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1

‘Waiting at the dinner table for scraps’: a qualitative study of the help-seeking experiences of heterosexual men living with HIV infection  

PubMed Central

Objectives To characterise the help-seeking experiences of heterosexual men living with HIV infection and explain these experiences in relation to the broader social relations and discourses in which they are embedded. Design Qualitative study using focus groups and theoretically informed constructionist grounded theory. Setting With one exception, focus groups were conducted in the offices of community-based AIDS service organisations across Ontario, Canada. Participants 40 HIV-infected heterosexual men aged 18?years or older. Results Heterosexual men living with HIV perceive themselves to be relegated to the margins of a health care and service field that was developed historically within a context that privileges the priorities of gay men and heterosexual women living with the virus. Specifically, gay men are better positioned than heterosexual men when vying for the services and recognition of AIDS service organisations due to their social capital within these agencies, thereby benefiting by virtue of their membership with the group perceived to control the decision-making apparatuses when resource allocation and programme development are at stake. Relative to women, heterosexual men are poorly positioned due to their negative symbolic capital, derived from being perceived as the ‘guilty’ parties in the context of heterosexual HIV transmission. As a result, the material and support needs of women have been prioritised, while those of heterosexual men living with HIV remain largely unaddressed. Conclusions Heterosexual men living with HIV are operating within a health and service field that has not kept pace with their increased representation among the population of persons living with the virus. Researchers, clinicians and policy makers should strive to integrate heterosexual men living with HIV in decision making and community-based research initiatives that build capacity among this group while simultaneously generating a research and policy agenda specific to the concerns of this growing demographic. PMID:22805006

Loutfy, Mona R; Glazier, Richard H; Strike, Carol

2012-01-01

2

Understanding heterosexual condom use among homeless men.  

PubMed

This study uses an event-based approach to examine individual, relationship, and contextual correlates of heterosexual condom use among homeless men. Structured interviews were conducted with a predominantly African American sample of 305 men recruited from meal lines in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Men reported on their most recent heterosexual event involving vaginal or anal intercourse. Adjusting for demographic characteristics only, condom use was more likely when men had higher condom use self-efficacy, greater HIV knowledge, or talked to their partner about condoms prior to sex. Condom use was less likely when men held more negative attitudes towards condoms, the partner was considered to be a primary/serious partner, hard drug use preceded sex, or sex occurred in a public setting. Condom attitudes, self-efficacy, partner type, and communication were the strongest predictors of condom use in a multivariate model that included all of the above-mentioned factors. Associations of unprotected sex with hard drug use prior to sex and having sex in public settings could be accounted for by lower condom self-efficacy and/or less positive condom attitudes among men having sex under these conditions. Results suggest that it may be promising to adapt existing, evidence-based IMB interventions for delivery in non-traditional settings that are frequented by men experiencing homelessness to achieve HIV risk reduction and thus reduce a significant point of disparity for the largely African American population of homeless men. PMID:22392155

Tucker, Joan S; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Ewing, Brett; Wertheimer, Samuel

2013-06-01

3

Vibrator Use Among Heterosexual Men Varies by Partnership Status: Results From a Nationally Representative Study in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

This nationally representative study documents that vibrator use among heterosexually identified men in the United States is common, with 43.8% reporting use of a vibrator at some point in their lives, with most vibrator use by heterosexual men occurring within the context of sexual interactions with a female partner. Approximately 94% of male vibrator users reported that they had used

Michael Reece; Debby Herbenick; Brian Dodge; Stephanie A. Sanders; Annahita Ghassemi; J. Dennis Fortenberry

2010-01-01

4

Recollections of Sexual Socialisation among Marginalised Heterosexual Black Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the sexual socialisation process of marginalised, drug-using heterosexual black men, focusing primarily on the sources and content of sexual information. Analysing qualitative interview data, we discovered that the men in our sample both learn about sex and become sexually active at an early age. They most often learn about…

Dunlap, Eloise; Benoit, Ellen; Graves, Jennifer L.

2013-01-01

5

Neighborhood context and Black heterosexual men's sexual HIV risk behaviors.  

PubMed

The effects of neighborhood context on sexual risk behavior are understudied, particularly for Black heterosexual men who do not inject drugs or report heavy drug use. Evidence of a generalized HIV epidemic (>1 %) among Black heterosexuals in low-income urban U.S. communities underscores the importance of examining the effects of neighborhood context on Black heterosexual men's sexual risk, however. We used structural equation modeling to test the pathways between neighborhood context (neighborhood disorder, personal violence, neighborhood threats), depression, substance use, and sexual risk behavior. Participants were 526 self-identified Black heterosexual men, ages 18-45, recruited via randomized venue-based probability sampling in Philadelphia, PA. Analyses of model fit statistics from Mplus indicated statistically significant direct pathways between neighborhood context, depression, substance use, and sexual risk behavior. The total indirect effect of neighborhood context on sexual risk behavior through substance use was also significant. The study's results highlight a need for more research on neighborhood context and sexual HIV risk, and for multilevel interventions to address the effects of negative neighborhood context on Black heterosexual men's sexual HIV risk. PMID:24906531

Bowleg, Lisa; Neilands, Torsten B; Tabb, Loni Philip; Burkholder, Gary J; Malebranche, David J; Tschann, Jeanne M

2014-11-01

6

Recollections of sexual socialisation among marginalised heterosexual black men  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the sexual socialisation process of marginalised, drug-using heterosexual black men, focusing primarily on the sources and content of sexual information. Analysing qualitative interview data, we discovered that the men in our sample both learn about sex and become sexually active at an early age. They most often learn about sex from the media and least often learn about sex from family members. The content of sexual information varies in specifics, but overall tends to equate sex with pleasure, encourage sexual activity with multiple partners, and emphasise using protection. Our goal is to use this data to better understand how sexual socialisation contributes to the prevalence of multiple sexual partners and high rates of HIV among heterosexual black men in order to inform future risk-reduction intervention programmes. PMID:24482611

Dunlap, Eloise; Benoit, Ellen; Graves, Jennifer L.

2013-01-01

7

Knowing is not enough: a qualitative report on HIV testing among heterosexual African-American men.  

PubMed

Despite having higher rates of HIV testing than all other racial groups, African-Americans continue to be disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic in the United States. Knowing one's status is the key step to maintaining behavioral changes that could stop the spread of the virus, yet little is known about the individual- and socio-structural-level barriers associated with HIV testing and communication among heterosexual African-American men. To address this and inform the development of an HIV prevention behavioral intervention for heterosexual African-American men, we conducted computerized, structured interviews with 61 men, focus group interviews with 25 men in 5 different groups, and in-depth qualitative interviews with 30 men living in high HIV prevalence neighborhoods in New York City. Results revealed that HIV testing was frequent among the participants. Even with high rates of testing, the men in the study had low levels of HIV knowledge; perceived little risk of HIV; and misused HIV testing as a prevention method. Factors affecting HIV testing, included stigma, relationship dynamics and communication, and societal influences, suggesting that fear, low perception of risk, and HIV stigma may be the biggest barriers to HIV testing. These results also suggest that interventions directed toward African-American heterosexual men must address the use of "testing as prevention" as well as correct misunderstandings of the window period and the meaning of HIV test results, and interventions should focus on communicating about HIV. PMID:25298014

Bond, Keosha T; Frye, Victoria; Taylor, Raekiela; Williams, Kim; Bonner, Sebastian; Lucy, Debbie; Cupid, Malik; Weiss, Linda; Koblin, Beryl A

2015-02-01

8

Maintaining a heterosexual identity: sexual meanings among a sample of heterosexually identified men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Heterosexually identified men who have sex with men are an understudied group for whom there is little knowledge of the social and sexual meanings of their same-sex encounters. This study employed qualitative methods to better understand the maintenance of a heterosexual identity in the face of discordant sexual behaviors. Open-ended, in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 heterosexually identified men (M age, 39.85 years) who reported at least one sexual encounter with a male in the previous year but not more than one sexual encounter per month with a male. Of the participants, 61.9% were African American/black, 28.6% were currently married, 71.4% reported current substance use, and 57.1% were HIV infected. Participants did not consider their same-sex activities as discrepant with their heterosexual identity as these activities were coded as infrequent, recreational, accidental, or an economic necessity. They avoided intimacy by depersonalizing male sexual partners, limiting gestures (e.g., kissing, hugging, eye contact, conversation), and by distancing themselves from gay-identified venues. Participants transferred responsibility for their same-sex sexual activities by blaming external factors, such as a fight with their wife or substance use, for the sexual encounters. Despite their ability to compartmentalize these sexual encounters, many participants expressed guilt and shame when discussing their same sex experiences. PMID:19030977

Reback, Cathy J; Larkins, Sherry

2010-06-01

9

Heterosexually Active Men's Beliefs About Methods For Preventing Sexually Transmitted Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

CONTEXT: Most research on heterosexual transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) has fo- cused on women. However, heterosexual transmission of STDs cannot be prevented without a better understanding of men's, as well as women's, sexual beliefs and behaviors. METHODS: Heterosexually active men's beliefs about four methods of STD prevention—abstinence, mutual monogamy, use of male condoms and use

Mary Rogers Gillmore; Sorrel Stielstra; Bu Huang; Sharon A. Baker; Blair Beadnell; Diane M. Morrison

2003-01-01

10

Emotional reactions of heterosexual men to gay imagery.  

PubMed

Studies of homonegativity in the general population typically use scales to examine the attitudes of a heterosexual sample toward gay men and lesbian women. However, these scales fail to address that accepting gay and lesbian people in theory is not tantamount to accepting the sexual practices engaged in by gay and lesbian people. As a result, relying on homonegativity scales and hypothetical scenarios (i.e., asking a participant to imagine a gay man or lesbian woman from personality characteristics provided) may not offer a complete view of the complexities of homonegativity. To explore this possibility, 83 men self-identifying as either largely or exclusively heterosexual rated one of three groups of images (romantic gay, erotic gay, and control) on the basis of five questions related to their emotional responses. A psychometrically sound homonegativity scale was also completed. Results indicated that homonegativity was a significant predictor of decreased happiness, anger, disgust, task enjoyment, and reported liking of the imagery. Furthermore, homonegativity was found to moderate the association between exposure to the romantic images and four of the five emotional responses (happiness, anger, disgust, and liking). Exposure to the set of erotic gay images, however, was associated with negative emotional responses, regardless of participants' self-reported level of homonegativity (i.e., overt homonegativity possessed less moderational power for this type of imagery). These findings suggest that standard scales of homonegative attitudes may be unable to capture the affective negativity that heterosexual men experience when viewing gay male intimacy. PMID:25153351

Bishop, Cj

2015-01-01

11

Heterosexuals' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men: Correlates and gender differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the basis for differences among heterosexuals in their reactions to gay people, with special emphasis on the issue of gender differences. Three studies conducted with students at six different universities revealed a consistent tendency for heterosexual males to express more hostile attitudes than heterosexual females, especially toward gay men. The same social psychological variables appear to underlie

Gregory M. Herek

1988-01-01

12

Age and Embodied Masculinities: Mid-Life Gay and Heterosexual Men Talk about their Bodies  

PubMed Central

This article integrates critical gerontology and masculinities theories to examine how midlife gay and heterosexual men experience their bodies in relation to cultural discourses of aging. Analyses of in-depth interviews with 15 gay and 15 heterosexual men ages 40–60 reveal that while both groups of men describe their bodies as deteriorating or declining in terms of functionality and are often distressed by these changes, midlife gay men also articulate a concern with a perceived decline in bodily appearance. Both gay and heterosexual midlife men frame their bodies as fundamentally different from women’s, possibly in an attempt to protect a masculine identity in response to the threat that aging bodies pose to that identity. We argue that midlife men’s embodied experiences are shaped by a discourse of midlife decline as well as inequalities between gay and heterosexual men. We also discuss the implications of embodiment for midlife men’s well-being. PMID:23849420

Lodge, Amy C.; Umberson, Debra

2013-01-01

13

Heterosexual anal intercourse among men in Long Beach, California.  

PubMed

Anal intercourse poses a greater risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission than vaginal intercourse, and in recent years there has been a growing understanding that heterosexual anal intercourse (HAI) is not uncommon. However, the majority of the anal intercourse literature has focused on men who have sex with men. The little research on HAI has mostly looked at women, with limited work among men. This analysis examined the association between HAI and high-risk behaviors (N = 1,622) and sexual sensation seeking (N = 239) in a sample of men recruited from 2001 to 2012 in Long Beach, California. Almost half of the sample was non-Hispanic Black. The median age was 42 years, 42% were homeless, and 20% reported recent HAI. Men who reported HAI were likely to be Hispanic, were likely to be homeless, had a male partner, engaged in sex exchange, and used cocaine or amphetamines during sex. Men who reported HAI scored higher on the Sexual Sensation Seeking scale. This research supports other work showing the relationship between HAI and high-risk behaviors. More important, it contributes new knowledge by demonstrating the association between HAI and sexual sensation seeking. This research highlights the importance of personality traits when trying to understand sexual behavior and when developing HIV prevention interventions. PMID:24024565

Hess, Kristen L; Reynolds, Grace L; Fisher, Dennis G

2014-01-01

14

The relationship of homophobia to intimacy in heterosexual men.  

PubMed

Interpersonal intimacy is more difficult to achieve for American men than women. Research has shown that men disclose less, have fewer close friendships, and are viewed by their wives as low in intimacy. Among the barriers to intimacy among men, Tognoli (1980) suggested that homophobia is the most powerful. The present study tested this idea by asking men to disclose a personal secret to either a male confidant, a female confidante, or by writing the secret. It was expected that the presence of a male confidant would stimulate homophobic feelings and inhibit disclosure, while the other two conditions would result in more personal disclosure. A correlation between intimacy of disclosure and level of homophobia was also expected. Subjects were 75 heterosexual men, 31 to 50 years of age, randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. They also completed the Miller Social Intimacy Scale, the Jourard Self-Disclosure Questionnaire, the Index of Homophobia, and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale. Results showed that homophobia was inversely related to level of social intimacy. There was some indication that homophobia does relate to less intimate disclosure to other males. Thus this study found some support for the idea that homophobia is an obstacle to intimacy for men. PMID:9210011

Monroe, M; Baker, R C; Roll, S

1997-01-01

15

‘Tits and ass and porn and fighting’Male heterosexuality in magazines for men  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the presentation of male heterosexuality in British soft-core pornographic and men’s lifestyle magazines, looking across these formats at the range of conventions and discourses they share. It maps out the key features of male heterosexuality in these publications, focusing on a sample of British magazines collected in June 2003 across both soft core and lifestyle formats, and

Feona Attwood

2005-01-01

16

Sex trade behavior among heterosexually active homeless men.  

PubMed

Sex trade behavior is fairly common among homeless adults and may contribute to higher rates of HIV/AIDS in this population. This study provides a detailed examination of the sex trade-related attitudes and behaviors of homeless men by: (1) determining the prevalence of sex trade-related behaviors, including sex with female sex workers (FSWs); (2) identifying risk factors for having sex with FSWs; and (3) comparing men's relationships with FSWs and non-FSWs in terms of relationship qualities and HIV-related risk behaviors, such as condom use. Structured interviews were conducted with a probability sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men recruited from meal lines in Los Angeles. Recent sex with a FSW was reported by 26 % of men, and more likely among those who were older, used crack cocaine, had more sex partners, believed that sometimes men just need to have sex no matter what, and were embedded in networks that were denser and where risky sex was more normative. Compared to non-FSW partners, men with FSW partners felt less emotionally close to them, were more likely to believe the partner had never been tested for HIV, and were more likely to have sex with them under the influence of drugs or alcohol; however, they were not more likely to talk about using condoms or to use condoms with FSWs. Whether the relationship was considered "serious" was a stronger correlate of condom use than whether the partner was a FSW. Implications of these findings for HIV prevention efforts among homeless adults are discussed. PMID:23720137

Tucker, Joan S; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Kennedy, David P; Golinelli, Daniela; Ewing, Brett

2013-11-01

17

Dating, Marriage, and Parenthood for HIV-Positive Heterosexual Puerto Rican Men: Normalizing Perspectives on Everyday Life With HIV.  

PubMed

HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV. PMID:24794822

Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

2015-03-01

18

HIV Type 1 Transmission Networks Among Men Having Sex with Men and Heterosexuals in Kenya  

PubMed Central

Abstract We performed a molecular phylogenetic study on HIV-1 polymerase sequences of men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual patient samples in Kenya to characterize any observed HIV-1 transmission networks. HIV-1 polymerase sequences were obtained from samples in Nairobi and coastal Kenya from 84 MSM, 226 other men, and 364 women from 2005 to 2010. Using Bayesian phylogenetics, we tested whether sequences clustered by sexual orientation and geographic location. In addition, we used trait diffusion analyses to identify significant epidemiological links and to quantify the number of transmissions between risk groups. Finally, we compared 84 MSM sequences with all HIV-1 sequences available online at GenBank. Significant clustering of sequences from MSM at both coastal Kenya and Nairobi was found, with evidence of HIV-1 transmission between both locations. Although a transmission pair between a coastal MSM and woman was confirmed, no significant HIV-1 transmission was evident between MSM and the comparison population for the predominant subtype A (60%). However, a weak but significant link was evident when studying all subtypes together. GenBank comparison did not reveal other important transmission links. Our data suggest infrequent intermingling of MSM and heterosexual HIV-1 epidemics in Kenya. PMID:23947948

Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; Hassan, Amin; Hamers, Raph L.; Mutua, Gaudensia; Anzala, Omu; Mandaliya, Kishor; Cane, Patricia; Berkley, James A.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole; Graham, Susan M.; Price, Matthew A.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Sanders, Eduard J.

2014-01-01

19

Hair today, gone tomorrow: a comparison of body hair removal practices in gay and heterosexual men.  

PubMed

Although hairlessness is rapidly becoming a component of the ideal male body, little research has examined men's concerns about their body hair or their hair removal practices. Samples of gay and heterosexual men completed questionnaires that assessed whether they had ever removed their back, buttock or pubic hair, the frequency with which they did so, the methods used and their self-reported reasons for removing this hair, as well as their level of appearance investment. Results indicated that many gay and heterosexual men remove their back, buttock and pubic hair regularly and that their primary reason for doing so is to maintain or improve their appearance. The frequency of hair removal was also associated with the motivational salience component of appearance investment. The findings offer further support to the premise that gay and heterosexual men exhibit similar body image concerns. PMID:18586585

Martins, Yolanda; Tiggemann, Marika; Churchett, Libby

2008-09-01

20

Sex differences in how heterosexuals think about lesbians and gay men: Evidence from survey context effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two experiments were embedded in a 1997 telephone survey of U.S. households to assess possible differences in how heterosexuals think about lesbians versus gay men. In each experiment, one half of the sample first responded to one or more attitude items about lesbians, followed by comparable items about gay men. The other half received the gay male item(s) first. Results

Gregory M. Herek; John P. Capitanio

1999-01-01

21

The Association between Sexual Aggression and HIV Risk Behavior in Heterosexual Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Perpetrating sexual coercion and rape can be conceptualized as a form of sexual risk taking. In this study, the authors evaluated the relationship between sexual aggression and other risky sexual behaviors (e.g., intercourse without a condom) using an online convenience sample of 1,240 heterosexual men. Sexually aggressive men engaged in more…

Peterson, Zoe D.; Janssen, Erick; Heiman, Julia R.

2010-01-01

22

Biodemographic comparisons of homosexual and heterosexual men in the kinsey interview data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between sexual orientation and several biodemographic variables previously reported to differentiate between homosexual\\u000a and heterosexual men were examined. Subjects were 4948 white, postpubertal males, who were never reared in foster homes, orphanages,\\u000a or other institutions, and were never arrested or convicted on criminal charges. These were dichotomously classified as homosexual\\u000a (n=844) or heterosexual (n=4104). Data came from survey interviews

Ray Blanchard; Anthony F. Bogaert

1996-01-01

23

Perceived erotic value of homosexuality and sex?role attitudes as mediators of sex differences in heterosexual college students' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on attitudes toward lesbians and gay men commonly shows that heterosexual women hold similar attitudes toward members of the two groups, whereas heterosexual men hold more negative attitudes toward gay men than toward lesbians. We tested the hypothesis that one reason for this sex difference is that heterosexual men attribute a high erotic value to lesbianism and that this

Laura A. Louderback; Bernard E. Whitley Jr

1997-01-01

24

Condom Use among Heterosexual Immigrant Latino Men in the Southeastern United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Latinos in the United States have been disproportionately affected by the intersecting epidemics of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). We examined correlates of condom use among adult heterosexual Latino men who are members of a large multicounty soccer league in rural North Carolina. Of 222 participants, the mean (plus or minus SD) age…

Knipper, Emily; Rhodes, Scott D.; Lindstrom, Kristen; Bloom, Fred R.; Leichliter, Jami S.; Montano, Jaime

2007-01-01

25

Gay Men and Lesbians' Experiences in and Expectations for Interactions with Heterosexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed 97 gay men's and lesbians' experiences with and expectations for interactions with majority group members. Respondents described reactions to previous or imagined future interactions with an unfamiliar heterosexual person who had just become aware that the respondent was lesbian or gay. Results indicated that respondents are more proactive than reactive (in contrast to expectation states theories), that the

Terri D. Conley; Patricia G. Devine; Jerome Rabow; Sophia R. Evett

2003-01-01

26

Interpersonal contact and heterosexuals’ attitudes toward gay men: Results from a national survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between heterosexuals’ attitudes toward gay men and their interpersonal contact experiences with a lesbian or gay person was examined with data from a national AIDS telephone survey with a probability sample of English?speaking adults in the United States (n = 937). When asked whether any friends or relatives had “let you know that they were homosexual,” approximately one?third

Gregory M. Herek; Eric K. Glunt

1993-01-01

27

Distinct Transmission Networks of Chlamydia trachomatis in Men Who Have Sex with Men and Heterosexual Adults in Amsterdam, The Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Background Genovar distributions of Chlamydia trachomatis based on ompA typing differ between men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexuals. We investigated clonal relationships using a high resolution typing method to characterize C. trachomatis types in these two risk groups. Methods C. trachomatis positive samples were collected at the STI outpatient clinic in Amsterdam between 2008 and 2010 and genotyped by multilocus sequence typing. Clusters were assigned using minimum spanning trees and these were combined with epidemiological data of the hosts. Results We typed 526 C. trachomatis positive samples: 270 from MSM and 256 from heterosexuals. Eight clusters, containing 10–128 samples were identified of which 4 consisted of samples from MSM (90%–100%), with genovars D, G, J, and L2b. The other 4 clusters consisted mainly of samples from heterosexuals (87%–100%) with genovars D, E, F, I, and J. Genetic diversity was much lower in the MSM clusters than in heterosexual clusters. Significant differences in number of sexual partners and HIV-serostatus were observed for MSM–associated clusters. Conclusions C. trachomatis transmission patterns among MSM and heterosexuals were largely distinct. We hypothesize that these differences are due to sexual host behavior, but bacterial factors may play a role as well. PMID:23342025

Bom, Reinier J. M.; van der Helm, Jannie J.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; van Rooijen, Martijn S.; Heijman, Titia; Matser, Amy; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Bruisten, Sylvia M.

2013-01-01

28

Strategies to prevent HIV transmission among heterosexual African-American men  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: As part of qualitative research for developing a culturally sensitive and developmentally appropriate videotape-based HIV prevention intervention for heterosexual African- American men, six focus groups were conducted with thirty African-American men to determine their perceptions of AIDS as a threat to the African-American community, characteristics of past situations that have placed African Americans at risk for HIV infection, their

Ekere J Essien; Angela F Meshack; Ronald J Peters; Gbadebo O Ogungbade; Nora I Osemene

2005-01-01

29

Are HIV/AIDS Prevention Interventions for Heterosexually Active Men in the United States Gender-Specific?  

PubMed Central

Although gender-specific theories are often deployed in interventions to reduce women's HIV risks, the same is often not true for interventions among men. Theories of masculinity are not guiding most US research on the risky sexual behavior of heterosexual men or on what can be done to intervene. We first assess the extent to which evidence-based HIV-prevention interventions among heterosexually active men in the United States draw upon relevant theories of masculinity. Next, we introduce a useful framework within masculinity and gender studies that can be applied to HIV-prevention interventions with heterosexually active men. Finally, we make suggestions to improve the gender specificity of HIV-prevention interventions for heterosexually active men in the United States. PMID:19372506

Fullilove, Robert E.; Peacock, Dean

2009-01-01

30

HIV Behavioral Interventions for Heterosexual African American Men: A Critical Review of Cultural Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the United States, the rate of HIV infection transmitted through high-risk heterosexual contact is disproportionately higher\\u000a among African American than among persons of other races or ethnicities (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC],\\u000a 2009). Therefore, African American men who have sex with women represent a critical target for behavioral interventions designed\\u000a to reduce HIV incidence in this community.

Kirk D. Henny; Kim M. Williams; Jocelyn Patterson

31

Sexual Risk Behavior has Decreased among Men who have Sex with Men in Los Angeles but Remains Greater than that among Heterosexual Men and Women  

PubMed Central

We examined changes and correlates of sexual risk behavior of men who have sex with men (MSM) compared with heterosexual men and women over three time periods. Data from the 1997, 1999, and 2003 Los Angeles County Health Surveys, a population–based telephone survey, were analyzed to examine the association of sociodemographic and health–related factors with sexual risk behaviors among the three groups. In each time period, MSM reported a significantly greater percentage of sexual risk (i.e., both inconsistent condom use and multiple sex partners in the past 12 months) compared with heterosexual men and women. Multivariate analyses indicated that MSM and heterosexual men reported greater sexual risk than heterosexual women. Respondents who were younger, U.S. born, reported heavy alcohol consumption, or had been tested for HIV in the past 24 months were more likely to report sexual risk behavior. The findings suggest the need for continued targeted prevention for MSM and prevention efforts for segments of the general population at elevated risk for HIV. PMID:18673064

Brooks, Ronald A.; Lee, Sung–Jae; Newman, Peter A.; Leibowitz, Arleen A.

2010-01-01

32

Polymorphous prejudice: liberating the measurement of heterosexuals' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men.  

PubMed

A multidimensional measure of sexual prejudice was developed to assess the increasing complexity of heterosexuals' attitudes toward gay men and lesbians. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a valid and reliable 7-factor measure that assessed: 1) traditional heterosexism; 2) tendency to deny anti-gay discrimination continues; 3) aversion toward gay men; 4) aversion to lesbians; 5) judgments regarding the value of the gay and lesbian movement; 6) resistance to heteronormative expectations; and 7) endorsement of positive beliefs about gay people. A modern heterosexism theory was supported and queer/liberationist notions of anti-heteronormativity and positive beliefs were found to be related to pro-homosexual attitudes. PMID:19197647

Massey, Sean G

2009-01-01

33

Unprotected sex among heterosexually active homeless men: results from a multi-level dyadic analysis.  

PubMed

HIV is a serious public health problem for homeless populations. Homeless men who have sex with women have received less attention in the HIV risk literature than other homeless populations. This research uses multi-level modeling to investigate the context of unprotected sex among heterosexually active homeless men in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles. Based on interviews with 305 randomly selected men who discussed 665 of their recent female sexual relationships, this project investigates the correlates of unprotected sex during the past 6 months at the partnership, individual, and social network levels. Several different measures of relationship closeness and lack of communication about HIV/condoms were associated with unprotected sex. Controlling for relationship factors, men's negative attitudes towards condoms, mental health, and higher number of male sex partners also were associated with having unprotected sex with female partners. We discuss the implications of these findings for health interventions. PMID:23212852

Kennedy, David P; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Brown, Ryan; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela

2013-06-01

34

Concurrent Partnering and Condom Use among Rural Heterosexual African-American Men  

PubMed Central

Background Limited research has targeted HIV risk among heterosexual African-American men in rural southeastern US. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 538 men to assess HIV knowledge, attitudes toward HIV testing and sexual risk behavior. Results Fifty-one percent reported consistent condom use in past three months. Monogamous men reported more consistent condom use (t =3.47, df =536, p<.001). In concurrent partnerships condom use was inversely related to age (AOR=.98, 95% CI=.95-.998, p=.03) and increased by number of female partners (AOR=1.49, 95% CI=1.26-1.76, p <.001). Conclusions African American HIV prevention outreach should include focus on concurrent partnering in rural settings. PMID:24286487

Ricks, JaNelle M.; Geter, Angelica; Crosby, Richard A.; Brown, Emma (E.J.)

2014-01-01

35

The Optimal Anatomic Sites for Sampling Heterosexual Men for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection: The HPV Detection in Men Study  

PubMed Central

Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in men contributes to infection and cervical disease in women as well as to disease in men. This study aimed to determine the optimal anatomic site(s) for HPV detection in heterosexual men. Methods A cross-sectional study of HPV infection was conducted in 463 men from 2003 to 2006. Urethral, glans penis/coronal sulcus, penile shaft/prepuce, scrotal, perianal, anal canal, semen, and urine samples were obtained. Samples were analyzed for sample adequacy and HPV DNA by polymerase chain reaction and genotyping. To determine the optimal sites for estimating HPV prevalence, site-specific prevalences were calculated and compared with the overall prevalence. Sites and combinations of sites were excluded until a recalculated prevalence was reduced by <5% from the overall prevalence. Results The overall prevalence of HPV was 65.4%. HPV detection was highest at the penile shaft (49.9% for the full cohort and 47.9% for the subcohort of men with complete sampling), followed by the glans penis/coronal sulcus (35.8% and 32.8%) and scrotum (34.2% and 32.8%). Detection was lowest in urethra (10.1% and 10.2%) and semen (5.3% and 4.8%) samples. Exclusion of urethra, semen, and either perianal, scrotal, or anal samples resulted in a <5% reduction in prevalence. Conclusions At a minimum, the penile shaft and the glans penis/coronal sulcus should be sampled in heterosexual men. A scrotal, perianal, or anal sample should also be included for optimal HPV detection. PMID:17955432

Giuliano, Anna R.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Flores, Roberto; Dunne, Eileen F.; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary R.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Smith, Danelle; Harris, Robin B.

2014-01-01

36

Sexual revictimization and mental health: a comparison of lesbians, gay men, and heterosexual women.  

PubMed

Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has several deleterious effects on health and well-being, including increased risk for rape in adulthood. Such revictimization experiences are linked to negative mental health outcomes. The vast majority of literature on prevalence and impact of sexual revictimization has focused on heterosexual women. In an effort to extend this research to lesbians and gay men, who are known to face higher rates of both CSA and adult rape, we conducted a study (N = 871) comparing adult lesbians, gay men, and heterosexual women on prevalence and mental health correlates of sexual revictimization. Results indicated that CSA is associated with elevated rates of adult rape for all three groups. In addition, revictimization showed comparable associations with mental health variables for all three groups. Participants with both CSA and adult rape had higher levels of psychological distress, suicidality, alcohol use, and self-harm behaviors relative to those with only one type of victimization and those with no victimization, and those with any victimization were more likely to report recent use of drugs compared to those with no victimization. PMID:20724297

Balsam, Kimberly F; Lehavot, Keren; Beadnell, Blair

2011-06-01

37

HIV, syphilis and heterosexual bridging among Peruvian men who have sex with men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To determine prevalence of and risk factors associated with HIV and syphilis seropositivity and estimate incidence of HIV infection among Peruvian men who have sex with men (MSM) and characterize behaviors of men who report sex with both men and women ('bridgers'). Design: Cross-sectional study of MSM in Lima, Peru. Methods: Four-hundred and fifty-one MSM (of whom 442 responded

Stephen Tabet; Jorge Sancheza; Javier Lamaa; Pedro Goicocheaa; Pablo Camposb; Manuel Rouillonc; Jose Luis Cairod; Lucia Uedae; Douglas Wattsf; Connie Celum; King K. Holmes

2002-01-01

38

Sex-Dimorphic Face Shape Preference in Heterosexual and Homosexual Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies have used manipulated faces to test the preferences of heterosexual individuals for sexually dimorphic facial cues. In contrast to previous studies, which have generally excluded homosexual participants, we directly compared homosexual and heterosexual male and female preferences for manipulated sexual dimorphism in faces (homosexual males: n = 311; heterosexual males: n = 215; homosexual females: n = 159; heterosexual

Aaron N. Glassenberg; David R. Feinberg; Benedict C. Jones; Anthony C. Little; Lisa M. DeBruine

2010-01-01

39

Unprotected Sexual Behavior Among Heterosexual HIV-Positive Injection Drug Using Men: Associations by Partner Type and Partner Serostatus  

PubMed Central

Few studies have examined sexual risk behaviors of HIV-positive, heterosexual, injection drug using (IDU) men. We investigated such behaviors and associations with risk among sexually active, HIV-positive IDU men who reported only female sex partners in the 3 months prior to baseline interview. We examined associations separately for four non-exclusive groups of men by crossing partner type (main or casual) and partner serostatus (HIV-positive or HIV-negative/unknown). Of 732 male participants, 469 (64%) were sexually active with only female partners. Of these 469 men, 155 (33%) reported sex with HIV-positive main partners, 127 (27%) with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus main partners, 145 (31%) with HIV-positive casual partners, and 192 (41%) with HIV-negative/unknown serostatus casual partners. Significant multivariate associations for unprotected sex with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus main partners were less self-efficacy to use condoms, weaker partner norms supporting condoms, and more negative condom beliefs. Similar correlates were found for unprotected sex with HIV-positive main and casual partners. In addition, alcohol or drug use during sex was a significant correlate of unprotected sex with HIV-positive main partners, while depression was significant for HIV-positive casual partners. For unprotected sex with HIV-negative/unknown status casual partners, self-efficacy for condom use, sex trade, and education were significant multivariate correlates. A combination of broad and tailored intervention strategies based on the relationship pattern of men's lives may provide the most benefit for reducing unprotected sex with female partners. PMID:16736116

Mizuno, Yuko; Metsch, Lisa R.; Garfein, Richard; Tobin, Karin; Knight, Kelly; Latka, Mary H.

2006-01-01

40

Factors contributing to inconsistent condom use among heterosexual men in Curaçao.  

PubMed

This study explored, from a public health perspective, factors that contribute to inconsistent condom use by men in Curaçao through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 21 heterosexual men. The findings show that there is an important disconnect between what is considered culturally appropriate sexual behaviour for men and women and condom use, that diverging from prescribed notions of masculinity and femininity in order to use condoms consistently is difficult, and that condom use is particularly problematic in the context of concurrent partnerships and sexual economic exchanges. Participants further reported that Caribbean family structures, whereby mothers assume the role as primary caregiver and fathers contribute biologically but, to a much lesser extent socially, also have an impact on condom use. Additionally, consistent condom use was reported to be impeded by a cultural taboo on talking seriously about sex and sexual health. In their totality, findings provide important input from men for the development of sexual health promotion interventions that are cognizant of the cultural context in which inconsistent condom use occurs, and that are geared not only to the individual level but also to the interpersonal and structural levels. PMID:23350609

Stutterheim, Sarah E; Bertens, Madelief G B C; Mevissen, Fraukje E F; Schaalma, Herman P

2013-01-01

41

Gay men and lesbians' experiences in and expectations for interactions with heterosexuals.  

PubMed

We analyzed 97 gay men's and lesbians' experiences with and expectations for interactions with majority group members. Respondents described reactions to previous or imagined future interactions with an unfamiliar heterosexual person who had just become aware that the respondent was lesbian or gay. Results indicated that respondents are more proactive than reactive (in contrast to expectation states theories), that the contact hypothesis can be appropriately applied to this group, even though the formulation of the theory was based upon negative attitudes in the absence of extensive contact, and that they have different reactions for people of different prejudice levels, rather than being globally suspicious, as is predicted by many intergroup theories. Future research should direct more attention to the stigmatized group members' attitudes about and reactions toward the majority group. PMID:12856757

Conley, Terri D; Devine, Patricia G; Rabow, Jerome; Evett, Sophia R

2002-01-01

42

Violence Victimization of Young Men in Heterosexual Relationships: Does Alcohol Outlet Density Influence Outcomes?  

PubMed Central

This study examined whether alcohol outlet density is associated with male physical and sexual victimization by a female partner. Data were from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). A total of 3,179 young adult men identified a current heterosexual relationship and had complete intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization data. Almost 16% of this sample reported being the victim of physical only IPV in their relationship over the previous 12 months; an additional 6.4% were victims of sexual only or sexual and physical IPV. Multivariate analyses indicated high alcohol outlet density was associated with greater odds of experiencing physical IPV only (odds ratio [OR] = 2.07). Heavy drinkers experienced increased odds of physical and sexual IPV victimization. Alcohol outlet density should be addressed in prevention efforts. PMID:22978073

Waller, Martha W.; Iritani, Bonita J.; Flewelling, Robert L.; Christ, Sharon L.; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Moracco, Kathryn E.

2012-01-01

43

Reactions of Heterosexual African-American Men to Women’s Condom Negotiation Strategies  

PubMed Central

This study describes responses of 172 single heterosexual African American men, ages 18–35, to condom negotiation attempts. Strategies used included reward, coercive, legitimate, expert, referent, and informational strategies, based on Raven’s (1992) influence model. The purpose was: 1) to identify strategies influencing participant acquiescence to request, and 2) to identify predictors of participant compliance/refusal to comply with negotiation attempts. Participants viewed six videotape segments showing an actress, portrayed in silhouette, speaking to the viewer as a ‘steady partner’. After each segment, participants completed measures of: request compliance, positive and negative affect, and attributions concerning the model and themselves. No significant differences were found in men’s ratings across all vignettes. However, differences in response existed across subgroups of individuals, suggesting that while the strategy used had little impact on participant response, the act of suggesting condom use produced responses that differed across participant subgroups. Subgroups differed on levels of AIDS risk knowledge, STD history, and experience with sexual coercion. Also, the “least-willing-to-use” subgroup was highest in anger/rejection and least likely to make attributions of caring for partner. Effective negotiation of condom use with a male sexual partner may not be determined as much by specific strategy used as by partner characteristics. PMID:19760529

Otto-Salaj, Laura L.; Traxel, Nicole; Brondino, Michael J.; Reed, Barbara; Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Stevenson, L. Yvonne

2009-01-01

44

“What Does it Take to be a Man? What is a Real Man?”: Ideologies of masculinity and HIV sexual risk among Black heterosexual men  

PubMed Central

Research documents the link between traditional ideologies of masculinity and sexual risk among multi-ethnic male adolescents and White male college students, but similar research with Black heterosexual men is scarce. This exploratory study addressed this gap through six focus groups with 41 Black, low to middle income heterosexual men aged 19 to 51 years in Philadelphia, PA. Analyses highlighted two explicit ideologies of masculinity: that Black men should have sex with multiple women, often concurrently; and that Black men should not be gay or bisexual. Analyses also identified two implicit masculinity ideologies: the perception that Black heterosexual men cannot decline sex, even risky sex; and that women are primarily responsible for condom use. The study’s implications for HIV prevention with Black heterosexual men are discussed. PMID:21390949

Bowleg, Lisa; Teti, Michelle; Massie, Jenné S.; Patel, Aditi; Malebranche, David J.; Tschann, Jeanne M.

2011-01-01

45

Misperceptions about HIV transmission among heterosexual African-American and Latino men and women.  

PubMed Central

This research was conducted to identify myths and misperceptions about HIV/AIDS and barriers to risk reduction among heterosexual African-American and Latino-American men and women in Houston, Texas. Sixty four Latino-American and 69 African-American men and women, aged 13 to 59 years, participated in 10 and 11 focus groups, respectively. Each group was audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using theme and domain analysis. The data confirmed the existence of myths and misperceptions among both groups about HIV/AIDS, specifically that HIV is an agent of genocide, suspicion of government information, belief that one can identify risky partners by odor and appearance, that partners' reported histories are accurate, significant misperceptions as to the meaning of "safe sex" (particularly in women), and belief that specific classes of people (not including oneself) are at risk for HIV. These data strongly suggest that concentration on narrow targeting of misinformation common in particular minority populations is important in the development of HIV/AIDS prevention programs. PMID:12069209

Essien, E. James; Meshack, Angela F.; Ross, Michael W.

2002-01-01

46

Sexual scripts among young heterosexually active men and women: Continuity and change  

PubMed Central

While gendered sexual scripts are hegemonic at the cultural level, research suggests they may be less so at dyadic and individual levels. Understanding “disjunctures” between sexual scripts at different levels holds promise for illuminating mechanisms through which sexual scripts can change. Through interviews with 44 heterosexually active men and women aged 18-25, we delineated ways young people grappled with culture-level scripts for sexuality and relationships. Findings suggest that although most participants’ culture-level gender scripts for behavior in sexual relationships were congruent with descriptions of traditional masculine and feminine sexuality, there was heterogeneity in how or whether these scripts were incorporated into individual relationships. Specifically, we found three styles of working with sexual scripts: Conforming, in which personal gender scripts for sexual behavior overlapped with traditional scripts; exception-finding, in which interviewees accepted culture-level gender scripts as a reality, but created exceptions to gender rules for themselves; and transforming, in which participants either attempted to remake culture-level gender scripts, or interpreted their own non-traditional styles as equally normative. Changing sexual scripts can potentially contribute to decreased gender inequity in the sexual realm and to increased opportunities for sexual satisfaction, safety, and wellbeing, particularly for women, but for men as well. PMID:22489683

Masters, N. Tatiana; Casey, Erin; Wells, Elizabeth A.; Morrison, Diane M.

2012-01-01

47

Fatherhood and Men’s Lives at Middle Age  

PubMed Central

This paper uses data on 2,024 men who were followed through the third wave of the National Survey of Families and Households to examine the implications of fatherhood experiences for men’s involvement in altruistic social activities at middle age. We find that middle-aged men (ages 45–65) who at some point in their lives become fathers are significantly more likely to have altruistically oriented social relationships and be involved in service organizations compared to men who have never become fathers. Furthermore, it appears that the defining aspect of the effect of fatherhood is the level of engagement with children while they are growing up. Neither current residential status nor whether current non-residence occurs because of nest leaving is found to distinguish men’s altruistic ties.

Eggebeen, David J.; Dew, Jeffrey; Knoester, Chris

2014-01-01

48

Those speedos become them: the role of self-objectification in gay and heterosexual men's body image.  

PubMed

Objectification Theory proposes that membership in sexually objectifying Western societies gradually socializes women to adopt an observer's perspective on their physical self. This leads to negative consequences, including body shame and restricted eating behavior. The authors extend this framework to investigate a subgroup of men, namely gay men, who also exist in a subculture that emphasizes and values physical appearance. Study 1 investigated trait differences in self-objectification and body image among gay and heterosexual men. Analyses indicated that gay men scored higher on self-objectification, body shame, body dissatisfaction, and drive for thinness. In Study 2, the authors experimentally manipulated state self-objectification and found that for gay men, increasing state self-objectification resulted in greater body shame and dissatisfaction and more restrained eating. Together, these results offer strong support to Objectification Theory as a useful framework from within which to view the experience of gay men. PMID:17440202

Martins, Yolanda; Tiggemann, Marika; Kirkbride, Alana

2007-05-01

49

HIV risk behavior and access to services: what predicts HIV testing among heterosexually active homeless men?  

PubMed

HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV testing behavior of homeless men. This study examined the association between individual (HIV risk) and structural (service access) factors and past year HIV testing. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men interviewed from meal programs in the Skid Row region of Los Angeles. Logistic regression examined the association between past year HIV testing and demographic characteristics, HIV risk behavior, and access to other services in the Skid Row area in the past 30 days. Despite high rates of past year HIV testing, study participants also reported high rates of HIV risk behavior, suggesting there is still significant unmet need for HIV prevention among homeless men. Having recently used medical/dental services in the Skid Row area (OR: 1.91; CI: 1.09, 3.35), and being a military veteran (OR: 2.10; CI: 1.01-4.37) were significantly associated with HIV testing service utilization. HIV testing was not associated with HIV risk behavior, but rather with access to services and veteran status, the latter of which prior research has linked to increased service access. We suggest that programs encouraging general medical service access may be important for disseminating HIV testing services to this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:22676465

Wenzel, Suzanne L; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

2012-06-01

50

Preparatory behavior for condom use among heterosexual young men: a longitudinal mediation model.  

PubMed

Objective. Motivation is not sufficient to actually use condoms, as self-regulatory processes are needed to translate motivation into action. Buying condoms and carrying them constitute preparatory behaviors that may serve as proximal predictors of action. Whether or not such preparatory behaviors operate as mediators between intention and action within a broader behavior change framework has been examined. Method. A sample of 150 heterosexual men between ages 18 and 25 years responded at three points in time to a computer-based survey that assessed behavior as well as social-cognitive antecedents. A structural equation model was specified that included preparatory behaviors and self-efficacy as mediators at Time 2. Results. Preparatory behaviors were the most proximal predictors of condom use, and they were, themselves, predicted by self-efficacy and intention. The latter was partly determined by positive emotional outcome expectancies. Conclusion. To bridge the intention-behavior gap, preparatory behaviors play a mediating role, and they represent a side of planning that constitutes the most proximal predictor of condom use. PMID:24986915

Carvalho, Telma; Alvarez, Maria-João; Barz, Milena; Schwarzer, Ralf

2015-02-01

51

Physical victimization and high-risk sexual partners among illicit drug-using heterosexual men in New York City.  

PubMed

Physical victimization has been linked to high-risk sexual partnerships in women. Although illicit drug-using heterosexual men are at high-risk of physical victimization, the association between violence and high-risk partners in heterosexual men has received little attention in the published literature. We examined the association between experience of severe physical victimization and acquisition of a high-risk sexual partner (i.e., a partner who injected drugs or participated in transactional sex) 1 year later among illicit drug-using men in New York City (2006-2009) using secondary cross-sectional data. Injection and non-injection drug-using men (n?=?280) provided a retrospectively recalled history of risk behavior and violence for each year over the past 4 years. Our primary outcome was acquisition of a high-risk sexual partner in any year following the baseline year. Our primary exposure was severe physical victimization (i.e., threatened with a knife or gun, beaten up, shot, or stabbed) in the prior year. Frequency of cocaine, heroin, and crack use and sexual victimization were also assessed. Log-binomial logistic regression with generalized estimating equation (GEE) methods was used to account for repeated measures for up to four time points. After adjustment for important covariates, participants that experienced physical victimization were significantly more likely to have acquired a high-risk sexual partner 1 year later (relative risk (RR), 3.73; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.55-8.97). Our study challenges gender-based stereotypes surrounding physical victimization and provides support for multidisciplinary programs that address both violence and HIV risk among illicit drug-using heterosexual men. PMID:25256949

Turner, Alezandria K; Jones, Kandice C; Rudolph, Abby; Rivera, Alexis V; Crawford, Natalie; Lewis, Crystal Fuller

2014-10-01

52

Heterosexual Men's Anger in Response to Male Homosexuality: Effects of Erotic and Non-Erotic Depictions of Male-Male Intimacy and Sexual Prejudice  

PubMed Central

The present study compared effects of erotic and non-erotic depictions of male-male intimacy on the experience of anger in heterosexual men. Data came from three independent laboratory studies designed to elicit anger in response to erotic or non-erotic depictions of male-male and male-female intimacy. All participants completed a measure of sexual prejudice and anger was assessed before and after viewing the erotic or non-erotic video. Among high-prejudiced men, viewing erotic and non-erotic intimate behavior between two men elicited significant increases in anger relative to viewing comparable behavior between a male-female dyad. In contrast, among low-prejudiced men, viewing erotic, but not non-erotic, intimate behavior between two men elicited significant increases in anger relative to viewing comparable behavior between a male-female dyad. Implications for understanding heterosexual men's anger, and aggression, toward gay men were discussed. PMID:20818528

Hudepohl, Adam D.; Parrott, Dominic J.; Zeichner, Amos

2010-01-01

53

“It’s an Uphill Battle Everyday”: Intersectionality, Low-Income Black Heterosexual Men, and Implications for HIV Prevention Research and Interventions  

PubMed Central

This interview study, the initial qualitative phase of a larger mixed methods HIV prevention study focused on Black heterosexual men, used intersectionality as a theoretical framework to explore: (1) How a sample of Black heterosexual men describe and experience the multiple intersections of race, gender, and SES; and (2) How these descriptions reflected interlocking systems of social inequality for Black men at the social-structural level. Participants were 30 predominantly low-income self-identified Black heterosexual men between the ages of 18 and 44. Analyses highlighted four themes that demonstrate how participants’ individual-level experiences as Black men reflect macro social-structural inequality: (1) racial discrimination and microaggressions; (2) unemployment; (3) incarceration; and (4) police surveillance and harassment. We discuss the study’s findings within the context of social-structural factors that disproportionately and adversely impact Black men. We also highlight the implications of the intersectionality perspective for HIV prevention research and interventions for Black heterosexual men. PMID:23482810

Bowleg, Lisa; Teti, Michelle; Malebranche, David J.; Tschann, Jeanne M.

2012-01-01

54

Sexual Revictimization and Mental Health: A Comparison of Lesbians, Gay Men, and Heterosexual Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has several deleterious effects on health and well-being, including increased risk for rape in adulthood. Such revictimization experiences are linked to negative mental health outcomes. The vast majority of literature on prevalence and impact of sexual revictimization has focused on heterosexual women. In an effort to…

Balsam, Kimberly F.; Lehavot, Keren; Beadnell, Blair

2011-01-01

55

Masturbation and Pornography Use Among Coupled Heterosexual Men With Decreased Sexual Desire: How Many Roles of Masturbation?  

PubMed

The relation between masturbation and sexual desire has not been systematically studied. The present study assessed the association between masturbation and pornography use and the predictors and correlates of frequent masturbation (several times a week or more often) among coupled heterosexual men who reported decreased sexual desire. Analyses were carried out on a subset of 596 men with decreased sexual desire (mean age = 40.2 years) who were recruited as part of a large online study on male sexual health in 3 European countries. A majority of the participants (67%) reported masturbating at least once a week. Among men who masturbated frequently, 70% used pornography at least once a week. A multivariate assessment showed that sexual boredom, frequent pornography use, and low relationship intimacy significantly increased the odds of reporting frequent masturbation among coupled men with decreased sexual desire. These findings point to a pattern of pornography-related masturbation that can be dissociated from partnered sexual desire and can fulfill diverse purposes. Clinical implications include the importance of exploring specific patterns of masturbation and pornography use in the evaluation of coupled men with decreased sexual desire. PMID:25189834

Carvalheira, Ana; Træen, Bente; Stulhofer, Aleksandar

2014-09-01

56

Using Intervention Mapping to develop a programme to prevent sexually transmittable infections, including HIV, among heterosexual migrant men  

PubMed Central

Background There is little experience with carefully developed interventions in the HIV/STI prevention field aimed at adult heterosexual target groups in the Netherlands. The ability to apply intervention development protocols, like Intervention Mapping, in daily practice outside of academia, is a matter of concern. An urgent need also exists for interventions aimed at the prevention of STI in migrant populations in the Netherlands. This article describes the theory and evidence based development of HIV/STI prevention interventions by the Municipal Public Health Service Rotterdam Area (MPHS), the Netherlands, for heterosexual migrant men with Surinamese, Dutch-Caribbean, Cape Verdean, Turkish and Moroccan backgrounds. Methods First a needs assessment was carried out. Then, a literature review was done, key figures were interviewed and seven group discussions were held. Subsequently, the results were translated into specific objectives ("change objectives") and used in intervention development for two subgroups: men with an Afro-Caribbean background and unmarried men with a Turkish and Moroccan background. A matrix of change objectives was made for each subgroup and suitable theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected. Culturally-tailored interventions were designed and were pre-tested among the target groups. Results This development process resulted in two interventions for specific subgroups that were appreciated by both the target groups and the migrant prevention workers. The project took place in collaboration with a university center, which provided an opportunity to get expert advice at every step of the Intervention Mapping process. At relevant points of the development process, migrant health educators and target group members provided advice and feedback on the draft intervention materials. Conclusion This intervention development project indicates that careful well-informed intervention development using Intervention Mapping is feasible in the daily practice of the MPHS, provided that sufficient time and expertise on this approach is available. Further research should test the effectiveness of these interventions. PMID:17615052

Wolfers, Mireille EG; van den Hoek, Caty; Brug, Johannes; de Zwart, Onno

2007-01-01

57

Sexual and affective responses to same- and opposite-sex stimuli in heterosexual and homosexual men: assessment and manipulation of visual attention.  

PubMed

Affective and cognitive factors play an important role in the activation and regulation of men's sexual arousal. Barlow (1986) argued that initial affective reactions determine the allocation of attention to sexual stimuli. We applied Barlow's model to our understanding of the role of sexual arousal in sexual orientation, where sexual arousal patterns have consistently been found to be congruent with self-reported orientation in men, but not in women. Visual attention of 28 heterosexual and 22 homosexual men to same- and opposite-sex erotic stimuli was assessed and experimentally-directed by means of a newly developed software application, while genital (penile rigidity) and affective responses (self-reported and physiological) were measured. In line with previous research, we found "category specificity" in men's sexual arousal, in that sexual responses were strongest to orientation-congruent stimuli. Also, both homosexual and heterosexual men experienced stronger sexual responses to conditions in which their attention was directed to sexual versus nonsexual content of orientation-congruent stimuli. Only homosexual men manifested higher sexual responses when their visual attention was directed towards the sexual content of orientation-incongruent stimuli. Heterosexual men experienced weaker positive and stronger negative affective responses to orientation-incongruent content, suggestive of potential avoidance or inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:24473940

Samson, Lelia; Janssen, Erick

2014-07-01

58

Fecundity of Paternal and Maternal Non-Parental Female Relatives of Homosexual and Heterosexual Men  

PubMed Central

A variety of social, developmental, biological and genetic factors influence sexual orientation in males. Thus, several hypotheses have attempted to explain the sustenance of genetic factors that influence male homosexuality, despite decreased fecundity within the homosexuals. Kin selection, the existence of maternal effects and two forms of balancing selection, sexually antagonistic selection and overdominance, have been proposed as compensatory mechanisms for reduced homosexual fecundity. Here, we suggest that the empirical support for kin selection and maternal effects cannot account for the low universal frequency and stability of the distribution of homosexuals. To identify the responsible compensatory mechanism, we analyzed fecundity in 2,100 European female relatives, i.e., aunts and grandmothers, of either homosexual or heterosexual probands who were matched in terms of age, culture and sampling strategy. Female relatives were chosen to avoid the sampling bias of the fraternal birth order effect, which occurs when indirectly sampling mothers though their homosexual sons. We observed that the maternal aunts and grandmothers of homosexual probands were significantly more fecund compared with the maternal aunts and maternal grandmothers of the heterosexual probands. No difference in fecundity was observed in the paternal female lines (grandmothers or aunts) from either of the two proband groups. Moreover, due to the selective increase in maternal female fecundity, the total female fecundity was significantly higher in homosexual than heterosexual probands, thus compensating for the reduced fecundity of homosexuals. Altogether, these data support an X-linked multi-locus sexually antagonistic hypothesis rather than an autosomal multi-locus overdominance hypothesis. PMID:23227237

Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Pellizzari, Elena

2012-01-01

59

Correlates of Condom-Associated Erection Problems in Young, Heterosexual Men: Condom Fit, Self-Efficacy, Perceptions, and Motivations  

PubMed Central

Questionnaire data from 479 heterosexual men 18–24 years old were analyzed for correlates of CAEP during application (CAEP-Application) and CAEP during penile-vaginal intercourse (CAEP-PVI). Potential correlates were self-efficacy (condom application, product selection, and maintaining arousal), condom perceptions (condom worry/distraction, negative condom perceptions, concerns about application speed), condom fit, and motivation to use condoms. We conclude that 1) experiencing CAEP may become a repeating cycle, both affecting and being affected by, worry and distraction related to losing erections and maintaining arousal while using a condom, 2) poorly fitting condoms may contribute to CAEP, and 3) CAEP may decrease motivation to use condoms. PMID:23404098

Sanders, Stephanie A.; Hill, Brandon J.; Crosby, Richard A.; Janssen, Erick

2013-01-01

60

Prejudice Events and Traumatic Stress among Heterosexuals and Lesbians, Gay Men and Bisexuals  

PubMed Central

This mixed-methods study examined associations between prejudice events and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 382 lesbians, gays, and bisexuals (LGB) and 126 heterosexuals. Using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, we assessed PTSD with a relaxed Criterion A1; that is, we allowed events that did not involve threat to life or physical integrity to also qualify as traumatic. We first assessed whether exposure to prejudice-related qualifying events differed with respect to participants’ sexual orientation and race. We found that White LGBs were more likely than White heterosexuals to encounter a prejudice-related qualifying event, and among LGBs, Black and Latino LGBs were no more likely than White LGBs to experience this type of event. We then used qualitative analysis of participants’ brief narratives to examine prejudice events that precipitated Relaxed Criterion A1 PTSD among 8 participants. Two themes emerged: (a) the need to make major changes and (b) compromised sense of safety and security following exposure to the prejudice event. PMID:24415898

Alessi, Edward J.; Martin, James I.; Gyamerah, Akua; Meyer, Ilan H.

2013-01-01

61

Effects of Traditional Gender Role Norms and Religious Fundamentalism on Self-Identified Heterosexual Men's Attitudes, Anger, and Aggression Toward Gay Men and Lesbians  

PubMed Central

Sexual prejudice and antigay anger were examined as mediators of the associations between traditional male gender norms, religious fundamentalism, and aggression toward gay men and lesbians. Participants were 201 self-identified heterosexual men recruited from the community to complete computer-administered measures of adherence to traditional male gender norms (i.e., status, toughness, antifemininity), religious fundamentalism, sexual prejudice, and frequency of aggression toward gay men and lesbians. Additionally, participants completed a structured interview designed to assess anger in response to a vignette depicting a male-male intimate relationship (i.e., partners saying “I love you,” holding hands, kissing). Results showed that sexual prejudice and antigay anger partially mediated the effect of antifemininity on aggression and fully mediated the effect of religious fundamentalism on aggression. Sexual prejudice alone fully mediated the effect of status on aggression and neither sexual prejudice nor antigay anger mediated the effect of toughness on aggression. Further, results suggested that religious fundamentalism is a multifaceted construct of which some aspects increase risk for aggression toward gay men and lesbians, whereas other aspects decrease this risk. These data provide multivariate evidence from a nonprobability, community-based sample that extreme internalization of dominant cultural values can set the stage for violence toward marginalized groups. Implications for intervention programming and future research are reviewed. PMID:22081759

Vincent, Wilson; Parrott, Dominic J.; Peterson, John L.

2011-01-01

62

The use of erection enhancing medication and party drugs among men living with HIV in Europe.  

PubMed

Studies have shown more erectile dysfunction (ED) in men living with HIV (MLHIV), relative to age matched HIV-negative men. Erection enhancing medication (EEM) is more frequently used by HIV-positive men than in the general male population. Increased sexually transmitted infection has been described in HIV-positive men with ED using EEM. This study investigated the use of EEM and party drugs (methyleendioxymethamfetamine (XTC), gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) "fluid XTC" and alkyl nitrites "poppers") among MLHIV. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed consecutively to all patients attending 17 European HIV treatment centers. The sample included 1118 HIV-positive men, among whom 74.5% men having sex with men (MSM). The use of EEM was more frequent in MSM than in heterosexual men (odds ratio (OR) 3.33, p<0.001) and was associated with increased sexual risk behavior (OR 3.27, p<0.001). Nonmedically indicated use of EEM was linked to increased use of party drugs (OR 2.30, p=0.01). Physicians taking care of MLHIV need to be aware of the high prevalence of (nonmedical) use of EEM and party drugs. Medical provision of EEM should be combined with a discussion on safer sex behavior and the risk related to concomitant use of party drugs and illegal EEM. PMID:23244618

De Ryck, Iris; Van Laeken, David; Noestlinger, Christiana; Platteau, Tom; Colebunders, Robert

2013-08-01

63

Men's and Women's Interpretation and Endorsement of Items Measuring Self-Reported Heterosexual Aggression.  

PubMed

Early research on sexual aggression (e.g., sexual coercion, sexual assault, and rape) mainly focused on men as perpetrators and women as victims; more recently, researchers have begun to investigate women as perpetrators of sexual aggression as well. However, most measures of sexual aggression perpetration were designed for use with men and have not been well validated with women. This study sought to examine two different measures of sexual aggression perpetration in terms of their convergent validity for both men and women and to examine gender differences and similarities in item interpretation using open-ended inquiries. Participants were 590 individuals (395 women, 195 men) with a mean age of 25 years (SD = 8.1) recruited from an undergraduate psychology subject pool and an online convenience sample. The majority of the sample was White (65.4%) and Black (20.3%). All measures were completed online anonymously. Results suggested that convergent validity for the two measures was less than optimal, particularly for women. Further, item interpretation analyses revealed that, compared to men, more than twice the percentage of women provided a false-positive response to one of the measures, suggesting that women may be more likely than men to endorse self-report perpetration items incorrectly. PMID:25369522

Buday, Sarah K; Peterson, Zoë D

2014-11-01

64

Hallway Fears and High School Friendships: The Complications of Young Men (Re)negotiating Heterosexualized Identities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on a larger ethnographic study of four high school young men, this paper foregrounds high school male-male friendships as a context for examining how heterosexism and homophobia operate to limit and delimit the ways masculinities are constructed. I begin this article by first highlighting an inconsistency between recent school initiatives…

Kehler, Michael D.

2007-01-01

65

Elucidating the origins of heterosexual sex differences in mating psychology by examining the behaviour of homosexual men and women.  

E-print Network

??Various competing theoretical frameworks have been invoked to explain heterosexual sex differences in mating psychology. Chapter One provides examples of such frameworks, details how considering… (more)

VanderLaan, Doug P

2007-01-01

66

Mediation effects of problem drinking and marijuana use on HIV sexual risk behaviors among childhood sexually abused South African heterosexual men?  

PubMed Central

HIV/AIDS prevalence in South Africa is one of the highest in the world with heterosexual, transmission predominantly promoting the epidemic. The goal of this study is to examine whether, marijuana use and problem drinking mediate the relationship between histories of childhood sexual, abuse (CSA) and HIV risk behaviors among heterosexual men. Participants were 1181 Black men aged, 18–45 from randomly selected neighborhoods in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Audio computer assisted, self-interviewing was used to assess self-reported childhood sexual abuse, problem drinking, and marijuana (dagga) use, and HIV sexual transmission behavior with steady and casual partners. Data were analyzed using multiple meditational modeling. There was more support for problem, drinking than marijuana use as a mediator. Findings suggest that problem drinking and marijuana use, mediate HIV sexual risk behaviors in men with histories of CSA. Focusing on men with histories of CSA, and their use of marijuana and alcohol may be particularly useful for designing strategies to reduce, HIV sexual transmission in South Africa. PMID:24041455

Icard, Larry D.; Jemmott, John B.; Teitelman, Anne; O'Leary, Ann; Heeren, G. Anita

2013-01-01

67

Mediation effects of problem drinking and marijuana use on HIV sexual risk behaviors among childhood sexually abused South African heterosexual men.  

PubMed

HIV/AIDS prevalence in South Africa is one of the highest in the world with heterosexual, transmission predominantly promoting the epidemic. The goal of this study is to examine whether, marijuana use and problem drinking mediate the relationship between histories of childhood sexual, abuse (CSA) and HIV risk behaviors among heterosexual men. Participants were 1181 Black men aged, 18-45 from randomly selected neighborhoods in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Audio computer assisted, self-interviewing was used to assess self-reported childhood sexual abuse, problem drinking, and marijuana (dagga) use, and HIV sexual transmission behavior with steady and casual partners. Data were analyzed using multiple meditational modeling. There was more support for problem, drinking than marijuana use as a mediator. Findings suggest that problem drinking and marijuana use, mediate HIV sexual risk behaviors in men with histories of CSA. Focusing on men with histories of CSA, and their use of marijuana and alcohol may be particularly useful for designing strategies to reduce, HIV sexual transmission in South Africa. PMID:24041455

Icard, Larry D; Jemmott, John B; Teitelman, Anne; O'Leary, Ann; Heeren, G Anita

2014-02-01

68

HIV transmission risk behavior among men and women living with HIV in 4 cities in the United States.  

PubMed

Determining rates of HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-positive individuals is a public health priority, especially as infected persons live longer because of improved medical treatments. Few studies have assessed the potential for transmission to the partners of HIV-positive persons who engage in high-risk activities. A total of 3723 HIV-infected persons (1918 men who have sex with men [MSM], 978 women, and 827 heterosexual men) were interviewed in clinics and community-based agencies in Los Angeles, Milwaukee, New York City, and San Francisco from June 2000 to January 2002 regarding sexual and drug use behaviors that confer risk for transmitting HIV. Less than one quarter of women and heterosexual men had 2 or more sexual partners, whereas 59% of MSM reported having multiple partners. Most unprotected vaginal and anal sexual activity took place in the context of relationships with other HIV-positive individuals. Approximately 19% of women, 15.6% of MSM, and 13.1% of heterosexual men engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal intercourse with partners who were HIV-negative or whose serostatus was unknown. The majority of sexually active participants disclosed their serostatus to all partners with whom they engaged in unprotected intercourse. An estimated 30.4 new infections (79.7% as a result of sexual interactions with MSM) would be expected among the sex partners of study participants during the 3-month reporting period. Eighteen percent of 304 participants who injected drugs in the past 3 months reported lending their used injection equipment to others. In addition to the more traditional approaches of HIV test counseling and of focusing on persons not infected, intensive prevention programs for persons with HIV infection are needed to stem the future spread of the virus. PMID:15247559

Weinhardt, Lance S; Kelly, Jeffrey A; Brondino, Michael J; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Kirshenbaum, Sheri B; Chesney, Margaret A; Remien, Robert H; Morin, Stephen F; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Ehrhardt, Anke A; Johnson, Mallory O; Catz, Sheryl L; Pinkerton, Steven D; Benotsch, Eric G; Hong, Daniel; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

2004-08-15

69

BARBERSHOP TALK WITH BROTHERS: USING COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH TO DEVELOP AND PILOT TEST A PROGRAM TO REDUCE HIV RISK AMONG BLACK HETEROSEXUAL MEN  

PubMed Central

There is a need for feasible, evidence-based interventions that support HIV risk reduction among heterosexual Black men. In this article, we describe the process for development of the Barbershop Talk With Brothers (BTWB) program and evaluation. The BTWB program is a theoretically grounded and community-based HIV prevention program that seeks to improve individual skills and motivation to decrease sexual risk, and that builds men’s interest in and capacity for improving their community’s health. Formative data collection included barbershop observations and barber focus groups, brief behavioral risk assessments of men in barbershops, and focus groups and individual interviews. Based on this information and in consultation with our steering committee, we developed the BTWB program and accompanying program evaluation. From April through November 2011, 80 men were recruited and completed a baseline assessment of a pilot test of the program; 78 men completed the program and 71 completed a 3-month assessment. The pilot evaluation procedures were feasible to implement, and assessments of pre- and post-test measures indicate that key behavioral outcomes and proposed mediators of those outcomes changed in hypothesized directions. Specifically, attitudes and self-efficacy toward consistent condom use improved, and respondents reported lower levels of sexual risk behavior from baseline to follow-up (all p < 0.05). Perceptions of community empowerment also increased (p = 0.06). While HIV stigma decreased, this difference did not reach statistical significance. Our approach to community-engaged program development resulted in an acceptable, feasible approach to reaching and educating heterosexual Black men about HIV prevention in community settings. PMID:25299804

Wilson, Tracey E.; Fraser-White, Marilyn; Williams, Kim M.; Pinto, Angelo; Agbetor, Francis; Camilien, Brignel; Henny, Kirk; Browne, Ruth C.; Gousse, Yolene; Taylor, Tonya; Brown, Humberto; Taylor, Raekiela; Joseph, Michael A.

2014-01-01

70

Barbershop Talk With Brothers: using community-based participatory research to develop and pilot test a program to reduce HIV risk among Black heterosexual men.  

PubMed

There is a need for feasible, evidence-based interventions that support HIV risk reduction among heterosexual Black men. In this article, we describe the process for development of the Barbershop Talk With Brothers (BTWB) program and evaluation. The BTWB program is a theoretically grounded and community-based HIV prevention program that seeks to improve individual skills and motivation to decrease sexual risk, and that builds men's interest in and capacity for improving their community's health. Formative data collection included barbershop observations and barber focus groups, brief behavioral risk assessments of men in barbershops, and focus groups and individual interviews. Based on this information and in consultation with our steering committee, we developed the BTWB program and accompanying program evaluation. From April through November 2011, 80 men were recruited and completed a baseline assessment of a pilot test of the program; 78 men completed the program and 71 completed a 3-month assessment. The pilot evaluation procedures were feasible to implement, and assessments of pre- and post-test measures indicate that key behavioral outcomes and proposed mediators of those outcomes changed in hypothesized directions. Specifically, attitudes and self-efficacy toward consistent condom use improved, and respondents reported lower levels of sexual risk behavior from baseline to follow-up (all p < 0.05). Perceptions of community empowerment also increased (p = 0.06). While HIV stigma decreased, this difference did not reach statistical significance. Our approach to community-engaged program development resulted in an acceptable, feasible approach to reaching and educating heterosexual Black men about HIV prevention in community settings. PMID:25299804

Wilson, Tracey E; Fraser-White, Marilyn; Williams, Kim M; Pinto, Angelo; Agbetor, Francis; Camilien, Brignel; Henny, Kirk; Browne, Ruth C; Gousse, Yolene; Taylor, Tonya; Brown, Humberto; Taylor, Raekiela; Joseph, Michael A

2014-10-01

71

The views of general practitioners and practice nurses towards the barriers and facilitators of proactive, internet-based chlamydia screening for reaching young heterosexual men  

PubMed Central

Background Chlamydia trachomatis is a common bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI), which disproportionately affects young people under 25 years. Commonly, more women are offered screening than men. This study obtained the views of general practitioners and practice nurses towards Internet-based screening and assessed levels of support for the development of proactive screening targeting young heterosexual men via the Internet. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews with 10 general practitioners and 8 practice nurses, across Central Scotland. Topics covered: experience of screening heterosexual men for chlamydia, views on the use of the Internet as a way to reach young men for chlamydia screening, beliefs about the potential barriers and facilitators to Internet-based screening. Transcripts from audio recordings were analysed with Framework Analysis, using QSR NVivo10. Results Experiences of chlamydia screening were almost exclusively with women, driven by the nature of consultations and ease of raising sexual health issues with female patients; few practice nurses reported seeing men during consultations. All participants spoke in favour of Internet-based screening for young men. Participants reported ease of access and convenience as potential facilitators of an Internet-based approach but anonymity and confidentiality could be potential barriers and facilitators to the success of an Internet approach to screening. Concerns over practical issues as well as those pertaining to gender and socio-cultural issues were raised. Conclusions Awareness of key barriers and facilitators, such as confidentiality, practicality and socio-cultural influences, will inform the development of an Internet-based approach to screening. However, this approach may have its limits in terms of being able to tackle wider social and cultural barriers, along with shifts in young people’s and health professionals’ attitudes towards screening. Nevertheless, employing innovative efforts as part of a multi-faceted approach is required to ensure effective interventions reach the policy agenda. PMID:24972919

2014-01-01

72

A systematic review of behavioral interventions to prevent HIV infection and transmission among heterosexual, adult men in low-and middle-income countries.  

PubMed

Prevention of new HIV infections needs to move to the forefront in the fight against HIV and AIDS. In the current economic crisis, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) should invest limited resources to amass reliable evidence-based information about behavioral prevention efforts, and on behaviors that are driving the epidemic among people who are engaging in those behaviors. This paper aims to provide a systematic review and synthesis of behavioral interventions among a group of people in high HIV-burden countries: heterosexual men in LMICs. The review includes articles published between January 2001 and May 2010 that evaluated behavioral prevention interventions among heterosexual males aged 18+ years in LMICs. The studies were evaluated using the quality assessment tool for quantitative studies developed by the Effective Public Health Practice Project. The review identified 19 articles that met the review's inclusion criteria. Most studies were conducted in South Africa (n=6); two each in Uganda and Thailand; and one in each of Angola, Brazil, Bulgaria, India, Nigeria, the Philippines, Russia, Ukraine and Zimbabwe. Eight of 19 interventions increased condom use among their respective populations. Those interventions that sought to reduce the number of sexual partners had little effect, and those that addressed alcohol consumption and intimate partner violence had mixed effects. There was no evidence for any specific format of intervention that impacted best on any of the targeted risk behaviors. The paucity of evaluated interventions for heterosexual men in LMICs suggests that adult men in these countries remain underrepresented in HIV prevention efforts. PMID:23111548

Townsend, Loraine; Mathews, Catherine; Zembe, Yanga

2013-02-01

73

Compensated Sex and Sexual Risk: Sexual, Social and Economic Interactions between Homosexually- and Heterosexually-Identified Men of Low Income in Two Cities of Peru  

PubMed Central

This study describes the complex dynamics of the sexual, economic and social interactions between a group of feminized homosexual men and men who have sex with men and self-identify as heterosexual (‘mostaceros’), in lower-income peripheral urban areas of Lima and Trujillo, Peru. The study examined sexual risk between these two groups of men, and the significance of the economic exchanges involved in their sexual interactions. Using a Grounded Theory approach, 23 individual interviews and 7 focus groups were analyzed. The results reveal that cultural, economic and gender factors mold sexual and social relations among a group of men who have sex with men in Peru. Compensated sex is part of the behaviors of these men, reflecting a complicated construction of sexuality based on traditional conceptions of gender roles, sexual identity and masculinity. Several factors (e.g. difficulty in negotiating condom use, low self-esteem, low risk perception, alcohol and drug consumption), in the context of compensated sex, play a role in risk-taking for HIV infection. PMID:19890491

Fernández-Dávila, Percy; Salazar, Ximena; Cáceres, Carlos F.; Maiorana, Andre; Kegeles, Susan; Coates, Thomas J.; Martinez, Josefa

2009-01-01

74

Heterosexual fronteras: Immigrant mexicanos, sexual vulnerabilities, and survival  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the busy street corners of many U.S. cities, day laborers, known as jornaleros, wait patiently on sidewalks for someone to offer them work. These men remain invisible, however, in sexuality research with\\u000a Latin American immigrant populations. Based on in-depth individual interviews with 20 self-identified heterosexual Mexican\\u000a immigrant men living in Los Angeles, this article examines two ways in which

Gloria González-López

2006-01-01

75

Can Some Gay Men and Lesbians Change Their Sexual Orientation? 200 Participants Reporting a Change from Homosexual to Heterosexual Orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Position statements of the major mental health organizations in the United States state that there is no scientific evidence that a homosexual sexual orientation can be changed by psychotherapy, often referred to as “reparative therapy.” This study tested the hypothesis that some individuals whose sexual orientation is predominantly homosexual can, with some form of reparative therapy, become predominantly heterosexual. The

Robert L. Spitzer

2003-01-01

76

The phenomenology of body image in men living with HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research into how people living with HIV or AIDS (PLWHA) experience and make sense of feared or actual body changes, such as lipodystrophy, is limited. The present study conducted in-depth interviews with gay men living with HIV. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) yielded themes across five domains. The ambiguity of early-stage lipodystrophy was a cause of distress. There was a drive

Jamie Stephen Kelly; Dawn Langdon; Lucy Serpell

2009-01-01

77

"I kiss them because I love them": the emergence of heterosexual men kissing in British institutes of education.  

PubMed

In this article, we combined data from 145 interviews and three ethnographic investigations of heterosexual male students in the U.K. from multiple educational settings. Our results indicate that 89% have, at some point, kissed another male on the lips which they reported as being non-sexual: a means of expressing platonic affection among heterosexual friends. Moreover, 37% also reported engaging in sustained same-sex kissing, something they construed as non-sexual and non-homosexual. Although the students in our study understood that this type of kissing remains somewhat culturally symbolized as a taboo sexual behavior, they nonetheless reconstructed it, making it compatible with heteromasculinity by recoding it as homosocial. We hypothesize that both these types of kissing behaviors are increasingly permissible due to rapidly decreasing levels of cultural homophobia. Furthermore, we argue that there has been a loosening of the restricted physical and emotional boundaries of traditional heteromasculinity in these educational settings, something which may also gradually assist in the erosion of prevailing heterosexual hegemony. PMID:20967493

Anderson, Eric; Adams, Adi; Rivers, Ian

2012-04-01

78

HIV Stigma Experienced by Young Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM) Living With HIV Infection.  

PubMed

Stigma can compromise the health of persons living with HIV. Although HIV is increasingly affecting young men who have sex with men (MSM), little is known about their experiences with HIV stigma. We used narrative data to examine HIV stigma experienced by young MSM living with HIV. Data came from 28 qualitative interviews with young MSM. We used inductive content analysis to identify themes across these interviews. Participants commonly discussed negative perceptions and treatment of persons living with HIV. Stigma could result in nondisclosure of HIV status, internalized stigma, and avoidance of HIV-related things. Some men discussed strategies that might combat stigma. Findings suggest that HIV stigma might challenge young MSM's health by undermining health-conducive resources (e.g., social support) and contributing to HIV vulnerability. Interventions that counteract HIV stigma may help to create environments that promote well-being among young MSM living with HIV. PMID:25646730

Jeffries, William L; Townsend, Ebony Symone; Gelaude, Deborah J; Torrone, Elizabeth A; Gasiorowicz, Mari; Bertolli, Jeanne

2015-02-01

79

Economic Evaluations of Adult Male Circumcision for Prevention of Heterosexual Acquisition of HIV in Men in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background There is conclusive evidence from observational data and three randomized controlled trials that circumcised men have a significantly lower risk of becoming infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The aim of this study was to systematically review economic evaluations on adult male circumcision (AMC) for prevention of heterosexual acquisition of HIV in men. Methods and Findings Studies were identified from the following bibliographic databases: MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), Cochrane Library (Wiley's internet version), NHS EED and DARE Office of Health Economics HEED. The searches were conducted in November 2009. The Drummond 10-point checklist was used for methodological critique of the economic evaluations. Cost data were inflated and converted to 2008 US dollars (US$). Of 264 identified papers, only five met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The studies were published between 2006 and 2009. Most of the studies were carried out from the perspective of government healthcare payer. The time horizon ranged from 10 to 20 years. All studies reported that AMC is cost-effective. The reported cost per HIV infection averted ranged from US$174 to US$2808. The key driver of the cost-effectiveness models was circumcision efficacy. Conclusions All published economic evaluations offered the same conclusion that AMC is cost-effective and potentially cost-saving for prevention of heterosexual acquisition of HIV in men. On these grounds, AMC may be seen as a promising new form of strategy for prevention of HIV and should be implemented in conjunction with other evidence-based prevention methods. PMID:20224784

Uthman, Olalekan A.; Popoola, Taiwo Aderemi; Uthman, Mubashir M. B.; Aremu, Olatunde

2010-01-01

80

Do women live longer than men?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity opens with a graph that depicts the life expectancies of men and women born in the United States. Students are asked to estimate the greatest difference between genders in the years between 1920 and 1996. The activity, part of the Figure This! collection of 80 real-world math challenges, introduces trend analysis and explains its utility to market research, radio stations, and manufacturers. The Hint tells students how they should read the graph to determine the life expectancy for a woman born in 1920. Related questions encourage students to think about how the shape of the curve might be affected by changing the scale, as well as variables that affect trends in life expectancy. Answers to all questions and additional resource suggestions are provided. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)

2002-01-01

81

Heterosexual men's ratings of sexual attractiveness of pubescent girls: Effects of labeling the target as under or over the age of sexual consent.  

PubMed

The study aimed to identify implicit and explicit processes involved in reporting the sexual attractiveness of photographs of the same pubescent girls labeled as either under or within the age of sexual consent in the UK, women, and men. In two studies, 53 and 70 heterosexual men (M age 25.2 and 31.0 years) rated the sexual attractiveness of photographs in each category presented via computer [seeing target photographs of girls labeled as either under- (14-15 years) or within the age of consent (16-17 years)], using a 7-point response box. Ratings in Study 1 were in response to a question asking participants to rate how sexually attractive the person in each photograph was. In Study 2, participants rated how sexually attractive they personally found the target. Response times were also recorded. Several findings were replicated in both studies (although the strength of findings differed). Mean ratings of the sexual attractiveness of the underage girls were lower than those of overage girls and women. In addition, correlations revealed significantly longer responding times when "underage" girls (and men) were rated as more highly sexually attractive. No such relationship emerged with the same girls labeled within the age of consent or women. Overall, these data suggest that men find pubescent girls identified as being under the age of consent sexually attractive, but inhibit their willingness to report this; the greater the attraction, the greater the inhibition. PMID:24132774

O'Donnell, Muireann; Lowe, Rob; Brotherton, Hannah; Davies, Hannah; Panou, Anna; Bennett, Paul

2014-02-01

82

Age Preferences and Mate Choice Among Homosexuals and Heterosexuals: A Case for Modular Psychological Mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Age preferences expressed by homosexuals and heterosexuals in 783 singles ads were compared. In line with earlier cross-cultural findings, heterosexual women at all ages tend to prefer men from their own age to several years older. Heterosexual men change with age; young men show an interest in both older and younger women, but older men express progressively stronger interest in

Douglas T. Kenrick; Richard C. Keefe; Angela Bryan; Alicia Barr; Stephanie Brown

1995-01-01

83

The Relation Between Sex Drive and Sexual Attraction to Men and Women: A Cross-National Study of Heterosexual, Bisexual, and Homosexual Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research suggests that, for most women, high sex drive is associated with increased sexual attraction to both women\\u000a and men. For men, however, high sex drive is associated with increased attraction to one sex or the other, but not to both,\\u000a depending on men's sexual orientation (Lippa, R. A., 2006, Psychological Science, 17, 46–52). These findings were replicated in

Richard A. Lippa

2007-01-01

84

Chlamydia trachomatis serovar distribution and other concurrent sexually transmitted infections in heterosexual men with urethritis in Italy.  

PubMed

The distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis serovars among 157 heterosexual male patients with urethritis and the presence of coinfections with other sexually transmitted infections were studied. One hundred seventeen (74.5%) patients, with a mean age of 33.7 years, were Italians, whereas 40 (25.5%) were immigrants coming from eastern European countries, Africa, and South America. All the immigrants and 82 (70.0%) Italian patients reported sex with prostitutes. Out of 157 patients, 73 (46.5%) were found positive for C. trachomatis in urethral secretions and eight different C. trachomatis serovars were identified. The most common serovars were E (n = 18; 24.7%), D (n = 15; 20.5%), G (n = 14;19.2%), and F (n = 12; 16.4%). The sequencing data showed a high degree of conservation of the omp1 gene. Thirty-six (46.7%) out of the 73 C. trachomatis-positive patients were coinfected with another sexually transmitted infection. The most common coinfection was gonorrhoea detected in 22 (30.1%) patients, followed by condyloma in eight (8.2%) patients, syphilis in five (6.8%), and HIV in three (4.1%). PMID:18958506

Donati, M; Di Francesco, A; D'Antuono, A; Pignanelli, S; Shurdhi, A; Moroni, A; Baldelli, R; Cevenini, R

2009-05-01

85

Anal high-risk human papillomavirus infection and high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia detected in women and heterosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus  

PubMed Central

Background Although anal high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and anal cytological abnormalities are highly prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM), there are insufficient data on these abnormalities among HIV-infected heterosexual men (HSM) and women. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of anal HR-HPV, cytological abnormalities, and performance of these screening tests in detecting high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN2+) among our cohort of HIV-infected MSM and non-MSM (HSM and women). Methods A single-center, retrospective cohort study was conducted with HIV-infected individuals who underwent anal cancer screening with anal cytology and HR-HPV testing from January 2011 to January 31, 2013. Results Screening of 221 HIV-infected individuals for both HR-HPV and anal cytology showed the presence of HR-HPV in 54% (abnormal anal cytology 48%) of MSM, 28% (abnormal anal cytology 28%) of HSM, and 27% (abnormal anal cytology 34%) of women. Among 117 (53%) individuals with abnormal results (HR-HPV-positive and/or cytology was atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or above), 67 underwent high resolution anoscopy. Of these 67 individuals, 22 individuals had AIN2+ (17 MSM, four women, and one HSM). HR-HPV correlated better with AIN2+ than with anal cytology on biopsy in both MSM (r=0.29 versus r=0.10; P=0.05 versus P=0.49) and non-MSM (r=0.36 versus r=?0.34; P=0.08 versus P=0.09). Conclusion Given the presence of AIN2+ in screened HIV-infected HSM and women, routine anal cancer screening in all HIV-infected individuals should be considered. HR-HPV merits further evaluation for anal cancer screening among non-MSM. PMID:25670914

Gandra, Sumanth; Azar, Aline; Wessolossky, Mireya

2015-01-01

86

ADAPTATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF HoMBReS: A COMMUNITY-LEVEL, EVIDENCE-BASED HIV BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION FOR HETEROSEXUAL LATINO MEN IN THE MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

PubMed Central

Over the past decade, the midwestern United States has witnessed a dramatic increase in its Latino population. The lack of culturally and linguistically congruent resources coupled with high incidence and prevalence rates of HIV among Latinos living in the Midwest merits attention. HoMBReS: Hombres Manteniendo Bienestar y Relaciones Saludables (Men Maintaining Wellbeing and Healthy Relationships) is a community-level social network intervention designed for Latino men. We describe the adaptation and implementation of HoMBReS for Latino men living in Indianapolis, Indiana, the second largest city in the Midwest. Five Navegantes (lay health educators) were trained; they provided a total of 34 educational charlas (small group didactic sessions). A total of 270 Latino men attended the charlas and were offered no-cost screening for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI). Three participants tested HIV positive and 15 screened positive for STI. The charlas coupled with the testing initiative, served as a successful method to increase sexual health knowledge among Latino men and to link newly-diagnosed HIV/STI-positive individuals to treatment and care. The adaptation and implementation of HoMBReS respond to the CDC and NIH call to increase HIV testing and service provision among vulnerable populations. PMID:24450279

Martinez, Omar; Roth, Alexis M.; Kelle, Guadalupe; Downs, Mario; Rhodes, Scott D.

2014-01-01

87

Adaptation and implementation of HoMBReS: a community-level, evidence-based HIV behavioral intervention for heterosexual Latino men in the midwestern United States.  

PubMed

Over the past decade, the midwestern United States has witnessed a dramatic increase in its Latino population. The lack of culturally and linguistically congruent resources coupled with high incidence and prevalence rates of HIV among Latinos living in the Midwest merits attention. HoMBReS: Hombres Manteniendo Bienestar y Relaciones Saludables (Men Maintaining Wellbeing and Healthy Relationships) is a community-level social network intervention designed for Latino men. We describe the adaptation and implementation of HoMBReS for Latino men living in Indianapolis, Indiana, the second largest city in the Midwest. Five Navegantes (lay health educators) were trained; they provided a total of 34 educational charlas (small group didactic sessions). A total of 270 Latino men attended the charlas and were offered no-cost screening for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI). Three participants tested HIV positive and 15 screened positive for STI. The charlas coupled with the testing initiative, served as a successful method to increase sexual health knowledge among Latino men and to link newly-diagnosed HIV/STI-positive individuals to treatment and care. The adaptation and implementation of HoMBReS respond to the CDC and NIH call to increase HIV testing and service provision among vulnerable populations. PMID:24450279

Martinez, Omar; Roth, Alexis M; Kelle, Guadalupe; Downs, Mario; Rhodes, Scott D

2014-02-01

88

Heteronormativity hurts everyone: experiences of young men and clinicians with sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing in British Columbia, Canada.  

PubMed

Heteronormative assumptions can negatively influence the lives of young gay and bisexual men, and recent sociological analyses have identified the negative impacts of heteronormativity on heterosexual men (e.g. 'fag discourse' targeted at heterosexual adolescents). However, insights into how heteronormative discourses may be (re)produced in clinical settings and how they contribute to health outcomes for gay, bisexual and heterosexual men are poorly understood. This analysis draws on in-depth interviews with 45 men (15-25 years old) and 25 clinicians in British Columbia, Canada, to examine how heteronormative discourses affect sexually transmitted infection testing. The sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing experience emerged as a unique situation, whereby men's (hetero)sexuality was explicitly 'interrogated'. Risk assessments discursively linked sexual identity to risk in ways that reinforced gay men as the risky 'other' and heterosexual men as the (hetero)normal and, therefore, relatively low-risk patient. This, in turn, alleviated concern for sexually transmitted infection/HIV exposure in heterosexual men by virtue of their sexual identity (rather than their sexual practices), which muted discussions around their sexual health. The clinicians also positioned sexual identities and practices as important 'clues' for determining their patients' social contexts and supports while concurrently informing particular tailored clinical communication strategies. These findings highlight how men's experiences with sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing can (re)produce heteronormative assumptions and expectations or create opportunities for more equitable gendered relations and discourses. PMID:23117592

Knight, Rod; Shoveller, Jean A; Oliffe, John L; Gilbert, Mark; Goldenberg, Shira

2013-09-01

89

Minority stress in the lives of men who have sex with men in Cape Town, South Africa.  

PubMed

The mental health outcomes of men who have sex with men (MSM) living in sub-Saharan Africa are understudied, despite evidence that discrimination and stigma are widespread. This article examines the occurrence and mental health effects of minority stress in a sample of diverse South African MSM. Twenty-two MSM living in Cape Town took part in exploratory qualitative in-depth interviews and completed mental health questionnaires. Results indicate that the majority of participants experienced minority stress, which affected their sexual relationships and coping strategies. Concealment behaviors and perceived discrimination levels were high and were associated with race, religion, SES, and geographical location. PMID:24392722

McAdams-Mahmoud, Ayesha; Stephenson, Rob; Rentsch, Christopher; Cooper, Hannah; Arriola, Kimberly Jacob; Jobson, Geoffrey; de Swardt, Glenn; Struthers, Helen; McIntyre, James

2014-01-01

90

Cerebral activation associated with sexual arousal in response to a pornographic clip: A 15O-H2O PET study in heterosexual men.  

PubMed

This study attempted to use PET and 15O-H2O to measure changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during sexual arousal evoked in 10 young heterosexual males while they watched a pornographic video clip, featuring heterosexual intercourse. This condition was compared with other mental setups evoked by noisy, nature, and talkshow audiovisual clips. Immediately after each clip, the participants answered three questions pertaining to what extent they thought about sex, felt aroused, and sensed an erection. They scored their answers using a 1 to 10 scale. SPM was used for data analysis. Sexual arousal was mainly associated with activation of bilateral, predominantly right, inferoposterior extrastriate cortices, of the right inferolateral prefrontal cortex and of the midbrain. The significance of those findings is discussed in the light of current theories concerning selective attention, "mind reading" and mirroring, reinforcement of pleasurable stimuli, and penile erection. PMID:11525320

Bocher, M; Chisin, R; Parag, Y; Freedman, N; Meir Weil, Y; Lester, H; Mishani, E; Bonne, O

2001-07-01

91

Heterosexual HIV transmission.  

PubMed

Most of the people now living with HIV acquired the infection through heterosexual intercourse. HIV transmission has been facilitated by (a) concomitant sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), (b) the presence of social conditions that create core groups who have frequent and numerous partners, (c) sexual practices associated with bleeding (i.e., trauma, sex during menses) as well as noncircumcision, (d) cervical ectopy, and (e) anal sex. HIV may be found both cell-free and as intracellular virus in genital tract secretion, and may be sexually transmitted through either mechanism. HIV titers in genital tract secretions vary by several logs between people and within individuals over time, being greatest just after seroconversion and with advanced immunosuppression, concomitant genital tract inflammation (including STDs), and decreasing (but not to zero) with antiretroviral therapy. The per-contact transmission efficiency rate is highly variable, ranging from > 3% to < 1 per thousand contacts, with male-to-female HIV transmission generally being more efficient than vice versa. Control of the heterosexual HIV epidemic will necessitate a multidisciplinary approach, utilizing direct biological approaches (e.g., culturally specific and behavioral interventions, as well as more fundamental community changes that decrease societal norms that augment unsafe practices. PMID:8665090

Mayer, K H; Anderson, D J

1995-12-01

92

Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Men Historically, men have not been comfortable discussing issues ... and sexual dysfunction with your healthcare team. Explore: Men Men’s Health Month Fear of receiving bad news ...

93

[Men and women living in marital violence: socioeconomic aspects].  

PubMed

Quantitative and descriptive study aiming to identify socioeconomic characteristics of men and women with a history of domestic violence. We conducted interviews with 50 men and 50 women. Nearly all subjects were self-declared black. Most did not have too many years of school education. Men perform occupations that are public and women do predominantly domestic activities. Only 3 women (6%) are considered financially independent. The degree of economic dependence is directly related to the level of education that has been established as a prerequisite to enter into the labor market. The situation is even more precarious for women interviewed with fewer years of education and a high degree of financial dependence that interferes with their empowerment to address domestic violence. Health professionals, especially nurses, should address the social inequities and improve the socioeconomic context of users to identify situations that endanger the health of the population. PMID:23155588

Gomes, Nadirlene Pereira; Diniz, Normélia Maria Freire; de Camargo, Climene Laura; da Silva, Marieve Pereira

2012-06-01

94

Safe sex practices of Indian immigrant men living in Australia: an exploratory research.  

PubMed

There is a paucity of scientific information about safe sex practices of Indians immigrants living in popular multicultural nations such as Australia. An online survey of adult Indian men living in Australia was conducted to measure the frequency of use of safe sex practices using the Safe Sex Behavior Questionnaire (SSBQ). Among the respondents of the SSBQ (n = 184), 16.8% (n = 31) reported that never insist on condom use, when having sexual intercourse. One in two men surveyed, agreed that it is difficult for them to discuss safe sex issues with their sexual partners. One in two men said that they used alcoholic beverages prior to or during sexual intercourse. There were no significant differences in SSBQ data among Indian men based on their relationship status. The current study has assessed a range of safe sex practices by involving a community sample of Indian men, and provides baseline data for further evaluation and comparison. PMID:25491521

Ramanathan, Vijayasarathi; Sitharthan, Gomathi

2014-01-01

95

Exploring Living-Learning Communities as a Venue for Men's Identity Construction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study explored how male undergraduate students experienced living-learning community environments. Findings revealed that living-learning communities provided men a "safe haven" from rigid gender role expectations, offered a plethora of involvement opportunities, and fostered relationships with faculty and peers. The findings…

Jessup-Anger, Jody E.; Johnson, Brianne N.; Wawrzynski, Matthew R.

2012-01-01

96

The Sexual Lives of Men with Mild Learning Disability: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We aimed to explore in detail the sexual lives and behaviour of men with mild learning disabilities living both in community and in secure hospital settings. We wanted to generate hypotheses about them and identify potential unmet needs. We used a narrative interview that focused on areas such as relationships, sex education, contraception and the…

Yacoub, Evan; Hall, Ian

2009-01-01

97

Body Image Satisfaction in Heterosexual, Gay, and Lesbian Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Does the prevalence and degree of body dissatisfaction differ among heterosexual and homosexual men and women? Some theorists\\u000a have suggested that, compared to their heterosexual peers, gay men are at greater risk for body dissatisfaction and lesbians\\u000a at lower risk. Past studies examining this issue have generally relied on small samples recruited from gay or lesbian groups.\\u000a Further, these studies

Letitia Anne Peplau; David A. Frederick; Curtis Yee; Natalya Maisel; Janet Lever; Negin Ghavami

2009-01-01

98

Men's Serostatus Disclosure to Parents: Associations Among Social Support, Ethnicity, and Disease Status in Men Living with HIV  

PubMed Central

Background Directly disclosing a positive HIV serostatus to family members can affect psychological and disease status. Perceptions that one is in a supportive family environment may moderate these effects; however, ethnic differences may exist in the support processes of families coping with HIV. Methods We examined the role of serostatus disclosure to parents, HIV-specific family support, and ethnicity (Latino versus non-Hispanic White) in explaining disease status (HIV Viral Load, CD4+ cell count) in a sample of men living with HIV (MLWH). Men (n = 120) reported whether they had disclosed their serostatus to their mothers and fathers, rated their perceptions of HIV-specific social support received from family members, and provided morning peripheral venous blood samples to assess immune function. We also collected psychosocial and urinary neuroendocrine indicators of stress/distress as possible mediator variables. Results A three-way interaction emerged between serostatus disclosure to mothers, HIV-specific family support, and ethnicity in explaining both viral load and CD4+ cell count. Non-Hispanic White men who had disclosed to mothers and were receiving high family support had a lower viral load and higher CD4+ cell count, but Latino men who had disclosed to mothers and were receiving low family support had a higher viral load. These associations were not accounted for by men's medication adherence, psychological distress, or neuroendocrine hormones. Disclosure to fathers was not related to disease status. Conclusions The effects of serostatus disclosure on disease status may depend, in part, on ethnic differences in the interpersonal processes of men's close family relationships. PMID:19486655

Fekete, Erin M.; Antoni, Michael H.; Lopez, Corina R.; Durán, Ron E.; Penedo, Frank J.; Bandiera, Frank C.; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Klimas, Nancy; Kumar, Mahendra; Schneiderman, Neil

2009-01-01

99

What should men living with haemophilia need to know? The perspectives of Canadian men with haemophilia.  

PubMed

Haemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder affecting approximately 3000 Canadian men (Walker 2012). To manage their disease effectively individuals must be knowledgeable about the disease, bleed prevention strategies, treatment approaches, and complications. Data on individuals' knowledge levels are scarce. The availability of such data could lead to better educational strategies for disease management. The aim of this study was to determine current knowledge levels, needs and gaps among Canadian individuals with haemophilia to facilitate optimal disease management. A survey was disseminated to adult males with haemophilia at three Haemophilia Treatment Centres (HTCs) in Canada. Self-reported current knowledge levels and knowledge seeking were measured. Survey respondents reported highest levels of knowledge in the following areas: identifying and treating a bleed, haemophilia and physical activity, travel, career issues and genetics. Lower levels of knowledge were reported in the areas of sexual activity, product safety, information about factor, haemophilia and ageing, advocacy, timing of prophylactic infusions, and new or alternative therapies. Treating a bleed was the most commonly sought information, followed by information about factor, product safety, identifying a bleed and other health care issues. There was a positive correlation between knowledge seeking and severity of disease. HTC attendance was associated with knowledge seeking, and HTCs were the most frequented knowledge source, followed by the Canadian Haemophilia Society website. Canadian men were well informed; the HTC's role in knowledge sharing was recognized. Timing of infusions, sexual activity and ageing are areas which should be targeted in knowledge sharing. PMID:24252098

Arnold, E; Lane, S; Webert, K E; Chan, A; Walker, I; Tufts, J; Rubin, S; Poon, M-C; Heddle, N M

2014-03-01

100

The relationship between alcohol and individual differences variables on attitudes and behavioral skills relevant to sexual health among heterosexual young adult men.  

PubMed

The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the effects of alcohol, alcohol sex expectancies, and sexual sensation seeking on determinants of sexual health behavior according to the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model. The participants were 48 heterosexual young adult males who attended 2 laboratory sessions. During Session 1, participants completed a set of screening and individual differences measures, and during Session 2 they were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 beverage conditions: control, alcohol (0.65 g alcohol/kg body weight), or placebo. Following the experimental manipulation, all participants completed measures regarding attitudes toward condom use, intention to engage in risky sex, and condom use negotiation skills. The results showed that participants who consumed alcohol had poorer negotiation skills and greater intention to engage in risky sex compared to participants who did not drink alcohol. Although alcohol did not affect any dimension of attitude regarding condom use, attitude about condoms' effects on sex, as well as sexual sensation seeking, were correlated with both intention ratings and skills. Multiple regression models, including both attitudes and sensation seeking, showed that attitudes accounted for 20-25% of variance independent of beverage condition in predicting intention ratings and skills. The findings were consistent with past research showing that alcohol consumption can have detrimental effects on determinants of sexual health behavior and that individual differences factors can enhance the power of models like the IMB to predict such behavior. PMID:15483371

Maisto, Stephen A; Carey, Michael P; Carey, Kate B; Gordon, Christopher M; Schum, Jennifer L; Lynch, Kevin G

2004-12-01

101

Transmission of Human Papillomavirus in Heterosexual Couples  

PubMed Central

We examined the transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) in 25 heterosexual, monogamous couples (25 men, 25 women), followed up over an average of 7.5 months. A total of 53 heterosexual transmission events were observed among 16 couples (14 male-to-female and 39 female-to-male). Sexual transmission involved 13 different oncogenic and nononcogenic HPV types; 8% were vaccine-covered types transmitted between partners. The overall rate of HPV transmission from the penis to the cervix was 4.9/100 person-months, which was substantially lower than that from the cervix to the penis (17.4/100 person-months). Transmission between the hands and genitals, as well as apparent self-inoculation events (primarily in men), were also observed. Couples who transmitted HPV were more sexually active and used condoms less frequently. These results have implications for HPV prevention and control strategies, including the targeting of prophylactic vaccines. PMID:18507898

Wilkens, Lynne R.; Zhu, Xuemei; Thompson, Pamela; McDuffie, Katharine; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Killeen, Jeffrey; Ning, Lily; Goodman, Marc T.

2008-01-01

102

Patterns and Correlates of Sexual Activity and Condom Use Behavior in Persons 50-Plus Years of Age Living with HIV/AIDS  

PubMed Central

This study characterized rates of sexual activity and identified psychosocial and behavioral correlates of sexual activity and condom use in a metropolitan sample of 290 HIV-infected adults 50-plus years of age. Thirty-eight percent of participants were sexually active in the past three months, 33% of whom had at least one occasion of anal or vaginal intercourse that was not condom protected. Rates and correlates of sexual activity and condom use differed between gay/bisexual men, heterosexual men, and heterosexual women. In the past three months, 72% of heterosexual men were sexually active compared to only 36% of gay/bisexual men and 21% of heterosexual women. However, among sexually active persons, only 27% of heterosexual men reported inconsistent condom use compared to 37% of gay/bisexual men and 35% of heterosexual women. As the number of older adults living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. continues to increase, age-appropriate secondary risk-reduction interventions are urgently needed. PMID:18389361

Heckman, Timothy G.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene; Suhr, Julie A.; Garske, John P.; Johnson, Christopher J.

2008-01-01

103

"We gotta get out of this place": A qualitative study on the effects of leisure travel on the lives of gay men living in a small community  

E-print Network

to larger cities was a major negotiation strategy used to escape the stifling, hetero-normative community in which they lived. Escaping perceived hostilities was essential for gay men to feel comfortable exploring their homosexuality in a positive...

Herrera, Sergio Lino

2005-02-17

104

Resilience processes demonstrated by young gay and bisexual men living with HIV: implications for intervention.  

PubMed

Given the increasing numbers of young gay/bisexual men (YGBM) diagnosed with HIV, it is important to understand the resilience processes enacted by this population in order to develop interventions that support their healthy development. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 54 YGBM (ages 17 to 24; 57% African American, 22% Latino) living with HIV from four geographically diverse clinics in the United States. Resilience processes clustered into four primary thematic areas: (1) engaging in health-promoting cognitive processes; (2) enacting healthy behavioral practices; (3) enlisting social support from others; and (4) empowering other young gay/bisexual men. These data suggest that YGBM living with HIV demonstrate resilience across multiple dimensions, including intrapersonal-level resilience related to individual cognitions and behaviors, as well as interpersonal-level resilience related to seeking support and providing support to others. Implications for the development of culturally-appropriate and strengths-based secondary prevention and other psychosocial interventions for YGBM living with HIV are discussed. PMID:25329778

Harper, Gary W; Bruce, Douglas; Hosek, Sybil G; Fernandez, M Isabel; Rood, Brian A

2014-12-01

105

Tobacco, Marijuana Use and Sensation-seeking: Comparisons Across Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Heterosexual Groups  

PubMed Central

This study examined patterns of smoked substances (cigarettes and marijuana) among heterosexuals, gays, lesbians, and bisexuals based on data from the 2000 National Alcohol Survey (NAS), a population-based telephone survey of adults in the United States. We also examined the effect of bar patronage and sensation-seeking/impulsivity (SSImp) on tobacco and marijuana use. Sexual orientation was defined as: lesbian or gay self-identified, bisexual self-identified, heterosexual self-identified with same-sex partners in the last five years, and exclusively heterosexual (heterosexual self-identified, reporting no same sex partners). Findings indicate that bisexual women and heterosexual women reporting same-sex partners had higher rates of cigarette smoking than exclusively heterosexual women. Bisexual women, lesbians and heterosexual women with same-sex partners also used marijuana at significantly higher rates than exclusively heterosexual women. Marijuana use was significantly greater and tobacco use was elevated among gay men compared to heterosexual men. SSImp was associated with greater use of both of these substances across nearly all groups. Bar patronage and SSImp did not buffer the relationship between sexual identity and smoking either cigarettes or marijuana. These findings suggest that marijuana and tobacco use differ by sexual identity, particularly among women, and underscore the importance of developing prevention and treatment services that are appropriate for sexual minorities. PMID:20025368

Trocki, Karen F.; Drabble, Laurie A.; Midanik, Lorraine T.

2009-01-01

106

Heteronormativity and 'troubled' masculinities among men who have sex with men in Addis Ababa.  

PubMed

In most societies, heterosexuality is the dominant way of expressing sexuality and masculinity and those men outside of it are stigmatised and discriminated against. This paper explores the sexual lives of men who have sex with men and the personal and social conflicts that arise as they attempt to both live up to societal expectations and manage their sexual desires. It critically explores how an overriding heteronormativity structures and influences men's perception and understanding of sexuality and masculinity/femininity. The paper draws on data from 24 in-depth/life history interviews, one focus group discussion and ethnographic observation conducted between July 2006 and June 2007. The study reveals that powerful and dominating beliefs about heteronormativity and masculinity result in men who have sex with men dealing with a number of issues of personal conflict and contradiction resulting in uncertainty, resentment, ambivalence, worry and discomfort. Heteronormativity or the expectations of parents, community and society at large is far more influential on the sexuality of men who have sex with men than their own individual desires and needs. The paper concludes that there is little room for individuality for Ethiopian men who have sex with men with their sexual bodies 'belonging' to parents, families and to society at large. PMID:21246428

Tadele, Getnet

2011-04-01

107

Tailoring AIDS prevention: differences in behavioral strategies among heterosexual and gay bar patrons in San Francisco.  

PubMed

Three groups of San Francisco bar patrons (heterosexual men, heterosexual women, and gay men) were compared on four sexual risk reduction strategies for AIDS: safer sex practices (particularly adoption of the use of condoms), reducing the number of sexual partners, taking the HIV antibody test, and determining the characteristics of a potential sexual partner. Heterosexuals reported fewer sex partners and were more likely than gay men to interview potential partners. Gay men were more likely to use condoms and the HIV antibody test than their heterosexual counterparts. These findings encourage the design of interventions that take advantage of shaping and reinforcing strategies already in use in each group, and suggest when it is necessary to teach new strategies. PMID:2036286

McKusick, L; Hoff, C C; Stall, R; Coates, T J

1991-01-01

108

Very Old, Widowed and Single Men Living Alone: The effect of residence, retirement village vs. the community, on social interactions, friendships and loneliness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study investigates the impact of residence on the social networks reported by very old (75 years+) single and widowed men who live alone, either in the community (n=26) or an independent living unit in a retirement village (n=24). With research suggesting that older men living alone are most at risk for experiencing social isolation, this study investigates whether

Laurie Buys; Evonne Miller

109

The heterosexual affectional system in monkeys  

Microsoft Academic Search

We believe that the heterosexual affectional system in the rhesus monkey, like all the other affectional systems, goes through a series of developmental stages––an infantile heterosexual stage, a preadolescent stage, and an adolescent and mature heterosexual stage.\\

Harry F. Harlow

1962-01-01

110

Age preferences in dating advertisements by homosexuals and heterosexuals: from sociobiological to sociological explanations.  

PubMed

Current sociobiological thought suggests that significant components of mate selection are based on indicators that correlate with the ability to produce and support offspring. Theorists have suggested that men tend to be attracted to and marry younger women, while women tend to be attracted to and marry older men. This behavior is referred to as age hypergamy. I complicate this picture by using gay men as a population in which to explore alternative components of mate selection as reflected in our behavior. Analyses of 120 dating advertisements from gay men and heterosexual men and women indicated that there exists a good measure of hypergamic age preference that is comparable to the heterosexual population and that relates to subjects' gender presentation. Data suggest that the biological-reproductive theory of age hypergamy is incomplete and support a cultural reproduction model of gender role behavior and preference in both heterosexuals and homosexuals. PMID:23179236

Burrows, Kathryn

2013-02-01

111

Relationships between homosexual and heterosexual interest and their implications for bisexuality: an empirical test.  

PubMed

Conceptualizing heterosexual and homosexual interest as reciprocal constructs can be a source of confusion, and may obstruct understanding of sexual orientation in counseling. We investigated the relationships between homosexual interest, heterosexual interest, and masculinity and femininity. Seventy-eight men attending a homophile organisation completed the Kinsey Scale, and two separate continua measuring degree of homosexual interest and degree of heterosexual interest independently. The correlation between the two continua was -.51, suggesting that homosexual and heterosexual interest are to some extent independent of one another, and that a single continuum which assumes homosexual interest to be the direct converse of heterosexual interest may not be an adequate measure of sexual orientation. No significant relationships between masculinity, femininity and sexual orientation were found. Implications for counseling people with concerns about sexual orientation and sex of partner are discussed. PMID:19835038

Ross, Michael W

2007-01-01

112

Fertility Desires among Men and Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Nairobi Slums: A Mixed Methods Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives Fertility desires require new understanding in a context of expanding access to antiretroviral therapy for people living with HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper studies the fertility desires and their rationales, of slum-dwelling Kenyan men and women living with HIV/AIDS who know their serostatus, but have different antiretroviral therapy treatment statuses. It addresses two research questions: How do people living with HIV/AIDS consider their future fertility? What factors contribute to an explanation of fertility desires among people living with HIV/AIDS. Methods A mixed methods study (survey [n?=?513] and in-depth interviews [n?=?41]) with adults living with HIV/AIDS living in Nairobi slums was conducted in 2010. Regression analyses assess independent relationships between fertility desires and socio-demographic factors. Analyses of in-depth interviews are used to interpret the statistical analyses of fertility desires. Results Our analyses show that fertility desires are complex and ambivalent, reflecting tensions between familial and societal pressures to have children versus pressures for HIV (re-)infection prevention. More than a third (34%) of men and women living with HIV expressed future fertility desires; however, this is significantly lower than in the general population. Factors independently associated with desiring a child among people living with HIV/AIDS were age, sex, number of surviving children, social support and household wealth of the respondent. Discussion Increasing access to ART is changing the context of future childbearing for people living with HIV/AIDS. Prevailing values mean that, for many people living with HIV/AIDS, having children is seen as necessary for a “normal” and healthy adult life. However, the social rewards of childbearing conflict with moral imperatives of HIV prevention, presenting dilemmas about the “proper” reproductive behaviour of people living with HIV/AIDS. The health policy and service delivery implications of these findings are explored. PMID:25171593

Wekesa, Eliud; Coast, Ernestina

2014-01-01

113

Body ideals for heterosexual romantic partners: Gender and sociocultural influences.  

PubMed

In the present study, heterosexual college women (N=327) and men (N=160) were asked about their body type preferences for (hypothetical) romantic partners. Participants chose a particular silhouette value as ideal for a romantic partner, and rated how important it was to them for their partner to have this ideal body type. Men placed more importance on the body silhouette they chose for a partner than women did, and men's importance ratings were positively associated with the rated sexual permissiveness of their peer group and their total media use. Consuming sports media and watching reality television were the best media predictors of men's judgments about women's bodies. Less variability was explained in women's preferences for men partners' bodies, but endorsing adversarial sexual attitudes was positively related to judging the ideals chosen for men's bodies as important. Results were interpreted within both evolutionary and sociocultural theoretical frameworks. PMID:25462878

Murnen, Sarah K; Poinsatte, Katherine; Huntsman, Karen; Goldfarb, Jesse; Glaser, Daniel

2014-10-17

114

Sex differences in aggression between heterosexual partners: A meta-analytic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meta-analyses of sex differences in physical aggression to heterosexual partners and in its physical consequences are reported. Women were slightly more likely (d = -.05) than men to use one or more act of physical aggression and to use such acts more frequently. Men were more likely (d =. 15) to inflict an injury, and overall, 62% of those injured

John Archer

2000-01-01

115

Attitudes of Heterosexual Students toward Their Gay Male and Lesbian Peers. Research Report #3-95.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined heterosexual college students attitudes toward gay men and lesbians, and in what types of situations were negative feelings expressed toward gay men and lesbians. A random sample of 224 residence hall students at the University of Maryland College Park completed the Situational Attitude Scale Sexual Orientation Survey, which…

Engstrom, Catherine McHugh; Sedlacek, William E.

116

Measuring Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality in Lesbian, Gay Male, and Heterosexual Populations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on studies on the development and validation of the Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality Scale (ARBS). In heterosexuals, subscales were strongly related to attitudes toward lesbians and gay men, frequency of religious attendance, political ideology, and prior contact. In lesbians and gay men, subscales correlated with prior experiences and…

Mohr, Jonathan J.; Rochlen, Aaron B.

1999-01-01

117

Intrasexual Competition and Eating Restriction in Heterosexual and Homosexual Individuals  

PubMed Central

Restrictive eating attitudes and behaviors have been hypothesized to be related to processes of intrasexual competition. According to this perspective, within-sex competition for status serves the adaptive purpose of attracting mates. As such, status competition salience may lead to concerns of mating desirability. For heterosexual women and gay men, such concerns revolve around appearing youthful and thus, thinner. Following this logic, we examined how exposure to high-status and competitive (but not thin or highly attractive) same-sex individuals would influence body image and eating attitudes in heterosexual and in gay/lesbian individuals. Results indicated that for heterosexuals, intrasexual competition cues led to greater body image dissatisfaction and more restrictive eating attitudes for women, but not for men. In contrast, for homosexual individuals, intrasexual competition cues led to worse body image and eating attitudes for gay men, but not for lesbian women. These findings support the idea that the ultimate explanation for eating disorders is related to intrasexual competition. PMID:20835352

Li, Norman P.; Smith, April R.; Griskevicius, Vladas; Cason, Margaret J.; Bryan, Angela

2010-01-01

118

The invisible stereotypes of bisexual men.  

PubMed

Bisexual men have little public visibility, yet previous reports indicate that heterosexuals have specific prejudicial attitudes towards them. This article reports on two studies that examined the stereotypical beliefs of heterosexual men and women regarding bisexual men. In Study 1 (n = 88), we examined awareness of social stereotypes (stereotype knowledge). Most of the participants were unable to describe the various stereotypes of bisexual men. Contrary to previous studies, low-prejudiced participants had more stereotype knowledge than high-prejudiced participants. In Study 2 (n = 232), we examined prejudice in a contextual evaluation task that required no stereotype knowledge. Participants evaluated a single target character on a first date: a bisexual man dating a heterosexual woman, a bisexual man dating a gay man, a heterosexual man dating a heterosexual woman, or a gay man dating a gay man. The findings indicated that participants implemented stereotypical beliefs in their evaluation of bisexual men: compared to heterosexual and gay men, bisexual men were evaluated as more confused, untrustworthy, open to new experiences, as well as less inclined towards monogamous relationships and not as able to maintain a long-term relationship. Overall, the two studies suggest that the stereotypical beliefs regarding bisexual men are prevalent, but often not acknowledged as stereotypes. In addition, the implementation of stereotypes in the evaluations was shown to be dependent on the potential romantic partner of the target. Possible theoretical explanations and implications are discussed. PMID:24558124

Zivony, Alon; Lobel, Thalma

2014-08-01

119

Proximity to HIV is associated with a high rate of HIV testing among men who have sex with men living in Douala, Cameroon.  

PubMed

In low- and middle-income countries, men who have sex with men (MSM) are 19 times more likely to be HIV positive compared with background populations. Criminalisation and social rejection of homosexuality in most sub-Saharan African countries reinforce stigma and exclude MSM from prevention activities, including HIV testing. This paper's purpose is to identify factors associated with never having been HIV tested (NHT), among a sample of Cameroonian MSM. In 2008, a community-based study was conducted in Douala, the economic capital city of Cameroon, by a local NGO Alternatives-Cameroun, recruiting participants through the snowball technique and administering a questionnaire during face-to-face interviews. Proximity to HIV was investigated according to the following criteria: knowing at least one person living with HIV and having been exposed to HIV prevention interventions. NHT was defined as reporting to have never been HIV tested. A logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with NHT. Among the 165 MSM of our study group who reported that they were not HIV positive, 19% reported NHT. Factors independently associated with NHT were as follows: being younger, being Muslim, not having a steady male partner, not knowing any person living with HIV and never having been exposed to HIV prevention interventions. In this MSM population, a small proportion reported that they had never been HIV tested and among these, the percentage was higher among individuals not in proximity to HIV. Despite the hostile context of sub-Saharan African countries towards MSM, local and national HIV testing campaigns to date may have played a substantial role in raising HIV awareness in the MSM population living in Douala, and peer-based counselling may have educated those in contact with Alternatives-Cameroun regarding the positive value of HIV testing. This result is a further argument for continuing community-based prevention and extending it to difficult-to-reach MSM. PMID:22519605

Lorente, Nicolas; Henry, Emilie; Fugon, Lionel; Yomb, Yves; Carrieri, Maria Patrizia; Eboko, Fred; Spire, Bruno

2012-01-01

120

Shorter Men Live Longer: Association of Height with Longevity and FOXO3 Genotype in American Men of Japanese Ancestry  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine the relation between height, FOXO3 genotype and age of death in humans. Methods Observational study of 8,003 American men of Japanese ancestry from the Honolulu Heart Program/Honolulu-Asia Aging Study (HHP/HAAS), a genetically and culturally homogeneous cohort followed for over 40 years. A Cox regression model with age as the time scale, stratified by year of birth, was used to estimate the effect of baseline height on mortality during follow-up. An analysis of height and longevity-associated variants of the key regulatory gene in the insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway, FOXO3, was performed in a HHP-HAAS subpopulation. A study of fasting insulin level and height was conducted in another HHP-HAAS subpopulation. Results A positive association was found between baseline height and all-cause mortality (RR?=?1.007; 95% CI 1.003–1.011; P?=?0.002) over the follow-up period. Adjustments for possible confounding variables reduced this association only slightly (RR?=?1.006; 95% CI 1.002–1.010; P?=?0.007). In addition, height was positively associated with all cancer mortality and mortality from cancer unrelated to smoking. A Cox regression model with time-dependent covariates showed that relative risk for baseline height on mortality increased as the population aged. Comparison of genotypes of a longevity-associated single nucleotide polymorphism in FOXO3 showed that the longevity allele was inversely associated with height. This finding was consistent with prior findings in model organisms of aging. Height was also positively associated with fasting blood insulin level, a risk factor for mortality. Regression analysis of fasting insulin level (mIU/L) on height (cm) adjusting for the age both data were collected yielded a regression coefficient of 0.26 (95% CI 0.10–0.42; P?=?0.001). Conclusion Height in mid-life is positively associated with mortality, with shorter stature predicting longer lifespan. Height was, moreover, associated with fasting insulin level and the longevity genotype of FOXO3, consistent with a mechanistic role for the IIS pathway. PMID:24804734

He, Qimei; Morris, Brian J.; Grove, John S.; Petrovitch, Helen; Ross, Webster; Masaki, Kamal H.; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Chen, Randi; Donlon, Timothy A.; Willcox, D. Craig; Willcox, Bradley J.

2014-01-01

121

Effect of four monthly oral vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation on fractures and mortality in men and women living in the community: randomised double blind controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To determine the effect of four monthly vitamin D supplementation on the rate of fractures in men and women aged 65 years and over living in the community. Design Randomised double blind controlled trial of 100 000 IU oral vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation or matching placebo every four months over five years. Setting and participants 2686 people (2037 men

Daksha P Trivedi; Richard Doll; Kay Tee Khaw

2003-01-01

122

Quality of Life of Men and Women with Borderline Intelligence and Attention Deficit Disorders Living in Community Residences: A Comparative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research studies the quality of life (QOL) of 127 men and women diagnosed as having a borderline IQ and ADHD living in two major residential programs of the Sharon region in central Israel in respect to their personal, disability, and social ecological variables. Core findings indicate that men and women differ significantly according to their…

Rimmerman, Arie; Yurkevich, Oren; Birger, Moshe; Araten-Bergman, Tal

2005-01-01

123

Patterns of sexual mixing with respect to social, health and sexual characteristics among heterosexual couples in England: analyses of probability sample survey data.  

PubMed

SUMMARY Patterns of sexual mixing are major determinants of sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission, in particular the extent to which high-risk populations mix with low-risk populations. However, patterns of mixing in the general population are poorly understood. We analysed data from a national probability sample survey of households, the Health Survey for England 2010. A total of 943 heterosexual couples living together, where at least one partner was aged between 16-44 years, were included. We used correlation coefficients to measure the strength of similarities between partners with respect to demographic characteristics, general health, health behaviours and sexual history. Males were on average 2 years older than their female partners, although this age difference ranged from a median of 0 years in men aged 16-24 years to a median of 2 years in men aged 35-44 years. A positive correlation between partners was found for all demographic characteristics. With respect to general health and health behaviours, a strongly positive correlation was found between men and women in reporting alcohol consumption at ?3 days a week and smoking. Men typically reported greater numbers of sexual partners than their female partner, although men and women with more partners were more likely to mix with each other. We have been able to elucidate the patterns of sexual mixing between men and women living together in England. Mixing based on demographic characteristics was more assortative than sexual characteristics. These data can better inform mathematical models of STI transmission. PMID:25167088

Prah, P; Copas, A J; Mercer, C H; Nardone, A; Johnson, A M

2014-08-28

124

Negotiating homosexual identities: the experiences of men who have sex with men in Guangzhou  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on an ethnographic study of male homosexuality in contemporary Chinese society. The study focused on how men negotiated with the mainstream Chinese heterosexual society and in so doing constructed their sexual identities. The factors found to inform sexual identity were: the cultural imperative of heterosexual marriage, normative family obligations, desired gender roles, emotional experiences and a need

Haochu Li; Eleanor Holroyd; Joseph T. F. Lau

2010-01-01

125

Heterosexual Allies: A Descriptive Profile  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty-six heterosexual members of a college-based gay/straight alliance organization were surveyed to investigate characteristics of students who commit to acting as allies in reducing sexual prejudice. Assessment focused on the students' history of intergroup contact and exposure to sexual prejudice prior to joining the gay/straight alliance,…

Goldstein, Susan B.; Davis, Denise S.

2010-01-01

126

Heterosexual Interests of Suburban Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Extensive cross sectional data suggest a real continuity between prepubertal attitudes and experience and those of adolescence. The preteen years (10-13) represent a period of preparation for later heterosexual involvement. These findings suggest need to modify traditional points of view regarding patterns of sociosexual development. (Author/CJ)

Broderick, Carlfred B.

1971-01-01

127

Bedouin wives on the home front: living with men serving in the Israel Defense Forces.  

PubMed

This community-based study examined emotional and somatic symptoms of 129 Bedouin women whose husbands serve in the Israel Defense Forces. Wives of men diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) reported more symptoms than wives of men diagnosed with other disorders and wives of men with no diagnosis. Findings indicate that not only was PTSD in Bedouin servicemen positively associated with their wives' symptoms of posttraumatic stress and depression and somatic complaints, but that this relationship was fully mediated by husbands' aggression. Unraveling the special circumstances of women from traditional backgrounds faced with the devastating effects of husbands' combat-related posttraumatic pathology may inform an approach to the concept of vicarious trauma that is more specific to non-Western societies. PMID:21171128

Caspi, Yael; Slobodin, Ortal; Kammerer, Nina; Enosh, Guy; Shorer, Shai; Klein, Ehud

2010-12-01

128

Stereotypes of Older Lesbians and Gay Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined stereotypes of older lesbians and gay men. Key findings are that older lesbians and gay men were perceived as similar to older heterosexual women and men with regard to aging stereotypes, such as being judicious. At the same time, sexual minorities were targets of unique stereotypes. Consistent with the implicit inversion…

Wright, Sara L.; Canetto, Silvia Sara

2009-01-01

129

Beyond the Model Minority Myth: Interrogating the Lived Experiences of Korean American Gay Men in College  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars have examined the experiences of GLBT students in college and found that gay students often report encountering unwelcoming campus environments, physical or verbal assault, and homophobia. Rarely, however, have the experiences of Asian Pacific Islander (API) or more specifically South Korean gay men been accounted for in the literature. A…

Strayhorn, Terrell L.

2014-01-01

130

Mistakes that heterosexual people make when trying to appear non-prejudiced: the view from LGB people.  

PubMed

In two studies, lesbians, gay men and bisexuals were queried concerning mistakes that well-meaning heterosexual people have made when interacting with them. In qualitative, open-ended research, we determined that the most common mistakes concerned heterosexuals' pointing out that they know someone who is gay, emphasizing their lack of prejudice, and relying on stereotypes about gays. Following up with a quantitative, close-ended questionnaire, we determined that the mistakes respondents experienced most often involved heterosexuals (a) relying on stereotypes and (b) ignoring gay issues; the most annoying mistakes were heterosexuals (a) using subtle prejudicial language and (b) not owning up to their discomfort with gay issues. We used two theoretical perspectives, shared reality theory and the contact hypothesis, to analyze the quantitative responses. Implications for intergroup relationships between heterosexual people and gay people are discussed. PMID:12013573

Conley, T D; Calhoun, C; Evett, S R; Devine, P G

2001-01-01

131

Men Do Matter: Ethnographic Insights on the Socially Supportive Role of the African American Uncle in the Lives of Inner-City African American Male Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the role of the African American uncle as a vital yet overlooked form of social support and social capital in the lives of adolescent African American male sons living in single-female-headed households. Research rarely examines the affective roles and functions of men in Black families; moreover, poor urban Black male youth…

Richardson, Joseph B., Jr.

2009-01-01

132

HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men and Histories of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Implications for Health and Prevention  

PubMed Central

A personal history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is prevalent and deleterious to health for people living with HIV (PLWH), and current statistics likely underrepresent the frequency of these experiences. In the general population, the prevalence of CSA appears to be higher in men who have sex with men (MSM) than heterosexual men, but there are limited data available for HIV-infected MSM. CSA is associated with poor mental and physical health and may contribute to high rates of HIV risk behaviors, including unprotected sex and substance abuse. CSA exposure is also associated with low engagement in care for PLWH. More information is needed regarding CSA experiences of HIV-infected MSM to optimize health and wellbeing for this population and to prevent HIV transmission. This article reviews the epidemiology, implications, and interventions for MSM who have a history of CSA. PMID:23790272

Schafer, Katherine R.; Gupta, Shruti; Dillingham, Rebecca

2014-01-01

133

HIV-infected men who have sex with men and histories of childhood sexual abuse: implications for health and prevention.  

PubMed

A personal history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is prevalent and deleterious to health for people living with HIV (PLWH), and current statistics likely underrepresent the frequency of these experiences. In the general population, the prevalence of CSA appears to be higher in men who have sex with men (MSM) than heterosexual men, but there are limited data available for HIV-infected MSM. CSA is associated with poor mental and physical health and may contribute to high rates of HIV risk behaviors, including unprotected sex and substance abuse. CSA exposure is also associated with low engagement in care for PLWH. More information is needed regarding CSA experiences of HIV-infected MSM to optimize health and wellbeing for this population and to prevent HIV transmission. This article reviews the epidemiology, implications, and interventions for MSM who have a history of CSA. PMID:23790272

Schafer, Katherine R; Gupta, Shruti; Dillingham, Rebecca

2013-01-01

134

Men’s beliefs about HPV-related disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

While human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with genital warts, anal cancer, and oral cancer, limited research\\u000a has examined what men think causes these diseases. We sought to examine knowledge and beliefs about HPV-related disease among\\u000a gay and bisexual men, who are at high risk for HPV infection and HPV-related cancers, and compare them to heterosexual men.\\u000a We conducted an

Noel T. Brewer; Terence W. Ng; Annie-Laurie McRee; Paul L. Reiter

2010-01-01

135

Urban Heterosexual Couples’ Sexual Scripts for Three Shared Sexual Experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

A heterogeneous sample of 38 young adult heterosexual couples living in a US city (N?=?76) provided narratives about their first, most physically arousing, and most emotionally intimate sexual experiences.\\u000a Physical arousal and passion and emotional intimacy intrapsychic scripts were evident across all three sexual experiences,\\u000a although both discourses encompassed multiple sub-themes. First sexual occasions generally adhered to more traditional interpersonal

David Wyatt Seal; Michael Smith; Brenda Coley; June Perry; Maria Gamez

2008-01-01

136

A Case for Including the “Lived Experience” of African American Men in Batterers’ Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Influenced by the national attention that followed the violent episode between pop superstar Rihanna and hip-hop artist Chris\\u000a Brown, this article explores the importance of including the psychosocial experiences of disenfranchised African American\\u000a men in traditional intervention programs for batterers. The article provides an overview of how intimate partner violence\\u000a affects African American women and discusses how racialized stereotypical images

Samuel R. Aymer

137

From sex to sexuality: exposing the heterosexual script on primetime network television.  

PubMed

Although it is widely recognized that sexual content pervades television, research rarely examines how television's sexual messages are gendered and occur in a relational context. This study describes the development and implementation of a new coding scheme to evaluate sexual content from a feminist perspective. Merging scripting theory (Gagnon and Simon, 1987) with the theory of compulsory heterosexuality (Rich, 1980), we explicate a heteronormative and dominant sexual script, the Heterosexual Script, and assessed its presence in the 25 primetime television programs viewed most frequently by adolescents. Our codes captured depictions of boys/men and girls/women thinking, feeling, and behaving in relational and sexual encounters in ways that sustain power inequalities between men and women. Male characters most frequently enacted the Heterosexual Script by actively and aggressively pursuing sex. Less frequently but still at high rates were depictions of female characters willingly objectifying themselves and being judged by their sexual conduct. PMID:17599272

Kim, Janna L; Sorsoli, C Lynn; Collins, Katherine; Zylbergold, Bonnie A; Schooler, Deborah; Tolman, Deborah L

2007-05-01

138

Muscularity versus Leanness: An Examination of Body Ideals and Predictors of Disordered Eating in Heterosexual and Gay College Students  

PubMed Central

The aim of the current study was to add to the growing body of research on men with eating disorders by examining the association between different types of body dissatisfaction (muscularity and body fat) and disordered eating in heterosexual and gay men. Two hundred four participants (over one-third were gay) completed measures assessing disordered eating, muscularity and body fat dissatisfaction, and sexual orientation. Body fat dissatisfaction, but not muscularity dissatisfaction, predicted disordered eating, dietary restraint, and concerns about weight and eating in gay and heterosexual men. These findings were consistent across all measures of body fat and muscularity dissatisfaction, providing stronger evidence that body fat dissatisfaction may be a greater risk factor for disordered eating in both gay and heterosexual college aged men than muscularity dissatisfaction. PMID:21561818

Smith, April R.; Hawkeswood, Sean E.; Bodell, Lindsay P.; Joiner, Thomas E.

2011-01-01

139

Dogma disputed: potential endemic heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in Australia.  

PubMed

The concept of tertiary sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been central to government efforts to communicate notions of risk to heterosexuals in Australia. Data on heterosexually transmitted acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and HIV for Australia are reviewed with emphasis given to the probability of misclassification bias in the heterosexually acquired and 'other/undetermined' categories. Tertiary cases are almost certainly rare in Australia, with little evidence of any increase in their incidence since the first cases were recorded. Three factors (low probability of exposure, the infectivity of HIV and a comparatively low rate of sexual partner change) make it improbable that Australian heterosexuals with no risk factors will experience endemic HIV infection, with a caveat to this conclusion lying in the potential of Australian sex tourism to Southeast Asia for introducing HIV into the Australian heterosexual population. Four hegemonic factors which have acted to suppress any serious debate of the notion that HIV in Australia is unlikely to become endemic among heterosexuals are discussed: the political 'democratization' of risk inspired by concerns that gay men should not be further vilified as a victim group; the preventive imperative; a reluctance among health educators to question the very foundations of the message they are employed to deliver; and a reluctance to curtail 'Trojan horse' benefits to sexually transmissible disease prevention engendered by HIV education promoting safe sex messages. PMID:1391154

Chapman, S

1992-06-01

140

Adjustment of male homosexuals and heterosexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A consideration of the marked disagreement in the literature concerning the adjustment of homosexuals compared to heterosexuals\\u000a led to the present study. Male homosexuals (307) and male heterosexuals (137), obtained from nonclinical sources, responded\\u000a to questionnaires measuring several adjustment variables. For the total samples, the homosexuals, compared to the heterosexuals,\\u000a described themselves as less well adjusted on four scales, better

Marvin Siegelman

1972-01-01

141

Attitudes of Heterosexual Students toward Their Gay Male and Lesbian Peers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines heterosexual college students' (N=224) stereotypical negative attitudes toward gay men and lesbians. Results indicate that participants reported more negative attitudes toward both gay male and lesbian peers than toward students whose sexual orientation was not disclosed in social, academic, and family situations. Implications of these…

Engstrom, Catherine McHugh; Sedlacek, William

1997-01-01

142

Gay Men: Negotiating Procreative, Father, and Family Identities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our qualitative study examines the social psychology of gay men's experiences with their procreative, father, and family identities. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 childless gay men and 20 gay men in the United States who have fathered using diverse means excluding heterosexual intercourse. By focusing on men aged 19-55 residing…

Berkowitz, Dana; Marsiglio, William

2007-01-01

143

Men's leisure and women's lives: the impact of pornography on women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The issue of pornography as a form of leisure practice has received little attention from researchers. In this study, the impact of pornography consumption on women's lives was examined. A diverse group of thirty-two women was interviewed, with discussion focusing on their individual experiences, meanings, and perceptions of pornography. The women's reactions to pornography, especially to violent pornography, were consistently

Susan M. Shaw

1999-01-01

144

A pilot test of the HOPE Intervention to explore employment and mental health among African American gay men living with HIV/AIDS: results from a CBPR study.  

PubMed

The Helping Overcome Problems Effectively (HOPE) intervention was developed by a community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership to improve mental health and employment outcomes of African American gay men living with HIV/AIDS. The intervention blended locally collected formative data, social cognitive theory, hope theory, and the lived experiences of African American gay men living with HIV/AIDS. The HOPE intervention included 7 weekly 3-hour group sessions, with participant assessment at baseline and 3-month post-intervention. A total of 7 African American men, who self-identified as gay and unemployed, participated. Mean age was 46.1 (range = 37-57) years. Throughout the intervention, participants developed goal-setting skills, problem-solving skills, health-promoting behaviors, and employment seeking behaviors. The results suggest that the HOPE intervention may be promising in improving mental health and employment outcomes. PMID:24059878

Hergenrather, Kenneth C; Geishecker, Steve; Clark, Glenn; Rhodes, Scott D

2013-10-01

145

Intervention effects on physical activity and insulin levels in men of Pakistani origin living in Oslo: a randomised controlled trial.  

PubMed

High prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is seen in some immigrant groups in Western countries, particularly in those from the Indian subcontinent. Our aims were to increase the physical activity (PA) level in a group of Pakistani immigrant men, and to see whether any increase was associated with reduced serum glucose and insulin concentrations. The intervention was developed in collaboration with the Pakistani community. It used a social cognitive theory framework and consisted of structured supervised group exercises, group lectures, individual counselling and telephone follow-up. One- hundred and fifty physically inactive Pakistani immigrant men living in Oslo, Norway, were randomised to either a control group or an intervention group. The 5-month intervention focused on increasing levels of PA, which were assessed by use of accelerometer (Actigraph MTI 7164) recordings. Risk of diabetes was assessed by serum glucose and insulin concentrations determined in a fasted state, and after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). ANCOVA was used to assess differences between groups. There was a mean difference in PA between the two groups of 49 counts per minute per day, representing a 15 % (95 % CI = 8.7-21.2; P = 0.01) higher increase in total PA level in the intervention group than in the control group. Insulin values taken 2 h after an OGTT were reduced in the intervention group by 27 % (95 % CI = 18.9-35.0; P = 0.02) more than those in the control group. There were no differences in fasting or postprandial glucose values between the groups at the follow-up test. This type of intervention can increase PA and reduce serum insulin in Pakistani immigrant men, thereby presumably reducing their risk of T2D. PMID:22828963

Andersen, Eivind; Høstmark, Arne T; Holme, Ingar; Anderssen, Sigmund A

2013-02-01

146

HIV, syphilis infection, and sexual practices among transgenders, male sex workers, and other men who have sex with men in Jakarta, Indonesia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To establish the prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and sexual risk behaviour among three groups of men who have sex with men in Jakarta, Indonesia, and to investigate sexual links between these men and broader heterosexual populations.Methods: Anonymous, cross sectional surveys among community recruited transgender and male sex workers and self recognised men who have sex with men (MSM) were

E Pisani; P Girault; M Gultom; N Sukartini; J Kumalawati; S Jazan; E Donegan

2004-01-01

147

Proximity to HIV is associated with a high rate of HIV testing among men who have sex with men living in Douala, Cameroon  

Microsoft Academic Search

In low- and middle-income countries, men who have sex with men (MSM) are 19 times more likely to be HIV positive compared with background populations. Criminalisation and social rejection of homosexuality in most sub-Saharan African countries reinforce stigma and exclude MSM from prevention activities, including HIV testing. This paper's purpose is to identify factors associated with never having been HIV

Nicolas Lorente; Emilie Henry; Lionel Fugon; Yves Yomb; Maria Patrizia Carrieri; Fred Eboko; Bruno Spire

2012-01-01

148

Gay officers in their midst: heterosexual police employees' anticipation of the consequences for coworkers who come out.  

PubMed

While fear among gay men and lesbians about being out in a masculinist environment is not surprising, this article examines what heterosexuals expect will happen when gay men and lesbians come out. We draw on a unique dataset from a police department in the southwest United States to examine the consequences anticipated by heterosexual police department employees if a gay or lesbian officer's sexual orientation became known in the workplace. We test four main sets of factors: individual-level demographic characteristics and religious background; homophobia; organizational tolerance for discrimination; and intergroup contact theory to explain how heterosexuals expect gay and lesbian coworkers to be treated. Using ordinary least squares regression, we find that characteristics of workplaces, measured by tolerance of discrimination, as well as contact with gay men and lesbians on the job are more significant predictors of anticipated outcomes than are individual-level traits and homophobic attitudes. We conclude by discussing the policy implications of our research. PMID:22966996

Bernstein, Mary; Swartwout, Paul

2012-01-01

149

Psychosocial development of heterosexual, bisexual, and homosexual behavior.  

PubMed

Relationships with overt adult Kinsey Scale scores (K) indicate that early sexual experiences are most closely related to K, followed in order by gender related and familial variables. A developmental model emphasizing social learning is presented. Interviewees were 7669 American white males and females. Elevated K (more homosexual scores) was found for females who had few girl companions at age 10 and few male companions at 16, had learned to masturbate by being masturbated by a female, had intense prepubertal sexual contact with boys or men, found thought or sight of females, but not males, arousing by age 18, had homosexual contact by age 18, higher K at 17, and higher first-year homosexual behavior frequency. Elevated K (more homosexual scores) was found for males who reported poorer teenage relationships with their fathers, had more girl companions at age 10, fewer male companions at 10 and 16, avoided sports participation, learned of homosexuality by experience, learned to masturbate by being masturbated by a male, had intense prepubertal sexual contact with boys or men, had neither heterosexual contact nor petting to orgasm by age 18, found thought or sight of males, but not females, arousing by age 18, had homosexual contact by age 18, higher K at ages 16 and 17, and had higher first-year homosexual behavior frequency. Behavioral bisexuals, those scoring between 2.0 and 4.0 on the K scale on the basis of overt behavior (0.7% of females, 1.2% of males), reported more arousal to heterosexual stimuli than did exclusive heterosexuals. PMID:6517686

Van Wyk, P H; Geist, C S

1984-12-01

150

[Extradyadic Sex and its Predictors in Homo- and Heterosexuals.  

PubMed

Infidelity appears to be a common phenomenon. Although there are initially positive consequences for the unfaithful partner, it has negative impacts on individuals, the relationship and health in the long-term. How often are extradyadic sexual contacts indicated within a German sample? Which factors predict infidelity? Via Internet (n=1?899) socio-demographic, individual (attitudes towards infidelity, religiosity), relationship (global and emotional relationship satisfaction, length of primary relationship, sexual agreements), and contextual factors (opportunities) were surveyed. The results of the regression analysis on an 80% subsample (n=1?533) were cross-validated with the remaining 20% of the data (n=366). The analysis showed that 4% of lesbian women, 34% of gay men, 29% of heterosexual women and 49% of heterosexual men reported extra-dyadic sexual contacts. Sexual orientation and restrictive attitudes towards monogamy and infidelity were found to be significant predictors. Low global relationship satisfaction, longer duration of primary relationship, non-monogamous relationships, availability of alternative sexual partners and ways to conceal infidelity increased the likelihood of extradyadic involvement. Cross-validation with 20% of the data (n=366) confirmed the stability of the regression model. Future research should examine identified predictors using representative population-based data. Predictors should be considered in therapy. PMID:25494186

Haversath, Julia; Kröger, Christoph

2014-12-01

151

Gender differences regarding preferences for specific heterosexual practices.  

PubMed

Few investigations of sexual attitudes have restricted their focus to individuals' preferences for specific behaviors within a heterosexual relationship. None have examined gender differences in a broad and multidimensional array of such behavioral particulars. As part of an effort to develop a measure of preferred scripts in heterosexual couples, 258 men and women reported how much they agreed or disagreed with 74 statements of preference. A reduced and factor analyzed questionnaire included 38 items and was administered to a second sample (N = 228). Results offer qualified support that, compared to women, men are more erotophilic and show a stronger preference for incorporating erotic materials as well as drugs and alcohol into sexual relations with their partner. These results were more robust in the second sample, in which almost half of the subjects were tested in same-sex groups. Across both samples, women showed stronger preferences for activities reflecting romanticism. No gender differences were evident in sexual conventionality or in preference regarding the general use of contraceptives. However, results suggest that both sexes respond more favorably to a partner-focused or unspecified contraceptive method than to a self-focused method. PMID:7897676

Purnine, D M; Carey, M P; Jorgensen, R S

1994-01-01

152

Sexual communication and sexual behavior among young adult heterosexual latinos.  

PubMed

We examined verbal sexual health communication, pleasure discussions, and physical sexual communication in relation to condom use by young adult, heterosexual Latinos (ages 18-30 years). Participants (N = 220, 51% female) were recruited in a Midwestern state. Verbal sexual health communication was positively associated with consistent condom use among men (odds ratio [OR] = 2.66, p < .05) and women (OR = 3.12, p < .05). For men, pleasure discussions were negatively associated with consistent condom use (OR = 0.21, p < .05). For women, verbal sexual health communication was positively associated with condom use at last sex (OR = 2.75, p < .05), whereas physical sexual communication was negatively associated with condom use at last sex (OR = .29, p < .05). Various aspects of sexual communication may be important in HIV-prevention programs with young Latinos. Physical sexual communication and pleasure discussions, in particular, warrant further exploration given negative relationships with condom use. PMID:25305027

Alvarez, Carmen; Bauermeister, José A; Villarruel, Antonia M

2014-01-01

153

Heterosexual Gender Relations and Masculinity in Fathers Who Smoke  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this research was to explore the role of masculinity and heterosexual gender relations in new and expectant fathers’ explanations of their continued smoking. We conducted a secondary analysis of in-depth interviews with 20 fathers. Two themes were identified: (1) reconciling with partners to maintain a smoke-free family home; and (2) smoking to self-regulate emotions and maintain relationships. Fathers’ decisions to smoke and changes in smoking behavior were shaped by ideals of masculinity and by partner relationships and family and social contexts, including division of domestic duties and childcare. Recognizing the influence of both masculinity and gender relations could provide new directions for supporting men’s smoking cessation efforts during early parenthood. © 2014 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25155799

Kwon, Jae-Yung; Oliffe, John L; Bottorff, Joan L; Kelly, Mary T

2014-01-01

154

“Stuck in the Quagmire of an HIV Ghetto”: The meaning of stigma in the lives of older black gay and bisexual men living with HIV in New York City  

PubMed Central

In this paper, we analyse the life history narratives of 10 poor gay and bisexual Black men over the age of 50 living with HIV/AIDS in New York City, focusing on experiences of stigma. Three overarching themes are identified. First, participants described the ways in which stigma marks them as just one more body within social and medical institutions, emphasising the dehumanisation they experience in these settings. Second, respondents described the process of knowing your place within social hierarchies as a means through which they are rendered tolerable. Finally, interviewees described the dynamics of stigma as all-consuming, relegating them to the quagmire of an HIV ghetto. These findings emphasise that despite advances in treatment and an aging population of persons living with HIV, entrenched social stigmas continue to endanger the well-being of Black men who have sex with men. PMID:21229421

Haile, Rahwa; Padilla, Mark B.; Parker, Edith A.

2010-01-01

155

‘Stuck in the quagmire of an HIV ghetto’: the meaning of stigma in the lives of older black gay and bisexual men living with HIV in New York City  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we analyse the life history narratives of 10 poor gay and bisexual Black men over the age of 50 living with HIV\\/AIDS in New York City, focusing on experiences of stigma. Three overarching themes are identified. First, participants described the ways in which stigma marks them as ‘just one more body’ within social and medical institutions, emphasising

Rahwa Haile; Mark B. Padilla; Edith A. Parker

2011-01-01

156

‘Not living life in too much of an excess’: lay men understanding health and well-being  

Microsoft Academic Search

While research on lay perspectives of health now has a wellestablished history, specific empirical data on male lay perspectives of health and well-being are largely absent. Drawing on focus group data and in-depth interviews with 20 lay men (including sub-samples of gay men and disabled men), and seven health professionals, this article explores how the men conceptualized ‘health’ and the

Steve Robertson

2006-01-01

157

Childhood family correlates of heterosexual and homosexual marriages: a national cohort study of two million Danes.  

PubMed

Children who experience parental divorce are less likely to marry heterosexually than those growing up in intact families; however, little is known about other childhood factors affecting marital choices. We studied childhood correlates of first marriages (heterosexual since 1970, homosexual since 1989) in a national cohort of 2 million 18-49 year-old Danes. In multivariate analyses, persons born in the capital area were significantly less likely to marry heterosexually, but more likely to marry homosexually, than their rural-born peers. Heterosexual marriage was significantly linked to having young parents, small age differences between parents, stable parental relationships, large sibships, and late birth order. For men, homosexual marriage was associated with having older mothers, divorced parents, absent fathers, and being the youngest child. For women, maternal death during adolescence and being the only or youngest child or the only girl in the family increased the likelihood of homosexual marriage. Our study provides population-based, prospective evidence that childhood family experiences are important determinants of heterosexual and homosexual marriage decisions in adulthood. PMID:17039403

Frisch, Morten; Hviid, Anders

2006-10-01

158

Later That Night: Descending Alcohol Intoxication and Men's Sexual Arousal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although men often have sex when intoxicated, basic questions remain about how alcohol affects erection. It may depend on whether blood alcohol level is ascending or descending and whether the situation calls for maxi- mizing or suppressing erection. Objective. To evaluate whether descending intoxication affects erection when men are instructed to maximize or suppress arousal. Method. Seventy-eight heterosexual men were

William H. George; Kelly Cue Davis; Trevor J. Schraufnagel; Jeanette Norris; Julia R. Heiman; Rebecca L. Schacht; Susan A. Stoner; Kelly F. Kajumulo

159

Sexual Orientation Prototypicality and Well-Being Among Heterosexual and Sexual Minority Adults.  

PubMed

The current study examined the associations between sexual orientation prototypicality-or the extent to which an individual's attractions or sexual behaviors are similar to others in the same sexual orientation category-and several indicators of well-being (depressive symptoms, loneliness, and self-esteem). Data were analyzed from a sample of 586 self-identified heterosexual and sexual minority (lesbian/gay and bisexual) men and women who completed an online survey. We used k-means cluster analysis to assign individuals to sexual orientation clusters (resulting in heterosexual and sexual minority clusters) based on dimensions of same-sex and other-sex attractions (emotional, romantic, and sexual) and sexual behavior. Sexual orientation prototypicality was operationalized as the Euclidean distance between an individual's position in the cluster and their cluster centroid. Lower sexual orientation prototypicality (i.e., greater Euclidean distance from one's cluster centroid) was significantly associated with higher depressive symptoms, higher loneliness, and lower self-esteem for men and women; results did not significantly differ for self-identified heterosexuals versus sexual minorities. Although self-identified sexual orientation and sexual orientation prototypicality were both associated with well-being for women, only sexual orientation prototypicality was associated with well-being for men. Findings suggest that sexual orientation prototypicality may be a better indicator of well-being than sexual orientation for men. Further, sexual orientation prototypicality appears to play a significant role in well-being for women. PMID:25257258

Feinstein, Brian A; Meuwly, Nathalie; Davila, Joanne; Eaton, Nicholas R; Yoneda, Athena

2014-09-26

160

Should we screen heterosexuals for extra-genital chlamydial and gonococcal infections?  

PubMed

Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are two of the most prevalent bacterial sexually transmitted infections in the UK. Although the high burden of extra-genital infections with GC and CT in men who have sex with men has been well established, a significant number of extra-genital site infections with CT and GC could similarly be present in heterosexual women. For this reason we started to routinely offer extra-genital site testing for GC and CT in all patients attending our sexual health clinic who reported having had receptive anal sex and giving oral sex. This followed a review of current evidence by the clinical team and a change in local testing policy. This study not only confirmed a large reservoir of extra-genital infection amongst men who have sex with men, but also demonstrates that a comparable reservoir of extra-genital infection is present amongst heterosexual women. Our study adds to the mounting evidence that extra-genital site testing in heterosexual women should occur when oral or anal sexual activity is reported. PMID:25013220

Garner, Anna L; Schembri, Gabriel; Cullen, Thomas; Lee, Vincent

2014-07-10

161

"Red Shoe Diaries": Sexual Fantasy and the Construction of the (Hetero)sexual Woman.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes Zalman King's 1990 film "Red Shoe Diaries." Argues that the conflicting interests of sexual desire in "Red Shoe Diaries" are indicative of the placement of female heterosexual desire within contemporary culture. Concludes that "Red Shoe Diaries" offers a narrative about the importance and construction of fantasy in the private lives of…

Martin, Nina K.

1994-01-01

162

Sexual Beginners: Accounting for First Sexual Intercourse in Italian Young People's Heterosexual Biographies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on survey data of 1000 young people aged 18-29 and semi-structured interviews with 51 young people aged 18-34 living in a north-western Italian region, the article explores how they account for their first heterosexual intercourse. Young people describe and make sense of their experiences by referring to sexual scripts; narrative sequences…

Ferrero Camoletto, Raffaella

2011-01-01

163

Community and Individual Factors Associated with Cigarette Smoking among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) have higher rates of cigarette smoking than their heterosexual counterparts, yet few studies have examined factors associated with cigarette smoking among YMSM. The present study sought to understand how different types of gay community connection (i.e., gay community identification and involvement, gay bar…

Holloway, Ian W.; Traube, Dorian E.; Rice, Eric; Schrager, Sheree M.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Richardson, Jean; Kipke, Michele D.

2012-01-01

164

Relationship Agreements and Willingness to Participate in Couples HIV Testing and Counseling Among Heterosexuals in the U.S.  

PubMed Central

Couples HIV testing and counseling (CHTC) has been used for more than 20 years in African settings and more recently among men who have sex with men in the United States, but little is known about willingness of heterosexuals in the U.S. to use CHTC. We conducted an online survey of heterosexuals in sexual relationships to assess willingness to use CHTC and willingness to discuss relationship agreements within a couples counseling session. We found moderate levels of willingness to use CHTC and somewhat higher levels of willingness to discuss relationship agreements in a couples counseling session. The most frequently cited reason people were not willing was that they did not perceive themselves or their partners to be at risk for HIV. These results will be useful in planning for CHTC implementation for heterosexuals in the U.S. PMID:25553143

Jones, Jeb S; Stephenson, Rob; Wall, Kristin M; Sullivan, Patrick S

2014-01-01

165

Tal Como Somos/just as we are: an educational film to reduce stigma toward gay and bisexual men, transgender individuals, and persons living with HIV/AIDS.  

PubMed

In this article, the authors describe the development and dissemination of a film-based educational intervention to reduce negative attitudes toward gay and bisexual men, transgender women, and people living with HIV/AIDS in Latino communities, with a focus on youth. The intervention, Tal Como Somos/Just as We Are, is based on stigma and attribution theories, extensive formative research, and community input. Evaluation findings among educators and school youth suggest the film has the potential to effectively influence attitudes toward gay and bisexual men, transgender women, and people living with HIV/AIDS. The film and intervention are being disseminated using diffusion of innovations theory through community-based organizations, schools, television broadcasting, and film festivals. PMID:24377496

Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Kuhns, Lisa M; Manjarrez, Dianna

2014-04-01

166

Factors Associated with the Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus Among Elderly Men and Women Living in Mediterranean Islands: The MEDIS Study  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The aim of the present work was to evaluate the relationships between socio-demographic, clinical, lifestyle and psychological characteristics and the presence of diabetes mellitus, among elderly individuals without known cardiovascular disease. METHODS: During 2005-2007, 1190 elderly (aged 65 to 100 years) men and women (from Cyprus, Mitilini, Samothraki, Cephalonia, Crete, Lemnos, Corfu and Zakynthos) were enrolled. Socio-demographic, clinical and lifestyle factors were assessed using standard procedures. Diabetes mellitus was defined as fasting blood glucose >125 mg/dl or use of special medication. RESULTS: 21% of males and 23% of females had diabetes. Only 70% of diabetic participants were on a special diet and 76% were receiving pharmaceutical treatment. Diabetic individuals had higher prevalence of hypertension (80% vs. 64%, p < 0.001) and hypercholesterolemia (63% vs. 51%, p < 0.001) and reported lower physical activity status (p < 0.001), compared with non-diabetic participants. After adjusting for various confounders, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia were associated with a 144% (95% CI, 1.37-4.35) and 83% (95% CI, 1.13-2.94) higher likelihood of having diabetes, while moderate and vigorous exercise correlated with a 82% (95% CI, 0.09-0.81) and 67% (95% CI, 0.11-0.97) lower likelihood of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: A considerable proportion of our elderly sample had diabetes and other metabolic disorders, almost 25% of which were untreated. Promotion of physical activities, even in the elderly, may contribute to reducing their burden of diabetes and provide them with a better quality of living. PMID:19557296

Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Zeimbekis, Akis; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Voutsa, Katia; Pounis, George; Papoutsou, Stalo; Metallinos, George; Ladoukaki, Evangelia; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Lionis, Christos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.

2009-01-01

167

Heterosexual Identity and the Heterosexual Therapist: An Identity Perspective on Sexual Orientation Dynamics in Psychotherapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to introduce a model of adult heterosexual identity that may be useful in conceptualizing heterosexual therapists' barriers to and facilitators of effective practice with lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LBG) clients. This model incorporates concepts from theories of identity development, social identity, and attitude…

Mohr, Jonathan J.

2002-01-01

168

The inventory of dyadic heterosexual preferences: development and psychometric evaluation.  

PubMed

This article describes the development and evaluation of an instrument that measures preferences for specific sexual behaviors of heterosexual men and women in a dyadic context. In Study 1, 74 statements of preference were reduced to 46 on the basis of reliability and range of responses. Factor analysis revealed that 27 of the 46 items loaded on 6 factors: Erotophilia, Use of Contraception, Conventionality, Use of Erotica, Use of Drugs/Alcohol, and Romanticism. In Study 2, factor analysis of fresh data from a second sample cross-validated these results. To establish construct validity of the revised 27-item Inventory of Dyadic Heterosexual Preferences (IDHP), relationships between each of its 6 scales and 6 criterion measures were examined. These analyses suggested that the last scale is more accurately characterized by the term Romantic Foreplay. We conclude that the IDHP measures 6 distinct domains of sexual preference with a brief, psychometrically sound instrument. Potential applications of the IDHP, suggestions for future research, and strengths and limitations of the current investigation are discussed. PMID:8871371

Purnine, D M; Carey, M P; Jorgensen, R S

1996-04-01

169

Trust, Respect and Friendship: The Key Attributes of Significant Others in the Lives of Young Working Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of 146 male construction industry apprentices (predominantly young men) in Australia self-reported on their significant relationships, as well as the key attributes of these relationships. The findings indicated that the young men shared events, disclosed confidences and looked for help and support from family, romantic partners and close…

du Plessis, Karin; Corney, Tim

2011-01-01

170

Heterosexual Anal Intercourse: Increasing Prevalence, and Association with Sexual Dysfunction, Bisexual Behavior, and Venereal Disease History  

Microsoft Academic Search

Representative samples of the Czech population were surveyed with regard to sexual behavior in 1993, 1998, 2003, and 2008 (N = 7,720). Lifetime prevalence of heterosexual anal intercourse increased from 1993 to 2008 (16.6% to 19.7% among women, 15.7% to 25.3% among men). Anal intercourse was associated with lifetime number of sex partners, current masturbation, and histories (prevalence of which

Stuart Brody; Petr Weiss

2011-01-01

171

The Abuse of Elderly Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elderly men are an under-studied group of abuse victims. Although victimization surveys discriminate against all elderly, abused elderly men are especially invisible. This paper will discuss the high rates of self-abuse by older men and their high risk for abuse when they are lonely, living within inner cities, incarcerated, or gay. Since most men live with a spouse (or significant

Jordan I. Kosberg

1998-01-01

172

Heterosexual gender relations and masculinity in fathers who smoke.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research was to explore the role of masculinity and heterosexual gender relations in new and expectant fathers' explanations of their continued smoking. We conducted a secondary analysis of in-depth interviews with 20 fathers. Two themes were identified: (1) reconciling with partners to maintain a smoke-free family home; and (2) smoking to self-regulate emotions and maintain relationships. Fathers' decisions to smoke and changes in smoking behavior were shaped by ideals of masculinity and by partner relationships and family and social contexts, including division of domestic duties and childcare. Recognizing the influence of both masculinity and gender relations could provide new directions for supporting men's smoking cessation efforts during early parenthood. PMID:25155799

Kwon, Jae-Yung; Oliffe, John L; Bottorff, Joan L; Kelly, Mary T

2014-10-01

173

The effect of HIV-discordance on the sexual lives of gay and bisexual men in Mexico City.  

PubMed

Drawing upon 44 in-depth interviews with men in HIV-discordant gay couples (only one man is HIV-positive) in Mexico, I explore whether being aware of the risk of primary infection or re-infection leads to protected sex. The results have policy implications, as the findings show that a significant number of men have participated in unprotected sex. An explanation is that these men perceive unprotected sex as an expression of commitment to their relationship. On the other hand, those who reported always using protection during sex perceive that guarding each other's health provides mutual benefit and shows their commitment to their relationship. PMID:20069494

Nieto-Andrade, Benjamin

2010-01-01

174

Characteristics of a sexual network of behaviorally bisexual men in Vientiane, Lao PDR, 2010.  

PubMed

Men who have sex with both men and women (behaviorally bisexual men) may be at increased risk of HIV acquisition and transmission due to risky sexual behaviors. We recruited a sexual network comprised of behaviorally bisexual men and their sexual partners in Vientiane, Lao PDR in 2010 to inform our understanding of the potential for HIV transmission among heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual networks. Participants completed a sexual behavior questionnaire and referred < 5 sexual partners. A total of 298 people were recruited, including 63 behaviorally bisexual men. Behaviorally bisexual men reported riskier sexual behaviors (number of sexual partners in the previous 12 months and consistent condom use) than behaviorally homosexual and heterosexual men. Using social network diagrammatic representation, heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual networks are shown to be interlinked. This study demonstrates that behaviorally bisexual men are potential key drivers of HIV epidemics and require a targeted approach to sexual health promotion. PMID:23631717

van Gemert, Caroline; Vongsaiya, Kongchay; Hughes, Chad; Jenkinson, Rebecca; Bowring, Anna L; Sihavong, Amphoy; Phimphachanh, Chansy; Chanlivong, Niramonh; Toole, Mike; Hellard, Margaret

2013-06-01

175

The Career Interests and Aspirations of Gay Men: How Sex-Role Orientation Is Related.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Holland's Self-Directed Search, a lifestyle questionnaire, and Bem Sex Role Inventory were completed by 63 gay and 60 heterosexual males. Gay men's career interests were less Realistic or Investigative and more Artistic/Social on Holland's scale; their aspirations were less traditional than heterosexuals'. Bem Femininity and Masculinity scores…

Chung, Y. Barry; Harmon, Lenore W.

1994-01-01

176

Genital colonisation and infection with candida in heterosexual and homosexual males.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: To determine the penile, perianal, and oropharyngeal candidal colonisation rates among homosexual and heterosexual males attending an STD clinic. To determine the prevalence of balanitis and candidal balanitis in the two groups. SUBJECTS: 252 heterosexual and 210 homosexual male patients attending consecutively the STD clinic in Coventry, England. DESIGN: A prospective study recording sexual behaviour, relevant history, symptoms, and examination. Specimens for candida culture were collected from the glans penis, perianal area, and oropharynx. RESULTS: Among the 462 men studied, penile, perianal, and oropharyngeal colonisation rates were 74 (16%), 70 (15%), and 116 (25%) respectively. On examination, 47 (10%) were found to have balanitis. Of the 74 patients with penile colonisation, 26 (37%) were symptomatic and 20 (27%) had balanitis. The 223 heterosexual and the 196 homosexual males who had sexual intercourse within 3 months had comparable colonisation rates of candida on the penis, perianal area, and oropharynx. Balanitis was seen in 31 heterosexuals (14%) and candidal balanitis in 16 (7%); the incidence was significantly less in homosexuals where balanitis was seen in 12 (6%) and candidal balanitis in four (2%). CONCLUSIONS: Itching or burning sensations after sex were the most common symptoms associated with penile colonisation with candida and were present in more than one third. Candidal balanitis was commoner in those who had vaginal than those who had anal intercourse within 3 months. PMID:9534752

David, L M; Walzman, M; Rajamanoharan, S

1997-01-01

177

Parent adjustment over time in gay, lesbian, and heterosexual parent families adopting from foster care.  

PubMed

Although increasing numbers of gay and lesbian individuals and couples are adopting children, gay men and lesbian women continue to face increased scrutiny and legal obstacles from the child welfare system. To date, little research has compared the experiences of gay or lesbian and heterosexual adoptive parents over time, limiting conceptual understandings of the similarities they share and the unique challenges that gay and lesbian adoptive parents may face. This study compared the adoption satisfaction, depressive symptoms, parenting stress, and social support at 2, 12, and 24 months postplacement of 82 parents (60 heterosexual, 15 gay, 7 lesbian) adopting children from foster care in Los Angeles County. Few differences were found between heterosexual and gay or lesbian parents at any of the assessments or in their patterns of change over time. On average, parents in both household types reported significant increases in adoption satisfaction and maintained low, nonclinical levels of depressive symptoms and parenting stress over time. Across all family types, greater parenting stress was associated with more depressive symptoms and lower adoption satisfaction. Results indicated many similarities between gay or lesbian and heterosexual adoptive parents, and highlight a need for services to support adoptive parents throughout the transition to parenthood to promote their well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24826826

Lavner, Justin A; Waterman, Jill; Peplau, Letitia Anne

2014-01-01

178

Heterosexual anal intercourse: a neglected risk factor for HIV?  

PubMed

Heterosexual anal intercourse confers a much greater risk of HIV transmission than vaginal intercourse, yet its contribution to heterosexual HIV epidemics has been under-researched. In this article we review the current state of knowledge of heterosexual anal intercourse practice worldwide and identify the information required to assess its role in HIV transmission within heterosexual populations, including input measures required to inform mathematical models. We then discuss the evidence relating anal intercourse and HIV with sexual violence. PMID:23279040

Baggaley, Rebecca F; Dimitrov, Dobromir; Owen, Branwen N; Pickles, Michael; Butler, Ailsa R; Masse, Ben; Boily, Marie-Claude

2013-02-01

179

Heterosexual Anal Intercourse: A Neglected Risk Factor for HIV?  

PubMed Central

Heterosexual anal intercourse confers a much greater risk of HIV transmission than vaginal intercourse, yet its contribution to heterosexual HIV epidemics has been under researched. In this article we review the current state of knowledge of heterosexual anal intercourse practice worldwide and identify the information required to assess its role in HIV transmission within heterosexual populations, including input measures required to inform mathematical models. We then discuss the evidence relating anal intercourse and HIV with sexual violence. PMID:23279040

Baggaley, Rebecca F.; Dimitrov, Dobromir; Owen, Branwen N.; Pickles, Michael; Butler, Ailsa R.; Masse, Ben; Boily, Marie-Claude

2014-01-01

180

Arousability and sexual satisfaction in lesbian and heterosexual women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past research suggests that lesbians may be more sexually responsive and sexually satisfied than heterosexual women. In order to clarify the similarities and differences between lesbians and heterosexual women, questionnaire responses of sexual arousability preferences and ratings of sexual behavior and satisfaction of 407 lesbians and 370 heterosexual women were compared. Both groups consisted primarily of Caucasian, college?educated, young women.

Emily M. Coleman; Peter W. Hoon; Emily F. Hoon

1983-01-01

181

The Attitudes of Australian Heterosexuals Toward Same-Sex Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the first study of attitudes of Australian heterosexuals toward heterosexual, gay male, and lesbian parents and the children raised by these parents. A sample of Australian heterosexual males and females read one of six vignettes describing a family situation. Participants assessed the parents' emotional stability, responsibility, and competence; how loving, sensitive, and nurturing they were; the amount of

Charmaine N. Morse; Suzanne McLaren; Angus J. McLachlan

2008-01-01

182

Individual Factors Determining the Food Behaviours of Single Men Living in Apartments in Montreal as Revealed by Photographs and Interviews  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore men's food behaviours using interviews and photographs. The research specifically looks at the importance of certain individual factors as determinants of food behaviours, namely food preferences, lifestyle, ability to cook, involvement with health and nutrition. Each man received two cameras and a guide…

Marquis, Marie; Manceau, Marilyn

2007-01-01

183

Living with HIV postdiagnosis: a qualitative study of the experiences of Nairobi slum residents  

PubMed Central

Objectives To characterise the experiences of heterosexual men and women living with HIV postdiagnosis and explain these experiences in relation to their identity and sexuality. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews and a theoretically informed biographic disruption theory. Setting Interviews were conducted in two Nairobi slums (Kenya). Participants 41 HIV-infected heterosexual men and women aged 18?years or older. Results People living with HIV have divergent experiences surrounding HIV diagnosis. Postdiagnosis, there are multiple phases of identity transition, including status (non-)disclosure, and attempts at identity repair and normalcy. For some people, this process involves a transition to a new self-identity, incorporating both HIV and antiretroviral treatment (ART) into their lives. For others, it involves a partial transition, with some aspects of their prediagnosis identity persisting, and for others it involves a rejection of HIV identity. Those people who were able to incorporate HIV/AIDS in their identity, without it being disruptive to their biography, were pursuing safer sexual and reproductive lives. By contrast, those people with a more continuous biography continued to reflect their prediagnosis identity and sexual behaviour. Conclusions People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) had to rework their sense of identity following diagnosis in the context of living in a slum setting. Men and women living with HIV in slums are poorly supported by health systems and services as they attempt to cope with a diagnosis of HIV. Given the availability of ART, health services and professionals need to support the rights of PLWHA to be sexually active if they want to and achieve their fertility goals, while minimising HIV transmission risk. PMID:23645922

Wekesa, Eliud; Coast, Ernestina

2013-01-01

184

Disordered eating behaviors among Italian men: objectifying media and sexual orientation differences.  

PubMed

Objectification theory was tested as a suitable framework for explaining sexual orientation differences in disordered eating behaviors in college-aged Italian men. The theory's applicability to 125 homosexual and 130 heterosexual men was investigated using self-report questionnaires. Gay men scored significantly higher on exposure to sexually objectifying media, body surveillance, body shame, disordered eating behaviors, and depression than heterosexual men. Although path analyses support the theory's applicability to both groups, for gay men the path model demonstrated a better fit to the objectification theory for disordered eating and depression. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:22985233

Dakanalis, Antonios; Di Mattei, Valentina E; Bagliacca, Elena Pagani; Prunas, Antonio; Sarno, Lucio; Riva, Giuseppe; Zanetti, M Assunta

2012-01-01

185

"The Things That Are inside of You Are Horrible": Children and Young Men with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Talk about the Impact of Living with a Long-Term Condition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited, progressive and life-limiting neuromuscular disease that affects boys. During their lives, they experience a series of medical and surgical interventions. Research reported in this paper took place in England with 37 young men living with DMD and their families and explored their experiences of…

Abbott, David; Carpenter, John

2015-01-01

186

High-selenium yeast supplementation in free-living North American men: no effect on thyroid hormone metabolism or body composition.  

PubMed

In a prior study, we observed decreased serum 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T(3)), increased serum thyrotropin and increased body weight in five men fed 297 microg/d of selenium (Se) in foods naturally high in Se while confined in a metabolic research unit. In an attempt to replicate and confirm those observations, we conducted a randomized study of high-Se yeast supplements (300 microg/d) or placebo yeast administered to 42 healthy free-living men for 48 weeks. Serum thyroxine, T(3) and thyrotropin did not change in supplemented or control subjects. Body weight increased in both groups during the 48-week treatment period and remained elevated for the 48-week follow-up period. Body fat increased by 1.2 kg in both groups. Energy intake and voluntary activity levels were not different between the groups and remained unchanged during the treatment period. Dietary intakes of Se, macronutrients and micronutrients were not different between groups and remained unchanged during the treatment period. These results suggest that our previous observation of a hypothyroidal response to high-Se foods was confounded by some aspect of the particular foods used, or were merely chance observations. Because of the high dose and long administration period, the present study suggests that the effects of Se supplements on thyroid hormone metabolism and energy metabolism in healthy North American men with adequate Se status do not represent a significant risk for unhealthy weight gain. PMID:18565425

Hawkes, Wayne Chris; Keim, Nancy L; Diane Richter, B; Gustafson, Mary B; Gale, Barbara; Mackey, Bruce E; Bonnel, Ellen L

2008-01-01

187

“He lacks his fatherhood”: Safer conception technologies and the biological imperative for fatherhood among recently-diagnosed Xhosa-speaking men living with HIV in South Africa  

PubMed Central

This paper explores notions of fatherhood and their linkages to fertility desires and intentions among a treatment-naïve cohort of Xhosa-speaking male key informants living with HIV aged 20-53 in Cape Town, South Africa. Analysis is based on an initial 27 and 20 follow up interviews with men who were part of a study that assessed the acceptability of safer conception and alternative parenting strategies among men and women newly diagnosed with HIV to inform an intervention. Grounded theory analysis revealed themes related to the cultural imperative of biologically-connected fatherhood. Certain safer conception strategies aimed at minimising the risk of HIV transmission were perceived as threats to paternity. These findings suggest that understanding of social and cultural beliefs related to notions of paternity and fatherhood may inform the implementation of acceptable safer conception options for HIV-positive men and their infected and uninfected female partners in a high HIV prevalence, low-resource setting. PMID:23862770

Taylor, Tonya N.; Mantell, Joanne E.; Nywagi, Ntobeko; Cishe, Nomazizi; Cooper, Diane

2013-01-01

188

Reported sexual desire predicts men's preferences for sexually dimorphic cues in women’s faces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies investigating the relationship between sexual desire and sexual attraction have found that heterosexual women’s reported sexual desire is positively correlated with their reported attraction to both own- and opposite-sex individuals, but that heterosexual men’s reported sexual desire is positively correlated with their reported attraction to opposite-sex individuals only. These findings have led to the proposal that sexual desire

Benedict C. Jones; Anthony C. Little; Christopher D. Watkins; Lisa L. M. Welling; Lisa M. DeBruine

2011-01-01

189

Effects of Stigmatization on Gay Men Living with HIV/AIDS in a Central-Eastern European Context: A Qualitative Analysis from Hungary  

PubMed Central

This qualitative study highlights the social dynamics affecting people living with HIV (PLH) in Hungary and in the Central-Eastern European region. The study focused on the special needs and concerns of men living with HIV/AIDS as well as changes in their social relationships and institutional support provision, coping strategies and patterns of social functioning, especially in the context of social stigmatization. Consistent with international qualitative research findings in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention, the present study contributes to a fuller understanding of relationship between sexual behavior, HIV/AIDS related risks and risk perceptions as well as homosexuality-and HIV/AIDS stigma-related social exclusion in a previously under-researched socio-cultural setting. The findings of our study point to several barriers to effective HIV prevention, which should be overcome to improve the present situation by lessening the adverse effects of HIV/AIDS-and homosexuality-related stigma within the gay community, the general population and especially among service providers. One of the main barriers is the lack of public health programs specifically targeting MSM in Hungary, where the predominant mode of HIV transmission remains sex between men. PMID:23439743

Takács, J.; Kelly, J.A.; P. Tóth, T.; Mocsonaki, L.; Amirkhanian, Y.A.

2012-01-01

190

Sex and the single (older) guy: sexual lives of older unmarried Thai men during the AIDS era.  

PubMed

In Thailand and elsewhere, some older persons remain sexually active well into late middle and old age. Very little research, program, or advocacy effort has targeted this group with respect to HIV and their susceptibility to it. We explore these issues using qualitative data from two sets of semi-structured, in-depth interviews of unmarried older Thai men, most of whom were in their 50's. Opportunities exist for several of the men we interviewed to engage in a fairly wide range of sexual relationships. Some do, but others choose celibacy because of declining interest; a wish to avoid financial hardships thought to be inextricably linked with sexual relationships; a wish to avoid social sanctions; and desires to pursue interests thought to be more appropriate for their age group. PMID:17885800

Vanlandingham, Mark; Knodel, John

2007-12-01

191

Molecular phylodynamics of the heterosexual HIV epidemic in the United Kingdom.  

PubMed

The heterosexual risk group has become the largest HIV infected group in the United Kingdom during the last 10 years, but little is known of the network structure and dynamics of viral transmission in this group. The overwhelming majority of UK heterosexual infections are of non-B HIV subtypes, indicating viruses originating among immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa. The high rate of HIV evolution, combined with the availability of a very high density sample of viral sequences from routine clinical care has allowed the phylodynamics of the epidemic to be investigated for the first time. Sequences of the viral protease and partial reverse transcriptase coding regions from 11,071 patients infected with HIV of non-B subtypes were studied. Of these, 2774 were closely linked to at least one other sequence by nucleotide distance. Including the closest sequences from the global HIV database identified 296 individuals that were in UK-based groups of 3 or more individuals. There were a total of 8 UK-based clusters of 10 or more, comprising 143/2774 (5%) individuals, much lower than the figure of 25% obtained earlier for men who have sex with men (MSM). Sample dates were incorporated into relaxed clock phylogenetic analyses to estimate the dates of internal nodes. From the resulting time-resolved phylogenies, the internode lengths, used as estimates of maximum transmission intervals, had a median of 27 months overall, over twice as long as obtained for MSM (14 months), with only 2% of transmissions occurring in the first 6 months after infection. This phylodynamic analysis of non-B subtype HIV sequences representing over 40% of the estimated UK HIV-infected heterosexual population has revealed heterosexual HIV transmission in the UK is clustered, but on average in smaller groups and is transmitted with slower dynamics than among MSM. More effective intervention to restrict the epidemic may therefore be feasible, given effective diagnosis programmes. PMID:19779560

Hughes, Gareth J; Fearnhill, Esther; Dunn, David; Lycett, Samantha J; Rambaut, Andrew; Leigh Brown, Andrew J

2009-09-01

192

Why Parenthood, and Why Now? Gay Men's Motivations for Pursuing Parenthood  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current qualitative study of 35 preadoptive gay male couples (70 men) examined gay men's motivations to parent and their reasons for pursuing parenthood at the current time. Similar to heterosexual couples, gay men described a range of psychologically oriented reasons as shaping their decision to become parents. Some of these (e.g., desire to…

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Downing, Jordan B.; Moyer, April M.

2012-01-01

193

HIV Stigma, Testing Attitudes and Health Care Access Among African-Born Men Living in the United States.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe HIV-testing attitudes, HIV related stigma and health care access in African-born men taking part in the African Health Cup (AHC), a soccer tournament held annually to improve HIV awareness and testing. Venue sampling was used to collect survey and qualitative interview data related to HIV-testing attitudes, stigma and experiences associated with the AHC. The sample included 135 survey respondents and 27 interview participants. AHC participants were successfully accessing health care services. Although the AHC was viewed positively, HIV testing rates remain low due to stigma and privacy concerns. This population continues to have misconceptions about HIV transmission and to use condoms inconsistently. The AHC is a successful intervention to engage African-born men in HIV awareness and education. More work is needed to enhance these AHC aspects and address stigma and privacy concerns related to using onsite health screenings. Continuing to develop novel strategies to educate African-born immigrants about HIV is urgently needed. PMID:25420781

Bova, Carol; Nnaji, Chioma; Woyah, Augustus; Duah, Akwasi

2014-11-25

194

Risk factors for AIDS among Haitians residing in the US: evidence of heterosexual transmission  

SciTech Connect

In a study of Haitians in Miami and New York, Creole-speaking interviewers questioned 55 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (45 men and ten women) and 242 control-persons (164 men and 78 women). One male patient was homosexual, and one female patient had received blood within five years. No one admitted to intravenous drug use, hemophilia, or sexual contact with AIDS patients. Male AIDS patients were significantly more likely than control-men to have entered the US after 1977 and to have had gonorrhea, syphilis, and sexual contact with female prostitutes. Female AIDS patients were more likely to have voodoo-priest friends and to have been offered money for sex. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was probably contracted through sexual contact with infected heterosexuals.

Not Available

1987-02-06

195

Piloting a System for Behavioral Surveillance Among Heterosexuals at Increased Risk of HIV in the United States  

PubMed Central

Objectives: During the past decade, the number and proportion of reported HIV cases in the United States acquired through heterosexual contact has increased markedly. CDC employs the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS) to monitor risk behaviors and HIV prevalence in high-risk populations. To identify a target population for conducting NHBS among heterosexuals at increased risk for HIV (NHBS-HET), CDC designed, implemented and evaluated a pilot study. Methods: The pilot study was conducted in 25 US metropolitan statistical areas in 2006-7. We recruited men and women who reported sex with at least one opposite-sex partner during the past year for a behavioral survey and HIV test. We investigated the relationship between newly diagnosed HIV infection and individual risk behaviors, sexual network characteristics, and social-structural characteristics to arrive at a definition of a heterosexual at increased risk of HIV. Results: Of 14,750 participants in the analysis, 207 (1.4%) had newly diagnosed HIV infection. Using low socioeconomic status (SES) as a criterion for defining a heterosexual at increased risk for HIV resulted in optimal rates of HIV prevalence, specificity, sensitivity and practicality. Conclusions: Results from the NHBS pilot study underscore the key role of social factors as determinants of HIV infection risk among U.S. heterosexuals, and low SES was incorporated into the definition of a heterosexual at increased risk for HIV in NHBS-HET cycles. Future cycles of NHBS-HET will help tailor prevention programs for those populations most at risk of HIV in the US. PMID:23049666

DiNenno, Elizabeth A; Oster, Alexandra M; Sionean, Catlainn; Denning, Paul; Lansky, Amy

2012-01-01

196

Urinary Perchlorate and Thyroid Hormone Levels in Adolescent and Adult Men and Women Living in the United States  

PubMed Central

Background Perchlorate is commonly found in the environment and known to inhibit thyroid function at high doses. Assessing the potential effect of low-level exposure to perchlorate on thyroid function is an area of ongoing research. Objectives We evaluated the potential relationship between urinary levels of perchlorate and serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and total thyroxine (T4) in 2,299 men and women, ? 12 years of age, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2001–2002. Methods We used multiple regression models of T4 and TSH that included perchlorate and covariates known to be or likely to be associated with T4 or TSH levels: age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, estrogen use, menopausal status, pregnancy status, premenarche status, serum C-reactive protein, serum albumin, serum cotinine, hours of fasting, urinary thiocyanate, urinary nitrate, and selected medication groups. Results Perchlorate was not a significant predictor of T4 or TSH levels in men. For women overall, perchlorate was a significant predictor of both T4 and TSH. For women with urinary iodine < 100 ?g/L, perchlorate was a significant negative predictor of T4 (p < 0.0001) and a positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.001). For women with urinary iodine ? 100 ?g/L, perchlorate was a significant positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.025) but not T4 (p = 0.550). Conclusions These associations of perchlorate with T4 and TSH are coherent in direction and independent of other variables known to affect thyroid function, but are present at perchlorate exposure levels that were unanticipated based on previous studies. PMID:17185277

Blount, Benjamin C.; Pirkle, James L.; Osterloh, John D.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Caldwell, Kathleen L.

2006-01-01

197

Dominant heterosexual sexual scripts in emerging adulthood: conceptualization and measurement.  

PubMed

Sexual script research (Simon & Gagnon 1969 , 1986 ) bourgeoned following Simon and Gagnon's groundbreaking work. Empirical measurement of sexual script adherence has been limited, however, as no measures exist that have undergone rigorous development and validation. We conducted three studies to examine current dominant sexual scripts of heterosexual adults and to develop a measure of endorsement of these scripts. In Study 1, we conducted three focus groups of men ( n = 19) and four of women ( n = 20) to discuss the current scripts governing sexual behavior. Results supported scripts for sex drive, physical and emotional sex, sexual performance, initiation and gatekeeping, and evaluation of sexual others. In Study 2, we used these qualitative findings to develop a measure of script endorsement, the Sexual Script Scale. Factor analysis of data from 721 participants revealed six interrelated factors demonstrating initial construct validity. In Study 3, confirmatory factor analysis of a separate sample of 289 participants supported the model from Study 2, and evidence of factorial invariance and test-retest reliability was obtained. This article presents the results of these studies, documenting the process of scale development from formative research through to confirmatory testing, and suggests future directions for the continued development of sexual scripting theory. PMID:23672338

Sakaluk, John K; Todd, Leah M; Milhausen, Robin; Lachowsky, Nathan J

2014-01-01

198

Disclosure and Concealment of Sexual Orientation and the Mental Health of Non-Gay-Identified, Behaviorally-Bisexual Men  

PubMed Central

Objective Although bisexual men report lower levels of mental health relative to gay men, few studies have examined the factors that contribute to bisexual men’s mental health. Bisexual men are less likely to disclose, and more likely to conceal (i.e., a desire to hide), their sexual orientation than gay men. Theory suggests that this may adversely impact their mental health. This report examined the factors associated with disclosure and with concealment of sexual orientation, the association of disclosure and concealment with mental health, and the potential mediators (i.e., internalized homophobia, social support) of this association with mental health. Method An ethnically-diverse sample of 203 non-gay-identified, behaviorally-bisexual men who do not disclose their same-sex behavior to their female partners were recruited in New York City to complete a single set of self-report measures. Results Concealment was associated with higher income, a heterosexual identification, living with a wife or girlfriend, more frequent sex with women, and less frequent sex with men. Greater concealment, but not disclosure to friends and family, was significantly associated with lower levels of mental health. Multiple mediation analyses revealed that both internalized homophobia and general emotional support significantly mediated the association between concealment and mental health. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that concealment and disclosure are independent constructs among bisexual men. Further, they suggest that interventions addressing concerns about concealment, emotional support, and internalized homophobia may be more beneficial for increasing the mental health of bisexual men than those focused on promoting disclosure. PMID:23276123

Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Siegel, Karolynn; Downing, Martin J.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

2013-01-01

199

Normalizing Heterosexuality: Mothers' Assumptions, Talk, and Strategies with Young Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, social scientists have identified not just heterosexism and homophobia as social problems, but also heteronormativity--the mundane, everyday ways that heterosexuality is privileged and taken for granted as normal and natural. There is little empirical research, however, on how heterosexuality is reproduced and then normalized for…

Martin, Karin A.

2009-01-01

200

Struggling against Heteronormativity: The Narratives of Seventeen Heterosexuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a paucity of literature that examines the narratives of heterosexuals who struggle against the discourse of heteronormativity. There is even less literature that discusses how the discourse of heteronormativity may play out between egalitarian heterosexual counselors and clients who identify as sexual minorities. Employing the qualitative…

Smith, Lance Christian

2009-01-01

201

Childhood play activities of male and female homosexuals and heterosexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the differences in childhood play behavior reported by adult male homosexuals (N =198) and heterosexuals (N =198) and those reported by female homosexuals (N =198) and heterosexuals (N =198). Two checklists with a total of 58 sports, games, and play activities were assembled: one for ages 5–8 and the other for ages 9–13. These were administered to

Edward A. Grellert; Michael D. Newcomb; P. M. Bentler

1982-01-01

202

"Coming Out": Gender, (Hetero)Sexuality and the Primary School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses data from an ethnographic exploration into children's gender and sexual identities during sixth grade to examine how dominant notions of heterosexuality underscore much of children's identity work and peer relationships, illustrating how boys and girls are subject to pressures of compulsory heterosexuality. Discusses the implications of…

Renold, Emma

2000-01-01

203

Why Parenthood, and Why Now?: Gay Men’s Motivations for Pursuing Parenthood  

PubMed Central

The current qualitative study of 35 pre-adoptive gay male couples (70 men) examined gay men’s motivations to parent and their reasons for pursuing parenthood at the current time. Similar to heterosexual couples, gay men described a range of psychologically-oriented reasons as shaping their decision to become parents. Some of these (e.g., desire to teach a child tolerance) may have been uniquely shaped by their sexual minority status, and others (e.g., desire to give a child a good home) in part reflect their adoptive status. Men named age, finances, and relationship factors, as well as unique contextual factors such as the need to find and move to gay-friendly neighborhoods, as influencing their readiness to pursue parenthood at the current time. Gay men’s motivations to parent echo normative life course decision-making processes, but also reflect concerns that are uniquely informed by their sexual minority status. PMID:22563135

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Downing, Jordan B.; Moyer, April M.

2011-01-01

204

Selection bias at the heterosexual HIV-1 transmission bottleneck  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Introduction Heterosexual HIV-1 transmission is an inefficient process with rates reported at <1% per unprotected sexual exposure. When transmission occurs, systemic infection is typically established by a single genetic variant, taken from the swarm of genetically distinct viruses circulating in the donor. Whether that founder virus represents a chance event or was systematically favored is unclear. Our work has tested a central hypothesis that founder virus selection is biased toward certain genetic characteristics. Rationale If HIV-1 transmission involves selection for viruses with certain favorable characteristics, then such advantages should emerge as statistical biases when viewed across many viral loci in many transmitting partners. We therefore identified 137 Zambian heterosexual transmission pairs, for whom plasma samples were available for both the donor and recipient partner soon after transmission, and compared the viral sequences obtained from each partner to identify features that predicted whether the majority amino acid observed at any particular position in the donor was transmitted. We focused attention on two features: viral genetic characteristics that correlate with viral fitness, and clinical factors that influence transmission. Statistical modeling indicates that the former will be favored for transmission, while the latter will nullify this relative advantage. Results We observed a highly significant selection bias that favors the transmission of amino acids associated with increased fitness. These features included the frequency of the amino acid in the study cohort, the relative advantage of the amino acid with respect to the stability of the protein, and features related to immune escape and compensation. This selection bias was reduced in couples with high risk of transmission. In particular, significantly less selection bias was observed in women and in men with genital inflammation, compared to healthy men, suggesting a more permissive environment in the female than male genital tract. Consistent with this observation, viruses transmitted to women were characterized by lower predicted fitness than those in men. The presence of amino acids favored during transmission predicted which individual virus within a donor was transmitted to their partner, while chronically infected individuals with viral populations characterized by a predominance of these amino acids were more likely to transmit to their partners. Conclusion These data highlight the clear selection biases that benefit fitter viruses during transmission in the context of a stochastic process. That such biases exist, and are tempered by certain risk factors, suggests that transmission is frequently characterized by many abortive transmission events in which some target cells are nonproductively infected. Moreover, for efficient transmission, some changes that favored survival in the transmitting partner are frequently discarded, resulting in overall slower evolution of HIV-1 in the population. Paradoxically, by increasing the selection bias at the transmission bottleneck, reduction of susceptibility may increase the expected fitness of breakthrough viruses that establish infection and may therefore worsen the prognosis for the newly infected partner. Conversely, preventative or therapeutic approaches that weaken the virus may reduce overall transmission rates via a mechanism that is independent from the quantity of circulating virus, and may therefore provide long-term benefits even upon breakthrough infection. PMID:25013080

Carlson, Jonathan M.; Schaefer, Malinda; Monaco, Daniela C.; Batorsky, Rebecca; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica; Deymier, Martin J.; Ende, Zachary S.; Klatt, Nichole R.; DeZiel, Charles E.; Lin, Tien-Ho; Peng, Jian; Seese, Aaron M.; Shapiro, Roger; Frater, John; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Tang, Jianming; Goepfert, Paul; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Kilembe, William; Heckerman, David; Goulder, Philip J.R.; Allen, Todd M.; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric

2014-01-01

205

Condom Use Errors and Problems Among College Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: An essential yet understudied aspect of con- dom use is whether they are used correctly. Goal: The goal of the study was to comprehensively evalu- ate condom use errors and problems reported by heterosexual college men (N 158). Study Design: A cross-sectional survey, involving a 3-month recall period, was conducted. Results: Of the 158 participants, 60% did not discuss

RICHARD A. CROSBY; STEPHANIE A. SANDERS; WILLIAM L. YARBER; CYNTHIA A. GRAHAM; BRIAN DODGE

2002-01-01

206

Condom Use Errors and Problems Among College Men RICHARD A. CROSBY, PHD,*  

E-print Network

Condom Use Errors and Problems Among College Men RICHARD A. CROSBY, PHD,* STEPHANIE A. SANDERS, PHD was to comprehensively evalu- ate condom use errors and problems reported by heterosexual college men (N 158). Study condoms but did not have any available; 43% put condoms on after starting sex; 15% removed condoms before

207

Sexual Compulsivity and Sexual Behaviors Among Gay and Bisexual Men and Lesbian and Bisexual Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the existing body of research, the information pertaining to sexual compulsivity (SC) among women, both homo- and heterosexual, remains rather limited in comparison to men. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of SC in a community sample of gay and bisexual men and lesbian and bisexual women and to identify differences in sexual practices based

Brian C. Kelly; David S. Bimbi; Jose E. Nanin; Hubert Izienicki; Jeffrey T. Parsons

2009-01-01

208

The positive outlook study- a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of an online self-management program targeting psychosocial issues for men living with HIV: a study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background The emergence of HIV as a chronic condition means that people living with HIV are required to take more responsibility for the self-management of their condition, including making physical, emotional and social adjustments. This paper describes the design and evaluation of Positive Outlook, an online program aiming to enhance the self-management skills of gay men living with HIV. Methods/design This study is designed as a randomised controlled trial in which men living with HIV in Australia will be assigned to either an intervention group or usual care control group. The intervention group will participate in the online group program ‘Positive Outlook’. The program is based on self-efficacy theory and uses a self-management approach to enhance skills, confidence and abilities to manage the psychosocial issues associated with HIV in daily life. Participants will access the program for a minimum of 90 minutes per week over seven weeks. Primary outcomes are domain specific self-efficacy, HIV related quality of life, and outcomes of health education. Secondary outcomes include: depression, anxiety and stress; general health and quality of life; adjustment to HIV; and social support. Data collection will take place at baseline, completion of the intervention (or eight weeks post randomisation) and at 12 week follow-up. Discussion Results of the Positive Outlook study will provide information regarding the effectiveness of online group programs improving health related outcomes for men living with HIV. Trial registration ACTRN12612000642886. PMID:24491034

2014-01-01

209

Men's Health  

MedlinePLUS

... men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to ... regular checkups and medical care There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate ...

210

Contesting 'straights': 'lesbians', 'queer heterosexuals' and the critique of heteronormativity.  

PubMed

The essay explores interrelations between Lesbian Theory and Queer Straight Theory. It provides a brief genealogy and an interrogation of the "discourse of queer heterosexuality." I argue that Queer Straight Theory is certainly indebted to lesbian (and) feminist critiques of institutional heterosexuality and their denaturalizations of straight and lesbian sexualities. Lesbian and Queer Straight Theories remain in disagreement, however, about notions of power and identity that shape their theoretical and political stances. PMID:17954455

Schlichter, Annette

2007-01-01

211

“We no longer live in the old days”: a qualitative study on the role of masculinity and religion for men’s views on violence within marriage in rural Java, Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies on domestic violence in Indonesia have focused primarily on women’s experiences and little research has been undertaken to understand men’s views on domestic violence or their involvement in the prevention of domestic violence. This study aimed to explore men’s views on masculinity and the use of violence within marriage, in order to gain knowledge on how to involve men in prevention of domestic violence in rural Indonesia. Methods Focus group discussions with six groups of local male community leaders in Purworejo were conducted. The discussions were transcribed and coded for the construction of a positional map on different masculinities and their relation to the level of acceptance of domestic violence. Results Social and cultural changes have played a crucial role in transforming the relationship between men and women in Indonesian society. Three different positions of masculinity with certain beliefs on the gender order and acceptance of violence within marriage were identified: the traditionalist, the pragmatist, and the egalitarian. The traditionalist had the highest acceptance of violence as a tool to uphold the superior position of men within marriage, while the pragmatist viewed violence as undesirable but sometimes needed in order to correct the wife’s behavior. The egalitarian did not see any reason for violence because they believed that men and women are equal and complementary to each other. Conclusions Adaptation to social and cultural changes combined with lack of exposures to contextual and progressive religious teachings has led to the formation of three different positions of masculinity among the population in this study. Each position has certain beliefs regarding the gender order and the use of violence within marriage. Religion is an extremely important aspect that must be included in every type of intervention with this population. PMID:24735687

2014-01-01

212

The experience of Middle Eastern men living in Sweden of maternal and child health care and fatherhood: focus-group discussions and content analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe how men from the Middle East experience Swedish maternity and child health care. An integral part of the aim of this study has also been to describe the experiences of men from the Middle East when becoming and being a father in Sweden. Design, setting and participants: an exploratory, qualitative study using focus-group discussions and individual interviews,

Pernilla Ny; Lars Plantin; Elisabeth Dejin-Karlsson; Anna-Karin Dykes

2006-01-01

213

The experience of Middle Eastern men living in Sweden of maternal and child health care and fatherhood: focus-group discussions and content analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo describe how men from the Middle East experience Swedish maternity and child health care. An integral part of the aim of this study has also been to describe the experiences of men from the Middle East when becoming and being a father in Sweden.

Pernilla Ny; Lars Plantin; Elisabeth Dejin-Karlsson; Anna-Karin Dykes

2008-01-01

214

Sex with women among men who have sex with men in China: prevalence and sexual practices.  

PubMed

Men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) are a potential bridge population for transmitting HIV to heterosexual women. This study assessed key characteristics of this subgroup of men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. Of 1141 eligible MSM, 45.6% reported bisexual behaviors. Besides marriage as a strong predictor (odds ratio: 23.90, 95% confidence interval: 14.29-39.98), older age (1.12, 1.10-1.15) and lower education (or no college education) (1.98, 1.52-2.59) were also independently associated with having ever had sex with women. MSMW reported higher proportions of alcohol drinking, heterosexual/bisexual orientation, and preference for an insertive role in anal sex than men who had sex with men only; but there was no statistically significant difference between two groups in prevalence of HIV and syphilis infections and in history of sexually transmitted infections. HIV prevention intervention programs should break the bridging role of HIV transmission in MSMW population. PMID:23931683

Tao, Jun; Ruan, Yuhua; Yin, Lu; Vermund, Sten H; Shepherd, Bryan E; Shao, Yiming; Qian, Han-Zhu

2013-09-01

215

Sex with Women Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: Prevalence and Sexual Practices  

PubMed Central

Abstract Men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) are a potential bridge population for transmitting HIV to heterosexual women. This study assessed key characteristics of this subgroup of men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. Of 1141 eligible MSM, 45.6% reported bisexual behaviors. Besides marriage as a strong predictor (odds ratio: 23.90, 95% confidence interval: 14.29–39.98), older age (1.12, 1.10–1.15) and lower education (or no college education) (1.98, 1.52–2.59) were also independently associated with having ever had sex with women. MSMW reported higher proportions of alcohol drinking, heterosexual/bisexual orientation, and preference for an insertive role in anal sex than men who had sex with men only; but there was no statistically significant difference between two groups in prevalence of HIV and syphilis infections and in history of sexually transmitted infections. HIV prevention intervention programs should break the bridging role of HIV transmission in MSMW population. PMID:23931683

Tao, Jun; Ruan, Yuhua; Yin, Lu; Vermund, Sten H.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Shao, Yiming

2013-01-01

216

Perceptions of HIV Risk and Explanations of Sexual Risk Behavior Offered by Heterosexual Black Male Barbershop Patrons in Brooklyn, NY  

PubMed Central

To describe HIV risk factors among adult heterosexual Black men recruited from four barbershops located in high HIV seroprevalent neighborhoods of Brooklyn, NY. Data on HIV-risk related behaviors and other characteristics were collected from barbershop clients. All participants (n=60) completed brief risk assessments; and a subset (n=22) also completed focus groups and/or individual interviews. Of the subset of 22 men, 68% were US born, 59% had been in jail/prison, 32% were unemployed; and during the 3 months before the interviews, 68% reported at least two partners and 45% reported unprotected vaginal or anal sex with two or more women. Emergent themes included: 1) the psychological function of multiple partnerships; 2) calculated risk taking regarding condom use; 3) the role of emotional attachment and partner trust in condom use; 4) low perceived HIV risk and community awareness; and 5) lack of relationship between HIV testing and safer sex practices. Interventions among heterosexual Black men should focus not only on increasing HIV awareness and reducing sexual risk, but also on contextual and interpersonal factors that influence sexual risk.

Taylor, Tonya N.; Joseph, Michael; Henny, Kirk D.; Pinto, Angelo R.; Agbetor, Francis; Camilien, Brignel; Williams, Kim M.; Browne, Ruth C.; White, Marilyn; Gousse, Yolene; Brown, Humberto; Taylor, Raekiela D.; Wilson, Tracey E.

2015-01-01

217

Status of men’s health in Canada  

PubMed Central

Men are more likely to die of cancer, heart disease, or diabetes at younger ages than women – a reality that is compounded by the reluctance of men to use healthcare services. In addition to reduced life expectancy, men can also expect to live fewer healthy years than their female counterparts. As gynecologists and obstetricians have led the women’s health movement in addressing gender-specific gaps in care, urologists are well-poised to take on a leadership role to advocate for, and address, men’s health initiatives. PMID:25243037

Goldenberg, S. Larry

2014-01-01

218

Sometimes you just have to have a lot of bitter to make it sweet: Substance abuse and partner abuse in the lives of HIV+ men who have sex with men  

PubMed Central

Although links between partner abuse (PA) and substance abuse (SA) are well-documented in the literature, we know less about these relations among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). We conducted a qualitative study with this group (N = 28). Participants reported (1) social modeling of SA in childhood and in adult social networks, (2) initial use of substance to cope with child abuse and neglect, and (3) the reinforcement of problematic SA by experiences of PA, whereby SA led to PA, resulting in increased SA. Recommendations for clinicians working with HIV+ MSM are discussed. PMID:24163573

Andrasik, Michele P.; Valentine, Sarah E.; Pantalone, David W.

2013-01-01

219

Men's Self-Definitions of Abusive Childhood Sexual Experiences, and Potentially Related Risky Behavioral and Psychiatric Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To estimate how many heterosexual and gay/bisexual men self-define abusive childhood sexual experiences (CSEs) to be childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and to assess whether CSA self-definition is associated with risky behavioral and psychiatric outcomes in adulthood. Methods: In Philadelphia County, 197 (66%) of 298 recruited men

Holmes, William C.

2008-01-01

220

Sexual and reproductive health perceptions and practices as revealed in the sexual history narratives of South African men living in a time of HIV/AIDS.  

PubMed

Abstract The frequent positioning of men's sexual risk-taking as driving the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa has triggered interest in men's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) perceptions, attitudes, and practices. Much research, however, presents men as a homogenous group, and focuses on the quantifiable aspects of male sexual behaviors, providing an inadequate basis for understanding men's SRH needs and addressing the gendered aspects of HIV prevention. This study used sexual history narratives to yield more nuanced and contextualized understandings of male sexuality as it relates to SRH. Fifty sexual life history individual interviews and 10 focus-group discussions (FGDs) with men, as well as 25 sexual life history interviews with women, were conducted with participants purposively sampled from three age categories: (18-24, 25-55, and 55+ years), a wide range of cultural and racial backgrounds, and in urban and rural sites across 5 provinces in South Africa. Interviews and FGDs elicited stories of participant's early knowledge of sex and sexual experimentation and then explored sexual relationships and experiences in adulthood-including engagement with HIV risks and SRH management. The data were analyzed using a thematic approach. Many male participants conformed to dominant norms of masculinity associated with a high risk of sexually transmitted infections including HIV, such as having regular unprotected sex, reluctance to test for HIV, and poor SRH-seeking behaviors. Yet, the narrative accounts reveal instances of men taking steps to protect their own SRH and that of their partners, and the complex ways in which hegemonic gender norms influence men and women's SRH. Ultimately, the study points to the value of sexual biographies for gaining a deeper understanding of male sexuality, and the social structures, meanings, and experiences that underlie it. Such insights are critical to more effectively engaging men in HIV prevention efforts. PMID:25495581

Stern, Erin; Rau, Asta; Cooper, Diane

2014-12-01

221

Sexual and reproductive health perceptions and practices as revealed in the sexual history narratives of South African men living in a time of HIV/AIDS  

PubMed Central

Abstract The frequent positioning of men's sexual risk-taking as driving the HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa has triggered interest in men's sexual and reproductive health (SRH) perceptions, attitudes, and practices. Much research, however, presents men as a homogenous group, and focuses on the quantifiable aspects of male sexual behaviors, providing an inadequate basis for understanding men's SRH needs and addressing the gendered aspects of HIV prevention. This study used sexual history narratives to yield more nuanced and contextualized understandings of male sexuality as it relates to SRH. Fifty sexual life history individual interviews and 10 focus-group discussions (FGDs) with men, as well as 25 sexual life history interviews with women, were conducted with participants purposively sampled from three age categories: (18–24, 25–55, and 55+ years), a wide range of cultural and racial backgrounds, and in urban and rural sites across 5 provinces in South Africa. Interviews and FGDs elicited stories of participant's early knowledge of sex and sexual experimentation and then explored sexual relationships and experiences in adulthood—including engagement with HIV risks and SRH management. The data were analyzed using a thematic approach. Many male participants conformed to dominant norms of masculinity associated with a high risk of sexually transmitted infections including HIV, such as having regular unprotected sex, reluctance to test for HIV, and poor SRH-seeking behaviors. Yet, the narrative accounts reveal instances of men taking steps to protect their own SRH and that of their partners, and the complex ways in which hegemonic gender norms influence men and women's SRH. Ultimately, the study points to the value of sexual biographies for gaining a deeper understanding of male sexuality, and the social structures, meanings, and experiences that underlie it. Such insights are critical to more effectively engaging men in HIV prevention efforts. PMID:25495581

Stern, Erin; Rau, Asta; Cooper, Diane

2014-01-01

222

PET and MRI show differences in cerebral asymmetry and functional connectivity between homo- and heterosexual subjects  

PubMed Central

Cerebral responses to putative pheromones and objects of sexual attraction were recently found to differ between homo- and heterosexual subjects. Although this observation may merely mirror perceptional differences, it raises the intriguing question as to whether certain sexually dimorphic features in the brain may differ between individuals of the same sex but different sexual orientation. We addressed this issue by studying hemispheric asymmetry and functional connectivity, two parameters that in previous publications have shown specific sex differences. Ninety subjects [25 heterosexual men (HeM) and women (HeW), and 20 homosexual men (HoM) and women (HoW)] were investigated with magnetic resonance volumetry of cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. Fifty of them also participated in PET measurements of cerebral blood flow, used for analyses of functional connections from the right and left amygdalae. HeM and HoW showed a rightward cerebral asymmetry, whereas volumes of the cerebral hemispheres were symmetrical in HoM and HeW. No cerebellar asymmetries were found. Homosexual subjects also showed sex-atypical amygdala connections. In HoM, as in HeW, the connections were more widespread from the left amygdala; in HoW and HeM, on the other hand, from the right amygdala. Furthermore, in HoM and HeW the connections were primarily displayed with the contralateral amygdala and the anterior cingulate, in HeM and HoW with the caudate, putamen, and the prefrontal cortex. The present study shows sex-atypical cerebral asymmetry and functional connections in homosexual subjects. The results cannot be primarily ascribed to learned effects, and they suggest a linkage to neurobiological entities. PMID:18559854

Savic, Ivanka; Lindström, Per

2008-01-01

223

Cystoscopy - Men  

MedlinePLUS

Cystoscopy - Men Introduction Cystoscopy is a common urological test that allows the doctor to look inside the bladder. Your ... can be taken out during a cystoscopy. In men, a cystoscopy can help the urologist determine the ...

224

“A man’s gonna do what a man wants to do”: African American and Hispanic women’s perceptions about heterosexual relationships: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background HIV prevention efforts have given limited attention to the relational schemas and scripts of adult heterosexual women. These broader schemas and scripts of romantic and other sexual liaisons, partner selection, relationship dynamics, and power negotiations may help to better understand facilitators and barriers to HIV risk-reduction practices. Methods We conducted exploratory qualitative interviews with 60 HIV-uninfected heterosexual African-American women from rural counties in North Carolina and Alabama, and Hispanic women from an urban county in southern Florida. Data were collected for relationship expectations; relationship experiences, and relationship power and decision-making. Interview transcripts underwent computer-assisted thematic analysis. Results Participants had a median age of 34 years (range 18–59), 34% were married or living as married, 39% earned an annual income of $12,000 or less, 12% held less than a high school education, and 54% were employed. Among the Hispanic women, 95% were foreign born. We identified two overarching relationship themes: contradictions between relationship expectations and desires and life circumstances that negated such ideals, and relationship challenges. Within the contradictions theme, we discovered six subthemes: a good man is hard to find; sex can be currency used to secure desired outcomes; compromises and allowances for cheating, irresponsible, and disrespectful behavior; redefining dating; sex just happens; needing relationship validation. The challenges theme centered on two subthemes: uncertainties and miscommunication, and relationship power negotiation. Gender differences in relationship intentions and desires as well as communication styles, the importance of emotional and financial support, and the potential for relationships to provide disappointment were present in all subthemes. In examining HIV risk perceptions, participants largely held that risk for HIV-infection and the need to take precautions were problems of women who differed from them (i.e., abuse drugs, are promiscuous, exchange sex). Conclusion Underlying women’s relational schemas was a belief that relationship priorities differed for men and women. Consequently, expectations and allowances for partner infidelity and negligent behaviors were incorporated into their scripts. Moreover, scripts endorsed women’s use of sex as currency in relationship formation and endurance, and did not emphasize HIV risk. Both couple- and gender-specific group-level interventions are needed to deconstruct (breakdown) and reconstruct (rewrite) relationship scripts. PMID:23705954

2013-01-01

225

Social Support and Psychological Well-Being in Lesbian and Heterosexual Preadoptive Couples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines predictors of social support and mental health among 36 lesbian and 39 heterosexual couples who were waiting to adopt. Lesbian preadoptive partners perceived less support from family than heterosexual partners but similar levels of support from friends. Lesbian and heterosexual partners reported similar levels of well-being.…

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

2008-01-01

226

Heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in northern California: results from a ten-year study.  

PubMed

To examine rates of and risk factors for heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the authors conducted a prospective study of infected individuals and their heterosexual partners who have been recruited since 1985. Participants were recruited from health care providers, research studies, and health departments throughout Northern California, and they were interviewed and examined at various study clinic sites. A total of 82 infected women and their male partners and 360 infected men and their female partners were enrolled. Over 90% of the couples were monogamous for the year prior to entry into the study; < 3% had a current sexually transmitted disease (STD). The median age of participants was 34 years, and the majority were white. Over 3,000 couple-months of data were available for the follow-up study. Overall, 68 (19%) of the 360 female partners of HIV-infected men (95% confidence interval (CI) 15.0-23.3%) and two (2.4%) of the 82 male partners of HIV-infected women (95% CI 0.3-8.5%) were infected. History of sexually transmitted diseases was most strongly associated with transmission. Male-to-female transmission was approximately eight-times more efficient than female-to-male transmission and male-to-female per contact infectivity was estimated to be 0.0009 (95% CI 0.0005-0.001). Over time, the authors observed increased condom use (p < 0.001) and no new infections. Infectivity for HIV through heterosexual transmission is low, and STDs may be the most important cofactor for transmission. Significant behavior change over time in serodiscordant couples was observed. PMID:9270414

Padian, N S; Shiboski, S C; Glass, S O; Vittinghoff, E

1997-08-15

227

Structural Stigma and Cigarette Smoking in a Prospective Cohort Study of Sexual Minority and Heterosexual Youth  

PubMed Central

Background Sexual minority youth are more likely to smoke cigarettes than heterosexuals but research into the determinants of these disparities is lacking. Purpose To examine whether exposure to structural stigma predicts cigarette smoking in sexual minority youth. Methods Prospective data from adolescents participating in the Growing Up Today Study (2000–2005). Results Among sexual minority youth, living in low structural stigma states (e.g., states with non-discrimination policies inclusive of sexual orientation) was associated with a lower risk of cigarette smoking after adjustment for individual-level risk factors (Relative Risk[RR]=0.97, 95% Confidence Interval[CI]: 0.96, 0.99, p=0.02). This association remained marginally significant after additional controls for potential state-level confounders (RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.93, 1.00, p=0.06). In contrast, among heterosexual youth, structural stigma was not associated with past-year smoking rates, documenting specificity of these effects to sexual minority youth. Conclusions Structural stigma represents a potential risk factor for cigarette smoking among sexual minority adolescents. PMID:24136092

Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Jun, Hee-Jin; Corliss, Heather L.; Austin, S. Bryn

2013-01-01

228

Therapy with Unmarried Heterosexual Couples: Clinical and Ethical Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

States that the number of unmarried heterosexual couples involved in counseling is increasing. Although they share problems with married couples, cohabitation often raises a distinctive set of issues. Presents three case examples. Treatment approaches include family of origin, feminist, and structural interventions. Also discusses problems of…

Searight, H. Russell; Bennett, Susan; Clansy, Carolyn; Heine, Barb; Horn, Gordon J.; Klocek, John; Rankin, Christine; Richardson, Patricia; Tschannen, Theresa; Williams, Lydia; Williams, Tom

1997-01-01

229

Predictors of Heterosexual College Students' Attitudes toward LGBT People  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study identifies the predictors of U.S. heterosexual undergraduate and graduate college students' attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people as a group rather than toward individual identities. Findings suggest that affirming LGBT attitudes are most strongly associated with liberal political ideology and whether…

Woodford, Michael R.; Silverschanz, Perry; Swank, Eric; Scherrer, Kristin S.; Raiz, Lisa

2012-01-01

230

Comparison of two dimensions of attitude similarity on heterosexual attraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared the effects of religious and sexual attitudes on heterosexual attraction in a computer dating study. 250 undergraduates were matched with 2 or 3 others randomly or on the basis of maximal or minimal similarity of the attitudes. Findings show that similar religious attitudes accounted for the attraction of females to males, but that the attraction of males to females

John C. Touhey

1972-01-01

231

Relationship between trauma and high-risk behavior among HIV-positive men who do not have sex with men (MDSM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of heterosexual HIV transmission continues to increase in the USA. However, little is known about factors that influence high-risk behavior among men who do not have sex with men (MDSM). This study examines the association of childhood sexual abuse and high-risk behaviors among MDSM. The Coping with HIV\\/AIDS in the Southeast (CHASE) study included 611 HIV-positive individuals in

Kathryn Whetten; Susan Reif; Matthew Toth; Erica Jain; Jane Leserman; Brian W. Pence

2012-01-01

232

A cross-sectional assessment of the burden of HIV and associated individual- and structural-level characteristics among men who have sex with men in Swaziland  

PubMed Central

Introduction Similar to other Southern African countries, Swaziland has been severely affected by HIV, with over a quarter of its reproductive-age adults estimated to be living with the virus, equating to an estimate of 170,000 people living with HIV. The last several years have witnessed an increase in the understanding of the potential vulnerabilities among men who have sex with men (MSM) in neighbouring countries with similarly widespread HIV epidemics. To date, there are no data characterizing the burden of HIV and the HIV prevention, treatment and care needs of MSM in Swaziland. Methods In 2011, 324 men who reported sex with another man in the last 12 months were accrued using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Participants completed HIV testing using Swazi national guidelines as well as structured survey instruments administered by trained staff, including modules on demographics, individual-level behavioural and biological risk factors, social and structural characteristics and uptake of HIV services. Population and individual weights were computed separately for each variable with a data-smoothing algorithm. The weights were used to estimate RDS-adjusted univariate estimates with 95% bootstrapped confidence intervals (BCIs). Crude and RDS-adjusted bivariate and multivariate analyses were completed with HIV as the dependent variable. Results Overall, HIV prevalence was 17.6% (n=50/284), although it was strongly correlated with age in bivariate- [odds ratio (OR) 1.2, 95% BCI 1.15–1.21] and multivariate-adjusted analyses (adjusted OR 1.24, 95% BCI 1.14–1.35) for each additional year of age. Nearly, 70.8% (n=34/48) were unaware of their status of living with HIV. Condom use with all sexual partners and condom-compatible-lubricant use with men were reported by 1.3% (95% CI 0.0–9.7). Conclusions Although the epidemic in Swaziland is driven by high-risk heterosexual transmission, the burden of HIV and the HIV prevention, treatment and care needs of MSM have been understudied. The data presented here suggest that these men have specific HIV acquisition and transmission risks that differ from those of other reproductive-age adults. The scale-up in HIV services over the past decade has likely had limited benefit for MSM, potentially resulting in a scenario where epidemics of HIV among MSM expand in the context of slowing epidemics in the general population, a reality observed in most of the world. PMID:24321117

Baral, Stefan D; Ketende, Sosthenes; Mnisi, Zandile; Mabuza, Xolile; Grosso, Ashley; Sithole, Bhekie; Maziya, Sibusiso; Kerrigan, Deanna L; Green, Jessica L; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Adams, Darrin

2013-01-01

233

"I didn't think I could get out of the fucking park." Gay men's retrospective accounts of neighborhood space, emerging sexuality and migrations.  

PubMed

Young, African American and Latino gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately represented among new HIV cases according to the most recent national surveillance statistics. Analysts have noted that these racial/ethnic disparities in HIV among MSM exist within the wider context of sexual, mental and physical health disparities between MSM and heterosexuals. The intercorrelation of these adverse health outcomes among MSM, termed syndemics, has been theorized to be socially produced by a heterosexist social system that marginalizes lesbian, gay, bisexual, MSM and other sexual minorities. African American and Latino MSM experience overlapping systems of oppression that may increase their risk of experiencing syndemic health outcomes. In this paper, using data from twenty in-depth qualitative interviews with MSM living in four New York City (NYC) neighborhoods, we present accounts of neighborhood space, examining how space can both physically constitute and reinforce social systems of stratification and oppression, which in turn produce social disparities in sexual health outcomes. By analyzing accounts of emerging sexuality in neighborhood space, i.e. across time and space, we identify pathways to risk and contribute to our understanding of how neighborhood space is experienced by gay men, adding to our ability to support young men as they emerge in place and to shape the social topography of urban areas. PMID:24581056

Frye, Victoria; Egan, James E; Van Tieu, Hong; Cerdá, Magdalena; Ompad, Danielle; Koblin, Beryl A

2014-03-01

234

Modeling minority stress effects on homelessness and health disparities among young men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Sexual minority youth are more likely to experience homelessness, and homeless sexual minority youth report greater risk for mental health and substance abuse symptoms than homeless heterosexual youth, yet few studies have assessed determinants that help explain the disparities. Minority stress theory proposes that physical and mental health disparities among sexual minority populations may be explained by the stress produced by living in heterosexist social environments characterized by stigma and discrimination directed toward sexual minority persons. We used data from a sample of 200 young men who have sex with men (YMSM) (38 % African American, 26.5 % Latino/Hispanic, 23.5 % White, 12 % multiracial/other) to develop an exploratory path model measuring the effects of experience and internalization of sexual orientation stigma on depression and substance use via being kicked out of home due to sexual orientation and current homelessness. Direct significant paths were found from experience of sexual orientation-related stigma to internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma, having been kicked out of one's home, experiencing homelessness during the past year, and major depressive symptoms during the past week. Having been kicked out of one's home had a direct significant effect on experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months and on daily marijuana use. Internalization of sexual orientation-related stigma and experiencing homelessness during the past 12 months partially mediated the direct effect of experience of sexual orientation-related stigma on major depressive symptoms. Our empirical testing of the effects of minority stress on health of YMSM advances minority stress theory as a framework for investigating health disparities among this population. PMID:24807702

Bruce, Douglas; Stall, Ron; Fata, Aimee; Campbell, Richard T

2014-06-01

235

PROVIDING WOMEN, KEPT MEN  

PubMed Central

This paper draws on ethnographic and interview based fieldwork to explore accounts of intimate relationships between widowed women and poor young men that emerged in the wake of economic crisis and a devastating HIV epidemic among the Luo ethnic group in Western Kenya. I show how the cooptation of widow inheritance practices in the wake of an overwhelming number of widows as well as economic crisis resulted in widows becoming providing women and poor young men becoming kept men. I illustrate how widows in this setting, by performing a set of practices central to what it meant to be a man in this society – pursuing and providing for their partners - were effectively doing masculinity. I will also show how young men, rather than being feminized by being kept, deployed other sets of practices to prove their masculinity and live in a manner congruent with cultural ideals. I argue that ultimately, women’s practice of masculinity in large part seemed to serve patriarchal ends. It not only facilitated the fulfillment of patriarchal expectations of femininity – to being inherited – but also served, in the end, to provide a material base for young men’s deployment of legitimizing and culturally valued sets of masculine practice. PMID:25489121

Mojola, Sanyu A

2014-01-01

236

The Role of Masculine Norms and Informal Support on Mental Health in Incarcerated Men  

PubMed Central

Mental health problems, in general, and major depression in particular, are prevalent among incarcerated men. It is estimated that 23% of state inmates report experiencing symptoms of major depression. Despite the high rates of depressive symptoms, there is little understanding about the psychosocial factors that are associated with depressive and anxiety symptoms of incarcerated men. One factor relevant to the mental health of incarcerated men is their adherence to traditional masculine norms. We investigated the role of masculine norms and informal support on depressive and anxiety symptoms among 123 incarcerated men. The results revealed that adherence to the masculine norm of emotional control were negatively associated with depressive symptoms while heterosexual presentation and informal support were related to both depressive and anxiety symptoms. High levels of reported informal support moderated the effects of heterosexual presentation on depressive and anxiety symptoms. Public health and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:23139638

Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Gordon, Derrick; Oliveros, Arazais; Perez-Cabello, Arturo; Brabham, Tamika; Lanza, Steve; Dyson, William

2012-01-01

237

Men's constructions of masculinity and male sexuality through talk of buying sex.  

PubMed

Commercial sex is an everyday occurrence across a range of contexts in South Africa. In this paper we turn our attention to the often-marginalised role of the buyers of sex by drawing on narrative interviews with male clients of female sex workers recruited through online advertisements in order to explore the ways in which heterosexual men construct, negotiate and perform their masculinity and sexuality through talking about their experiences of paying for sex. We highlight parallels between men's narratives of paying for sex and dominant discourses of gender and heterosexuality. We show how men draw on heteronormative sexual scripts in constructing and making sense of paid sexual encounters and how men are simultaneously able to construct and enact a particular idealised version of masculinity and male sexuality through their talk on paying for sex. Finally, we discuss how online resources could be used more extensively in future research with the male clients of sex workers. PMID:25287270

Huysamen, Monique; Boonzaier, Floretta

2014-10-01

238

The impact of gout on patient’s lives: a study of African-American and Caucasian men and women with gout  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the impact of gout on quality of life (QOL) and study differences by gender and race. Methods Ten race- and sex-stratified nominal groups were conducted, oversampling for African-Americans and women with gout. Patients presented, discussed, combined and rank-ordered their concerns. Results A total of 62 patients with mean age 65.1 years, 60% men, 64% African-American, participated in 10 nominal groups: African-American men (n?=?23; 3 groups); African-American women (n?=?18; 3 groups); Caucasian men (n?=?15; 3 groups); and Caucasian women (n?=?6; 1 group). The most frequently cited high-ranked concerns among the ten nominal groups were: (1) effect of gout flare on daily activities (n?=?10 groups); (2) work disability (n?=?8 groups); (3) severe pain (n?=?8 groups); (4) joint swelling and tenderness (n?=?6 groups); (5) food restrictions (n?=?6 groups); (6) medication related issues (n?=?6 groups); (7) dependency on family and others (n?=?5 groups); (8) emotional Impact (n?=?5 groups); (9) interference with sexual function (n?=?4 groups); (10) difficulty with shoes (n?=?4 groups); and (11) sleep disruption (n?=?4 groups). Compared with men, women ranked the following concerns high more often: problems with shoes (n?=?4 versus n?=?0 groups); dependency (n?=?3 versus n?=?2 groups); and joint/limb deformity (n?=?2 versus n?=?0 group). Compared with Caucasians, African-Americans ranked the following concerns high more often: dietary restrictions (n?=?6 versus n?=?0 groups); severe pain (n?=?6 versus n?=?2 groups); gout bringing the day to a “halt” (n?=?2 versus n?=?0 group); effect on emotional health (n?=?4 versus n?=?1 groups); and the need for canes/crutches during flares (n?=?2 versus n?=?0 group). Conclusions Gout has a significant impact on a patient’s QOL. Important differences in the impact of gout by gender and race were noted. PMID:24961941

2014-01-01

239

Skin cancer risk behaviors among US men: the role of sexual orientation.  

PubMed

The current study assessed skin cancer risk behaviors by sexual orientation in a nationally representative prospective sample of US men (n = 1767), sampled at ages 16 and 29 years. At age 16 years, sexual minority men were 3.9 times as likely as heterosexual men to indoor tan. Participants did not significantly differ in the use of sunscreen or the frequency of outdoor tanning. Thus, sexual minority men might be an at-risk group for developing skin cancers because of their indoor tanning behaviors. PMID:25033138

Blashill, Aaron J; Safren, Steven A

2014-09-01

240

Perspectives on substance use and disclosure among behaviorally bisexual Black men with female primary partners  

PubMed Central

Black men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) are believed to be a bridge to HIV infection among heterosexual Black women, and substance use can increase the risk of infection among men. However, empirical evidence on the social context of MSMW’s sexual behavior and substance use is needed. This study examines the perspectives of Black MSMW with female primary partners on the role of substance use in their sexual encounters with men and their reasons for disclosing or not disclosing this behavior to their female partners. Findings can inform culturally relevant HIV prevention interventions for this population. PMID:23216438

Koken, Juline A.

2012-01-01

241

The Potential Impact of Discrimination Fears of Older Gays, Lesbians, Bisexuals and Transgender Individuals Living in Small to Moderate-Sized Cities on Long-Term Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

As an exploration of the potential impact of fears of discrimination against GLBTs in long-term health care settings, this study compared perceptions of GLBT persons and heterosexuals. A total of 132 GLBT persons and 187 heterosexuals living in Eastern Washington completed a survey that contained demographic questions and perceptions of discrimination in long-term care settings. Most respondents suspected that staff

Nick C. Jackson; Michael J. Johnson; Roe Roberts

2008-01-01

242

Sexual stigma, psychological well-being and social engagement among men who have sex with men in Beirut, Lebanon.  

PubMed

This qualitative study sought to explore sexual identity development among men who have sex with men in Beirut, Lebanon; the stigma experienced by these men; and how their psychological well-being and social engagement are shaped by how they cope with this stigma. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 31 men who have sex with men and content analysis was used to identify emergent themes. While many men reported feeling very comfortable with their sexual orientation and had disclosed their sexual orientation to family, most men struggled at least somewhat with their sexuality, often because of perceived stigma from others and internal religious conflict about the immorality of homosexuality. Most participants described experiencing verbal harassment or ridicule or being treated as different or lesser than in social relationships with friends or family. Mechanisms for coping with stigma included social avoidance (trying to pass as heterosexual and limiting interaction with men who have sex with men to the internet) or withdrawal from relationships in an attempt to limit exposure to stigma. Findings suggest that effective coping with both internal and external sexual stigma is central to the psychological well-being and social engagement of men who have sex with men in Beirut, much as has been found in Western gay communities. PMID:23730919

Wagner, Glenn J; Aunon, Frances M; Kaplan, Rachel L; Karam, Rita; Khouri, Danielle; Tohme, Johnny; Mokhbat, Jacques

2013-01-01

243

The construction of the homosexual ‘other’ by British Muslim heterosexuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Islam’s explicit condemnation of homosexuality has created a theologically based homophobia which engenders the intolerance\\u000a of homosexuals by Muslims. In this article I explore Muslim attitudes towards homosexuality and homosexuals as this area has\\u000a elicited very little research. Based on structured interviews with 68 Muslim male and female heterosexuals I examine the connection\\u000a between participants’ attitudes towards homosexuality and their

Asifa Siraj

2009-01-01

244

Lesbian and heterosexual preadoptive couples' openness to transracial adoption.  

PubMed

This study uses data from 147 White preadoptive couples (54 lesbian, 93 heterosexual) to examine adopters' subjective explanations for why they are open or not open to adopting transracially. Participant perceptions of racial-ethnic diversity in their communities and families, perceptions of family support or nonsupport, and attitudes about race were among the factors they cited as influencing their openness. These findings hold important implications for training and service delivery in transracial adoption. PMID:19290730

Goldberg, Abbie E

2009-01-01

245

Details for Manuscript Number SSM-D-06-00290R2 “Internalized Stigma, Discrimination, and Depression among Men and Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Cape Town, South Africa”  

PubMed Central

AIDS stigmas interfere with HIV prevention, diagnosis and treatment and can become internalized by people living with HIV/AIDS. However, the effects of internalized AIDS stigmas have not been investigated in Africa, home to two-thirds of the more than 40 million people living with AIDS in the world. The current study examined the prevalence of discrimination experiences and internalized stigmas among 420 HIV positive men and 643 HIV positive women recruited from AIDS services in Cape Town, South Africa. The anonymous surveys found that 40% of persons with HIV/AIDS had experienced discrimination resulting from having HIV infection and one in five had lost a place to stay or a job because of their HIV status. More than one in three participants indicated feeling dirty, ashamed, or guilty because of their HIV status. A hierarchical regression model that included demographic characteristics, health and treatment status, social support, substance use, and internalized stigma significantly predicted cognitive-affective depression. Internalized stigma accounted for 4.8% of the variance in cognitive-affective depression scores over and above the other variables. These results indicate an urgent need for social reform to reduce AIDS stigmas and the design of interventions to assist people living with HIV/AIDS to adjust and adapt to the social conditions of AIDS in South Africa. PMID:17337318

Simbayi, Leickness C.; Strebel, Anna; Cloete, Allanise; Henda, Nomvo; Mqeketo, Ayanda

2014-01-01

246

Masculine ideology, norms, and HIV prevention among young Black men  

PubMed Central

This study examines the relationship between masculine ideology, adherence to norms, and HIV prevention among young Black heterosexual and gay men on the campus of a historically Black college/university. The data from four focus groups and nine individual interviews (N = 35) were aggregated and two recurring themes emerged: sexual communication, and mate availability. Additional themes related to HIV prevention were stigma, protection, and testing. The importance of investigating masculinity with young men is highlighted and implications for professionals working with college students to prevent the transmission of HIV are included.

Hall, Naomi M.; Applewhite, Sheldon

2014-01-01

247

Epidemiology and pathophysiology of osteoporosis in men.  

PubMed

Osteoporosis in men is an unrecognized but growing problem as the number of men who live to old age increases. The 10-year fracture risk at age 50 quadruples by age 80, and in general the incidence rate of osteoporotic fracture in men is about half that of women. Of note, the mortality and morbidity after hip fracture are much greater in men. There are many men whose osteoporosis is the result of specific causes such as oral glucocorticoid therapy, hypogonadism, or androgen withdrawal therapy for prostate cancer. In addition there are several interesting syndromes of osteoporosis in middle-aged men; these men usually present with vertebral fractures. As knowledge about the prevalence and etiology of osteoporosis in men increases, it will be recognized and treated in more men, in hopes of preventing fracture. PMID:16908000

Adler, Robert A

2006-09-01

248

Making Sense of Heterosexuality: An Exploratory Study of Young Heterosexual Identities in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the basis of the understanding that the shaping, experience, and meaning of sexual identities is informed by the social\\u000a context, an exploratory study of sexual identities was done with a college sample in urban Turkey. Participants included 225\\u000a students taking an introductory psychology course at a private urban university in ?stanbul (66.5% women, 33.5% men, age range:\\u000a 18–30 years,

Hale Bolak Boratav

2006-01-01

249

Women’s Porno: The heterosexual female gaze in porn sites “for women”  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article deals with a number of Internet sites claiming to specialize in providing pornography for heterosexual women,\\u000a as a vehicle to examine the nascent “gaze” and visual parameters of heterosexual female sexuality. The focus here is semiotic—looking\\u000a at visual coding of website images rather than audience reception (i.e., whether heterosexual women are actually the main\\u000a consumers of women’s porno).

Terrie Schauer

2005-01-01

250

Will providing marriage rights to same-sex couples undermine heterosexual marriage?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes data regarding the impact on heterosexual marriages of laws in five European countries that provide marriage\\u000a or marriage-like rights to same-sex couples. The data provide no evidence that giving partnership rights to same-sex couples\\u000a had any impact on heterosexual marriage. Specifically, heterosexual marriage rates and divorce rates in Denmark, Norway, Sweden,\\u000a Iceland, and the Netherlands displayed no

M. V. Lee Badgett

2004-01-01

251

Similarities and Differences in Relational Boundaries among Heterosexuals, Gay Men, and Lesbians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relative contributions of gender and sexual orientation as factors associated with the formation of boundaries in dyadic intimate relating in both same- and opposite-sex couples. The study examined a relational pattern previously not empirically investigated but widely accepted as an actuality unique to lesbians;…

Harkless, Lynne E.; Fowers, Blaine J.

2005-01-01

252

Attitudes toward Gay Men and Lesbian Women among Heterosexual Social Work Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports results from a national Internet-based survey administered anonymously to a cross-section of social work faculty in the United States. Drawn from a sampling frame of 700 accredited or in candidacy schools, data were collected between November 2010 and March 2011. We investigate the role of sex, sexual orientation, race,…

Chonody, Jill M.; Woodford, Michael R.; Brennan, David J.; Newman, Bernie; Wang, Donna

2014-01-01

253

Changing blood donor screening criteria from permanent deferral for men who have sex with men to individual sexual risk assessment: no evidence of a significant impact on the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic in Italy  

PubMed Central

Background In 2001, the criteria for blood donor eligibility in Italy were modified by a ministerial decree from a permanent deferral for "men who have sex with men" to an individual risk assessment of sexual behaviours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of this change in donor screening criteria on the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic among blood donors in Italy. Materials and methods We used the data obtained from the Italian blood donor epidemiological surveillance system. We compared data collected in 2009 and 2010, when the individual risk assessment policy was applied, with data collected in 1999 when permanent deferral was applied for men who have sex with men based on a declaration of sexual orientation. We evaluated the change over time in the relative proportion of HIV antibody-positive donors who likely acquired the infection from men who have sex with men vs heterosexual sexual exposure; the relative risk was calculated using 1999 as the reference year. Results In all 3 years, the majority of HIV antibody-positive donors reported sexual exposure as a risk factor for HIV infection; this proportion increased over time, although not statistically significantly. Heterosexuals always accounted for at least 40% of all HIV antibody-positive cases. The rate of HIV antibody-positive donors increased similarly in men who have sex with men and heterosexuals; specifically, the rate of HIV antibody-positive cases per 100,000 donors was more than 2-fold higher among men who have sex with men in 2009–2010 than in 1999 (2009–2010 vs 1999, RR =2.8; P =0.06), and that among heterosexuals was 1.5 fold higher (P =0.18). Discussion When comparing the period before (1999) and after (2009–2010), the implementation of the individual risk assesment policy in 2001, no significant increase in the proportion of men who have sex with men compared to heterosexuals was observed among HIV antibody-positive blood donors, suggesting that the change in donor deferral policy did not lead to a disproportionate increase of HIV-seropositive men who have sex with men. PMID:23867178

Suligoi, Barbara; Pupella, Simonetta; Regine, Vincenza; Raimondo, Mariangela; Velati, Claudio; Grazzini, Giuliano

2013-01-01

254

Domestic Abuse and HIV-Risk Behavior in Latin American Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted with 273 Latin American men who have sex with men living in the New York metropolitan area. The results show that 51% of the men reported having experienced domestic abuse at least once in their relationships. Up to 12% of these men had been forced to have receptive anal sex without condoms by one of their

Luis E. Nieves-Rosa; Alex Carballo-Dieguez; Curtis Dolezal

2000-01-01

255

Correlates of African American Men's Sexual Schemas  

PubMed Central

Sexual schemas are cognitive representations of oneself as a sexual being and aid in the processing of sexually relevant information. We examined the relationship between sociosexuality (attitudes about casual sex), masculine ideology (attitudes toward traditional men and male roles), and cultural centrality (strength of identity with racial group) as significant psychosocial and sociocultural predictors in shaping young, heterosexual African American men's sexual schemas. A community sample (n=133) of men in a southeastern city of the United States completed quantitative self-report measures examining their attitudes and behavior related to casual sex, beliefs about masculinity, racial and cultural identity, and self-views of various sexual aspects of themselves. Results indicated that masculine ideology and cultural centrality were both positively related to men's sexual schemas. Cultural centrality explained 12 % of the variance in level of sexual schema, and had the strongest correlation of the predictor variables with sexual schema (r=.36). The need for more attention to the bidirectional relationships between masculinity, racial/cultural identity, and sexual schemas in prevention, intervention, and public health efforts for African American men is discussed. PMID:24031118

Morales, Dawn A.; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; St. Lawrence, Janet

2013-01-01

256

Biological versus nonbiological older brothers and men's sexual orientation.  

PubMed

The most consistent biodemographic correlate of sexual orientation in men is the number of older brothers (fraternal birth order). The mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. In this article, I provide a direct test pitting prenatal against postnatal (e.g., social/rearing) mechanisms. Four samples of homosexual and heterosexual men (total n = 944), including one sample of men raised in nonbiological and blended families (e.g., raised with half- or step-siblings or as adoptees) were studied. Only biological older brothers, and not any other sibling characteristic, including nonbiological older brothers, predicted men's sexual orientation, regardless of the amount of time reared with these siblings. These results strongly suggest a prenatal origin to the fraternal birth-order effect. PMID:16807297

Bogaert, Anthony F

2006-07-11

257

Community Involvement among Behaviourally Bisexual Men in the Midwestern USA: Experiences and Perceptions across Communities  

PubMed Central

Limited research exists regarding community involvement and social support among behaviourally bisexual men. Previous studies suggest that bisexual men experience high levels of social stigma in both heterosexual and homosexual community settings. Research focusing on social support has demonstrated that individuals with limited access to similar individuals experience greater risk for negative health outcomes. Using a community-based research design, participants were recruited using multiple methods in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Researchers conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 75 men who reported having engaged in bisexual behaviour within the past six months. Interviews elucidated the experiences of behaviourally bisexual men in heterosexual and homosexual settings, as well as their perceptions of the existence of a bisexual community or bisexual spaces. All participants perceived a lack of a visible bisexual community and expressed difficulty with being comfortable, or feeling belonging, within a variety of heterosexual and homosexual community spaces. Findings suggest the need for interventions focused on community building among, as well as creating spaces specifically designed for, bisexual men in order to increase perceived social support and decrease isolation and possible negative health outcomes. PMID:22978551

Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Reece, Michael; Goncalves, Gabriel; Martinez, Omar; Nix, Ryan; Malebranche, David; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Murray, Maresa; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2012-01-01

258

The male street prostitute: a vector for transmission of HIV infection into the heterosexual world.  

PubMed

Two hundred and eleven New Orleans male street prostitutes were interviewed and tested for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The subjects' lifestyle characteristics and their sex and drug use practices were evaluated to determine the prostitutes' potential to function as a vector for transmission of HIV into populations with currently low infection rates. Information about the customers of the male prostitutes was also obtained from the sample. The period prevalence of HIV in the sample was 175/1000. Many of the male prostitutes reported having wives or girlfriends, some of whom were prostitutes themselves. The prostitutes perceived a majority of their male customers to be heterosexual or bisexual (indicating sexual contact with women as well as men), many (39%) were thought to be married. Results from the study support the argument that male prostitutes serve as a bridge of HIV infection into populations with currently low infection rates through contact with both non-customer sexual partners and customers and thus indirectly to spouses and sexual partners of these individuals. PMID:2017720

Morse, E V; Simon, P M; Osofsky, H J; Balson, P M; Gaumer, H R

1991-01-01

259

Correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual methamphetamine users.  

PubMed

While many studies have examined correlates of trading sex for money, few have examined factors associated with exclusive trading of sex for drugs. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual men and women who were enrolled in a sexual risk reduction intervention in San Diego, California. Of 342 participants, 26% overall (21% of males and 31% of females) reported trading sex for methamphetamine in the past two months. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that recently trading sex for methamphetamine was independently associated with being female, homeless, binging on methamphetamine, sexual victimization in the past two months, engaging in anal sex 24 or more times in the past two months, and higher sexual compulsivity scores. Effective interventions for this high-risk population should consider gender-focused counseling for sexual abuse, motivational enhancement therapy, social-cognitive skills training, as well as enhanced access and utilization of social services, including drug treatment. PMID:21858954

Semple, Shirley J; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L

2011-01-01

260

Perceived parenting skill across the transition to adoptive parenthood among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples.  

PubMed

Little research has examined change in perceived parenting skill across the transition to parenthood or predictors of change in perceived skill. The current study used an ecological framework to examine predictors of self-perceived parenting skill among 47 lesbian, 31 gay, and 56 heterosexual couples who were adopting their first child. Findings revealed that, on average, all new parents perceived themselves as becoming more skilled, although gay men increased the most and lesbians the least. Participants who were female, reported fewer depressive symptoms, expected to do more child care, and reported higher job autonomy viewed themselves as more skilled pre-adoption. With regard to change, parents who reported more relational conflict and parents who expected to do more child care experienced lesser increases in perceived skill. These findings suggest that regardless of gender, sexual orientation, and route to parenthood, new parents experience similar, positive changes in perceived skill, thereby broadening our understanding of parenting skill in diverse groups. The findings also highlight the importance of examining how gender, sexual orientation, and the family context may shape perceived skill across the transition to parenthood. PMID:20001145

Goldberg, Abbie E; Smith, JuliAnna Z

2009-12-01

261

Fear, fascination and the sperm donor as 'abjection' in interviews with heterosexual recipients of donor insemination.  

PubMed

The background to this article is the medical regulation of sperm donation in the UK and the recent policy change so that children born from sperm, eggs or embryos donated after April 2005 have the right to know their donor's identity. I draw upon data from interviews with ten women and seven joint interviews with couples who received donor insemination from an anonymous sperm donor and were the parents of donor insemination children. I explore the symbolic presence of the donor and his potential to disrupt social and physical boundaries using the theoretical conceptions of boundaries and pollution as articulated by Mary Douglas and Julia Kristeva. I present data to argue that the anonymous donor manifests in various figures; the shadowy and ambiguous figure of 'another man'; the intelligent medical student; the donor as a family man, with children of his own who wants to help infertile men father children. In addition participants perceive the donor's physical characteristics, but also see their husband's physical characteristics, in their children. In conclusion I argue that anonymisation preserves features of conventional family life, maintains the idea of exclusivity within the heterosexual relationship and affirms the legal father's insecurity about his infertility. PMID:19470135

Burr, Jennifer

2009-07-01

262

Perceived Parenting Skill Across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood Among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples  

PubMed Central

Little research has examined change in perceived parenting skill across the transition to parenthood or predictors of change in perceived skill. The current study used an ecological framework to examine predictors of self-perceived parenting skill among 47 lesbian, 31 gay, and 56 heterosexual couples who were adopting their first child. Findings revealed that, on average, all new parents perceived themselves as becoming more skilled, although gay men increased the most and lesbians the least. Participants who were male, reported fewer depressive symptoms, expected to do more child care, and reported higher job autonomy viewed themselves as more skilled pre-adoption. With regard to change, parents who reported more relational conflict, and parents who expected to do more child care, experienced lesser increases in perceived skill. These findings suggest that regardless of gender, sexual orientation, and route to parenthood, new parents experience similar, positive changes in perceived skill, thereby broadening our understanding of parenting skill in diverse groups. The findings also highlight the importance of examining how gender, sexual orientation, and the family context may shape perceived skill across the transition to parenthood. PMID:20001145

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

2009-01-01

263

Heterosexual, lesbian, and gay male relationships: a comparison of couples in 1975 and 2000.  

PubMed

This study examined the differences among lesbians, gay men, and heterosexuals at two points in time (1975 and 2000) using responses of 6,864 participants from two archival data sets. Groups were compared on variables representing equality of behaviors between partners in seven realms: traditionally "feminine" housework, traditionally "masculine" housework, finances, support, communication, requesting/refusing sex, and decision-making. In addition, the current study compared monogamy agreements and monogamy behaviors reported by the two cohorts of couple types. Overall, the results indicate that on the equality variables, there have been many statistically significant behavioral shifts among the different sexual orientations across 25 years. In addition, all couple types reported substantially greater rates of monogamy in the year 2000 than in 1975. The present study has important clinical implications for therapists working with couples because it provides new baseline evidence regarding how couples now interact with one another (especially about monogamy) and how this has shifted over time. In addition, it elucidates the differences that still exist between different couple types, which could serve to inform couple therapists as they strive to become more culturally competent working with same-sex couples. PMID:21884075

Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay; Rothblum, Esther; Solomon, Sondra; Balsam, Kimberly; Schwartz, Pepper

2011-09-01

264

Sexual orientation of men with pathological gambling: prevalence and psychiatric comorbidity in a treatment-seeking sample.  

PubMed

Although gay men represent a high-risk group for psychiatric illness and impairment, they are largely an understudied population. The purpose of the present study was to examine the sexual orientation and clinical correlates of men with pathological gambling (PG). Sexual orientation was assessed in 105 men presenting with PG. Gay and bisexual men with PG were compared with heterosexual men in terms of gambling symptoms, impairment, and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Of 22 men (21.0%) with PG, 15 were gay (14.3%) and 7 were bisexual (6.7%). Gay and bisexual men vs heterosexual men were more likely to be single (81.8% vs 21.7%; chi(2)(2) = 28.2; P < .001), have a lifetime (81.8% vs 44.6%; chi(2)(1) = 9.7; P = .002) or current (68.2% vs 34.9%; chi(2)(1) = 7.9; P = .005) impulse control disorder, and have a lifetime substance use disorder (59.1% vs 31.3%; chi(2)(1) = 5.7; P < .05). Gay and bisexual men with PG also showed a trend toward greater impairment (P = .04). Psychiatric comorbidity and impairment are high in gay and bisexual men with PG. Research is needed to optimize patient care for gay and bisexual men with PG. PMID:17067876

Grant, Jon E; Potenza, Marc N

2006-01-01

265

"They're Just a Good Time and Move On": Fraternity Men Reflect on Their Hookup Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hookups have largely replaced heterosexual dating on campus, but literature suggests men and women may ascribe different motivations and meanings to hookup experiences. This study, utilizing Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, makes sense of the responses of three fraternity members reflecting upon their sexual and dating experiences. Four…

Stinson, Rebecca D.; Levy, Lauren B.; Alt, Marcus

2014-01-01

266

Tobacco Smoking in HIV-Infected versus General Population in France: Heterogeneity across the Various Groups of People Living with HIV  

PubMed Central

Background Although the various groups of people living with HIV (PLWHIV) considerably differ regarding socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics, their specificities regarding tobacco smoking have been poorly investigated. We aimed to assess patterns of tobacco consumption across the various groups of PLWHIV and to compare them to the general population, accounting for the specific socioeconomic profile of PLWHIV. Methods We used data of the ANRS-Vespa2 study, a national representative survey on PLWHIV conducted in France in 2011. Prevalence of past and current tobacco consumption, heavy smoking and strong nicotine dependence were assessed among the various groups of PLWHIV as defined by transmission category, gender and geographic origin, and compared to the French general population using direct standardization and multivariate Poisson regression models, accounting for gender, age, education and geographic origin. Results Among the 3,019 participants aged 18–85 years (median time since HIV diagnosis: 12 years), 37.5% were current smokers and 22.1% were past smokers, with marked differences across the various groups of PLWHIV. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of regular smoking was increased among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) (adjusted prevalence rate ratio (aPRR): 1.19, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.07–1.32), French-native women (aPRR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.10–1.57), and heterosexual French-native men (although not significantly, aPRR: 1.19, 95% CI: 0.98–1.45). Additionally, HIV-infected MSM were significantly less likely to be ex-smokers (aPRR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.64–0.82) than the general population and similar trends were observed among heterosexual French-native men (aPRR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.78–1.02) and women (aPRR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.70–1.01). HIV-infected sub-Saharan African migrants were less likely to be regular smokers than the general population. Conclusions Smoking constitutes a major concern in various groups of PLWHIV in France including MSM and heterosexual French-natives, probably resulting from PLWHIV being less likely to quit smoking than their counterparts in the general population. PMID:25202968

Tron, Laure; Lert, France; Spire, Bruno; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

2014-01-01

267

Heterosexuals' Attitudes toward Lesbianism and Male Homosexuality: Their Affective Orientation toward Sexuality and Sex Guilt  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to determine if there was a relationship between heterosexuals' attitudes toward lesbianism and male homosexuality and their affective orientation toward sexuality (erotophiliaerotophobia) and sex guilt. Subjects were 72 male and 57 female heterosexual college undergraduates. A self-report questionnaire was administered in a health education class and mailed to campus dormitories. The variables were measured by four scales:

William L. Yarber; Bernadette Yee

1983-01-01

268

Poverty among Cohabiting Gay and Lesbian, and Married and Cohabiting Heterosexual Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a subsample ( N = 1,365,145) of the 2000 Census 5% Public Use Microdata Sample, the authors investigate explanations for differing poverty chances of cohabiting gay and lesbian, and married and cohabiting heterosexual families. Gay and lesbian couples fare worse than married couples, but better economically than cohabiting heterosexuals.…

Prokos, Anastasia H.; Keene, Jennifer Reid

2010-01-01

269

Social Support and Psychological Well-Being in Lesbian and Heterosexual Preadoptive Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines predictors of social support and mental health among 36 lesbian and 39 heterosexual couples who were waiting to adopt. Lesbian preadoptive partners perceived less support from family than heterosex- ual partners but similar levels of support from friends. Lesbian and heterosexual partners reported similar levels of well-being. Aspects of the adoption process were associated with anxiety, whereas

Abbie E. Goldberg; JuliAnna Z. Smith

2008-01-01

270

A Comparison of Lesbian, Bisexual, and Heterosexual College Undergraduate Women on Selected Mental Health Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate selected mental health characteristics of lesbians and bisexual undergraduate college women as compared with heterosexual college women. Participants: Self-identified lesbians and bisexual and heterosexual female college students who took part in the American College Health Association National College Health Assessment…

Kerr, Dianne L.; Santurri, Laura; Peters, Patricia

2013-01-01

271

Are 2D:4D Finger-Length Ratios Related to Sexual Orientation?: Yes for Men, No for Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ratio of index and ring finger lengths (2D:4D) is thought to be a marker of prenatal androgen exposure. In a sample of over 2,000 participants, men had significantly lower 2D:4D ratios than women (d =.36 and.23 for right and left hands, respectively), and these results were consistent across ethnic groups. Heterosexual men had significantly lower (more male typical) 2D:4D

Richard A. Lippa

2003-01-01

272

Coparenting among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples: associations with adopted children's outcomes.  

PubMed

Coparenting is associated with child behavior in families with heterosexual parents, but less is known about coparenting among lesbian- and gay-parent families. Associations were studied among self-reported divisions of labor, coparenting observations, and child adjustment (Mage  = 3 years) among 104 adoptive families headed by lesbian, gay, or heterosexual couples. Lesbian and gay couples reported sharing child care, whereas heterosexual couples reported specialization (i.e., mothers did more child care than fathers). Observations confirmed this pattern-lesbian and gay parents participated more equally than heterosexual parents during family interaction. Lesbian couples showed the most supportive and least undermining behavior, whereas gay couples showed the least supportive behavior, and heterosexual couples the most undermining behavior. Overall, supportive coparenting was associated with better child adjustment. PMID:23336749

Farr, Rachel H; Patterson, Charlotte J

2013-01-01

273

HIV heterosexual transmission: a hypothesis about an additional potential determinant.  

PubMed

Transmission rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during heterosexual intercourse vary dramatically around the world. In Asia and South America, they are extraordinarily high, whereas in the United States and Europe, rates are much lower even after a large number of unprotected contacts. The transmission rates in Africa also probably are high, but the available studies unfortunately are weak. In Thailand, female-to-male transmission rates per contact were estimated at.056 (l in 18) compared to.0002 to.0015 (1/5000-1. 5/1000) for male-to-female transmission in the United States and Europe. Male-to-female transmission in Thailand appears to show, as expected, even greater transmission likelihood compared to female-to-male rates. In general, in the United States and Europe, transmission rates within heterosexual couples range from less than 10% to 22%, whereas in Thailand and Brazil, the rates exceed 40%. The much lower transmission rate per contact in the United States and Europe is based on an assumption that HIV transmitters are a homogeneous group. Wiley and colleagues argue that transmitters are likely to be a heterogeneous group with a large percentage of very low frequency transmitters and a small percentage of high frequency transmitters. That hypothesis is given some support by a cluster of cases in rural New York State in which one man appeared to infect 31% of his many contacts. PMID:10737850

Louria, D B; Skurnick, J H; Palumbo, P; Bogden, J D; Rohowsky-Kochan, C; Denny, T N; Kennedy, C A

2000-01-01

274

The Increased Effectiveness of HIV Preventive Intervention among Men Who Have Sex with Men and of Follow-Up Care for People Living with HIV after ‘Task-Shifting’ to Community-Based Organizations: A ‘Cash on Service Delivery’ Model in China  

PubMed Central

Background A large number of men who have sex with men (MSM) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) are underserved despite increased service availability from government facilities while many community based organizations (CBOs) are not involved. We aimed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the task shifting from government facilities to CBOs in China. Methods HIV preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA were shifted from government facilities to CBOs. Based on ‘cash on service delivery’ model, 10 USD per MSM tested for HIV with results notified, 82 USD per newly HIV cases diagnosed, and 50 USD per PLHA received a defined package of follow-up care services, were paid to the CBOs. Cash payments were made biannually based on the verified results in the national web-based HIV/AIDS information system. Findings After task shifting, CBOs gradually assumed preventive intervention for MSM and follow-up care for PLHA from 2008 to 2012. HIV testing coverage among MSM increased from 4.1% in 2008 to 22.7% in 2012. The baseline median CD4 counts of newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM increased from 309 to 397 cells/µL. HIV tests among MSM by CBOs accounted for less than 1% of the total HIV tests in Nanjing but the share of HIV cases detected by CBOs was 12.4% in 2008 and 43.6% in 2012. Unit cost per HIV case detected by CBOs was 47 times lower than that by government facilities. The coverage of CD4 tests and antiretroviral therapy increased from 71.1% and 78.6% in 2008 to 86.0% and 90.1% in 2012, respectively. Conclusion It is feasible to shift essential HIV services from government facilities to CBOs, and to verify independently service results to adopt ‘cash on service delivery’ model. Services provided by CBOs are cost-effective, as compared with that by government facilities. PMID:25050797

Yan, Hongjing; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jinkou; Huan, Xiping; Ding, Jianping; Wu, Susu; Wang, Chenchen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Li; Xu, Fei; Yang, Haitao

2014-01-01

275

Spreading of sexually transmitted diseases in heterosexual populations  

E-print Network

Disease spreading is a topical issue in a variety of fields ranging from computer viruses in the Internet to air-borne (e.g. influenza) diseases in societies. In particular, the description of the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (Chlamydia, Syphilis, Gonorrhea, AIDS) across population constitutes a major concern for scientists and health agencies. In this context, both data collection on sexual contact networks and the modeling of disease spreading are intensively contributing to the search for effective immunization policies. Here, the spread of sexually transmitted diseases on bipartite scale-free graphs, representing heterosexual contact networks, is considered. We analytically derive the expression for the epidemic threshold and its dependence with the system size in finite populations. The results indicate that in finite bipartite populations with degree distribution as those found in national surveys of sexual attitudes, the onset of the epidemic outbreak takes place for larger spreading rates t...

Gómez-Gardenes, J; Moreno, Y; Profumo, E V

2007-01-01

276

Correlates of sexual risk among sexual minority and heterosexual South African youths.  

PubMed

We explored psychosocial correlates of sexual risk among heterosexual and sexual minority youths (SMYs) in Johannesburg, South Africa. Young people 16 to 18 years old (n = 822) were administered surveys assessing demographic characteristics, sexual behaviors, mental health, and parent-child communication. Adjusted multivariate regressions examining correlates of sexual risk revealed that SMYs had more sexual partners than heterosexual youths (B = 3.90; SE = 0.95; P < .001) and were more likely to engage in sex trading (OR = 3.11; CI = 1.12-8.62; P < .05). South African SMYs are at increased risk relative to their heterosexual peers. PMID:24832149

Thurston, Idia B; Dietrich, Janan; Bogart, Laura M; Otwombe, Kennedy N; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Nkala, Busiswe; Gray, Glenda E

2014-07-01

277

Status of men's health in Canada.  

PubMed

Men are more likely to die of cancer, heart disease, or diabetes at younger ages than women - a reality that is compounded by the reluctance of men to use healthcare services. In addition to reduced life expectancy, men can also expect to live fewer healthy years than their female counterparts. As gynecologists and obstetricians have led the women's health movement in addressing gender-specific gaps in care, urologists are well-poised to take on a leadership role to advocate for, and address, men's health initiatives. PMID:25243037

Goldenberg, S Larry

2014-07-01

278

Subjective Sexual Experiences of Behaviorally Bisexual Men in the Midwestern United States: Sexual Attraction, Sexual Behaviors, & Condom Use  

PubMed Central

Studies concerning behaviorally bisexual men continue to focus on understanding sexual risk in according to a narrow range of sexual behaviors. Few studies have explored the subjective meanings and experiences related to bisexual men’s sexual behaviors with both male and female partners. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 75 men who engaged in bisexual behavior within the past six months. Participants were asked about their subjective sexual experiences with male and female partners. Findings suggest adherence to normative gender roles, with attraction to men and women conforming to these stereotypes, as well as a segregation of sexual behaviors along gendered lines. Overall, condom use was influenced by perceptions of potential negative consequences. Based on these findings, it remains critical that public health and other social and behavioral sciences continue to study bisexual men’s sexual health issues as separate and distinct from their exclusively homosexual and heterosexual counterparts. PMID:22745592

Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Dodge, Brian; Reece, Michael; Goncalves, Gabriel; Martinez, Omar; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Malebranche, David; Murray, Maresa; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2012-01-01

279

The occupational status of partnered lesbians, compared to married women and heterosexual cohabiting women  

E-print Network

studies have found that lesbian women have an advantageous wage effect, compared to their heterosexual counterparts irrespective of marital status. A special focus of comparing the occupational status of cohabiting lesbians with married women...

Lin, Chin-Huei

2009-05-15

280

Partner Selection among Latino Immigrant Men Who Have Sex with Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative study explored partner selection in a sample of immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). In-depth\\u000a interviews were conducted with men living in the greater New York metropolitan area who had been born in Brazil (n = 10), Colombia (n = 14), or the Dominican Republic (n = 9). One focus group was conducted with MSM from each of the three countries

Fernanda T. Bianchi; Michele G. Shedlin; Kelly D. Brooks; Marcelo Montes Penha; Carol A. Reisen; Maria Cecilia Zea; Paul J. Poppen

2010-01-01

281

The Influence of Different School Structures on Heterosexual Behavior in Early Adolescence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a study of the effects of school structure on heterosexual behavior, self-report data on heterosexual behavior were collected from more than 2,000 sixth through tenth graders in 1978 when their district had a 6-3-3 school structure and in 1979 after the district had changed to a 6-2-2-2 structure. The district was located in a medium-size,…

Blyth, Dale A.; And Others

282

Prevalence Estimates of Health Risk Behaviors of Immigrant Latino Men Who Have Sex with Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Little is known about the health status of rural immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). These MSM comprise a subpopulation that tends to remain "hidden" from both researchers and practitioners. This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol, and drug use, and sexual risk behaviors of Latino MSM living in…

Rhodes, Scott D.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Vissman, Aaron T.; Wolfson, Mark; Alonzo, Jorge; Bloom, Fred R.; Alegria-Ortega, Jose; Eng, Eugenia

2012-01-01

283

Charting a Moral Life: The Influence of Stigma and Filial Duties on Marital Decisions among Chinese Men who Have Sex with Men  

PubMed Central

Introduction Stigma constitutes a critical challenge to the rising rates of HIV among Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM). It reduces willingness to disclose one’s sexual orientation and can lead to concurrent sexual partnerships. Disclosure decisions are also affected by cultural norms that place pressures on sons to marry. In this manuscript, we characterize how stigma and cultural factors influenced Chinese MSM’s decisions around disclosure and marriage. We seek to show that MSM’s actions were motivated by moral considerations, even when those choices posed HIV transmission risks. Methods We conducted qualitative interviews with 30 MSM in Beijing, China. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated into English for analysis. Transcripts were coded using a procedure that allowed for themes to emerge organically. Results Participants struggled with feelings of shame and believed that others possessed stigmatizing attitudes about homosexuality. They had experienced relatively little discrimination because they infrequently disclosed their MSM status. In response to marital pressures, participant had to reconcile same-sex attractions with filial expectations. Their choices included: not being involved with women; putting on the appearance of a heterosexual relationship by marrying a lesbian; or fulfilling family expectations by marrying a heterosexual woman. Regardless of the decision, many rooted the justifications for their choices in the considerations they had given to others’ needs. Conclusion The growing epidemic among MSM in China requires action from the public health community. As programs are scaled up to serve these men, it is critical to remember that MSM, who often fear social sanction if they were to reveal their sexual orientation, continue to face the same pressures from culturally normative social duties as heterosexual men. Interventions must find ways to help men navigate a balance between their own needs and the responsibilities they feel toward their parents and others. PMID:23951245

Steward, Wayne T.; Miège, Pierre; Choi, Kyung-Hee

2013-01-01

284

Intimate Partner Violence and Social Pressure among Gay Men in Six Countries  

PubMed Central

Introduction Recent research suggests that men who have sex with men (MSM) experience intimate partner violence (IPV) at significantly higher rates than heterosexual men. Few studies, however, have investigated implications of heterosexist social pressures – namely, homophobic discrimination, internalized homophobia, and heterosexism – on risk for IPV among MSM, and no previous studies have examined cross-national variations in the relationship between IPV and social pressure. This paper examines reporting of IPV and associations with social pressure among a sample of internet-recruited MSM in the United States (U.S.), Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Brazil. Methods We recruited internet-using MSM from 6 countries through selective banner advertisements placed on Facebook. Eligibility criteria were men age over 18 reporting sex with a man in the past year. Of the 2,771 eligible respondents, 2,368 had complete data and were included in the analysis. Three outcomes were examined: reporting recent experience of physical violence, sexual violence, and recent perpetration of physical violence. The analysis focused on associations between reporting of IPV and experiences of homophobic discrimination, internalized homophobia, and heteronormativity. Results Reporting of experiencing physical IPV ranged from 5.75% in the U.S. to 11.75% in South Africa, while experiencing sexual violence was less commonly reported and ranged from 2.54% in Australia to 4.52% in the U.S. Perpetration of physical violence ranged from 2.47% in the U.S. to 5.76% in South Africa. Experiences of homophobic discrimination, internalized homophobia, and heteronormativity were found to increase odds of reporting IPV in all countries. Conclusion There has been little data on IPV among MSM, particularly MSM living in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the lack of consensus in demographic correlates of violence reporting, heterosexist social pressures were found to significantly increase odds of reporting IPV in all countries. These findings show the universality of violence reporting among MSM across countries, and highlight the unique role of heteronormativity as a risk factor for violence reporting among MSM. The results demonstrate that using internet-based surveys to reach MSM is feasible for certain areas, although modified efforts may be required to reach diverse samples of MSM. PMID:22900124

Finneran, Catherine; Chard, Anna; Sineath, Craig; Sullivan, Patrick; Stephenson, Rob

2012-01-01

285

Oppression and resiliency in a post-apartheid South Africa: unheard voices of Black gay men and lesbians.  

PubMed

Guided by photovoice, a form of participatory action research that uses documentary photography and storytelling, this study examines how Black gay men and lesbians view themselves in relation to White gay men and lesbians in South Africa. Participants were from 4 South African townships and included 4 women, and 3 men. Participants discussed interracial dating, a lack of education, and information regarding differing sexualities and health care. They reported being sexually and physically assaulted for challenging the heterosexual status quo. Other themes that emerged from this study were classism, cultural traditions of visiting African healers, and segregated social spaces. Amidst oppression and despair, participants showed signs of strength, hope, and optimism. PMID:15311981

Graziano, Kevin J

2004-08-01

286

Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents' Experiences in Preschool Environments.  

PubMed

Little research has examined the school experiences of lesbian/gay (LG) parent families or adoptive parent families. The current exploratory study examined the experiences of 79 lesbian, 75 gay male, and 112 heterosexual adoptive parents of preschool-age children with respect to their (a) level of disclosure regarding their LG parent and adoptive family status at their children's schools; (b) perceived challenges in navigating the preschool environment and advocating on behalf of their children and families; and (c) recommendations to teachers and schools about how to create affirming school environments with respect to family structure, adoption, and race/ethnicity. Findings revealed that the majority of parents were open about their LG and adoptive family status, and had not encountered challenges related to family diversity. Those parents who did experience challenges tended to describe implicit forms of marginalization, such as insensitive language and school assignments. Recommendations for teachers included discussing and reading books about diverse families, tailoring assignments to meet the needs of diverse families, and offering school community-building activities and events to help bridge differences across families. PMID:25414543

Goldberg, Abbie E

2014-01-01

287

Spreading of sexually transmitted diseases in heterosexual populations  

PubMed Central

The spread of sexually transmitted diseases (e.g., chlamydia, syphilis, gonorrhea, HIV, etc.) across populations is a major concern for scientists and health agencies. In this context, both the data collection on sexual contact networks and the modeling of disease spreading are intensive contributions to the search for effective immunization policies. Here, the spreading of sexually transmitted diseases on bipartite scale-free graphs, representing heterosexual contact networks, is considered. We analytically derive the expression for the epidemic threshold and its dependence with the system size in finite populations. We show that the epidemic outbreak in bipartite populations, with number of sexual partners distributed as in empirical observations from national sex surveys, takes place for larger spreading rates than for the case in which the bipartite nature of the network is not taken into account. Numerical simulations confirm the validity of the theoretical results. Our findings indicate that the restriction to crossed infections between the two classes of individuals (males and females) has to be taken into account in the design of efficient immunization strategies for sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:18212127

Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Latora, Vito; Moreno, Yamir; Profumo, Elio

2008-01-01

288

Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents' Experiences in Preschool Environments  

PubMed Central

Little research has examined the school experiences of lesbian/gay (LG) parent families or adoptive parent families. The current exploratory study examined the experiences of 79 lesbian, 75 gay male, and 112 heterosexual adoptive parents of preschool-age children with respect to their (a) level of disclosure regarding their LG parent and adoptive family status at their children's schools; (b) perceived challenges in navigating the preschool environment and advocating on behalf of their children and families; and (c) recommendations to teachers and schools about how to create affirming school environments with respect to family structure, adoption, and race/ethnicity. Findings revealed that the majority of parents were open about their LG and adoptive family status, and had not encountered challenges related to family diversity. Those parents who did experience challenges tended to describe implicit forms of marginalization, such as insensitive language and school assignments. Recommendations for teachers included discussing and reading books about diverse families, tailoring assignments to meet the needs of diverse families, and offering school community-building activities and events to help bridge differences across families. PMID:25414543

Goldberg, Abbie E.

2014-01-01

289

Lack of evidence for the heterosexual transmission of hepatitis C.  

PubMed

To determine the potential for sexual transmission of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), we specifically studied a cohort of 42 young adults (median age, 39 yr) with chronic HCV infection and their stable sexual partners. All HCV assays were supplemented with the four-antigen recombinant immunoblot assay, and 39 of 42 partners were tested for HCV RNA by the nested polymerase chain reaction. Ninety percent of the partners reported frequent and unprotected sexual intercourse with the index patients. Two of 42 partners tested positive for the anti-HCV antibody and both were HCV RNA positive; one had independent risk factors for viral hepatitis. Therefore, one of 41 partners, (2.4%; 95% CI, 0.6-12.9%) without independent risk factors for HCV was anti-HCV positive. This woman was one of five partners (20%; 95% CI, 1-66%) who reported frequent razor-sharing with the index patient. The partner frequently sustained skin lacerations, with bleeding, secondary to this shared razor blade. We conclude that heterosexual transmission of hepatitis C is extremely uncommon, despite frequent and unprotected sexual intercourse. PMID:1333172

Gordon, S C; Patel, A H; Kulesza, G W; Barnes, R E; Silverman, A L

1992-12-01

290

Osteoporosis in Men  

MedlinePLUS

... preventing osteoporosis in men. What causes osteoporosis in men? Osteoporosis occurs when your body cannot replace bone ... risk of developing osteoporosis. How is osteoporosis in men diagnosed? Your doctor may suspect osteoporosis based on ...

291

Nutrition for Older Men  

MedlinePLUS

... Men For Women For Seniors Nutrition for Older Men Published February 01, 2014 Print Email The Difference ... mind sharp and extend quality of life. Older men need: Calcium and Vitamin D Older adults need ...

292

Implicit Sexual Attitude of Heterosexual, Gay and Bisexual Individuals: Disentangling the Contribution of Specific Associations to the Overall Measure  

PubMed Central

The article aims to measure implicit sexual attitude in heterosexual, gay and bisexual individuals. A Many-Facet Rasch Measurement analysis was used to disentangle the contribution of specific associations to the overall IAT measure. A preference for heterosexuals relative to homosexuals is observed in heterosexual respondents, driven most by associating positive attributes with heterosexuals rather than negative attributes with homosexuals. Differently, neither the negative nor the positive evaluation of any of the target groups play a prominent role in driving the preference for homosexuals observed in gay respondents. A preference for heterosexuals relative to homosexuals is observed in bisexual respondents, that results most from ascribing negative attributes to homosexuals rather than positive attributes to heterosexuals. The results are consistent with the expression of the need for achieving a positive self-image and with the influence of shared social norms concerning sexuality. PMID:24260142

Anselmi, Pasquale; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voci, Alberto; Robusto, Egidio

2013-01-01

293

The Significance of Privacy and Trust in Providing Health-Related Services to Behaviorally Bisexual Men in the United States  

PubMed Central

Previous research suggests that bisexual men face unique health concerns in comparison to their exclusively homosexual and heterosexual counterparts. However, little is known about behaviorally bisexual men’s experiences with health services, including ways of providing services that would be most appropriate to meet the health needs of this population. This study sought to understand preferences for health-related services among behaviorally bisexual men in the Midwestern United States. Using a community-based research approach, a diverse sample of 75 behaviorally bisexual men was recruited for in-depth interviews. Qualitative data were analyzed utilizing inductive coding through established team-based protocols to ensure reliability. Themes emerged involving the importance of privacy and trust when reaching, recruiting, and engaging behaviorally bisexual men in health services. Findings suggest that multifaceted approaches are needed, including those that provide relevant and confidential services while allowing for the development and ongoing maintenance of trust. PMID:22676463

Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Goncalves, Gabriel; Malebranche, David; Martinez, Omar; Reece, Michael; Rhodes, Scott D.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2012-01-01

294

An Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use Comparison of Lesbian, Bisexual, and Heterosexual Undergraduate Women.  

PubMed

Background: Little research has focused specifically on alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use of lesbian and bisexual women in general or the college subgroup specifically. Previous research shows sexual minority women at increased risk when compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to compare ATOD use of lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual undergraduate college women. Methods: A secondary analysis of three fall semesters (2009-2011) of American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA-II) data was conducted. Women who self-identified as gay/lesbian (N = 538), bisexual (N = 1579), and heterosexual (N = 40,869) were compared on ATOD use. Chi-square Tests were used to analyze differences between the groups and logistic regression determined odds ratios of ATOD use. Results: Bisexual women had greater odds of using alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana than heterosexual women and lesbians. They also had greater odds of using all illicit drugs (except steroids) and misusing prescription drugs than heterosexual women and greater odds of using amphetamines other than meth, sedatives, and ecstasy when compared to lesbians. Lesbians had greater odds of using tobacco, marijuana, sedatives, hallucinogens, other illegal drugs and misusing prescription drugs than heterosexual women. Conclusions/Importance: The study confirms increased ATOD use among sexual minority women as compared to their heterosexual counterparts with bisexual women having the highest use. This is the first study to examine misuse of prescription drugs among a large number of lesbian and bisexual college women, and contributes to the scant literature addressing college women's ATOD use by sexual orientation. PMID:25488100

Kerr, Dianne; Ding, Kele; Burke, Amanda; Ott-Walter, Katherine

2014-12-01

295

Condom Use and High-Risk Sexual Acts in Adult Films: A Comparison of Heterosexual and Homosexual Films  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We compared the prevalence of condom use during a variety of sexual acts portrayed in adult films produced for heterosexual and homosexual audiences to assess compliance with state Occupational Health and Safety Administration regulations. Methods. We analyzed 50 heterosexual and 50 male homosexual films released between August 1, 2005, and July 31, 2006, randomly selected from the distributor of 85% of the heterosexual adult films released each year in the United States. Results. Penile–vaginal intercourse was protected with condoms in 3% of heterosexual scenes. Penile–anal intercourse, common in both heterosexual (42%) and homosexual (80%) scenes, was much less likely to be protected with condoms in heterosexual than in homosexual scenes (10% vs 78%; P < .001). No penile–oral acts were protected with condoms in any of the selected films. Conclusions. Heterosexual films were much less likely than were homosexual films to portray condom use, raising concerns about transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, especially among performers in heterosexual adult films. In addition, the adult film industry, especially the heterosexual industry, is not adhering to state occupational safety regulations. PMID:19218178

Elliott, Marc N.; Kerndt, Peter R.; Schuster, Mark A.; Brook, Robert H.; Gelberg, Lillian

2009-01-01

296

"How to Be a Rural Man": Young Men's Performances and Negotiations of Rural Masculinities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is concerned with young rural men and how they "do" identity politics living in a rural area of Norway. Focusing on how masculinity and rurality are constructed and interrelated in young men's narratives of living in a remote community, it is identified that young rural men reproduce, negotiate and transform local discourses of rural…

Bye, Linda Marie

2009-01-01

297

The mere anticipation of an interaction with a woman can impair men's cognitive performance.  

PubMed

Recent research suggests that heterosexual men's (but not heterosexual women's) cognitive performance is impaired after an interaction with someone of the opposite sex (Karremans et al., 2009). These findings have been interpreted in terms of the cognitive costs of trying to make a good impression during the interaction. In everyday life, people frequently engage in pseudo-interactions with women (e.g., through the phone or the internet) or anticipate interacting with a woman later on. The goal of the present research was to investigate if men's cognitive performance decreased in these types of situations, in which men have little to no opportunity to impress her and, moreover, have little to no information about the mate value of their interaction partner. Two studies demonstrated that men's (but not women's) cognitive performance declined if they were led to believe that they interacted with a woman via a computer (Study 1) or even if they merely anticipated an interaction with a woman (Study 2). Together, these results suggest that an actual interaction is not a necessary prerequisite for the cognitive impairment effect to occur. Moreover, these effects occur even if men do not get information about the woman's attractiveness. This latter finding is discussed in terms of error management theory. PMID:22042159

Nauts, Sanne; Metzmacher, Martin; Verwijmeren, Thijs; Rommeswinkel, Vera; Karremans, Johan C

2012-08-01

298

ORIGINAL PAPER Women's Sexual Responses to Heterosexual and Lesbian Erotica  

E-print Network

, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 123 Arch Sex Behav (2010) 39 March 2008 / Revised: 11 August 2009 / Accepted: 11 August 2009 / Published online: 24 October 2009 Ã? a nonspecific pattern of sexual arous- al that is quite different from men's category-specific pat- tern

299

Parental monitoring, parent-adolescent communication about sex, and sexual risk among young men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Parental monitoring and parent-adolescent communication about sex protect against HIV-related sexual risk behaviors among heterosexual adolescents, but it is unknown if these findings generalize to young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Sexual orientation-specific stressors, including "coming out" to parents, complicate the family context of YMSM. We examined associations between parental monitoring, communication about sex, outness to cohabitating parents, and sexual behaviors. Ethnically diverse YMSM ages 14-19 provided cross-sectional data (n = 257). Monitoring and outness to parents interacted to predict recent same-sex unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). For YMSM who reported mixed or uncertain outness to parents, higher levels of perceived parental monitoring were associated with greater risk of UAI. Higher levels of communication about sex were associated with greater risk of UAI for YMSM out to parents. Parental monitoring and communication about sex might not protect YMSM against sexual risk in the same way they protect heterosexual youth. Future research should examine whether adapted forms of family factors could protect YMSM, and family-based HIV risk-reduction interventions for YMSM should be attuned to the unique ways family factors function within this group. PMID:24549462

Thoma, Brian C; Huebner, David M

2014-08-01

300

Young Men’s Views Toward the Barriers and Facilitators of Internet-Based Chlamydia Trachomatis Screening: Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background There is a growing number of Internet-based approaches that offer young people screening for sexually transmitted infections. Objective This paper explores young men’s views towards the barriers and facilitators of implementing an Internet-based screening approach. The study sought to consider ways in which the proposed intervention would reach and engage men across ages and socioeconomic backgrounds. Methods This qualitative study included 15 focus groups with 60 heterosexual young men (aged 16-24 years) across central Scotland, drawn across age and socioeconomic backgrounds. Focus groups began by obtaining postcode data to allocate participants to a high/low deprivation category. Focus group discussions involved exploration of men’s knowledge of chlamydia, use of technology, and views toward Internet-based screening. Men were shown sample screening invitation letters, test kits, and existing screening websites to facilitate discussions. Transcripts from audio recordings were analyzed with "Framework Analysis". Results Men’s Internet and technology use was heterogeneous in terms of individual practices, with greater use among older men (aged 20-24 years) than teenagers and some deprivation-related differences in use. We detail three themes related to barriers to successful implementation: acceptability, confidentiality and privacy concerns, and language, style, and content. These themes identify ways Internet-based screening approaches may fail to engage some men, such as by raising anxiety and failing to convey confidentiality. Men wanted screening websites to frame screening as a serious issue, rather than using humorous images and text. Participants were encouraged to reach a consensus within their groups on their broad design and style preferences for a screening website; this led to a set of common preferences that they believed were likely to engage men across age and deprivation groups and lead to greater screening uptake. Conclusions The Internet provides opportunities for re-evaluating how we deliver sexual health promotion and engage young men in screening. Interventions using such technology should focus on uptake by age and socioeconomic background. Young people should be engaged as coproducers of intervention materials and websites to ensure messages and content are framed appropriately within a fast-changing environment. Doing so may go some way to addressing the overall lower levels of testing and screening among men compared with women. PMID:24300158

McDaid, Lisa

2013-01-01

301

Reference ranges and sources of variability of CD4 counts in HIV-seronegative women and men.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: CD4 lymphocyte counts are used to monitor immune status in HIV disease. An understanding of the variability of CD4 counts which occurs in the absence of HIV infection is essential to their interpretation. The sources and degree of such variability have not been extensively studied. OBJECTIVES: To establish reference ranges for CD4 counts in HIV-seronegative women and heterosexual men attending a genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinic, and to identify possible differences according to gender and cigarette smoking and, in women, any effect of the menstrual cycle, oral contraceptive use and cigarette smoking. DESIGN: Female and heterosexual male patients attending a GUM clinic and requesting an HIV-antibody test were recruited prospectively. Results from an earlier study of CD4 counts in homosexual men were available for comparison. METHODS: Lymphocyte subpopulation analysis on whole blood by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The absolute CD4 count and percentage of CD4 cells (CD4%) were significantly higher in women (n = 195) than heterosexual men (n = 91) [difference between the means 111 x 106/1 (95% CI 41, 180) and 3.1% (1.30, 4.88)]. The absolute CD4 count and CD4% were also significantly higher in smokers (n = 143) than non-smokers (n = 140) [difference 143 (79, 207) and 2.1% (0.43, 3.81)]. Reference ranges for absolute CD4 counts (geometric mean +/- 2SD) were calculated on log transformed data as follows; female smokers 490-1610, female non-smokers 430-1350, heterosexual male smokers 380-1600, heterosexual male non-smokers 330-1280. Among other variables examined, combined oral contraceptive pill use was associated with a trend towards a lower absolute CD4 count. Changes were seen in CD4% with the menstrual cycle. CD4 counts and CD4% did not differ significantly between heterosexual men and homosexual men (n = 45). CONCLUSION: There is a significant gender and smoking effect on CD4 counts. The effects of oral contraceptive use and the menstrual cycle warrant further investigation. PMID:8655163

Maini, M K; Gilson, R J; Chavda, N; Gill, S; Fakoya, A; Ross, E J; Phillips, A N; Weller, I V

1996-01-01

302

Relationship quality in lesbian and heterosexual couples undergoing treatment with assisted reproduction  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND One of the major factors impacting on a couple's relationship is the desire to have children. To many couples having a child is a confirmation of their love and relationship and a means to deepen and develop their intimate relationship. At the same time parental stress can impact on relationship quality. Relationship quality in lesbian couples is, currently, sparsely studied. The aim of the present study was to compare lesbian and heterosexual couples' perceptions of their relationship quality at the commencement of assisted reproduction, and to relate this to background data such as educational level, having previous children and, for lesbian couples, the use of a known versus anonymous donor. METHODS The present study is part of the prospective longitudinal ‘Swedish study on gamete donation’, including all fertility clinics performing donation treatment in Sweden. Of a consecutive cohort of 214 lesbian couples about to receive donor insemination and 212 heterosexual couples starting regular IVF treatment, 166 lesbian couples (78% response) and 151 heterosexual couples (71% response) accepted participation in the study. At commencement of assisted reproduction participants individually completed questionnaires including the instrument ‘ENRICH’, which is a standardized measure concerning relationship quality. RESULTS In general, the couples rated their relationship quality as good, the lesbian couple better than the heterosexuals. In addition, the lesbian women with previous children assessed their relationship quality lower than did the lesbian woman without previous children. For heterosexual couples previous children did not influence their relationship quality. Higher educational levels reduced the satisfaction with the sexual relationship (P = 0.04) for treated lesbian women, and enhanced the rating of conflict resolution for treated lesbian women (P = 0.03) and their partners (P = 0.02). Heterosexual women with high levels of education expressed more satisfaction with communication in their relationship (P = 0.02) than did heterosexual women with lower educational levels. CONCLUSIONS In this Swedish study sample of lesbian and heterosexual couples' relationships, we found that they were generally well adjusted and stable in their relationships when starting treatment with donated sperm or IVF, respectively. However, where lesbian women had children from a previous relationship, it decreased relationship quality. For the heterosexual couples previous children did not affect relationship quality. PMID:22252089

Borneskog, Catrin; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta; Lampic, Claudia; Sydsjö, Gunilla

2012-01-01

303

No evidence for LGV transmission among heterosexuals in Amsterdam, the Netherlands  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years a few cases of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) in heterosexuals in Europe have been reported. It is not known whether LGV transmission among heterosexuals occurs on a wider scale. Methods Heterosexual male and female STI clinic clients (n?=?587) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, with a positive nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) result for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) were screened for IgA anti-MOMP in serum. If the value was above the cut-off index (2.0) the patient’s CT positive urogenital, ocular or rectal sample(s) were selected and tested for LGV by an in-house LGV-specific NAAT. Results Sera of 126 patients were above 2.0 COI. Some patients had >1 CT positive sample. Samples could not be retrieved from 15 of the 126 persons, and 7 samples that were found positive for CT in the diagnostic amplification process could not be confirmed and hence not typed. We did not find a single case of LGV infection in 123 urogenital, ocular or rectal samples from 104 patients. Conclusion We found no indications for significant spread of LGV infection in heterosexuals in Amsterdam. Surveillance in females with cervical or anal CT infection is indicated to monitor LGV occurrence in heterosexuals. PMID:24915990

2014-01-01

304

School absenteeism and mental health among sexual minority youth and heterosexual youth.  

PubMed

Adolescent school absenteeism is associated with negative outcomes such as conduct disorders, substance abuse, and dropping out of school. Mental health factors, such as depression and anxiety, have been found to be associated with increased absenteeism from school. Sexual minority youth (youth who are attracted to the same sex or endorse a gay, lesbian, or bisexual identity) are a group at risk for increased absenteeism due to fear, avoidance, and higher rates of depression and anxiety than their heterosexual peers. The present study used longitudinal data to compare sexual minority youth and heterosexual youth on excused and unexcused absences from school and to evaluate differences in the relations between depression and anxiety symptoms and school absences among sexual minority youth and heterosexual youth. A total of 108 14- to 19-years-old adolescents (71% female and 26% sexual minority) completed self-report measures of excused and unexcused absences and depression and anxiety symptoms. Compared to heterosexual youth, sexual minority youth reported more excused and unexcused absences and more depression and anxiety symptoms. Sexual minority status significantly moderated the effects of depression and anxiety symptoms on unexcused absences such that depression and anxiety symptoms were stronger predictors of unexcused absences for sexual minority youth than for heterosexual youth. The results demonstrate that sexual minority status and mental health are important factors to consider when assessing school absenteeism and when developing interventions to prevent or reduce school absenteeism among adolescents. PMID:24495493

Burton, Chad M; Marshal, Michael P; Chisolm, Deena J

2014-02-01

305

"Where Have All the Good Men Gone?" Gendered Interactions in Online Dating.  

PubMed

This article explores gendered patterns of online dating and their implications for heterosexual union formation. The authors hypothesized that traditional gender norms combine with preferences for more socially desirable partners to benefit men and disadvantage women in the earliest stages of dating. They tested this with 6 months of online dating data from a mid-sized southwestern city (N = 8,259 men and 6,274 women). They found that both men and women tend to send messages to the most socially desirable alters in the dating market, regardless of their own social desirability. They also found that women who initiate contacts connect with more desirable partners than those who wait to be contacted, but women are 4 times less likely to send messages than men. They concluded that socioeconomic similarities in longer term unions result, in part, from relationship termination (i.e., nonreciprocity) rather than initial preferences for similar partners. PMID:24910472

Kreager, Derek A; Cavanagh, Shannon E; Yen, John; Yu, Mo

2014-04-01

306

Can an asymptomatic screening pathway for men who have sex with men be introduced safely at a level 3 sexual health service in the UK?  

PubMed

Summary To manage the rising demand on sexual health services in the UK, many clinics have introduced asymptomatic screening pathways for heterosexuals, which omit examination. In men who have sex with men however the screening of extragenital sites poses additional challenges. This study aimed to establish whether omitting examination of asymptomatic men who have sex with men would lead to clinically significant diagnoses being missed. The notes of all men who have sex with men who attended a UK level 3 sexual health clinic between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Exclusion criteria included HIV-positive patients attending for HIV-related care, attendances for follow-up consultations not requiring a full sexual health screen, symptomatic patients, contacts of sexually transmitted infections and patients requesting an examination or a repeat prescription of a regularly used medication. In all, 920 consultations occurred during 12 months, of which 893 were reviewed; 476 (53.3%) consultations would have been eligible for screening on an asymptomatic pathway and, of these, 21 (4.4%) had abnormalities found at examination. Findings included genital warts, minor dermatological conditions and three cases of minor asymptomatic urological conditions. There were no clinically significant findings on examination of asymptomatic men who have sex with men requiring treatment, indicating that examination in this cohort may be of little benefit. PMID:24810213

Collister, Alex; Bains, Manroop; Jackson, Rachel; Clarke, Emily; Patel, Raj

2015-03-01

307

Sexual Stigma, Psychological Well-Being and Social Engagement among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beirut, Lebanon  

PubMed Central

This qualitative study sought to explore the sexual identity development of men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beirut, the stigma experienced by these men, and how their psychological well-being and social engagement are shaped by how they cope with this stigma. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 31 MSM, and content analysis was used to identify emergent themes. While many men reported feeling very comfortable with their sexual orientation and had disclosed their sexual orientation to family, most men struggled at least somewhat with their sexuality, often because of perceived stigma from others and internal religious conflict about the immorality of homosexuality. Most participants described experiencing verbal harassment or ridicule, or being treated as different or lesser than in social relationships with friends or family. Mechanisms for coping with stigma included social avoidance (trying to pass as heterosexual; limiting interaction with MSM to the internet) or withdrawal from relationships in an attempt to limit exposure to stigma. Our findings suggest that effective coping with both internal and external sexual stigma is central to the psychological well-being and social engagement of MSM in Beirut, much like what has been found in Western gay communities. PMID:23730919

Wagner, Glenn J.; Aunon, Frances M.; Kaplan, Rachel L.; Karam, Rita; Khouri, Danielle; Tohme, Johnny; Mokhbat, Jacques

2013-01-01

308

An Ecological Systems Comparison Between Homeless Sexual Minority Youths and Homeless Heterosexual Youths  

PubMed Central

This study examined risk and protective outcomes by comparing homeless sexual minority youths to heterosexual homeless youths regarding family, peer behaviors, school, mental health (suicide risk and depression), stigma, discrimination, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. Structured interviews (N = 147) were conducted with individuals ages 16-24 at three drop-in programs serving homeless youths in Toronto. Bivariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences between homeless sexual minorities (n=66) and their heterosexual counterparts (n=81) regarding all variables: family, peer behaviors, stigma, discrimination, mental health, substance use and sexual risk behaviors with the exception of school belonging. Specifically, homeless sexual minority youths fared more poorly (e.g. lower satisfaction with family communication, experienced more stigma, used more drugs and alcohol) than their heterosexual counterparts. Improving family communication may be a worthwhile intervention if the youths are still in contact with their families. Future research should focus on victimization in the context of multiple systems. PMID:23687399

Gattis, Maurice N.

2012-01-01

309

"Did you come?" A qualitative exploration of gender differences in beliefs, experiences, and concerns regarding female orgasm occurrence during heterosexual sexual interactions.  

PubMed

This study explored gender differences in young adult heterosexual men's and women's experiences, beliefs, and concerns regarding the occurrence or nonoccurrence of orgasm during sexual interactions, with emphasis on the absence of female orgasm during intercourse. Qualitative reports were obtained from five female focus groups (N = 24, M age = 19.08) and five male focus groups (N = 21, M age = 19.29), involving three to five participants per group. Transcripts of the discussions were analyzed for emerging themes across focus group discussions. Results indicated that, for both male and female participants, the most common concern regarding lack of female orgasm in a partnered context focused on the negative impact this might have on the male partner's ego. Male and female participants also agreed that men have the physical responsibility to stimulate their female partner to orgasm, while women have the psychological responsibility of being mentally prepared to experience the orgasm. Men and women tended to maintain different beliefs, however, regarding clitoral stimulation during intercourse, as well as the importance of female orgasm for a woman's sexual satisfaction in a partnered context. Findings suggest foci for sexual education. PMID:24350619

Salisbury, Claire M A; Fisher, William A

2014-01-01

310

Observation as Good as Surgery for Some Men with Prostate Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Results from the PIVOT trial showed that some men diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer who forego radical prostatectomy may live as long as men who have immediate surgery. This article explores how the findings may affect clinical practice.

311

"If You Don't Kiss Me, You're Dumped": Boys, Boyfriends and Heterosexualized Masculinities in the Primary School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An ethnographic study of 10-11 year-old boys' construction of gender and sexual identities illustrates the complex and contradictory aspects of heterosexuality. The study suggests how boys define their heterosexualities through projections of fantasies, imagined futures, misogynistic objectification of females, and homophobic performances.…

Renold, Emma

2003-01-01

312

"I Would Just like to Be Known as an Athlete": Managing Hegemony, Femininity, and Heterosexuality in Female Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The community of sport is a powerful site for the construction of masculinity, male identities, and heterosexuality. Consequently, the increased entry of women into the sporting arena has been actively resisted, with women athletes either excluded or framed within traditional, sexualized discourses of femininity and heterosexuality. Yet Title IX…

Mean, Lindsey J.; Kassing, Jeffrey W.

2008-01-01

313

Prevalence, concordance and determinants of human papillomavirus infection among heterosexual partners in a rural region in central Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in heterosexual couples has been sparsely studied, it is relevant to understand disease burden and transmission mechanisms. The present study determined the prevalence and concordance of type-specific HPV infection as well as the determinants of infection in heterosexual couples in a rural area of Mexico. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 504 clinically

Rocio Parada; Rosalba Morales; Anna R Giulliano; Aurelio Cruz; Xavier Castellsagué; Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce

2010-01-01

314

[Reproductive options for people living with HIV: 2013 guidelines from the French expert working group].  

PubMed

The desire for children is a legitimate aspiration that should be part of multidisciplinary care for all men, women or couples living with HIV. The use of effective antiretroviral therapy has revolutionized the prevention of sexual, as well as mother-to-child HIV transmission. When the HIV plasma viral load is undetectable on long-term antiretroviral therapy, the risk of mother-to-child transmission is <1% and the risk of heterosexual HIV transmission without condom use in a stable relationship is very low (estimated at less than 1/10,000) in the absence of inflammation of the genital tract. In a man with a long-term undetectable viral load, viral shedding in semen is uncommon, but may occur persistently or intermittently. The same appears true of viral shedding in the vaginal tract of women. Reproductive options are: natural conception, self-insemination when the woman is HIV-infected, assisted reproduction. Natural conception is now considered to be an acceptable option when the conditions are met, after exploring four aspects: (1) virological (viral load undetectable sustained for at least 6 months on therapy), (2) genital (absence of genital infections or lesions), (3) fertility (after appropriate evaluation) and (4) detecting the ovulation period to limit intercourse without condoms. Assisted reproduction has two objectives in the context of HIV, to allow the couple to conceive without abandoning condom use and/or to treat infertility. PMID:24969954

Mandelbrot, L; Berrebi, A; Rouzioux, C; Partisani, M; Faucher, P; Tubiana, R; Matheron, S; Bujan, L; Morlat, P

2014-01-01

315

Narrating Rural Lesbian Lives: Body Image and Lesbian Community in Central Pennsylvania  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on women's body image has focused on the sexual objectification that women experience in society. The present study explored how rural lesbian women experience their bodies and how lesbian communities, as safe havens from the dominant heterosexual culture, contribute to their body image. Ten lesbians living in central Pennsylvania were interviewed for this study. Interviews were analyzed using interpretative

Megan R. Yost; Jennifer F. Chmielewski

2011-01-01

316

Men's Reproductive Health  

MedlinePLUS

... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Men's Reproductive Health: Overview Skip sharing on social media ... Content Reproductive health is an important component of men's overall health and well-being. Too often, males ...

317

Gum Disease and Men  

MedlinePLUS

... than men with healthy gums. Specifically, men with periodontal disease may be 49 percent more likely than women to develop kidney cancer, 54 percent ... Tuesday, September 23, 2014 American Academy of Periodontology ...

318

The Masculinity of Mr. Right: Feminist Identity and Heterosexual Women's Ideal Romantic Partners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our study explored the relationship between feminist identity and women's report of an ideal male partner's conformity to masculine gender role norms. Heterosexual, mostly White, college women (N = 183) completed measures assessing feminist beliefs and the masculinity characteristics of an ideal male partner. Results indicated that feminist…

Backus, Faedra R.; Mahalik, James R.

2011-01-01

319

Gender stereotypes and normative heterosexuality in matrimonial ads from globalizing India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Matrimonial ads serve as unobtrusive sites to observe the construction and perpetuation of normative heterosexuality through socio-cultural discourses. The current study focuses on gendered spousal expectations and sex role preferences in 1065 matrimonial ads from two popular newspapers in India. Gender differences in ad type, financial stability, physical attractiveness, fairness, slimness, personality traits, and occupational preferences were examined. Results found

Srividya Ramasubramanian; Parul Jain

2009-01-01

320

Perceived Emotional Support from Family and Friends in Members of Homosexual, Married, and Heterosexual Cohabiting Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influenced perceptions of emotional support from friends and family in members of gay, lesbian, married, and heterosexual cohabiting couples. Both the individual partner and the couple were used as units of analysis. Using the individual partner scores, perceived emotional support was related to Type of Couple (marrieds perceived more emotional

Lawrence A. Kurdek; J. Patrick Schmitt

1987-01-01

321

Illicit Drug Use in a Community-Based Sample of Heterosexually Identified Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study we assess lifetime and recent drug use patterns among 261 heterosexually identified 18- to 25-year-olds through brief street intercept surveys conducted in New York City. Marijuana, hallucinogens, powder cocaine, and ecstasy were the most frequently reported drugs for both lifetime and recent use. Findings further suggest significant…

Halkitis, Perry N.; Manasse, Ashley N.; McCready, Karen C.

2010-01-01

322

Brief Report: Activities in Heterosexual Romantic Relationships--Grade Differences and Associations with Relationship Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Whereas much research addresses relations of youths' heterosexual romantic relationships with sexual and/or delinquent activities, less attention has been paid to youths' more normative, day-to-day activities with romantic partners. This gap in the literature is problematic given that these activities define the substance of the relationships and…

Carlson, Wendy; Rose, Amanda J.

2012-01-01

323

Gender Differences in Beliefs about Condom Use among Young, Heterosexual Australian Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To investigate gender differences in beliefs about condom use among young, sexually active, heterosexual Australian adults. Design: Cross-sectional survey of 1,113 adults aged 18-26 years. Setting: Higher education institutions across New South Wales and Victoria, Australia. Method: Participants were recruited during higher-education…

Newton, Fiona J.; Newton, Joshua D.; Windisch, Lydia; Ewing, Michael T.

2013-01-01

324

Coparenting among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples: Associations with Adopted Children's Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coparenting is associated with child behavior in families with heterosexual parents, but less is known about coparenting among lesbian- and gay-parent families. Associations were studied among self-reported divisions of labor, coparenting observations, and child adjustment ("M[subscript age]" = 3 years) among 104 adoptive families headed…

Farr, Rachel H.; Patterson, Charlotte J.

2013-01-01

325

Perceived Parenting Skill Across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood Among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little research has examined change in perceived parenting skill across the transition to parenthood or predictors of change in perceived skill. The current study used an ecological framework to examine predictors of self-perceived parenting skill among 47 lesbian, 31 gay, and 56 heterosexual couples who were adopting their first child. Findings revealed that, on average, all new parents perceived themselves

Abbie E. Goldberg; JuliAnna Z. Smith

2009-01-01

326

Increase of infectious syphilis among heterosexuals in Amsterdam: its relationship to drug use and prostitution.  

PubMed Central

Since 1986, an increase in heterosexually acquired syphilis cases has been seen in Amsterdam. The proportion of syphilis patients who reported using hard drugs, increased from 7% in 1985 to 23% in 1988, which was mainly due to increased numbers of addicted prostitute women with syphilis. PMID:2312115

van den Hoek, J A; van der Linden, M M; Coutinho, R A

1990-01-01

327

An Observational Study of Early Heterosexual Interaction at Middle School Dances  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this longitudinal, observational study of heterosexual interaction at middle school dances we examined the degree to which boys' and girls' groups became more gender integrated over time. The results show groups became more integrated over time with the pattern differing by gender. Boys had a relatively low level of contact with girls over the…

Pellegrini, Anthony D.; Long, Jeffery D.

2007-01-01

328

Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples in Open Adoption Arrangements: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little research has attended to the role of gender and sexual orientation in shaping open adoption dynamics. This qualitative, longitudinal study of 45 adoptive couples (15 lesbian, 15 gay, and 15 heterosexual couples) examined adopters' motivations for open adoption, changes in attitudes about openness, and early relationship dynamics. Key…

Goldberg, Abbie E.; Kinkler, Lori A.; Richardson, Hannah B.; Downing, Jordan B.

2011-01-01

329

Bullying Explains Only Part of LGBTQ-Heterosexual Risk Disparities: Implications for Policy and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) experience higher rates of victimization by bullying than do their heterosexual-identified peers. In this article, we investigate the extent to which this difference in rates of victimization can explain LGBTQ youths' greater rates of suicidal ideation, suicide…

Robinson, Joseph P.; Espelage, Dorothy L.

2012-01-01

330

Fibromyalgia syndrome in men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is uncommon in men and data on its characteristics and severity are limited. The current study was undertaken to determine whether the clinical characteristics and the spectrum of this disorder are similar in men and women. Methods: Forty men with FMS were matched with 40 women by age and educational level. All subjects were asked about

Dan Buskila; Lily Neumann; Ali Alhoashle; Mahmoud Abu-Shakra

2000-01-01

331

HIV Risk and the Internet: Results of the Men’s INTernet Sex (MINTS) Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the feasibility of online recruitment of high-risk Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) for HIV prevention\\u000a survey research and investigated the relationship between Internet use and unsafe sex. Participants (N = 1,026) were Internet-using Latino MSM living in the U.S. recruited using online banner advertisements. Respondents completed\\u000a a cross-sectional, online survey in English or Spanish. Sample characteristics

B. R. Simon Rosser; Michael H. Miner; Walter O. Bockting; Michael W. Ross; Joseph Konstan; Laura Gurak; Jeffrey Stanton; Weston Edwards; Scott Jacoby; Alex Carballo-Diéguez; Rafael Mazin; Eli Coleman

2009-01-01

332

The Heroism of Women and Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Heroism consists of actions undertaken to help others, despite the possibility that they may result in the helper's death or injury. The authors examine heroism by women and men in 2 extremely dangerous settings: the emergency situations in which Carnegie medalists rescued others and the holocaust in which some non-Jews risked their lives to…

Becker, Selwyn W.; Eagly, Alice H.

2004-01-01

333

Global epidemiology of HIV infection in men who have sex with men  

PubMed Central

Epidemics of HIV in men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to expand in most countries. We sought to understand the epidemiological drivers of the global epidemic in MSM and why it continues unabated. We did a comprehensive review of available data for HIV prevalence, incidence, risk factors, and the molecular epidemiology of HIV in MSM from 2007 to 2011, and modelled the dynamics of HIV transmission with an agent-based simulation. Our findings show that the high probability of transmission per act through receptive anal intercourse has a central role in explaining the disproportionate disease burden in MSM. HIV can be transmitted through large MSM networks at great speed. Molecular epidemiological data show substantial clustering of HIV infections in MSM networks, and higher rates of dual-variant and multiple-variant HIV infection in MSM than in heterosexual people in the same populations. Prevention strategies that lower biological transmission and acquisition risks, such as approaches based on antiretrovirals, offer promise for controlling the expanding epidemic in MSM, but their potential effectiveness is limited by structural factors that contribute to low health-seeking behaviours in populations of MSM in many parts of the world. PMID:22819660

Beyrer, Chris; Baral, Stefan D; van Griensven, Frits; Goodreau, Steven M; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Wirtz, Andrea L; Brookmeyer, Ron

2013-01-01

334

Adapting the VOICES HIV behavioral intervention for Latino men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, but few behavioral interventions address their prevention needs. Adaptation of evidence-based interventions is a pragmatic strategy that builds upon lessons learned and has the potential to fill gaps in prevention programming. Yet there are few reports of how transfers are executed and whether effectiveness is achieved. This research reports on the adaptation of VOICES/VOICES, a single-session intervention designed for heterosexual adults, into No Excuses/Sin buscar excuses for Latino MSM. To test the adapted intervention, 370 at-risk Latino MSM were enrolled in a randomized trial. At a three-month follow-up, there was a sharper decrease in unprotected intercourse in the intervention group compared to controls (59 % vs. 39 %, ANOVA p < 0.05, F = 4.10). Intervention participants also reported more condom use at last intercourse (AOR = 1.69; 95 % CI 1.02-2.81, p < 02). Findings support use of adapted models for meeting prevention needs of high-priority populations. PMID:24419993

O'Donnell, Lydia; Stueve, Ann; Joseph, Heather A; Flores, Stephen

2014-04-01

335

Comparison of a Low-Fat Diet to a Low-Carbohydrate Diet on Weight Loss, Body Composition, and Risk Factors for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Free-Living, Overweight Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overweight and obese men and women (24 - 61 yr of age) were recruited into a randomized trial to compare the effects of a low-fat (LF) vs. a low-carbohydrate (LC) diet on weight loss. Thirty-one subjects completed all 10 wk of the diet interven- tion (retention, 78%). Subjects on the LF diet consumed an average of 17.8% of energy from

KELLY A. MECKLING; DAYNA SAARI

336

Men, Masculinities, and Murder-Suicide.  

PubMed

Murder-suicide (M-S) is a complex phenomenon that can involve a multifaceted set of interrelated biological and social factors. M-S is also sexed and gendered in that the perpetrators are most often male and their underpinning motives and actions link to masculinities in an array of diverse ways. With the overarching goal to describe connections between men, masculinities, and M-S, 296 newspaper articles describing 45 North American M-S cases were analyzed. The inductively derived findings revealed three themes: (a) domestic desperation, (b) workplace justice, and (c) school retaliation. Cases in the domestic desperation theme were characterized by the murder of a family member(s) and were often underpinned by men's self-perceptions of failing to provide economic security. Workplace justice cases emerged from men's grievances around paid-work, job insecurity, and perceptions of being bullied and/or marginalized by coworkers or supervisors. The school retaliation cases were strongly linked to "pay back" against individuals and/or society for the hardships endured by M-S perpetrators. Prevailing across the three themes was men's loss of control in their lives, hopelessness, and marginalized masculine identities. Also evident were men's alignments to hegemonic masculinities in reasserting one's masculine self by protesting the perceived marginalization invoked on them. Overall, the findings give pause to consider the need for men-centered M-S prevention strategies to quell the catastrophic impacts of this long-standing but understudied men's health issue. PMID:25294867

Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina S E; Drummond, Murray; Sta Maria, Estephanie; Bottorff, Joan L; Creighton, Genevieve

2014-10-01

337

Is HIV/AIDS Stigma Dividing the Gay Community? Perceptions of HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stigma surrounding HIV/AIDS has existed since the beginning of the epidemic, but little is known about HIV/AIDS stigma within the gay community and how it affects men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV. A better understanding of the effects of stigma on this population is needed to reduce it and its harmful effects. Our study used…

Courtenay-Quirk, Cari; Wolitski, Richard J.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Gomez, Cynthia A.

2006-01-01

338

The Consolidation of Early Heterosexual Gender Identification in the Young Son of Two Men: A Clinical Presentation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the gendering of self of a young boy who has two males as parents, from the view point of his female psychotherapist. During the 2 years of psychotherapy, the young boy was preoccupied with the need to create a kind of mother. He referred to his female caretaker as "Real Mommy" whom he loved and to his psychotherapist as "The…

Eisold, Barbara

339

Hepatitis C Virus Testing in Adults Living with HIV: A Need for Improved Screening Efforts  

PubMed Central

Objectives Guidelines recommend hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening for all people living with HIV (PLWH). Understanding HCV testing practices may improve compliance with guidelines and can help identify areas for future intervention. Methods We evaluated HCV screening and unnecessary repeat HCV testing in 8,590 PLWH initiating care at 12 U.S. HIV clinics between 2006 and 2010, with follow-up through 2011. Multivariable logistic regression examined the association between patient factors and the outcomes: HCV screening (?1 HCV antibody tests during the study period) and unnecessary repeat HCV testing (?1 HCV antibody tests in patients with a prior positive test result). Results Overall, 82% of patients were screened for HCV, 18% of those screened were HCV antibody-positive, and 40% of HCV antibody-positive patients had unnecessary repeat HCV testing. The likelihood of being screened for HCV increased as the number of outpatient visits rose (adjusted odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 1.01–1.03). Compared to men who have sex with men (MSM), patients with injection drug use (IDU) were less likely to be screened for HCV (0.63, 0.52–0.78); while individuals with Medicaid were more likely to be screened than those with private insurance (1.30, 1.04–1.62). Patients with heterosexual (1.78, 1.20–2.65) and IDU (1.58, 1.06–2.34) risk compared to MSM, and those with higher numbers of outpatient (1.03, 1.01–1.04) and inpatient (1.09, 1.01–1.19) visits were at greatest risk of unnecessary HCV testing. Conclusions Additional efforts to improve compliance with HCV testing guidelines are needed. Leveraging health information technology may increase HCV screening and reduce unnecessary testing. PMID:25032989

Yehia, Baligh R.; Herati, Ramin S.; Fleishman, John A.; Gallant, Joel E.; Agwu, Allison L.; Berry, Stephen A.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Moore, Richard D.; Metlay, Joshua P.; Gebo, Kelly A.

2014-01-01

340

Self-identified heterosexual clients in substance abuse treatment with a history of same-gender sexual contact.  

PubMed

There is virtually no literature concerning the experiences of self-identified heterosexual clients in substance abuse treatment who have a history of same-gender sexual contact (HSGS). In a U.S. urban inpatient program in 2009-2010, 99 HSGS clients were compared to 681 other heterosexual and 86 lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients regarding background factors, program completion rates, and feelings about treatment. Male HSGS participants had lower completion rates than other male heterosexual participants. Qualitative data indicated that most male HSGS participants experienced difficult emotions regarding same-gender sexual encounters, particularly those involving trading sex for money or drugs. Implications for treatment are discussed. PMID:25364839

Senreich, Evan

2015-04-01

341

Sexuality and the drive for muscularity: evidence of associations among British men.  

PubMed

Previous studies have documented associations between sexuality and body image, but the directionality of this association is unclear among men. This study examined whether men's drive for muscularity can be considered a correlate of their sexuality. A community-based sample of 292 heterosexual men from London, UK, completed a survey consisting of measures of drive for muscularity, sociosexuality, sexual assertiveness, sexual esteem, and sexual sensation seeking. A multiple regression analysis showed that greater drive for muscularity was predicted by more unrestricted sociosexuality (i.e., a greater proclivity for short-term, transient relationships), greater sexual sensation seeking, and greater sexual assertiveness, once the effects of participant age and body mass index had been accounted for. Possible avenues for intervention based on a sex-positive approach are discussed in conclusion. PMID:25201097

Swami, Viren; Diwell, Rachel; McCreary, Donald R

2014-09-01

342

Differences in African American and White Women’s Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to examine racial differences in women’s attitudes toward lesbians and gay men and to offer an understanding of these differences. Participants were 224 18–30 year old heterosexual African American (64%) and White (36%) female undergraduates from a large urban university in the southeastern United States. Participants completed measures of social demographics, sexual orientation, and sexual prejudice. Results showed that African American, relative to White, women endorsed more negative attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. Also, unlike White women, African American women reported more negative attitudes toward gay men than lesbians. Implications are discussed regarding differences in cultural contexts that exist between African American and White women. PMID:20161368

Vincent, Wilson; Peterson, John L.; Parrott, Dominic J.

2009-01-01

343

Managing HIV among serodiscordant heterosexual couples: serostatus, stigma and sex.  

PubMed

A qualitative study was conducted with 28 men and women in HIV-serodiscordant couples to explore the management of HIV in their relationship. Content analysis of the interviews revealed the role of serostatus and stigma in shaping partners' experience of HIV, sex and risk. Partners' differing serostatus often created feelings of alienation within the relationship. Compounding this interpersonal dynamic, the HIV service community was experienced as segregating because they were not funded or prepared to work with seronegative partners. Thus many, particularly seronegative women, felt invisible both within and outside of the relationship. Yet, the uninfected partners shared the burden of a stigmatizing illness because of the serodiscordant relationship. Stigma hindered communication about HIV and sex, disclosure to others and access to services. Many experienced HIV as a loss of their sexuality. Seronegative partners spoke about 'keeping sex alive' and often had to push to continue having sex. Couples used multiple strategies to manage HIV, including developing strict behavioural guidelines, connecting with other couples, accessing scientific information and becoming educators and activists. These altruistic activities, which also included participation in research, helped to transcend external and internalized stigma. Implications for developing interventions for HIV-serodiscordant couples are discussed. PMID:9828951

van der Straten, A; Vernon, K A; Knight, K R; Gómez, C A; Padian, N S

1998-10-01

344

Socio-cultural influences on the transmission of HIV among gay men in rural China.  

PubMed

Bisexual behaviours are relatively common among men who have sex with men in China. This pilot study aims to reveal the complex processes through which such men manage their sexuality, family responsibilities and sexual behaviours in a rural Chinese setting. A total of 15 men who have sex with men were recruited by purposive sampling. Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted to explore participants' views about their sexual experiences and practices. The Chinese traditional moral code, family values and gender roles that form the crucial components of Confucianism were reflected in the participants' efforts to maintain familial and social harmony through a compromised form of sexual partnership. Most study participants demonstrated a mixed experience of social stigma, sexual naiveté and ignorance of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Under cultural and family pressure, men who have sex with men entered heterosexual marriages with the intention of maintaining a balance between their collectivist (familial) obligations and their individualistic (same-sex sexual) desires. However, the opaque nature of their concurrent sexual relationships may endanger their personal health and accelerate HIV and STI transmission. Reducing the stigma and social prejudice associated with male same-sex sexual relations is essential for any culturally sensitive HIV-prevention programme to succeed in rural China. PMID:24555479

Koo, Fung Kuen; Chow, Eric P F; Gao, Liangmin; Fu, Xiaoxing; Jing, Jun; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Lei

2014-02-21

345

NETWORK POSITION AND SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION: IMPLICATIONS OF PARTNER BETWEENNESS FOR MEN*  

PubMed Central

This paper combines relational perspectives on gender identity with social network structural perspectives on health to understand men’s sexual functioning. We argue that network positions that afford independence and control over social resources are consistent with traditional masculine roles and may therefore affect men’s sexual performance. For example, when a heterosexual man’s female partner has more frequent contact with his confidants than he does–a situation that we refer to as partner betweenness – his relational autonomy, privacy, and control are constrained. Analyses of data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) show that about a quarter of men experience partner betweenness, and that these men are 92 percent more likely to report problems getting and/or maintaining an erection (95% CI: 1.274, 2.881). This association is strongest among the youngest men in the sample, which may reflect changing conceptions of masculinity in later life. We close by considering several explanations for these findings, and urge additional research on the linkages between health, gender, and network structure. PMID:22003520

Cornwell, Benjamin; Laumann, Edward O.

2013-01-01

346

Individual and Social Factors Related to Mental Health Concerns among Bisexual Men in the Midwestern United States  

PubMed Central

Research has not yet explored the potential impact of social stress, biphobia, and other factors on the mental health of bisexual men. In-depth interviews were conducted with a diverse sample of 75 men who engaged in bisexual behavior within the past six months. Interviewers explored potential mental health stressors and supports. Many participants reported personal and social challenges associated with bisexuality, which in turn influenced their mental health. Reported instances of stigma toward bisexuality, from both homosexual and heterosexual individuals, impacted participants’ feelings regarding their own sexualities. Isolation was also commonly reported. Programs are greatly needed that focus on the specific mental health and other concerns voiced by these men. Based on our study findings, such programs should emphasize self-acceptance, social network and community building, and ways to maximize available social support, similar to community-level empowerment interventions that have shown success among gay-identified men. PMID:22745591

Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Reece, Michael; Martinez, Omar; Goncalves, Gabriel; Malebranche, David; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2012-01-01

347

Women's sexual responses to heterosexual and lesbian erotica: the role of stimulus intensity, affective reaction, and sexual history.  

PubMed

Past research has demonstrated that women do not show a "category-specific" genital response to erotic stimuli. That is, on average, heterosexual and lesbian women are indistinguishable in terms of their physiological genital responses to heterosexual versus lesbian erotica. In two studies with heterosexual women (n = 28 for Study 1; n = 30 for Study 2) and lesbians (n = 24 for Study 1; n = 25 for Study 2), results confirmed that, on average, women did not show category-specific genital responses or category-specific subjective sexual arousal. However, there was evidence of notable within-group variability; many women did respond to the stimuli in a category-specific manner. Heterosexual women were more likely than lesbian women to demonstrate category-specificity. Findings also revealed that category-specificity was associated with multiple factors, including affective responses to the erotic stimuli and sexual history. Results of this study highlight the complexity of women's sexual identities and sexual responses. PMID:19856092

Peterson, Zoë D; Janssen, Erick; Laan, Ellen

2010-08-01

348

Intimate Relationship Challenges in Early Parenthood among Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples Adopting via the Child Welfare System.  

PubMed

Little research has examined the transition to parenthood among couples who adopt through the child welfare system. The current qualitative study of 84 individuals within 42 couples (17 lesbian, 13 gay, and 12 heterosexual), who were placed with a child via foster care three months earlier, examined perceived changes in their intimate relationship. Findings indicated that, like heterosexual biological-parent couples, some adoptive parents perceived the loss of their partner's undivided attention as stressful to the relationship. Adoption-specific stressors were also identified, including the need to find state-approved child care to facilitate "couple time" and the legal insecurity of foster-to-adopt placements. Although our findings were similar for heterosexual, lesbian, and gay adoptive parents, same-sex couples cited some additional stressors related to their sexual minority status. Findings have implications for individual, couple, and family practitioners who work with lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents, particularly during their transition to parenthood. PMID:25177080

Goldberg, Abbie E; Kinkler, Lori A; Moyer, April M; Weber, Elizabeth

2014-08-01

349

Cohort of Swedish Men  

Cancer.gov

The Cohort of Swedish Men (COSM) was established in 1997 when all men born between 1918 and 1952 and residing in Västmanland and Örebro counties in central Sweden received a questionnaire concerning diet and other lifestyle factors. Of the 100,303 eligible men, 48,850 (49%) responded to the questionnaire, which included items about diet, physical activity, medical history, and lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking history and use of dietary supplements.

350

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY MEN'S LACROSSE  

E-print Network

....................................Michael S. Roth '78 V.P. for Student Affairs.....Michael J. Whaley Dean of Students ........Casey Brown men's lacrosse information Home field (grass)............................. Jackson Field

Royer, Dana

351

‘From cricket lover to terror suspect’ – challenging representations of young British Muslim men  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contemporary media and policy debates young British Muslim men are frequently described as experiencing cultural conflict, as alienated, deviant, underachieving, and as potential terrorists. In this article we seek to convey the everyday negotiations, struggles and structural constraints that shape the lives of young British Pakistani Muslim men in particular. We draw on interviews with British Pakistani Muslim men

Claire Dwyer; Bindi Shah; Gurchathen Sanghera

2008-01-01

352

Standard of living in the retirement survey: A predictor of six-year functional limitation onset and mortality in women, but not in men from ages 55?–?69 years  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. To investigate the predictive validity for health decline of a standard of living, a measure that combines basic necessities and consumer durables. Method. A nationally representative sample of those aged 55 - 69 years was interviewed at home in the Great Britain Retirement and Retirement Plans Survey, (1988; n = 3541). In 1994, 2247 were re-interviewed, response rate being

Nicola A. Spiers; Ruth J. Matthews; Geraldine A. Barker; Carol Jagger; Ruth M. Hancock

2005-01-01

353

The impact of prostate cancer on men's everyday life.  

PubMed

Prostate cancer impacts on the daily lives of men, particularly their physical and emotional health, relationships and social life. This paper highlights how men cope with disease and treatment and the strategies they employ to manage their diagnosis alongside daily life. Twenty-seven men were interviewed at different stages in their disease pathway: nine men prior to radiotherapy, eight men at 6-8 months post radiotherapy and 10 men at 12-18 months post radiotherapy. A grounded theory approach was used to collect and analyse the data. Regardless of the point at which they were interviewed four areas emerged as important to the men: the pathway to diagnosis; the diagnosis; the impact of prostate cancer and its treatment on daily life; and living with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer was diagnosed using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, rectal examination and biopsy. Many men did not understand the consequences of a high PSA reading before they undertook the test. Painful investigative biopsies were viewed as the worst part of the disease experience. Radiotherapy was considered less invasive than other treatments, although preparatory regimes were associated with stress and inconvenience. Men used various strategies to deal with treatment-induced threats to their masculinity in the long term. PMID:25204357

Appleton, L; Wyatt, D; Perkins, E; Parker, C; Crane, J; Jones, A; Moorhead, L; Brown, V; Wall, C; Pagett, M

2015-01-01

354

Therapy with Infertile Heterosexual Couples: It’s Not About Gender—Or is it?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In spite of medical data that show males are equal to their female partners as a source of a heterosexual couple’s infertility,\\u000a therapists face many unanswered questions about the extent to which gender influences each partner’s infertility experience\\u000a in American culture. How is “hers” different from “his?” To what extent should the therapist strive to help the couple define\\u000a the

Constance Hoenk Shapiro

2009-01-01

355

Genital self-mutilation in nonpsychotic heterosexual males: Case report of two cases  

PubMed Central

Genital self-mutilation is a rare event that is commonly associated with psychotic disorders. However such injuries have also been reported from nonpsychotic patients as a result either from bizarre autoerotic acts, attempts at crude sex change operation by transsexuals or secondary to complex religious beliefs and delusions regarding sexual guilt. We report two cases of genital self-mutilation in nonpsychotic married heterosexual males as a result of conflict and frustration. PMID:19823616

Nerli, Rajendra B.; Ravish, Indupur R.; Amarkhed, Shrishailesh S.; Manoranjan, Ujjaini D.; Prabha, Vikram; Koura, Ashish

2008-01-01

356

Gender-Role Stereotypes and Perceptions of Heterosexual, Gay and Lesbian Domestic Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although domestic violence occurs in all types of relationships, non-prototypical cases (e.g., gay male, lesbian, female-against-male)\\u000a are often overlooked. We replicated and extended previous research demonstrating that perceptions of heterosexual and same-sex\\u000a domestic violence are generally consistent with gender-role stereotypes. Male and female undergraduates read one of four domestic\\u000a abuse cases varying by victim and perpetrator sex and sexual orientation.

Sheila M. Seelau; Eric P. Seelau

2005-01-01

357

HIV1 Langerhans' Cell Tropism Associated with Heterosexual Transmission of HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterosexual transmission by vaginal intercourse accounts for most transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) in Africa and Asia but is less important in the HIV-1 epidemics of the United States and Western Europe. Epithelial Langerhans' cells (LCs) represent a possible source of initial cell contact for vaginal infection. Fifteen primary isolates of HIV-1 from U.S. homosexuals and 18 HIV-1

Luis E. Soto-Ramirez; Boris Renjifo; Mary F. McLane; Richard Marlink; Carl O'Hara; Ruengpung Sutthent; Chantapong Wasi; Prakong Vithayasai; Vicharn Vithayasai; Chatchawann Apichartpiyakul; Prasert Auewarakul; Victor Pena Cruz; Dao-Shan Chui; Rapin Osathanondh; Kenneth Mayer; Tun-Hou Lee; Max Essex

1996-01-01

358

“HELPED PUT IN A QUILT:”Men's Work and Male Intimacy in Nineteenth-Century New England  

Microsoft Academic Search

By examining the case of one man in the early nineteenth century, this article challenges the assumptions of separate work and emotional lives for men and women and raises questions for the study of gender. The experience of Brigham Nims, as revealed in his diaries and letters, demonstrates that men and women did not live their lives in completely separate

KAREN V. HANSEN

1989-01-01

359

Gender-Typed Play Behavior in Early Childhood: Adopted Children with Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Parents.  

PubMed

This study examined whether the gender-typed play of young children varies as a function of family structure. Using a sample of 126 couples (44 lesbian couples, 34 gay male couples, and 48 heterosexual couples) located throughout the United States, with an adopted child between the age of 2 and 4 years old (mean = 2.5 years), we examined parent reports of children's gender-typed play behavior utilizing the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI; Golombok & Rust, 1993). Findings revealed that the perceived play behaviors of boys and girls in same-gender parent families were more similar (i.e., less gender-stereotyped) than the perceived play behavior of boys and girls in heterosexual-parent families (which were more divergent; that is, gender-stereotyped). Sons of lesbian mothers were less masculine in their play behavior than sons of gay fathers and sons of heterosexual parents. Our findings have implications for researchers who study gender development in children and adolescents. PMID:23420542

Goldberg, Abbie E; Kashy, Deborah A; Smith, Juilanna Z

2012-11-01

360

Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms and Suicidality among Heterosexual and Sexual Minority Youth  

PubMed Central

Sexual minority youth report higher rates of depression and suicidality than do heterosexual youth. Little is known, however, about whether these disparities continue as youth transition into young adulthood. The primary goals of this study were to describe and compare trajectories of adolescent depressive symptoms and suicidality among sexual minority and heterosexual youth, examine differences in depressive symptoms and suicidality trajectories across sexual orientation subgroups, and determine whether there are gender differences in these longitudinal disparities. Four waves of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health were analyzed using latent curve modeling (N = 12,379; 53% female). Results showed that the rates of depressive symptoms and suicidality in early adolescence were higher among sexual minority youth than among heterosexual youth, and that these disparities persisted over time as participants transitioned into young adulthood. Consistent with previous cross-sectional studies, the observed longitudinal disparities were largest for females and for bisexually-identified youth. Sexual minority youth may benefit from childhood and early adolescent prevention and intervention programs. PMID:23784511

Marshal, Michael P.; Dermody, Sarah S.; Cheong, JeeWon; Burton, Chad M.; Friedman, Mark S.; Aranda, Frances; Hughes, Tonda

2013-01-01

361

Anti-Gay Prejudice and All-Cause Mortality Among Heterosexuals in the United States  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We determined whether individuals who harbor antigay prejudice experience elevated mortality risk. Methods. Data on heterosexual sexual orientation (n?=?20?226, aged 18–89 years), antigay attitudes, and mortality risk factors came from the General Social Survey, which was linked to mortality data from the National Death Index (1988–2008). We used Cox proportional hazard models to examine whether antigay prejudice was associated with mortality risk among heterosexuals. Results. Heterosexuals who reported higher levels of antigay prejudice had higher mortality risk than those who reported lower levels (hazard ratio [HR]?=?1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.09, 1.42), with control for multiple risk factors for mortality, including demographics, socioeconomic status, and fair or poor self-rated health. This result translates into a life expectancy difference of approximately 2.5 years (95% CI?=?1.0, 4.0 years) between individuals with high versus low levels of antigay prejudice. Furthermore, in sensitivity analyses, antigay prejudice was specifically associated with increased risk of cardiovascular-related causes of death in fully adjusted models (HR?=?1.29; 95% CI?=?1.04, 1.60). Conclusions. The findings contribute to a growing body of research suggesting that reducing prejudice may improve the health of both minority and majority populations. PMID:24328664

Bellatorre, Anna; Muennig, Peter

2014-01-01

362

Trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression among sexual minority and heterosexual women veterans.  

PubMed

This study examined the impact of various traumas across the life span on screening positive for current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among heterosexual and sexual minority women veterans. Women veterans were recruited over the Internet (N = 706, 37% lesbian or bisexual) to participate in an anonymous, online survey. We assessed childhood trauma; adult sexual assault and adult physical victimization before, during, and after the military; combat exposure; perceived sexist discrimination during military service; sexual minority military stressors; past-year sexist events; and whether participants screened positive for PTSD or depression. Binary logistic regressions were used to generate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for PTSD and depression, stratified by sexual orientation and controlling for demographic characteristics. Lesbian and bisexual women reported higher rates of trauma across the life span, although in some instances (e.g., sexual assault during and after military service, combat exposure), they did not differ from their heterosexual counterparts. Childhood trauma and traumas that occurred during military service added the most variance to both PTSD and depression models. Sexual assault during military service appeared to be especially harmful with respect to screening positive for PTSD for both sexual orientation groups. Results revealed a number of other predictors of mental health status for women veterans, some of which differed by sexual orientation. Findings indicate a significant burden of interpersonal trauma for both heterosexual and lesbian/bisexual women veterans and provide information on the distinct association of various traumas with current PTSD and depression by sexual orientation. PMID:25019543

Lehavot, Keren; Simpson, Tracy L

2014-07-01

363

NATIONAL SURVEY OF MEN  

EPA Science Inventory

The 1991 National Survey of Men was conducted to examine issues related to sexual behavior and condom use among U.S. men aged 20 to 39. Data collection and processing took place between March 1991 and January 1992. This survey was intended to serve as a baseline survey for a long...

364

Death and football: an analysis of men's talk about emotions.  

PubMed

This study is concerned with men's talk about emotions and with how emotion discourses function in the construction and negotiation of masculine ways of doing emotions and of consonant masculine subject positions. A sample group of 16 men, who were recruited from two social contexts in England, participated in focus groups on 'men and emotions'. Group discussions were transcribed and analysed using discourse analysis. Participants drew upon a range of discursive resources in constructing masculine emotional behaviour and negotiating masculine subject positions. They constructed men as emotional beings, but only within specific, rule-governed contexts, and cited death, a football match and a nightclub scenario as prototypical contexts for the permissible/understandable expression of grief, joy and anger, respectively. However, in the nightclub scenario, the men distanced themselves from the expression of anger as violence, whilst maintaining a masculine subject position. These discursive practices are discussed in terms of the possibilities for effecting change in men's emotional lives. PMID:15479538

Walton, Chris; Coyle, Adrian; Lyons, Evanthia

2004-09-01

365

Five-year safety and immunogenicity of GlaxoSmithKline’s candidate malaria vaccine RTS,S/AS02 following administration to semi-immune adult men living in a malaria-endemic region of The Gambia  

PubMed Central

RTS,S is a pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine candidate antigen based on the circumsporozoite surface protein of Plasmodium falciparum fused to HBsAg, incorporating a novel Adjuvant System (AS02). The first field efficacy of RTS,S/AS02 against infection was demonstrated in a trial initiated in The Gambia in 1998. This paper presents the five-year safety and immunogenicity follow up of the 306 men who were enrolled in the original trial. In the primary study men aged 18 to 45 years were randomized to receive either RTS,S/AS02 or rabies vaccine at 0, 1, 5 months followed by a booster dose at month 19. The subjects were observed for long term safety and immunogenicity continuously until month 58. Of the 153 subjects in each group at enrollment, 80 (52%) subjects in the RTS,S/AS02 group and 83 (54%) subjects in the rabies group returned for the final long-term follow-up visit at month 58. The main reason for non-attendance at month 58 was migration (76% of all drop-outs). Nine subjects in the RTS,S/AS02 group and seven in the rabies group experienced serious adverse events (SAEs) over the 58 month surveillance period, of which seven had a fatal outcome (five RTS,S/AS02 and two rabies group). None of the SAEs with fatal outcome were attributed to the study vaccine. Anti-CS antibody persistence compared to control was observed for five years, although titres had waned from post-booster levels; similar responses in anti-HBs antibody persistence were observed in initially HBsAg seronegative subjects. This study provides the first indication of the long-term safety and persistence of anti-CS and anti-HBs antibodies of the RTS,S vaccine candidate in combination with the novel AS02 Adjuvant System. PMID:19276646

Bojang, Kalifa; Milligan, Paul; Pinder, Margaret; Doherty, Tom; Leach, Amanda; Ofori-Anyinam, Opokua; Lievens, Marc; Kester, Kent; Schaecher, Kurt; Ballou, W. Ripley; Cohen, Joe

2013-01-01

366

The Men's Bibliography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Compiled by Michael Flood, the Men's Bibliography lists close to 8,000 books and articles on men and masculinity, many from UK or Australian publishers. The bibliography is organized into 35 major subject areas such as: Gay men and masculinity, Men and feminism, Men's liberation, Mid-life and ageing, HIV/AIDS, and so on, which is helpful, since although the bibliography is available electronically, users will have to turn to other catalogs to determine for themselves which individual items are available on the Web and which are only available in print. Flood encourages duplication of the subject sections of the bibliography for use as course handouts or reading lists and also provides a form for submission of additional items for inclusion in the bibliography.

367

Health screening - men age 65 and older  

MedlinePLUS

Health maintenance visit - men - over age 65; Physical exam - men - over age 65; Yearly exam - men - over age 65; Checkup - men - over age 65; Men's health - over age 65; Preventive care exam - men - over ...

368

Health screening - men - ages 18 to 39  

MedlinePLUS

Health maintenance visit - men - ages 18 - 39; Physical exam - men - ages 18 - 39; Yearly exam - men - ages 18 - 39; Checkup - men - ages 18 - 39; Men's health - ages 18 - 39; Preventive care exam - men - ages ...

369

Syphilis and MSM (Men Who Have Sex with Men)  

MedlinePLUS

... Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Share Compartir Syphilis & MSM (Men Who Have Sex With Men) - CDC Fact Sheet Español What is syphilis? How ... 20 to 24 years of age and in men 20 to 29 years of age. Reported cases ...

370

Understanding African American Men’s Perceptions of Racism, Male Gender Socialization, and Social Capital Through Photovoice  

PubMed Central

In this study we used a participatory qualitative research approach—photovoice—to collect information about African American men’s perceptions of the factors that influenced their own health and the health of their communities. Photovoice was conducted as part of the “Men as Navigators (MAN) for Health” project, an evaluation of a male lay health advisor (LHA) intervention in central North Carolina. Twelve African American men living in both urban and rural communities took photographs and discussed the photos in six photo discussion sessions. Analysis involved identifying recurring themes from the photos and transcriptions of photo discussions. The results suggest that race and racism, male gender socialization, and social networks and social capital all have important influences on African American men’s health. The implications for further research and public health practice are discussed. PMID:19201993

Ornelas, India J.; Amell, Jim; Tran, Anh N.; Royster, Michael; Armstrong-Brown, Janelle; Eng, Eugenia

2009-01-01

371

Is preference for ovulatory female's faces associated with men's testosterone levels?  

PubMed

Women's ovulation is perceivable with different senses. Already subtle face shape differences are enough to trigger men's preference for the ovulatory female. The aim of the present study is to investigate if men's testosterone level can be linked to their preference for the ovulatory female. Thirty-nine heterosexual participants were shown face pairs of which one of them was transformed to the shape of a prototype face of a woman in her luteal cycle phase and the other was transformed to the shape of a prototype face of an ovulatory woman. Participants were asked to choose the face which they perceived as being more attractive (attractiveness task), or the woman with whom they would have better chances to get a date (dating task). In both tasks, the ovulatory female was chosen more often. Testosterone was not predictive for the chosen face; regardless of testosterone level men preferred the ovulatory woman. However testosterone predicted how confident the men were with their choice. Men with lower testosterone levels were more confident with their choice than men with higher testosterone levels. PMID:24975650

Bobst, Cora; Lobmaier, Janek S

2014-08-01

372

Probability of heterosexual transmission of HIV: relationship to the number of unprotected sexual contacts. European Study Group in Heterosexual Transmission of HIV.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the number of unprotected heterosexual contacts with an HIV-infected person and the probability of HIV transmission. Data from a European study involving 563 heterosexual partners of HIV-infected subjects were analyzed. The number of unprotected contacts could be estimated for 525 couples (377 with male index case, 148 with female index case) from the reported frequency of unprotected contacts and an estimate of the length of the period during which transmission could have occurred. Nonparametric (isotonic regression) and parametric (Bernoulli model) analyses were performed on data at study entry and on follow-up data (121 couples). The nonparametric analysis resulted in several exposure groups, with the proportion of infected partners increasing with the number of contacts. For example, the percentage of female partners infected ranged from 10%, among those with < 10 unprotected contacts with an infected male, to 23% after 2,000 unprotected contacts. The parametric estimates of (assumed constant) per-contact infectivity were higher for male-to-female than for female-to-male transmission, but not significantly so. However, in comparison with nonparametric estimates, the model assuming constant infectivity appears to seriously underestimate the risk after very few contacts and to seriously overestimate the risk associated with a large number of contacts. Our results suggest that the association between the number of unprotected sexual contacts and the probability of infection is weak and highly inconsistent with constant per-contact infectivity. Probable explanations for these findings include large variability in infectivity between couples and within individuals over time. Estimates based on partner study data under the hypothesis of constant infectivity can, therefore, be highly misleading at a public health level, particularly when extrapolated to multiple casual contacts. PMID:8601226

Downs, A M; De Vincenzi, I

1996-04-01

373

Healthy Eating for Men  

MedlinePLUS

... of potassium from fruits, vegetables, fish and milk. Energy Foods Since men have more muscle and are ... 000 to 2,800 calories per day. Your energy needs depend on your height, weight and activity ...

374

HPV and Men  

MedlinePLUS

... HPV. Because HPV is so common and usually invisible, the only sure way to prevent it is ... Treatment Vaccine Monitoring Archive HPV & Men Fact Sheet Web Cast: HPV and Cervical Cancer - 2005 STDs Home ...

375

For Men Only  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Central Piedmont Community College has developed a course designed to help men take an objective look at themselves and their circumstances, develop an awareness of alternate points of view, and learn processes for goal setting and lifestyle planning. (DC)

Kirkman, A. Victor, Jr.

1977-01-01

376

The Relationship Between Hegemonic Norms of Masculinity and Men's Conceptualization of Sexually Coercive Acts by Women in South Africa.  

PubMed

While sexual abuse against women and girls in South Africa has generated much deserved attention, the awareness of men's experiences of sexual coercion is limited, and often restricted to a homosexual context. This article illuminates men's experiences of pressurized sex in a heterosexual context, which were revealed in a broader men's sexual health study. Fifty sexual history narrative interviews were conducted with men purposively sampled from three age categories: (18-24, 25-54, and 55+), a wide range of cultural and racial backgrounds, and in urban and rural sites across five provinces in South Africa. Narrative interviews began with accounts of early knowledge of sex and sexual experimentation and explored the range of sexual relationships and experiences through adulthood. The narratives privileged the diversity of men's conceptualizations of and the impact of reportedly sexually coercive experiences by women. Many men described feeling unready for their first sexual experiences but pressured to do so by their peers and female partners, who were often older. There were also some instances of sexual coercion by women against men, some of which would constitute a criminal offense in South Africa. Due to the pressure for men to always be responsive to women's sexual desires, these experiences were often not framed as sexual coercion. Nevertheless, for many of these men, such experiences were uncomfortable and unrewarding. Men's negative responses to such experiences appeared to be linked to the fact that they did not fit social stereotypes of masculine sexuality as being initiative and dominant. Such coercive experiences could influence men's sexual risk-taking, including their use of sexual coercion against women. Research on sexual abuse should not be limited to male against male sexual abuse, but needs to explore the meanings and experiences associated with reported coercion against men by women to more comprehensively prevent and respond to sexual violence. PMID:24928253

Stern, Erin; Cooper, Diane; Greenbaum, Bryant

2015-03-01

377

The Experience of Living Kidney Donors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the experiences, feelings, and ideas of living kidney donors. Using a phenomenological, qualitative research approach, the authors interviewed 12 purposefully selected living kidney donors (eight men and four women), who were between four and 29 years since donation. Interviews were audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim, and…

Brown, Judith Belle; Karley, Mary Lou; Boudville, Neil; Bullas, Ruth; Garg, Amit X.; Muirhead, Norman

2008-01-01

378

Fournier's Gangrene in a Heterosexual Man: A Complication of Neisseria meningitidis Urethritis  

PubMed Central

A 55-year-old heterosexual male presented to the emergency department with a symptomatology consistent with urethritis and Fournier's gangrene. Urethral swab and operative tissue cultures were positive for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and an intracellular Gram-negative diplococcus. The latter was initially thought to be Neisseria gonorrhea; however, DNA sequencing technique confirmed it to be Neisseria meningitidis. The patient required three separate surgical debridements to control widespread necrotizing infection. Following documentation of sterile wound healing with appropriate antibiotics, four reconstructive surgeries were necessary to manage the resultant wound defects. To our knowledge, Neisseria meningitidis as a causative organism in Fournier's gangrene has not been reported in the literature. PMID:23304623

Porshinsky, Brian S.; Patel, Abhishek P.; McClung, Christopher D.

2012-01-01

379

Partner selection among Latino immigrant men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

This qualitative study explored partner selection in a sample of immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). In-depth interviews were conducted with men living in the greater New York metropolitan area who had been born in Brazil (n = 10), Colombia (n = 14), or the Dominican Republic (n = 9). One focus group was conducted with MSM from each of the three countries (9 Brazilian, 11 Colombian, and 5 Dominican participants). A grounded theory approach revealed three main themes relating to partner selection. The first concerned stereotypes of how Latino and Anglo-American men tend to behave in their sexual encounters and relationships. The participants perceived Latinos to be more affectionate and passionate, whereas they saw Anglo-American men as more independent and practical. These cultural discrepancies sometimes resulted in a preference for Latino partners. A second theme concerned stereotypes of the national groups, including expectations that Brazilians would be sexy and sensual and that Dominicans would have large penises. As found in other research on MSM of color, ethnic and national stereotypes were associated with experiences of sexual objectification. The third theme addressed the importance of masculine characteristics in sexual attraction and partner selection. Negative feelings towards effeminate men who did not conform to normative male physical or behavioral presentation reflect a stigma found inside and outside of the gay community. These findings suggest that gender and ethnic stereotypes play an important role in shaping partner choice and have implications for sexual risk and relationship formation. PMID:19688592

Bianchi, Fernanda T; Shedlin, Michele G; Brooks, Kelly D; Montes Penha, Marcelo; Reisen, Carol A; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Poppen, Paul J

2010-12-01

380

Partner Selection among Latino Immigrant Men Who Have Sex with Men  

PubMed Central

This qualitative study explored partner selection in a sample of immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). In-depth interviews were conducted with men living in the greater New York metropolitan area who had been born in Brazil (n = 10), Colombia (n = 14), or the Dominican Republic (n = 9). One focus group was conducted with MSM from each of the three countries (9 Brazilian, 11 Colombian, and 5 Dominican participants). A grounded theory approach revealed three main themes relating to partner selection. The first concerned stereotypes of how Latino and Anglo-American men tend to behave in their sexual encounters and relationships. The participants perceived Latinos to be more affectionate and passionate, whereas they saw Anglo-American men as more independent and practical. These cultural discrepancies sometimes resulted in a preference for Latino partners. A second theme concerned stereotypes of the national groups, including expectations that Brazilians would be sexy and sensual and that Dominicans would have large penises. As found in other research on MSM of color, ethnic and national stereotypes were associated with experiences of sexual objectification. The third theme addressed the importance of masculine characteristics in sexual attraction and partner selection. Negative feelings towards effeminate men who did not conform to normative male physical or behavioral presentation reflect a stigma found inside and outside of the gay community. These findings suggest that gender and ethnic stereotypes play an important role in shaping partner choice and have implications for sexual risk and relationship formation. PMID:19688592

Shedlin, Michele G.; Brooks, Kelly D.; Penha, Marcelo Montes; Reisen, Carol A.; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Poppen, Paul J.

2010-01-01

381

Health Information Needs of Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To understand the views of men and service providers concerning the health information needs of men. Design: A men's health programme was implemented aimed at developing new health information resources designed for use by local organizations with men in socially disadvantaged groups. Research was carried out at the scoping stage…

Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve

2014-01-01

382

Setting the scene: locations for meeting sex partners among behaviorally bisexual men in Vientiane, Laos, and opportunities for health promotion.  

PubMed

Behaviorally bisexual men (BBM) in Vientiane, Laos report high-risk sexual behaviors. We explore settings for meeting sex partners and associated risk behaviors among BBM in Laos. BBM and their sexual partners were recruited in Vientiane Capital using modified snowball sampling (2010). Settings for usually meeting sex partners and associations with risk behaviors were assessed. Among 88 BBM, the most common settings for men meeting male, kathoey, and female sex partners were private residences (48%, 37%, 51%, respectively) and hospitality settings (39%, 31%, 40%, respectively). Hospitality settings were more commonly reported by heterosexual-identifying BBM, and private residences more commonly reported by bisexual/homosexual-identifying BBM. Inconsistent condom use was high across partners and settings. Meeting partners in hospitality settings was associated with reporting a high number of female sex partners and frequently drinking alcohol before sex. Our results suggest that targeted health promotion initiatives in bars, clubs, and beer-shops could reach a high proportion of high-risk bisexual men, particularly heterosexual-identifying BBM. PMID:25490734

Bowring, Anna L; van Gemert, Caroline; Vongsaiya, Kongchay; Hughes, Chad; Sihavong, Amphoy; Phimphachanh, Chansy; Chanlivong, Niramonh; Agius, Paul A; Toole, Mike; Hellard, Margaret

2014-12-01

383

Sexual behaviour of young and middle aged men in England and Wales.  

PubMed Central

Establishing patterns of sexual behaviour is essential in predicting the future spread of HIV. The sexual behaviour patterns of a randomly selected sample of 480 white men aged 15 to 49 were obtained by interview and analysed in relation to age, social class, and area of residence. Over half of the men had first had intercourse before the age of 18 and over three quarters had done so before the age of 20. Age at first intercourse tended to be lower in more recent birth cohorts and in social classes III, IV, and V. Men in earlier birth cohorts tended to have had fewer heterosexual partners, both regular and casual, than those born more recently, but there were no social class or regional differences in the number of partners. Eight of the 480 men (1.7%, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.3%) stated that they had had homosexual intercourse, four of whom had had one casual homosexual partner. Only one man had had more than 25 homosexual partners. The number of men having had homosexual intercourse was lower than is widely thought. When possible, data were checked with national data or other surveys and thought to be accurate. The difficulties in collecting data of this nature are discussed. PMID:2500166

Forman, D.; Chilvers, C.

1989-01-01

384

Assisted reproduction in a cohort of same-sex male couples and single men.  

PubMed

To date, there is limited published data on same-sex male couples and single men using assisted reproduction treatment to build their families. The objective of this retrospective study was to better understand treatment considerations and outcomes for this population when using assisted reproduction treatment. A total of 37 same-sex male couples and eight single men (seven homosexual and one heterosexual) who attended the CReATe Fertility Centre for assisted reproduction services were studied. There was a 21-fold increase in the number of same-sex male couples and single men undergoing assisted reproduction treatment since 2003. The mean age was 46years (24-58). Twenty-eight couples (76%) chose to use spermatozoa from both partners to fertilize their donated oocytes. Most men (32 same-sex male couples and seven single men; 87%) obtained oocytes from an anonymous donor, whereas five couples and one single man (13%) had a known donor. Anonymous donors who were open to be contacted by the child after the age of 18 were selected by 67% of patients. Of all 25 deliveries, eight (32%) were sets of twins. All of the twins were half genetic siblings. PMID:23768615

Grover, Stephanie A; Shmorgun, Ziva; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Baratz, Ari; Librach, Clifford L

2013-08-01

385

Predictors of Bisexual Behaviour among MSM Attending Intervention Sites May Help in Prevention Interventions for This Bridge to the Heterosexual Epidemic in India: Data from HIV Sentinel Surveillance  

PubMed Central

Background Indian cultural tradition demanding marriage, many MSM howsoever they self-identify are likely to be married or have sex with women. To consolidate India's HIV prevention gains, it is important to understand and address the interaction between the MSM and heterosexual epidemics in India and create specific interventions for bisexual MSM. The challenge is to identify and intervene this hard to reach population. Data from HIV Sentinel Surveillance 2011 among MSM in four Indian states were analyzed to assess predictors and prevalence of bisexual behaviour in MSM. Methods Between March-May 2011, 4682 men (15–49 years) who had anal/oral sex with a male partner in the past month, attending intervention sites and consenting for an un-linked anonymous survey answered an 11- item questionnaire and provided blood for HIV test by finger stick at 19 designated surveillance sites. Results Of 4682 MSM tested overall, 5% were illiterate, 51% reported only receptive anal intercourse, 21% only penetrative and 28% both. 36% MSM had ever received money for sex. Overall 6.8% were HIV infected. 44% MSM were bisexual in the last six months. On multivariate analysis, ‘being bisexual’ was found to be independently associated with ‘older age’: 26–30 years [AOR?=?3.1, 95% CI(2.7, 3.7)], >30 years [AOR?=?6.5, 95% CI(5.5, 7.7)]; ‘reporting penetrative behaviour alone’ with other men [AOR?=?5.8, 95% CI(4.8, 7.0), p<0.01] and ‘reporting both penetrative and receptive behaviour’ [AOR?=?2.7, 95% CI(2.3, 3.1) p<0.01]. Those who both paid and received money for sex [AOR?=?0.49, 95% CI (0.38, 0.62)] were significantly less likely to be bisexual. Conclusions A substantial proportion of men receiving services from Targeted Intervention programs are bisexual and the easy opportunity for intervention in this setting should be capitalised upon. Focusing on older MSM, as well as MSM who show penetrative behaviour with other men, could help in reaching this population. PMID:25211511

Godbole, Sheela; Sane, Suvarna; Kamble, Pranil; Raj, Yujwal; Dulhani, Nisha; Venkatesh, Srinivasan; Reddy, D. C. S.; Chavan, Laxmikant; Bhattacharya, Madhulekha; Bindoria, Suchitra; Kadam, Dilip; Thakur, Savita; Narwani, Prakash; Pereira, Elmira; Paranjape, Ramesh; Risbud, Arun

2014-01-01

386

Children Raised in Fatherless Families from Infancy: A Follow-Up of Children of Lesbian and Single Heterosexual Mothers at Early Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: An increasing number of lesbian women and single heterosexual women are bringing up children with no male involvement. This study follows up to adolescence a sample of children raised in fatherless families from birth or early infancy. Methods: Twenty-five lesbian mother families and 38 families headed by a single heterosexual mother…

MacCallum, Fiona; Golombok, Susan

2004-01-01

387

Money, Housework, Sex, and Conflict: Same-Sex Couples in Civil Unions, Those Not in Civil Unions, and Heterosexual Married Siblings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we examined the division of finances, the division of household tasks, relationship maintenance behaviors, sexual activity, monogamy, and conflict among same-sex couples who had had civil unions in Vermont, same-sex couples who had not had civil unions recruited from their friendship circles, and married heterosexual couples recruited from among their siblings. Married heterosexuals had a more traditional,

Sondra E. Solomon; Esther D. Rothblum; Kimberly F. Balsam

2005-01-01

388

The Preliminary Findings of a Study Exploring the Perceptions of a Sample of Young Heterosexual Males regarding HIV Prevention Education Programming in Nova Scotia, Canada  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the increasing numbers of young Canadian females becoming infected with HIV through heterosexual transmission with an infected male sexual partner, the majority of current HIV prevention programs and services in Canada continue to ignore the needs of young heterosexual males. This research is derived from 30 in-depth interviews, 9 focus…

Gahagan, Jacqueline; Rehman, Laurene; Barbour, Laura; McWilliam, Susan

2007-01-01

389

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... but they don't need full-time nursing care. Some assisted living facilities are part of retirement ... change. Assisted living costs less than nursing home care. It is still fairly expensive. Older people or ...

390

Assisted Living  

MedlinePLUS

... Chat Assisted Living Assisted living facilities offer a housing alternative for older adults who may need help ... part of a retirement community, nursing home, senior housing complex, or may stand-alone. Licensing requirements for ...

391

Living Terror  

Microsoft Academic Search

Living organisms move. They act. Their actions may be inimical to man's best interests. They inspire fear, dread, even terror. From time immemorial, humans have viewed with alarm, nay, with horror, the evil that lurks inside living consciousness.

Merlin X. Houdini

1977-01-01

392

Living Donation  

MedlinePLUS

... donors and transplant candidates Paired donation or paired exchange involves two pairs of living kidney donors and ... trans- plants are made possible. This type of exchange often involves multiple living kidney donor/transplant candidate ...

393

Lively Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Maintaining living things in a classroom requires knowledge and preparation. It also requires the proper equipment and space. There are two primary goals in the study of living things: first, we want our students to respect life, and second, we want them to appreciate its complexity in nature. Observing healthy living things in school accomplishes both goals. This chapter describes the appropriate precautions that should be taken into consideration when bringing living organisms into classrooms.

Texley, Juliana; Kwan, Terry

2002-01-01

394

Relationship Between Trauma and High Risk Behavior among HIV Positive Men Who Don’t have Sex with Men (MDSM)  

PubMed Central

The incidence of heterosexual HIV transmission continues to increase in the US. However, little is known about factors that influence high-risk behavior among men who do not have sex with men (MDSM). This study examines the association of childhood sexual abuse and high-risk behaviors among MDSM. The Coping with HIV/AIDS in the Southeast (CHASE) study included 611 HIV-positive individuals in the Southeastern U.S. Bivariate statistics were used to examine the influence of childhood sexual abuse among MDSM, MSM, and women. Study findings indicated that among MDSM with HIV, childhood sexual abuse predicted a higher number of sexual partners, alcohol and drug use problems, depression, PTSD, and less trust in medical providers. Similar statistically significant relationships between childhood sexual abuse and negative outcomes were not found for MSM and women with the exception of childhood sexual abuse predicting PTSD and alcohol use in women. Study findings indicate a need for more in-depth research to examine the role of childhood sexual abuse in shaping adult risk behaviors among MDSM as well as a need to assess for and address childhood sexual abuse in this population. PMID:22909318

Whetten, Kathryn; Reif, Susan; Toth, Matthew; Jain, Erica; Leserman, Jane; Pence, Brian W.

2012-01-01

395

A description of common mental disorders in men who have sex with men (MSM) referred for assessment and intervention at an MSM clinic in Cape Town, South Africa.  

PubMed

Men who have sex with men (MSM) have a higher prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD), as compared with heterosexual men. HIV infection is independently associated with higher rates of CMD. Given this context, and the high background community prevalence of HIV in South Africa, MSM are at even greater risk of developing CMD. The aim of this research was to investigate neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders in MSM who were referred for assessment and management of mental health problems, in an MSM Clinic in urban Cape Town, South Africa. Twenty-five men were screened using the MINI, AUDIT, DUDIT, and IPDE Screener. Depression, suicidality, as well as alcohol and drug use disorders were highly prevalent in this group (44, 56, 48, and 56 % respectively). The personality disorder screening was suggestive of a high prevalence of personality disorders. The high prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders in this sample supports the idea that integrated mental health services are needed to address the complex needs of this population. Adequate input into the mental health needs of this population could reduce the potential for HIV acquisition and transmission, improve adherence to treatment and care, and ensure the provision a comprehensive health service for MSM. PMID:23532397

Stoloff, Kevin; Joska, John A; Feast, Dorothy; De Swardt, Glenn; Hugo, Johan; Struthers, Helen; McIntyre, James; Rebe, Kevin

2013-05-01

396

Enhanced heterosexual transmission hypothesis for the origin of pandemic HIV-1.  

PubMed

HIV-1 M originated from SIVcpz endemic in chimpanzees from southeast Cameroon or neighboring areas, and it started to spread in the early 20th century. Here we examine the factors that may have contributed to simian-to-human transmission, local transmission between humans, and export to a city. The region had intense ape hunting, social disruption, commercial sex work, STDs, and traffic to/from Kinshasa in the period 1899-1923. Injection treatments increased sharply around 1930; however, their frequency among local patients was far lower than among modern groups experiencing parenteral HIV-1 outbreaks. Recent molecular datings of HIV-1 M fit better the period of maximal resource exploitation and trade links than the period of high injection intensity. We conclude that although local parenteral outbreaks might have occurred, these are unlikely to have caused massive transmission. World War I led to additional, and hitherto unrecognized, risks of HIV-1 emergence. We propose an Enhanced Heterosexual Transmission Hypothesis for the origin of HIV-1 M, featuring at the time and place of its origin a coincidence of favorable co-factors (ape hunting, social disruption, STDs, and mobility) for both cross-species transmission and heterosexual spread. Our hypothesis does not exclude a role for parenteral transmission in the initial viral adaptation. PMID:23202448

de Sousa, João Dinis; Alvarez, Carolina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Müller, Viktor

2012-10-01

397

A HIV-1 heterosexual transmission chain in Guangzhou, China: a molecular epidemiological study  

PubMed Central

Background We conducted molecular analyses to confirm four clustering HIV-1 infections (Patient A, B, C & D) in Guangzhou, China. These cases were identified by epidemiological investigation and suspected to acquire the infection through a common heterosexual transmission chain. Methods Env C2V3V4 region, gag p17/p24 junction and partial pol gene of HIV-1 genome from serum specimens of these infected cases were amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nucleotide sequenced. Results Phylogenetic analyses indicated that their viral nucleotide sequences were significantly clustered together (bootstrap value is 99%, 98% and 100% in env, gag and pol tree respectively). Evolutionary distance analysis indicated that their genetic diversities of env, gag and pol genes were significantly lower than non-clustered controls, as measured by unpaired t-test (env gene comparison: p < 0.005; gag gene comparison: p < 0.005; pol gene comparison: p < 0.005). Conclusion Epidemiological results and molecular analyses consistently illustrated these four cases represented a transmission chain which dispersed in the locality through heterosexual contact involving commercial sex worker. PMID:19778458

Han, Zhigang; Leung, Tommy WC; Zhao, Jinkou; Wang, Ming; Fan, Lirui; Li, Kai; Pang, Xinli; Liang, Zhenbo; Lim, Wilina WL; Xu, Huifang

2009-01-01

398

Ecological models of sexual satisfaction among lesbian/bisexual and heterosexual women.  

PubMed

Sexual satisfaction is an integral component of sexual health and well-being, yet we know little about which factors contribute to it among lesbian/bisexual women. To examine a proposed ecological model of sexual satisfaction, we conducted an internet survey of married heterosexual women and lesbian/bisexual women in committed same-sex relationships. Structural equation modeling included five final latent variables for heterosexual women and seven final latent variables for lesbian/bisexual women. Overall, results indicated that, for both groups of women, a similar constellation of factors (depressive symptoms, relationship satisfaction, sexual functioning, and social support) was related to sexual satisfaction. In lesbian/bisexual women, internalized homophobia was an additional factor. Contrary to expectations, the presence of children in the home and a history of childhood sexual abuse did not contribute significantly to the model for either group. Findings support the idea that gender socialization may influence sexual satisfaction more than socialization around sexual orientation. Additionally, given that for both groups of women relationship satisfaction explained a substantial amount of variance in sexual satisfaction, sexual concerns may be better addressed at the relationship than the individual level. PMID:18574685

Henderson, Alison W; Lehavot, Keren; Simoni, Jane M

2009-02-01

399

Limited evidence of HCV transmission in stable heterosexual couples from Bahia, Brazil.  

PubMed

HCV infected patients frequently ask their physician about the risk of transmission to their partners. Although it is easy to answer that the risk does exist, it is difficult to quantify. We studied the transmission of HCV infection in stable heterosexual couples: anti-HCV positive patients in hemodialytic therapy and their partners. Thirty-four couples were tested by third generation ELISA and RIBA. Blood samples of anti-HCV positive patients were evaluated by RT-PCR and detected sequences were genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Concordance of infection was observed in only one couple in which both subjects were in dialytic therapy. One other partner had two positive ELISA tests and an indeterminate RIBA, with negative RT-PCR, which may suggest a false positive or a previous resolved infection. Either sexual relations, sharing of personal items and history of parenteral exposure (hemodialysis, blood transfusion) could explain transmission in the only couple with concordant infection. We observed, in accordance with previous reports, that this risk is minimal or negligible in stable heterosexual couples. PMID:20231987

Bessa, Márcia; Rodart, Itatiana Ferreira; Menezes, Gisele Barreto Lopes; Carmo, Theomira Mauadi de Azevedo; Athanazio, Daniel A; Reis, Mitermayer G

2009-08-01

400

Lifetime Victimization and Physical Health Outcomes among Lesbian and Heterosexual Women  

PubMed Central

Background Lifetime victimization experiences, including child sexual abuse (CSA), child physical abuse (CPA), adult sexual assault (ASA), and adult physical assault (APA), are associated with health problems. Purpose To examine relationships between cumulative victimization and physical health among heterosexual and lesbian women and determine whether these relationships differ by sexual identity. Methods Large samples of heterosexual (n?=?482) and lesbian women (n?=?394) were interviewed. Questions included lifetime victimization experiences and physical health problems. Results Compared to women who reported no childhood victimization, those who reported experiencing both CSA and CPA were 44% more likely to report health problems and women who experienced all four types of victimization (CSA, CPA, APA, ASA) were nearly 240% as likely to report physical health problems. Interaction analyses revealed the association between victimization and physical health did not differ by sexual identity. Conclusions Although lesbians were more likely to report all types of victimization, results suggest that victimization conferred increased physical health risks regardless of sexual identity. PMID:25068978

Andersen, Judith P.; Hughes, Tonda L.; Zou, Christopher; Wilsnack, Sharon C.

2014-01-01

401

The quest for intimate\\/sexual citizenship: lived experiences of lesbian and bisexual Muslim women  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, the concept of ‘citizenship’ has increasingly been subjected to critique for its ‘heterosexist’ underpinnings.\\u000a Indeed, in the case of non-heterosexual Muslims in Europe—particularly women—their quest for legal and cultural citizenship\\u000a is inextricably linked to that for intimate\\/sexual citizenship. This paper draws upon a qualitative research project exploring\\u000a the lived experiences of British lesbian and bisexual Muslim women,

Andrew Kam-Tuck Yip

2008-01-01

402

Pakistani and Bangladeshi Young Men: Re-Racialization, Class and Masculinity within the Neo-Liberal School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores Pakistani and Bangladeshi young men's experiences of schooling to examine what inclusion/exclusion means to them. Qualitative research was undertaken with 48 Pakistani and Bangladeshi young men living in areas of the West Midlands, England. The young men highlighted three key areas: the emergence of a schooling regime…

Mac an Ghaill, Mairtin; Haywood, Chris

2014-01-01

403

FROM BIAS TO BISEXUAL HEALTH DISPARITIES: ATTITUDES TOWARD BISEXUAL MEN AND WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES  

PubMed Central

PUROPSE A newly emergent literature suggest that bisexual men and women face profound health disparities in comparison to both heterosexual and homosexual individuals. Additionally, bisexual individuals often experience prejudice, stigma, and discrimination from both gay/lesbian and straight communities, termed “biphobia.” However, only limited research exists that empirically tests the extent and predictors of this double discrimination. The Bisexualities: Indiana Attitudes Survey (BIAS) was developed to test associations between biphobia and sexual identity. METHODS Using standard techniques, we developed and administered a scale to a purposive online sample of adults from a wide range of social networking websites. We conducted exploratory factor analysis to refine scales assessing attitudes toward bisexual men and bisexual women, respectively. Using generalized linear modeling, we assessed relationships between BIAS scores and sexual identity, adjusting for covariates. RESULTS Two separately gendered scales were developed, administered, and refined: BIAS-m (n=645), focusing on attitudes toward bisexual men; and BIAS-f (n=631), focusing on attitudes toward bisexual women. Across scales, sexual identity significantly predicted response variance. Lesbian/gay respondents had lower levels of bi-negative attitudes than their heterosexual counterparts (all p-values <.05); bisexual respondents had lower levels of bi-negative attitudes than their straight counterparts (all p-values <.001); and bisexual respondents had lower levels of bi-negative attitudes than their lesbian/gay counterparts (all p-values <.05). Within racial/ethnic minority respondents, biracial/multiracial status was associated with lower bi-negativity scores (all p-values <.05). CONCLUSION This study provides important quantitative support for theories related to biphobia and double discrimination. Our findings provide strong evidence for understanding how stereotypes and stigma may lead to dramatic disparities in depression, anxiety, stress, and other health outcomes among bisexual individuals in comparison to their heterosexual and homosexual counterparts. Our results yield valuable data for informing social awareness and intervention efforts that aim to decrease bi-negative attitudes within both straight and gay/lesbian communities, with the ultimate goal of alleviating health disparities among bisexual men and women. PMID:25568885

Friedman, M. Reuel; Dodge, Brian; Schick, Vanessa; Herbenick, Debby; Hubach, Randolph; Bowling, Jessamyn; Goncalves, Gabriel; Krier, Sarah; Reece, Michael

2014-01-01

404

An examination of stress among Aboriginal women and men with diabetes in Manitoba, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, a series of focus groups were conducted to gain an understanding of the nature of stress among Canadian Aboriginal women and men living with diabetes. Specifically, attention was given to the meanings Aboriginal peoples with diabetes attach to their lived experiences of stress, and the major sources or causes of stress in their lives. The key common

Yoshi Iwasaki; Judith Bartlett; John O'neil

2004-01-01

405

Nest-Leaving Patterns and the Transition to Marriage for Young Men and Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Men and Young Women provide some support for hypotheses that independent living among young adults delays marriage, effects of nonfamily living are smaller for persons in group quarters than for others, living away has larger effects if done early in adulthood, and effects are stronger for women…

Goldscheider, Frances Kobrin; Waite, Linda J.

1987-01-01

406

The GAy MEn Sex StudieS: erectile dysfunction among Belgian gay men  

PubMed Central

Aim To determine the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in a sample of the Belgian men who have sex with men (MSM) population, and to assess the relevance of major predictors such as age, relationship, and education. We investigated the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors among Belgian MSM. Methods An internet-based survey on sexual behavior and sexual dysfunctions, called GAy MEn Sex StudieS (GAMESSS), was administered to MSM, aged 18 years or older, between the months of April and December 2008. The questionnaire used was a compilation of the Kinsey’s Heterosexual–Homosexual Rating Scale, Erection Quality Scale (EQS), and the shortened version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Results Of the 1752 participants, 45% indicated having some problems getting an erection. In this group of MSM, 71% reported mild ED; 22% mild to moderate ED; 6% moderate ED; and 2% severe ED. Independent predictors for the presence of ED were: age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, P < 0.0001), having a steady relationship (OR = 0.59, P < 0.0001), frequency of sex with their partner (OR = 1.22, P < 0.0001), versatile sex role (OR = 1.58, P = 0.016), passive sex role (OR = 3.12, P < 0.0001), problems with libido (OR = 1.15, P = 0.011), ejaculation problems (OR = 1.33, P < 0.0001), and anodyspareunia (OR = 0.87, P < 0.0001). Ten percent of the Belgian MSM used a PDE5 inhibitor (age 43 ± 11 years; mean ± standard deviation) and 83% of them were satisfied with the effects. “Street drugs” were used by 43% of MSM to improve ED. Conclusion Forty-five percent of participating Belgian MSM reported some degree of ED and 10% used a PDE5 inhibitor to improve erections. Older MSM reported more ED. MSM, who were in a steady relationship or frequently had sex with a partner, reported less ED. MSM with ejaculation problems indicated having more ED. PMID:23861591

Vansintejan, Johan; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

2013-01-01

407

Assessing the Applicability of E-Therapies for Depression, Anxiety, and Other Mood Disorders Among Lesbians and Gay Men: Analysis of 24 Web- and Mobile Phone-Based Self-Help Interventions  

PubMed Central

Background Lesbians and gay men have disproportionately high rates of depression and anxiety, and report lower satisfaction with treatments. In part, this may be because many health care options marginalize them by assuming heterosexuality, or misunderstand and fail to respond to the challenges specifically faced by these groups. E-therapies have particular potential to respond to the mental health needs of lesbians and gay men, but there is little research to determine whether they do so, or how they might be improved. Objective We sought to examine the applicability of existing mental health e-therapies for lesbians and gay men. Methods We reviewed 24 Web- and mobile phone-based e-therapies and assessed their performance in eight key areas, including the use of inclusive language and content and whether they addressed mental health stressors for lesbians and gay men, such as experiences of stigma related to their sexual orientation, coming out, and relationship issues that are specific to lesbians and gay men. Results We found that e-therapies seldom addressed these stressors. Furthermore, 58% (14/24) of therapies contained instances that assumed or suggested the user was heterosexual, with instances especially prevalent among better-evidenced programs. Conclusions Our findings, and a detailed review protocol presented in this article, may be used as guides for the future development of mental health e-therapies to better accommodate the needs of lesbians and gay men. PMID:24996000

Lyons, Anthony; Pitts, Marian; Mitchell, Anne; Christensen, Helen

2014-01-01

408

"I Don't Know Who to Blame": HIV-Positive South African Women Navigating Heterosexual Infection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women who become HIV infected through heterosexual transmission are faced with the task of making sense of how they became infected. This paper presents a qualitative analysis based on interviews with 35 HIV-positive South African Black women. A specific theme, that blame of a male partner was avoided or disavowed in interviews, is explored in…

Long, Carol

2009-01-01

409

"That's so Gay": Heterosexual Male Undergraduates and the Perpetuation of Sexual Orientation Microagressions on Campus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"That's so gay," a popular expression on campuses, is a sexual orientation microaggression that can contribute to a hostile environment for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students. Using data from a campus climate survey conducted at a large urban university, we investigated use of the phrase among heterosexual male undergraduates…

Woodford, Michael R.; Howell, Michael L.; Kulick, Alex; Silverschanz, Perry

2013-01-01

410

Commitment in Age-Gap Heterosexual Romantic Relationships: A Test of Evolutionary and Socio-Cultural Predictions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little research has addressed age-gap romantic relationships (romantic involvements characterized by substantial age differences between partners). Drawing on evolutionary and socio-cultural perspectives, the present study examined normative beliefs and commitment processes among heterosexual women involved in age-gap and age-concordant…

Lehmiller, Justin J.; Agnew, Christopher R.

2008-01-01

411

"Just Be Friends": Exposing the Limits of Educational Bully Discourses for Understanding Teen Girls' Heterosexualized Friendships and Conflicts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present paper explores the conceptual limitations of the bully discourses that ground UK anti-bullying policy frameworks and psychological research literatures on school bullying, suggesting they largely ignore gender, (hetero)sexuality and the social, cultural and subjective dynamics of conflict and aggression among teen-aged girls. To…

Ringrose, Jessica

2008-01-01

412

Men (and women) as "sellers" of sex in alcohol-serving venues in Cape Town, South Africa.  

PubMed

The relationship between transactional sex, HIV risk, and partner violence has been well documented in South Africa, but research has focused primarily on women and has not been conducted in high-risk social contexts. The aim of this study was to examine associations between transactional sex and HIV risk among women and men in alcohol-serving venues in Cape Town, South Africa. We surveyed 1,989 women and 2,468 men attending alcohol-serving venues in Cape Town, South Africa to assess transactional sex behavior (i.e., receiving money or goods in exchange for sex), alcohol and drug use, history of childhood abuse, current relationship violence, and sexual risk behaviors. Among both women and men, trading sex was related to higher alcohol use, greater likelihood of drug use, substance use in sexual contexts, and a greater likelihood of experiencing physical and sexual violence. Compared to other women, women who traded sex reported a greater proportion of condom-unprotected sex; this relationship was not found for men. Analyses showed that men were almost twice as more likely to report trading sex for items, including money or alcohol, than women (9.7 vs. 5.8 %). Overall, men who traded sex were similar to their female counterparts. Similar associations between trading sex and different risk behaviors were found among women and men with limited economic means and substance use problems. Future research should more closely study transactional sex in high-risk venues as it relates to violence and should examine men who trade sex as a potential bridge population between heterosexual women and men who have sex with men. PMID:23494405

Pitpitan, Eileen V; Kalichman, Seth C; Eaton, Lisa A; Watt, Melissa H; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Skinner, Donald; Pieterse, Desiree; Cain, Demetria

2014-06-01

413

2012 PROSPECTUS2012 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S SOCCERWESLEYAN MEN'S SOCCER  

E-print Network

2012 PROSPECTUS2012 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S SOCCERWESLEYAN MEN'S SOCCER #12;Director of Athletics............Michael) President...............................Michael S. Roth '78 Director of Athletics............Michael Whalen info. phone...............(860) 685-2887 men's soccer InformatIon Home field (grass)...............Jackson

Devoto, Stephen H.

414

Men's Health and Spina Bifida  

MedlinePLUS

... Men's Health Info Sheet here Urologic and Sexual Function Why is bladder control important for sexual activity? ... contact with you. For men with SB, bladder function is inseparable from sexual function. Some of the ...

415

Men who report recent male and female sex partners in Cape Town, South Africa: an understudied and underserved population.  

PubMed

The HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa has largely focused on the needs of heterosexual men and women. However, little is known about the sexual risk histories of men who have sex with both men and women (MSMW). Furthermore, we know very little about the psychosocial health needs or of the possibility of a syndemic (numerous interrelated epidemics) among MSMW. We surveyed 1,203 men attending drinking establishments in a township located in Cape Town, South Africa. We compared the behaviors and experiences of MSMW to men reporting only having sex with women (MSW). Twelve percent of the sample reported having sex with both men and women in the past 4 months. MSMW were twice as likely as MSW to report being HIV positive (10.5 vs. 4.6 %). MSW were more likely to be married than MSMW but reported similar numbers of female sex partners. MSMW were more likely to report a history of childhood sexual abuse, recent experienced and perpetrated physical and sexual partner violence, both receiving and giving sex for money, drugs, or shelter, and a recent STI. These factors were found to be interrelated among MSW but not MSMW. Although MSMW demonstrate considerable risk taking and report higher rates of HIV infection than MSW, their needs are largely unmet and underemphasized. Findings suggest the need to better understand factors contributing to sexual risk taking among MSMW. HIV prevention interventions should consider psychosocial health problems unique to MSMW residing in South African townships. PMID:23519592

Eaton, Lisa A; Pitpitan, Eileen V; Kalichman, Seth C; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Skinner, Donald; Watt, Melissa H; Pieterse, Desiree

2013-10-01

416

Evaluation of heterosexual partners, children, and household contacts of adults with AIDS  

SciTech Connect

Forty-five adults with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their 45 spouses, 109 children, and 29 household contacts were studied for evidence of heterosexual, perinatal, and household spread of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) infection. Of the 45 spouses enrolled, 26 (58%) had antibody to HTLV-III, including 12 (71%) of 17 male spouses and 14 (50%) of 28 female spouses. Of the 12 seropositive male spouses, nine were seropositive at enrollment and three had seroconversion. Of the 14 seropositive female spouses, four were seropositive at enrollment and ten seroconverted. Lack of barrier contraceptive use and oral sex were associated with seroconversion. Of the 109 children enrolled, 15 had AIDS or an AIDS-related illness, two had evidence of passive transfer of maternal antibodies, and two had HTLV-III infection acquired outside the household. None of the 90 seronegative children seroconverted. Of 29 household contacts studied, nondeveloped antibody to HTLV-III.

Fischl, M.A.; Dickinson, G.M.; Scott, G.B.; Klimas, N.; Fletcher, M.A.; Parks, W.

1987-02-06

417

An ongoing outbreak of heterosexually-acquired syphilis across Teesside, UK.  

PubMed

Prior to 2006, diagnoses of heterosexually acquired syphilis were rare in Teesside (an area in the north east of England, UK). Since 2006, there has been an increase in such cases, with 24 cases diagnosed in 2006 and 22 in 2007. There was a marked reduction in cases in 2008 with six cases reported, but a large increase in diagnoses in 2009 (34 cases). There have been 14 cases to date in 2010. Of concern is the increase noted in women and younger age groups. Geographical mapping of cases shows a wide dispersion across Teesside although some clusters were identified, mostly in areas of high deprivation. Little detailed information is available to help identify social and sexual networks widely and target intervention. A multiagency outbreak control team is addressing this problem, based on the principles of partner notification, increased awareness, increased screening and health promotion activities. A range of measures, including a detailed communications plan, have been implemented. PMID:21890548

Acheson, P; McGivern, M; Frank, P; Kunonga, E; Simms, I; Tayal, S; Thody, E; Waldram, A; Kibirige, J

2011-09-01

418

Preadoptive factors predicting lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples' relationship quality across the transition to adoptive parenthood.  

PubMed

The authors examined preadoptive factors as predictors of relationship quality (love, ambivalence, and conflict) among 125 couples (44 lesbian couples, 30 gay male couples, and 51 heterosexual couples) across the 1st year of adoptive parenthood. On average, all new parents experienced declines in their relationship quality across the 1st year of parenthood regardless of sexual orientation, with women experiencing steeper declines in love. Parents who, preadoption, reported higher levels of depression, greater use of avoidant coping, lower levels of relationship maintenance behaviors, and less satisfaction with their adoption agencies reported lower relationship quality at the time of the adoption. The effect of avoidant coping on relationship quality varied by gender. Parents who, preadoption, reported higher levels of depression, greater use of confrontative coping, and higher levels of relationship maintenance behaviors reported greater declines in relationship quality. These findings have implications for professionals who work with adoptive parents both pre- and postadoption. PMID:20545395

Goldberg, Abbie E; Smith, Julianna Z; Kashy, Deborah A

2010-06-01

419

Specific Aspects of Minority Stress Associated With Depression Among LDS Affiliated Non-Heterosexual Adults.  

PubMed

A nation-wide sample of 634 previous or current members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS), non-heterosexual adults (ages 18-33), were surveyed to examine how specific aspects of minority stress are individually and collectively associated with depression, and how such associations differ across sex, sexual orientation, and level of affiliation with the LDS church. When five stressors were examined simultaneously, need for others' acceptance (NA) was the strongest predictor of depression, followed by internalized homophobia (IH). All minority stress factors were found to be individually predictive of depression and did not differ across sex or sexual orientation subgroups. Differences were observed, however, when considering current LDS status, such that participants who were no longer affiliated with the LDS church reported stronger relationships between some minority stressors and depression. Implications of religious identity salience as a potential mediator of relationships between specific stressors and depression are discussed. PMID:25257561

Crowell, Katherine A; Galliher, Renee V; Dehlin, John; Bradshaw, William S

2015-02-01

420

Exploring a Dutch paradox: an ethnographic investigation of gay men's mental health.  

PubMed

Despite the Netherlands' reputation as a world leader with respect to gay rights, homosexual Dutch men have much higher rates of mood disorders, anxiety disorders and suicide attempts than heterosexual Dutch men. Epidemiologists report similar disparities elsewhere in Western Europe and North America. These findings have been the focus of a blossoming psychological literature, inspired by minority stress theory and deploying quantitative methods. Our investigation aims to complement this body of work by adopting an ethnographic approach. Drawing from fieldwork conducted in the Netherlands from 2009 to 2010, we explore sociocultural and contextual factors that have received relatively little attention with respect to gay mental health. In the Netherlands - considered a model for gay equality - how can one understand high rates of psychiatric disorders among gay men? This study points to heteronormativity, complex dynamics involving long-term relationships and processes within gay subcultures as key issues. Notwithstanding their putative socioeconomic, legal and political equality, gay men struggled - at various stages of the life cycle - with internalised norms that they found difficult to fulfil. The desire to embody these ideals, and structural constraints in meeting them, could be potent sources of disappointment and distress. PMID:24236852

Aggarwal, Sanjay; Gerrets, Rene

2014-01-01

421

Adult attachment among partnered gay men: patterns and associations with sexual relationship quality.  

PubMed

Previous research has found secure adult attachment to be associated positively with dimensions of main partner relationship quality and negatively with sexual risk taking and sex with casual partners among heterosexuals in primary relationships. Potential associations between adult attachment and aspects of relationship functioning have received limited attention among gay men. Data were collected from both members of 344 gay male couples as part of a community survey (M age = 38.6, SD = 9.4). Participants completed a shortened version of the Adult Attachment Inventory (Collins & Read, 1990) and the Dyadic Sexual Communication Scale (Catania, 1998). They reported the frequency of sex with main partners and the number of casual male unprotected sex partners. Data were analyzed using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Securely attached individuals reported the highest levels of sexual communication and men with securely attached partners were the most likely to report having sex with their partners as least once per week. Avoidantly attached men reported significantly more casual unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) partners compared to other attachment styles. Having an avoidantly attached partner was also associated with an increase in the number of UAI partners reported. Attachment style is relevant to the sexual relationship quality and sexual safety of partnered gay men. Cognitive-interpersonal intervention approaches developed to target attachment-related cognitions and behaviors may be relevant to HIV prevention efforts in this population. PMID:24297659

Starks, Tyrel J; Parsons, Jeffrey T

2014-01-01

422

Cybersex addiction in heterosexual female users of internet pornography can be explained by gratification hypothesis.  

PubMed

In the context of Internet addiction, cybersex is considered to be an Internet application in which users are at risk for developing addictive usage behavior. Regarding males, experimental research has shown that indicators of sexual arousal and craving in response to Internet pornographic cues are related to severity of cybersex addiction in Internet pornography users (IPU). Since comparable investigations on females do not exist, the aim of this study is to investigate predictors of cybersex addiction in heterosexual women. We examined 51 female IPU and 51 female non-Internet pornography users (NIPU). Using questionnaires, we assessed the severity of cybersex addiction in general, as well as propensity for sexual excitation, general problematic sexual behavior, and severity of psychological symptoms. Additionally, an experimental paradigm, including a subjective arousal rating of 100 pornographic pictures, as well as indicators of craving, was conducted. Results indicated that IPU rated pornographic pictures as more arousing and reported greater craving due to pornographic picture presentation compared with NIPU. Moreover, craving, sexual arousal rating of pictures, sensitivity to sexual excitation, problematic sexual behavior, and severity of psychological symptoms predicted tendencies toward cybersex addiction in IPU. Being in a relationship, number of sexual contacts, satisfaction with sexual contacts, and use of interactive cybersex were not associated with cybersex addiction. These results are in line with those reported for heterosexual males in previous studies. Findings regarding the reinforcing nature of sexual arousal, the mechanisms of learning, and the role of cue reactivity and craving in the development of cybersex addiction in IPU need to be discussed. PMID:25080011

Laier, Christian; Pekal, Jaro; Brand, Matthias

2014-08-01

423

Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C Virus Between HIV Infected Subjects and Their Main Heterosexual Partners  

PubMed Central

Background Overall, 60-70% of the hepatitis c virus (HCV) transmission routes is parenteral, and in 30-40% of the cases is unknown (e.g. sexual route). Knowing these routes in HIV infected dyads is very important due to clinical and methodological reasons. Objectives The present study aimed to identify and quantitatively investigate HIV-infected individuals and their main heterosexual partners regarding the risk factors of HCV transmission. Patients and Methods One hundred sixty eight of 984 couples were chosen through random generated numbers using a computer program from behavioral consultation center in Shiraz, Iran. We used actor partner independent model (APIM) and multilevel analysis to assess multiple risk factors for HCV, while partitioning the source of risk at the individual and couple levels. Results Age of the index samples was 38.71 ± 7 years, and 33.2 ± 6.3 for their main heterosexual partners; the mean duration of sexual relationship for couples was 11.9 (median = 8.5) years. Multivariate analysis showed that actor risk factor of intravenous drug using (IDU) (AOR= 13.03; 95% CI: 3.9- 43.82) and actor cofactors of HIV positivity (AOR = 7.1; 95% CI: 1.37- 36.97), razor sharing (AOR = 4.81; 95% CI: 1.84- 12.55), sex (AOR = 8.83; 95% CI: 3.16- 24.87), and condom use in sexual activity with main partner (AOR = 0.15; 95% CI: 0.02- 0.44) were associated with actor HCV positivity. Conclusions Health care providers need to pay special attention to sexual transmission of HCV among HIV-infected individuals, and should recommend control/preventive measures for HCV sexual transmission. PMID:24348647

Alipour, Abbas; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Hasanzadeh, Jafar; Rajaeefard, Abdorreza; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali

2013-01-01

424

Sex differences in psychosocial correlates of concurrent substance use among heterosexual, homosexual and bisexual college students  

PubMed Central

Background College students identifying as Lesbian, Gay or Bisexual (LGB) are at increased risk for substance use. Few studies have assessed correlates of concurrent substance use, which increases the risk for substance use disorders. Objectives The current study aimed to (1) examine differences in substance use among male and female sexual minorities and (2) explore the impact of psychosocial factors on the relationship between sexual identity and concurrent substance use. Methods A web-based survey assessing health behavior, psychosocial characteristics, attitudes and demographics was administered to students from six colleges in the southeastern US. A total of 4840 students responded to the survey; 2.9% reported a homosexual identity (n = 111) and 3.5% reported a bisexual identity (n = 135). Multivariable modeling was used to assess the relationship between sexual identity and the number of substances used, adjusting for demographic and psychosocial factors. Results Bisexual females were significantly more likely than their homosexual or heterosexual counterparts to report tobacco use (p < 0.0001), binge drinking (p < 0.05) and marijuana use (p < 0.0001) in the past 30 days. No differences in substances used existed among males. Adjusted for age and ethnicity, homosexually- and bisexually-identified females were more likely to have concurrent substance use than those who identified as heterosexual (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Adjusting for psychosocial factors decreased the magnitude and significance of the association (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Female sexual minorities are at high risk for substance use. Targeting specific psychosocial factors might be useful in efforts to address use of tobacco, alcohol and marijuana among LGB young adults. PMID:23773221

Schauer, Gillian L.; Berg, Carla J.; Bryant, Lawrence O.

2014-01-01

425

Resource Security Impacts Men’s Female Breast Size Preferences  

PubMed Central

It has been suggested human female breast size may act as signal of fat reserves, which in turn indicates access to resources. Based on this perspective, two studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that men experiencing relative resource insecurity should perceive larger breast size as more physically attractive than men experiencing resource security. In Study 1, 266 men from three sites in Malaysia varying in relative socioeconomic status (high to low) rated a series of animated figures varying in breast size for physical attractiveness. Results showed that men from the low socioeconomic context rated larger breasts as more attractive than did men from the medium socioeconomic context, who in turn perceived larger breasts as attractive than men from a high socioeconomic context. Study 2 compared the breast size judgements of 66 hungry versus 58 satiated men within the same environmental context in Britain. Results showed that hungry men rated larger breasts as significantly more attractive than satiated men. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that resource security impacts upon men’s attractiveness ratings based on women’s breast size. PMID:23483919

Swami, Viren; Tovée, Martin J.

2013-01-01

426

UPenn researchers find radiation plus hormone therapy prolongs survival for older men with prostate cancer  

Cancer.gov

Adding radiation treatment to hormone therapy saves more lives among older men with locally advanced prostate therapy than hormone therapy alone, according to a new study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology this week from Penn Medicine researchers.

427

Action Figures and Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three studies were conducted to determine whether action figures contributed to negative body images in the young adult men\\u000a who handled them. In Study 1 and Study 2, participants were randomly assigned to different conditions to handle action figures\\u000a with different muscularity levels. The participants were instructed to place the action figures into various positions for\\u000a a set time limit.

Chris Barlett; Richard Harris; Sara Smith; Jennifer Bonds-Raacke

2005-01-01

428

Family Living and Personal Living  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Find links for various projects for Family Living and Personal Living classes. FAMILY LIVING Wayne County Clerk - Marriage License The Knot Martha Stewart Weddings *Travel Planning Sites* Northwest Airlines Amtrak Travelocity Spirit Air Orbitz PERSONAL LIVING (and Parenting): *Alcohol Research* Alcohol and Public Health - CDC MedlinePlus: Alcoholism NIAAA National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism *Birth Control* Health and Wellness Resource Center - - start at this site by typing Birth Control in the search bar on the right of the screen and select "full text articles" and consumer heatlh. It will list a range of birth ...

Ms. Schultz

2007-11-05

429

Women, Men, Work, and Family: An Expansionist Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lives of women and men, the relationships that they establish, and their work have changed dramatically in the past 50 years, but the dominant theories driving research in these areas have not. In this article, the authors argue that the facts underlying the assumptions of the classical theories of gender and multiple roles have changed so radically as to

Rosalind Chait Barnett; Janet Shibley Hyde

2001-01-01

430

November 2012 AIDS: in Africa, men are less  

E-print Network

with the AIDS virus, of which 75% live in sub-Saharan Africa. Women are particu- larly affected: they represent), which leads to slower immune reconstitution. In Africa, more than 25 million people, most of them womenN° 417 November 2012 AIDS: in Africa, men are less responsive to treatment Scientific news

431

Portraits of Aging Men in Late Medieval Italy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This essay examines the human experience of aging in the distant past by investigating a group of aging men during the 14th century in an Italian city, Bergamo, using notarial "documents of practice" from that community. Studying the aging process and its effects on the lives of people in the medieval era has three-fold significance: it…

Cossar, Roisin

2012-01-01

432

Intermarriages between Western Women and Palestinian Men: Multidirectional Adaptation Processes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses cultural adaptation of Western-Palestinian intermarried couples. Using in-depth interviews, information was gathered from 16 participants, 7 Western women and 9 Palestinian men, living in Palestinian cities in the West Bank. Adaptation strategies are typified by the extent to which each spouse embraces the partner's culture.…

Roer-Strier, Dorit; Ezra, Dina Ben

2006-01-01

433

Beyond sex differences: Family and occupational roles' impact on women's and men's dreams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The question addressed is: do recent changes in the occupational roles of women, with their indirect influence on men's lives, have an impact on the dreams of women and men? Three groups of parents (N=96) including in equal numbers, mothers at home, wage-earning mothers and fathers, kept a dream diary from which two dreams per dreamer were content analyzed. Assuming

Monique Lortie-Lussier; Suzanne Simond; Natalie Rinfret; Joseph De Koninck

1992-01-01

434

When men become “women”: Gender antagonism and the changing sexual geography of work in Newfoundland  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the traditional Newfoundland maritime division of labor, men worked at sea on boats and women worked on the land in their households. Patterns of gender identity, work, and gender relations were characterized by an ethos of complementarity. Present declines in the fishery make it impossible to earn a living at sea and men have become landbound. The resulting infringement

Dona L. Davis

1993-01-01

435

Predictors of Gender-Related Barriers, Work, and Life Satisfaction Among Men in Nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on the experiences of 174 men in the nursing profession across the United States. Participants completed online measures of gender role conflict, social support, gender-related work barriers, and work and life satisfaction. Overall, men appeared well adjusted and content in their roles and lives. Variables predictive of career and life satisfaction included perceptions of gender-related work barriers,

Aaron B. Rochlen; Glenn E. Good; Tracy A. Carver

2009-01-01

436

The End of the LineInfertile Men's Experiences of Being Unable to Produce a Child  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were used to explore the experience of infertility for six men diagnosed with male factor infertility. A thematic analysis of the interview data generated seven phenomenological themes that reflect how being infertile changed and shaped the lives of these men as they attempted to come to terms with their infertility.

RUSSELL E. WEBB; JUDITH C. DANILUK

1999-01-01

437

Predicting the use of conflict resolution tactics among engaged Arab-Palestinian men in Israel  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports one of the first studies of woman abuse in the Arab world. A standardized measurement package was completed by 434 engaged Arab-Palestinian men living in Israel. The study sought to explain men's differential use of conflict tactics with their fiancées using variables representing three frameworks: (1) male dominance, (2) intergenerational learning, and (3) interpersonal skills deficit. Results

Muhammad M. Haj-Yahia; Jeffrey L. Edleson

1994-01-01

438

Distress and Depression in Men Who Have Sex With Men: The Urban Men's Health Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This study estimates the prev- alence of depression and describes the correlates and independent associations of distress and depression among U.S. men who have sex with men. Method: A household-based probability sample of men who have sex with men (N=2,881) was interviewed between 1996 and 1998 in four large American cities. With cutoff points of 15 and 22 for

Thomas C. Mills; Jay Paul; Ron Stall; M. P. H. Lance Pollack; D. Jesse Canchola; Jason Chang; M. S. Judith; T. Moskowitz; Joseph A. Catania

2004-01-01

439

Lymphogranuloma Venereum Prevalence in Sweden among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis ompA Genotypes?  

PubMed Central

An outbreak of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) infections has recently been reported from The Netherlands and other European countries. The Swedish surveillance system has identified three LGV cases since 2004, all with clinically suspected infection in men who have sex with men (MSM). In order to assess the prevalence of LGV in a high-risk group of MSM and include clinically atypical cases, retrospective analysis of 197 Chlamydia trachomatis-infected men was performed. Sequencing of the ompA gene showed a different serotype distribution compared to recent Swedish studies in heterosexual populations. The most common types were G (45%), D (27%), and J (26%), whereas the normally predominant type E accounted for only 4% of the chlamydia cases. Furthermore, certain ompA genotype variants of the dominant serotypes were highly prevalent among MSM, and the reason for this is discussed. No additional case of LGV was detected by retrospective analysis of the high-risk MSM population. This indicates that, thus far, LGV in Sweden is only a result of sporadic import from infected MSM clusters abroad. PMID:16971651

Klint, Markus; Löfdahl, Margareta; Ek, Carolina; Airell, Åsa; Berglund, Torsten; Herrmann, Björn

2006-01-01

440

Willingness of Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in the United States to Be Circumcised as Adults to Reduce the Risk of HIV Infection  

PubMed Central

Background Circumcision reduces HIV acquisition among heterosexual men in Africa, but it is unclear if circumcision may reduce HIV acquisition among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States, or whether MSM would be willing to be circumcised if recommended. Methods We interviewed presumed-HIV negative MSM at gay pride events in 2006. We asked uncircumcised respondents about willingness to be circumcised if it were proven to reduce risk of HIV among MSM and perceived barriers to circumcision. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify covariates associated with willingness to be circumcised. Results Of 780 MSM, 133 (17%) were uncircumcised. Of these, 71 (53%) were willing to be circumcised. Willingness was associated with black race (exact odds ratio [OR]: 3.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3–9.8), non-injection drug use (OR: 6.1, 95% CI: 1.8–23.7) and perceived reduced risk of penile cancer (OR: 4.7, 95% CI: 2.0–11.9). The most commonly endorsed concerns about circumcision were post-surgical pain and wound infection. Conclusions Over half of uncircumcised MSM, especially black MSM, expressed willingness to be circumcised. Perceived risks and benefits of circumcision should be a part of educational materials if circumcision is recommended for MSM in the United States. PMID:18628946

Begley, Elin B.; Jafa, Krishna; Voetsch, Andrew C.; Heffelfinger, James D.; Borkowf, Craig B.; Sullivan, Patrick S.

2008-01-01

441

A comparison of HIV seropositive and seronegative young adult heroin- and cocaine-using men who have sex with men in New York City, 2000-2003.  

PubMed

The purpose of this analysis was to determine the prevalence and correlates of HIV infection among a street-recruited sample of heroin- and cocaine-using men who have sex with men (MSM). Injection (injecting men who either identified as gay/bisexual or reported ever having sex with a man were used for this analysis. Nonparametric statistics guided interpretation. Of 95 heroin/ cocaine-using MSM, 25.3% tested HIV seropositive with 75% reporting a previous HIV diagnosis. The majority was black (46%) or Hispanic (44%), and the median age was 28 years (range 18-40). HIV-seropositive MSM were more likely than seronegatives to be older and to have an HIV-seropositive partner but less likely to report current homelessness, illegal income, heterosexual identity, multiple sex partners, female partners, and sex for money/drug partners than seronegatives. These data indicate high HIV prevalence among street-recruited, drug-using MSM compared with other injection drug use (IDU) subgroups and drug-using MSM; however, lower risk behaviors were found among HIV seropositives compared with seronegatives. Large-scale studies among illicit drug-using MSM from more marginalized neighborhoods are warranted. PMID:15738320

Fuller, Crystal M; Absalon, Judith; Ompad, Danielle C; Nash, Denis; Koblin, Beryl; Blaney, Shannon; Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David

2005-03-01