibei; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary; Gage, Christine; Galindo, Claudia M.; Giuliano, Anna R.

2014-01-01

209

Acceptability of circumcision as a means of HIV prevention among men who have sex with men in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusive evidence-based research has shown that circumcision reduces the risk of HIV transmission via heterosexual intercourse, whilst ongoing studies are investigating similar effects via homosexual transmissions and the results are equivocal. Few acceptability studies regarding circumcision were conducted among men who have sex with men (MSM). In this cross-sectional study, a total of 307 MSM were recruited by snowball sampling

Joseph T. F. Lau; Jun Zhang; Hongjing Yan; Chunqing Lin; Kai-Chow Choi; Zhijun Wang; Chun Hao; Xiping Huan; Haitao Yang

2011-01-01

210

Latino Gay and Bisexual Men’s Relationships with Non-Gay-Identified Men Who Have Sex With Men  

PubMed Central

This study investigated relationships between Latino gay-identified men in metropolitan New York City and their non-gay-identified male partners. Phase 1 consisted of in-depth interviews (N = 33), and Phase 2 consisted of quantitative surveys (N = 120) with Brazilian, Colombian, and Dominican men who have sex with men (MSM). A majority of participants reported having had sex with heterosexually identified men, and in many cases, the relationship was sustained over time. We found mixed results concerning an attitude sometimes attributed to Latinos that sexual orientation is defined by sexual role, with receptive MSM seen as gay and insertive MSM seen as straight. Although there were no significant associations between partner sexual orientation and unprotected anal intercourse, gay men were less likely to take the insertive role in oral or anal sex with straight-identified male partners than with gay partners. PMID:20818527

Reisen, Carol A.; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Bianchi, Fernanda T.; Poppen, Paul J.; Shedlin, Michele G.; Penha, Marcelo Montes

2012-01-01

211

Diabetes mellitus and echocardiographic left ventricular function in free-living elderly men and women: The Cardiovascular Health Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the relation among diabetes, blood pressure, and prevalent cardiovascular disease, and echocardiographically measured left ventricular mass and filling (transmitral valve flow) velocities in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a cohort of 5201 men and women ?65 years of age. Ventricular septal and left posterior wall thicknesses were greater in diabetic than in nondiabetic subjects, showing a significant linear

Marshall Lee; Julius M. Gardin; James C. Lynch; Vivienne-Elizabeth Smith; Russell P. Tracy; Peter J. Savage; Moyses Szklo; Beverly J. Ward

1997-01-01

212

Individual Factors Determining the Food Behaviours of Single Men Living in Apartments in Montreal as Revealed by Photographs and Interviews  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore men's food behaviours using interviews and photographs. The research specifically looks at the importance of certain individual factors as determinants of food behaviours, namely food preferences, lifestyle, ability to cook, involvement with health and nutrition. Each man received two cameras and a guide…

Marquis, Marie; Manceau, Marilyn

2007-01-01

213

EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND STROKE IN JAPANESE MEN LIVING IN JAPAN, HAWAII AND CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The incidence of myocardial infarction and death from coronary heart disease was studied in defined samples of 45 to 68 year old Japanese men in Japan, Hawaii and California. The incidence rate was lowest in Japan where it was half that observed in Hawaii (P...

214

"The Things That Are inside of You Are Horrible": Children and Young Men with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Talk about the Impact of Living with a Long-Term Condition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited, progressive and life-limiting neuromuscular disease that affects boys. During their lives, they experience a series of medical and surgical interventions. Research reported in this paper took place in England with 37 young men living with DMD and their families and explored their experiences of…

Abbott, David; Carpenter, John

2015-01-01

215

Correlates of negative attitudes toward gay men: Sexism, male role norms, and male sexuality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research has shown that heterosexual men are more negative toward gay men than women are on measures of attitudes toward homosexual behaviour and homosexual persons (Kite & Whitley, 1996). Gender differences in attitudes toward gay men's civil rights are less clear. No empirical studies, however, have investigated these findings with a scale that measures specifically these three attitudinal subcomponents. This

Michelle Davies

2004-01-01

216

Why Parenthood, and Why Now? Gay Men's Motivations for Pursuing Parenthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current qualitative study of 35 preadoptive gay male couples (70 men) examined gay men's motivations to parent and their reasons for pursuing parenthood at the current time. Similar to heterosexual couples, gay men described a range of psychologically oriented reasons as shaping their decision to become parents. Some of these (e.g., desire to…

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Downing, Jordan B.; Moyer, April M.

2012-01-01

217

Effects of Stigmatization on Gay Men Living with HIV/AIDS in a Central-Eastern European Context: A Qualitative Analysis from Hungary  

PubMed Central

This qualitative study highlights the social dynamics affecting people living with HIV (PLH) in Hungary and in the Central-Eastern European region. The study focused on the special needs and concerns of men living with HIV/AIDS as well as changes in their social relationships and institutional support provision, coping strategies and patterns of social functioning, especially in the context of social stigmatization. Consistent with international qualitative research findings in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention, the present study contributes to a fuller understanding of relationship between sexual behavior, HIV/AIDS related risks and risk perceptions as well as homosexuality-and HIV/AIDS stigma-related social exclusion in a previously under-researched socio-cultural setting. The findings of our study point to several barriers to effective HIV prevention, which should be overcome to improve the present situation by lessening the adverse effects of HIV/AIDS-and homosexuality-related stigma within the gay community, the general population and especially among service providers. One of the main barriers is the lack of public health programs specifically targeting MSM in Hungary, where the predominant mode of HIV transmission remains sex between men. PMID:23439743

Takács, J.; Kelly, J.A.; P. Tóth, T.; Mocsonaki, L.; Amirkhanian, Y.A.

2012-01-01

218

Risk factors for AIDS among Haitians residing in the US: evidence of heterosexual transmission  

SciTech Connect

In a study of Haitians in Miami and New York, Creole-speaking interviewers questioned 55 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (45 men and ten women) and 242 control-persons (164 men and 78 women). One male patient was homosexual, and one female patient had received blood within five years. No one admitted to intravenous drug use, hemophilia, or sexual contact with AIDS patients. Male AIDS patients were significantly more likely than control-men to have entered the US after 1977 and to have had gonorrhea, syphilis, and sexual contact with female prostitutes. Female AIDS patients were more likely to have voodoo-priest friends and to have been offered money for sex. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was probably contracted through sexual contact with infected heterosexuals.

Not Available

1987-02-06

219

The use of medication and associated factors among adults living in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil: differences between men and women.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to verify factors associated with the use of medication by adults, with emphasis on the differences between men and women. It was a population-based, cross-sectional study with cluster sampling conducted in two stages in Campinas in the state of São Paulo in 2008. Among the 2,413 individuals aged 20 or older, the prevalence of use of at least one drug in the three days before the research was 45.4% (95% CI: 41.3 - 49.4) in men and 64.6% (95% CI: 59.8 - 69.2) in women. For adult men over 40 years old who were not working, former smokers, with one or more chronic diseases, with two or more health problems and who sought health care or a health professional in the two weeks preceding the research showed higher prevalence of medication use. Among women, a higher prevalence of use was observed in females over 40, obese, former smokers, who reported a short sleep pattern, with one or more chronic diseases and two or more health problems, and who reported seeking a health care service or professional in the past 15 days. The findings showed some differences in the determinants of drug use in relation to gender, revealing the greater importance of health-related behavior among women. PMID:25388199

Francisco, Priscila Maria Stolses Bergamo; Bastos, Tássia Fraga; Costa, Karen Sarmento; do Prado, Maria Aparecida Medeiros Barros; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

2014-12-01

220

Phylogenetic analysis provides evidence of interactions between Italian heterosexual and South American homosexual males as the main source of national HIV-1 subtype C epidemics.  

PubMed

The HIV-1 clade C is prevalent worldwide and spread from Africa to South East Asia and South America early in the course of the epidemic. As a consequence of migration waves about 13% of the Italian HIV-1 epidemic is sustained by this clade. Two hundred fifty-four C pol sequences from the Italian ARCA database collected during 1997-2011 were analyzed. Epidemiological networks and geographical fluxes were identified through phylogeny using Bayesian approaches. Patients' country of origin was Italy, Africa, South America, and South East Asia for 44.9%, 23.6%, 4.7%, and 1.6%, respectively. Heterosexuals and men having sex with men accounted for 83.2% and 16.8%, respectively. Modality of infection was distributed differently: heterosexuals were largely prevalent among Italians (84.1%) and Africans (95.3%), while men having sex with men predominated among South Americans (66.7%). Eight significant clusters encompassing 111 patients (43.7%) were identified. Comparison between clustering and non-clustering patients indicated significant differences in country of origin, modality of infection and gender. Men having sex with men were associated to a higher probability to be included in networks (70% for men having sex with men vs. 30.3% for heterosexuals). Phylogeography highlighted two significant groups. One contained Indian strains and the second encompassed South Americans and almost all Italian strains. Phylogeography indicated that the spread of C subtype among Italians is related to South American variant. Although Italian patients mainly reported themselves as heterosexuals, homo-bisexual contacts were likely their source of infection. Phylogenetic monitoring is warranted to guide public health interventions aimed at controlling HIV infection. PMID:24482324

Lai, Alessia; Bozzi, Giorgio; Franzetti, Marco; Binda, Francesca; Simonetti, Francesco R; Micheli, Valeria; Meraviglia, Paola; Corsi, Paola; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; De Luca, Andrea; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Zazzi, Maurizio; Balotta, Claudia

2014-05-01

221

Determinants of Treatment Access in a Population-based Cohort of HIV-positive Men and Women Living in Argentina  

PubMed Central

Objective To report emerging data on the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in Argentina by assessing patterns of HAART access and late vs early treatment initiation in a population-based cohort of adults infected with HIV type-1. Design The Prospective Study on the Use and Monitoring of Antiretroviral Therapy (PUMA) is a study of 883 HIV-positive individuals enrolled in the Argentinean drug treatment program. Individuals were 16 years of age and older and were recruited from 10 clinics across Argentina. Methods Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were examined using contingency tables (Pearson chi-square test and Fisher exact test) for categoric variables and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for continuous variables. To analyze time to initiation of HAART we used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression. Results Patients who initiated HAART were more likely to be older, have an AIDS-defining illness, be an injection drug user (IDU), have a lower median CD4 cell count, have a higher median viral load, and be less likely to be men who have sex with men (MSM). In multivariate analysis, AIDS-defining illness and plasma viral load were significantly associated with time to starting therapy. Patients who received late access were more likely to be diagnosed with AIDS and have higher median plasma viral loads than those receiving early access. Conclusion Our results indicate that despite free availability of treatment, monitoring, and care in Argentina, a significant proportion of men and women are accessing HAART late in the course of HIV disease. Further characterization of the HIV-positive population will allow for a more comprehensive evaluation of the impact of HAART within the Argentinean drug treatment program. PMID:19825142

2008-01-01

222

Exploring the Mental Health of Black Men Who Have Sex with Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absract  Current research indicates that black men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately burdened by depressive distress\\u000a and anxiety disorders as compared to their white gay and heterosexual counterparts. This study utilizes focus groups to qualitatively\\u000a explore issues surrounding the mental health status of this population in an attempt to shed light on potential influencing\\u000a and determinant factors. Twenty-two

Louis F. Graham; Kisha Braithwaite; Pilgrim Spikes; Charles F. Stephens; Ugo F. Edu

2009-01-01

223

Micronutrient profiles in HIV-1-infected heterosexual adults.  

PubMed

There is compelling evidence that micronutrients can profoundly affect immunity. We surveyed vitamin supplement use and circulating concentrations of 22 nutrients and glutathione in 64 HIV-1 seropositive men and women and 33 seronegative controls participating in a study of heterosexual HIV-1 transmission. We assayed antioxidants (vitamins A, C, and E; total carotenes), vitamins B6 and B12, folate, thiamin, niacin, biotin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, free and total choline and carnitine, biopterin, inositol, copper, zinc, selenium, and magnesium. HIV-infected patients had lower mean circulating concentrations of magnesium (p < 0.0001), total carotenes (p = 0.009), total choline (p = 0.002), and glutathione (p = 0.045), and higher concentrations of niacin (p < 0.0001) than controls. Fifty-nine percent of HIV+ patients had low concentrations of magnesium, compared with 9% of controls (p < 0.0001). These abnormal concentrations were unrelated to stage of disease. Participants who took vitamin supplements had consistently fewer low concentrations of antioxidants, across HIV infection status and disease stage strata (p = 0.0006). Nevertheless, 29% of the HIV+ patients taking supplemental vitamins had subnormal levels of one or more antioxidants. The frequent occurrence of abnormal micronutrient nutriture, as found in these HIV+ subjects, may contribute to disease pathogenesis. The low magnesium concentrations may be particularly relevant to HIV-related symptoms of fatigue, lethargy, and impaired mentation. PMID:8624765

Skurnick, J H; Bogden, J D; Baker, H; Kemp, F W; Sheffet, A; Quattrone, G; Louria, D B

1996-05-01

224

Individual differences in perceptions of gay men's sexual role preferences from facial cues.  

PubMed

Research has demonstrated that the sexual role preferences of gay men can be perceived with accuracies that exceed chance guessing from viewing photos of their faces. This research was conducted with only heterosexual perceivers making the categorizations. We therefore examined whether men who have sex with men (N = 121) were able to perceive sexual role preferences from faces and, critically, whether perceivers' masculinity, femininity, homonegativity, and own sexual role preference affected their categorizations of targets as "tops" or "bottoms." We found that men who have sex with men, like heterosexual perceivers in prior work, perceived gay men's sexual role preferences accurately. Furthermore, men who self-identified with a receptive (bottom) role were more accurate in their categorizations and male perceivers who self-reported higher levels of masculinity were more likely to categorize other men as bottoms. These findings suggest that men's masculinity could serve as a lens through which people perceive others and interact with the world. PMID:24906820

Tskhay, Konstantin O; Re, Daniel E; Rule, Nicholas O

2014-11-01

225

Towards the Development of an Intimate Partner Violence Screening Tool for Gay and Bisexual Men  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Recent research suggests that gay and bisexual men experience intimate partner violence (IPV) at rates comparable to heterosexual women. However, current screening tools used to identify persons experiencing IPV were largely created for use with heterosexual women. Given the high prevalence of IPV among gay and bisexual men in the United States, the lack of IPV screening tools that reflect the lived realities of gay and bisexual men is problematic.This paper describes the development of a short-form IPV screening tool intended to be used with gay and bisexual men. Methods: A novel definition of IPV, informed by formative Focus Group Discussions, was derived from a quantitative survey of approximately 1,100 venue-recruited gay and bisexual men. From this new definition, a draft IPV screening tool was created. After expert review (n=13) and cognitive interviews with gay and bisexual men (n=47), a screening tool of six questions was finalized.A national, online-recruited sample (n=822) was used to compare rates of IPV identified by the novel tool and current standard tools. Results: The six-item, short-form tool created through the six-stage research process captured a significantly higher prevalence of recent experience of IPV compared to a current and commonly used screening tool (30.7% versus 7.5%, p<0.05). The novel short-form tool described additional domains of IPV not currently found in screening tools, including monitoring behaviors, controlling behaviors, and HIV-related IPV. The screener takes less than five minutes to complete and is 6th grade reading level. Conclusion: Gay and bisexual men experiencing IPV must first be identified before services can reach them. Given emergent literature that demonstrates the high prevalence of IPV among gay and bisexual men and the known adverse health sequela of experiencing IPV, this novel screening tool may allow for the quick identification of men experiencing IPV and the opportunity for referrals for the synergistic management of IPV. Future work should focus on implementing this tool in primary or acute care settings in order to determine its acceptability and its feasibility of use more broadly. PMID:23997849

Stephenson, Rob; Hall, Casey D.; Williams, Whitney; Sato, Kimi; Finneran, Catherine

2013-01-01

226

Struggling against Heteronormativity: The Narratives of Seventeen Heterosexuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a paucity of literature that examines the narratives of heterosexuals who struggle against the discourse of heteronormativity. There is even less literature that discusses how the discourse of heteronormativity may play out between egalitarian heterosexual counselors and clients who identify as sexual minorities. Employing the qualitative…

Smith, Lance Christian

2009-01-01

227

An Investigation of Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Carotid Plaque Presence and Intima Media Thickness in Middle-Aged South Asian and European Men Living in the United Kingdom  

PubMed Central

Objectives Ultrasound studies of carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) and plaques are limited in South Asians, a group at elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We determined whether South Asians have a difference in these ultrasound markers compared to Europeans living in the United Kingdom and whether measured risk factor(s) could account for any such differences. Methods One hundred South Asian men, aged 40 to 70 years and 100 European men of similar age and BMI, without diagnosed CVD or diabetes, underwent carotid ultrasound for measurement of cIMT and carotid plaque presence. Physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, anthropometry and blood pressure were assessed, fasted blood taken for measurement of cardiometabolic risk factors and demographic and lifestyle factors recorded. Results Age-adjusted mean (SD) cIMT was similar in South Asians and Europeans (0.64 (0.16) mm v 0.65 (0.12) mm, p = 0.64). Plaque was present in 48 South Asians and 37 Europeans and overall, there was no age-adjusted difference between South Asian and Europeans for plaque score(odds ratio 1.49, 95% CI, 0.86-2.80, p = 0.16), however, South Asians appeared to have more plaques at a younger age than Europeans; at age 40-50 years the odds of South Asians having plaques was 2.63 (95% CI, 1.16-5.93) times that for Europeans. Conclusions cIMT is similar between healthy South Asian and European men. Whilst there was no overall difference in plaque presence in South Asians, there is an indication of greater plaque prevalence at younger ages - an observation requiring further investigation. Prospective studies linking plaques to CVD outcomes in South Asians are needed to investigate whether these measures help improve CVD risk prediction. PMID:25884221

Ghouri, Nazim; Purves, David; Deans, Kevin A.; Logan, Greig; McConnachie, Alex; Wilson, John; Gill, Jason M. R.; Sattar, Naveed

2015-01-01

228

Urinary Perchlorate and Thyroid Hormone Levels in Adolescent and Adult Men and Women Living in the United States  

PubMed Central

Background Perchlorate is commonly found in the environment and known to inhibit thyroid function at high doses. Assessing the potential effect of low-level exposure to perchlorate on thyroid function is an area of ongoing research. Objectives We evaluated the potential relationship between urinary levels of perchlorate and serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and total thyroxine (T4) in 2,299 men and women, ? 12 years of age, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2001–2002. Methods We used multiple regression models of T4 and TSH that included perchlorate and covariates known to be or likely to be associated with T4 or TSH levels: age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, estrogen use, menopausal status, pregnancy status, premenarche status, serum C-reactive protein, serum albumin, serum cotinine, hours of fasting, urinary thiocyanate, urinary nitrate, and selected medication groups. Results Perchlorate was not a significant predictor of T4 or TSH levels in men. For women overall, perchlorate was a significant predictor of both T4 and TSH. For women with urinary iodine < 100 ?g/L, perchlorate was a significant negative predictor of T4 (p < 0.0001) and a positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.001). For women with urinary iodine ? 100 ?g/L, perchlorate was a significant positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.025) but not T4 (p = 0.550). Conclusions These associations of perchlorate with T4 and TSH are coherent in direction and independent of other variables known to affect thyroid function, but are present at perchlorate exposure levels that were unanticipated based on previous studies. PMID:17185277

Blount, Benjamin C.; Pirkle, James L.; Osterloh, John D.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Caldwell, Kathleen L.

2006-01-01

229

Tal Como Somos/Just As We Are: An Educational Film to Reduce Stigma towards Gay and Bisexual Men, Transgender Individuals & Persons Living with HIV/AIDS  

PubMed Central

In this paper we describe the development and dissemination of a film-based educational intervention to reduce negative attitudes towards gay and bisexual men and transgender women (GBT) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Latino communities, with a focus on youth. The intervention, Tal Como Somos/Just as We Are, is based on stigma and attribution theories, extensive formative research, and community input. Evaluation findings among educators and school youth suggest the film has the potential to effectively impact attitudes towards GBT and PLWHA. The film and intervention are being disseminated using diffusion of innovations theory through community-based organizations, schools, television broadcasting and film festivals. PMID:24377496

Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Kuhns, Lisa M.; Manjarrez, Dianna

2013-01-01

230

“I didn't think I could get out of the fucking park.” Gay men’s retrospective accounts of neighborhood space, emerging sexuality and migrations  

PubMed Central

Young, African American and Latino gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately represented among new HIV cases according to the most recent national surveillance statistics. Analysts have noted that these racial/ethnic disparities in HIV among MSM exist within the wider context of sexual, mental and physical health disparities between MSM and heterosexuals. The intercorrelation of these adverse health outcomes among MSM, termed syndemics, has been theorized to be socially produced by a heterosexist social system that marginalizes lesbian, gay, bisexual, MSM and other sexual minorities. African American and Latino MSM experience overlapping systems of oppression that may increase their risk of experiencing syndemic health outcomes. In this paper, using data from twenty in-depth qualitative interviews with MSM living in four New York City (NYC) neighborhoods, we present accounts of neighborhood space, examining how space can both physically constitute and reinforce social systems of stratification and oppression, which in turn produce social disparities in sexual health outcomes. By analyzing accounts of emerging sexuality in neighborhood space, i.e. across time and space, we identify pathways to risk and contribute to our understanding of how neighborhood space is experienced by gay men, adding to our ability to support young men as they emerge in place and to shape the social topography of urban areas. PMID:24581056

Frye, Victoria; Egan, James E.; Tieu, Hong Van; Cerdá, Magdalena; Ompad, Danielle; Koblin, Beryl A.

2014-01-01

231

Disclosure and Concealment of Sexual Orientation and the Mental Health of Non-Gay-Identified, Behaviorally-Bisexual Men  

PubMed Central

Objective Although bisexual men report lower levels of mental health relative to gay men, few studies have examined the factors that contribute to bisexual men’s mental health. Bisexual men are less likely to disclose, and more likely to conceal (i.e., a desire to hide), their sexual orientation than gay men. Theory suggests that this may adversely impact their mental health. This report examined the factors associated with disclosure and with concealment of sexual orientation, the association of disclosure and concealment with mental health, and the potential mediators (i.e., internalized homophobia, social support) of this association with mental health. Method An ethnically-diverse sample of 203 non-gay-identified, behaviorally-bisexual men who do not disclose their same-sex behavior to their female partners were recruited in New York City to complete a single set of self-report measures. Results Concealment was associated with higher income, a heterosexual identification, living with a wife or girlfriend, more frequent sex with women, and less frequent sex with men. Greater concealment, but not disclosure to friends and family, was significantly associated with lower levels of mental health. Multiple mediation analyses revealed that both internalized homophobia and general emotional support significantly mediated the association between concealment and mental health. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that concealment and disclosure are independent constructs among bisexual men. Further, they suggest that interventions addressing concerns about concealment, emotional support, and internalized homophobia may be more beneficial for increasing the mental health of bisexual men than those focused on promoting disclosure. PMID:23276123

Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Siegel, Karolynn; Downing, Martin J.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

2013-01-01

232

Why Parenthood, and Why Now?: Gay Men’s Motivations for Pursuing Parenthood  

PubMed Central

The current qualitative study of 35 pre-adoptive gay male couples (70 men) examined gay men’s motivations to parent and their reasons for pursuing parenthood at the current time. Similar to heterosexual couples, gay men described a range of psychologically-oriented reasons as shaping their decision to become parents. Some of these (e.g., desire to teach a child tolerance) may have been uniquely shaped by their sexual minority status, and others (e.g., desire to give a child a good home) in part reflect their adoptive status. Men named age, finances, and relationship factors, as well as unique contextual factors such as the need to find and move to gay-friendly neighborhoods, as influencing their readiness to pursue parenthood at the current time. Gay men’s motivations to parent echo normative life course decision-making processes, but also reflect concerns that are uniquely informed by their sexual minority status. PMID:22563135

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Downing, Jordan B.; Moyer, April M.

2011-01-01

233

Heterosexual bias in the perception of loving relationships of gay males and lesbians  

Microsoft Academic Search

It was hypothesized that a heterosexual bias would emerge in the perception of loving relationships of gay males and lesbians. Specifically, it was predicted that if heterosexual subjects were presented with identical information about a hypothetical heterosexual couple, a lesbian couple, and a gay male couple, that the latter two would be perceived more negatively than the former. Heterosexual subjects

Ronald J. Testa; Bill N. Kinder; Gail Ironson

1987-01-01

234

Gendered experiences of conflict and co-operation in heterosexual relations of Somalis in exile in Gothenburg, Sweden.  

PubMed

Political upheaval and poverty at home has been forcing many Somalis to immigrate. These immigrants do not only leave their physical house, families, relatives, loved ones, friends, but also familiarities, culture, customs, and often they do end up in no man's land being between their own and new home culture. Available reports suggest that there are about 15,000 Somalis in Sweden and their majority came here from late 1989 to 1996. About one third these immigrants live in and around the city of Gothenburg. This paper explores and describes gendered experiences of conflict and co-operation in heterosexual relations of Somalis in exile in Gothenburg, Sweden. A qualitative sociological in-depth interviews with 6 women and 7 men was performed during May 1999 to January 2000. A follow up focus group interviews with 10 people (2 women and 8 men) was also carried on. The results show that both the Somali culture and Muslim religion do not support the children being taught sex education in schools or the names of the sex organs being pronounced other than to be used as metaphors. The girls, unlike their age group males, experience a very painful and terrifying process during childhood in which their self-esteem is downgraded by means of serious degrading traditional active violence such as female genital mutilation and visible virginity control. The narratives tell stories in which Somali women are degraded and expected to obey in situations characterised by their man's arbitrariness. They are subject to a very extensive form of social control, which is especially pronounced on issues regarding sexuality. Their integrity as women is, consequently set aside. When Somali refugees came to Sweden some of them came to adopt much of the modern lifestyle and cultural norm systems, preferable young people and some of the females. Relating to a new culture with its new expectations on the norm obedience also created changes in self-esteem. Exile situation tends to generate horizontal conflicts, among spouses and between groups of people. It also tends to generate vertical conflicts because now generations stand up against each other and this is especially pronounced when it is about issues of sexuality and sexual relations. The young generations questions their parents authority. They are now living in new social context and perceive risks, as well as possibilities. Their new dreams and choices, however, do not fit their parents' expectations, which sometimes leads to big problems. From a traditional perspective these deviants lack of respect for traditions and the original culture. From a male perspective this means more specifically a lack of respect for male dominance and superiority. PMID:15554519

Aden, A S; Dahlgren, L; Tarsitani, G

2004-01-01

235

Physical and biochemical characteristics of homosexual men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared the height, weight, obesity, muscularity linearity, biacromial-bi-iliac ratio, and muscle strength of 44 homosexual and 111 heterosexual men. Homosexuals had less subcutaneous fat and smaller muscle\\/bone development and were longer in proportion to bulk. Their shoulders were narrower in relation to pelvic width, and their muscle strength was less. Linearity and muscularity were related to childhood build and certain

Ray B. Evans

1972-01-01

236

Sexual Attitudes and Number of Partners in Young British Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between sexual attitudes and number of heterosexual partners in a survey-based and nationally representative random sample of 551 British men aged 16–25 years was examined. The main predictor of the number of partners in the last 5 years was the time since the first sexual intercourse, whereas age, marital status, education, social class, smoking, and alcohol consumption contributed

Emil Kupek

2001-01-01

237

The Effects of Death Reminders on Sex Differences in Prejudice Toward Gay Men and Lesbians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terror management research shows that death reminders (mortality salience) increase prejudice toward worldview violators. Two studies investigated whether death reminders exacerbated differences in heterosexual men's and women's reports of sexual prejudice (negative attitudes based on sexual orientation). Results showed that following death reminders, sex differences in anti-gay discrimination and affective prejudice toward gay men (but not toward lesbians) were larger,

Russell J. Webster; Donald A. Saucier

2011-01-01

238

MMPI Responses of Homosexual and Heterosexual Male College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory as a psychodiagnostic measure for homosexuality and psychopathology is reviewed and discussed. The MMPI was administered to samples of non-patient homosexuals and heterosexuals enrolled in college. Results are discussed. (Author)

Horstman, William R.

1975-01-01

239

Personal adjustment of male and female homosexuals and heterosexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared the personal adjustment and psychological well-being of 127 male and 84 female homosexuals with 123 male and 94 female heterosexuals. Ss were matched for sex, age, and education. Homosexuals did not differ in important ways from heterosexuals in defensiveness, personal adjustment, or self-confidence as measured by the adjective check list; or in self-evaluation as measured by a semantic differential.

Norman L. Thompson; Boyd R. McCandless; Bonnie R. Strickland

1971-01-01

240

Lesbian mothers and their children: a comparison with solo parent heterosexual mothers and their children.  

PubMed

Two types of single-parent households and their effects on children ages 3-11 years were compared. One type comprised 50 homosexual mothers and their 56 children, and the other was a group of 40 heterosexual mothers and their 48 children. There were 30 daughters and 26 sons of homosexual mothers and 28 daughters and 20 sons of heterosexual mothers. The sexual identity and social relationships of the children were assessed in relation to the sexual orientation of the mothers. The samples consisted of families from rural and urban areas in 10 American states. All have lived without adult males (18 years or older) in the household for a minimum of 2 years (average 4). Families with heterosexual mothers were matched to families with homosexual mothers on age and race of mother; length of mother and child separation from father; educational level and income of mother; and number, age, and sex of children. Data are reported from childrens' tests designed to provide information on general intelligence, core-morphologic sexual identity, gender-role preferences, family and peer group relationships, and adjustment to the single-parent family. No significant differences were found between the two types of households for boys and few significant differences for girls. Concerns that being raised by a homosexual mother might produce sexual identity conflict and peer group stigmatization were not supported by the research findings. Data also revealed more similarities than differences in parenting experiences, marital history, and present living situations of the two groups of mothers. The postulated compromised parental fitness of lesbian mothers, commonly asserted in child custody cases, is not supported by these data. PMID:3718205

Green, R; Mandel, J B; Hotvedt, M E; Gray, J; Smith, L

1986-04-01

241

Heterosexual daters' sexual initiation behaviors: use of the theory of planned behavior.  

PubMed

The current study investigated sexual initiations within the framework of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) (Ajzen, 1991; Ajzen & Madden, 1986). Male and female daters in heterosexual dating relationships completed an online survey that assessed their sexual relationship with their partner and the TPB components (perceptions of social norms, attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and intentions). The TPB was supported for both men and women in that, as predicted, the more an individual perceived that important others would approve of them initiating sexual activities with their partner, the more positive their evaluations were of the outcomes of initiating, and the more confident they were in their ability to initiate, the stronger were their initiation intentions. In turn, stronger sexual initiation intentions were associated with more frequent initiation behaviors. Compared to women, men initiated more frequently, had stronger sexual initiation intentions, and perceived more positive social norms regarding initiation; men and women did not differ in their attitudes toward sexual initiation or in their perceived behavioral control. Both men and women who reported initiating more frequently and perceived their partner as initiating more frequently reported greater sexual satisfaction. These results are discussed in terms of the utility of the TPB for understanding sexual initiations and the role of the traditional sexual script in initiation-related cognitions and behavior. PMID:22875717

Simms, Deanne C; Byers, E Sandra

2013-01-01

242

Willingness of Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in the United States to Be Circumcised as Adults to Reduce the Risk of HIV Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundCircumcision reduces HIV acquisition among heterosexual men in Africa, but it is unclear if circumcision may reduce HIV acquisition among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States, or whether MSM would be willing to be circumcised if recommended.MethodsWe interviewed presumed-HIV negative MSM at gay pride events in 2006. We asked uncircumcised respondents about willingness to be

Elin B. Begley; Krishna Jafa; Andrew C. Voetsch; James D. Heffelfinger; Craig B. Borkowf; Patrick S. Sullivan; Landon Myer

2008-01-01

243

The positive outlook study- a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of an online self-management program targeting psychosocial issues for men living with HIV: a study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background The emergence of HIV as a chronic condition means that people living with HIV are required to take more responsibility for the self-management of their condition, including making physical, emotional and social adjustments. This paper describes the design and evaluation of Positive Outlook, an online program aiming to enhance the self-management skills of gay men living with HIV. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled trial in which men living with HIV in Australia will be assigned to either an intervention group or usual care control group. The intervention group will participate in the online group program ‘Positive Outlook’. The program is based on self-efficacy theory and uses a self-management approach to enhance skills, confidence and abilities to manage the psychosocial issues associated with HIV in daily life. Participants will access the program for a minimum of 90 minutes per week over seven weeks. Primary outcomes are domain specific self-efficacy, HIV related quality of life, and outcomes of health education. Secondary outcomes include: depression, anxiety and stress; general health and quality of life; adjustment to HIV; and social support. Data collection will take place at baseline, completion of the intervention (or eight weeks post randomisation) and at 12 week follow-up. Discussion Results of the Positive Outlook study will provide information regarding the effectiveness of online group programs improving health related outcomes for men living with HIV. Trial registration ACTRN12612000642886. PMID:24491034

2014-01-01

244

Absence of hepatitis C virus transmission in a prospective cohort of heterosexual serodiscordant couples  

PubMed Central

Methods: We followed an open cohort of 171 people, 152 women and 19 men, who were not initially infected by either HIV or HCV, and whose steady heterosexual partner presented antibodies to both viruses (index case). Other risk exposures were excluded. Every 6 months clinical, epidemiological, and risk behaviour information was collected, and antibodies to both viruses were determined. Results: During 529 person years of follow up more than 40 000 vaginal or anal penetrations were recorded. 74 partners (43.3%) had vaginal and/or anal intercourse without condoms with the index case; another 15.8%, who always used condoms, declared breaking or slipping episodes during intercourse; and another 22.2% had unprotected orogenital exposures. During the follow up, over 5800 unprotected vaginal and anal contacts with the index case were estimated, as well as more than 25 000 unprotected orogenital contacts. 31 women became pregnant (two were index cases), and seroconversion to HIV occurred for one woman (1.7 per 10 000 unprotected contacts; 95% CI, 0 to 9.5), but there was no seroconversion to HCV (95% CI, 0–6.3 per 10 000 unprotected contacts). Conclusion: These results are consistent with a low or null transmissibility of HCV in heterosexual relations, even when the index case is HIV co-infected. PMID:12690143

Marincovich, B; Castilla, J; Del Romero, J; Garcia, S; Hernando, V; Raposo, M; Rodriguez, C

2003-01-01

245

Performance of the Duke Religion Index and the Spiritual Well-Being Scale in Online Samples of Men who have Sex with Men  

PubMed Central

Religiosity is associated with behaviors that reduce the risk of HIV/STI infection among general-population and heterosexual-specific samples. Whether this association is similar for homosexual persons is unknown. Measures of religiosity have not been evaluated psychometrically among men who have sex with men (MSM), a population who, because of stigma, experience religiosity differently than heterosexual persons. We assessed the DUREL and the SWB (short form) in two samples of MSM. Neither instrument produced adequate model fit. To study the association between religiosity and HIV/STI risk behaviors among MSM, scales are needed that measure the religious and spiritual experiences of MSM. PMID:22441843

Wilkerson, J. Michael; Smolensk, Derek J.; Brady, Sonya S.; Rosser, B. R. Simon

2012-01-01

246

Men's Health  

MedlinePLUS

... men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to ... regular checkups and medical care There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate ...

247

Increased Drug Use and STI Risk with Injection Drug Use Among HIV-Seronegative Heterosexual Methamphetamine Users†  

PubMed Central

Methamphetamine (MA) use has been found to be associated with increased risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) among men having sex with men, but it is unknown whether those who inject MA are at greater risk for these infections than those who administer MA by other routes. Furthermore, comparable data from heterosexual MA users are lacking. We investigated whether the HIV and STI risks of male and female heterosexual MA users who inject MA differ from those of comparable users who do not inject. Between 2001 and 2005, we interviewed 452 HIV-negative men and women aged 18 and older who had recently used MA and engaged in unprotected sex. Their mean age was 36.6 years; 68% were male; ethnicity was 49.4% Caucasian, 26.8% African-American, and 12.8% Hispanic. Logistic regression identified factors associated with injecting MA. Compared to non-IDU, IDU were more likely to: be Caucasian; be homeless; have used MA for a longer period and used more grams of MA in the last 30 days; have a history of felony conviction; and report a recent STI. HIV and STI prevention interventions should be tailored according to MA users’ method of administration. PMID:20464802

Cheng, W. Susan; Garfein, Richard S.; Semple, Shirley J.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Zians, James K.; Patterson, Thomas L.

2010-01-01

248

Perceptions of HIV Risk and Explanations of Sexual Risk Behavior Offered by Heterosexual Black Male Barbershop Patrons in Brooklyn, NY  

PubMed Central

To describe HIV risk factors among adult heterosexual Black men recruited from four barbershops located in high HIV seroprevalent neighborhoods of Brooklyn, NY. Data on HIV-risk related behaviors and other characteristics were collected from barbershop clients. All participants (n=60) completed brief risk assessments; and a subset (n=22) also completed focus groups and/or individual interviews. Of the subset of 22 men, 68% were US born, 59% had been in jail/prison, 32% were unemployed; and during the 3 months before the interviews, 68% reported at least two partners and 45% reported unprotected vaginal or anal sex with two or more women. Emergent themes included: 1) the psychological function of multiple partnerships; 2) calculated risk taking regarding condom use; 3) the role of emotional attachment and partner trust in condom use; 4) low perceived HIV risk and community awareness; and 5) lack of relationship between HIV testing and safer sex practices. Interventions among heterosexual Black men should focus not only on increasing HIV awareness and reducing sexual risk, but also on contextual and interpersonal factors that influence sexual risk. PMID:25699198

Taylor, Tonya N.; Joseph, Michael; Henny, Kirk D.; Pinto, Angelo R.; Agbetor, Francis; Camilien, Brignel; Williams, Kim M.; Browne, Ruth C.; White, Marilyn; Gousse, Yolene; Brown, Humberto; Taylor, Raekiela D.; Wilson, Tracey E.

2015-01-01

249

Do Web-Based and Clinic Samples of Gay Men Living With HIV Differ on Self-Reported Physical and Psychological Symptoms? A Comparative Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Although the Internet is commonly used to recruit samples in studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related risk behaviors, it has not been used to measure patient-reported well-being. As the burden of long-term chronic HIV infection rises, the Internet may offer enormous potential for recruitment to research and interventions. Objective This study aimed to compare two samples of gay men living with HIV, one recruited via the Web and the other recruited in outpatient settings, in terms of self-reported physical and psychological symptom burden. Methods The Internet sample was recruited from a UK-wide Web-based survey of gay men with diagnosed HIV. Of these, 154 respondents identified themselves as resident in London and were included in this analysis. The HIV clinic sample was recruited from five HIV outpatient clinics. Of these participants, 400 gay men recruited in London clinics were included in this analysis. Results The Web-based sample was younger than the clinic sample (37.3 years, SD 7.0 vs 40.9 years, SD 8.3), more likely to be in paid employment (72.8%, 99/136 vs 60.1%, 227/378), less likely to be on antiretroviral therapy (ART) (58.4%, 90/154 vs 68.0%, 266/391), and had worse mean psychological symptom burden compared to the clinic sample (mean scores: 1.61, SD 1.09 vs 1.36, SD 0.96) but similar physical symptom burden (mean scores: 0.78, SD 0.65 vs 0.70, SD 0.74). In multivariable logistic regression, for the physical symptom burden model, adjusted for age, ethnicity, employment status, and ART use, the recruitment setting (ie, Web-based vs clinic) was not significantly associated with high physical symptom score. The only variable that remained significantly associated with high physical symptom score was employment status, with those in employment being less likely to report being in the upper (worst) physical symptom tertile versus the other two tertiles (adjusted OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.28-0.62, P<.001). For the psychological symptom burden model, those recruited via the Web were significantly more likely to report being in the upper (worst) tertile (adjusted OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.41-3.44, P=.001). In addition, those in employment were less likely to report being in the upper (worst) psychological symptom tertile compared to those not in employment (adjusted OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.49, P<.001). Conclusions Our data have revealed a number of differences. Compared to the clinic sample, the Web-based sample had worse psychological symptom burden, younger average age, higher prevalence of employment, and a lower proportion on ART. For future research, we recommend that Web-based data collection should include the demographic variables that we note differed between samples. In addition, we recognize that each recruitment method may bring inherent sampling bias, with clinic populations differing by geographical location and reflecting those accessing regular medical care, and Web-based sampling recruiting those with greater Internet access and identifying survey materials through specific searches and contact with specific websites. PMID:25793749

Lampe, Fiona; Molloy, Tim; Sherr, Lorraine

2015-01-01

250

Social Dominance Orientation Relates to Believing Men Should Dominate Sexually, Sexual Self-Efficacy, and Taking Free Female Condoms Among Undergraduate Women and Men  

PubMed Central

Gendered-based power affects heterosexual relationships, with beliefs in the U.S. prescribing that men dominate women sexually. We draw on social dominance theory to examine whether women’s and men’s level of support for group-based hierarchy (i.e., social dominance orientation; SDO) helps explain gender-based power beliefs and dynamics in heterosexual relationships. We conducted a laboratory study at a Northeastern U.S. university among 357 women and 126 men undergraduates who reported being heterosexual and sexually active, testing three sets of hypotheses. First, as hypothesized, women endorsed SDO and the belief that men should dominate sexually less than men did. Second, as hypothesized, among women and men, SDO was positively correlated with the belief that men should dominate sexually, and negatively correlated with sexual self-efficacy (confidence in sexual situations) and number of female condoms (a woman-controlled source of protection) taken. Third, structural equation modeling, controlling for age, family income, number of sexual partners in the past month, and perceived HIV/AIDS risk, supported the hypothesis that among women and men, the belief that men should dominate sexually mediates SDO’s association with sexual self-efficacy. The hypothesis that the belief that men should dominate sexually mediates SDO’s association with number of female condoms taken was supported for women only. The hypothesis that sexual self-efficacy mediates SDO’s association with number of female condoms taken was not supported. Results suggest SDO influences power beliefs and dynamics in heterosexual relationships. Although female condoms are an important woman-controlled source of protection, power-related beliefs may pose a challenge to their use. PMID:24482555

Levy, Sheri R.; Earnshaw, Valerie A.

2014-01-01

251

Tobacco Smoking and Its Association with Illicit Drug Use among Young Men Aged 15-24 Years Living in Urban Slums of Bangladesh  

PubMed Central

Background Tobacco smoking (TS) and illicit drug use (IDU) are of public health concerns especially in developing countries, including Bangladesh. This paper aims to (i) identify the determinants of TS and IDU, and (ii) examine the association of TS with IDU among young slum dwellers in Bangladesh. Methodology/Principal Findings Data on a total of 1,576 young slum dwellers aged 15–24 years were extracted for analysis from the 2006 Urban Health Survey (UHS), which covered a nationally representative sample of 13,819 adult men aged 15–59 years from slums, non-slums and district municipalities of six administrative regions in Bangladesh. Methods used include frequency run, Chi-square test of association and multivariable logistic regression. The overall prevalence of TS in the target group was 42.3%, of which 41.4% smoked cigarettes and 3.1% smoked bidis. The regression model for TS showed that age, marital status, education, duration of living in slums, and those with sexually transmitted infections were significantly (p<0.001 to p<0.05) associated with TS. The overall prevalence of IDU was 9.1%, dominated by those who had drug injections (3.2%), and smoked ganja (2.8%) and tari (1.6%). In the regression model for IDU, the significant (p<0.01 to p<0.10) predictors were education, duration of living in slums, and whether infected by sexually transmitted diseases. The multivariable logistic regression (controlling for other variables) revealed significantly (p<0.001) higher likelihood of IDU (OR?=?9.59, 95% CI?=?5.81–15.82) among users of any form of TS. The likelihood of IDU increased significantly (p<0.001) with increased use of cigarettes. Conclusions/Significance Certain groups of youth are more vulnerable to TS and IDU. Therefore, tobacco and drug control efforts should target these groups to reduce the consequences of risky lifestyles through information, education and communication (IEC) programs. PMID:23935885

Kabir, Mohammad Alamgir; Goh, Kim-Leng; Kamal, Sunny Mohammad Mostafa; Khan, Md. Mobarak Hossain

2013-01-01

252

“We no longer live in the old days”: a qualitative study on the role of masculinity and religion for men’s views on violence within marriage in rural Java, Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies on domestic violence in Indonesia have focused primarily on women’s experiences and little research has been undertaken to understand men’s views on domestic violence or their involvement in the prevention of domestic violence. This study aimed to explore men’s views on masculinity and the use of violence within marriage, in order to gain knowledge on how to involve men in prevention of domestic violence in rural Indonesia. Methods Focus group discussions with six groups of local male community leaders in Purworejo were conducted. The discussions were transcribed and coded for the construction of a positional map on different masculinities and their relation to the level of acceptance of domestic violence. Results Social and cultural changes have played a crucial role in transforming the relationship between men and women in Indonesian society. Three different positions of masculinity with certain beliefs on the gender order and acceptance of violence within marriage were identified: the traditionalist, the pragmatist, and the egalitarian. The traditionalist had the highest acceptance of violence as a tool to uphold the superior position of men within marriage, while the pragmatist viewed violence as undesirable but sometimes needed in order to correct the wife’s behavior. The egalitarian did not see any reason for violence because they believed that men and women are equal and complementary to each other. Conclusions Adaptation to social and cultural changes combined with lack of exposures to contextual and progressive religious teachings has led to the formation of three different positions of masculinity among the population in this study. Each position has certain beliefs regarding the gender order and the use of violence within marriage. Religion is an extremely important aspect that must be included in every type of intervention with this population. PMID:24735687

2014-01-01

253

The gender role motivation model of women's sexually submissive behavior and satisfaction in heterosexual couples.  

PubMed

Previous findings suggest that women are more likely than men to take on the submissive role during sexual activities (e.g., waiting for their partner to initiate and orchestrate sexual activities), often to the detriment of their sexual satisfaction. Extending previous research on gender role motivation, the authors recruited 181 heterosexual couples to examine scripted sexual behavior, motivation for such behavior, and relationship outcomes (sexual satisfaction, perceptions of closeness, and relationship satisfaction) for both women and their partners. Using the actor-partner interdependence model, path analyses revealed that women's submissive behavior had negative links to personal sexual satisfaction and their partner's sexual satisfaction but only when their submission was inconsistent with their sexual preferences. Moreover, the authors show there are negative downstream consequences of diminished sexual satisfaction on perceptions of closeness and overall relationship satisfaction for both partners in the relationship. PMID:22207631

Sanchez, Diana T; Phelan, Julie E; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A; Good, Jessica J

2012-04-01

254

Sex with Women Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: Prevalence and Sexual Practices  

PubMed Central

Abstract Men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) are a potential bridge population for transmitting HIV to heterosexual women. This study assessed key characteristics of this subgroup of men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. Of 1141 eligible MSM, 45.6% reported bisexual behaviors. Besides marriage as a strong predictor (odds ratio: 23.90, 95% confidence interval: 14.29–39.98), older age (1.12, 1.10–1.15) and lower education (or no college education) (1.98, 1.52–2.59) were also independently associated with having ever had sex with women. MSMW reported higher proportions of alcohol drinking, heterosexual/bisexual orientation, and preference for an insertive role in anal sex than men who had sex with men only; but there was no statistically significant difference between two groups in prevalence of HIV and syphilis infections and in history of sexually transmitted infections. HIV prevention intervention programs should break the bridging role of HIV transmission in MSMW population. PMID:23931683

Tao, Jun; Ruan, Yuhua; Yin, Lu; Vermund, Sten H.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Shao, Yiming

2013-01-01

255

Sex with women among men who have sex with men in China: prevalence and sexual practices.  

PubMed

Men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) are a potential bridge population for transmitting HIV to heterosexual women. This study assessed key characteristics of this subgroup of men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. Of 1141 eligible MSM, 45.6% reported bisexual behaviors. Besides marriage as a strong predictor (odds ratio: 23.90, 95% confidence interval: 14.29-39.98), older age (1.12, 1.10-1.15) and lower education (or no college education) (1.98, 1.52-2.59) were also independently associated with having ever had sex with women. MSMW reported higher proportions of alcohol drinking, heterosexual/bisexual orientation, and preference for an insertive role in anal sex than men who had sex with men only; but there was no statistically significant difference between two groups in prevalence of HIV and syphilis infections and in history of sexually transmitted infections. HIV prevention intervention programs should break the bridging role of HIV transmission in MSMW population. PMID:23931683

Tao, Jun; Ruan, Yuhua; Yin, Lu; Vermund, Sten H; Shepherd, Bryan E; Shao, Yiming; Qian, Han-Zhu

2013-09-01

256

Gendered constructions of the impact of HIV and AIDS in the context of the HIV-positive seroconcordant heterosexual relationship  

PubMed Central

Introduction This article explores the complex, dynamic and contextual frameworks within which men working in a mining community and their live-in long-term partners or spouses (termed “couples” in this study) respond to the introduction of HIV into their heterosexual relationships; the way in which partners adopt gendered positions in enabling them to make sense of their illness; how they negotiate their respective masculine and feminine roles in response to the need for HIV-related lifestyle changes; as well as the gendered nature of partner support in relation to antiretroviral therapy (ARV) adherence. Methods We conducted an in-depth qualitative study with a sample of 12 HIV-positive seroconcordant heterosexual couples in a South African mining organization. Transcripts based on semi-structured couple's interviews were analyzed using an inductive emergent thematic analytical method. Results The findings present compelling evidence that the impact of HIV and AIDS is mitigated, in the main, by the nature of the dyadic relationship. Where power and agency were skewed in accordance with traditional gender scripts, the impact of HIV and AIDS was deleterious in terms of negotiating disclosure, meeting expectations of care and support, and promoting treatment adherence. As a corollary, the study also revealed that where the relational dynamic evidenced a more equitable distribution of power, the challenge of negotiating illness was embraced in a way that strengthened the couples’ affiliation in profound ways, manifested not simply in a reduction in risk behaviours, but in both partner's courage to re-visit sensitive issues related to managing their relationship in the context of a debilitating illness. Conclusions Gendered positioning (by self and others) was found to play a crucial role in the way couples experienced HIV and ARV treatment, and underscored the positive role of a couples-counselling approach in the negotiation of the illness experience. However, as part of a broader social project, the findings highlight the need to address the shortcomings of a public health discourse on illness normalization that reifies and reinforces skewed gender relations. In essence, the findings make a compelling case for targeting couples as the primary unit of analysis and intervention in HIV and AIDS praxis, not only to enhance treatment and prevention outcomes, but to impact on and potentially transform the lived identity of such relationships, in AIDS-affected communities. We recommend early intervention with couples in terms of couples HIV testing, risk-reduction counselling and gender-based interventions giving couples opportunities to revisit and challenge their prevailing gendered identities. We note, however, that these efforts will be undermined in the long term, if the structural drivers of HIV risk and vulnerability, contained within macro-level social, economic and cultural practices, are not simultaneously addressed. PMID:23680303

Bhagwanjee, Anil; Govender, Kaymarlin; Reardon, Candice; Johnstone, Leigh; George, Gavin; Gordon, Sarah

2013-01-01

257

Aggression Toward Gay Men as Gender Role Enforcement: Effects of Male Role Norms, Sexual Prejudice, and Masculine Gender Role Stress  

PubMed Central

This study examined sexual prejudice and masculine gender role stress as mediators of the relations between male gender norms and anger and aggression toward gay men. Participants were 150 self-identified heterosexual men who completed measures of adherence to male gender role norms, sexual prejudice, masculine gender role stress, and state anger. Participants then viewed a video depicting intimate relationship behavior between two gay men, reported state anger a second time, and competed in a laboratory aggression task against either a heterosexual or a gay male. Results indicated that adherence to the antifemininity norm exerted an indirect effect, primarily through sexual prejudice, on increases in anger. Adherence to the status and antifemininity norms exerted indirect effects, also through sexual prejudice, on physical aggression toward the gay, but not the heterosexual, male. Findings provide the first multivariate evidence for determinants of aggression toward gay men motivated by gender role enforcement. PMID:19558440

Parrott, Dominic J.

2009-01-01

258

EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND STROKE IN JAPANESE MEN LIVING IN JAPAN, HAWAII AND CALIFORNIA. CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK FACTORS IN JAPAN AND HAWAII  

EPA Science Inventory

Various risk factors were evaluated to explain a significantly greater incidence of coronary heart disease in men of Japanese ancestry resident in Hawaii compared with men resident in Japan. The independent predictors of incidence of coronary heart disease in both Japan and Hawai...

259

Male Peer Influence on African American Men’s Motivation for Physical Activity: Men’s and Women’s Perspectives  

PubMed Central

Thematic analysis of data from nine exploratory focus groups conducted with 71 middle-aged and older African American men and eight focus groups with 77 key women in their lives revealed how social norms and modeling of physical activity influenced men’s motivation to exercise. Both men and women identified male peers as an important source of ideas, encouragement, and support to initiate and sustain physical activity, yet sedentary peers also could contribute to men being less motivated to be active. The primary difference in men’s and women’s perspectives was that men attributed their decline in activity levels to difficulties in finding time for physical activity, whereas women attributed sedentary lifestyles to an increase in men’s physical illnesses and ailments. Men’s participation in team sports and overall activity levels diminished with age. Peer social support can be critical for interventions to help African American men engage in and sustain physical activity. PMID:23160732

Griffith, Derek M.; King, Andrea; Allen, Julie Ober

2014-01-01

260

The Significance of Privacy and Trust in Providing Health-Related Services to Behaviorally Bisexual Men in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research suggests that bisexual men face unique health concerns in comparison to their exclusively homosexual and heterosexual counterparts. However, little is known about behaviorally bisexual men's experiences with health services, including ways of providing services that would be most appropriate to meet the health needs of this…

Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Goncalves, Gabriel; Malebranche, David; Martinez, Omar; Reece, Michael; Rhodes, Scott D.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2012-01-01

261

Men's Self-Definitions of Abusive Childhood Sexual Experiences, and Potentially Related Risky Behavioral and Psychiatric Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To estimate how many heterosexual and gay/bisexual men self-define abusive childhood sexual experiences (CSEs) to be childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and to assess whether CSA self-definition is associated with risky behavioral and psychiatric outcomes in adulthood. Methods: In Philadelphia County, 197 (66%) of 298 recruited men

Holmes, William C.

2008-01-01

262

Criminal prosecutions for HIV transmission: people living with HIV respond.  

PubMed

This paper presents an analysis of responses to the first criminal convictions for HIV transmission in England and Wales within a sample of people living with HIV. These findings represent an important contribution to the development of well-informed prosecution policy. The responses were collected during 20 focused group discussions with a community and web-recruited sample of heterosexual African men and women, and gay and bisexual men (n = 125) living with diagnosed HIV in London, Manchester and Brighton. The vast majority (90%) of comments made were critical of the implementation and impact of criminalization. In particular, respondents expressed concern about the way in which criminal convictions conflict with messages about shared responsibility for 'safer sex', and the extent to which such cases will exacerbate existing stigma and discrimination related to HIV. Most felt that the successes achieved by human rights approaches to HIV prevention, treatment, and care were placed under threat by the growing culture of blame encouraged by criminal prosecutions. PMID:16643681

Dodds, C; Keogh, P

2006-05-01

263

Force and temptation: South African men's accounts of coercion into sex by men and women  

PubMed Central

Men's experiences of sexual coercion is seldom the subject of research, yet it is commonly reported in all settings and increasingly evidence from South Africa points to the health risks associated with sexual coercion of men by men. Thirty-one in-depth interviews were conducted with heterosexual men aged 18-25 years who were volunteers in a HIV prevention behavioural intervention evaluation in the Eastern Cape. Men chosen included some who had reported coercion by men and women in their baseline structure interviews and some who had not. Sexual coercion by men involved abuse of trust and age-related power, temptation through material goods, as well as use of aggression. The narratives were notable for the anger that was caused by these assaults. In contrast, coercion by women was framed as ‘temptation’. In some cases young men were tempted by much older women and those in a position of trust and the experience did not make them feel good. There are very substantial differences in the circumstances of coercion of young men by men and women. This needs to be taken into account in the growing trend to research coercion of men and present findings in a way that equates these two experiences. PMID:19499390

Sikweyiya, Yandisa; Jewkes, Rachel

2010-01-01

264

The Development of Gender Schemata About Heterosexual and Homosexual Others During Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perceptions of heterosexual and homosexual individuals were investigated among 12-, 16-, and 20-year-old French adolescents. Participants described heterosexual and homosexual males and females with typical masculine and feminine personality traits. Overall, they perceived heterosexual males as having more masculine traits than homosexual males. The 16- and 20-year-olds perceived homosexual males as more feminine than heterosexual males, whereas the reverse was

Pascal Mallet; Themistoklis Apostolidis; Benjamin Paty

1997-01-01

265

Coping with homosexual expression within heterosexual marriages: five case studies.  

PubMed

The general consensus of previous studies dealing with heterosexually married homosexuals is that the outcome is a rather poor and unhappy marriage, or divorce. The subjects in previous studies, for the most part, had not disclosed their sexual orientation to their marriage partner or were divorced at the time of the study. Presented are five case studies of heterosexual marriages where disclosure to the spouse is evident. Examined are the coping mechanisms involved when such marriages do not end in divorce. A three-phase heuristic model is offered for understanding and aiding individuals in such marriages. PMID:722822

Latham, J D; White, G D

1978-01-01

266

The value of children to gay and heterosexual fathers.  

PubMed

Responses of 33 gay fathers were compared with those of 33 heterosexual fathers on the Value of Children scale, an empirical measure of the reasons for wanting to become a parent. Responses of gay fathers did not differ significantly from heterosexual fathers on the majority of the items of the inventory, but differences were found on two subscales, Tradition-Continuity-Security and Social Status. Item analysis of responses shows that gay fathers may have particularly significant reasons motivating them to become parents. PMID:2794497

Bigner, J J; Jacobsen, R B

1989-01-01

267

Status of men’s health in Canada  

PubMed Central

Men are more likely to die of cancer, heart disease, or diabetes at younger ages than women – a reality that is compounded by the reluctance of men to use healthcare services. In addition to reduced life expectancy, men can also expect to live fewer healthy years than their female counterparts. As gynecologists and obstetricians have led the women’s health movement in addressing gender-specific gaps in care, urologists are well-poised to take on a leadership role to advocate for, and address, men’s health initiatives. PMID:25243037

Goldenberg, S. Larry

2014-01-01

268

“A man’s gonna do what a man wants to do”: African American and Hispanic women’s perceptions about heterosexual relationships: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background HIV prevention efforts have given limited attention to the relational schemas and scripts of adult heterosexual women. These broader schemas and scripts of romantic and other sexual liaisons, partner selection, relationship dynamics, and power negotiations may help to better understand facilitators and barriers to HIV risk-reduction practices. Methods We conducted exploratory qualitative interviews with 60 HIV-uninfected heterosexual African-American women from rural counties in North Carolina and Alabama, and Hispanic women from an urban county in southern Florida. Data were collected for relationship expectations; relationship experiences, and relationship power and decision-making. Interview transcripts underwent computer-assisted thematic analysis. Results Participants had a median age of 34 years (range 18–59), 34% were married or living as married, 39% earned an annual income of $12,000 or less, 12% held less than a high school education, and 54% were employed. Among the Hispanic women, 95% were foreign born. We identified two overarching relationship themes: contradictions between relationship expectations and desires and life circumstances that negated such ideals, and relationship challenges. Within the contradictions theme, we discovered six subthemes: a good man is hard to find; sex can be currency used to secure desired outcomes; compromises and allowances for cheating, irresponsible, and disrespectful behavior; redefining dating; sex just happens; needing relationship validation. The challenges theme centered on two subthemes: uncertainties and miscommunication, and relationship power negotiation. Gender differences in relationship intentions and desires as well as communication styles, the importance of emotional and financial support, and the potential for relationships to provide disappointment were present in all subthemes. In examining HIV risk perceptions, participants largely held that risk for HIV-infection and the need to take precautions were problems of women who differed from them (i.e., abuse drugs, are promiscuous, exchange sex). Conclusion Underlying women’s relational schemas was a belief that relationship priorities differed for men and women. Consequently, expectations and allowances for partner infidelity and negligent behaviors were incorporated into their scripts. Moreover, scripts endorsed women’s use of sex as currency in relationship formation and endurance, and did not emphasize HIV risk. Both couple- and gender-specific group-level interventions are needed to deconstruct (breakdown) and reconstruct (rewrite) relationship scripts. PMID:23705954

2013-01-01

269

The transition from infertility to adoption: Perceptions of lesbian and heterosexual couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores how lesbian and heterosexual pre-adoptive couples experience and construct the transition from infertil- ity to adoption as a means to becoming parents. Thirty lesbian couples and 30 heterosexual couples were interviewed about the challenges and benefits they perceived in attempting con- ception and then later choosing adoption. Although similarities in perspectives emerged between heterosexual and lesbian participants

Abbie E. Goldberg; Jordan B. Downing; Hannah B. Richardson

2009-01-01

270

Mostly Heterosexual as a Distinct Sexual Orientation Group: A Systematic Review of the Empirical Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We reviewed empirical evidence regarding whether mostly heterosexual exists as a sexual orientation distinct from two adjacent groups on a sexual continuum--exclusively heterosexual and substantially bisexual. We addressed the question: Do mostly heterosexuals show a unique profile of sexual and romantic characteristics that distinguishes them as…

Savin-Williams, Ritch C.; Vrangalova, Zhana

2013-01-01

271

Infidelity in heterosexual couples: demographic, interpersonal, and personality-related predictors of extradyadic sex.  

PubMed

This study aimed to assess the relative importance of demographic, interpersonal, and personality factors in predicting sexual infidelity in heterosexual couples. A total of 506 men (M age = 32.86 years, SD = 10.60) and 412 women (M age = 27.66 years, SD = 8.93), who indicated they were in a monogamous sexual relationship, completed a series of questionnaires, including the Sexual Excitation/Inhibition (SES/SIS) scales and the Mood and Sexuality Questionnaire, and answered questions about, among others, religiosity, education, income, relationship and sexual satisfaction, and sexual compatibility. Almost one-quarter of men (23.2%) and 19.2% of women indicated that they had "cheated" during their current relationship (i.e., engaged in sexual interactions with someone other than their partner that could jeopardize, or hurt, their relationship). Among men, a logistic regression analysis, explaining 17% of the variance, revealed that a higher propensity of sexual excitation (SES) and sexual inhibition due to "the threat of performance concerns" (SIS1), a lower propensity for sexual inhibition due to "the threat of performance consequences" (SIS2), and an increased tendency to engage in regretful sexual behavior during negative affective states were all significant predictors of infidelity. In women, a similar regression analysis explained 21% of the variance in engaging in infidelity. In addition to SIS1 and SIS2, for which the same patterns were found as for men, low relationship happiness and low compatibility in terms of sexual attitudes and values were predictive of infidelity. The findings of this study suggest that, for both men and women, sexual personality characteristics and, for women, relationship factors are more relevant to the prediction of sexual infidelity than demographic variables such as marital status and religiosity. PMID:21667234

Mark, Kristen P; Janssen, Erick; Milhausen, Robin R

2011-10-01

272

The Social/Sexual Environment of Gay Men Residing in a Rural Frontier State: Implications for the Development of HIV Prevention Programs  

PubMed Central

Context The incidence and prevalence of HIV/AIDS is increasing among rural men who have sex with men (MSM). Yet little is known about the social/sexual environment of rural frontier areas. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the social/sexual environment of gay men living in rural areas and how this environment contributes to the development of HIV/AIDS prevention programs. Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Wyoming. In-depth guided interviews were conducted with 39 self-identified gay men. Data were analyzed for emergent themes using constant comparative analysis. Findings Four broadly related themes emerged. Participants perceive that they live in a hostile social environment in which the potential for becoming a target of violence is present. In order to cope with this social reality, men adopt strategies to assimilate into the predominant heterosexual culture and to look for sex partners. These, in turn, are related to their attitudes about HIV/AIDS and prevention activities. Notably, the Internet was discussed by participants as a means for men to connect to a larger gay society and look for sex partners and as a potential venue to HIV/AIDS prevention programs. Conclusions Data provided a number of implications for developing HIV/AIDS prevention programs targeting rural MSM. Especially apparent was the need for programs to be mindful of the desire to keep one's sexual preferences shielded from public knowledge and the effect this may have on recruiting rural MSM to participate in prevention activities. The Internet, because men can access it privately, might provide a venue for prevention projects. PMID:15667009

Williams, Mark L.; Bowen, Anne M.; Horvath, Keith J.

2008-01-01

273

Sometimes you just have to have a lot of bitter to make it sweet: Substance abuse and partner abuse in the lives of HIV+ men who have sex with men  

PubMed Central

Although links between partner abuse (PA) and substance abuse (SA) are well-documented in the literature, we know less about these relations among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). We conducted a qualitative study with this group (N = 28). Participants reported (1) social modeling of SA in childhood and in adult social networks, (2) initial use of substance to cope with child abuse and neglect, and (3) the reinforcement of problematic SA by experiences of PA, whereby SA led to PA, resulting in increased SA. Recommendations for clinicians working with HIV+ MSM are discussed. PMID:24163573

Andrasik, Michele P.; Valentine, Sarah E.; Pantalone, David W.

2013-01-01

274

Men Helping Boys Become Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the idea of men raising boys to be men as a potential site for abuse in the rearing of men and then creating abusive men. Looking at issues such as character building, the use of symbols to connote power and authority, and corporal punishment to create respect, the article, in a very personal way, explores the process

Norman Shub

2001-01-01

275

Structural Stigma and Cigarette Smoking in a Prospective Cohort Study of Sexual Minority and Heterosexual Youth  

PubMed Central

Background Sexual minority youth are more likely to smoke cigarettes than heterosexuals but research into the determinants of these disparities is lacking. Purpose To examine whether exposure to structural stigma predicts cigarette smoking in sexual minority youth. Methods Prospective data from adolescents participating in the Growing Up Today Study (2000–2005). Results Among sexual minority youth, living in low structural stigma states (e.g., states with non-discrimination policies inclusive of sexual orientation) was associated with a lower risk of cigarette smoking after adjustment for individual-level risk factors (Relative Risk[RR]=0.97, 95% Confidence Interval[CI]: 0.96, 0.99, p=0.02). This association remained marginally significant after additional controls for potential state-level confounders (RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.93, 1.00, p=0.06). In contrast, among heterosexual youth, structural stigma was not associated with past-year smoking rates, documenting specificity of these effects to sexual minority youth. Conclusions Structural stigma represents a potential risk factor for cigarette smoking among sexual minority adolescents. PMID:24136092

Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Jun, Hee-Jin; Corliss, Heather L.; Austin, S. Bryn

2013-01-01

276

Men and Not-Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Male gender-mixing statuses, such as Native American berdaches, consist of men who assume the cultural, symbolic attributes of women at attain the status of not-men. Remaining distinct from women, not-men are a culturally defined gender status whose indexing features include women's dress and behavior, occupational inversion, and some cultural traits of men. Another indexing feature of not-men is the absence

Charles Callender; Lee M. Kochems

1986-01-01

277

Sexual and reproductive health perceptions and practices as revealed in the sexual history narratives of South African men living in a time of HIV/AIDS  

PubMed Central

Abstract The frequent positioning of men's sexual risk-taking as driving the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa has triggered interest in men's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) perceptions, attitudes, and practices. Much research, however, presents men as a homogenous group, and focuses on the quantifiable aspects of male sexual behaviors, providing an inadequate basis for understanding men's SRH needs and addressing the gendered aspects of HIV prevention. This study used sexual history narratives to yield more nuanced and contextualized understandings of male sexuality as it relates to SRH. Fifty sexual life history individual interviews and 10 focus-group discussions (FGDs) with men, as well as 25 sexual life history interviews with women, were conducted with participants purposively sampled from three age categories: (18–24, 25–55, and 55+ years), a wide range of cultural and racial backgrounds, and in urban and rural sites across 5 provinces in South Africa. Interviews and FGDs elicited stories of participant's early knowledge of sex and sexual experimentation and then explored sexual relationships and experiences in adulthood—including engagement with HIV risks and SRH management. The data were analyzed using a thematic approach. Many male participants conformed to dominant norms of masculinity associated with a high risk of sexually transmitted infections including HIV, such as having regular unprotected sex, reluctance to test for HIV, and poor SRH-seeking behaviors. Yet, the narrative accounts reveal instances of men taking steps to protect their own SRH and that of their partners, and the complex ways in which hegemonic gender norms influence men and women's SRH. Ultimately, the study points to the value of sexual biographies for gaining a deeper understanding of male sexuality, and the social structures, meanings, and experiences that underlie it. Such insights are critical to more effectively engaging men in HIV prevention efforts. PMID:25495581

Stern, Erin; Rau, Asta; Cooper, Diane

2014-01-01

278

Heterosexuality as an Organizing Principle in Women's Sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores how heterosexual images structure representations of female elite athletes, and the different practices through which these are perpetuated, both by female athletes themselves, and by others. The focus is on how female athletes experience and reflect upon the relationship between being an athlete and conceptions of femininity with reference to the media, sponsors, fashion\\/sports clothing and the

Liv-Jorunn Kolnes

1995-01-01

279

Variations in College Women's Self-Reported Heterosexual Aggression  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to provide an examination of differences in college women's self-reported heterosexual aggression between two samples. One sample of college women was drawn from three colleges in and around New York city (East; N = 212) and one was drawn from a midsized commuter university in Louisiana (South; N = 249). The respondents were questioned

Peter B. Anderson

1998-01-01

280

Predictors of Heterosexual College Students' Attitudes toward LGBT People  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study identifies the predictors of U.S. heterosexual undergraduate and graduate college students' attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people as a group rather than toward individual identities. Findings suggest that affirming LGBT attitudes are most strongly associated with liberal political ideology and whether…

Woodford, Michael R.; Silverschanz, Perry; Swank, Eric; Scherrer, Kristin S.; Raiz, Lisa

2012-01-01

281

Misrepresentation, Liberalism, and Heterosexual Bias in Introductory Psychology Textbooks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated the content of 48 introductory psychology textbooks published over a five-year period (1975-1979) and recommended by publishing companies or psychology professors for use in Canadian universities. The finding indicated that for every one source of relevant information on homosexuality there were five sources of misrepresentative data that reflect a combination of misleading information, liberalism, and heterosexual

Gary McDonald

1981-01-01

282

Psychological Abuse among College Women in Exclusive Heterosexual Dating Relationship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies possible predictors of psychological abuse in nonmarital heterosexual romantic relationships. Responses from 175 undergraduate women reveal 11% claiming psychological abuse as well as more instances of partner behaviors characteristic of psychological abuse. Abused individuals were more likely to have lower self-esteem, had parents'…

Pipes, Randolph B.; LeBov-Keeler, Karen

1997-01-01

283

Measuring physical aggressiveness in heterosexual, homosexual, and transsexual males  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was the development of a self-report measure of boyhood aggressiveness for use with adult males. Aggressiveness was defined as a generalized disposition to engage in physically combative or competitive interactions with male peers. This attribute is of sexological interest because of the reported difference in physical aggressiveness between heterosexual and homosexual boys. A physical aggressiveness

Ray Blanchard; James G. McConkey; Vincent Roper; Betty W. Steiner

1983-01-01

284

Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for prevention of HIV in serodiscordant heterosexual couples in the United States: opportunities and challenges.  

PubMed

Oral HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising new biomedical prevention approach in which HIV-negative individuals are provided with daily oral antiretroviral medication for the primary prevention of HIV-1. Several clinical trials have demonstrated efficacy of oral PrEP for HIV prevention among groups at high risk for HIV, with adherence closely associated with level of risk reduction. In the United States (US), three groups have been prioritized for initial implementation of PrEP-injection drug users, men who have sex with men at substantial risk for HIV, and HIV-negative partners within serodiscordant heterosexual couples. Numerous demonstration projects involving PrEP implementation among MSM are underway, but relatively little research has been devoted to study PrEP implementation in HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples in the US. Such couples face a unique set of challenges to PrEP implementation at the individual, couple, and provider level with regard to PrEP uptake and maintenance, adherence, safety and toxicity, clinical monitoring, and sexual risk behavior. Oral PrEP also provides new opportunities for serodiscordant couples and healthcare providers for primary prevention and reproductive health. This article provides a review of the critical issues, challenges, and opportunities involved in the implementation of oral PrEP among HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples in the US. PMID:25045996

McMahon, James M; Myers, Julie E; Kurth, Ann E; Cohen, Stephanie E; Mannheimer, Sharon B; Simmons, Janie; Pouget, Enrique R; Trabold, Nicole; Haberer, Jessica E

2014-09-01

285

The WoMen's Center Real Women, Real Men  

E-print Network

-skinned women face throughout the world. February 18th THIN (2006) (Eating Disorders) Filmmaker Lauren Greenfield chronicles six months in the lives of four women undergoing treatment for eating disordersThe WoMen's Center presents Real Women, Real Men REEL WORLD Join us TUESDAY evenings at 5:00 PM

de Lijser, Peter

286

Relationship between trauma and high-risk behavior among HIV-positive men who do not have sex with men (MDSM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of heterosexual HIV transmission continues to increase in the USA. However, little is known about factors that influence high-risk behavior among men who do not have sex with men (MDSM). This study examines the association of childhood sexual abuse and high-risk behaviors among MDSM. The Coping with HIV\\/AIDS in the Southeast (CHASE) study included 611 HIV-positive individuals in

Kathryn Whetten; Susan Reif; Matthew Toth; Erica Jain; Jane Leserman; Brian W. Pence

2012-01-01

287

Cigarette Smoking as Part of a Syndemic among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men Ages 13–29 in New York City  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of cigarette smoking among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) is significantly higher than among their\\u000a heterosexual peers. We undertook an analysis to examine cigarette smoking in relation to demographic factors and other risk\\u000a behaviors among 580 YMSM, ages 13–29, in New York City. Cross-sectional data were collected as part of larger study of risk\\u000a behaviors

Erik David Storholm; Perry N. Halkitis; Daniel E. Siconolfi; Robert W. Moeller

288

SOUTHERN (DIS)COMFORT: SEXUAL PREJUDICE AND CONTACT WITH GAY MEN AND LESBIANS IN THE SOUTH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent surveys have found antigay attitudes and behavior to be commonplace. In this article, we use contact theory to explain these prejudicial attitudes. We contribute to the literature on contact and prejudice by expanding contact to include not only whether the heterosexual knows any gay men or lesbians, but also how many, for how long, and in what ways. To

Dawn M. Baunach; Elisabeth O. Burgess; Courtney S. Muse

2009-01-01

289

Perceptions of Victimization Risk and Fear of Crime among Lesbians and Gay Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on fear of crime has evolved to suggest the existence of a complex relationship between individual, lifestyle, and contextual factors. Past work generally focuses on predominantly heterosexual populations; this study examines correlates of fear of crime and perceptions of risk among a sample of 272 self-identified lesbians and gay men.…

Otis, Melanie D.

2007-01-01

290

EEG Responses to Visual Erotic Stimuli in Men with Normal and Paraphilic Interests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contingent negative variation and evoked potentials to visual erotic stimuli were recorded from 8 brain sites in a sample of 62 right-handed men aged 20–50, half of whom declared paraphilic interests and half claimed “normal” heterosexual interests. To quantify erotic preferences, a “variance quotient” (VQ) was calculated from scores on the Wilson Sex Fantasy Questionnaire using the formula VQ =

Rogeria Waismann; Peter B. C. Fenwick; Glenn D. Wilson; Terry D. Hewett; John Lumsden

2003-01-01

291

Perceived emotional and life change impact of AIDS on homosexual men in two countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive self-administered life event inventory examining both general life stress and stress from events specific to the homosexual and bisexual male population was developed in order to assess the impact of AIDS and HIV infection on homo- and bisexual men. Ranking of questions revealed that while general stressors affected homosexuals similarly to heterosexuals, there were critical stressors affecting homosexuals

B. R. Simon Rosser; Michael W. Ross

1988-01-01

292

Modeling minority stress effects on homelessness and health disparities among young men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Sexual minority youth are more likely to experience homelessness, and homeless sexual minority youth report greater risk for mental health and substance abuse symptoms than homeless heterosexual youth, yet few studies have assessed determinants that help explain the disparities. Minority stress theory proposes that physical and mental health disparities among sexual minority populations may be explained by the stress produced by living in heterosexist social environments characterized by stigma and discrimination directed toward sexual minority persons. We used data from a sample of 200 young men who have sex with men (YMSM) (38 % African American, 26.5 % Latino/Hispanic, 23.5 % White, 12 % multiracial/other) to develop an exploratory path model measuring the effects of experience and internalization of sexual orientation stigma on depression and substance use via being kicked out of home due to sexual orientation and current homelessness. Direct significant paths were found from experience of sexual orientation-related stigma to internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma, having been kicked out of one's home, experiencing homelessness during the past year, and major depressive symptoms during the past week. Having been kicked out of one's home had a direct significant effect on experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months and on daily marijuana use. Internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma and experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months partially mediated the direct effect of experience of sexual orientation-related stigma on major depressive symptoms. Our empirical testing of the effects of minority stress on health of YMSM advances minority stress theory as a framework for investigating health disparities among this population. PMID:24807702

Bruce, Douglas; Stall, Ron; Fata, Aimee; Campbell, Richard T

2014-06-01

293

Men's constructions of masculinity and male sexuality through talk of buying sex.  

PubMed

Commercial sex is an everyday occurrence across a range of contexts in South Africa. In this paper we turn our attention to the often-marginalised role of the buyers of sex by drawing on narrative interviews with male clients of female sex workers recruited through online advertisements in order to explore the ways in which heterosexual men construct, negotiate and perform their masculinity and sexuality through talking about their experiences of paying for sex. We highlight parallels between men's narratives of paying for sex and dominant discourses of gender and heterosexuality. We show how men draw on heteronormative sexual scripts in constructing and making sense of paid sexual encounters and how men are simultaneously able to construct and enact a particular idealised version of masculinity and male sexuality through their talk on paying for sex. Finally, we discuss how online resources could be used more extensively in future research with the male clients of sex workers. PMID:25287270

Huysamen, Monique; Boonzaier, Floretta

2015-05-01

294

The construction of the homosexual ‘other’ by British Muslim heterosexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Islam’s explicit condemnation of homosexuality has created a theologically based homophobia which engenders the intolerance\\u000a of homosexuals by Muslims. In this article I explore Muslim attitudes towards homosexuality and homosexuals as this area has\\u000a elicited very little research. Based on structured interviews with 68 Muslim male and female heterosexuals I examine the connection\\u000a between participants’ attitudes towards homosexuality and their

Asifa Siraj

2009-01-01

295

Lesbian and heterosexual preadoptive couples' openness to transracial adoption.  

PubMed

This study uses data from 147 White preadoptive couples (54 lesbian, 93 heterosexual) to examine adopters' subjective explanations for why they are open or not open to adopting transracially. Participant perceptions of racial-ethnic diversity in their communities and families, perceptions of family support or nonsupport, and attitudes about race were among the factors they cited as influencing their openness. These findings hold important implications for training and service delivery in transracial adoption. PMID:19290730

Goldberg, Abbie E

2009-01-01

296

Psychological Abuse Among College Women in Exclusive Heterosexual Dating Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to identify possible predictors of psychological abuse in non-marital heterosexual romantic relationships. In attempting to predict who would self-identify as being psychologically abused, we investigated a number of variables including psychological abuse in past close relationships, psychological abuse within the family of origin, self-esteem, and characteristics of the current relationship, including seriousness and duration of the

Randolph B. Pipes; Karen LeBov-Keeler

1997-01-01

297

Gay and lesbian couples in Italy: comparisons with heterosexual couples.  

PubMed

Assessing couple relationships across diverse languages and cultures has important implications for both clinical intervention and prevention. This is especially true for nontraditional relationships potentially subject to various expressions of negative societal evaluation or bias. Few empirically validated measures of relationship functioning have been developed for cross-cultural applications, and none have been examined for their psychometric sufficiency for evaluating same-sex couples across different languages and cultures. The current study examined the psychometric properties of an Italian translation of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory - Revised (MSI-R), a 150-item 13-scale measure of couple relationship functioning, for its use in assessing the intimate relationships of gay and lesbian couples in Italy. Results for these couples were compared to data from heterosexual married and unmarried cohabiting couples from the same geographical region, as well as to previously published data for gay, lesbian, and unmarried heterosexual couples from the United States. Findings suggest that, despite unique societal pressures confronting Italian same-sex couples, these relationships appear resilient and fare well both overall and in specific domains of functioning compared to heterosexual couples both in Italy and the United States. PMID:24867576

Antonelli, Paolo; Dèttore, Davide; Lasagni, Irene; Snyder, Douglas K; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina

2014-12-01

298

Gay-for-Pay: Straight Men and the Making of Gay Pornography  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the social conditions that enable heterosexually-identified men to turn in credible sexual performances in gay pornographic videos. These men are widely known in the porn industry and among spectators as gay-for-pay. Drawing on John Gagnon and William Simon's theory of sexual scripts, this article shows that performers adopt a “persona” as a career script that functions as

Jeffrey Escoffier

2003-01-01

299

Effects of behavioral intervention on substance use among people living with HIV: the Healthy Living Project randomized controlled study  

PubMed Central

Aim Reductions in substance use were examined in response to an intensive intervention with people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (PLH). Design, setting and participants A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 936 PLH who had recently engaged in unprotected sexual risk acts recruited from four US cities: Milwaukee, San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles. Substance use was assessed as the number of days of use of 19 substances recently (over the last 90 days), evaluated at 5-month intervals over 25 months. Intervention A 15-session case management intervention was delivered to PLH in the intervention condition; the control condition received usual care. Measurements An intention-to-treat analysis was conducted examining reductions on multiple indices of recent substance use calculated as the number of days of use. Findings Reductions in recent substance use were significantly greater for intervention PLH compared to control PLH: alcohol and/or marijuana use, any substance use, hard drug use and a weighted index adjusting for seriousness of the drug. While the intervention-related reductions in substance use were larger among women than men, men also reduced their use. Compared to controls, gay and heterosexual men in the intervention reduced significantly their use of alcohol and marijuana, any substance, stimulants and the drug severity-weighted frequency of use index. Gay men also reduced their hard drug use significantly in the intervention compared to the control condition. Conclusions A case management intervention model, delivered individually, is likely to result in significant and sustained reductions in substance use among PLH. PMID:18494840

Wong, F. Lennie; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Pequegnat, Willo; Comulada, W. Scott; Cumberland, William; Weinhardt, Lance S.; Remien, Robert H.; Chesney, Margaret; Johnson, Mallory

2009-01-01

300

PROVIDING WOMEN, KEPT MEN  

PubMed Central

This paper draws on ethnographic and interview based fieldwork to explore accounts of intimate relationships between widowed women and poor young men that emerged in the wake of economic crisis and a devastating HIV epidemic among the Luo ethnic group in Western Kenya. I show how the cooptation of widow inheritance practices in the wake of an overwhelming number of widows as well as economic crisis resulted in widows becoming providing women and poor young men becoming kept men. I illustrate how widows in this setting, by performing a set of practices central to what it meant to be a man in this society – pursuing and providing for their partners - were effectively doing masculinity. I will also show how young men, rather than being feminized by being kept, deployed other sets of practices to prove their masculinity and live in a manner congruent with cultural ideals. I argue that ultimately, women’s practice of masculinity in large part seemed to serve patriarchal ends. It not only facilitated the fulfillment of patriarchal expectations of femininity – to being inherited – but also served, in the end, to provide a material base for young men’s deployment of legitimizing and culturally valued sets of masculine practice. PMID:25489121

Mojola, Sanyu A

2014-01-01

301

Interactive voice response self-monitoring to assess risk behaviors in rural substance users living with HIV/AIDS.  

PubMed

Community-dwelling HIV/AIDS patients in rural Alabama self-monitored (SM) daily HIV risk behaviors using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system, which may enhance reporting, reduce monitored behaviors, and extend the reach of care. Sexually active substance users (35 men, 19 women) engaged in IVR SM of sex, substance use, and surrounding contexts for 4-10 weeks. Baseline predictors of IVR utilization were assessed, and longitudinal IVR SM effects on risk behaviors were examined. Frequent (n = 22), infrequent (n = 22), and non-caller (n = 10) groups were analyzed. Non-callers had shorter durations of HIV medical care and lower safer sex self-efficacy and tended to be older heterosexuals. Among callers, frequent callers had lost less social support. Longitudinal logistic regression models indicated reductions in risky sex and drug use with IVR SM over time. IVR systems appear to have utility for risk assessment and reduction for rural populations living with HIV disease. PMID:21311964

Tucker, Jalie A; Blum, Elizabeth R; Xie, Lili; Roth, David L; Simpson, Cathy A

2012-02-01

302

Perspectives on substance use and disclosure among behaviorally bisexual Black men with female primary partners  

PubMed Central

Black men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) are believed to be a bridge to HIV infection among heterosexual Black women, and substance use can increase the risk of infection among men. However, empirical evidence on the social context of MSMW’s sexual behavior and substance use is needed. This study examines the perspectives of Black MSMW with female primary partners on the role of substance use in their sexual encounters with men and their reasons for disclosing or not disclosing this behavior to their female partners. Findings can inform culturally relevant HIV prevention interventions for this population. PMID:23216438

Koken, Juline A.

2012-01-01

303

Correlates of Same-Sex Sexuality in Heterosexually Identified Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, little is known about heterosexually identified individuals who nonetheless acknowledge same-sex interests. To address this shortcoming, the prevalence of same-sex attractions, fantasies, and experiences among heterosexually identified college students was examined, as well as differences between those who are exclusively heterosexual in their interests and those who are nonexclusive because they report some same-sex attractions or fantasies. Students (N = 243)

Zhana Vrangalova; Ritch C. Savin-Williams

2010-01-01

304

Women’s Porno: The heterosexual female gaze in porn sites “for women”  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article deals with a number of Internet sites claiming to specialize in providing pornography for heterosexual women,\\u000a as a vehicle to examine the nascent “gaze” and visual parameters of heterosexual female sexuality. The focus here is semiotic—looking\\u000a at visual coding of website images rather than audience reception (i.e., whether heterosexual women are actually the main\\u000a consumers of women’s porno).

Terrie Schauer

2005-01-01

305

Sexual-Minority and Heterosexual Youths' Peer Relationships: Experiences, Expectations, and Implications for Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study compared the peer relationships and well-being of 60 sexual-minority (i.e., nonheterosexual) and 65 heterosexual youths between the ages of 15 and 23. Sexual-minority youths had comparable self-esteem, mastery, and perceived stress as did heterosexuals, but greater negative affect. Younger sexual-minority male adolescents had smaller overall peer networks than did young male heterosexuals, whereas older male and fe-

Lisa M. Diamond; Sarah Lucas

2004-01-01

306

Compulsive sexual behavior and psychopathology among treatment-seeking men in São Paulo, Brazil.  

PubMed

This study examined compulsive sexual behavior (CSB) and psychopathology in a treatment-seeking sample of men in São Paulo, Brazil. Eighty-six men (26% gay, 17% bisexual, 57% heterosexual) who met diagnostic criteria for excessive sexual drive and sexual addiction completed assessments consisting of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, a structured clinical interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders-Clinical Version (segment for Impulse Control Disorder), Sexual Compulsivity Scale (SCS), and questions about problematic CSB. The average SCS score for our sample was above the cut-off score reported in other studies, and 72% of the sample presented at least one Axis I psychiatric diagnosis. There were no differences among gay, bisexual, and heterosexual men on SCS scores and psychiatric conditions, but gay and bisexual men were more likely than heterosexual men to report casual sex and sex with multiple casual partners as problematic behaviors. SCS scores were associated with psychiatric co-morbidities, mood disorder, and suicide risk, but diagnosis of a mood disorder predicted higher SCS scores in a regression analysis. The study provides important data on the mental health needs of men with CSB in São Paulo, Brazil. PMID:23415890

Scanavino, Marco de Tubino; Ventuneac, Ana; Abdo, Carmita Helena Najjar; Tavares, Hermano; do Amaral, Maria Luiza Sant'ana; Messina, Bruna; dos Reis, Sirlene Caramello; Martins, João Paulo Lian Branco; Parsons, Jeffrey T

2013-10-30

307

From Identity to Queer Politics: Shifts in the Social Logic of Normative Heterosexuality in Contemporary America  

E-print Network

of the heterosexual and the homosexual asantithetical human types and enforce the normative status of heterosexuality by polluting the homosexual. I will argue that in the last decade or so, the n~rm of heterosexuality has been sustained less by social repression than... gender, racial, or class politics, and it has not politicized social norms that regulate gay selves apart from the norm of heterosexuality, for 3 SocialThought&Research example, norms of sexual monogamy or public sex. In short, gay identity politics has...

Seidman, Steven

2001-04-01

308

Sexual orientation and demographic, cultural, and psychological factors associated with the perpetration and victimization of intimate partner violence among Hispanic men.  

PubMed

Hispanics are disproportionately affected by intimate partner violence (IPV). Most of the research describing factors associated with intimate partner violence among Hispanics has focused on Hispanic women or Hispanics in heterosexual relationships. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship among sexual orientation (heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual), and demographic, cultural, and psychological factors and intimate partner violence among Hispanic men. A cross sectional questionnaire was administered to 160 Hispanic heterosexual men and men who have sex with men. Demographic factors (age, education, and income), acculturation, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem were assessed using standardized instruments. Data was analyzed using ANOVA, and simple and multiple logistical regression. Differences in education, income, and self-esteem were noted across participants identifying as heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual. Bisexual Hispanic men had almost four times greater odds of reporting the perpetration of IPV than homosexual Hispanic men, even when differences in education, income, and self-esteem were controlled for (AOR = 3.92, 95%CI = 1.11, 14.19). This study suggests the importance of specifically targeting bisexual Hispanic men in IPV research and services. PMID:23369121

Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; De Santis, Joseph P; Vasquez, Elias P

2013-02-01

309

Masculine ideology, norms, and HIV prevention among young Black men  

PubMed Central

This study examines the relationship between masculine ideology, adherence to norms, and HIV prevention among young Black heterosexual and gay men on the campus of a historically Black college/university. The data from four focus groups and nine individual interviews (N = 35) were aggregated and two recurring themes emerged: sexual communication, and mate availability. Additional themes related to HIV prevention were stigma, protection, and testing. The importance of investigating masculinity with young men is highlighted and implications for professionals working with college students to prevent the transmission of HIV are included. PMID:25525415

Hall, Naomi M.; Applewhite, Sheldon

2014-01-01

310

Exploring the relationships among food insecurity, alcohol use, and sexual risk taking among men and women living in South African townships.  

PubMed

South African townships have among the highest rates of HIV infection in the world. Considerable research on understanding the high rates of HIV transmission in this country has identified alcohol use as a critical factor in driving the HIV epidemic. Although the relationship between alcohol use and sexual risk-taking is well documented, less is known about how other factors, such as food insecurity, might be important in understanding alcohol's role in sexual risk-taking. Furthermore, prior research has highlighted how patterns of alcohol use and sexual risk-taking tend to vary by gender. We examined how food insecurity is related to both alcohol use and sexual risk-taking. We administered anonymous community surveys to men (n = 1,137) and women (n = 458) residing within four contiguous Black African townships outside of Cape Town, South Africa. In multivariate linear regression, we found that food insecurity was related to having higher numbers of male sex partners and condom-protected sex acts among women only. These relationships, however, were fully mediated by women's alcohol use. Among men, we found that food insecurity was negatively related to unprotected sex; that is, men with greater food security reported more unprotected sex acts. Unlike the results found among women, this relationship was not mediated by alcohol use. Food insecurity appears to be an important factor in understanding patterns of sexual risk-taking in regards to gender and alcohol use, and may serve as an important point of intervention for reducing HIV transmission rates. PMID:24806889

Eaton, Lisa A; Cain, Demetria N; Pitpitan, Eileen V; Carey, Kate B; Carey, Michael P; Mehlomakulu, Vuyelwa; Simbayi, Leickness C; Mwaba, Kelvin; Kalichman, Seth C

2014-08-01

311

Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency during the summer and its relationship with sun exposure and skin phototype in elderly men living in the tropics  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of the study reported here was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among elderly men and its association with sun exposure and skin phototypes. Subjects and methods This was an analytical cross-sectional study, which involved 284 men aged 60 years or over, randomly recruited from a basic care unit in the city of Recife (Brazil). Measurements Serum levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), sun index, and skin phototypes were evaluated. Results The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 31.5% and 66.7% when cut points of less than 20 and 30 ng/mL, respectively, were used. Mean serum 25(OH)D was 27.86 ± 13.52 standard deviation (SD) ng/mL. There was no difference (P = 0.113) in 25(OH) D (23.98 ± 14.66 SD vs 29.88 ± 13.78 SD) between individuals in the lowest quartile (Q) of the sun index (Q1: 1.96) compared with those in the highest (Q4: 7.86). When considering a cutoff of 20 ng/mL, the sun index was different in the two groups (P = 0.006), but there was no difference when cutoffs of 25 and 30 ng/mL were used. After adjustment, sun index and body mass index were associated positively and negatively, respectively with serum 25(OH)D independently. Most subjects (66.7%) had Fitzpatrick’s skin phototypes IV, V, and VI. Low calcium intake was observed in 72%. There was no difference in serum 25(OH)D levels between patients with low intake and those with intermediate and high intakes. Only 2.5% were taking a vitamin supplement. Conclusion We found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among elderly men despite their high sun exposure during the summer months. PMID:24124357

Cabral, Marcelo Azevedo; Borges, Carla Núbia; Maia, Juliana Maria Coelho; Aires, Caio Augusto Martins; Bandeira, Francisco

2013-01-01

312

The impact of gout on patient’s lives: a study of African-American and Caucasian men and women with gout  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the impact of gout on quality of life (QOL) and study differences by gender and race. Methods Ten race- and sex-stratified nominal groups were conducted, oversampling for African-Americans and women with gout. Patients presented, discussed, combined and rank-ordered their concerns. Results A total of 62 patients with mean age 65.1 years, 60% men, 64% African-American, participated in 10 nominal groups: African-American men (n?=?23; 3 groups); African-American women (n?=?18; 3 groups); Caucasian men (n?=?15; 3 groups); and Caucasian women (n?=?6; 1 group). The most frequently cited high-ranked concerns among the ten nominal groups were: (1) effect of gout flare on daily activities (n?=?10 groups); (2) work disability (n?=?8 groups); (3) severe pain (n?=?8 groups); (4) joint swelling and tenderness (n?=?6 groups); (5) food restrictions (n?=?6 groups); (6) medication related issues (n?=?6 groups); (7) dependency on family and others (n?=?5 groups); (8) emotional Impact (n?=?5 groups); (9) interference with sexual function (n?=?4 groups); (10) difficulty with shoes (n?=?4 groups); and (11) sleep disruption (n?=?4 groups). Compared with men, women ranked the following concerns high more often: problems with shoes (n?=?4 versus n?=?0 groups); dependency (n?=?3 versus n?=?2 groups); and joint/limb deformity (n?=?2 versus n?=?0 group). Compared with Caucasians, African-Americans ranked the following concerns high more often: dietary restrictions (n?=?6 versus n?=?0 groups); severe pain (n?=?6 versus n?=?2 groups); gout bringing the day to a “halt” (n?=?2 versus n?=?0 group); effect on emotional health (n?=?4 versus n?=?1 groups); and the need for canes/crutches during flares (n?=?2 versus n?=?0 group). Conclusions Gout has a significant impact on a patient’s QOL. Important differences in the impact of gout by gender and race were noted. PMID:24961941

2014-01-01

313

Sexuality, gendered identities and exclusion: the deployment of proper (hetero)sexuality within an HIV-prevention text from South Africa.  

PubMed

HIV prevention discourses concern lives, the protection of bodily rights and people's active involvement in the policies and programmes that affect them. HIV prevention discourses also create lives, relying upon the deployment of normative sexual identities at the same time as they invite complex and fluid youth identities to embody the norms of prevention. This paper examines a particular HIV prevention text that is available to teachers in the Western Cape province of South Africa to support the implementation of the national Life Orientation programme. Rather than considering this text as a neutral 'scaffold' upon which teachers and students add cultural meanings, it is important to interrogate the ways in which texts rely upon and reiterate particular discursive constructions of the youth sexual subject. This paper argues that the text deploys a particular discursive framework in order to construct a 'normal' (and hetero) sexuality that validates, rather than questions, social constructions of masculine privilege within heterosexuality. This is achieved through the deployment of a scientific expertise of sexuality; the mobilisation of a valued hetero/homosexual binary to create a 'safe' heterosexuality; the normalisation of bourgeois sexuality through the ideology of marriage; and the naturalisation of heterosexual masculine and feminine identities. PMID:20169478

Gacoin, Andrée

2010-05-01

314

Blood Sugar and Brothers' Voices: An Exploratory Study Of The Self-Care Management Experiences of African-American Men Living With Type 2 Diabetes  

E-print Network

Self-care is the key to living a long and healthy life for people with diabetes. Yet numerous studies show that self-care is far from optimal. This has resulted in attempts to understand the progress underlying self-care behavior in the efforts...

Sherman, Ledric D

2013-07-23

315

Preparatory Behavior for Condom Use among Heterosexual Young Men: A Longitudinal Mediation Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Motivation is not sufficient to actually use condoms, as self-regulatory processes are needed to translate motivation into action. Buying condoms and carrying them constitute preparatory behaviors that may serve as proximal predictors of action. Whether or not such preparatory behaviors operate as mediators between intention and action…

Carvalho, Telma; Alvarez, Maria-João; Barz, Milena; Schwarzer, Ralf

2015-01-01

316

Sexual function and satisfaction in heterosexual couples when men are administered sildenafil  

E-print Network

(IIEF), General Efficacy Questions, event log data, Self-Esteem And Relationship questionnaire February 2007. Objective To investigate the effect of improvement in erectile dysfunction (ED) on sexual with placebo couples had greater improvement in the primary outcome (FePEDS Q3 [P

317

A systematic review of the correlates and management of nonpremature ejaculatory dysfunction in heterosexual men  

PubMed Central

Introduction: A better understanding of ejaculatory disorders has led to an increasing interest in nonpremature ejaculatory dysfunction (non-PE EjD). Current reviews on the subject use a symptom-based classification to describe ejaculatory dysfunction even when it is a single case report. While these reviews provide important information on the disorder, a clearer picture of the prevalence of non-PE EjD in relation to the community and various pathophysiologic states is needed. Objectives: The objective of this study was to provide a systematic review of studies of non-PE EjD excluding single case reports. Methods: A systematic review of Medline for terms including ejaculation, orgasm or hematospermia. Association with terms delay, pain or headache was made. The search was restricted to male gender and articles written in English. Abstracts were reviewed and those mainly concerned with premature ejaculation were excluded. Results: A total of 333 articles on non-PE EjD were identified. The condition was reported in community-based studies. In certain patient populations, non-PE EjD was commonly reported in association with antidepressant and antipsychotic treatments, in patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, patients with lower urinary tract symptoms particularly in association with medical or surgical treatment, patients with retroperitoneal surgery and in patients with neurological diseases. Few articles were concerned with treatment options. Conclusion: There is a significant prevalence of non-PE EjD in the community and in association with particular disease states or as a side effect of medical or surgical interventions. There is a need to direct efforts to prevent and treat these conditions. PMID:24082920

2013-01-01

318

Viewing time as a measure of sexual interest among child molesters and normal heterosexual men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although phallometric assessment is the best scientific method for measuring male sexual interest, it is intrusive and highly technical. We examined viewing time as an unobtrusive and technically simple measure of sexual preference and compared the discrimination obtained by viewing time measures with that obtained by phallometric measures. Slides of nude males and females of various ages were shown to

Grant T. Harris; Marnie E. Rice; Vernon L. Quinsey; Terry C. Chaplin

1996-01-01

319

HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

2012-01-01

320

Changing blood donor screening criteria from permanent deferral for men who have sex with men to individual sexual risk assessment: no evidence of a significant impact on the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic in Italy  

PubMed Central

Background In 2001, the criteria for blood donor eligibility in Italy were modified by a ministerial decree from a permanent deferral for "men who have sex with men" to an individual risk assessment of sexual behaviours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of this change in donor screening criteria on the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic among blood donors in Italy. Materials and methods We used the data obtained from the Italian blood donor epidemiological surveillance system. We compared data collected in 2009 and 2010, when the individual risk assessment policy was applied, with data collected in 1999 when permanent deferral was applied for men who have sex with men based on a declaration of sexual orientation. We evaluated the change over time in the relative proportion of HIV antibody-positive donors who likely acquired the infection from men who have sex with men vs heterosexual sexual exposure; the relative risk was calculated using 1999 as the reference year. Results In all 3 years, the majority of HIV antibody-positive donors reported sexual exposure as a risk factor for HIV infection; this proportion increased over time, although not statistically significantly. Heterosexuals always accounted for at least 40% of all HIV antibody-positive cases. The rate of HIV antibody-positive donors increased similarly in men who have sex with men and heterosexuals; specifically, the rate of HIV antibody-positive cases per 100,000 donors was more than 2-fold higher among men who have sex with men in 2009–2010 than in 1999 (2009–2010 vs 1999, RR =2.8; P =0.06), and that among heterosexuals was 1.5 fold higher (P =0.18). Discussion When comparing the period before (1999) and after (2009–2010), the implementation of the individual risk assesment policy in 2001, no significant increase in the proportion of men who have sex with men compared to heterosexuals was observed among HIV antibody-positive blood donors, suggesting that the change in donor deferral policy did not lead to a disproportionate increase of HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men. PMID:23867178

Suligoi, Barbara; Pupella, Simonetta; Regine, Vincenza; Raimondo, Mariangela; Velati, Claudio; Grazzini, Giuliano

2013-01-01

321

Heterosexual, lesbian, and gay male relationships: a comparison of couples in 1975 and 2000.  

PubMed

This study examined the differences among lesbians, gay men, and heterosexuals at two points in time (1975 and 2000) using responses of 6,864 participants from two archival data sets. Groups were compared on variables representing equality of behaviors between partners in seven realms: traditionally "feminine" housework, traditionally "masculine" housework, finances, support, communication, requesting/refusing sex, and decision-making. In addition, the current study compared monogamy agreements and monogamy behaviors reported by the two cohorts of couple types. Overall, the results indicate that on the equality variables, there have been many statistically significant behavioral shifts among the different sexual orientations across 25 years. In addition, all couple types reported substantially greater rates of monogamy in the year 2000 than in 1975. The present study has important clinical implications for therapists working with couples because it provides new baseline evidence regarding how couples now interact with one another (especially about monogamy) and how this has shifted over time. In addition, it elucidates the differences that still exist between different couple types, which could serve to inform couple therapists as they strive to become more culturally competent working with same-sex couples. PMID:21884075

Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay; Rothblum, Esther; Solomon, Sondra; Balsam, Kimberly; Schwartz, Pepper

2011-09-01

322

Correlates of Trading Sex for Methamphetamine in a Sample of HIV-Negative Heterosexual Methamphetamine Users  

PubMed Central

While many studies have examined correlates of trading sex for money, few have examined factors associated with exclusive trading of sex for drugs. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual men and women who were enrolled in a sexual risk reduction intervention in San Diego, California. Of 342 participants, 26% overall (21% of males and 31% of females) reported trading sex for methamphetamine in the past two months. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that recently trading sex for methamphetamine was independently associated with being female, homeless, binging on methamphetamine, sexual victimization in the past two months, engaging in anal sex 24 or more times in the past two months, and higher sexual compulsivity scores. Effective interventions for this high-risk population should consider gender-focused counseling for sexual abuse, motivational enhancement therapy, social-cognitive skills training, as well as enhanced access and utilization of social services, including drug treatment. PMID:21858954

Semple, Shirley J.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L.

2012-01-01

323

Perceived parenting skill across the transition to adoptive parenthood among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples.  

PubMed

Little research has examined change in perceived parenting skill across the transition to parenthood or predictors of change in perceived skill. The current study used an ecological framework to examine predictors of self-perceived parenting skill among 47 lesbian, 31 gay, and 56 heterosexual couples who were adopting their first child. Findings revealed that, on average, all new parents perceived themselves as becoming more skilled, although gay men increased the most and lesbians the least. Participants who were female, reported fewer depressive symptoms, expected to do more child care, and reported higher job autonomy viewed themselves as more skilled pre-adoption. With regard to change, parents who reported more relational conflict and parents who expected to do more child care experienced lesser increases in perceived skill. These findings suggest that regardless of gender, sexual orientation, and route to parenthood, new parents experience similar, positive changes in perceived skill, thereby broadening our understanding of parenting skill in diverse groups. The findings also highlight the importance of examining how gender, sexual orientation, and the family context may shape perceived skill across the transition to parenthood. PMID:20001145

Goldberg, Abbie E; Smith, JuliAnna Z

2009-12-01

324

Perceived Parenting Skill Across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood Among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples  

PubMed Central

Little research has examined change in perceived parenting skill across the transition to parenthood or predictors of change in perceived skill. The current study used an ecological framework to examine predictors of self-perceived parenting skill among 47 lesbian, 31 gay, and 56 heterosexual couples who were adopting their first child. Findings revealed that, on average, all new parents perceived themselves as becoming more skilled, although gay men increased the most and lesbians the least. Participants who were male, reported fewer depressive symptoms, expected to do more child care, and reported higher job autonomy viewed themselves as more skilled pre-adoption. With regard to change, parents who reported more relational conflict, and parents who expected to do more child care, experienced lesser increases in perceived skill. These findings suggest that regardless of gender, sexual orientation, and route to parenthood, new parents experience similar, positive changes in perceived skill, thereby broadening our understanding of parenting skill in diverse groups. The findings also highlight the importance of examining how gender, sexual orientation, and the family context may shape perceived skill across the transition to parenthood. PMID:20001145

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

2009-01-01

325

Measuring heterosexual LGBT ally development: a Rasch analysis.  

PubMed

An instrument was developed that measured heterosexual persons' level of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) ally identity. Using a Rasch analysis, 2 dimensions were observed: (a) internal and interpersonal and (b) activity. Persons with high levels of LGBT ally identities endorsed items about having LGBT knowledge, attitudes, and skills; having interpersonal experiences with LGBT communities; and including LGBT ally as part of their identities. The instrument met criteria for the content, substantive, structural, generalizability, and responsiveness validity. The instrument can be used to assist persons to develop their abilities to support and advocate for equality for LGBT communities. PMID:24175888

Ji, Peter; Fujimoto, Ken

2013-01-01

326

Gay men and intimate partner violence: a gender analysis.  

PubMed

Though intimate partner violence (IPV) is predominately understood as a women's health issue most often emerging within heterosexual relationships, there is increasing recognition of the existence of male victims of IPV. In this qualitative study we explored connections between masculinities and IPV among gay men. The findings show how recognising IPV was based on an array of participant experiences, including the emotional, physical and sexual abuse inflicted by their partner, which in turn led to three processes. Normalising and concealing violence referred to the participants' complicity in accepting violence as part of their relationship and their reluctance to disclose that they were victims of IPV. Realising a way out included the participants' understandings that the triggers for, and patterns of, IPV would best be quelled by leaving the relationship. Nurturing recovery detailed the strategies employed by participants to mend and sustain their wellbeing in the aftermath of leaving an abusive relationship. In terms of masculinities and men's health research, the findings reveal the limits of idealising hegemonic masculinities and gender relations as heterosexual, while highlighting a plurality of gay masculinities and the need for IPV support services that bridge the divide between male and female as well as between homosexual and heterosexual. PMID:24641108

Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina; Maria, Estephanie Sta; Lohan, Maria; Howard, Terry; Stewart, Donna E; MacMillan, Harriet

2014-05-01

327

"He Enjoys Giving Her Pleasure": Diversity and Complexity in Young Men's Sexual Scripts.  

PubMed

Research on heterosexual men's sexual expectations has focused on self-described personal traits and culturally dominant models of masculinity. In a pair of studies, we used a sexual scripts perspective to explore the range and diversity of young men's thoughts about sex and relationships with women and to develop measures for assessing these scripts. In the first study, we conducted semi-structured interviews to elicit young men's accounts of their sexual relationships. We used these narratives to produce brief sexual script scenarios describing typical sexual situations, as well as conventional survey items assessing sexual behavior themes. In the second study, we administered the scenarios and theme items to an ethnically diverse, national sample of 648 heterosexually active young men in an online survey. Using exploratory factor analysis, we delineated sets of sexual scripts and sexual behavior themes. In the scenarios, we found both a traditional masculine "player" script and a script that emphasized mutual sexual pleasure. Analysis of theme items produced scales of Drinking and Courtship, Monogamy and Emotion, and Sexual Focus and Variety. We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding heterosexual men's thinking about sexuality and how cultural change in sexual thinking may arise. We also discuss the need for measures of sexual thinking that better integrate perceptions and expectations about the partner as well as the self in relation to the partner, rather than solely self-assessed traits. PMID:25287971

Morrison, Diane M; Masters, N Tatiana; Wells, Elizabeth A; Casey, Erin; Beadnell, Blair; Hoppe, Marilyn J

2015-04-01

328

The Meaning of Heterosexual Intercourse Among Women with Female Orgasmic Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present studies attempt to portray the unique profile of the subjective meaning of heterosexual intercourse in women with Female Orgasmic Disorder (FOD). In Studies 1 and 2, the Meaning of Heterosexual Intercourse Scale for Women (MHISW) was developed. In Study 3, the MHISW was administered to 36 self-referred women with FOD, 26 nonreferred women with FOD, and 36 sexually

Gurit E. Birnbaum

2003-01-01

329

Timing of Pubertal Maturation and Heterosexual Behavior Among Hong Kong Chinese Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents a cross-sectional examination of the independent contribution of pubertal maturation timing to heterosexual activity among Chinese adolescents. A standardized self-administered questionnaire was designed to obtain information on a spectrum of physical heterosexual behaviors from dating to sexual intercourse, age at first nocturnal ejaculation in boys, age at menarche in girls, and several psychosocial variables that might be

T. H. Lam; H. J. Shi; L. M. Ho; Sunita M. Stewart; Susan Fan

2002-01-01

330

Accounting for Single Status: Heterosexism and Ageism in Heterosexual Women's Talk about Marriage  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interviews are reported in which heterosexual women construct unmarried status as a temporary stage, preparatory to marriage, or the consequence of failure to maintain heterosexual relationships. Remaining single in later life is constructed as a threat, and older single women are constructed as lonely and isolated. Women construct themselves as responsible for the ending of past relationships, and report having

Anna Sandfield; Carol Percy

2003-01-01

331

Social Support and Psychological Well-Being in Lesbian and Heterosexual Preadoptive Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines predictors of social support and mental health among 36 lesbian and 39 heterosexual couples who were waiting to adopt. Lesbian preadoptive partners perceived less support from family than heterosex- ual partners but similar levels of support from friends. Lesbian and heterosexual partners reported similar levels of well-being. Aspects of the adoption process were associated with anxiety, whereas

Abbie E. Goldberg; JuliAnna Z. Smith

2008-01-01

332

Sexuality Sells: A Content Analysis of Lesbian and Heterosexual Women's Bodies in Magazine Advertisements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Controversies in the literature suggest varied views as to whether lesbian and heterosexual women accept different cultural norms about body shape and size. This article explores whether messages about the body from lesbian media deviate from mainstream, heterosexually focused media. In particular, I differentiate the messages within both media by the physical appearance of the model in the photo, and

Diana Milillo

2008-01-01

333

A Comparison of Lesbian, Bisexual, and Heterosexual College Undergraduate Women on Selected Mental Health Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate selected mental health characteristics of lesbians and bisexual undergraduate college women as compared with heterosexual college women. Participants: Self-identified lesbians and bisexual and heterosexual female college students who took part in the American College Health Association National College Health Assessment…

Kerr, Dianne L.; Santurri, Laura; Peters, Patricia

2013-01-01

334

Poverty among Cohabiting Gay and Lesbian, and Married and Cohabiting Heterosexual Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a subsample ( N = 1,365,145) of the 2000 Census 5% Public Use Microdata Sample, the authors investigate explanations for differing poverty chances of cohabiting gay and lesbian, and married and cohabiting heterosexual families. Gay and lesbian couples fare worse than married couples, but better economically than cohabiting heterosexuals.…

Prokos, Anastasia H.; Keene, Jennifer Reid

2010-01-01

335

Happily Never after: Young Women's Stories of Abuse in Heterosexual Love Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although repeated exposure to narratives of romance in popular culture from an early age may lead young women to expect idealized romance in their heterosexual love relationships, a good number encounter abusive experiences. This article draws on young women's stories of abuse in heterosexual love relationships gathered from interviews with 23 young women aged 16-18 years. These stories are examined

Sue Jackson

2001-01-01

336

"Undoing" the Self: Should Heterosexual Teachers "Come Out" in the University Classroom?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The issue of whether to "come out" in class has a poignant history in the literature by gay, lesbian and bisexual educators on this topic. By comparison few heterosexuals have publicly written about whether they explicitly reveal their heterosexuality to students. This paper contributes to the enduring debate about whether to "come out" in class…

Allen, Louisa

2011-01-01

337

Psychological androgyny, feminine gender identity and self?esteem in homosexual and heterosexual males  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homosexual and heterosexual male college students were provided with three questionnaires designed to measure feminine gender identity, sex role attributes, and self?esteem. No differences were found between homosexual and heterosexual students on self?esteem. Significant differences were found between the two groups on the femininity, masculinity, and androgyny scales of the Bem Sex Role Inventory and on a feminine gender identity

Robert E. Hooberman

1979-01-01

338

Will current socioeconomic trends produce a depressing future for men?  

PubMed Central

The changing economic and social environment of Western nations is having a profound impact on men’s lives. Men who assume a greater share of roles traditionally filled by women will experience challenges to traditional sources of male self-esteem, potentially heightening the risk for depressive disorders among men. PMID:21357871

Dunlop, Boadie W.; Mletzko, Tanja

2011-01-01

339

Biological versus nonbiological older brothers and men's sexual orientation.  

PubMed

The most consistent biodemographic correlate of sexual orientation in men is the number of older brothers (fraternal birth order). The mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. In this article, I provide a direct test pitting prenatal against postnatal (e.g., social/rearing) mechanisms. Four samples of homosexual and heterosexual men (total n = 944), including one sample of men raised in nonbiological and blended families (e.g., raised with half- or step-siblings or as adoptees) were studied. Only biological older brothers, and not any other sibling characteristic, including nonbiological older brothers, predicted men's sexual orientation, regardless of the amount of time reared with these siblings. These results strongly suggest a prenatal origin to the fraternal birth-order effect. PMID:16807297

Bogaert, Anthony F

2006-07-11

340

Antecedents of Intimate Partner Violence Among Gay and Bisexual Men  

PubMed Central

Examinations of gay and bisexual men’s (GBM) perceptions of intimate partner violence (IPV), including their perceptions of events likely to precipitate IPV, are lacking. Focus group discussions with GBM (n = 83) yielded 24 unique antecedents, or triggers, of IPV in male–male relationships. Venue-recruited survey participants (n = 700) identified antecedents that were likely to cause partner violence in male–male relationships, including antecedents GBM-specific currently absent from the literature. Chi-square tests found significant variations in antecedent endorsement when tested against recent receipt of IPV. Linear regression confirmed that men reporting recent IPV endorsed significantly more IPV antecedents than men without recent IPV (? = 1.8155, p < .012). A better understanding of the IPV event itself in male–male couples versus heterosexual couples, including its antecedents, can inform and strengthen IPV prevention efforts. PMID:25069147

Finneran, Catherine; Stephenson, Rob

2014-01-01

341

Protective factors and HIV risk behavior among South African men.  

PubMed

The primary mode of HIV transmission in South Africa is heterosexual sexual behavior. HIV prevention research specifically focusing on men in South Africa is limited. We assessed self-reported HIV risk behaviors in 1,181 men ages 18 to 45 years in randomly selected neighborhoods in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Older men were less likely to report having multiple partners. Religiosity was a protective factor for condom use and unprotected sex with steady partners. Discussing using condoms was a protective factor for condom use and unprotected sex with both steady and casual partners. Having a child was associated with decreased condom use with steady partners and employment was associated with decreased condom use with casual partners. The findings suggest the need for HIV risk-reduction behavioral interventions tailored for South African men with regard to age, religiosity, and types of sexual partners. Implications for the development of such interventions are discussed. PMID:24722765

Heeren, G Anita; Icard, Larry D; O'Leary, Ann; Jemmott, John B; Ngwane, Zolani; Mtose, Xoliswa

2014-10-01

342

Correlates of African American Men's Sexual Schemas  

PubMed Central

Sexual schemas are cognitive representations of oneself as a sexual being and aid in the processing of sexually relevant information. We examined the relationship between sociosexuality (attitudes about casual sex), masculine ideology (attitudes toward traditional men and male roles), and cultural centrality (strength of identity with racial group) as significant psychosocial and sociocultural predictors in shaping young, heterosexual African American men's sexual schemas. A community sample (n=133) of men in a southeastern city of the United States completed quantitative self-report measures examining their attitudes and behavior related to casual sex, beliefs about masculinity, racial and cultural identity, and self-views of various sexual aspects of themselves. Results indicated that masculine ideology and cultural centrality were both positively related to men's sexual schemas. Cultural centrality explained 12 % of the variance in level of sexual schema, and had the strongest correlation of the predictor variables with sexual schema (r=.36). The need for more attention to the bidirectional relationships between masculinity, racial/cultural identity, and sexual schemas in prevention, intervention, and public health efforts for African American men is discussed. PMID:24031118

Morales, Dawn A.; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; St. Lawrence, Janet

2013-01-01

343

Acceptability of male circumcision and predictors of circumcision preference among men and women in Nyanza Province, Kenya  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous epidemiologic studies report significant associations between lack of male circumcision and HIV-1 infection, leading some to suggest that male circumcision be added to the limited armamentarium of HIV prevention strategies in areas where HIV prevalence is high and the mode of transmission is primarily heterosexual. This cross-sectional survey of 107 men and 110 women in Nyanza Province, Kenya, assesses

C. L. Mattson; R. C. Bailey; R. Muga; R. Poulussen; T. Onyango

2005-01-01

344

"They're Just a Good Time and Move On": Fraternity Men Reflect on Their Hookup Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hookups have largely replaced heterosexual dating on campus, but literature suggests men and women may ascribe different motivations and meanings to hookup experiences. This study, utilizing Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, makes sense of the responses of three fraternity members reflecting upon their sexual and dating experiences. Four…

Stinson, Rebecca D.; Levy, Lauren B.; Alt, Marcus

2014-01-01

345

Coparenting among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples: associations with adopted children's outcomes.  

PubMed

Coparenting is associated with child behavior in families with heterosexual parents, but less is known about coparenting among lesbian- and gay-parent families. Associations were studied among self-reported divisions of labor, coparenting observations, and child adjustment (Mage  = 3 years) among 104 adoptive families headed by lesbian, gay, or heterosexual couples. Lesbian and gay couples reported sharing child care, whereas heterosexual couples reported specialization (i.e., mothers did more child care than fathers). Observations confirmed this pattern-lesbian and gay parents participated more equally than heterosexual parents during family interaction. Lesbian couples showed the most supportive and least undermining behavior, whereas gay couples showed the least supportive behavior, and heterosexual couples the most undermining behavior. Overall, supportive coparenting was associated with better child adjustment. PMID:23336749

Farr, Rachel H; Patterson, Charlotte J

2013-01-01

346

Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Concordance in Heterosexual Couples  

PubMed Central

Background.?Few studies have assessed genital human papillomavirus (HPV) concordance and factors associated with concordance among asymptomatic heterosexual couples. Methods.?Genotyping for HPV was conducted with male and female sex partners aged 18–70 years from Tampa, Florida. Eligibility included no history of HPV-associated disease. Type-specific positive concordance (partners with ?1 genotype in common) and negative concordance (neither partner had HPV) were assessed for 88 couples. Factors associated with concordance were assessed with Fisher exact tests and tests for trend. Results.?Couples reported engaging in sexual intercourse for a median of 1.7 years (range, 0.1–49 years), and 75% reported being in the same monogamous relationship for the past 6 months. Almost 1 in 4 couples had type-specific positive concordance, and 35% had negative concordance for all types tested, for a total concordance of 59%. Concordance was not associated with monogamy. Type-specific positive concordance was associated with an increasing difference in partners’ lifetime number of sex partners and inversely associated with an increasing difference in age. Negative concordance was inversely associated with both the couple's sum of lifetime number of sex partners and the difference in the partners’ lifetime number of sex partners. Conclusions.?Genital HPV concordance was common. Viral infectiousness and number of sex partners may help explain concordance among heterosexual partners. PMID:22539815

Nyitray, Alan G.; Menezes, Lynette; Lu, Beibei; Lin, Hui-Yi; Smith, Dan'elle; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary; Gage, Christine; Giuliano, Anna R.

2012-01-01

347

PROCESSES LEADING SELF-IDENTIFIED HETEROSEXUALS TO DEVELOP INTO SEXUAL MINORITY SOCIAL JUSTICE ALLIES: A QUALITATIVE EXPLORATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of homonegativity on both sexual minorities and heterosexuals is profoundly debilitating. Due to the implicit power of their privileged status, heterosexually-identified individuals can serve a crucial role as allies in eliminating sexual minority oppression. Because minimal research exists around heterosexual identity issues, broadly, and sexual minority ally development, specifically, it is difficult to promote such ally work without

Julie Marie Duhigg

2007-01-01

348

Tobacco Smoking in HIV-Infected versus General Population in France: Heterogeneity across the Various Groups of People Living with HIV  

PubMed Central

Background Although the various groups of people living with HIV (PLWHIV) considerably differ regarding socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics, their specificities regarding tobacco smoking have been poorly investigated. We aimed to assess patterns of tobacco consumption across the various groups of PLWHIV and to compare them to the general population, accounting for the specific socioeconomic profile of PLWHIV. Methods We used data of the ANRS-Vespa2 study, a national representative survey on PLWHIV conducted in France in 2011. Prevalence of past and current tobacco consumption, heavy smoking and strong nicotine dependence were assessed among the various groups of PLWHIV as defined by transmission category, gender and geographic origin, and compared to the French general population using direct standardization and multivariate Poisson regression models, accounting for gender, age, education and geographic origin. Results Among the 3,019 participants aged 18–85 years (median time since HIV diagnosis: 12 years), 37.5% were current smokers and 22.1% were past smokers, with marked differences across the various groups of PLWHIV. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of regular smoking was increased among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) (adjusted prevalence rate ratio (aPRR): 1.19, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.07–1.32), French-native women (aPRR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.10–1.57), and heterosexual French-native men (although not significantly, aPRR: 1.19, 95% CI: 0.98–1.45). Additionally, HIV-infected MSM were significantly less likely to be ex-smokers (aPRR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.64–0.82) than the general population and similar trends were observed among heterosexual French-native men (aPRR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.78–1.02) and women (aPRR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.70–1.01). HIV-infected sub-Saharan African migrants were less likely to be regular smokers than the general population. Conclusions Smoking constitutes a major concern in various groups of PLWHIV in France including MSM and heterosexual French-natives, probably resulting from PLWHIV being less likely to quit smoking than their counterparts in the general population. PMID:25202968

Tron, Laure; Lert, France; Spire, Bruno; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

2014-01-01

349

Sexual Risk in “Mostly Heterosexual” Young Women: Influence of Social Support and Caregiver Mental Health  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Female youth who describe their sexual orientation as “mostly heterosexual,” rather than exclusively heterosexual, display greater sexual risk, yet reasons for this greater risk are not understood. Research is needed to identify factors responsible for health disparities in this population comprising the majority of youth who report a minority sexual orientation. Methods We compared indicators of perceived social support, parental/caregiver mental health, and sexual risk (age at first sexual intercourse, lifetime history of a sexually transmitted infection (STI), lifetime number of sexual partners) among 33 young women describing themselves as mostly heterosexual and 337 indicating they were 100% heterosexual (aged 18–24 years) participating in an urban, multiethnic, community-based cohort study. Linear, logistic, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to test whether social support and caregiver mental health explained greater sexual risk among mostly heterosexual compared with heterosexual participants. Results Compared with exclusively heterosexuals, mostly heterosexuals reported less social support from family (p?=?0.01) and friends (p?=?0.02) and were more likely to report primary male caregiver (though not primary female caregiver) histories of depression (p?heterosexual female youth, mostly heterosexual female youth may have poorer relationships with their family and others in their social networks, and this may contribute to their elevated health risks. Additional research is needed to understand causal mechanisms responsible for sexual orientation disparities in sexual risk. PMID:20044863

Austin, S. Bryn; Roberts, Andrea L.; Molnar, Beth E.

2009-01-01

350

A Comparison of Substance Use Behaviors of Hispanic Men by Sexual Orientation  

PubMed Central

Background/Significance Substance use is a public health concern in the United States. Hispanic men in the United States experience disproportionate rates of substance use when compared to other ethnic groups. Previous research with the general population of Hispanic men has identified factors that are related and may contribute to substance use. In addition, Hispanic men who have sex with men (HMSM) may experience additional social factors that may result in substance use. Despite the body of research on substance use among Hispanic men, no study to date has compared the substance use behaviors of Hispanic men by sexual orientation. Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the substance use behaviors of Hispanic men by sexual orientation. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to collect data from 164 community-dwelling Hispanic men (i.e., 77 heterosexual men and 87 HMSM) who resided in the South Florida area. Participants completed standardized measures of substance use and demographic characteristics. Results Findings suggested that heterosexual men had higher rates of substance use when compared to MSM. No differences were found among the two groups of men in terms of alcohol intoxication. Religion, education, and income were not predictors of substance use. When health insurance status was controlled, MSM were less likely to report substance use. Implications As a population, Hispanic men continue to experience health disparities in terms of substance use. Because substance use renders Hispanic men at risk for other health issues, more research is needed to understand the co-occurring health disparities experienced by Hispanic men who reside in the United States. PMID:25419537

De Santis, Joseph P.; Valdes, Beatriz; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias; Patsdaughter, Carol A.; Gattamorta, Karina A.

2014-01-01

351

Sexual Desire, Communication, Satisfaction, and Preferences of Men and Women in Same-Sex Versus Mixed-Sex Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an online study, measures of subjective sexual experiences in one's current relationship were compared across four groups: Men and women in mixed-sex (i.e., heterosexual) and same-sex (i.e., homosexual) relationships. Results indicated far more similarities than differences across the four groups, with groups reporting almost identical sexual repertoires, and levels of sexual communcation with partner. Men reported experiencing somewhat more

Diane Holmberg; Karen L. Blair

2009-01-01

352

Resilience Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men in New York City  

PubMed Central

This article describes a study of resilience among young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Resilience is defined as positive adaptation in the context of hardship. Using targeted sampling to capture the diversity and range of this hidden population, we recruited 569 YMSM ages 17–28 years old and examined a subset of 134 YMSM who had experienced severe childhood adversity, as indicated by placement in foster care. Most of the YMSM in this subset were from racial or ethnic minority backgrounds and fewer than half identified as gay or homosexual (46.3 percent). More than half (58.3 percent) exhibited positive outcomes on four of seven indicators of adaptive functioning. YMSM who identified as either bisexual or heterosexual exhibited lower rates of resilience. Structural- as well as individual-level factors appear to be implicated in resilience among YMSM. Findings underscore the importance of fostering stable sexual identity as a means of building resilience. PMID:18079993

Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Clatts, Michael C.; Yi, Huso; Leonard, Noelle R.; Goldsamt, Lloyd

2007-01-01

353

Prevalence of sexual problems and associated distress among lesbian and heterosexual women.  

PubMed

Prevalence studies on female sexual problems among heterosexual samples have been conducted extensively across different countries. However, relatively little is known regarding prevalence of sexual problems in lesbians. The present study aimed to assess and compare the frequency of self-perceived sexual problems and associated levels of distress in lesbians and heterosexual women. In all, 390 lesbians and 1,009 heterosexual women completed an online survey. The authors assessed the frequency of self-perceived sexual problems in lesbians and heterosexual women, over the past 6 months, as well as the associated levels of distress. Main results suggested that, after controlling for distress levels, sexual pain was the most frequent sexual problem reported by lesbians and heterosexual women. Also, when distress was considered a significant decrease on prevalence rates of sexual problems were found for both lesbians and heterosexual women. Current findings emphasize the role of associated levels of distress to self-perceived sexual problems in women, regardless of sexual orientation. In addition, results suggest that length of relationship play a major role on sexual problems. Overall, data indicated a relatively similar pattern in prevalence of sexual problems in lesbians and heterosexual women. PMID:24794229

Peixoto, Maria Manuela; Nobre, Pedro

2015-01-01

354

Gay men seeking surrogacy to achieve parenthood.  

PubMed

Assisted reproduction technologies have developed at an extraordinary rate in recent years. This, combined with the changing landscape of legal, technical and social possibilities, enables gay men to consider their options for fatherhood as new opportunities emerge for them to create families. Media coverage of gay celebrities embracing surrogacy as a way of having a family and high-profile legal cases have raised awareness of surrogacy across the world. However, gay fatherhood achieved through assisted reproduction is a highly under-researched area, both in the UK and internationally. The research that currently exists on gay fatherhood is largely related to gay men who become parents through processes such as adoption and fostering and children conceived through previous heterosexual relationships. Much of this evidence has centred on parenting experiences, the outcomes for children or the legal perspectives. This paper outlines the different types of surrogacy and the legal issues facing gay men who choose this route to parenthood, summarizes the limited research on gay men and surrogacy and discusses gaps in the current knowledge base. PMID:23664815

Norton, Wendy; Hudson, Nicky; Culley, Lorraine

2013-09-01

355

Comparison of the auditory systems of heterosexuals and homosexuals: Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions  

PubMed Central

Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are echo-like waveforms emitted by normal-hearing cochleas in response to a brief transient. CEOAEs are known to be stronger in females than in males. In this experiment, the CEOAEs of homosexual and bisexual females were found to be intermediate to those of heterosexual females and heterosexual males. A parsimonious explanation is that the auditory systems of homosexual and bisexual females, and the brain structures responsible for their sexual orientation, have been partially masculinized by exposure to high levels of androgens prenatally. No difference in CEOAEs was observed between homosexual and heterosexual males. PMID:9482952

McFadden, Dennis; Pasanen, Edward G.

1998-01-01

356

Correlates of sexual risk among sexual minority and heterosexual South African youths.  

PubMed

We explored psychosocial correlates of sexual risk among heterosexual and sexual minority youths (SMYs) in Johannesburg, South Africa. Young people 16 to 18 years old (n = 822) were administered surveys assessing demographic characteristics, sexual behaviors, mental health, and parent-child communication. Adjusted multivariate regressions examining correlates of sexual risk revealed that SMYs had more sexual partners than heterosexual youths (B = 3.90; SE = 0.95; P < .001) and were more likely to engage in sex trading (OR = 3.11; CI = 1.12-8.62; P < .05). South African SMYs are at increased risk relative to their heterosexual peers. PMID:24832149

Thurston, Idia B; Dietrich, Janan; Bogart, Laura M; Otwombe, Kennedy N; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Nkala, Busiswe; Gray, Glenda E

2014-07-01

357

For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly  

MedlinePLUS

... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table ... Man's Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. Simpler Diabetes Care: Estimated Average Glucose (eAG) The American Diabetes ...

358

Survival Strategies of Older Homeless Men.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined how 281 homeless men aged 50 and older living on skid row were able to procure basic necessities such as money, food, shelter, and health care. Found men had and used informal supports to survive. Inability to fulfill needs was primarily associated with physical health, depression, lack of contacts with institutions and agencies, and…

Cohen, Carl I.; And Others

1988-01-01

359

The Increased Effectiveness of HIV Preventive Intervention among Men Who Have Sex with Men and of Follow-Up Care for People Living with HIV after ‘Task-Shifting’ to Community-Based Organizations: A ‘Cash on Service Delivery’ Model in China  

PubMed Central

Background A large number of men who have sex with men (MSM) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) are underserved despite increased service availability from government facilities while many community based organizations (CBOs) are not involved. We aimed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the task shifting from government facilities to CBOs in China. Methods HIV preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA were shifted from government facilities to CBOs. Based on ‘cash on service delivery’ model, 10 USD per MSM tested for HIV with results notified, 82 USD per newly HIV cases diagnosed, and 50 USD per PLHA received a defined package of follow-up care services, were paid to the CBOs. Cash payments were made biannually based on the verified results in the national web-based HIV/AIDS information system. Findings After task shifting, CBOs gradually assumed preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA from 2008 to 2012. HIV testing coverage among MSM increased from 4.1% in 2008 to 22.7% in 2012. The baseline median CD4 counts of newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM increased from 309 to 397 cells/µL. HIV tests among MSM by CBOs accounted for less than 1% of the total HIV tests in Nanjing but the share of HIV cases detected by CBOs was 12.4% in 2008 and 43.6% in 2012. Unit cost per HIV case detected by CBOs was 47 times lower than that by government facilities. The coverage of CD4 tests and antiretroviral therapy increased from 71.1% and 78.6% in 2008 to 86.0% and 90.1% in 2012, respectively. Conclusion It is feasible to shift essential HIV services from government facilities to CBOs, and to verify independently service results to adopt ‘cash on service delivery’ model. Services provided by CBOs are cost-effective, as compared with that by government facilities. PMID:25050797

Yan, Hongjing; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jinkou; Huan, Xiping; Ding, Jianping; Wu, Susu; Wang, Chenchen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Li; Xu, Fei; Yang, Haitao

2014-01-01

360

Men’s Aggression Toward Women  

PubMed Central

The present study examined the longitudinal course of men’s physical and psychological aggression toward a partner across 10 years, using a community sample of young couples (N = 194) from at-risk backgrounds. Findings indicated that men’s aggression decreased over time and that women’s antisocial behavior and depressive symptoms predicted changes in men’s aggression. This suggests the importance of studying social processes within the dyad to have a better understanding of men’s aggression toward a partner. PMID:19122790

Kim, Hyoun K.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Capaldi, Deborah M.; Feingold, Alan

2008-01-01

361

Heterosexual and nonheterosexual young university students' involvement in traditional and cyber forms of bullying.  

PubMed

Research has consistently found that school students who do not identify as self-declared completely heterosexual are at increased risk of victimization by bullying from peers. This study examined heterosexual and nonheterosexual university students' involvement in both traditional and cyber forms of bullying, as either bullies or victims. Five hundred twenty-eight first-year university students (M=19.52 years old) were surveyed about their sexual orientation and their bullying experiences over the previous 12 months. The results showed that nonheterosexual young people reported higher levels of involvement in traditional bullying, both as victims and perpetrators, in comparison to heterosexual students. In contrast, cyberbullying trends were generally found to be similar for heterosexual and nonheterosexual young people. Gender differences were also found. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of intervention and prevention of the victimization of nonheterosexual university students. PMID:23078337

Wensley, Kate; Campbell, Marilyn

2012-12-01

362

A Qualitative Examination of Men’s Condom Use Attitudes and Resistance: “It’s Just a Part of the Game”  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to investigate the variability in young heterosexual men’s perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of condom use in their casual sexual relationships. Because men who perceive greater disadvantages of condom use may be more likely to resist using them, we also explored the tactics that men employ to avoid using condoms. Semi-structured focus groups were conducted with single men who have sex with women (n = 60), aged 21 to 35, all of whom reported using condoms inconsistently. Transcripts were analyzed using a framework analysis approach. As expected, participants reported advantages and disadvantages to condom use that pertained to the likelihood and quality of sex, physical sensations during intercourse, and the risk of STIs and unwanted pregnancies. Within each of these topics, however, participants’ appraisals of the relative pros and cons of condom use varied considerably. Additionally, participants reported that men use a wide range of condom use resistance tactics - including seduction, deception, and condom sabotage – and that the use of these tactics is viewed as normative behavior for men their age. These findings suggest that the effectiveness of sexual health prevention efforts could be enhanced by increasing young men’s motivations to use condoms and by targeting social norms regarding condom use resistance. Additionally, the issue of men’s condom use resistance clearly merits increased empirical investigation and intervention attention. PMID:23912776

Davis, Kelly Cue; Schraufnagel, Trevor J.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.; Gilmore, Amanda K.; Norris, Jeanette; George, William H.

2013-01-01

363

Development of Heterosexuals into Sexual-Minority Allies: A Qualitative Exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterosexually identified individuals can serve a crucial role as allies in eliminating sexual prejudice and the resulting\\u000a policies that discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. However, few studies have systematically\\u000a examined the development of heterosexual allies. Consensual qualitative research methods (Hill et al., The Counseling Psychologist,\\u000a 25, 517–572, 1997) were used to analyze individual interviews conducted with

Julie M. Duhigg; Sharon S. Rostosky; Barry E. Gray; Mary K. Wimsatt

2010-01-01

364

Ecological Models of Sexual Satisfaction among Lesbian\\/Bisexual and Heterosexual Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sexual satisfaction is an integral component of sexual health and well-being, yet we know little about which factors contribute\\u000a to it among lesbian\\/bisexual women. To examine a proposed ecological model of sexual satisfaction, we conducted an internet\\u000a survey of married heterosexual women and lesbian\\/bisexual women in committed same-sex relationships. Structural equation modeling\\u000a included five final latent variables for heterosexual women

Alison W. Henderson; Keren Lehavot; Jane M. Simoni

2009-01-01

365

Differences in Risk Factors for Breast Cancer: Lesbian and Heterosexual Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose\\/Objectives: To compare differences in risk for developing breast cancer between lesbian and heterosexual women. Design: Retrospective medical record review. Setting: Lyon-Martin Women's Health Services (LMWHS) in San Francisco, California. Sample: Women age 35 or older, seen at LMWHS in 1995, 1996, or 1997, who described themselves as either lesbian or heterosexual. The typical participant (n = 1019) was 42.9

Stephanie A. Roberts; Suzanne L. Dibble; Jennifer L. Scanlon; Steven M. Paul; Heather Davids

1998-01-01

366

Parent-child relationships and sexual identity in male and female homosexuals and heterosexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conducted 2 studies of reported parent-child relations and sexual identity: one of a population of 84 white, well-educated female homosexuals and their 94 matched heterosexual controls and the other of a group of 127 similarly well-educated, white male homosexuals and their 123 heterosexual matched controls. Female homosexuals reported having had more negative relations with their fathers in childhood than female

Norman L. Thompson; David M. Schwartz; Boyd R. McCandless; David A. Edwards

1973-01-01

367

Childhood Family Correlates of Heterosexual and Homosexual Marriages: A National Cohort Study of Two Million Danes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children who experience parental divorce are less likely to marry heterosexually than those growing up in intact families; however, little is known about other childhood factors affecting marital choices. We studied childhood correlates of first marriages (heterosexual since 1970, homosexual since 1989) in a national cohort of 2 million 18–49 year-old Danes. In multivariate analyses, persons born in the capital area

Morten Frisch; Anders Hviid

2006-01-01

368

Sexual Consent in Heterosexual Relationships: Development of a New Measure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extensive research on date rape attitudes and experiences has left sexual consent itself largely unexamined. The objective\\u000a of this study was to develop a measure to assess women’s and men’s attitudes and behaviors regarding sexual consent. Using\\u000a both focus groups (N?=?18) and a mail survey (N?=?514) of undergraduate students at a Canadian university, two scales of sexual consent were

Terry Humphreys; Ed Herold

2007-01-01

369

Heteronormativity and sexual partnering among bisexual latino men.  

PubMed

Our analyses address the question of how bisexual Latino men organize their sexual partnerships. Heteronormativity can be understood as the set of social norms and normative structures that guide sexual partnering among men and women. We provide descriptive statistics to describe bisexual Latino men's sexual partnerships. Logistic and linear regression modeling were used to explore bivariate and multivariate relationships. Of our total sample (N = 142), 41.6 % had unprotected vaginal intercourse 2 months prior to the interview; 21.8 % had unprotected anal intercourse with female partners; 37.5 % had unprotected insertive anal intercourse with male partners; and 22.5 % had unprotected receptive anal intercourse with male partners. In our multivariate model, machismo was directly associated with meeting female partners through formal spaces (workplace, school, and/or church), but inversely associated with meeting male partners in formal spaces. Machismo was positively associated with meeting male sex partners through social networks (i.e., friendship and kinship networks). The more comfortable men were with homosexuality the less likely they were to meet men online and the more likely they were to meet men through social networks of friends and kinship. Interventions to reduce sexually transmitted diseases that target bisexual behavior as an epidemiological "bridge" of transmission from homosexual to heterosexual networks might very well benefit from a more complex understanding of how Latino bisexuality is patterned. Thus, this exploratory analysis might lead to a rethinking of how to address risk and vulnerability among Latino bisexual men and their sexual networks. PMID:25128415

Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Garcia, Jonathan; Wilson, Patrick A; Parker, Richard G; Severson, Nicolette

2015-05-01

370

Policy implications of gay men's workplace experiences: public service employees in Australia's capital, Canberra  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2008, changes in Australian federal legislation commenced the removal of workplace policies that historically discriminated against non-heterosexual employees. Academic research, however, reveals that much workplace discrimination is covert. To examine perceptions of covert workplace discrimination, experiences of gay men employed in the public service in the Australian Capital Territory in Canberra were investigated using semi-structured, in-depth interviews. Qualitative thematic

David J. Aaron; Angela T. Ragusa

2011-01-01

371

Subjective Sexual Experiences of Behaviorally Bisexual Men in the Midwestern United States: Sexual Attraction, Sexual Behaviors, & Condom Use  

PubMed Central

Studies concerning behaviorally bisexual men continue to focus on understanding sexual risk in according to a narrow range of sexual behaviors. Few studies have explored the subjective meanings and experiences related to bisexual men’s sexual behaviors with both male and female partners. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 75 men who engaged in bisexual behavior within the past six months. Participants were asked about their subjective sexual experiences with male and female partners. Findings suggest adherence to normative gender roles, with attraction to men and women conforming to these stereotypes, as well as a segregation of sexual behaviors along gendered lines. Overall, condom use was influenced by perceptions of potential negative consequences. Based on these findings, it remains critical that public health and other social and behavioral sciences continue to study bisexual men’s sexual health issues as separate and distinct from their exclusively homosexual and heterosexual counterparts. PMID:22745592

Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Dodge, Brian; Reece, Michael; Goncalves, Gabriel; Martinez, Omar; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Malebranche, David; Murray, Maresa; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2012-01-01

372

Correlates of HIV and HCV risk and testing among Chinese, Filipino, and Vietnamese men who have sex with men and other at-risk men.  

PubMed

Asian Americans are one of the more under-researched groups in the United States. This holds true with regard to research on risk assessment, screening, and testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C (HCV). Here, we address that lack by exploring correlates of risk and testing for the two diseases among Chinese, Filipino, and Vietnamese men who have sex with men (MSM) and other at-risk men in the San Francisco Bay Area. We do so by analyzing findings from the study of a community-based prevention program, Project 3-3-3 (P333), designed to address the often comorbid conditions of substance abuse, HIV infection, and HCV infection among underserved and high-risk Chinese, Filipino, and Vietnamese adults, most of whom are MSM. A risk-behavior survey completed at preintervention identified risk factors related to HIV, HCV, and substance use among this population (n = 273). The study of survey data identifies and distinguishes between correlates of HIV and HCV testing. Among our findings, significant differences were found between Asian ethnic subpopulation groups with respect to number of sexual partners (p = .007), and HIV testing rates comparing MSM and heterosexual men differed significantly (p < .002). Those who spoke English at home were more likely to be tested for HIV (p < .008). With HCV testing, the number of partners was positively correlated to getting tested (p < .047), and Filipino men were significantly more likely to get tested for HCV than Chinese men (p < .022). PMID:23631718

Toleran, Daniel E; Friese, Bettina; Battle, Robynn S; Gardiner, Phillip; Tran, Phu Duc; Lam, John; Cabangun, Ben

2013-06-01

373

Implicit Sexual Attitude of Heterosexual, Gay and Bisexual Individuals: Disentangling the Contribution of Specific Associations to the Overall Measure  

PubMed Central

The article aims to measure implicit sexual attitude in heterosexual, gay and bisexual individuals. A Many-Facet Rasch Measurement analysis was used to disentangle the contribution of specific associations to the overall IAT measure. A preference for heterosexuals relative to homosexuals is observed in heterosexual respondents, driven most by associating positive attributes with heterosexuals rather than negative attributes with homosexuals. Differently, neither the negative nor the positive evaluation of any of the target groups play a prominent role in driving the preference for homosexuals observed in gay respondents. A preference for heterosexuals relative to homosexuals is observed in bisexual respondents, that results most from ascribing negative attributes to homosexuals rather than positive attributes to heterosexuals. The results are consistent with the expression of the need for achieving a positive self-image and with the influence of shared social norms concerning sexuality. PMID:24260142

Anselmi, Pasquale; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voci, Alberto; Robusto, Egidio

2013-01-01

374

Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents' Experiences in Preschool Environments  

PubMed Central

Little research has examined the school experiences of lesbian/gay (LG) parent families or adoptive parent families. The current exploratory study examined the experiences of 79 lesbian, 75 gay male, and 112 heterosexual adoptive parents of preschool-age children with respect to their (a) level of disclosure regarding their LG parent and adoptive family status at their children's schools; (b) perceived challenges in navigating the preschool environment and advocating on behalf of their children and families; and (c) recommendations to teachers and schools about how to create affirming school environments with respect to family structure, adoption, and race/ethnicity. Findings revealed that the majority of parents were open about their LG and adoptive family status, and had not encountered challenges related to family diversity. Those parents who did experience challenges tended to describe implicit forms of marginalization, such as insensitive language and school assignments. Recommendations for teachers included discussing and reading books about diverse families, tailoring assignments to meet the needs of diverse families, and offering school community-building activities and events to help bridge differences across families. PMID:25414543

Goldberg, Abbie E.

2014-01-01

375

Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents' Experiences in Preschool Environments.  

PubMed

Little research has examined the school experiences of lesbian/gay (LG) parent families or adoptive parent families. The current exploratory study examined the experiences of 79 lesbian, 75 gay male, and 112 heterosexual adoptive parents of preschool-age children with respect to their (a) level of disclosure regarding their LG parent and adoptive family status at their children's schools; (b) perceived challenges in navigating the preschool environment and advocating on behalf of their children and families; and (c) recommendations to teachers and schools about how to create affirming school environments with respect to family structure, adoption, and race/ethnicity. Findings revealed that the majority of parents were open about their LG and adoptive family status, and had not encountered challenges related to family diversity. Those parents who did experience challenges tended to describe implicit forms of marginalization, such as insensitive language and school assignments. Recommendations for teachers included discussing and reading books about diverse families, tailoring assignments to meet the needs of diverse families, and offering school community-building activities and events to help bridge differences across families. PMID:25414543

Goldberg, Abbie E

2014-01-01

376

Charting a Moral Life: The Influence of Stigma and Filial Duties on Marital Decisions among Chinese Men who Have Sex with Men  

PubMed Central

Introduction Stigma constitutes a critical challenge to the rising rates of HIV among Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM). It reduces willingness to disclose one’s sexual orientation and can lead to concurrent sexual partnerships. Disclosure decisions are also affected by cultural norms that place pressures on sons to marry. In this manuscript, we characterize how stigma and cultural factors influenced Chinese MSM’s decisions around disclosure and marriage. We seek to show that MSM’s actions were motivated by moral considerations, even when those choices posed HIV transmission risks. Methods We conducted qualitative interviews with 30 MSM in Beijing, China. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated into English for analysis. Transcripts were coded using a procedure that allowed for themes to emerge organically. Results Participants struggled with feelings of shame and believed that others possessed stigmatizing attitudes about homosexuality. They had experienced relatively little discrimination because they infrequently disclosed their MSM status. In response to marital pressures, participant had to reconcile same-sex attractions with filial expectations. Their choices included: not being involved with women; putting on the appearance of a heterosexual relationship by marrying a lesbian; or fulfilling family expectations by marrying a heterosexual woman. Regardless of the decision, many rooted the justifications for their choices in the considerations they had given to others’ needs. Conclusion The growing epidemic among MSM in China requires action from the public health community. As programs are scaled up to serve these men, it is critical to remember that MSM, who often fear social sanction if they were to reveal their sexual orientation, continue to face the same pressures from culturally normative social duties as heterosexual men. Interventions must find ways to help men navigate a balance between their own needs and the responsibilities they feel toward their parents and others. PMID:23951245

Steward, Wayne T.; Miège, Pierre; Choi, Kyung-Hee

2013-01-01

377

Major Contributions: Feminism and Men's Lives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the various areas of sex role change as an evolution verging on revolution, and states the result of these changes as being a blurring of gender roles. Reactions of different male groups, from the traditional to the liberal, are given, as well as a complete explanation of emotional trouble spots. (LPG)

Skovholt, Thomas M.

1978-01-01

378

Condom Use and High-Risk Sexual Acts in Adult Films: A Comparison of Heterosexual and Homosexual Films  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We compared the prevalence of condom use during a variety of sexual acts portrayed in adult films produced for heterosexual and homosexual audiences to assess compliance with state Occupational Health and Safety Administration regulations. Methods. We analyzed 50 heterosexual and 50 male homosexual films released between August 1, 2005, and July 31, 2006, randomly selected from the distributor of 85% of the heterosexual adult films released each year in the United States. Results. Penile–vaginal intercourse was protected with condoms in 3% of heterosexual scenes. Penile–anal intercourse, common in both heterosexual (42%) and homosexual (80%) scenes, was much less likely to be protected with condoms in heterosexual than in homosexual scenes (10% vs 78%; P < .001). No penile–oral acts were protected with condoms in any of the selected films. Conclusions. Heterosexual films were much less likely than were homosexual films to portray condom use, raising concerns about transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, especially among performers in heterosexual adult films. In addition, the adult film industry, especially the heterosexual industry, is not adhering to state occupational safety regulations. PMID:19218178

Elliott, Marc N.; Kerndt, Peter R.; Schuster, Mark A.; Brook, Robert H.; Gelberg, Lillian

2009-01-01

379

Intimate Partner Violence and Social Pressure among Gay Men in Six Countries  

PubMed Central

Introduction Recent research suggests that men who have sex with men (MSM) experience intimate partner violence (IPV) at significantly higher rates than heterosexual men. Few studies, however, have investigated implications of heterosexist social pressures – namely, homophobic discrimination, internalized homophobia, and heterosexism – on risk for IPV among MSM, and no previous studies have examined cross-national variations in the relationship between IPV and social pressure. This paper examines reporting of IPV and associations with social pressure among a sample of internet-recruited MSM in the United States (U.S.), Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Brazil. Methods We recruited internet-using MSM from 6 countries through selective banner advertisements placed on Facebook. Eligibility criteria were men age over 18 reporting sex with a man in the past year. Of the 2,771 eligible respondents, 2,368 had complete data and were included in the analysis. Three outcomes were examined: reporting recent experience of physical violence, sexual violence, and recent perpetration of physical violence. The analysis focused on associations between reporting of IPV and experiences of homophobic discrimination, internalized homophobia, and heteronormativity. Results Reporting of experiencing physical IPV ranged from 5.75% in the U.S. to 11.75% in South Africa, while experiencing sexual violence was less commonly reported and ranged from 2.54% in Australia to 4.52% in the U.S. Perpetration of physical violence ranged from 2.47% in the U.S. to 5.76% in South Africa. Experiences of homophobic discrimination, internalized homophobia, and heteronormativity were found to increase odds of reporting IPV in all countries. Conclusion There has been little data on IPV among MSM, particularly MSM living in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the lack of consensus in demographic correlates of violence reporting, heterosexist social pressures were found to significantly increase odds of reporting IPV in all countries. These findings show the universality of violence reporting among MSM across countries, and highlight the unique role of heteronormativity as a risk factor for violence reporting among MSM. The results demonstrate that using internet-based surveys to reach MSM is feasible for certain areas, although modified efforts may be required to reach diverse samples of MSM. PMID:22900124

Finneran, Catherine; Chard, Anna; Sineath, Craig; Sullivan, Patrick; Stephenson, Rob

2012-01-01

380

Prevalence Estimates of Health Risk Behaviors of Immigrant Latino Men Who Have Sex with Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Little is known about the health status of rural immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). These MSM comprise a subpopulation that tends to remain "hidden" from both researchers and practitioners. This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol, and drug use, and sexual risk behaviors of Latino MSM living in…

Rhodes, Scott D.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Vissman, Aaron T.; Wolfson, Mark; Alonzo, Jorge; Bloom, Fred R.; Alegria-Ortega, Jose; Eng, Eugenia

2012-01-01

381

Three-year follow-up of same-sex couples who had civil unions in Vermont, same-sex couples not in civil unions, and heterosexual married couples.  

PubMed

This study was a 3-year follow-up of 65 male and 138 female same-sex couples who had civil unions in Vermont during the 1st year of that legislation. These couples were compared with 23 male and 61 female same-sex couples in their friendship circles who did not have civil unions and with 55 heterosexual married couples (1 member of each was a sibling to a member of a civil union couple). Despite the legalized nature of their relationships, civil union couples did not differ on any measure from same-sex couples who were not in civil unions. However, same-sex couples not in civil unions were more likely to have ended their relationships than same-sex civil union or heterosexual married couples. Compared with heterosexual married participants, both types of same-sex couples reported greater relationship quality, compatibility, and intimacy and lower levels of conflict. Longitudinal predictors of relationship quality at Time 2 included less conflict, greater level of outness, and a shorter relationship length for men in same-sex relationships and included less conflict and more frequent sex for women in same-sex relationships at Time 1. PMID:18194009

Balsam, Kimberly F; Beauchaine, Theodore P; Rothblum, Esther D; Solomon, Sondra E

2008-01-01

382

Low Testosterone and Men's Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Men’s Health Share: Fact Sheet Low Testosterone and Men’s Health March, 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... MD What is the role of testosterone in men’s health? Testosterone is the most important sex hormone ...

383

Relationship quality in lesbian and heterosexual couples undergoing treatment with assisted reproduction  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND One of the major factors impacting on a couple's relationship is the desire to have children. To many couples having a child is a confirmation of their love and relationship and a means to deepen and develop their intimate relationship. At the same time parental stress can impact on relationship quality. Relationship quality in lesbian couples is, currently, sparsely studied. The aim of the present study was to compare lesbian and heterosexual couples' perceptions of their relationship quality at the commencement of assisted reproduction, and to relate this to background data such as educational level, having previous children and, for lesbian couples, the use of a known versus anonymous donor. METHODS The present study is part of the prospective longitudinal ‘Swedish study on gamete donation’, including all fertility clinics performing donation treatment in Sweden. Of a consecutive cohort of 214 lesbian couples about to receive donor insemination and 212 heterosexual couples starting regular IVF treatment, 166 lesbian couples (78% response) and 151 heterosexual couples (71% response) accepted participation in the study. At commencement of assisted reproduction participants individually completed questionnaires including the instrument ‘ENRICH’, which is a standardized measure concerning relationship quality. RESULTS In general, the couples rated their relationship quality as good, the lesbian couple better than the heterosexuals. In addition, the lesbian women with previous children assessed their relationship quality lower than did the lesbian woman without previous children. For heterosexual couples previous children did not influence their relationship quality. Higher educational levels reduced the satisfaction with the sexual relationship (P = 0.04) for treated lesbian women, and enhanced the rating of conflict resolution for treated lesbian women (P = 0.03) and their partners (P = 0.02). Heterosexual women with high levels of education expressed more satisfaction with communication in their relationship (P = 0.02) than did heterosexual women with lower educational levels. CONCLUSIONS In this Swedish study sample of lesbian and heterosexual couples' relationships, we found that they were generally well adjusted and stable in their relationships when starting treatment with donated sperm or IVF, respectively. However, where lesbian women had children from a previous relationship, it decreased relationship quality. For the heterosexual couples previous children did not affect relationship quality. PMID:22252089

Borneskog, Catrin; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta; Lampic, Claudia; Sydsjö, Gunilla

2012-01-01

384

Multiple discriminations experienced by people living with HIV in France: results from the ANRS-Vespa2 study.  

PubMed

Since the advent of AIDS, discrimination has remained at the core of the experience of people living with HIV (PLHIV). PLHIV who belong to minority groups are exposed to discrimination not only on the grounds of their HIV infection but also because of rejecting attitudes towards drug users, homosexuals and black people. This article aimed to measure the frequency of discrimination and assess its correlates among PLHIV in France. We used data from a national representative survey, the ANRS-Vespa2 study, conducted in France in 2011 among 3022 male and female HIV-positive patients followed at hospitals. Respondents answered a face-to-face questionnaire documenting their health status and living conditions. Discrimination was documented during the previous two years on the grounds of HIV infection, gender, country of birth, skin colour, sexual orientation, place of residence, and substance abuse in a variety of contexts. For each context, we performed logistic regressions on discrimination, controlling for socio-epidemiological group, age, education level and employment status. Discrimination is frequently experienced by PLHIV in France (26%), particularly when applying for a job (24%), interacting with family (11%) or seeking health services (8%). Women from sub-Saharan Africa reported the highest levels of discrimination, whereas heterosexual non-African men reported the lowest. Men who have sex with men experienced levels of discrimination that fell between those of these two groups. The major perceived reason for discrimination was HIV status (13%). Nationality, skin colour and sexual orientation were cited by 5% each, whereas gender was cited by 1% of respondents. Our analyses show that discrimination is a frequent and cross-cutting experience with differences across the various contexts and among the diverse subpopulations. The intertwining of HIV-related stigma with sexism, racism and homophobia needs to be addressed to understand why discrimination against PLHIV persists when the disease itself has greatly evolved. PMID:24738926

Marsicano, Elise; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Lert, France; Aubrière, Cindy; Spire, Bruno; Hamelin, Christine

2014-01-01

385

Gender, splitting and non-recognition in Mad Men.  

PubMed

The world of Mad Men is one in which life lived on the surface and repression dominates the scene. A superficial reading seems to suggest that the classically gendered subject-object split characterizes Mad Men: women in the series appear devoid of desire, while men possess power, sexuality and agency. But despite its blatant sexism, Mad Men's rendering has turned traditional 1960s American culture on its head. There is no subject-object split in Mad Men because men do not have access to the subject position; they, as much as women, remain objects to themselves and their partners. In the absence of mutual recognition, serotics ultimately fails. PMID:22143509

Slochower, Joyce

2011-12-01

386

Managing HIV among serodiscordant heterosexual couples: Serostatus, stigma and sex  

Microsoft Academic Search

A qualitative study was conducted with 28 men and women in HIV-serodiscordant couples to explore the management of HIV in their relationship. Content analysis of the interviews revealed the role of serostatus and stigma in shaping partners' experience of HIV, sex and risk. Partners' differing serostatus often created feelings of alienation within the relationship. Compounding this interpersonal dynamic, the HIV

A. Van Der Straten; K. A. Vernon; K. R. Knight; C. A. Gómez; N. S. Padian

1998-01-01

387

Correlates of Unprotected Vaginal or Anal Intercourse with Women among Substance-Using Men Who Have Sex with Men  

PubMed Central

The role men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) play in heterosexual HIV transmission is not well understood. We analyzed baseline data from Project MIX, a behavioral intervention study of substance-using men who have sex with men (MSM), and identified correlates of unprotected vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or both with women (UVAI). Approximately 10% (n=194) of the men reported vaginal sex, anal sex, or both with a woman; of these substance-using MSMW, 66% (129) reported UVAI. Among substance-using MSMW, multivariate analyses found unemployment relative to full/part-time employment (OR=2.28; 95% CI 1.01, 5.17), having a primary female partner relative to no primary female partner (OR=3.44; CI 1.4, 8.46), and higher levels of treatment optimism (OR=1.73; 95% CI 1.18, 2.54) increased odds of UVAI. Strong feelings of connection to a same-race gay community (OR=0.71; 95% CI 0.56, 0.91) and Viagra use (OR=0.31; 95% CI 0.10, 0.95) decreased odds of UVAI. This work suggests that although the proportion of substance-using MSM who also have sex with women is low, these men engage in unprotected sex with women, particularly with primary female partners. This work highlights the need for further research with the substance using MSMW population to inform HIV prevention interventions specifically for MSMW. PMID:23229336

Greene, Emily; Frye, Victoria; Mansergh, Gordon; Colfax, Grant N.; Hudson, Sharon M.; Flores, Stephen A.; Hoover, Donald R; Bonner, Sebastian; Koblin, Beryl A.

2013-01-01

388

School Absenteeism and Mental Health among Sexual Minority Youth and Heterosexual Youth  

PubMed Central

Adolescent school absenteeism is associated with negative outcomes such as conduct disorders, substance abuse, and dropping out of school. Mental health factors, such as depression and anxiety, have been found to be associated with increased absenteeism from school. Sexual minority youth (youth who are attracted to the same sex or endorse a gay, lesbian, or bisexual identity) are a group at risk for increased absenteeism due to fear, avoidance, and higher rates of depression and anxiety than their heterosexual peers. The present study used longitudinal data to compare sexual minority youth and heterosexual youth on excused and unexcused absences from school and to evaluate differences in the relations between depression and anxiety symptoms and school absences among sexual minority youth and heterosexual youth. A total of 108 14- to 19-years-old adolescents (71% female and 26% sexual minority) completed self-report measures of excused and unexcused absences and depression and anxiety symptoms. Compared to heterosexual youth, sexual minority youth reported more excused and unexcused absences and more depression and anxiety symptoms. Sexual minority status significantly moderated the effects of depression and anxiety symptoms on unexcused absences such that depression and anxiety symptoms were stronger predictors of unexcused absences for sexual minority youth than for heterosexual youth. The results demonstrate that sexual minority status and mental health are important factors to consider when assessing school absenteeism and when developing interventions to prevent or reduce school absenteeism among adolescents. PMID:24495493

Burton, Chad M.; Marshal, Michael P.; Chisolm, Deena J.

2014-01-01

389

The Significance of Privacy and Trust in Providing Health-Related Services to Behaviorally Bisexual Men in the United States  

PubMed Central

Previous research suggests that bisexual men face unique health concerns in comparison to their exclusively homosexual and heterosexual counterparts. However, little is known about behaviorally bisexual men’s experiences with health services, including ways of providing services that would be most appropriate to meet the health needs of this population. This study sought to understand preferences for health-related services among behaviorally bisexual men in the Midwestern United States. Using a community-based research approach, a diverse sample of 75 behaviorally bisexual men was recruited for in-depth interviews. Qualitative data were analyzed utilizing inductive coding through established team-based protocols to ensure reliability. Themes emerged involving the importance of privacy and trust when reaching, recruiting, and engaging behaviorally bisexual men in health services. Findings suggest that multifaceted approaches are needed, including those that provide relevant and confidential services while allowing for the development and ongoing maintenance of trust. PMID:22676463

Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Goncalves, Gabriel; Malebranche, David; Martinez, Omar; Reece, Michael; Rhodes, Scott D.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2012-01-01

390

Cancer--Living with Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... Half of all men and a third of women will get a diagnosis of cancer in their lifetime. Many people with cancer do survive. Millions of Americans alive today have a history of cancer. For most people with cancer, living ...

391

Nutrition for Older Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Men For Women For Seniors Nutrition for Older Men Published February 01, 2014 Print Email The Difference ... mind sharp and extend quality of life. Older men need: Calcium and Vitamin D Older adults need ...

392

Recreational Viagra Use and Sexual Risk among Drug Abusing Men.  

PubMed

Until recently, the Viagra connection to HIV was anchored in older adults. However, CDC investigation showed stability in 50+ HIV diagnoses on the heels of upward trends in risk indicators among men who have sex with men (MSM) and substance abusing populations. Signs have increasingly pointed to recreational drug use among younger populations, to which Viagra is being added to the mix. Currently, the field is still locating the substance abuse, sexual risk and age-related dimensions of Viagra misuse. Recent studies identify it primarily as substance abuse, but the majority reports a combination of risky sex and risky drug use. At the very least, Viagra appears related to the enhancement of sexual experience or performance, even when it is used to compensate for erectile dysfunction caused by other drugs-either illicit or prescribed (e.g., antidepressants and highly active antiretroviral therapy or HAART). The populations studied, however, frequently have limited the generalizability of findings. This report analyzes the relationship among Viagra, Club Drugs and HIV sexual risk behavior in drug using men with a sample diverse in sexual orientation and demographic scope. Participants were 640 males recruited from three HIV prevention programs in Los Angeles County. Mean age was 43.97 years, ranging from 18.7 to 70.3 with almost 25% over 50. Sexual orientation was 79% heterosexual, 8% bisexual and 12% gay. Racial composition was 45% white, 35% black and 19% Hispanic. NIDA's Risk Behavior Assessment and a Club Drug/Viagra addendum were used to collect socio-demographic, substance use and sexual risk data. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed along with chi-square tests of association and some t-tests. White race was a major risk factor. No age effect was found. MSM were more likely to use Viagra. Insertive anal sex was a significant co-factor among heterosexual Viagra users involved in transactional sex with women. In the overall sample and the subsets of heterosexual, MSM, younger and older men, predictive models all identified club or designer drugs as significant co-factors in the use of Viagra. Different patterns of drug co-factors were observed for each subset. We detected consistent positive associations between the use of Viagra and the use of amphetamines immediately before or during sex. Viagra use has moved into a new generational context and now complicates the sexual risk and intervention equations for all men, particularly MSM as well as more hidden subgroups. PMID:17191089

Fisher, Dennis G; Malow, Robert; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Reynolds, Grace L; Farrell, Nisha; Jaffe, Adi

2006-01-01

393

Parental monitoring, parent-adolescent communication about sex, and sexual risk among young men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Parental monitoring and parent-adolescent communication about sex protect against HIV-related sexual risk behaviors among heterosexual adolescents, but it is unknown if these findings generalize to young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Sexual orientation-specific stressors, including "coming out" to parents, complicate the family context of YMSM. We examined associations between parental monitoring, communication about sex, outness to cohabitating parents, and sexual behaviors. Ethnically diverse YMSM ages 14-19 provided cross-sectional data (n = 257). Monitoring and outness to parents interacted to predict recent same-sex unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). For YMSM who reported mixed or uncertain outness to parents, higher levels of perceived parental monitoring were associated with greater risk of UAI. Higher levels of communication about sex were associated with greater risk of UAI for YMSM out to parents. Parental monitoring and communication about sex might not protect YMSM against sexual risk in the same way they protect heterosexual youth. Future research should examine whether adapted forms of family factors could protect YMSM, and family-based HIV risk-reduction interventions for YMSM should be attuned to the unique ways family factors function within this group. PMID:24549462

Thoma, Brian C; Huebner, David M

2014-08-01

394

An Ecological Systems Comparison Between Homeless Sexual Minority Youths and Homeless Heterosexual Youths  

PubMed Central

This study examined risk and protective outcomes by comparing homeless sexual minority youths to heterosexual homeless youths regarding family, peer behaviors, school, mental health (suicide risk and depression), stigma, discrimination, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. Structured interviews (N = 147) were conducted with individuals ages 16-24 at three drop-in programs serving homeless youths in Toronto. Bivariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences between homeless sexual minorities (n=66) and their heterosexual counterparts (n=81) regarding all variables: family, peer behaviors, stigma, discrimination, mental health, substance use and sexual risk behaviors with the exception of school belonging. Specifically, homeless sexual minority youths fared more poorly (e.g. lower satisfaction with family communication, experienced more stigma, used more drugs and alcohol) than their heterosexual counterparts. Improving family communication may be a worthwhile intervention if the youths are still in contact with their families. Future research should focus on victimization in the context of multiple systems. PMID:23687399

Gattis, Maurice N.

2012-01-01

395

"I Would Just like to Be Known as an Athlete": Managing Hegemony, Femininity, and Heterosexuality in Female Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The community of sport is a powerful site for the construction of masculinity, male identities, and heterosexuality. Consequently, the increased entry of women into the sporting arena has been actively resisted, with women athletes either excluded or framed within traditional, sexualized discourses of femininity and heterosexuality. Yet Title IX…

Mean, Lindsey J.; Kassing, Jeffrey W.

2008-01-01

396

The Influence of Body Mass Index on the Physical Attractiveness Preferences of Feminist and Nonfeminist Heterosexual Women and Lesbians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined associations between lesbian and feminist identity and predictors of female physical attractiveness. Seventy-two nonfeminist heterosexuals, 38 feminist heterosexuals, 75 nonfeminist lesbians, and 33 feminist lesbians were asked to rate according to physical attractiveness a set of images of real women with known body…

Swami, Viren; Tovee, Martin J.

2006-01-01

397

Challenges Faced by Homeless Sexual Minorities: Comparison of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Homeless Adolescents With Their Heterosexual Counterparts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The goal of this study was to identify differences between gay, lesbian, bi- sexual, and transgender (GLBT) homeless youths and their heterosexual counterparts in terms of physical and mental health difficulties. Methods. A sample of 84 GLBT adolescents was matched in regard to age and self- reported gender with 84 heterosexual adolescents. The 2 samples were compared on a

Bryan N. Cochran; Angela J. Stewart; Joshua A. Ginzler; Ana Mari Cauce

2002-01-01

398

MEN 2 syndrome masquerading as MEN 1  

PubMed Central

Patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A develop medullary thyroid cancer, which is associated with poor prognosis in its metastatic stage. Hyperparathyroidism is a common finding in both MEN 1 and 2. We report a 68-year-old patient diagnosed clinically with MEN 1 based on the presence of hyperparathyroidism and pituitary Cushing’s disease with no supporting genetic evidence. The hyperparathyroidism was later found to be part of MEN 2A with underlying metastatic medullary thyroid cancer. We highlight the importance of genetic confirmation before a diagnosis of MEN 1 is made as other more serious pathologies might be overlooked. PMID:22943324

Tarek, Ezzat; Paramesawaran, Rajeev; Phillips, Ben; Sadler, Greg

2012-01-01

399

"How to Be a Rural Man": Young Men's Performances and Negotiations of Rural Masculinities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is concerned with young rural men and how they "do" identity politics living in a rural area of Norway. Focusing on how masculinity and rurality are constructed and interrelated in young men's narratives of living in a remote community, it is identified that young rural men reproduce, negotiate and transform local discourses of rural…

Bye, Linda Marie

2009-01-01

400

How lesbian and heterosexual women view relationships, sex, and virginity: explorations with a Singapore sample.  

PubMed

Thirty-eight lesbian and 38 heterosexual women in Singapore (ages 21 to 35) discussed relationships, sex, and virginity in focus groups. Views were mostly similar between the two groups, although there were differences. All participants defined relationships as romantic involvement. However, while heterosexual participants equated commitment with monogamy, lesbian participants distinguished them. All participants differentiated between having sex (for thrill and fun) and making love (for expressing love), although there were differences in the purposes of making love. Primacy of penetration was found in defining virginity loss, but for many participants, virginity was important only insofar as it indicated sexual permissiveness. PMID:24383860

Ho, Anqi; Sim, Tick Ngee

2014-01-01

401

ORIGINAL PAPER Infidelity in Heterosexual Couples: Demographic, Interpersonal,  

E-print Network

in extradyadic sexual relationships at least once in their lives(Kinsey, Pomeroy,& Martin,1948; Kinsey, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA e-mail: kpmark@indiana.edu E. Janssen The KinseyInstitute for Researchin Sex

402

"Where Have All the Good Men Gone?" Gendered Interactions in Online Dating.  

PubMed

This article explores gendered patterns of online dating and their implications for heterosexual union formation. The authors hypothesized that traditional gender norms combine with preferences for more socially desirable partners to benefit men and disadvantage women in the earliest stages of dating. They tested this with 6 months of online dating data from a mid-sized southwestern city (N = 8,259 men and 6,274 women). They found that both men and women tend to send messages to the most socially desirable alters in the dating market, regardless of their own social desirability. They also found that women who initiate contacts connect with more desirable partners than those who wait to be contacted, but women are 4 times less likely to send messages than men. They concluded that socioeconomic similarities in longer term unions result, in part, from relationship termination (i.e., nonreciprocity) rather than initial preferences for similar partners. PMID:24910472

Kreager, Derek A; Cavanagh, Shannon E; Yen, John; Yu, Mo

2014-04-01

403

“Where Have All the Good Men Gone?” Gendered Interactions in Online Dating  

PubMed Central

This article explores gendered patterns of online dating and their implications for heterosexual union formation. The authors hypothesized that traditional gender norms combine with preferences for more socially desirable partners to benefit men and disadvantage women in the earliest stages of dating. They tested this with 6 months of online dating data from a mid-sized southwestern city (N = 8,259 men and 6,274 women). They found that both men and women tend to send messages to the most socially desirable alters in the dating market, regardless of their own social desirability. They also found that women who initiate contacts connect with more desirable partners than those who wait to be contacted, but women are 4 times less likely to send messages than men. They concluded that socioeconomic similarities in longer term unions result, in part, from relationship termination (i.e., nonreciprocity) rather than initial preferences for similar partners. PMID:24910472

Kreager, Derek A.; Cavanagh, Shannon E.; Yen, John; Yu, Mo

2013-01-01

404

Children raised in fatherless families from infancy: a follow-up of children of lesbian and single heterosexual mothers at early adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: An increasing number of lesbian women and single heterosexual women are bringing up children with no male involvement. This study follows up to adolescence a sample of children raised in fatherless families from birth or early infancy. Methods: Twenty-five lesbian mother families and 38 families headed by a single heterosexual mother were compared with 38 two-parent heterosexual families. The

Fiona MacCallum; Susan Golombok

2004-01-01

405

Suicidality and Sexual Orientation: Differences Between Men and Women in a General Population-Based Sample From The Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homosexuality has been shown to be associated with suicidality and mental disorders. It is unclear whether homosexuality is\\u000a related to suicidality, independently of mental disorders. This study assessed differences in lifetime symptoms of suicidality\\u000a (death ideation, death wishes, suicide contemplation, and deliberate self-harm) between homosexual and heterosexual men and\\u000a women, controlling for lifetime psychiatric morbidity. Interaction effects of age and

Ron de Graaf; Theo G. M. Sandfort; Margreet ten Have

2006-01-01

406

Living Non-Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fill out your worksheet as you learn more about living and non-living things. 1. First take this pretest to test your knowledge of living and non living things.Beginning Quiz 2. So, you know what is alive and what is not. But why are those things alive or not? Read the information on this site to learn the 7 characteristics that make things ...

Mrs. Benson

2010-02-23

407

Willingness to Be Circumcised for Preventing HIV among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men  

PubMed Central

Abstract Male circumcision can reduce the risk of HIV acquisition among heterosexual men, but its effectiveness is uncertain in men who have sex with men (MSM). Additionally, its acceptability among Chinese men is unknown given a lack of history and cultural norms endorsing neonatal and adult circumcision. This study evaluated the willingness to participate in a clinical trial of circumcision among 328 Chinese MSM. Some 11.6% respondents reported having been circumcised, most of them due to a tight foreskin. Of 284 uncircumcised MSM, 16.9% said they were absolutely willing to participate, 26.4% were probably, 28.9% were probably not, and 27.8% were absolutely not; 81% said male circumcision would help maintain genital hygiene. The major motivators for willingness to participate included contribution to AIDS scientific research and getting free medical service. Men also had concerns about ineffectiveness of circumcision in reducing HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) risks and side effects of the surgery. Those who did not have a Beijing resident card (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17–3.38), did not find sexual partners through the Internet (AOR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.21–3.75), and were not concerned about the effectiveness of circumcision (AOR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.34–4.19) were more likely to be willing to participate in a trial. The study suggests that circumcision is uncommon among Chinese MSM. Considerable community education will be needed in circumcision advocacy among MSM in China. A clinical trial for efficacy among MSM should be considered. PMID:19335172

Ruan, Yuhua; Qian, Han-Zhu; Li, Dongliang; Shi, Wei; Li, Qingchun; Liang, Hongyuan; Yang, Ye; Luo, Fengji; Vermund, Sten H.

2009-01-01

408

Can an asymptomatic screening pathway for men who have sex with men be introduced safely at a level 3 sexual health service in the UK?  

PubMed

Summary To manage the rising demand on sexual health services in the UK, many clinics have introduced asymptomatic screening pathways for heterosexuals, which omit examination. In men who have sex with men however the screening of extragenital sites poses additional challenges. This study aimed to establish whether omitting examination of asymptomatic men who have sex with men would lead to clinically significant diagnoses being missed. The notes of all men who have sex with men who attended a UK level 3 sexual health clinic between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Exclusion criteria included HIV-positive patients attending for HIV-related care, attendances for follow-up consultations not requiring a full sexual health screen, symptomatic patients, contacts of sexually transmitted infections and patients requesting an examination or a repeat prescription of a regularly used medication. In all, 920 consultations occurred during 12 months, of which 893 were reviewed; 476 (53.3%) consultations would have been eligible for screening on an asymptomatic pathway and, of these, 21 (4.4%) had abnormalities found at examination. Findings included genital warts, minor dermatological conditions and three cases of minor asymptomatic urological conditions. There were no clinically significant findings on examination of asymptomatic men who have sex with men requiring treatment, indicating that examination in this cohort may be of little benefit. PMID:24810213

Collister, Alex; Bains, Manroop; Jackson, Rachel; Clarke, Emily; Patel, Raj

2015-03-01

409

Sexual Stigma, Psychological Well-Being and Social Engagement among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beirut, Lebanon  

PubMed Central

This qualitative study sought to explore the sexual identity development of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beirut, the stigma experienced by these men, and how their psychological well-being and social engagement are shaped by how they cope with this stigma. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 31 MSM, and content analysis was used to identify emergent themes. While many men reported feeling very comfortable with their sexual orientation and had disclosed their sexual orientation to family, most men struggled at least somewhat with their sexuality, often because of perceived stigma from others and internal religious conflict about the immorality of homosexuality. Most participants described experiencing verbal harassment or ridicule, or being treated as different or lesser than in social relationships with friends or family. Mechanisms for coping with stigma included social avoidance (trying to pass as heterosexual; limiting interaction with MSM to the internet) or withdrawal from relationships in an attempt to limit exposure to stigma. Our findings suggest that effective coping with both internal and external sexual stigma is central to the psychological well-being and social engagement of MSM in Beirut, much like what has been found in Western gay communities. PMID:23730919

Wagner, Glenn J.; Aunon, Frances M.; Kaplan, Rachel L.; Karam, Rita; Khouri, Danielle; Tohme, Johnny; Mokhbat, Jacques

2013-01-01

410

Male gender role strain as a barrier to African American men’s physical activity  

PubMed Central

Despite the potential health consequences, African American men tend to treat their roles as providers, fathers, spouses, and community members as more important than engaging in health behaviors such as physical activity. We conducted 14 exploratory focus groups with 105 urban, middle-aged African American men from the Midwest to examine factors that influence their health behaviors. Thematic content analysis revealed three interrelated barriers to physical activity: (a) work, family, and community commitments and priorities limited time and motivation for engaging in physical activity; (b) physical activity was not a normative individual or social activity and contributed to men prioritizing work and family responsibilities over physical activity; and (c) the effort men exerted in seeking to fulfill the provider role limited their motivation and energy to engage in physical activity. These findings highlight the need for physical activity interventions that consider how health fits in the context of men’s overall lives. PMID:21632436

Griffith, Derek M.; Gunter, Katie; Allen, Julie Ober

2015-01-01

411

[Reproductive options for people living with HIV: 2013 guidelines from the French expert working group].  

PubMed

The desire for children is a legitimate aspiration that should be part of multidisciplinary care for all men, women or couples living with HIV. The use of effective antiretroviral therapy has revolutionized the prevention of sexual, as well as mother-to-child HIV transmission. When the HIV plasma viral load is undetectable on long-term antiretroviral therapy, the risk of mother-to-child transmission is <1% and the risk of heterosexual HIV transmission without condom use in a stable relationship is very low (estimated at less than 1/10,000) in the absence of inflammation of the genital tract. In a man with a long-term undetectable viral load, viral shedding in semen is uncommon, but may occur persistently or intermittently. The same appears true of viral shedding in the vaginal tract of women. Reproductive options are: natural conception, self-insemination when the woman is HIV-infected, assisted reproduction. Natural conception is now considered to be an acceptable option when the conditions are met, after exploring four aspects: (1) virological (viral load undetectable sustained for at least 6 months on therapy), (2) genital (absence of genital infections or lesions), (3) fertility (after appropriate evaluation) and (4) detecting the ovulation period to limit intercourse without condoms. Assisted reproduction has two objectives in the context of HIV, to allow the couple to conceive without abandoning condom use and/or to treat infertility. PMID:24969954

Mandelbrot, L; Berrebi, A; Rouzioux, C; Partisani, M; Faucher, P; Tubiana, R; Matheron, S; Bujan, L; Morlat, P

2014-01-01

412

Illicit Drug Use in a Community-Based Sample of Heterosexually Identified Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study we assess lifetime and recent drug use patterns among 261 heterosexually identified 18- to 25-year-olds through brief street intercept surveys conducted in New York City. Marijuana, hallucinogens, powder cocaine, and ecstasy were the most frequently reported drugs for both lifetime and recent use. Findings further suggest significant…

Halkitis, Perry N.; Manasse, Ashley N.; McCready, Karen C.

2010-01-01

413

Predictors of feminist activism among sexual-minority and heterosexual college women.  

PubMed

Engagement in activism is related to several aspects of social development in adolescence and emerging adulthood. Therefore, it is important to examine the correlates of different forms of activism, such as feminist collective action, among all youth. However, previous research has not investigated young sexual-minority women's engagement with feminist collective action. This study examined predictors of college-aged heterosexual and sexual-minority women's commitment to and participation in feminist activism. Sexual orientation, number of years in college, social support, experiences with discrimination, and gender identity were tested as predictors of commitment to and participation in feminist activism with a sample of 280 college-aged women (173 heterosexuals and 107 sexual minorities). Similar predictors were related to both commitment to and participation in feminist activism. However, for sexual-minority women, but not heterosexual women, the number of years in college was correlated with participation in feminist activism. Young sexual-minority women reported more participation in feminist activism than did heterosexual women, even after controlling for social support, discrimination, and gender identity. PMID:24175889

Friedman, Carly K; Ayres, Melanie

2013-01-01

414

Who is a homosexual? A critique of the heterosexual?homosexual dimension  

Microsoft Academic Search

The heterosexual?homosexual distinction as a construction inhibits appreciation of the diversity of sexual experience by encouraging use of static labels to classify people's continually evolving sexual histories. Distinguishing sexual preference may expedite comprehension of sexual acts, but is counterproductive when considering whole persons. We question the need for biological explanations of homosexuality and propose that “coming out” as homosexual is

Franz R. Epting; Jonathan D. Raskin; Timothy B. Burke

1994-01-01

415

Heterosexual Male Perpetrators of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Preliminary Neuropsychiatric Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents data from a series of prelimary neuropsychiatric studies, including neuropsychological, personality, sexual history, plethysmographic and neuroimaging investigations, on a sample of 22 male, heterosexual, nonexclusive pedophiles and 24 demographically similar healthy controls. A psychobiological model of pedophilia is proposed, positing that early childhood sexual abuse leads to neurodevelopmental abnormalities in the temporal regions mediating sexual arousal and

Lisa J. Cohen; Konstantin Nikiforov; Sniezyna Gans; Olga Poznansky; Pamela McGeoch; Carrie Weaver; Enid Gertmanian King; Ken Cullen; Igor Galynker

2002-01-01

416

HIV risk behavior and drug use among heterosexual male crack users by prostitution involvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crack and prostitution, or sex exchange, have been linked to the heterosexual spread of HIV (e.g. Inciardi 1993, 1995). Previous studies have found that among female crack users there are subgroups who do and do not become involved in prostitution (e.g. Logan, Farabee & Leukefeld 1998; Logan & Leukefeld 1998). However, there has been little focus in the literature on

Carl Leukefeld

1999-01-01

417

Perceived Parenting Skill Across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood Among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little research has examined change in perceived parenting skill across the transition to parenthood or predictors of change in perceived skill. The current study used an ecological framework to examine predictors of self-perceived parenting skill among 47 lesbian, 31 gay, and 56 heterosexual couples who were adopting their first child. Findings revealed that, on average, all new parents perceived themselves

Abbie E. Goldberg; JuliAnna Z. Smith

2009-01-01

418

“That's so gay”: Language Use and Antigay Bias Among Heterosexual College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the word “gay” to refer to something that is “boring” is part of American slang, and heterosexual males commonly call one another a “fag.” The responses of 767 college students were analyzed to explore how this language relates to antigay bias. Results of multiple regression explained 14.8% of the variance for believing that “it's no big deal” to call

Jill M. Chonody; Scott Edward Rutledge; Scott Smith

2012-01-01

419

Rural Adolescent Boys' Negotiating Heterosexual Romantic Relationships: "We Need to Sacrifice Our Brains"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty-four adolescent boys in Grades 9 to 12 in a rural New Brunswick high school engaged in focused discussions that were analyzed using grounded theory to determine their heterosexual dating relationship processes. A theory was created from exchange transcriptions. The core category was "wrestling with gendered expectations,"…

Dmytro, Dana; Luft, Toupey; Jenkins, Melissa; Hoard, Ryan; Cameron, Catherine Ann

2013-01-01

420

Heterosexual College Student Sexual Experiences, Feminist Identity, and Attitudes Toward LGBT Individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although sexual experiences among college students have been well documented, few studies have explored how sexual activity may be related to attitudes concerning sex and sexuality. Limited research suggests there may be an important relationship between sexual experiences, feminist self-identification, and supportive attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Using a college sample of heterosexual students (n =

Meredith G. F. Worthen

2012-01-01

421

Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples in Open Adoption Arrangements: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little research has attended to the role of gender and sexual orientation in shaping open adoption dynamics. This qualitative, longitudinal study of 45 adoptive couples (15 lesbian, 15 gay, and 15 heterosexual couples) examined adopters' motivations for open adoption, changes in attitudes about openness, and early relationship dynamics. Key…

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Kinkler, Lori A.; Richardson, Hannah B.; Downing, Jordan B.

2011-01-01

422

Coparenting among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples: Associations with Adopted Children's Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coparenting is associated with child behavior in families with heterosexual parents, but less is known about coparenting among lesbian- and gay-parent families. Associations were studied among self-reported divisions of labor, coparenting observations, and child adjustment ("M[subscript age]" = 3 years) among 104 adoptive families headed…

Farr, Rachel H.; Patterson, Charlotte J.

2013-01-01

423

Gender stereotypes and normative heterosexuality in matrimonial ads from globalizing India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Matrimonial ads serve as unobtrusive sites to observe the construction and perpetuation of normative heterosexuality through socio-cultural discourses. The current study focuses on gendered spousal expectations and sex role preferences in 1065 matrimonial ads from two popular newspapers in India. Gender differences in ad type, financial stability, physical attractiveness, fairness, slimness, personality traits, and occupational preferences were examined. Results found

Srividya Ramasubramanian; Parul Jain

2009-01-01

424

Heterosexuals' Attitudes Toward Hate Crimes and Hate Speech Against Gays and Lesbians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern racism and sexism have been studied to examine the different ways that prejudice can be expressed; yet, little attention has been given to modern heterosexism. This study examined the extent to which modern heterosexism and old-fashioned heterosexism predict acceptance of hate crimes against gays and lesbians and perceptions of hate speech. Male (n= 74) and female (n= 95) heterosexual

Gloria Cowan; Becky Heiple; Carolyn Marquez; Désirée Khatchadourian; Michelle McNevin

2005-01-01

425

Moving (in) the Heterosexual Matrix. On Heteronormativity in Secondary School Physical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Studies on heteronormativity in PE either appear to have explored the experiences of and conditions for non-heterosexual students, or adopt a retrospective point of view. Further, the relation between heteronormativity and movement and how movement activities embody social norms and values related to gender and sexuality has not been…

Larsson, Hakan; Redelius, Karin; Fagrell, Birgitta

2011-01-01

426

Lesbians Choosing Motherhood: A Comparative Study of Lesbian and Heterosexual Parents and Their Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared 15 lesbian couples, and the children born to them through donor insemination, with 15 heterosexual-parent families. Assessment measures evaluated the children's cognitive functioning and behavioral adjustment and the parents' relationship quality and parenting skills. Found no significant differences between the two groups of children.…

Flaks, David K.; And Others

1995-01-01

427

Perceptions of sexual coercion in heterosexual dating relationships: The role of aggressor gender and tactics  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large body of research has found a concerning prevalence rate of sexual coercion in heterosexual college student dating relationships; however, little research has examined how college students perceive and interpret these behaviors. In this study we examined the impact of initiator gender and sexually coercive strategy (verbal pressure, purposeful intoxication, physical force, or control\\/mutual consent) on perceptions of the

Debra L. Oswald; Brenda L. Russell

2006-01-01

428

Bullying Explains Only Part of LGBTQ-Heterosexual Risk Disparities: Implications for Policy and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) experience higher rates of victimization by bullying than do their heterosexual-identified peers. In this article, we investigate the extent to which this difference in rates of victimization can explain LGBTQ youths' greater rates of suicidal ideation, suicide…

Robinson, Joseph P.; Espelage, Dorothy L.

2012-01-01

429

Emotion Regulation and Internalizing Symptoms in a Longitudinal Study of Sexual Minority and Heterosexual Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Sexual minority adolescents appear to be at increased risk for internalizing disorders relative to their heterosexual peers, but there is a paucity of research explaining this elevated risk. Emotion regulation deficits are increasingly understood as important predictors of internalizing psychopathology among general samples of…

Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

2008-01-01

430

Suicidality and Associated Risk Factors among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Compared to Heterosexual Austrian Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the first study in German-speaking countries to compare the suicidality of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults (n = 358) with matched heterosexual adults (n = 267). The former had significantly elevated incidences of current suicide ideation (28% vs. 13%) and lifetime suicide attempts defined in three ways (14% vs. 1% to 10% vs. 2%),…

Ploderl, Martin; Fartacek, Reinhold

2005-01-01

431

Brief Report: Activities in Heterosexual Romantic Relationships--Grade Differences and Associations with Relationship Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whereas much research addresses relations of youths' heterosexual romantic relationships with sexual and/or delinquent activities, less attention has been paid to youths' more normative, day-to-day activities with romantic partners. This gap in the literature is problematic given that these activities define the substance of the relationships and…

Carlson, Wendy; Rose, Amanda J.

2012-01-01

432

Parental relationships and early social experiences of activist male homosexuals and male heterosexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared questionnaire data from a sample of 88 young activist male homosexuals and a control sample of 105 male heterosexuals on variables relating to parental relationships and early social experiences. Samples were similar with respect to age, father's occupation, and religion. Results indicate that the homosexuals came from families in which the mothers were more dominant and affectionate than the

Walter G. Stephan

1973-01-01

433

The occupational status of partnered lesbians, compared to married women and heterosexual cohabiting women  

E-print Network

................................................................... 24 Definition of the Dependent Variable ............................................ 25 Method 36 28 Duncan?s SEI (Socioeconomic Index) ........................................... 27 Nam-Powers-Boyd Occupational Score... Sociological Review. 2 For example, if lesbians indeed tend to be employed in higher socioeconomic occupations and higher paid jobs, then there would be no question that they would have a wage advantage compared to heterosexual women. Researchers...

Lin, Chin-Huei

2009-05-15

434

Normal Variations in Personality are Associated with Coital Orgasmic Infrequency in Heterosexual Women  

E-print Network

the TwinsUK registry completed questionnaires relating to personality and sexual behavior. Personality; Orgasm; Frequency; Personality; Twins Introduction Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is used as an umbrellaNormal Variations in Personality are Associated with Coital Orgasmic Infrequency in Heterosexual

435

Observation as Good as Surgery for Some Men with Prostate Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Results from the PIVOT trial showed that some men diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer who forego radical prostatectomy may live as long as men who have immediate surgery. This article explores how the findings may affect clinical practice.

436

Development of Muscularity and Weight Concerns in Heterosexual and Sexual Minority Males  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the development of muscularity and weight concerns among heterosexual and sexual minority males in adolescence. Method Participants were 5,868 males from the Growing Up Today Study, a US prospective cohort spanning ages 9–25 years. Generalized estimating equations were used to test sexual orientation differences in the development of muscularity concerns, weight gain attempts, and weight and shape concern. Results Desire for bigger muscles increased slightly each year across adolescence (? =.10, 95% C.I.= .09, .11) regardless of sexual orientation, but gay and bisexual participants reported greater desire for toned muscles than completely and mostly heterosexual males (?=.39, 95% C.I.=.21, .57). Desire for toned muscles did not change with age. Attempts to gain weight increased three-fold across adolescence, with up to 30% reporting weight gain attempts by age 16. Although underweight males (the smallest weight status class) were most likely to attempt to gain weight, most of the observed weight gain attempts were by healthy (69%) and overweight/obese (27%) males, suggesting that most attempts were medically unnecessary and could lead to overweight. Sexual minority participants were 20% less likely to report weight gain attempts than completely heterosexual participants. Weight and shape concern increased with age, with gay and bisexual participants experiencing a significantly greater increase than heterosexual males. Conclusions Sexual orientation modifies the development and expression of male weight and muscularity concerns. The findings have implications for early interventions for the prevention of obesity and eating disorder risk in heterosexual and sexual minority males. PMID:23316852

Calzo, Jerel P.; Corliss, Heather L.; Blood, Emily A.; Field, Alison E.; Austin, S. Bryn

2013-01-01

437

Seroprevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type 6 and 16 Vary by Anatomic Site of HPV Infection in Men  

PubMed Central

Background It is largely unknown if anti-HPV serum antibody responses vary by anatomic site of infection in men. Methods This study assessed type-specific anti-HPV serum antibody prevalence associated with corresponding HPV DNA detection in the external genitalia and the anal canal of 1587 heterosexual men and 199 men who have sex with men (MSM). Results We observed that HPV 6 and 16 seroprevalence was higher in the presence of same HPV type infection in the anal canal compared to the presence in the external genitalia only, and among MSM compared to heterosexual men. Seropositivity to HPV 6 was strongly associated with HPV 6 DNA detection in the anal canal but not in the external genitalia alone among both heterosexual men (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio (APR), anal+/genital+ vs. anal-/genital-: 4.2 [95% CI: 11.7-10.5]; anal+/genital- vs. anal-/genital-: 7.9 [95% CI: 3.7-17.0]) and MSM (APR, anal+/genital+ vs. anal-/genital-: 5.6 [95% CI: 2.7-11.9]; anal+/genital- vs. anal-/genital-: 3.2 [95% CI: 2.1-4.9]). Similar associations between seropositivity to HPV 16 and anal HPV 16 DNA detection were only observed in MSM (anal+/genital+ vs. anal-/genital-: 3.1 [95% CI: 2.0-5.0]; anal+/genital- vs. anal-/genital-: 2.2 [95% CI: 1.3-3.5]). Conclusion Our data demonstrated that seroprevalence varied by anatomic site of HPV infection, suggesting differences in epithelium type present at these anatomic sites may be relevant. Impact Our finding is instrumental in advancing our understanding of immune mechanism involved in anatomic site-specific antibody response. PMID:22761306

Lu, Beibei; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Wu, Yougui; Nyitray, Alan G.; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; da Silva, Roberto J. Carvalho; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Quiterio, Manuel; Salmerón, Jorge; Smith, Danelle C.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary; Giuliano, Anna R.

2012-01-01

438

Self-identified heterosexual clients in substance abuse treatment with a history of same-gender sexual contact.  

PubMed

There is virtually no literature concerning the experiences of self-identified heterosexual clients in substance abuse treatment who have a history of same-gender sexual contact (HSGS). In a U.S. urban inpatient program in 2009-2010, 99 HSGS clients were compared to 681 other heterosexual and 86 lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients regarding background factors, program completion rates, and feelings about treatment. Male HSGS participants had lower completion rates than other male heterosexual participants. Qualitative data indicated that most male HSGS participants experienced difficult emotions regarding same-gender sexual encounters, particularly those involving trading sex for money or drugs. Implications for treatment are discussed. PMID:25364839

Senreich, Evan

2015-04-01

439

Feminist gerontology and old men.  

PubMed

This article outlines feminist gerontology and shows how its focus on power relations lends insight into the lives of those people disadvantaged by them as well as the people privileged by social inequalities. To illustrate the latter, I discuss how feminist gerontology might examine old men, using the topic of health as an example. For instance, arrangements that maintain privilege in young adulthood and middle age can lead to poor health in old age. These practices of masculinity include physical risk in competition with other men, neglect of social networks and medical care, and avoidance of any self-report of emotional strain. However, with its focus on diversity, feminist gerontology also emphasizes that experiences of manhood, aging, and health vary by one's location in a network of inequalities. PMID:15576861

Calasanti, Toni

2004-11-01

440

Gender differences in desire discrepancy as a predictor of sexual and relationship satisfaction in a college sample of heterosexual romantic relationships.  

PubMed

The authors examined desire discrepancy and its effect on sexual and relationship satisfaction in a sample of 133 heterosexual couples attending a midsize university. Couples were required to be in a relationship for at least 1 year (M = 4.32 years, SD = 3.13 years); 23.7% of the couples were cohabitating. Hierarchical multiple regression results indicated that higher desire discrepancy scores significantly predicted women's (but not men's) lower sexual satisfaction after controlling for relationship satisfaction. Higher desire discrepancy scores significantly predicted men's (but not women's) lower relationship satisfaction after controlling for sexual satisfaction. The authors assessed gender differences using a mixed model with the dyad and gender as factors and satisfaction as the outcome. Although gender difference patterns appeared in the regression models, the differences were nonsignificant within each couple in the extent to which desire discrepancy affected sexual and relationship satisfaction. These findings suggest moving away from focusing on only one partner with low desire and shifting attention to the dyad's interaction. Also, the way in which desire discrepancy affects sexual and relationship satisfaction deserves consideration. Therapeutic implications and study limitations are discussed. PMID:22390532

Mark, Kristen P; Murray, Sarah H

2012-01-01

441

Men and IC  

MedlinePLUS

Men & IC Interstitial cystitis (IC) affects both women and men—and both girls and boys. Though IC has traditionally ... or prostate enlargement. Is it CP/CPPS or IC? CP/CPPS is a relatively new term used ...