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Sample records for heterozygous knockout mice

  1. Norepinephrine Transporter Heterozygous Knockout Mice Exhibit Altered Transport and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fentress, HM; Klar, R; Krueger, JK; Sabb, T; Redmon, SN; Wallace, NM; Shirey-Rice, JK; Hahn, MK

    2013-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically-driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET+/−), demonstrating that they display an ~50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity, assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET+/− mouse establishes an activated state of existing, surface NET proteins. NET+/− mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris Water Maze. These data suggest recovery of near basal activity in NET+/− mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET+/− mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  2. Norepinephrine transporter heterozygous knockout mice exhibit altered transport and behavior.

    PubMed

    Fentress, H M; Klar, R; Krueger, J J; Sabb, T; Redmon, S N; Wallace, N M; Shirey-Rice, J K; Hahn, M K

    2013-11-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) regulates synaptic NE availability for noradrenergic signaling in the brain and sympathetic nervous system. Although genetic variation leading to a loss of NET expression has been implicated in psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders, complete NET deficiency has not been found in people, limiting the utility of NET knockout mice as a model for genetically driven NET dysfunction. Here, we investigate NET expression in NET heterozygous knockout male mice (NET(+/-) ), demonstrating that they display an approximately 50% reduction in NET protein levels. Surprisingly, these mice display no significant deficit in NET activity assessed in hippocampal and cortical synaptosomes. We found that this compensation in NET activity was due to enhanced activity of surface-resident transporters, as opposed to surface recruitment of NET protein or compensation through other transport mechanisms, including serotonin, dopamine or organic cation transporters. We hypothesize that loss of NET protein in the NET(+/-) mouse establishes an activated state of existing surface NET proteins. The NET(+/-) mice exhibit increased anxiety in the open field and light-dark box and display deficits in reversal learning in the Morris water maze. These data suggest that recovery of near basal activity in NET(+/-) mice appears to be insufficient to limit anxiety responses or support cognitive performance that might involve noradrenergic neurotransmission. The NET(+/-) mice represent a unique model to study the loss and resultant compensatory changes in NET that may be relevant to behavior and physiology in human NET deficiency disorders. PMID:24102798

  3. Exposure to low-dose rotenone precipitates synaptic plasticity alterations in PINK1 heterozygous knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Martella, G; Madeo, G; Maltese, M; Vanni, V; Puglisi, F; Ferraro, E; Schirinzi, T; Valente, E M; Bonanni, L; Shen, J; Mandolesi, G; Mercuri, N B; Bonsi, P; Pisani, A

    2016-07-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene are considered a susceptibility factor to develop early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD), as supported by dopamine hypometabolism in asymptomatic mutation carriers and subtle alterations of dopamine-dependent striatal synaptic plasticity in heterozygous PINK1 knockout (PINK1(+/-)) mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exposure to low-dose rotenone of heterozygous PINK1(+/-) mice, compared to their wild-type PINK1(+/+) littermates, could impact on dopamine-dependent striatal synaptic plasticity, in the absence of apparent structural alterations. Mice were exposed to a range of concentrations of rotenone (0.01-1mg/kg). Chronic treatment with concentrations of rotenone up to 0.8mg/kg did not cause manifest neuronal loss or changes in ATP levels both in the striatum or substantia nigra of PINK1(+/-) and PINK1(+/+) mice. Moreover, rotenone (up to 0.8mg/kg) treatment did not induce mislocalization of the mitochondrial membrane protein Tom20 and release of cytochrome c in PINK1(+/-) striata. Accordingly, basic electrophysiological properties of nigral dopaminergic and striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) were normal. Despite the lack of gross alterations in neuronal viability in chronically-treated PINK1(+/-), a complete loss of both long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP) was recorded in MSNs from PINK1(+/-) mice treated with a low rotenone (0.1mg/kg) concentration. Even lower concentrations (0.01mg/kg) blocked LTP induction in heterozygous PINK1(+/-) MSNs compared to PINK1(+/+) mice. Of interest, chronic pretreatment with the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol and Trolox, a water-soluble analog of vitamin E and powerful antioxidant, rescued synaptic plasticity impairment, confirming that, at the doses we utilized, rotenone did not induce irreversible alterations. In this model, chronic exposure to low-doses of rotenone was not sufficient to alter mitochondrial integrity and ATP production, but

  4. Appetitively motivated instrumental learning in SynGAP heterozygous knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Muhia, Mary; Feldon, Joram; Knuesel, Irene; Yee, Benjamin K

    2009-10-01

    The synaptic Ras/Rap-GTPase-activating protein (SynGAP) regulates specific intracellular events following N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation. Here, the impact of SynGAP heterozygous knockout (SG+/-) on NMDAR-dependent functions was assessed using different positive reinforcement schedules in instrumental conditioning. The knockout did not affect the temporal control of operant responding under a fixed interval (FI) schedule, but led to a putative enhancement in response vigor and/or disinhibition. When examined on differential reinforcement of low rates of response (DRL) schedules, SG+/- mice showed increased responding under DRL-4s and DRL-8s, without impairing the response efficiency (total rewards/total lever presses) because both rewarded and nonrewarded presses were elevated. Motivation was unaffected as evaluated using a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. Yet, SG+/- mice persisted in responding during extinction at the end of PR training, although an equivalent phenotype was not evident in extinction learning following FI-20s training. This extinction phenotype is therefore schedule-specific and cannot be generalized to Pavlovian conditioning. In conclusion, constitutive SynGAP reduction increases vigor in the execution of learned operant behavior without compromising its temporal control, yielding effects readily distinguishable from NMDAR blockade. PMID:19824778

  5. Sensitivity of Heterozygous α1,6-Fucosyltransferase Knock-out Mice to Cigarette Smoke-induced Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Congxiao; Maeno, Toshitaka; Ota, Fumi; Ueno, Manabu; Korekane, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Shinji; Shirato, Ken; Matsumoto, Akio; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Keiichi; Kitazume, Shinobu; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a deficiency in core fucosylation caused by the genetic disruption of α1,6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) leads to lethal abnormalities and the development of emphysematous lesions in the lung by attenuation of TGF-β1 receptor signaling. Herein, we investigated the physiological relevance of core fucosylation in the pathogenesis of emphysema using viable heterozygous knock-out mice (Fut8+/−) that were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). The Fut8+/− mice exhibited a marked decrease in FUT8 activity, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activities were elevated in the lung at an early stage of exposure. Emphysema developed after a 3-month CS exposure, accompanied by the recruitment of large numbers of macrophages to the lung. CS exposure substantially and persistently elevated the expression level of Smad7, resulting in a significant reduction of Smad2 phosphorylation (which controls MMP-9 expression) in Fut8+/− mice and Fut8-deficient embryonic fibroblast cells. These in vivo and in vitro studies show that impaired core fucosylation enhances the susceptibility to CS and constitutes at least part of the disease process of emphysema, in which TGF-β-Smad signaling is impaired and the MMP-mediated destruction of lung parenchyma is up-regulated. PMID:22433854

  6. Age-Dependent Deficits in Fear Learning in Heterozygous BDNF Knock-Out Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endres, Thomas; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2012-01-01

    Beyond its trophic function, the neurotrophin BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is well known to crucially mediate synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Whereas recent studies suggested that acute BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates amygdala-dependent fear learning, no impairments of cued fear learning were reported in heterozygous BDNF…

  7. Behavioral phenotyping of heterozygous acetylcholinesterase knockout (AChE+/-) mice showed no memory enhancement but hyposensitivity to amnesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Espallergues, Julie; Galvan, Laurie; Sabatier, Florence; Rana-Poussine, Vanessa; Maurice, Tangui; Chatonnet, Arnaud

    2010-01-20

    Decrease in the expression or activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymatic activity results in increased cholinergic tonus in the brain and periphery, with concomitant regulations of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors expression. We generated AChE knockout mice and characterized the behavioral phenotype of heterozygous animals, focusing on learning and memory functions. Male and female, AChE+/- and AChE+/+ littermate controls (129 sv strain) were tested at 5-9 weeks of age. AChE activity was significantly decreased in the hippocampus and cortex of AChE+/- mice, but butyrylcholinesterase activity was preserved. AChE+/- mice failed to show any difference in terms of locomotion, exploration and anxiety parameters in the open-field test. Animals were then tested for place learning in the water-maze. They were trained using a 'sustained acquisition' protocol (3 swim trials per day) or a 'mild acquisition' protocol (2 swim trials per day) to locate an invisible platform in fixed position (reference memory procedure). Then, during 3 days, they were trained to locate the platform in a variable position (working memory procedure). Learning profiles and probe test performances were similar for AChE+/- and AChE+/+ mice. Mice were then treated with the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine (0.5, 5 mg/kg) 20 min before each training session. Scopolamine impaired learning at both doses in AChE+/+ mice, but only at the highest dose in AChE+/- mice. Moreover, the intracerebroventricular injection of amyloid-beta25-35 peptide, 9 nmol, 7 days before water-maze acquisition, failed to induce learning deficits in AChE+/- mice, but impaired learning in AChE+/+ controls. The peptide failed to be toxic in forebrain structures of AChE+/- mice, since an increase in lipid peroxidation levels was measured in the hippocampus of AChE+/+ but not AChE+/- mice. We conclude that the increase in cholinergic tonus observed in AChE+/- mice did not result in increased memory functions but

  8. X-linked Christianson syndrome: heterozygous female Slc9a6 knockout mice develop mosaic neuropathological changes and related behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Jakub; Leddy, Jennifer; Gulinello, Maria; Walkley, Steven U

    2016-01-01

    Christianson syndrome (CS) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental and neurological disorder characterized in males by core symptoms that include non-verbal status, intellectual disability, epilepsy, truncal ataxia, postnatal microcephaly and hyperkinesis. CS is caused by mutations in the SLC9A6 gene, which encodes a multipass transmembrane sodium (potassium)-hydrogen exchanger 6 (NHE6) protein, functional in early recycling endosomes. The extent and variability of the CS phenotype in female heterozygotes, who presumably express the wild-type and mutant SLC9A6 alleles mosaically as a result of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), have not yet been systematically characterized. Slc9a6 knockout mice (Slc9a6 KO) were generated by insertion of the bacterial lacZ/β-galactosidase (β-Gal) reporter into exon 6 of the X-linked gene. Mutant Slc9a6 KO male mice have been shown to develop late endosomal/lysosomal dysfunction associated with glycolipid accumulation in selected neuronal populations and patterned degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). In heterozygous female Slc9a6 KO mice, β-Gal serves as a transcriptional/XCI reporter and thus facilitates testing of effects of mosaic expression of the mutant allele on penetrance of the abnormal phenotype. Using β-Gal, we demonstrated mosaic expression of the mutant Slc9a6 allele and mosaically distributed lysosomal glycolipid accumulation and PC pathology in the brains of heterozygous Slc9a6 KO female mice. At the behavioral level, we showed that heterozygous female mice suffer from visuospatial memory and motor coordination deficits similar to but less severe than those observed in X-chromosome hemizygous mutant males. Our studies in heterozygous Slc9a6 KO female mice provide important clues for understanding the likely phenotypic range of Christianson syndrome among females heterozygous for SLC9A6 mutations and might improve diagnostic practice and genetic counseling by helping to characterize this presumably underappreciated patient

  9. X-linked Christianson syndrome: heterozygous female Slc9a6 knockout mice develop mosaic neuropathological changes and related behavioral abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Jakub; Leddy, Jennifer; Gulinello, Maria; Walkley, Steven U.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Christianson syndrome (CS) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental and neurological disorder characterized in males by core symptoms that include non-verbal status, intellectual disability, epilepsy, truncal ataxia, postnatal microcephaly and hyperkinesis. CS is caused by mutations in the SLC9A6 gene, which encodes a multipass transmembrane sodium (potassium)-hydrogen exchanger 6 (NHE6) protein, functional in early recycling endosomes. The extent and variability of the CS phenotype in female heterozygotes, who presumably express the wild-type and mutant SLC9A6 alleles mosaically as a result of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), have not yet been systematically characterized. Slc9a6 knockout mice (Slc9a6 KO) were generated by insertion of the bacterial lacZ/β-galactosidase (β-Gal) reporter into exon 6 of the X-linked gene. Mutant Slc9a6 KO male mice have been shown to develop late endosomal/lysosomal dysfunction associated with glycolipid accumulation in selected neuronal populations and patterned degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). In heterozygous female Slc9a6 KO mice, β-Gal serves as a transcriptional/XCI reporter and thus facilitates testing of effects of mosaic expression of the mutant allele on penetrance of the abnormal phenotype. Using β-Gal, we demonstrated mosaic expression of the mutant Slc9a6 allele and mosaically distributed lysosomal glycolipid accumulation and PC pathology in the brains of heterozygous Slc9a6 KO female mice. At the behavioral level, we showed that heterozygous female mice suffer from visuospatial memory and motor coordination deficits similar to but less severe than those observed in X-chromosome hemizygous mutant males. Our studies in heterozygous Slc9a6 KO female mice provide important clues for understanding the likely phenotypic range of Christianson syndrome among females heterozygous for SLC9A6 mutations and might improve diagnostic practice and genetic counseling by helping to characterize this presumably

  10. Cell type-restricted expression of erythrocyte tropomodulin Isoform41 in exon 1 knockout/LacZ knock-in heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weijuan; Chu, Xin; Sung, Lanping Amy

    2015-01-01

    Full-length erythrocyte tropomodulin (E-Tmod or Tmod1) isoform of 41 kDa is an actin nucleation protein and caps the pointed end of tropomyosin-coated actin filaments. It participates in the length control of short actin protofilaments in the erythrocyte membrane skeletal network as well as the organization of microfilaments in non-erythroid cells. Recently we discovered and characterized a truncated isoform of 29 kDa, which lacks the N-terminal sequence encoded by exons 1 and 2 required for nucleation and capping. Thus, it is important to study the expression pattern of solely the E-Tmod41 isoform in tissues. We utilized our exon 1 knockout (KO) mouse model with a knock-in lacZ reporter gene which reports the expression of E-Tmod41, but not E-Tmod29. Because this homozygous isoform-specific KO is an embryonic lethal mutation, we used heterozygous mice. X-gal staining localized specific signals at the single cell level and revealed a timed expression during embryonic development and restricted expression in adult mice. Our results showed that E-Tmod41 expressing cells include developing and young erythroid cells, developing somites, young fiber cells in the lens, certain subtype(s) of tubular cells in the kidney, smooth muscle cells in various tissues, and horizontal cells in the retina. A comparison with previous studies revealed that most if not all tissues known to express E-Tmod contained lacZ-expressing cells. Interestingly, some tubular cells were lacZ-positive while others in the same renal tubule were not, indicating heterogeneity within the tubular cells. Combined with double immunocytochemistry, we further localized E-Tmod41 to dendritic spines of horizontal cells. These timed and cell-type restricted expressions of E-Tmod41 suggest a role of actin nucleation and/or short actin protofilaments in these cell types and sub-cellular structures. PMID:25721257

  11. Increased extracellular dopamine concentrations and FosB/DeltaFosB expression in striatal brain areas of heterozygous GDNF knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Airavaara, Mikko; Planken, Anu; Gäddnäs, Helena; Piepponen, Timo Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Ahtee, Liisa

    2004-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of striatal dopaminergic neurons. To study whether reduced levels of endogenous GDNF affect the striatal dopaminergic transmission we estimated the basal extracellular levels of dopamine in vivo, the basal expression of FosB-related proteins in striatal brain areas as well as the effects of acute and repeated cocaine on locomotor activity and dopamine output in mice lacking one GDNF allele (heterozygous GDNF+/- mice). As expected the striatal GDNF protein content was found to be smaller in the GDNF+/- mice than in their wild-type littermates. Unexpectedly the extracellular dopamine concentration in the GDNF+/- mice in the dorsal striatum (CPu) was 2.0-fold, and in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) 1.6-fold the concentration found in the wild-type littermates. Also FosB/DeltaFosB-like immunoreactivity was found to be elevated in the CPu as well as in the core and in the shell of NAc of the GDNF+/- mice as compared with the wild-type mice. This suggests chronic postsynaptic activation of these brain areas and is in line with elevated extracellular dopamine concentrations. Cocaine's effects acutely and after repeated treatment on locomotor activity were similar in the GDNF+/- and the wild-type mice. Neither did cocaine's acute effects on dopamine output differ between the mice of the two strains. Our findings demonstrate that reduced levels of endogenous GDNF induce alterations in dorsal striatal and accumbal dopaminergic transmission, and stress the importance of endogenous GDNF in the regulation of the dopaminergic neurons. PMID:15525275

  12. De novo inbred heterozygous Zeb2/Sip1 mutant mice uniquely generated by germ-line conditional knockout exhibit craniofacial, callosal and behavioral defects associated with Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Tsuyoshi; Nishizaki, Yuriko; Matsui, Fumiko; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki; Higashi, Yujiro

    2015-11-15

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MOWS) is caused by de novo heterozygous mutation at ZEB2 (SIP1, ZFHX1B) gene, and exhibit moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID), a characteristic facial appearance, epilepsy and other congenital anomalies. Establishing a murine MOWS model is important, not only for investigating the pathogenesis of this disease, but also for identifying compounds that may improve the symptoms. However, because the heterozygous Zeb2 knockout mouse could not be maintained as a mouse line with the inbred C57BL/6 background, it was difficult to use those mice for the study of MOWS. Here, we systematically generated de novo Zeb2 Δex7/+ mice by inducing the Zeb2 mutation in the germ cells using conditional recombination system. The de novo Zeb2 Δex7/+ mice with C57BL/6 background developed multiple defects relevant to MOWS, including craniofacial abnormalities, defective corpus callosum formation and the decreased number of parvalbumin interneurons in the cortex. In behavioral analyses, these mice showed reduced motor activity, increased anxiety and impaired sociability. Notably, during the Barnes maze test, immobile Zeb2 mutant mice were observed over repeated trials. In contrast, neither the mouse line nor the de novo Zeb2 Δex7/+ mice with the closed colony ICR background showed cranial abnormalities or reduced motor activities. These results demonstrate the advantages of using de novo Zeb2 Δex7/+ mice with the C57BL/6 background as the MOWS model. To our knowledge, this is the first time an inducible de novo mutation system has been applied to murine germline cells to produce an animal model of a human congenital disease. PMID:26319231

  13. Comparative analyses of lung transcriptomes in patients with alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins and in foxf1 heterozygous knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of Pulmonary Veins (ACDMPV) is a developmental disorder of the lungs, primarily affecting their vasculature. FOXF1 haploinsufficiency due to heterozygous genomic deletions and point mutations have been reported in most patients with ACDMPV. The majority...

  14. Hippocampal dysfunction in the Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 heterozygous knockout mouse model for Kleefstra syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balemans, Monique C M; Kasri, Nael Nadif; Kopanitsa, Maksym V; Afinowi, Nurudeen O; Ramakers, Ger; Peters, Theo A; Beynon, Andy J; Janssen, Sanne M; van Summeren, Rik C J; Eeftens, Jorine M; Eikelenboom, Nathalie; Benevento, Marco; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Kleefstra, Tjitske; van Bokhoven, Hans; Van der Zee, Catharina E E M

    2013-03-01

    Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1) is a highly conserved protein that catalyzes mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9, thereby epigenetically regulating transcription. Kleefstra syndrome (KS), is caused by haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene, and is an example of an emerging group of intellectual disability (ID) disorders caused by genes encoding epigenetic regulators of neuronal gene activity. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying this disorder, prompting us to study the Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 heterozygous knockout (Ehmt1(+/-)) mice as a model for KS. In agreement with the cognitive disturbances observed in patients with KS, we detected deficits in fear extinction learning and both novel and spatial object recognition in Ehmt1(+/-) mice. These learning and memory deficits were associated with a significant reduction in dendritic arborization and the number of mature spines in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of Ehmt1(+/-) mice. In-depth analysis of the electrophysiological properties of CA3-CA1 synapses revealed no differences in basal synaptic transmission or theta-burst induced long-term potentiation (LTP). However, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) was significantly increased in Ehmt1(+/-) neurons, pointing to a potential deficiency in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Accordingly, a reduction in the frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) was observed in Ehmt1(+/-) neurons. These data demonstrate that Ehmt1 haploinsufficiency in mice leads to learning deficits and synaptic dysfunction, providing a possible mechanism for the ID phenotype in patients with KS. PMID:23175442

  15. Generation of conditional knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Conditional knockout mouse models are powerful tools to examine the biological and molecular function(s) of genes in specific tissues. The general procedure to generate such genetically engineered mouse models consists of three main steps. The first step is to find the appropriate genomic clone of the gene of interest and to design the cloning and Southern blot strategies. The second step is the cloning of the gene-targeting vector with all its essential components including positive and negative selection cassettes and the insertion of LoxP sites. Although conventional methods are still being widely used for DNA cloning, we describe in this book chapter the use of λ Red phage-based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli to capture the genomic DNA of the gene of interest and to assemble the gene-targeting vector. This new method provides several advantages as it does not require the presence of restriction sites within the gene of interest to insert LoxP-flanked DNA fragments. In the final step, the gene-targeting vector is transferred into embryonic stem (ES) cells, and successfully targeted ES cell clones are injected into mouse blastocysts to generate conditional knockout mice. PMID:25064096

  16. Knockout of Foxp2 disrupts vocal development in mice.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, Gregg A; McGinley, Matthew J; McCormick, David A

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP2 gene is important for the development of proper speech motor control in humans. However, the role of the gene in general vocal behavior in other mammals, including mice, is unclear. Here, we track the vocal development of Foxp2 heterozygous knockout (Foxp2+/-) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates from juvenile to adult ages, and observe severe abnormalities in the courtship song of Foxp2+/- mice. In comparison to their WT littermates, Foxp2+/- mice vocalized less, produced shorter syllable sequences, and possessed an abnormal syllable inventory. In addition, Foxp2+/- song also exhibited irregular rhythmic structure, and its development did not follow the consistent trajectories observed in WT vocalizations. These results demonstrate that the Foxp2 gene is critical for normal vocal behavior in juvenile and adult mice, and that Foxp2 mutant mice may provide a tractable model system for the study of the gene's role in general vocal motor control. PMID:26980647

  17. Male Men1 heterozygous mice exhibit fasting hyperglycemia in the early stage of MEN1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhongxiuzi; Zhang, Li; Xie, Wenting; Wang, Siqi; Bao, Xiaorui; Guo, Yuli; Zhang, Houjian; Hu, Qingzhong; Chen, Yi; Wang, Zeen; Xue, Maoqiang; Jin, Guanghui

    2016-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome characterized by multiple tumors in the parathyroid glands, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary. Recent clinical studies have revealed a strong association between MEN1 syndrome and the risk of developing diabetes mellitus; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, heterozygous Men1 knockout (Men1(+/-)) mice were used as MEN1 models to investigate MEN1-associated glucose metabolic phenotypes and mechanisms. Heterozygous deficiency of Men1 in 12-month-old male mice induced fasting hyperglycemia, along with increased serum insulin levels. However, male Men1(+/-) mice did not show insulin resistance, as evidenced by Akt activation in hepatic tissues and an insulin tolerance test. Increased glucose levels following pyruvate challenge and expression of key gluconeogenic genes suggested increased hepatic glucose output in the male Men1(+/-) mice. This effect could be partly due to higher basal serum glucagon levels, which resulted from pancreatic islet cell proliferation induced by heterozygous loss of Men1 Taken together, our results indicate that fasted male Men1(+/-) mice, in the early stage of development of MEN1, display glucose metabolic disorders. These disorders are caused not by direct induction of insulin resistance, but via increased glucagon secretion and the consequent stimulation of hepatic glucose production. PMID:27432891

  18. Characterization of Kidney and Skeleton Phenotypes of Mice Double Heterozygous for Foxc1 and Foxc2.

    PubMed

    Motojima, Masaru; Tanimoto, Sho; Ohtsuka, Masato; Matsusaka, Taiji; Kume, Tsutomu; Abe, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Foxc1 and Foxc2 play key roles in mouse development. Foxc1 mutant mice develop duplex kidneys with double ureters, and lack calvarial and sternal bones. Foxc2 null mice have been reported to have glomerular abnormalities in the kidney and axial skeletal anomalies. Expression patterns of Foxc1 and Foxc2 overlap extensively and are believed to have interactive roles. However, cooperative roles of these factors in glomerular and skeletal development are unknown. Therefore, we examined the kidneys and skeleton of mice that were double heterozygous for Foxc1 and Foxc2. Double heterozygotes were generated by mating single heterozygotes for Foxc1 and Foxc2. Newborn double heterozygous mice showed many anomalies in the kidney and urinary tract resembling Foxc1 phenotypes, including duplex kidneys, double ureters, hydronephrosis and mega-ureter. Some mice had hydronephrosis alone. In addition to these macroscopic anomalies, some mice had abnormal glomeruli and disorganized glomerular capillaries observed in Foxc2 phenotypes. Interestingly, these mice also showed glomerular cysts not observed in the single-gene knockout of either Foxc1 or Foxc2 but observed in conditional knockout of Foxc2 in the kidney. Serial section analysis revealed that all cystic glomeruli were connected to proximal tubules, precluding the possibility of atubular glomeruli resulting in cyst formation. Dorsally opened vertebral arches and malformations of sternal bones in the double heterozygotes were phenotypes similar to Foxc1 null mice. Absent or split vertebral bodies in the double heterozygotes were phenotypes similar to Foxc2 null mice, whilst hydrocephalus noted in the Foxc1 phenotype was not observed. Thus, Foxc1 and Foxc2 have a role in kidney and axial skeleton development. These transcription factors might interact in the regulation of the embryogenesis of these organs. PMID:27193493

  19. Knockout of Foxp2 disrupts vocal development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Castellucci, Gregg A.; McGinley, Matthew J.; McCormick, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP2 gene is important for the development of proper speech motor control in humans. However, the role of the gene in general vocal behavior in other mammals, including mice, is unclear. Here, we track the vocal development of Foxp2 heterozygous knockout (Foxp2+/−) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates from juvenile to adult ages, and observe severe abnormalities in the courtship song of Foxp2+/− mice. In comparison to their WT littermates, Foxp2+/− mice vocalized less, produced shorter syllable sequences, and possessed an abnormal syllable inventory. In addition, Foxp2+/− song also exhibited irregular rhythmic structure, and its development did not follow the consistent trajectories observed in WT vocalizations. These results demonstrate that the Foxp2 gene is critical for normal vocal behavior in juvenile and adult mice, and that Foxp2 mutant mice may provide a tractable model system for the study of the gene’s role in general vocal motor control. PMID:26980647

  20. Characterization of the heterozygous glucokinase knockout mouse as a translational disease model for glucose control in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D J; Atkinson, A M; Wilkinson, G P; Coope, G J; Charles, A D; Leighton, B

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The global heterozygous glucokinase (GK) knockout (gkwt/del) male mouse, fed on a high-fat (60% by energy) diet, has provided a robust and reproducible model of hyperglycaemia. This model could be highly relevant to some facets of human type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to investigate the ability of standard therapeutic agents to lower blood glucose at translational doses, and to explore the glucose-lowering potential of novel glucokinase activators (GKAs) in this model. Experimental Approach We measured the ability of insulin, metformin, glipizide, exendin-4 and sitagliptin, after acute or repeat dose administration, to lower free-feeding glucose levels in gkwt/del mice. Further, we measured the ability of novel GKAs, GKA23, GKA71 and AZD6370 to control glucose either alone or in combination with some standard agents. Key Results A single dose of insulin (1 unit·kg−1), metformin (150, 300 mg·kg−1), glipizide (0.1, 0.3 mg·kg−1), exendin-4 (2, 20 μg·kg−1) and GKAs reduced free-feeding glucose levels. Sitagliptin (10 mg·kg−1), metformin (300 mg·kg−1) and AZD6370 (30, 400 mg·kg−1) reduced glucose excursions on repeat dosing. At a supra-therapeutic dose (400 mg·kg−1), AZD6370 also lowered basal levels of glucose without inducing hypoglycaemia. Conclusion and Implications Standard glucose-lowering therapeutic agents demonstrated significant acute glucose lowering in male gkwt/del mice at doses corresponding to therapeutic free drug levels in man, suggesting the potential of these mice as a translatable model of human T2D. Novel GKAs also lowered glucose in this mouse model. PMID:24772483

  1. Clues to VIP function from knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, S A; Szema, A M; Lyubsky, S; Dickman, K G; Degene, A; Mathew, S M; Waschek, J A; Said, S I

    2006-07-01

    We have taken advantage of the availability of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) knockout (KO) mice to examine the possible influence of deletion of the VIP gene on: (a) airway reactivity and airway inflammation, as indicators of bronchial asthma; (b) mortality from endotoxemia, a model of septic shock; and (c) the pulmonary circulation. VIP KO mice showed: (a) airway hyperresponsiveness to the cholinergic agonist methacholine, as well as peribronchial and perivascular inflammation; (b) a greater susceptibility to death from endotoxemia; and (c) evidence suggestive of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:16888146

  2. Ppp2ca knockout in mice spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xia; Tong, Xin; Tang, Chao; Li, Jianmin

    2015-04-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine phosphatase involved in meiosis, mitosis, sperm capacitation, and apoptosis. Abberant activity of PP2A has been associated with a number of diseases. The homolog PPP2CA and PPP2CB can each function as the phosphatase catalytic subunit generally referred to as PP2AC. We generated a Ppp2ca conditional knockout (CKO) in C57BL/6J mice. Exon 2 of Ppp2ca was knocked out in a spatial or temporal-specific manner in primordial germ cells at E12.5. This Ppp2ca-null mutation caused infertility in male C57BL/6J mice. These CKO mice provide a powerful tool to study the mechanisms of Ppp2ca in development and disease. PMID:25628439

  3. Disruption of NBS1 gene leads to early embryonic lethality in homozygous null mice and induces specific cancer in heterozygous mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Henrie, Melinda; Ouyang, Honghai; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Ito, Hisao; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Little, John B.; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Gloria C.; Chen, David J.

    2002-04-15

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive chromosome instability syndrome characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition, with cellular features similar to that of ataxia telangiectasia (AT). NBS results from mutations in the mammalian gene Nbs1 that codes for a 95-kDa protein called nibrin, NBS1, or p95. To establish an animal model for NBS, we attempted to generate NBS1 knockout mice. However, NBS1 gene knockouts were lethal at an early embryonic stage. NBS1 homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured in vitro showed retarded growth and subsequently underwent growth arrest within 5 days of culture. Apoptosis, assayed by TUNEL staining, was observed in NBSI homozygous(-/-) blastocyst cells cultured for four days. NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice were normal, and exhibited no specific phenotype for at least one year. However, fibroblast cells from NBSI heterozygous(+/-) mice displayed an enhanced frequency of spontaneous transformation to anchorage-independent growth as compared to NBS1 wild-type(+/+) cells. Furthermore, heterozygous(+/-) mice exhibited a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma after one year compared to wild-type mice, even though no significant differences in the incidence of other tumors such as lung adenocarcinoma and lymphoma were observed. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that NBS1 heterozygosity and reduced NBSI expression induces formation of specific tumors in mice.

  4. Enhanced Tumor Formation in Mice Heterozygous for Blm Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Risinger, Mary A.; Kordich, Jennifer J.; Sanz, Maureen M.; Straughen, Joel E.; Slovek, Lisa E.; Capobianco, Anthony J.; German, James; Boivin, Gregory P.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-09-01

    Persons with the autosomal recessive disorder Bloom syndrome are predisposed to cancers of many types due to loss-of-function mutations in the BLM gene, which encodes a recQ-like helicase. Here we show that mice heterozygous for a targeted null mutation of Blm, the murine homolog of BLM, develop lymphoma earlier than wild-type littermates in response to challenge with murine leukemia virus and develop twice the number of intestinal tumors when crossed with mice carrying a mutation in the Apctumor suppressor. These observations indicate that Blm is a modifier of tumor formation in the mouse and that Blm haploinsufficiency is associated with tumor predisposition, a finding with important implications for cancer risk in humans.

  5. Spatiotemporal Alterations in Primary Odorant Representations in Olfactory Marker Protein Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Marley D.; Moberly, Andrew H.; McGann, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory marker protein (OMP) is highly and selectively expressed in primary olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) across species, but its physiological function remains unclear. Previous studies in the olfactory epithelium suggest that it accelerates the neural response to odorants and may modulate the odorant-selectivity of OSNs. Here we used a line of gene-targeted mice that express the fluorescent exocytosis indicator synaptopHluorin in place of OMP to compare spatiotemporal patterns of odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release from OSNs in adult mice that were heterozygous for OMP or OMP-null. We found that these patterns, which constitute the primary neural representation of each odorant, developed more slowly during the odorant presentation in OMP knockout mice but eventually reached the same magnitude as in heterozygous mice. In the olfactory bulb, each glomerulus receives synaptic input from a subpopulation of OSNs that all express the same odor receptor and thus typically respond to a specific subset of odorants. We observed that in OMP knockout mice, OSNs innervating a given glomerulus typically responded to a broader range of odorants than in OMP heterozygous mice and thus each odorant evoked synaptic input to a larger number of glomeruli. In an olfactory habituation task, OMP knockout mice behaved differently than wild-type mice, exhibiting a delay in their onset to investigate an odor stimulus during its first presentation and less habituation to that stimulus over repeated presentations. These results suggest that the actions of OMP in olfactory transduction carry through to the primary sensory representations of olfactory stimuli in adult mice in vivo. PMID:23630588

  6. Evidence for mitotic recombination in W sup ei /+ heterozygous mice

    SciTech Connect

    Panthier, J.J.; Condamine, H.; Jacob, F. ); Guenet, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    A number of alleles at coat color loci of the house mouse give rise to areas of wild-type pigmentation on the coats of otherwise mutant animals. Such unstable alleles include both recessive and dominant mutations. Among the latter are several alleles at the W locus. In this report, phenotypic reversions of the W{sup ei} allele at the W locus were studied. Mice heterozygous in repulsion for both W{sup ei} and buff (bf) (i.e. W{sup ei}+/+bf) were examined for the occurrence of phenotypic reversion events. Buff (bf) is a recessive mutation, which lies 21 cM from W on the telomeric side of chromosome 5 and is responsible for the khaki colored coat of nonagouti buff homozygotes (a/a; bf/bf). Two kinds of fully pigmented reversion spots were recovered on the coats of a/a; W{sup ei}+/+bf mice: either solid black or khaki colored. Furthermore phenotypic reversions of W{sup ei}/+ were enhanced significantly following X-irradiation of 9.25-day-old W{sup ei}/+ embryos (P < 0.04). These observations are consistent with the suggestion of a role for mitotic recombination in the origin of these phenotypic reversions. In addition these results raise the intriguing possibility that some W mutations may enhance mitotic recombination in the house mouse.

  7. Production of a mouse strain with impaired glucose tolerance by systemic heterozygous knockout of the glucokinase gene and its feasibility as a prediabetes model

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Mikako; KANEDA, Asako; SUGIYAMA, Tae; IIDA, Ryousuke; OTOKUNI, Keiko; KABURAGI, Misako; MATSUOKA, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Exon II of glucokinase (Gk) was deleted to produce a systemic heterozygous Gk knockout (Gk+/−) mouse. The relative expression levels of Gk in the heart, lung, liver, stomach, and pancreas in Gk+/− mice ranged from 0.41–0.68 versus that in wild (Gk+/+) mice. On the other hand, its expression levels in the brain, adipose tissue, and muscle ranged from 0.95–1.03, and its expression levels in the spleen and kidney were nearly zero. Gk knockout caused no remarkable off-target effect on the expression of 7 diabetes causing genes (Shp, Hnf1a, Hnf1b, Irs1, Irs2, Kir6.2, and Pdx1) in 10 organs. The glucose tolerance test was conducted to determine the blood glucose concentrations just after fasting for 24 h (FBG) and at 2 h after high-glucose application (GTT2h). The FBG-GTT2h plots obtained with the wild strain fed the control diet (CD), Gk+/− strain fed the CD, and Gk+/− strain fed the HFD were distributed in separate areas in the FBG-GTT2h diagram. The respective areas could be defined as the normal state, prediabetes state, and diabetes state, respectively. Based on the results, the criteria for prediabetes could be defined for the Gk+/− strain developed in this study. PMID:25765873

  8. Heterozygous SOD2 deletion impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but not insulin action, in high-fat-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Li; Dai, Chunhua; Lustig, Mary E; Bonner, Jeffrey S; Mayes, Wesley H; Mokshagundam, Shilpa; James, Freyja D; Thompson, Courtney S; Lin, Chien-Te; Perry, Christopher G R; Anderson, Ethan J; Neufer, P Darrell; Wasserman, David H; Powers, Alvin C

    2014-11-01

    Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are linked to insulin resistance and islet dysfunction. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is a primary defense against mitochondrial oxidative stress. To test the hypothesis that heterozygous SOD2 deletion impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and insulin action, wild-type (sod2(+/+)) and heterozygous knockout mice (sod2(+/-)) were fed a chow or high-fat (HF) diet, which accelerates ROS production. Hyperglycemic (HG) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic (HI) clamps were performed to assess GSIS and insulin action in vivo. GSIS during HG clamps was equal in chow-fed sod2(+/-) and sod2(+/+) but was markedly decreased in HF-fed sod2(+/-). Remarkably, this impairment was not paralleled by reduced HG glucose infusion rate (GIR). Decreased GSIS in HF-fed sod2(+/-) was associated with increased ROS, such as superoxide ion. Surprisingly, insulin action determined by HI clamps did not differ between sod2(+/-) and sod2(+/+) of either diet. Since insulin action was unaffected, we hypothesized that the unchanged HG GIR in HF-fed sod2(+/-) was due to increased glucose effectiveness. Increased GLUT-1, hexokinase II, and phospho-AMPK protein in muscle of HF-fed sod2(+/-) support this hypothesis. We conclude that heterozygous SOD2 deletion in mice, a model that mimics SOD2 changes observed in diabetic humans, impairs GSIS in HF-fed mice without affecting insulin action. PMID:24947366

  9. Heterozygous SOD2 Deletion Impairs Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion, but Not Insulin Action, in High-Fat–Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chunhua; Lustig, Mary E.; Bonner, Jeffrey S.; Mayes, Wesley H.; Mokshagundam, Shilpa; James, Freyja D.; Thompson, Courtney S.; Lin, Chien-Te; Perry, Christopher G.R.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Wasserman, David H.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are linked to insulin resistance and islet dysfunction. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) is a primary defense against mitochondrial oxidative stress. To test the hypothesis that heterozygous SOD2 deletion impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and insulin action, wild-type (sod2+/+) and heterozygous knockout mice (sod2+/−) were fed a chow or high-fat (HF) diet, which accelerates ROS production. Hyperglycemic (HG) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic (HI) clamps were performed to assess GSIS and insulin action in vivo. GSIS during HG clamps was equal in chow-fed sod2+/− and sod2+/+ but was markedly decreased in HF-fed sod2+/−. Remarkably, this impairment was not paralleled by reduced HG glucose infusion rate (GIR). Decreased GSIS in HF-fed sod2+/− was associated with increased ROS, such as superoxide ion. Surprisingly, insulin action determined by HI clamps did not differ between sod2+/− and sod2+/+ of either diet. Since insulin action was unaffected, we hypothesized that the unchanged HG GIR in HF-fed sod2+/− was due to increased glucose effectiveness. Increased GLUT-1, hexokinase II, and phospho-AMPK protein in muscle of HF-fed sod2+/− support this hypothesis. We conclude that heterozygous SOD2 deletion in mice, a model that mimics SOD2 changes observed in diabetic humans, impairs GSIS in HF-fed mice without affecting insulin action. PMID:24947366

  10. Mice heterozygous for the ATM gene are more sensitive to heavy ions exposure than are wildtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worgul, B.; Smilenov, L.; Brenner, D.; Vazquez, M.; Hall, E.

    Previous studies have shown that the eyes of atm heterozygous mice exposed to Low LET radiation (X-rays) are more susceptible to the development of cataracts than are those of wildtype mice. The findings, as well as others, run counter to the assumption underpinning current radiation safety guidelines, that individuals are all equally sensitive to the biological effects of radiation. A question, highly relevant to human space activities is whether or not, in similar fashion there may exist a genetic predisposition to High LET radiation damage. Again the lens and, its primary radiopathy, cataract, were used to assay for the effects of ATM deficiency in a late-responding tissue. Together with those of wildtypes, the eyes of AT heterozygous knockout mice were exposed to 325 mGy of 1 GEV/amu 56Fe ions at the AGS facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The fluence was equivalent to 1 ion per nuclear area. As was the case in the earlier X-ray studies all irradiations were done on the 28th day after birth. Controls consisted of wildtype irradiated as well as unirradiated wildtype and heterozygotes. Ten mice from each group were examined weekly by conventional slitlamp biomicroscopy for a total of 35 weeks. The time required for prevalence to reach 50% (T50) as an endpoint for each stage indicated that not only cataract onset but also progression were accelerated in the mice haplo-deficient for the atm gene. For example the T50 for definitive cataract onset (stage 1) in the atm heterozygotes was 10 weeks whereas 17 weeks were required for the wildtypes. Similarly at the conclusion of the experiment (35 weeks), 40% of the lenses of allele-deficient mice had progressed to stage 3 (near fully opaque and obviously visually debilitating), while only one lens (5%) from the wildtype irradiated eyes achieved that stage. The data show that heterozygosity for the atm gene predisposes the eye to the cataractogenic influence of heavy ions and suggest that AT heterozygotes in the

  11. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of RNG105 (Caprin1) heterozygous mice: Reduced social interaction and attenuated response to novelty.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Rie; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    RNG105 (also known as Caprin1) is a major RNA-binding protein in neuronal RNA granules, and is responsible for mRNA transport to dendrites and neuronal network formation. A recent study reported that a heterozygous mutation in the Rng105 gene was found in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between RNG105 deficiency and ASD. Here, we subjected Rng105(+/-) mice to a comprehensive behavioral test battery, and revealed the influence of RNG105 deficiency on mouse behavior. Rng105(+/-) mice exhibited a reduced sociality in a home cage and a weak preference for social novelty. Consistently, the Rng105(+/-) mice also showed a weak preference for novel objects and novel place patterns. Furthermore, although the Rng105(+/-) mice exhibited normal memory acquisition, they tended to have relative difficulty in reversal learning in the spatial reference tasks. These findings suggest that the RNG105 heterozygous knockout leads to a reduction in sociality, response to novelty and flexibility in learning, which are implicated in ASD-like behavior. PMID:26865403

  12. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of RNG105 (Caprin1) heterozygous mice: Reduced social interaction and attenuated response to novelty

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Rie; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    RNG105 (also known as Caprin1) is a major RNA-binding protein in neuronal RNA granules, and is responsible for mRNA transport to dendrites and neuronal network formation. A recent study reported that a heterozygous mutation in the Rng105 gene was found in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between RNG105 deficiency and ASD. Here, we subjected Rng105+/− mice to a comprehensive behavioral test battery, and revealed the influence of RNG105 deficiency on mouse behavior. Rng105+/− mice exhibited a reduced sociality in a home cage and a weak preference for social novelty. Consistently, the Rng105+/− mice also showed a weak preference for novel objects and novel place patterns. Furthermore, although the Rng105+/− mice exhibited normal memory acquisition, they tended to have relative difficulty in reversal learning in the spatial reference tasks. These findings suggest that the RNG105 heterozygous knockout leads to a reduction in sociality, response to novelty and flexibility in learning, which are implicated in ASD-like behavior. PMID:26865403

  13. Generation of Gene Knockout Mice by ES Cell Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Glenn; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    This unit lists and describes protocols used in the production of chimeric mice leading to the generation of gene knockout mice. These protocols include the collection of blastocyst embryos, ES cell injection, and uterine transfer of injected blastocysts. Support protocols in the superovulation of blastocyst donor mice, generation of pseudopregnant recipients, fabrication of glass pipettes, and generation of germline mice are also included. Practical tips and solutions are mentioned to help troubleshoot problems that may occur. PMID:19731226

  14. Impaired conditioned taste aversion learning in spinophilin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Stafstrom-Davis, C A; Ouimet, C C; Feng, J; Allen, P B; Greengard, P; Houpt, T A

    2001-01-01

    Plasticity in dendritic spines may underlie learning and memory. Spinophilin, a protein enriched in dendritic spines, has the properties of a scaffolding protein and is believed to regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics affecting dendritic spine morphology. It also binds protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1), an enzyme that regulates dendritic spine physiology. In this study, we tested the role of spinophilin in conditioned taste aversion learning (CTA) using transgenic spinophilin knockout mice. CTA is a form of associative learning in which an animal rejects a food that has been paired previously with a toxic effect (e.g., a sucrose solution paired with a malaise-inducing injection of lithium chloride). Acquisition and extinction of CTA was tested in spinophilin knockout and wild-type mice using taste solutions (sucrose or sodium chloride) or flavors (Kool-Aid) paired with moderate or high doses of LiCl (0.15 M, 20 or 40 mL/kg). When sucrose or NaCl solutions were paired with a moderate dose of LiCl, spinophilin knockout mice were unable to learn a CTA. At the higher dose, knockout mice acquired a CTA but extinguished more rapidly than wild-type mice. A more salient flavor stimulus (taste plus odor) revealed similar CTA learning at both doses of LiCl in both knockouts and wild types. Sensory processing in the knockouts appeared normal because knockout mice and wild-type mice expressed identical unconditioned taste preferences in two-bottle tests, and identical lying-on-belly responses to acute LiCl. We conclude that spinophilin is a candidate molecule required for normal CTA learning. PMID:11584074

  15. Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced cataracts than are their wild-type counterparts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worgul, Basil V.; Smilenov, Lubomir; Brenner, David J.; Junk, Anna; Zhou, Wei; Hall, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    It is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. In vitro studies have shown that cells from individuals homozygous for ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) are much more radiosensitive than cells from unaffected individuals. Although cells heterozygous for the ATM gene (ATM(+/-)) may be slightly more radiosensitive in vitro, it remained to be determined whether the greater susceptibility of ATM(+/-) cells translates into an increased sensitivity for late effects in vivo, though there is a suggestion that radiotherapy patients that are heterozygous for the ATM gene may be more at risk of developing late normal tissue damage. We chose cataractogenesis in the lens as a means to assay for the effects of ATM deficiency in a late-responding tissue. One eye of wild-type, Atm heterozygous and homozygous knockout mice was exposed to 0.5-, 1.0-, 2.0-, or 4.0-Gy x rays. The animals were followed weekly for cataract development by conventional slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Cataract development in the animals of all three groups was strongly dependent on dose. The lenses of homozygous mice were the first to opacify at any given dose. Most important in the present context is that cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals. The data suggest that ATM heterozygotes in the human population may also be radiosensitive. This may influence the choice of individuals destined to be exposed to higher than normal doses of radiation, such as astronauts, and may also suggest that radiotherapy patients who are ATM heterozygotes could be predisposed to increased late normal tissue damage.

  16. Heterozygous L1-deficient mice express an autism-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher; Netrakanti, Meera; Saylor, Joshua; Schachner, Melitta; Matzel, Louis D

    2015-10-01

    The L1CAM (L1) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule that contributes to several important processes in the developing and adult nervous system, including neuronal migration, survival, and plasticity. In humans and mice, mutations in the X chromosome-linked gene L1 cause severe neurological defects in males. L1 heterozygous female mice with one functional copy of the L1 gene show complex morphological features that are different from L1 fully-deficient and wild-type littermate mice. However, almost no information is available on the behavior of L1 heterozygous mice and humans. Here, we investigated the behavior of heterozygous female mice in which the L1 gene is constitutively inactivated. These mice were compared to wild-type littermate females. Animals were assessed in five categories of behavioral tests: five tests for anxiety/stress/exploration, four tests for motor abilities, two tests for spatial learning, three tests for social behavior, and three tests for repetitive behavior. We found that L1 heterozygous mice express an autism-like phenotype, comprised of reduced social behaviors and excessive self-grooming (a repetitive behavior also typical in animal models of autism). L1 heterozygous mice also exhibited an increase in sensitivity to light, assessed by a reluctance to enter the lighted areas of novel environments. However, levels of anxiety, stress, motor abilities, and spatial learning in L1 heterozygous mice were similar to those of wild-type mice. These observations raise the possibility that using molecules known to trigger L1 functions may become valuable in the treatment of autism in humans. PMID:26079769

  17. Physical, Heritable and Age-Related Factors as Modifiers of Radiation Cancer Risk in Patched Heterozygous Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pazzaglia, Simonetta Pasquali, Emanuela M.Sc.; Tanori, Mirella; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Di Majo, Vincenzo; Rebessi, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To address the tumorigenic potential of exposure to low/intermediate doses of ionizing radiation and to identify biological factors influencing tumor response in a mouse model highly susceptible to radiogenic cancer. Methods and Materials: Newborn Ptc1 heterozygous mice were exposed to X-ray doses of 100, 250, and 500 mGy, and tumor development was monitored for their lifetime. Additional groups were irradiated with the same doses and sacrificed at fixed times for determination of short-term endpoints, such as apoptosis and early preneoplastic lesions in cerebellum. Finally, groups of Ptc1 heterozygous mice were bred on the C57BL/6 background to study the influence of common variant genes on radiation response. Results: We have identified a significant effect of low-intermediate doses of radiation (250 and 500 mGy) in shortening mean survival and inducing early and more progressed stages of tumor development in the cerebellum of Ptc1{sup +/-} mice. In addition, we show that age at exposure and heritable factors are potent modifiers of radiation-related cancer risk. Conclusions: The Ptc1 knockout mouse model offers a highly sensitive system that may potentially help to improve understanding and quantification of risk at low doses, such as doses experienced in occupational and medical exposures, and clarify the complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors underlying cancer susceptibility.

  18. Knockout Mice Challenge our Concepts of Glucose Homeostasis and the Pathogenesis of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    A central component of type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome is insulin resistance. Insulin exerts a multifaceted and highly integrated series of actions via its intracellular signaling systems. Generation of mice carrying null mutations of the genes encoding proteins in the insulin signaling pathway provides a unique approach to determining the role of individual proteins in the molecular mechanism of insulin action and the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and diabetes. The role of the four major insulin receptor substrates (IRS1-4) in insulin and IGF-1 signaling have been examined by creating mice with targeted gene knockouts. Each produces a unique phenotype, indicating the complementary role of these signaling components. Combined heterozygous defects often produce synergistic or epistatic effects, although the final severity of the phenotype depends on the genetic background of the mice. Conditional knockouts of the insulin receptor have also been created using the Cre-lox system. These tissue specific knockouts have provide unique insights into the control of glucose homeostasis and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, and have led to development of new hypotheses about the nature of the insulin action and development of diabetes. PMID:15061645

  19. Idebenone and Resveratrol Extend Lifespan and Improve Motor Function of HtrA2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szegő, Éva M.; Moisoi, Nicoleta; Martins, L. Miguel; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Kermer, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutation of the human gene for the mitochondrial protease HtrA2 has been associated with increased risk to develop mitochondrial dysfunction, a process known to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Knockout of HtrA2 in mice also leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and to phenotypes that resemble those found in neurodegenerative disorders and, ultimately, lead to death of animals around postnatal day 30. Here, we show that Idebenone, a synthetic antioxidant of the coenzyme Q family, and Resveratrol, a bioactive compound extracted from grapes, are both able to ameliorate this phenotype. Feeding HtrA2 knockout mice with either compound extends lifespan and delays worsening of the motor phenotype. Experiments conducted in cell culture and on brain tissue of mice revealed that each compound has a different mechanism of action. While Idebenone acts by downregulating the integrated stress response, Resveratrol acts by attenuating apoptosis at the level of Bax. These activities can account for the delay in neuronal degeneration in the striata of these mice and illustrate the potential of these compounds as effective therapeutic approaches against neurodegenerative disorders such as HD or PD. PMID:22205977

  20. Enhanced inhibitory neurotransmission in the cerebellar cortex of Atp1a3-deficient heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keiko; Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Onaka, Tatsushi; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Takeda, Naoki; Imoto, Keiji; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by excessive involuntary and prolonged simultaneous contractions of both agonist and antagonist muscles. Although the basal ganglia have long been proposed as the primary region, recent studies indicated that the cerebellum also plays a key role in the expression of dystonia. One hereditary form of dystonia, rapid-onset dystonia with parkinsonism (RDP), is caused by loss of function mutations of the gene for the Na pump α3 subunit (ATP1A3). Little information is available on the affected brain regions and mechanism for dystonia by the mutations in RDP. The Na pump is composed of α and β subunits and maintains ionic gradients of Na+ and K+ across the cell membrane. The gradients are utilized for neurotransmitter reuptake and their alteration modulates neural excitability. To provide insight into the molecular aetiology of RDP, we generated and analysed knockout heterozygous mice (Atp1a3+/−). Atp1a3+/− showed increased symptoms of dystonia that is induced by kainate injection into the cerebellar vermis. Atp1a3 mRNA was highly expressed in Purkinje cells and molecular-layer interneurons, and its product was concentrated at Purkinje cell soma, the site of abundant vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (VGAT) signal, suggesting the presynaptic localization of the α3 subunit in the inhibitory synapse. Electrophysiological studies showed that the inhibitory neurotransmission at molecular-layer interneuron–Purkinje cell synapses was enhanced in Atp1a3+/− cerebellar cortex, and that the enhancement originated via a presynaptic mechanism. Our results shed light on the role of Atp1a3 in the inhibitory synapse, and potential involvement of inhibitory synaptic dysfunction for the pathophysiology of dystonia. PMID:23652595

  1. Dentin Dysplasia in Notum Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Read, R W; Hansen, G M; Powell, D R; Kantaputra, P N; Zambrowicz, B; Brommage, R

    2016-07-01

    Secreted WNT proteins control cell differentiation and proliferation in many tissues, and NOTUM is a secreted enzyme that modulates WNT morphogens by removing a palmitoleoylate moiety that is essential for their activity. To better understand the role this enzyme in development, the authors produced NOTUM-deficient mice by targeted insertional disruption of the Notum gene. The authors discovered a critical role for NOTUM in dentin morphogenesis suggesting that increased WNT activity can disrupt odontoblast differentiation and orientation in both incisor and molar teeth. Although molars in Notum(-/-) mice had normal-shaped crowns and normal mantle dentin, the defective crown dentin resulted in enamel prone to fracture during mastication and made teeth more susceptible to endodontal inflammation and necrosis. The dentin dysplasia and short roots contributed to tooth hypermobility and to the spread of periodontal inflammation, which often progressed to periapical abscess formation. The additional incidental finding of renal agenesis in some Notum (-/-) mice indicated that NOTUM also has a role in kidney development, with undiagnosed bilateral renal agenesis most likely responsible for the observed decreased perinatal viability of Notum(-/-) mice. The findings support a significant role for NOTUM in modulating WNT signaling pathways that have pleiotropic effects on tooth and kidney development. PMID:26926082

  2. Functional recovery of regenerating motor axons is delayed in mice heterozygously deficient for the myelin protein P(0) gene.

    PubMed

    Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2013-06-01

    Mice with a heterozygous knock-out of the myelin protein P0 gene (P0+/-) develop a neuropathy similar to human Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. They are indistinguishable from wild-types (WT) at birth and develop a slowly progressing demyelinating neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the regeneration capacity of early symptomatic P0+/- is impaired as compared to age matched WT. Right sciatic nerves were lesioned at the thigh in 7-8 months old mice. Tibial motor axons at ankle were investigated by conventional motor conduction studies and axon excitability studies using threshold tracking. To evaluate regeneration we monitored the recovery of motor function after crush, and then compared the fiber distribution by histology. The overall motor performance was investigated using Rotor-Rod. P0+/- had reduced compound motor action potential amplitudes and thinner myelinated axons with only a borderline impairment in conduction and Rotor-Rod. Plantar muscle reinnervation occurred within 21 days in all mice. Shortly after reinnervation the conduction of P0+/- regenerated axons was markedly slower than WT, however, this difference decayed with time. Nevertheless, after 1 month, regenerated P0+/- axons had longer strength-duration time constant, larger threshold changes during hyperpolarizing electrotonus and longer relative refractory period. Their performance at Rotor-Rod remained also markedly impaired. In contrast, the number and diameter distribution of regenerating myelinated fibers became similar to regenerated WT. Our data suggest that in the presence of heterozygously P0 deficient Schwann cells, regenerating motor axons retain their ability to reinnervate their targets and remyelinate, though their functional recovery is delayed. PMID:23564290

  3. Behavioral characterization of P311 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gregory A.; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Greene, Robert I.; Daniell, Xiaoju; Henry, Stanley C.; Crooks, Kristy R.; Kotloski, Robert; Tessarollo, Lino; Phillips, Lindsey E.; Wetsel, William C.

    2013-01-01

    P311 is an 8-kDa protein that is expressed in many brain regions, particularly the hippocampus, cerebellum and olfactory lobes, and is under stringent regulation by developmental, mitogenic and other physiological stimuli. P311 is thought to be involved in the transformation and motility of neural cells; however, its role in normal brain physiology is undefined. To address this point, P311-deficient mice were developed through gene targeting and their behaviors were characterized. Mutants displayed no overt abnormalities, bred normally and had normal survival rates. Additionally, no deficiencies were noted in motor co-ordination, balance, hearing or olfactory discrimination. Nevertheless, P311-deficient mice showed altered behavioral responses in learning and memory. These included impaired responses in social transmission of food preference, Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning. Additionally, mutants displayed altered emotional responses as indicated by decreased freezing in contextual and cued fear conditioning and reduced fear-potentiated startle. Together, these data establish P311 as playing an important role in learning and memory processes and emotional responses. PMID:18616608

  4. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs. PMID:25126564

  5. Altered social cognition in male BDNF heterozygous mice and following chronic methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Manning, Elizabeth E; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2016-05-15

    Growing clinical evidence suggests that persistent psychosis which occurs in methamphetamine users is closely related to schizophrenia. However, preclinical studies in animal models have focussed on psychosis-related behaviours following methamphetamine, and less work has been done to assess endophenotypes relevant to other deficits observed in schizophrenia. Altered social behaviour is a feature of both the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, and significantly impacts patient functioning. We recently found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) heterozygous mice show disrupted sensitization to methamphetamine, supporting other work suggesting an important role of this neurotrophin in the pathophysiology of psychosis and the neuronal response to stimulant drugs. In the current study, we assessed social and cognitive behaviours in methamphetamine-treated BDNF heterozygous mice and wildtype littermate controls. Following chronic methamphetamine exposure male wildtype mice showed a 50% reduction in social novelty preference. Vehicle-treated male BDNF heterozygous mice showed a similar impairment in social novelty preference, with a trend for no further disruption by methamphetamine exposure. Female mice were unaffected in this task, and no groups showed any changes in sociability or short-term spatial memory. These findings suggest that chronic methamphetamine alters behaviour relevant to disruption of social cognition in schizophrenia, supporting other studies which demonstrate a close resemblance between persistent methamphetamine psychosis and schizophrenia. Together these findings suggest that dynamic regulation of BDNF signalling is necessary to mediate the effects of methamphetamine on behaviours relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:26965573

  6. A high‐calcium diet failed to rescue an osteopenia phenotype in claudin‐18 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Alshbool, Fatima Z.; Alarcon, Catrina; Wergedal, Jon; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have recently demonstrated that mice with disruption of claudin‐18 (Cldn‐18) gene exhibited osteopenia due to increased bone resorption (BR). In this study, we found that gastric pH was significantly higher in Cldn‐18 knockout (KO) mice compared to heterozygous control mice at 10 weeks of age. To test the possibility that the increased BR in the Cldn‐18 KO mice fed a normal‐Ca diet is a consequence of decreased Ca absorption caused by increased stomach pH, we subjected KO and control mice to a normal‐Ca and high‐Ca diet at birth. Serum Ca levels were significantly lower in Cldn‐18 KO mice compared to control mice at a normal‐Ca diet but not at high‐Ca diet. Dual energy X‐ray absorptiometry revealed that a high‐Ca diet significantly increased lumbar bone mineral density (BMD), but had no effect on femur/tibia BMD in both Cldn‐18 KO and control mice compared to a normal‐Ca diet. While a high‐Ca diet did not affect volumetric BMD, trabecular, and cortical parameters of the lumbar vertebra (LV) as measured by μCT, the size of the LV did increase, in both genotypes due to reduced BR. Comparison of the skeletal phenotype of high‐Ca Cldn‐18 KO and control mice revealed that an osteopenia phenotype seen at a normal‐Ca diet was still maintained at different skeletal sites in the KO mice till 10 weeks of age. In conclusion, our findings suggest that increased BR is likely caused by direct effects of a lack of Cldn‐18 on osteoclasts rather than gastric pH changes. PMID:24744879

  7. Mutations of the functional ARH1 allele in tumors from ARH1 heterozygous mice and cells affect ARH1 catalytic activity, cell proliferation and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, J; Vekhter, D; Heath, J; Zhu, J; Barbieri, J T; Moss, J

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation results from transfer of the ADP-ribose moiety of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to an acceptor with ADP-ribose-acceptor content determined by the activities of ADP-ribosyltransferases, which modify the acceptor, and ADP-ribose-acceptor hydrolase (ARH), which cleave the ADP-ribose-acceptor bond. ARH1 was discovered as an ADP-ribose(arginine)protein hydrolase. Previously, we showed that ARH1-knockout and ARH1 heterozygous mice spontaneously developed tumors. Further, ARH1-knockout and ARH1 heterozygous mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) produced tumors when injected into nude mice. In tumors arising in ARH1 heterozygous mice and MEFs, we found both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the ARH1 gene and ARH1 gene mutations. In the present report, we found that these mutant ARH1 genes encode proteins with reduced ARH1 enzymatic activity. Moreover, MEFs transformed with ARH1 mutant genes exhibiting different levels of ARH1 activity showed altered rates of proliferation, anchorage-independent colony growth in soft agar, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. MEFs transformed with the wild-type (WT) gene, but expressing low levels of hydrolase activity were also tumorigenic. However, transformation with the WT gene was less likely to yield tumors than transformation with a mutant gene exhibiting similar hydrolase activity. Thus, control of protein-ADP-ribosylation by ARH1 is critical for tumorigenesis. In the human cancer database, LOH and mutations of the ARH1 gene were observed. Further, ARH1 gene mutations were located in exons 3 and 4, comparable to exons 2 and 3 of the murine ARH1 gene, which comprise the catalytic site. Thus, human ARH1 gene mutations similar to their murine counterparts may be involved in human cancers. PMID:26029825

  8. Mice with a heterozygous Lrp6 deletion have impaired fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Travis A; Vivanco, Juan F; Zahatnansky, Juraj; Moren, Andrew J Vander; Mason, James J; Williams, Bart O

    2016-01-01

    Bone fracture non-unions, the failure of a fracture to heal, occur in 10%–20% of fractures and are a costly and debilitating clinical problem. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is critical in bone development and fracture healing. Polymorphisms of linking low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), a Wnt-binding receptor, have been associated with decreased bone mineral density and fragility fractures, although this remains controversial. Mice with a homozygous deletion of Lrp6 have severe skeletal abnormalities and are not viable, whereas mice with a heterozygous deletion have a combinatory effect with Lrp5 to decrease bone mineral density. As fracture healing closely models embryonic skeletal development, we investigated the process of fracture healing in mice heterozygous for Lrp6 (Lrp6 +/−) and hypothesized that the heterozygous deletion of Lrp6 would impair fracture healing. Mid-diaphyseal femur fractures were induced in Lrp6 +/− mice and wild-type controls (Lrp6 +/+). Fractures were analyzed using micro-computed tomography (μCT) scans, biomechanical testing, and histological analysis. Lrp6 +/− mice had significantly decreased stiffness and strength at 28 days post fracture (PF) and significantly decreased BV/TV, total density, immature bone density, and mature area within the callus on day-14 and -21 PF; they had significantly increased empty callus area at days 14 and 21 PF. Our results demonstrate that the heterozygous deletion of Lrp6 impairs fracture healing, which suggests that Lrp6 has a role in fracture healing.

  9. Hepatic changes in metabolic gene expression in old ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin knockout (GKO) and ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor) knockout (GHSRKO) mice exhibit enhanced insulin sensitivity, but the mechanism is unclear. Insulin sensitivity declines with age and is inversely associated with accumulation of lipid in liver, a key glucoregulatory ...

  10. Social dominance in male vasopressin 1b receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Heather K; Dike, Obianuju E; Stevenson, Erica L; Storck, Kathryn; Young, W Scott

    2010-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with a targeted disruption of their vasopressin 1b receptor gene, Avpr1b, have mild impairments in social recognition and reduced aggression. The reductions in aggression are limited to social forms of aggression, i.e., maternal and inter-male aggression, while predatory aggression remains unaffected. To further clarify the role of the Avpr1b in the regulation of social behavior we first examined anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in Avpr1b knockout (Avpr1b -/-) mice. We then went on to test the ability of Avpr1b -/- mice to form dominance hierarchies. No major differences were found between Avpr1b -/- and wildtype mice in anxiety-like behaviors, as measured using an elevated plus maze and an open field test, or depression-like behaviors, as measured using a forced swim test. In the social dominance study we found that Avpr1b -/- mice are able to form dominance hierarchies, though in early hierarchy formation dominant Avpr1b -/- mice display significantly more mounting behavior on Day 1 of testing compared to wildtype controls. Further, non-socially dominant Avpr1b -/- mice spend less time engaged in attack behavior than wildtype controls. These findings suggest that while Avpr1b -/- mice may be able to form dominance hierarchies they appear to employ alternate strategies. PMID:20298692

  11. Bone growth and turnover in progesterone receptor knockout mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jaime C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-05-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and mCT analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 weeks of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain and tibia longitudinal bone growth was normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total and cortical bone mass were increased in long bones of post-pubertal (12 and 26-week-old) PRKO mice, whereas cancellous bone mass was normal in the tibia but increased in the humerus. The striking 57% decrease in cancellous bone from the proximal tibia metaphysis which occurred between 6 and 26 weeks in WT mice was abolished in PRKO mice. The improved bone balance in aging PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice attenuates the accumulation of cortical bone mass during adolescence and is required for early age-related loss of cancellous bone.

  12. Bone Growth and Turnover in Progesterone Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, David J.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Evans, Glenda; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Hunter, Jamie C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lydon, John P.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Khosla, Sundeep; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Turner, Russell T.

    2008-01-01

    The role of progesterone receptor (PR) signaling in skeletal metabolism is controversial. To address whether signaling through the PR is necessary for normal bone growth and turnover, we performed histomorphometric and microcomputed tomography analyses of bone from homozygous female PR knockout (PRKO) mice at 6, 12, and 26 wk of age. These mice possess a null mutation of the PR locus, which blocks the gene expression of A and B isoforms of PR. Body weight gain, uterine weight gain, and tibia longitudinal bone growth were normal in PRKO mice. In contrast, total, cancellous, and cortical bone mass were increased in the humerus of 12-wk-old PRKO mice, whereas cortical and cancellous bone mass in the tibia was normal. At 26 wk of age, cancellous bone area in the proximal tibia metaphysis of PRKO mice was 153% greater than age matched wild-type mice. The improved cancellous bone balance in 6-month-old PRKO mice was associated with elevated bone formation and a tendency toward reduced osteoclast perimeter. Taken together, these findings suggest that PR signaling in mice is not essential for bone growth and turnover. However, at some skeletal sites, PR signaling attenuates the accumulation of cortical and cancellous bone mass during adolescence. PMID:18276762

  13. Knock-out of nexilin in mice leads to dilated cardiomyopathy and endomyocardial fibroelastosis.

    PubMed

    Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Schlossarek, Saskia; Stoelting, Stephanie; Klinger, Matthias; Geertz, Birgit; Weinberger, Florian; Kessler, Thorsten; Aherrahrou, Redouane; Moreth, Kristin; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Just, Steffen; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schunkert, Heribert; Carrier, Lucie; Erdmann, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is one of the most common causes of chronic heart failure worldwide. Mutations in the gene encoding nexilin (NEXN) occur in patients with both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM); however, little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms and relevance of NEXN to these disorders. Here, we evaluated the functional role of NEXN using a constitutive Nexn knock-out (KO) mouse model. Heterozygous (Het) mice were inter-crossed to produce wild-type (WT), Het, and homozygous KO mice. At birth, 32, 46, and 22 % of the mice were WT, Het, and KO, respectively, which is close to the expected Mendelian ratio. After postnatal day 6, the survival of the Nexn KO mice decreased dramatically and all of the animals died by day 8. Phenotypic characterizations of the WT and KO mice were performed at postnatal days 1, 2, 4, and 6. At birth, the relative heart weights of the WT and KO mice were similar; however, at day 4, the relative heart weight of the KO group was 2.3-fold higher than of the WT group. In addition, the KO mice developed rapidly progressive cardiomyopathy with left ventricular dilation and wall thinning and decreased cardiac function. At day 6, the KO mice developed a fulminant DCM phenotype characterized by dilated ventricular chambers and systolic dysfunction. At this stage, collagen deposits and some elastin deposits were observed within the left ventricle cavity, which resembles the features of endomyocardial fibroelastosis (EFE). Overall, these results further emphasize the role of NEXN in DCM and suggest a novel role in EFE. PMID:26659360

  14. Phenotypic characterization of mice heterozygous for a null mutation of glutamate carboxypeptidase II.

    PubMed

    Han, Liqun; Picker, Jonathan D; Schaevitz, Laura R; Tsai, Guochuan; Feng, Jiamin; Jiang, Zhichun; Chu, Hillary C; Basu, Alo C; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne; Coyle, Joseph T

    2009-08-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. Disturbed glutamate signaling resulting in hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) hydrolyzes N-acetyl-alpha L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate. NAAG is a neuropeptide that is an NMDAR antagonist as well as an agonist for the metabotropic glutamate receptor-3 (mGluR3), which inhibits glutamate release. The aggregate effect of NAAG is thus to attenuate NMDAR activation. To manipulate the expression of GCP II, LoxP sites were inserted flanking exons 1 and 2, which were excised by crossing with a Cre-expressing mouse. The mice heterozygous for this deletion showed a 50% reduction in the expression level of protein and functional activity of GCP II in brain samples. Heterozygous mutant crosses did not yield any homozygous null animals at birth or as embryos (N > 200 live births and fetuses). These data are consistent with the previous report that GCP II homozygous mutant mice generated by removing exons 9 and 10 of GCP II gene were embryonically lethal and confirm our hypothesis that GCP II plays an essential role early in embryonic development. Heterozygous mice, however, developed normally to adulthood and exhibited increased locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, and a subtle cognitive deficit in working memory. PMID:19347959

  15. Phenotypic Characterization of Mice Heterozygous for a Null Mutation of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liqun; Picker, Jonathan D.; Schaevitz, Laura R.; Tsai, Guochuan; Feng, Jiamin; Jiang, Zhichun; Chu, Hillary C.; Basu, Alo C.; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne; Coyle, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. Disturbed glutamate signaling resulting in hypofunction of NMDA receptors has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) hydrolyzes N-acetyl-alpha L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA). NAAG is a neuropeptide that is an NMDA receptor antagonist as well as an agonist for the metabotropic glutamate receptor-3 (mGluR3), which inhibits glutamate release. The aggregate effect of NAAG is thus to attenuate NMDA receptor activation. To manipulate the expression of GCP II, loxP sites were inserted flanking exon 1 and 2, which were excised by crossing with a Cre-expressing mouse. The mice heterozygous for this deletion showed a 50% reduction in the expression level of protein and functional activity of GCP II in brain samples. Heterozygous mutant crosses did not yield any homozygous null animals at birth or as embryos (N >200 live births and fetuses). These data are consistent with the previous report that GCP II homozygous mutant mice generated by removing exons 9 and 10 of GCP II gene were embryonically lethal and confirm our hypothesis that GCP II plays an essential role early in embryonic development. Heterozygous mice, however, developed normally to adulthood and exhibited increased locomotor activity, reduced social interaction, and a subtle cognitive deficit in working memory. PMID:19347959

  16. Delayed liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in adiponectin knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ezaki, Hisao; Yoshida, Yuichi; Saji, Yukiko; Takemura, Takayo; Fukushima, Juichi; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Wada, Akira; Igura, Takumi; Kihara, Shinji; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Tamura, Shinji; Kiso, Shinichi Hayashi, Norio

    2009-01-02

    We previously demonstrated that adiponectin has anti-fibrogenic and anti-inflammatory effects in the liver of mouse models of various liver diseases. However, its role in liver regeneration remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role of adiponectin in liver regeneration. We assessed liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in wild-type (WT) and adiponectin knockout (KO) mice. We analyzed DNA replication and various signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and metabolism. Adiponectin KO mice exhibited delayed DNA replication and increased lipid accumulation in the regenerating liver. The expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), a key enzyme in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, were decreased in adiponectin KO mice, suggesting possible contribution of altered fat metabolism to these phenomena. Collectively, the present results highlight a new role for adiponectin in the process of liver regeneration.

  17. Neuregulin 3 Knockout Mice Exhibit Behaviors Consistent with Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Lindsay N; Shevelkin, Alexey; Zeledon, Mariela; Steel, Gary; Chen, Pei-Lung; Obie, Cassandra; Pulver, Ann; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Valle, David; Sawa, Akira; Pletnikov, Mikhail V

    2016-07-01

    Neuregulin 3 (NRG3) is a paralog of NRG1. Genetic studies in schizophrenia demonstrate that risk variants in NRG3 are associated with cognitive and psychotic symptom severity, and several intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms in NRG3 are associated with delusions in patients with schizophrenia. In order to gain insights into the biological function of the gene, we generated a novel Nrg3 knockout (KO) mouse model and tested for neurobehavioral phenotypes relevant to psychotic disorders. KO mice displayed novelty-induced hyperactivity, impaired prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response, and deficient fear conditioning. No gross cytoarchitectonic or layer abnormalities were noted in the brain of KO mice. Our findings suggest that deletion of the Nrg3 gene leads to alterations consistent with aspects of schizophrenia. We propose that KO mice will provide a valuable animal model to determine the role of the NRG3 in the molecular pathogenesis of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. PMID:27606322

  18. Characteristics of Skeletal Muscle Fibers of SOD1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Nagahisa, Hiroshi; Okabe, Kazuma; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) knockout (KO) mice are known as an aging model in some aspects, but the damage and regeneration process of each fiber type have not been sufficiently studied. In this study, we investigated the damage and satellite cell state of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice (6 months old) using immunohistochemical staining and real-time RT-PCR. The proportion of central nuclei-containing Type IIx/b fibers in the deep and superficial portions of the gastrocnemius muscle was significantly higher in SOD1 KO than control mice. The number of satellite cells per muscle fiber decreased in all muscle fiber types in the deep portion of the gastrocnemius muscle in SOD1 KO mice. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of Pax7 and myogenin, which are expressed in satellite cells in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation states, significantly increased in the gastrocnemius muscle of SOD1 KO mice. Furthermore, mRNA of myosin heavy chain-embryonic, which is expressed in the early phase of muscle regeneration, significantly increased in SOD1 KO mice. It was suggested that muscle is damaged by reactive oxygen species produced in the mitochondrial intermembrane space in Type IIxb fibers, accelerating the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells through growth factors in SOD1 KO mice. PMID:26798428

  19. Development of Soft Tissue Sarcomas in Ribosomal Proteins L5 and S24 Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kazerounian, Shideh; Ciarlini, Pedro D.S.C.; Yuan, Daniel; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Joshi, Mugdha; Zhang, Hong; Beggs, Alan H.; Gazda, Hanna T.

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome associated with ribosomal protein (RP) gene mutations. Recent studies have also demonstrated an increased risk of cancer predisposition among DBA patients. In this study, we report the formation of soft tissue sarcoma in the Rpl5 and Rps24 heterozygous mice. Our observation suggests that even though one wild-type allele of the Rpl5 or Rps24 gene prevents anemia in these mice, it still predisposes them to cancer development. PMID:26722357

  20. Development of Soft Tissue Sarcomas in Ribosomal Proteins L5 and S24 Heterozygous Mice.

    PubMed

    Kazerounian, Shideh; Ciarlini, Pedro D S C; Yuan, Daniel; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Joshi, Mugdha; Zhang, Hong; Beggs, Alan H; Gazda, Hanna T

    2016-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome associated with ribosomal protein (RP) gene mutations. Recent studies have also demonstrated an increased risk of cancer predisposition among DBA patients. In this study, we report the formation of soft tissue sarcoma in the Rpl5 and Rps24 heterozygous mice. Our observation suggests that even though one wild-type allele of the Rpl5 or Rps24 gene prevents anemia in these mice, it still predisposes them to cancer development. PMID:26722357

  1. Screening methods to identify TALEN-mediated knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Araki, Kimi; Takeda, Naoki; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Sakuma, Tetsushi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with site-specific nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases, such as the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system, is becoming the new standard for targeted genome modification in various organisms. Application of these techniques to the manufacture of knockout mice would be greatly aided by simple and easy methods for genotyping of mutant and wild-type pups among litters. However, there are no detailed or comparative reports concerning the identification of mutant mice generated using genome editing technologies. Here, we genotyped TALEN-derived enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) knockout mice using a combination of approaches, including fluorescence observation, heteroduplex mobility assay, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. The detection sensitivities for TALEN-induced mutations differed among these methods, and we therefore concluded that combinatorial testing is necessary for the screening and determination of mutant genotypes. Since the analytical methods tested can be carried out without specialized equipment, costly reagents and/or sophisticated protocols, our report should be of interest to a broad range of researchers who are considering the application of genome editing technologies in various organisms. PMID:24521866

  2. Screening Methods to Identify TALEN-Mediated Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yoshiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Araki, Kimi; Takeda, Naoki; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Sakuma, Tetsushi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with site-specific nucleases, such as zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided nucleases, such as the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system, is becoming the new standard for targeted genome modification in various organisms. Application of these techniques to the manufacture of knockout mice would be greatly aided by simple and easy methods for genotyping of mutant and wild-type pups among litters. However, there are no detailed or comparative reports concerning the identification of mutant mice generated using genome editing technologies. Here, we genotyped TALEN-derived enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) knockout mice using a combination of approaches, including fluorescence observation, heteroduplex mobility assay, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. The detection sensitivities for TALEN-induced mutations differed among these methods, and we therefore concluded that combinatorial testing is necessary for the screening and determination of mutant genotypes. Since the analytical methods tested can be carried out without specialized equipment, costly reagents and/or sophisticated protocols, our report should be of interest to a broad range of researchers who are considering the application of genome editing technologies in various organisms. PMID:24521866

  3. Enhanced colonic tumorigenesis in alkaline sphingomyelinase (NPP7) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Ping; Xu, Shu-Chang; Yang, Liping; Voss, Ulrikke; Ekblad, Eva; Wu, Yunjin; Min, Yalan; Hertervig, Erik; Nilsson, Åke; Duan, Rui-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase (alk-SMase) generates ceramide and inactivates platelet-activating factor (PAF) and was previously suggested to have anticancer properties. The direct evidence is still lacking. We studied colonic tumorigenesis in alk-SMase knockout (KO) mice. Formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) was examined after azoxymethane (AOM) injection. Tumor was induced by AOM alone, a conventional AOM/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) treatment, and an enhanced AOM/DSS method. β-Catenin was determined by immunohistochemistry, PAF levels by ELISA, and sphingomyelin metabolites by mass spectrometry. Without treatment, spontaneous tumorigenesis was not identified but the intestinal mucosa appeared thicker in KO than in wild-type (WT) littermates. AOM alone induced more ACF in KO mice but no tumors 28 weeks after injection. However, combination of AOM/DSS treatments induced colonic tumors and the incidence was significantly higher in KO than in WT mice. By the enhanced AOM/DSS method, tumor number per mouse increased 4.5 times and tumor size 1.8 times in KO compared with WT mice. Although all tumors were adenomas in WT mice, 32% were adenocarcinomas in KO mice. Compared with WT mice, cytosol expression of β-catenin was significantly increased and nuclear translocation in tumors was more pronounced in KO mice. Lipid analysis showed decreased ceramide in small intestine and increased sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in both small intestine and colon in nontreated KO mice. PAF levels in feces were significantly higher in the KO mice after AOM/DSS treatment. In conclusion, lack of alk-SMase markedly increases AOM/DSS-induced colonic tumorigenesis associated with decreased ceramide and increased S1P and PAF levels. PMID:25381265

  4. Salty taste deficits in CALHM1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, Michael G; Ellis, Hillary T; Aleman, Tiffany R; Downing, Arnelle; Marambaud, Philippe; Foskett, J Kevin; Dana, Rachel M; McCaughey, Stuart A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic ablation of calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate from Type 2 taste cells, severely compromises the behavioral and electrophysiological responses to tastes detected by G protein-coupled receptors, such as sweet and bitter. However, the contribution of CALHM1 to salty taste perception is less clear. Here, we evaluated several salty taste-related phenotypes of CALHM1 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) controls: 1) In a conditioned aversion test, CALHM1 WT and KO mice had similar NaCl avoidance thresholds. 2) In two-bottle choice tests, CALHM1 WT mice showed the classic inverted U-shaped NaCl concentration-preference function but CALHM1 KO mice had a blunted peak response. 3) In brief-access tests, CALHM1 KO mice showed less avoidance than did WT mice of high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, NH(4)Cl, and sodium lactate (NaLac). Amiloride further ameliorated the NaCl avoidance of CALHM1 KO mice, so that lick rates to a mixture of 1000 mM NaCl + 10 µM amiloride were statistically indistinguishable from those to water. 4) Relative to WT mice, CALHM1 KO mice had reduced chorda tympani nerve activity elicited by oral application of NaCl, NaLac, and sucrose but normal responses to HCl and NH(4)Cl. Chorda tympani responses to NaCl and NaLac were amiloride sensitive in WT but not KO mice. These results reinforce others demonstrating that multiple transduction pathways make complex, concentration-dependent contributions to salty taste perception. One of these pathways depends on CALHM1 to detect hypertonic NaCl in the mouth and signal the aversive taste of concentrated salt. PMID:24846212

  5. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M; Fröhlich, Esther E; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for "enviromimetics", therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation. PMID:27305846

  6. Environmental enrichment induces behavioural disturbances in neuropeptide Y knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Florian; Wegerer, Vanessa; Jain, Piyush; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Hassan, Ahmed M.; Fröhlich, Esther E.; Bock, Elisabeth; Pritz, Elisabeth; Herzog, Herbert; Holzer, Peter; Leitinger, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) refers to the provision of a complex and stimulating housing condition which improves well-being, behaviour and brain function of laboratory animals. The mechanisms behind these beneficial effects of EE are only partially understood. In the current report, we describe a link between EE and neuropeptide Y (NPY), based on findings from NPY knockout (KO) mice exposed to EE. Relative to EE-housed wildtype (WT) animals, NPY KO mice displayed altered behaviour as well as molecular and morphological changes in amygdala and hippocampus. Exposure of WT mice to EE reduced anxiety and decreased central glucocorticoid receptor expression, effects which were absent in NPY KO mice. In addition, NPY deletion altered the preference of EE items, and EE-housed NPY KO mice responded to stress with exaggerated hyperthermia, displayed impaired spatial memory, had higher hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity, effects which were not seen in WT mice. Accordingly, these findings suggest that NPY contributes to the anxiolytic effect of EE and that NPY deletion reverses the beneficial effects of EE into a negative experience. The NPY system could thus be a target for “enviromimetics”, therapeutics which reproduce the beneficial effects of enhanced environmental stimulation. PMID:27305846

  7. Benefits of a "vulnerability gene"? A study in serotonin transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kästner, Niklas; Richter, S Helene; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Schreiber, Rebecca S; Kaiser, Sylvia; Sachser, Norbert

    2015-04-15

    Over the past years, certain "vulnerability genes" have been identified that play a key role in the development of mood and anxiety disorders. In particular, a low-expressing variant of the human serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene has been described that renders individuals more susceptible to adverse experience and hence to the development of psychiatric diseases. However, some authors have recently argued that lower 5-HTT expression not only increases vulnerability to adverse experiences, but also enhances susceptibility to beneficial experiences, thus promoting phenotypic plasticity. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of 5-HTT expression on susceptibility to beneficial experience in a hypothesis-driven experimental approach. Using a well-established rodent model for the human polymorphism, male heterozygous 5-HTT knockout (HET) and 5-HTT wildtype (WT) mice were either provided with the beneficial experience of cohabitation with a female (mating experience) or kept as naïve controls in single-housing conditions. Following the experimental treatment, they were tested for their anxiety-like behaviour and exploratory locomotion in three widely used behavioural tests. Interestingly, while cohabitation reduced anxiety-like behaviour and increased exploratory locomotion in the open field test in HET mice, it did not affect WT mice, pointing to a genotype-dependent susceptibility to the beneficial experience. Thus, our results might support the view of the low expressing version of the 5-HTT gene as a "plasticity" rather than a "vulnerability" variant. PMID:25629942

  8. The evolution of thymic lymphomas in p53 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Dudgeon, Crissy; Chan, Chang; Kang, Wenfeng; Sun, Yvonne; Emerson, Ryan; Robins, Harlan; Levine, Arnold J

    2014-12-01

    Germline deletion of the p53 gene in mice gives rise to spontaneous thymic (T-cell) lymphomas. In this study, the p53 knockout mouse was employed as a model to study the mutational evolution of tumorigenesis. The clonality of the T-cell repertoire from p53 knockout and wild-type thymic cells was analyzed at various ages employing TCRβ sequencing. These data demonstrate that p53 knockout thymic lymphomas arose in an oligoclonal fashion, with tumors evolving dominant clones over time. Exon sequencing of tumor DNA revealed that all of the independently derived oligoclonal mouse tumors had a deletion in the Pten gene prior to the formation of the TCRβ rearrangement, produced early in development. This was followed in each independent clone of the thymic lymphoma by the amplification or overexpression of cyclin Ds and Cdk6. Alterations in the expression of Ikaros were common and blocked further development of CD-4/CD-8 T cells. While the frequency of point mutations in the genome of these lymphomas was one per megabase, there were a tremendous number of copy number variations producing the tumors' driver mutations. The initial inherited loss of p53 functions appeared to delineate an order of genetic alterations selected for during the evolution of these thymic lymphomas. PMID:25452272

  9. Spontaneous sleep and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Eva; Kapás, Levente; Sun, Yuxiang; Smith, Roy G; Krueger, James M

    2007-07-01

    Ghrelin is well known for its feeding and growth hormone-releasing actions. It may also be involved in sleep regulation; intracerebroventricular administration and hypothalamic microinjections of ghrelin stimulate wakefulness in rats. Hypothalamic ghrelin, together with neuropeptide Y and orexin form a food intake-regulatory circuit. We hypothesized that this circuit also promotes arousal. To further investigate the role of ghrelin in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness, we characterized spontaneous and homeostatic sleep regulation in ghrelin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups of mice exhibited similar diurnal rhythms with more sleep and less wakefulness during the light period. In ghrelin KO mice, spontaneous wakefulness and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) were slightly elevated, and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) was reduced. KO mice had more fragmented NREMS than WT mice, as indicated by the shorter and greater number of NREMS episodes. Six hours of sleep deprivation induced rebound increases in NREMS and REMS and biphasic changes in electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (EEG SWA) in both genotypes. Ghrelin KO mice recovered from NREMS and REMS loss faster, and the delayed reduction in EEG SWA, occurring after sleep loss-enhanced increases in EEG SWA, was shorter-lasting compared with WT mice. These findings suggest that the basic sleep-wake regulatory mechanisms in ghrelin KO mice are not impaired and they are able to mount adequate rebound sleep in response to a homeostatic challenge. It is possible that redundancy in the arousal systems of the brain or activation of compensatory mechanisms during development allow for normal sleep-wake regulation in ghrelin KO mice. PMID:17409264

  10. Feeding-elicited cataplexy in orexin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erika L.; Baumann, Christian R.; Cano, Georgina; Scammell, Thomas E.; Mochizuki, Takatoshi

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking orexin/hypocretin signaling have sudden episodes of atonia and paralysis during active wakefulness. These events strongly resemble cataplexy, episodes of sudden muscle weakness triggered by strong positive emotions in people with narcolepsy, but it remains unknown whether murine cataplexy is triggered by positive emotions. To determine whether positive emotions elicit murine cataplexy, we placed orexin knockout (KO) mice on a scheduled feeding protocol with regular or highly palatable food. Baseline sleep/wake behavior was recorded with ad lib regular chow. Mice were then placed on a scheduled feeding protocol in which they received 60% of their normal amount of chow 3 hr after dark onset for the next 10 days. Wild-type and KO mice rapidly entrained to scheduled feeding with regular chow, with more wake and locomotor activity prior to the feeding time. On day 10 of scheduled feeding, orexin KO mice had slightly more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and more cataplexy in the second half of the dark period, when they may have been foraging for residual food. To test whether more palatable food increases cataplexy, mice were then switched to scheduled feeding with an isocaloric amount of Froot Loops, a food often used as a reward in behavioral studies. With this highly palatable food, orexin KO mice had much more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and throughout the dark period. The increase in cataplexy with scheduled feeding, especially with highly palatable food, suggests that positive emotions may trigger cataplexy in mice, just as in people with narcolepsy. Establishing this connection helps validate orexin KO mice as an excellent model of human narcolepsy and provides an opportunity to better understand the mechanisms that trigger cataplexy. PMID:19362119

  11. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; Gay, Jason P; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V; Lanthorn, Thomas H; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side

  12. Diacylglycerol Lipase α Knockout Mice Demonstrate Metabolic and Behavioral Phenotypes Similar to Those of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Powell, David R.; Gay, Jason P.; Wilganowski, Nathaniel; Doree, Deon; Savelieva, Katerina V.; Lanthorn, Thomas H.; Read, Robert; Vogel, Peter; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Brommage, Robert; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Desai, Urvi; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    After creating >4,650 knockouts (KOs) of independent mouse genes, we screened them by high-throughput phenotyping and found that cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) KO mice had the same lean phenotype published by others. We asked if our KOs of DAG lipase α or β (Dagla or Daglb), which catalyze biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid (EC) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), or Napepld, which catalyzes biosynthesis of the EC anandamide, shared the lean phenotype of Cnr1 KO mice. We found that Dagla KO mice, but not Daglb or Napepld KO mice, were among the leanest of 3651 chow-fed KO lines screened. In confirmatory studies, chow- or high fat diet-fed Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice were leaner than wild-type (WT) littermates; when data from multiple cohorts of adult mice were combined, body fat was 47 and 45% lower in Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice, respectively, relative to WT values. By contrast, neither Daglb nor Napepld KO mice were lean. Weanling Dagla KO mice ate less than WT mice and had body weight (BW) similar to pair-fed WT mice, and adult Dagla KO mice had normal activity and VO2 levels, similar to Cnr1 KO mice. Our Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also had low fasting insulin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels, and after glucose challenge had normal glucose but very low insulin levels. Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice also showed similar responses to a battery of behavioral tests. These data suggest: (1) the lean phenotype of young Dagla and Cnr1 KO mice is mainly due to hypophagia; (2) in pathways where ECs signal through Cnr1 to regulate food intake and other metabolic and behavioral phenotypes observed in Cnr1 KO mice, Dagla alone provides the 2-AG that serves as the EC signal; and (3) small molecule Dagla inhibitors with a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that of Cnr1 inverse agonists are likely to mirror the ability of these Cnr1 inverse agonists to lower BW and improve glycemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, but may also induce undesirable neuropsychiatric side

  13. The Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Rptpζ Suppresses Osteosarcoma Development in Trp53-Heterozygous Mice.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, Christina; Jeschke, Anke; Kanbach, Vincent; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Baumhoer, Daniel; Gerull, Helwe; Buhs, Sophia; Amling, Michael; Nollau, Peter; Harroch, Sheila; Schinke, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), a highly aggressive primary bone tumor, belongs to the most common solid tumors in growing children. Since specific molecular targets for OS treatment remain to be identified, surgical resection combined with multimodal (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy is still the only way to help respective individuals. We have previously identified the protein tyrosine phosphatase Rptpζ as a marker of terminally differentiated osteoblasts, which negatively regulates their proliferation in vitro. Here we have addressed the question if Rptpζ can function as a tumor suppressor protein inhibiting OS development in vivo. We therefore analyzed the skeletal phenotype of mice lacking Ptprz1, the gene encoding Rptpζ on a tumor-prone genetic background, i.e. Trp53-heterozygosity. By screening a large number of 52 week old Trp53-heterozygous mice by contact radiography we found that Ptprz1-deficiency significantly enhanced OS development with 19% of the mice being affected. The tumors in Ptprz1-deficient Trp53-heterozygous mice were present in different locations (spine, long bones, ribs), and their OS nature was confirmed by undecalcified histology. Likewise, cell lines derived from the tumors were able to undergo osteogenic differentiation ex vivo. A comparison between Ptprz1-heterozygous and Ptprz1-deficient cultures further revealed that the latter ones displayed increased proliferation, a higher abundance of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and resistance towards the influence of the growth factor Midkine. Our findings underscore the relevance of Rptpζ as an attenuator of proliferation in differentiated osteoblasts and raise the possibility that activating Rptpζ-dependent signaling could specifically target osteoblastic tumor cells. PMID:26360410

  14. Progranulin Knockout Accelerates Intervertebral Disc Degeneration in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-peng; Tian, Qing-yun; Liu, Ben; Cuellar, Jason; Richbourgh, Brendon; Jia, Tang-hong; Liu, Chuan-ju

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a common degenerative disease, yet much is unknown about the mechanisms during its pathogenesis. Herein we investigated whether progranulin (PGRN), a chondroprotective growth factor, is associated with IVD degeneration. PGRN was detectable in both human and murine IVD. The levels of PGRN were upregulated in murine IVD tissue during aging process. Loss of PGRN resulted in an early onset of degenerative changes in the IVD tissue and altered expressions of the degeneration-associated molecules in the mouse IVD tissue. Moreover, PGRN knockout mice exhibited accelerated IVD matrix degeneration, abnormal bone formation and exaggerated bone resorption in vertebra with aging. The acceleration of IVD degeneration observed in PGRN null mice was probably due to the enhanced activation of NF-κB signaling and β-catenin signaling. Taken together, PGRN may play a critical role in homeostasis of IVD, and may serve as a potential molecular target for prevention and treatment of disc degenerative diseases. PMID:25777988

  15. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Niksch, Paul D.; Webber, Roxanna M.; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  16. Hair-Cell Mechanotransduction Persists in TRP Channel Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xudong; Indzhykulian, Artur A; Niksch, Paul D; Webber, Roxanna M; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Watnick, Terry; Zhou, Jing; Vollrath, Melissa A; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    Members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels mediate mechanosensation in some organisms, and have been suggested as candidates for the mechanotransduction channel in vertebrate hair cells. Some TRP channels can be ruled out based on lack of an inner ear phenotype in knockout animals or pore properties not similar to the hair-cell channel. Such studies have excluded Trpv4, Trpa1, Trpml3, Trpm1, Trpm3, Trpc1, Trpc3, Trpc5, and Trpc6. However, others remain reasonable candidates. We used data from an RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in hair cells as well as data on TRP channel conductance to narrow the candidate group. We then characterized mice lacking functional Trpm2, Pkd2, Pkd2l1, Pkd2l2 and Pkd1l3, using scanning electron microscopy, auditory brainstem response, permeant dye accumulation, and single-cell electrophysiology. In all of these TRP-deficient mice, and in double and triple knockouts, mechanotransduction persisted. Together with published studies, these results argue against the participation of any of the 33 mouse TRP channels in hair cell transduction. PMID:27196058

  17. BDNF restricted knockout mice as an animal model for aggression

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Wataru; Chehab, Mahmoud; Thakur, Siddarth; Li, Jiayang; Morozov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Mice with global deletion of one BDNF allele, or with forebrain-restricted deletion of both alleles show elevated aggression, but this phenotype is accompanied by other behavioral changes, including increases in anxiety and deficits in cognition. Here, we performed behavioral characterization of conditional BDNF knockout mice generated using a Cre recombinase driver line, KA1-Cre, which expresses Cre in few areas of brain: highly at hippocampal area CA3, moderately in dentate gyrus, cerebellum and facial nerve nucleus. The mutant animals exhibited elevated conspecific aggression and social dominance, but did not show changes in anxiety-like behaviors assessed using the elevated plus maze and open field test. There were no changes in depression like behaviors tested in the forced swim test, but small increase in immobility in the tail suspension test. In cognitive tasks, mutants showed normal social recognition and normal spatial and fear memory, but exhibited a deficit in object recognition. Thus, this knockout can serve as a robust model of BDNF-dependent aggression and object recognition deficiency. PMID:21255268

  18. Sustained delayed gastric emptying during repeated restraint stress in oxytocin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Babygirija, R; Zheng, J; Bülbül, M; Cerjak, D; Ludwig, K; Takahashi, T

    2010-11-01

    We have recently shown that impaired gastric motility observed in acute restraint stress was restored following repeated restraint stress in mice. Repeated restraint stress up-regulates oxytocin mRNA expression and down-regulates corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA expression at the hypothalamus. Oxytocin knockout mice (OXT-KO) have been widely used to study the central oxytocin signalling pathways in response to various stressors. We studied the effects of acute and repeated restraint stress on solid gastric emptying and hypothalamic CRF mRNA expression in wild-type (WT) and OXT-KO mice. Heterozygous (HZ) parents (B6; 129S-Oxt(tm1Wsy)/J mice) were bred in our animal facility. Male OXT-KO, WT and HZ littermates were used for the study. Solid gastric emptying was measured following acute restraint stress (for 90 min) or repeated restraint stress (for five consecutive days). Expression of CRF mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was measured by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant differences of gastric emptying in WT (68.4 ± 4.1%, n = 6), HZ (71.8 ± 3.1%, n = 6) and OXT-KO (70.6 ± 3.1%, n = 6) mice in nonstressed conditions. Acute stress significantly delayed gastric emptying in OXT-KO mice (33.10 ± 2.5%, n = 6) WT (39.1 ± 1.1%, n = 6) and HZ mice (35.8 ± 1.2%, n = 6). Following repeated restraint stress loading, gastric emptying was significantly restored in WT (68.3 ± 4.5%, n = 6) and HZ mice (63.1 ± 2.6%, n = 6). By contrast, gastric emptying was still delayed in OXT-KO mice (34.7 ± 1.3%, n = 6) following repeated restraint stress. The increase in CRF mRNA expression at the PVN was much pronounced in OXT-KO mice compared to WT or HZ mice following repeated restraint stress. These findings suggest that central oxytocin plays a pivotal role in mediating the adaptation mechanism following repeated restraint stress in mice. PMID:20969650

  19. Acid Sphingomyelinase Gene Knockout Ameliorates Hyperhomocysteinemic Glomerular Injury in Mice Lacking Cystathionine-β-Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Boini, Krishna M.; Xia, Min; Abais, Justine M.; Xu, Ming; Li, Cai-xia; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) has been implicated in the development of hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys)-induced glomerular oxidative stress and injury. However, it remains unknown whether genetically engineering of ASM gene produces beneficial or detrimental action on hHcys-induced glomerular injury. The present study generated and characterized the mice lacking cystathionine β-synthase (Cbs) and Asm mouse gene by cross breeding Cbs+/− and Asm+/− mice. Given that the homozygotes of Cbs−/−/Asm−/− mice could not survive for 3 weeks. Cbs+/−/Asm+/+, Cbs+/−/Asm+/− and Cbs+/−/Asm−/− as well as their Cbs wild type littermates were used to study the role of Asm−/− under a background of Cbs+/− with hHcys. HPLC analysis revealed that plasma Hcys level was significantly elevated in Cbs heterozygous (Cbs+/−) mice with different copies of Asm gene compared to Cbs+/+ mice with different Asm gene copies. Cbs+/−/Asm+/+ mice had significantly increased renal Asm activity, ceramide production and O2.− level compared to Cbs+/+/Asm+/+, while Cbs+/−/Asm−/− mice showed significantly reduced renal Asm activity, ceramide production and O2.− level due to increased plasma Hcys levels. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that colocalization of podocin with ceramide was much lower in Cbs+/−/Asm−/− mice compared to Cbs+/−/Asm+/+ mice, which was accompanied by a reduced glomerular damage index, albuminuria and proteinuria in Cbs+/−/Asm−/− mice. Immunofluorescent analyses of the podocin, nephrin and desmin expression also illustrated less podocyte damages in the glomeruli from Cbs+/−/Asm−/− mice compared to Cbs+/−/Asm+/+ mice. In in vitro studies of podocytes, hHcys-enhanced O2.− production, desmin expression, and ceramide production as well as decreases in VEGF level and podocin expression in podocytes were substantially attenuated by prior treatment with amitriptyline, an Asm inhibitor. In conclusion, Asm gene knockout or

  20. Autism-related behavioral abnormalities in synapsin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Barbara; Managò, Francesca; Tucci, Valter; Kao, Hung-Teh; Valtorta, Flavia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Several synaptic genes predisposing to autism-spectrum disorder (ASD) have been identified. Nonsense and missense mutations in the SYN1 gene encoding for Synapsin I have been identified in families segregating for idiopathic epilepsy and ASD and genetic mapping analyses have identified variations in the SYN2 gene as significantly contributing to epilepsy predisposition. Synapsins (Syn I/II/III) are a multigene family of synaptic vesicle-associated phosphoproteins playing multiple roles in synaptic development, transmission and plasticity. Lack of SynI and/or SynII triggers a strong epileptic phenotype in mice associated with mild cognitive impairments that are also present in the non-epileptic SynIII−/− mice. SynII−/− and SynIII−/− mice also display schizophrenia-like traits, suggesting that Syns could be involved in the regulation of social behavior. Here, we studied social interaction and novelty, social recognition and social dominance, social transmission of food preference and social memory in groups of male SynI−/−, SynII−/− and SynIII−/− mice before and after the appearance of the epileptic phenotype and compared their performances with control mice. We found that deletion of Syn isoforms widely impairs social behaviors and repetitive behaviors, resulting in ASD-related phenotypes. SynI or SynIII deletion altered social behavior, whereas SynII deletion extensively impaired various aspects of social behavior and memory, altered exploration of a novel environment and increased self-grooming. Social impairments of SynI−/− and SynII−/− mice were evident also before the onset of seizures. The results demonstrate an involvement of Syns in generation of the behavioral traits of ASD and identify Syn knockout mice as a useful experimental model of ASD and epilepsy. PMID:23280234

  1. Chronic Toxoplasma gondii in Nurr1-Null Heterozygous Mice Exacerbates Elevated Open Field Activity

    PubMed Central

    Eells, Jeffrey B.; Varela-Stokes, Andrea; Guo-Ross, Shirley X.; Kummari, Evangel; Smith, Holly M.; Cox, Erin; Lindsay, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection with Toxoplasma gondii is common in humans (approximately 30% of the global population) and is a significant risk factor for schizophrenia. Since prevalence of T. gondii infection is far greater than prevalence of schizophrenia (0.5-1%), genetic risk factors are likely also necessary to contribute to schizophrenia. To test this concept in an animal model, Nurr1-null heterozygous (+/-) mice and wild-type (+/+) mice were evaluate using an emergence test, activity in an open field and with a novel object, response to bobcat urine and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI) prior to and 6 weeks after infection with T. gondii. In the emergence test, T. gondii infection significantly decreased the amount of time spent in the cylinder. Toxoplasma gondii infection significantly elevated open field activity in both +/+ and +/- mice but this increase was significantly exacerbated in +/- mice. T. gondii infection reduced PPI in male +/- mice but this was not statistically significant. Aversion to bobcat urine was abolished by T. gondii infection in +/+ mice. In female +/- mice, aversion to bobcat urine remained after T. gondii infection while the male +/- mice showed no aversion to bobcat urine. Antibody titers of infected mice were a critical variable associated with changes in open field activity, such that an inverted U shaped relationship existed between antibody titers and the percent change in open field activity with a significant increase in activity at low and medium antibody titers but no effect at high antibody titers. These data demonstrate that the Nurr1 +/- genotype predisposes mice to T. gondii-induced alterations in behaviors that involve dopamine neurotransmission and are associated with symptoms of schizophrenia. We propose that these alterations in murine behavior were due to further exacerbation of the altered dopamine neurotransmission in Nurr1 +/- mice. PMID:25855987

  2. Chronic Toxoplasma gondii in Nurr1-null heterozygous mice exacerbates elevated open field activity.

    PubMed

    Eells, Jeffrey B; Varela-Stokes, Andrea; Guo-Ross, Shirley X; Kummari, Evangel; Smith, Holly M; Cox, Erin; Lindsay, David S

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection with Toxoplasma gondii is common in humans (approximately 30% of the global population) and is a significant risk factor for schizophrenia. Since prevalence of T. gondii infection is far greater than prevalence of schizophrenia (0.5-1%), genetic risk factors are likely also necessary to contribute to schizophrenia. To test this concept in an animal model, Nurr1-null heterozygous (+/-) mice and wild-type (+/+) mice were evaluate using an emergence test, activity in an open field and with a novel object, response to bobcat urine and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI) prior to and 6 weeks after infection with T. gondii. In the emergence test, T. gondii infection significantly decreased the amount of time spent in the cylinder. Toxoplasma gondii infection significantly elevated open field activity in both +/+ and +/- mice but this increase was significantly exacerbated in +/- mice. T. gondii infection reduced PPI in male +/- mice but this was not statistically significant. Aversion to bobcat urine was abolished by T. gondii infection in +/+ mice. In female +/- mice, aversion to bobcat urine remained after T. gondii infection while the male +/- mice showed no aversion to bobcat urine. Antibody titers of infected mice were a critical variable associated with changes in open field activity, such that an inverted U shaped relationship existed between antibody titers and the percent change in open field activity with a significant increase in activity at low and medium antibody titers but no effect at high antibody titers. These data demonstrate that the Nurr1 +/- genotype predisposes mice to T. gondii-induced alterations in behaviors that involve dopamine neurotransmission and are associated with symptoms of schizophrenia. We propose that these alterations in murine behavior were due to further exacerbation of the altered dopamine neurotransmission in Nurr1 +/- mice. PMID:25855987

  3. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Cluster of Differentiation 47 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Takao, Keizo; Matozaki, Takashi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 47 (CD47) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily which functions as a ligand for the extracellular region of signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), a protein which is abundantly expressed in the brain. Previous studies, including ours, have demonstrated that both CD47 and SIRPα fulfill various functions in the central nervous system (CNS), such as the modulation of synaptic transmission and neuronal cell survival. We previously reported that CD47 is involved in the regulation of depression-like behavior of mice in the forced swim test through its modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPα. However, other potential behavioral functions of CD47 remain largely unknown. In this study, in an effort to further investigate functional roles of CD47 in the CNS, CD47 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type littermates were subjected to a battery of behavioral tests. CD47 KO mice displayed decreased prepulse inhibition, while the startle response did not differ between genotypes. The mutants exhibited slightly but significantly decreased sociability and social novelty preference in Crawley’s three-chamber social approach test, whereas in social interaction tests in which experimental and stimulus mice have direct contact with each other in a freely moving setting in a novel environment or home cage, there were no significant differences between the genotypes. While previous studies suggested that CD47 regulates fear memory in the inhibitory avoidance test in rodents, our CD47 KO mice exhibited normal fear and spatial memory in the fear conditioning and the Barnes maze tests, respectively. These findings suggest that CD47 is potentially involved in the regulation of sensorimotor gating and social behavior in mice. PMID:24586890

  4. P2X6 Knockout Mice Exhibit Normal Electrolyte Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Viering, Daan H. H. M.; Bos, Caro; Bindels, René J. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-mediated signaling is an important regulator of electrolyte transport in the kidney. The purinergic cation channel P2X6 has been previously localized to the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), a nephron segment important for Mg2+ and Na+ reabsorption, but its role in ion transport remains unknown. In this study, P2x6 knockout (P2x6-/-) mice were generated to investigate the role of P2X6 in renal electrolyte transport. The P2x6-/- animals displayed a normal phenotype and did not differ physiologically from wild type mice. Differences in serum concentration and 24-hrs urine excretion of Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ were not detected between P2x6+/+, P2x6+/- and P2x6-/- mice. Quantitative PCR was applied to examine potential compensatory changes in renal expression levels of other P2x subunits and electrolyte transporters, including P2x1-5, P2x7, Trpm6, Ncc, Egf, Cldn16, Scnn1, Slc12a3, Slc41a1, Slc41a3, Cnnm2, Kcnj10 and Fxyd2. Additionally, protein levels of P2X2 and P2X4 were assessed in P2x6+/+ and P2x6-/- mouse kidneys. However, significant changes in expression were not detected. Furthermore, no compensatory changes in gene expression could be demonstrated in heart material isolated from P2x6-/- mice. Except for a significant (P<0.05) upregulation of P2x2 in the heart of P2x6-/- mice compared to the P2x6+/+ mice. Thus, our data suggests that purinergic signaling via P2X6 is not significantly involved in the regulation of renal electrolyte handling under normal physiological conditions. PMID:27254077

  5. Reduced Extinction of Hippocampal-Dependent Memories in CPEB Knockout Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zearfoss, N. Ruth; Richter, Joel D.; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA binding protein that regulates translation at synapses. In neurons of CPEB knockout mice, synaptic efficacy is reduced. Here, we have performed a battery of behavioral tests and find that relative to wild-type animals, CPEB knockout mice, although similar on many baseline behaviors, have reduced extinction of…

  6. Female mice heterozygous for creatine transporter deficiency show moderate cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Hautman, Emily R; Kokenge, Amanda N; Udobi, Kenea C; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V; Skelton, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Creatine transporter (CrT) deficiency (CTD) is an X-linked disorder characterized by intellectual disability and speech delay. There have been reports that show female carriers have clinical symptoms. We have created CrT knockout (CrT(-/y)) mice in which males show severe cognitive deficits as a model of this disorder. The purpose of this study was to examine if the female carrier mice show cognitive deficits. Reductions in Cr levels as well as CrT transcript were observed in the brains of the female CrT(+/-) mice. CrT(+/-) mice show hyperactivity and increased latency to find the cued platform in the Morris water maze (MWM). CrT(+/-) female mice showed deficits in MWM hidden platform acquisition but not during reversal testing. Memory deficits on probe trials were observed during both phases. Novel object recognition memory and contextual fear memory were not affected in female CrT(+/-) mice. Female CrT(+/-) mice show moderate cognitive deficits, which is consistent with some of the human data. Female CrT(+/-) mice could prove to be beneficial in further understanding CTD and testing therapeutic approaches. PMID:23716276

  7. Mice heterozygous for cathepsin D deficiency exhibit mania-related behavior and stress-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Lu, Yi; Han, Yong; Li, Xia; Lou, Huifang; Zhu, Liya; Zhen, Xuechu; Duan, Shumin

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in cathepsin D (CTSD), an aspartic protease in the endosomal-lysosomal system, underlie congenital neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (cNCL, also known as CLN10), a devastating neurodegenerative disease. CLN10 patients die within the first few days of life, and in the few patients who live into adulthood psychopathological symptoms have not been reported. Extensive neuropathology and altered neurotransmission have been reported in CTSD-deficient mice; however signs of neuropsychiatric behavior in these mice are not well characterized due to the severe movement disorder and premature death of the animal. In the present study, we show that heterozygous CTSD-deficient (CTSD HET) mice display an overall behavioral profile that is similar to human mania, including hyperlocomotion, d-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, sleep-disturbance, and reduced anxiety-like behavior. However, under stressful conditions CTSD HET mice manifest depressive-like behavior, including anhedonia, behavioral despair, and enhanced learned helplessness. Chronic administration of lithium chloride or valproic acid, two clinically effective mood stabilizers, reverses the majority of these behavioral abnormalities. In addition, CTSD HET mice display stress-induced hypersecretion of corticosterone. These findings suggest an important role for CTSD in the regulation of mood stabilization. PMID:26092248

  8. Effects of aging on glutamate neurotransmission in the substantia nigra of Gdnf heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Farrand, Ariana Q; Gregory, Rebecca A; Scofield, Michael D; Helke, Kristi L; Boger, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) helps protect dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal tract. Although the cause of nigrostriatal degeneration is unknown, one theory is that excess glutamate from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) results in excitotoxic events in the substantia nigra (SN). Since dopaminergic degeneration is accompanied by a reduction in GDNF, we examined glutamate neurotransmission in the SN using a Gdnf heterozygous mouse model (Gdnf+/−) at 8 and 12 months of age. At 8 months, Gdnf+/− mice have greater glutamate release and higher basal glutamate levels, which precede the SN dopaminergic degeneration observed at 12 months of age. However, at 12 months, Gdnf+/− mice have lower basal levels of glutamate and less glutamate release than wildtype (WT) mice. Also at 8 months, Gdnf+/− mice have lower levels of GLT-1 and greater GFAP levels in the SN compared to WT mice, differences that increase with age. These data suggest that reduced levels of GDNF induce excess glutamate release and dysregulation of GLT-1, causing excitotoxicity in the SN that precedes dopaminergic degeneration. PMID:25577412

  9. Maximal Oxygen Consumption Is Reduced in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Samir, Samer; Goossens, Dominique; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Nielsen, Søren; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have measured maximal oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O2,max) of mice lacking one or two of the established mouse red-cell CO2 channels AQP1, AQP9, and Rhag. We intended to study whether these proteins, by acting as channels for O2, determine O2 exchange in the lung and in the periphery. We found that [Formula: see text]O2,max as determined by the Helox technique is reduced by ~16%, when AQP1 is knocked out, but not when AQP9 or Rhag are lacking. This figure holds for animals respiring normoxic as well as hypoxic gas mixtures. To see whether the reduction of [Formula: see text]O2,max is due to impaired O2 uptake in the lung, we measured carotid arterial O2 saturation (SO2) by pulse oximetry. Neither under normoxic (inspiratory O2 21%) nor under hypoxic conditions (11% O2) is there a difference in SO2 between AQP1null and WT mice, suggesting that AQP1 is not critical for O2 uptake in the lung. The fact that the % reduction of [Formula: see text]O2,max is identical in normoxia and hypoxia indicates moreover that the limitation of [Formula: see text]O2,max is not due to an O2 diffusion problem, neither in the lung nor in the periphery. Instead, it appears likely that AQP1null animals exhibit a reduced [Formula: see text]O2,max due to the reduced wall thickness and muscle mass of the left ventricles of their hearts, as reported previously. We conclude that very likely the properties of the hearts of AQP1 knockout mice cause a reduced maximal cardiac output and thus cause a reduced [Formula: see text]O2,max, which constitutes a new phenotype of these mice. PMID:27559317

  10. Maximal Oxygen Consumption Is Reduced in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Goossens, Dominique; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Nielsen, Søren; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have measured maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2,max) of mice lacking one or two of the established mouse red-cell CO2 channels AQP1, AQP9, and Rhag. We intended to study whether these proteins, by acting as channels for O2, determine O2 exchange in the lung and in the periphery. We found that V˙O2,max as determined by the Helox technique is reduced by ~16%, when AQP1 is knocked out, but not when AQP9 or Rhag are lacking. This figure holds for animals respiring normoxic as well as hypoxic gas mixtures. To see whether the reduction of V˙O2,max is due to impaired O2 uptake in the lung, we measured carotid arterial O2 saturation (SO2) by pulse oximetry. Neither under normoxic (inspiratory O2 21%) nor under hypoxic conditions (11% O2) is there a difference in SO2 between AQP1null and WT mice, suggesting that AQP1 is not critical for O2 uptake in the lung. The fact that the % reduction of V˙O2,max is identical in normoxia and hypoxia indicates moreover that the limitation of V˙O2,max is not due to an O2 diffusion problem, neither in the lung nor in the periphery. Instead, it appears likely that AQP1null animals exhibit a reduced V˙O2,max due to the reduced wall thickness and muscle mass of the left ventricles of their hearts, as reported previously. We conclude that very likely the properties of the hearts of AQP1 knockout mice cause a reduced maximal cardiac output and thus cause a reduced V˙O2,max, which constitutes a new phenotype of these mice. PMID:27559317

  11. Hypoxia-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Function Is Blunted in Angiotensinogen Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Hwa; Nguyen, Minh-Phuong; Lee, Dongjin; Oh, Goo-Taeg; Lee, You-Mie

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensinogen (AGT), the precursor of angiotensin I, is known to be involved in tumor angiogenesis and associated with the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. This study was undertaken to determine the role played by AGT in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in tumor progression and metastasis. It was found that the number of EPC colonies formed by AGT heterozygous knockout (AGT+/−) cells was less than that formed by wild-type (WT) cells, and that the migration and tube formation abilities of AGT+/− EPCs were significantly lower than those of WT EPCs. In addition, the gene expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flk1, angiopoietin (Ang)-1, Ang-2, Tie-2, stromal derived factor (SDF)-1, C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), and of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were suppressed in AGT+/− EPCs. Furthermore, the expressions of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and -2α were downregulated in AGT+/− early EPCs under hypoxic conditions, suggesting a blunting of response to hypoxia. Moreover, the activation of Akt/eNOS signaling pathways induced by VEGF, epithelial growth factor (EGF), or SDF-1α were suppressed in AGT+/− EPCs. In AGT+/− mice, the incorporation of EPCs into the tumor vasculature was significantly reduced, and lung tumor growth and melanoma metastasis were attenuated. In conclusion, AGT is required for hypoxia-induced vasculogenesis. PMID:24938229

  12. Effects of LSD on grooming behavior in serotonin transporter heterozygous (Sert⁺/⁻) mice.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) plays a crucial role in the brain, modulating mood, cognition and reward. The serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for the reuptake of 5-HT from the synaptic cleft and regulates serotonin signaling in the brain. In humans, SERT genetic variance is linked to the pathogenesis of various psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Rodent self-grooming is a complex, evolutionarily conserved patterned behavior relevant to stress, ASD and OCD. Genetic ablation of mouse Sert causes various behavioral deficits, including increased anxiety and grooming behavior. The hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a potent serotonergic agonist known to modulate human and animal behavior. Here, we examined heterozygous Sert(+/-) mouse behavior following acute administration of LSD (0.32 mg/kg). Overall, Sert(+/-) mice displayed a longer duration of self-grooming behavior regardless of LSD treatment. In contrast, LSD increased serotonin-sensitive behaviors, such as head twitching, tremors and backwards gait behaviors in both Sert(+/+) and Sert(+/-) mice. There were no significant interactions between LSD treatment and Sert gene dosage in any of the behavioral domains measured. These results suggest that Sert(+/-) mice may respond to the behavioral effects of LSD in a similar manner to wild-type mice. PMID:26340513

  13. Impaired water maze learning performance without altered dopaminergic function in mice heterozygous for the GDNF mutation.

    PubMed

    Gerlai, R; McNamara, A; Choi-Lundberg, D L; Armanini, M; Ross, J; Powell-Braxton, L; Phillips, H S

    2001-10-01

    Exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) exhibits potent survival-promoting effects on dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway that is implicated in Parkinson's disease and also protects neurons in forebrain ischemia of animal models. However, a role for endogenous GDNF in brain function has not been established. Although mice homozygous for a targeted deletion of the GDNF gene have been generated, these mice die within hours of birth because of deficits in kidney morphogenesis, and, thus, the effect of the absence of GDNF on brain function could not be studied. Herein, we sought to determine whether adult mice, heterozygous for a GDNF mutation on two different genetic backgrounds, demonstrate alterations in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system or in cognitive function. While both neurochemical and behavioural measures suggested that reduction of GDNF gene expression in the mutant mice does not alter the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system, it led to a significant and selective impairment of performance in the spatial version of the Morris water maze. A standard panel of blood chemistry tests and basic pathological analyses did not reveal alterations in the mutants that could account for the observed performance deficit. These results suggest that endogenous GDNF may not be critical for the development and functioning of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system but it plays an important role in cognitive abilities. PMID:11683907

  14. The antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic drugs ketamine and AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646 are preserved in bdnf⁺/⁻ heterozygous null mice.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Jesse S O; Autio, Henri; Vesa, Liisa; Antila, Hanna; Lindemann, Lothar; Hoener, Marius C; Skolnick, Phil; Rantamäki, Tomi; Castrén, Eero

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that biogenic amine-based antidepressants act, at least in part, via regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. Biogenic amine-based antidepressants increase BDNF synthesis and activate its signaling pathway through TrkB receptors. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of these molecules are abolished in BDNF deficient mice. Glutamate-based drugs, including the NMDA antagonist ketamine, and the AMPA receptor potentiator LY 451646, mimic the effects of antidepressants in preclinical tests with high predictive validity. In humans, a single intravenous dose of ketamine produces an antidepressant effect that is rapid, robust and persistent. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF in expression of the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and an AMPA receptor potentiator (LY 451646) in the forced swim test (FST). Ketamine and LY 451646 produced antidepressant-like effects in the FST in mice at 45 min after a single injection, but no effects were observed one week after a single ketamine injection. As previously reported, the effects of imipramine in the forced swim test were blunted in heterozygous BDNF knockout (bdnf(+/-)) mice. However ketamine and LY 451646 produced similar antidepressant-like responses in wildtype and bdnf(+/-) mice. Neither ketamine nor LY 451646 significantly influenced the levels BDNF or TrkB phosphorylation in the hippocampus when assessed at 45 min or 7 days after the drug administration. These data demonstrate that under the conditions tested, neither ketamine nor the AMPA-potentiator LY 451656 activate BDNF signaling, but produce a characteristic antidepressant-like response in heterozygous bdnf(+/-) mice. These data indicate that unlike biogenic amine-based agents, BDNF signaling does not play a pivotal role in the antidepressant effects of glutamate-based compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'. PMID:21867718

  15. Abolished thermal and mechanical antinociception but retained visceral chemical antinociception induced by butorphanol in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Ishihara, Kumatoshi; Uhl, George R; Satoh, Masamichi; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2008-06-01

    Butorphanol is hypothesized to induce analgesia via opioid pathways, although the precise mechanisms for its effects remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the mu-opioid receptor (MOP) in thermal, mechanical, and visceral chemical antinociception induced by butorphanol using MOP knockout (KO) mice. Butorphanol-induced thermal antinociception, assessed by the hot-plate and tail-flick tests, was significantly reduced in heterozygous and abolished in homozygous MOP-KO mice compared with wildtype mice. The results obtained from our butorphanol-induced mechanical antinociception experiments, assessed by the Randall-Selitto test, were similar to the results obtained from the thermal antinociception experiments in these mice. Interestingly, however, butorphanol retained its ability to induce significant visceral chemical antinociception, assessed by the writhing test, in homozygous MOP-KO mice. The butorphanol-induced visceral chemical antinociception that was retained in homozygous MOP-KO mice was completely blocked by pretreatment with nor-binaltorphimine, a kappa-opioid receptor (KOP) antagonist. In vitro binding and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays also showed that butorphanol possessed higher affinity for KOPs and MOPs than for delta-opioid receptors. These results molecular pharmacologically confirmed previous studies implicating MOPs, and partially KOPs, in mediating butorphanol-induced analgesia. PMID:18417173

  16. Alterations of Retinal Vasculature in Cystathionine–β-Synthase Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Amany; Markand, Shanu; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Mayo, Jamie N.; Reynolds, Jason; Bearden, Shawn E.; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Mild to moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is prevalent in humans and is implicated in neurovascular diseases, including recently in certain retinal diseases. Herein, we used hyperhomocysteinemic mice deficient in the Cbs gene encoding cystathionine–β-synthase (Cbs+/−) to evaluate retinal vascular integrity. The Cbs+/+ (wild type) and Cbs+/− (heterozygous) mice (aged 16 to 52 weeks) were subjected to fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography to assess vasculature in vivo. Retinas harvested for cryosectioning or flat mount preparations were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy to detect blood vessels (isolectin-B4), angiogenesis [anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and anti-CD105], gliosis [anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)], pericytes (anti-neural/glial antigen 2), blood-retinal barrier [anti–zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and anti-occludin], and hypoxia [anti–pimonidazole hydrochloride (Hypoxyprobe-1)]. Levels of VEGF, GFAP, ZO-1, and occludin were determined by immunoblotting. Results of these analyses showed a mild vascular phenotype in young mice, which progressed with age. Fluorescein angiography revealed progressive neovascularization and vascular leakage in Cbs+/− mice; optical coherence tomography confirmed new vessels in the vitreous by 1 year. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated vascular patterns consistent with ischemia, including a capillary-free zone centrally and new vessels with capillary tufts midperipherally in older mice. This was associated with increased VEGF, CD105, and GFAP and decreased ZO-1/occludin levels in the Cbs+/− retinas. Retinal vein occlusion was observed in some Cbs+/− mouse retinas. We conclude that mild to moderate elevation of homocysteine in Cbs+/− mice is accompanied by progressive alterations in retinal vasculature characterized by ischemia, neovascularization, incompetent blood-retinal barrier, and vascular occlusion. PMID:25016930

  17. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice display cold allodynia, but enhanced recovery from spared-nerve injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Piskoun, Boris; Russo, Lori; Norcini, Monica; Blanck, Thomas; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Background The function of the Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Mounting evidence suggest that CB1R expression and activation may contribute to pain. Cannabinoid 1 receptor knockout mice (CB1R−/−) generated on a C57Bl/6 background exhibit hypoalgesia in the hotplate assay and formalin test. These findings suggest that Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression mediates the responses to at least some types of painful stimuli. By using this mouse line, we sought to determine if the lack of Cannabinoid 1 receptor unveils a general hypoalgesic phenotype, including protection against the development of neuropathic pain. The acetone test was used to measure cold sensitivity, the electronic von Frey was used to measure mechanical thresholds before and after spared-nerve injury, and analysis of footprint patterns was conducted to determine if motor function is differentially affected after nerve-injury in mice with varying levels of Cannabinoid 1 receptor. Results At baseline, CB1R−/− mice were hypersensitive in the acetone test, and this phenotype was maintained after spared-nerve injury. Using calcium imaging of lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, a higher percentage of neurons isolated from CB1R−/− mice were menthol sensitive relative to DRG isolated from wild-type (CB1R+/+) mice. Baseline mechanical thresholds did not differ among genotypes, and mechanical hypersensitivity developed similarly in the first two weeks following spared-nerve injury (SNI). At two weeks post-SNI, CB1R−/− mice recovered significantly from mechanical hypersensitivity, while the CB1R+/+ mice did not. Heterozygous knockouts (CB1R+/−) transiently developed cold allodynia only after injury, but recovered mechanical thresholds to a similar extent as the CB1R−/− mice. Sciatic functional indices, which reflect overall nerve health, and alternation coefficients, which indicate uniformity of strides, were not significantly different

  18. Knockout of the TauT Gene Predisposes C57BL/6 Mice to Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaobin; Patters, Andrea B.; Ito, Takashi; Schaffer, Stephen W.; Chesney, Russell W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the world. Although tremendous efforts have been made, scientists have yet to identify an ideal animal model that can reproduce the characteristics of human diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we hypothesize that taurine insufficiency is a critical risk factor for development of diabetic nephropathy associated with diabetes mellitus. This hypothesis was tested in vivo in TauT heterozygous (TauT+/-) and homozygous (TauT-/-) knockout in C57BL/6 background mice. We have shown that alteration of the TauT gene (also known as SLC6A6) has a substantial effect on the susceptibility to development of extensive diabetic kidney disease in both TauT+/- and TauT-/-mouse models of diabetes. These animals developed histological changes characteristic of human diabetic nephropathy that included glomerulosclerosis, nodular lesions, arteriosclerosis, arteriolar dilation, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Immunohistochemical staining of molecular markers of smooth muscle actin, CD34, Ki67 and collagen IV further confirmed these observations. Our results demonstrated that both homozygous and heterozygous TauT gene deletion predispose C57BL/6 mice to develop end-stage diabetic kidney disease, which closely replicates the pathological features of diabetic nephropathy in human diabetic patients. PMID:25629817

  19. Nature vs. nurture: can enrichment rescue the behavioural phenotype of BDNF heterozygous mice?

    PubMed

    Chourbaji, Sabine; Brandwein, Christiane; Vogt, Miriam A; Dormann, Christof; Hellweg, Rainer; Gass, Peter

    2008-10-10

    In earlier experiments we have demonstrated that group-housing in a rather impoverished "standard" environment can be a crucial stress factor in male C57Bl/6 mice. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of combining a probable genetic vulnerability--postulated by the "Neurotrophin Hypothesis of Depression"--with the potentially modulating influence of a stressful environment such as "impoverished" standard housing conditions. For that purpose mice with a partial deletion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were group-housed under standard and enriched housing conditions and analysed in a well-established test battery for emotional behaviours. Standard group-housing affected emotional behaviour in male and female BDNF heterozygous mice, causing an increase in anxiety, changes in exploration as well as nociception. Providing the animals' cages with supplementary enrichment, however, led to a rescue of emotional alterations, which emphasises the significance of external factors and their relevance for a valid investigation of genetic aspects in these mutants as well as others, which may be examined in terms of stress-responsiveness or emotionality. PMID:18538870

  20. Impact of partial dopamine depletion on cognitive flexibility in BDNF heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vinay; Naughton, Sean X.; Yegla, Brittney; Guzman, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Cognitive flexibility is a key component of executive function and is disrupted in major psychiatric disorders. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts neuromodulatory effects on synaptic transmission and cognitive/affective behaviors. However the causal mechanisms linking BDNF hypofunction with executive deficits are not well understood. Objectives Here, we assessed the consequences of BDNF hemizygosity on cognitive flexibility in mice performing an operant conditioning task. As dopaminergic-glutamatergic interaction in the striatum is important for cognitive processing, and BDNF heterozygous (BDNF+/−) mice display a higher dopamine tone in the dorsal striatum, we also assessed the effects of partial striatal dopamine depletion on task performance and glutamate release. Results BDNF+/− mice acquired discrimination learning as well as new rule learning during set-shifting as efficiently as wild-type mice. However, partial removal of striatal dopaminergic inputs with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) impaired these cognitive processes by impeding the maintenance of a new learning strategy in both genotypes. BDNF mutants exhibited performance impairments during reversal learning and these deficits were associated with increased perseveration to the previously acquired strategy. Partial dopamine depletion of the striatum reversed these cognitive impairments. Additionally, reduction in depolarization-evoked glutamate release noted in the dorsal striatum of BDNF+/− mice was not observed in 6-OHDA-infused BDNF mutants indicating normalization of glutamatergic transmission in these animals. Conclusions Our data illustrate that BDNF signaling regulates cognitive control processes presumably by maintaining striatal dopamine-glutamate balance. Moreover, aberrations in BDNF signaling may act as a common neurobiological substrate that accounts for executive dysfunction observed in multiple psychiatric conditions. PMID:26861892

  1. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer's disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1(+/-) mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1(+/-)/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression. PMID:27406855

  2. Chronic hyperglycemia induced via the heterozygous knockout of Pdx1 worsens neuropathological lesion in an Alzheimer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuang; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jia-Yi; Ding, Chen; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence has indicated that dysregulated glucose metabolism links Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) via glucose metabolic products. Nevertheless, because of the lack of appropriate animal models, whether chronic hyperglycemia worsens AD pathologies in vivo remains to be confirmed. Here, we crossed diabetic mice (Pdx1+/− mice) with Alzheimer mice (APP/PS1 transgenic mice) to generate Pdx1+/−/APP/PS1. We identified robust increases in tau phosphorylation, the loss of the synaptic spine protein, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and plaque formation associated with increased microglial and astrocyte activation proliferation, which lead to exacerbated memory and cognition deficits. More importantly, we also observed increased glucose intolerance accompanied by Pdx1 reduction, the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and the activation of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) signaling pathways during AD progression; these changes are thought to contribute to the processing of Aβ precursor proteins and result in increased Aβ generation and decreased Aβ degradation. Protein glycation, increased oxidative stress and inflammation via hyperglycemia are the primary mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of AD. These results indicate the pathological relationship between these diseases and provide novel insights suggesting that glycemic control may be beneficial for decreasing the incidence of AD in diabetic patients and delaying AD progression. PMID:27406855

  3. Hypolocomotion, anxiety and serotonin syndrome-like behavior contribute to the complex phenotype of serotonin transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kalueff, A V; Fox, M A; Gallagher, P S; Murphy, D L

    2007-06-01

    Although mice with a targeted disruption of the serotonin transporter (SERT) have been studied extensively using various tests, their complex behavioral phenotype is not yet fully understood. Here we assess in detail the behavior of adult female SERT wild type (+/+), heterozygous (+/-) and knockout (-/-) mice on an isogenic C57BL/6J background subjected to a battery of behavioral paradigms. Overall, there were no differences in the ability to find food or a novel object, nest-building, self-grooming and its sequencing, and horizontal rod balancing, indicating unimpaired sensory functions, motor co-ordination and behavioral sequencing. In contrast, there were striking reductions in exploration and activity in novelty-based tests (novel object, sticky label and open field tests), accompanied by pronounced thigmotaxis, suggesting that combined hypolocomotion and anxiety (rather than purely anxiety) influence the SERT -/- behavioral phenotype. Social interaction behaviors were also markedly reduced. In addition, SERT -/- mice tended to move close to the ground, frequently displayed spontaneous Straub tail, tics, tremor and backward gait - a phenotype generally consistent with 'serotonin syndrome'-like behavior. In line with replicated evidence of much enhanced serotonin availability in SERT -/- mice, this serotonin syndrome-like state may represent a third factor contributing to their behavioral profile. An understanding of the emerging complexity of SERT -/- mouse behavior is crucial for a detailed dissection of their phenotype and for developing further neurobehavioral models using these mice. PMID:16939636

  4. Vmat2 Heterozygous Mutant Mice Display a Depressive-Like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Masato; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Zhou, Jiechun; Jiang, Sara X.; Phillips, Lindsey E.; Caron, Marc G.; Wetsel, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is localized primarily within the CNS and is responsible for transporting monoamines from the cytoplasm into secretory vesicles. Because reserpine (a VMAT inhibitor) can precipitate depressive-like symptoms in humans, we investigated whether Vmat2 heterozygous (HET) mice present with depressive-like behaviors. The mutants showed locomotor and rearing retardation in the open field and appeared anhedonic to 1 and 1.5% sucrose solutions. Immobility times for Vmat2 heterozygotes were prolonged in forced swim and imipramine normalized this behavior. HET animals also showed enhanced immobility in tail suspension and this response was alleviated by fluoxetine, reboxetine, and bupropion. Stimulated GTPγS binding indicated that α2-adrenergic receptors in HET hippocampus were more sensitive to UK 14,304 (5-bromo-N-(4,5-dihydro-1-H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine) stimulation than in wild type (WT) mice. In learned helplessness, mice were exposed to a shuttle box for 4 d or were given inescapable foot-shocks for the same time period. On day 5, all animals were tested in shock escape. Failure rates and the latency to escape were similar for WT and HET mice that were only pre-exposed to the test apparatus. In foot-shock groups, learned helplessness was more robust in heterozygotes than in WT controls. Basal secretion of serum corticosterone was not distinguished by genotype; however, corticosterone levels in mutants were more responsive to stress. Anxiety-like responses of WT and HET animals in the open field, light-dark exploration, zero maze, and novelty-suppressed feeding tests were indistinguishable. Collectively, these findings suggest that Vmat2 heterozygotes display a depressive-like phenotype that is devoid of anxiety-like behavior. PMID:17898223

  5. Characterization of Heterogeneous Prostate Tumors in Targeted Pten Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Korsten, Hanneke; Ziel-van der Made, Angelique C. J.; van Weerden, Wytske M.; van der Kwast, Theo; Trapman, Jan; Van Duijn, Petra W.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we generated a preclinical mouse prostate tumor model based on PSA-Cre driven inactivation of Pten. In this model homogeneous hyperplastic prostates (4-5m) developed at older age (>10m) into tumors. Here, we describe the molecular and histological characterization of the tumors in order to better understand the processes that are associated with prostate tumorigenesis in this targeted mouse Pten knockout model. The morphologies of the tumors that developed were very heterogeneous. Different histopathological growth patterns could be identified, including intraductal carcinoma (IDC), adenocarcinoma and undifferentiated carcinoma, all strongly positive for the epithelial cell marker Cytokeratin (CK), and carcinosarcomas, which were negative for CK. IDC pattern was already detected in prostates of 7–8 month old mice, indicating that it could be a precursor stage. At more than 10 months IDC and carcinosarcoma were most frequently observed. Gene expression profiling discriminated essentially two molecular subtypes, denoted tumor class 1 (TC1) and tumor class 2 (TC2). TC1 tumors were characterized by high expression of epithelial markers like Cytokeratin 8 and E-Cadherin whereas TC2 tumors showed high expression of mesenchyme/stroma markers such as Snail and Fibronectin. These molecular subtypes corresponded with histological growth patterns: where TC1 tumors mainly represented adenocarcinoma / intraductal carcinoma, in TC2 tumors carcinosarcoma was the dominant growth pattern. Further molecular characterization of the prostate tumors revealed an increased expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response. Moreover, functional markers for senescence, proliferation, angiogenesis and apoptosis were higher expressed in tumors compared to hyperplasia. The highest expression of proliferation and angiogenesis markers was detected in TC2 tumors. Our data clearly showed that in the genetically well-defined PSA-Cre;Pten-loxP/loxP prostate tumor model

  6. Long-Term Effects of Prenatal Hypoxia on Schizophrenia-Like Phenotype in Heterozygous Reeler Mice.

    PubMed

    Howell, Kristy R; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal hypoxia (PHX) is a well-known environmental factor implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the long-term effects of PHX on schizophrenia-related neuroplasticity are poorly understood. Using behavioral tasks, MRI imaging, and biochemical studies, we examined the long-term effects of PHX in heterozygous reeler mice (HRM; mice deficient for reelin, a candidate gene for schizophrenia). PHX at E17 failed to induce any significant deficits in prepulse inhibition, spatial memory, anxiety-like behavior, or blood flow in wild type (WT) and HRM at 6 months of age. However, PHX induced a significant increase in frontal cortex volume in WT whereas the higher frontal cortical volume found in HRM was significantly reduced by PHX. A significant decrease in reelin levels was observed in frontal cortex of WT and HRM and hippocampus of HRM following PHX. In addition, PHX induced significant reductions in hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus of HRM. Although no significant effect of PHX was observed in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus of WT and HRM, serum VEGF levels were found higher in HRM following PHX. Moreover, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels were significantly lower in frontal cortex of WT and HRM and hippocampus of HRM following PHX. We found a significant reduction in serum corticosterone levels of PHX-treated WT mice. These findings suggest that future experiments addressing gene-environment interaction in schizophrenia should consider age-dependent effects of the environmental factor, in addition to the specificity of the gene of interest. PMID:26059812

  7. Abnormal corneal epithelial maintenance in mice heterozygous for the micropinna microphthalmia mutation Mp.

    PubMed

    Douvaras, Panagiotis; Dorà, Natalie J; Mort, Richard L; Lodge, Emily J; Hill, Robert E; West, John D

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the corneal morphology of adult Mp/+ mice, which are heterozygous for the micropinna microphthalmia mutation, and identified several abnormalities, which implied that corneal epithelial maintenance was abnormal. The Mp/+ corneal epithelium was thin, loosely packed and contained goblet cells in older mice. Evidence also suggested that the barrier function was compromised. However, there was no major effect on corneal epithelial cell turnover and mosaic patterns of radial stripes indicated that radial cell movement was normal. Limbal blood vessels formed an abnormally wide limbal vasculature ring, K19-positive cells were distributed more widely than normal and K12 was weakly expressed in the peripheral cornea. This raises the possibilities that the limbal-corneal boundary was poorly defined or the limbus was wider than normal. BrdU label-retaining cell numbers and quantitative clonal analysis suggested that limbal epithelial stem cell numbers were not depleted and might be higher than normal. However, as corneal epithelial homeostasis was abnormal, it is possible that Mp/+ stem cell function was impaired. It has been shown recently that the Mp mutation involves a chromosome 18 inversion that disrupts the Fbn2 and Isoc1 genes and produces an abnormal, truncated fibrillin-2(MP) protein. This abnormal protein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells that normally express Fbn2 and causes ER stress. It was also shown that Fbn2 is expressed in the corneal stroma but not the corneal epithelium, suggesting that the presence of truncated fibrillin-2(MP) protein in the corneal stroma disrupts corneal epithelial homeostasis in Mp/+ mice. PMID:27235794

  8. Vesicoureteral reflux and other urinary tract malformations in mice compound heterozygous for Pax2 and Emx2.

    PubMed

    Boualia, Sami K; Gaitan, Yaned; Murawski, Inga; Nadon, Robert; Gupta, Indra R; Bouchard, Maxime

    2011-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) are the most common cause of chronic kidney disease in children. This disease group includes a spectrum of urinary tract defects including vesicoureteral reflux, duplex kidneys and other developmental defects that can be found alone or in combination. To identify new regulators of CAKUT, we tested the genetic cooperativity between several key regulators of urogenital system development in mice. We found a high incidence of urinary tract anomalies in Pax2;Emx2 compound heterozygous mice that are not found in single heterozygous mice. Pax2⁺/⁻;Emx2⁺/⁻ mice harbor duplex systems associated with urinary tract obstruction, bifid ureter and a high penetrance of vesicoureteral reflux. Remarkably, most compound heterozygous mice refluxed at low intravesical pressure. Early analysis of Pax2⁺/⁻;Emx2⁺/⁻ embryos point to ureter budding defects as the primary cause of urinary tract anomalies. We additionally establish Pax2 as a direct regulator of Emx2 expression in the Wolffian duct. Together, these results identify a haploinsufficient genetic combination resulting in CAKUT-like phenotype, including a high sensitivity to vesicoureteral reflux. As both genes are located on human chromosome 10q, which is lost in a proportion of VUR patients, these findings may help understand VUR and CAKUT in humans. PMID:21731775

  9. Developmental Divergence of Sleep-Wake Patterns in Orexin Knockout and Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Cassandra M.; Johnson, Eric D.; Shaw, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by fragmented bouts of sleep and wakefulness during the day and night as well as cataplexy, has been linked in humans and non-human animals to the functional integrity of the orexinergic system. Adult orexin knockout mice and dogs with a mutation of the orexin receptor exhibit symptoms that mirror those seen in narcoleptic humans. As with narcolepsy, infant sleep-wake cycles in humans and rats are highly fragmented, with consolidated bouts of sleep and wakefulness developing gradually. Based on these common features of narcoleptics and infants, we hypothesized that the development of sleep-wake fragmentation in orexin knockout mice would be expressed as a developmental divergence between knockouts and wild-types, with the knockouts lagging behind the wild-types. We tested this hypothesis by recording the sleep-wake patterns of infant orexin knockout and wild-type mice across the first three postnatal weeks. Both knockouts and wild-types exhibited age-dependent, and therefore orexin-independent, quantitative and qualitative changes in sleep-wake patterning. At 3 weeks of age, however, by which time the sleep and wake bouts of the wild-types had consolidated further, the knockouts lagged behind the wild-types and exhibited significantly more bout fragmentation. These findings suggest the possibility that the fragmentation of behavioral states that characterizes narcolepsy in adults reflects reversion back toward the more fragmented sleep-wake patterns that characterize infancy. PMID:17284193

  10. PROXIMAL GUT MUCOSAL EPITHELIAL HOMEOSTASIS IN AGED IL-1 TYPE I RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER STARVATION

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E.; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that starvation induces small bowel atrophy, and that atrophy diminishes with aging. In this experiment, we assessed whether starvation-induced atrophy of proximal gut mucosa is associated with the Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling pathway in aged mice. Materials and Methods Thirty 26-month-old IL-1R knockout mice and age-matched wild-type C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into two groups: ad libitum fed and fasted. Mice were euthanized 12 or 48 hours after starvation. The proximal small bowel was harvested for morphologic analysis. Gut epithelial cell proliferation was detected using immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and apoptosis was identified using terminal deoxyuridine nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Results Aged IL-1R knockout mice were larger than aged-matched wild-type mice (p<0.05). Proximal gut mucosal height and mucosal cell number were not different between aged IL-1R knockout and wild-type groups. The apoptosis index in gut epithelial cells was higher in fed IL-1R knockout versus wild-type mice (p<0.05), while no significant difference in cell proliferation between both groups. Mucosal atrophy was induced in both aged IL-1R knockout and wild-type groups by starvation (p<0.05), however, aged IL-1R knockout mice experienced greater losses in proximal gut weight, mucosal length, and corresponding cell number than did wild-type mice at the 12-hour time point (p<0.05). The apoptosis index in gut epithelial cells significantly increased in both groups after starvation (p<0.05). Starvation decreased cell proliferation in IL-1R knockout mice (p<0.05), but not in wild-type mice. Conclusions The response in aged IL-1R knockout mice differs from wild-type mice in that starvation increases atrophy and is associated with decreased cell proliferation rather than increased apoptosis. PMID:20605606

  11. Featured Article: Accelerated decline of physical strength in peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Gang; Wang, Li; Kaifu, Tomonori; Li, Jingmin; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Lianqin

    2016-07-01

    As a member of peroxiredoxin family, peroxiredoxin-3 plays a major role in the control of mitochondrial level of reactive oxygen species. During the breeding of experimental mice, we noticed that the peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice were listless with aging. In the present study, we compared the swimming exercise performance and oxidative status between peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice (n = 15) and wild-type littermates (n = 15). At the age of 10 months, the physical strength of peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice was much lower than the wild-type littermates. Increased oxidative damage and decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number of the animal skeletal muscles were observed in peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice as compared to that in the wild-type littermates. In addition, we found increased apoptotic cells in the brains of peroxiredoxin-3 knockout mice. Our results suggest that the deficiency of peroxiredoxin-3 induces accelerated oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment, resulting in the decrease of energy supply and cellular activities. Peroxiredoxin-3 might be involved in the inhibition of aging process. PMID:27037278

  12. Cysteamine treatment ameliorates alterations in GAD67 expression and spatial memory in heterozygous reeler mice

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyanawalla, Ammar; Promsote, Wanwisa; Terry, Alvin; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2011-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its receptor, TrkB is known to regulate GABAergic function and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 expression in neurons. Alterations in BDNF signaling have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and as a result, they are a potential therapeutic target. Interestingly, heterozygous reeler mice (HRM) have decreased GAD67 expression in the frontal cortex and hippocampus and they exhibit many behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities similar to schizophrenia. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of cysteamine, a neuroprotective compound to improve the deficits in GAD67 expression and cognitive function in HRM. We found that cysteamine administration (150 mg/kg/day, through drinking water) for 30 days significantly ameliorated the decreases in GAD67, mature BDNF and full-length TrkB protein levels found in frontal cortex and hippocampus of HRM. A significant attenuation of the increased levels of truncated BDNF in frontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as truncated TrkB in frontal cortex of HRM was also observed following cysteamine treatment. In behavioral studies, HRM were impaired in a Y-maze spatial recognition memory task, but not in a spontaneous alternation task or a sensorimotor, prepulse inhibition (PPI) procedure. Cysteamine improved Y-maze spatial recognition in HRM to the level of wide-type controls and it improved PPI in both wild-type and HRM. Finally, mice deficient in TrkB, showed a reduced response to cysteamine in GAD67 expression suggesting that TrkB signaling plays an important role in GAD67 regulation by cysteamine. PMID:21777509

  13. Effects of blueberries in prevention of atherosclerosis in apoe knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ApoE knockout (ApoE-/-) mice were fed AIN-93G diet (CD) or CD formulated to contain 1% freeze-dried whole wild blueberries (CD1% BB). Mice were sacrificed after 20 weeks on the specified diet. Atherosclerotic lesions in aortic sinus were determined by staining cryosections (10 µm) with Oil Red O. Th...

  14. MR histology of advanced atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE- knockout mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, A.; Yarnykh, V.; Ferguson, M.; Rosenfeld, M.; Yuan, C.

    2016-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the feasibility of determining the composition of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in fixed ApoE-knockout mice and to develop a time-efficient microimaging protocol for MR histological imaging on mice. Five formalin-fixed transgenic ApoE-knockout mice were imaged at the 9.4T Bruker BioSpec MR scanner using 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence with an isotropic field of view of 24 mm3; TR 20.8 ms; TE 2.6 ms; flip angle 20°, resulted voxel size 47 × 63 × 94 pm3. MRI examination has shown that advanced atherosclerotic lesions of aorta, innominate and carotid arteries in ApoE-knockout mice are characterized by high calcification and presence of the large fibrofatty nodules. MRI quantification of atherosclerotic lesion components corresponded to histological assessment of plaque composition with a correlation coefficient of 0.98.

  15. Mosaic synaptopathy and functional defects in Cav1.4 heterozygous mice and human carriers of CSNB2

    PubMed Central

    Michalakis, Stylianos; Shaltiel, Lior; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Koch, Susanne; Schludi, Verena; Krause, Stefanie; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Hamel, Christian; Meunier, Isabelle; Preising, Markus N.; Friedburg, Christoph; Lorenz, Birgit; Zabouri, Nawal; Haverkamp, Silke; Garrido, Marina Garcia; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in CACNA1F encoding the α1-subunit of the retinal Cav1.4 L-type calcium channel have been linked to Cav1.4 channelopathies including incomplete congenital stationary night blindness type 2A (CSNB2), Åland Island eye disease (AIED) and cone-rod dystrophy type 3 (CORDX3). Since CACNA1F is located on the X chromosome, Cav1.4 channelopathies are typically affecting male patients via X-chromosomal recessive inheritance. Occasionally, clinical symptoms have been observed in female carriers, too. It is currently unknown how these mutations lead to symptoms in carriers and how the retinal network in these females is affected. To investigate these clinically important issues, we compared retinal phenotypes in Cav1.4-deficient and Cav1.4 heterozygous mice and in human female carrier patients. Heterozygous Cacna1f carrier mice have a retinal mosaic consistent with differential X-chromosomal inactivation, characterized by adjacent vertical columns of affected and non-affected wild-type-like retinal network. Vertical columns in heterozygous mice are well comparable to either the wild-type retinal network of normal mice or to the retina of homozygous mice. Affected retinal columns display pronounced rod and cone photoreceptor synaptopathy and cone degeneration. These changes lead to vastly impaired vision-guided navigation under dark and normal light conditions and reduced retinal electroretinography (ERG) responses in Cacna1f carrier mice. Similar abnormal ERG responses were found in five human CACNA1F carriers, four of which had novel mutations. In conclusion, our data on Cav1.4 deficient mice and human female carriers of mutations in CACNA1F are consistent with a phenotype of mosaic CSNB2. PMID:24163243

  16. Narp knockout mice show normal reactivity to novelty but attenuated recovery from neophobia.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Ashley M; Lee, Jongah J; Tao, Bo; Smith, Dani R; Johnson, Alexander W; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2013-11-15

    Narp knockout (KO) mice demonstrate cognitive inflexibility and addictive behavior, which are associated with abnormal reactivity to a novel stimulus. To assess reactivity to novelty, we tested Narp KO and wild-type (WT) mice on a neophobia procedure. Both Narp KO and WT mice showed a similar decrease in consumption upon initial exposure to a novel flavor, but Narp KO mice did not increase consumption with subsequent exposures to the novel flavor like the WT mice. Therefore, Narp KO mice do not have abnormal reactivity to novelty but show deficits in adapting behavior to reflect the updated value of a stimulus. PMID:24120400

  17. Methylphenidate improves the behavioral and cognitive deficits of neurogranin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Freesia L.; Huang, Kuo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Neurogranin (Ng), a brain-specific calmodulin-binding protein, is expressed highly in hippocampus, and is important for cognitive function. Deletion of the Ng gene from mice caused attenuation of signal reaction cascade in hippocampus, impairments in learning and memory and high frequency stimulation-induced long-term potentiation. Environmental enrichment alone failed to improve cognitive function. In the present study, behavioral testing revealed that Ng knockout mice were both hyperactive and socially withdrawn. Methylphenidate (MPH) was given to mice while they were also kept under an enrichment condition. MPH treatment reduced the hyperactivity of Ng knockout mice tested in both the open field and forced swim chamber. MPH improved their social abilities such that mice recognized and interacted better with novel subjects. The cognitive memories of MPH-treated mutants were improved in both water maze and contextual fear conditioning tests. High frequency stimulation-induced long-term potentiation of Ng knockout mice was also improved by MPH. The present treatment regimen, however, did not fully reverse the deficits of the mutant mice. In contrast, MPH exerted only a minimal effect on the wild type mice. At the cellular level, MPH increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells in hippocampus, particularly within the dentate gyrus of Ng knockout mice. Therefore it will be of interest to determine the nature of MPH-mediated astrocyte activation and how it may modulate behavior in future studies. Taken together these Ng knockout mice may be useful for the development of better drug treatment to improve cognitive and behavioral impairments. PMID:22809330

  18. (-)-Pentazocine induces visceral chemical antinociception, but not thermal, mechanical, or somatic chemical antinociception, in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background (-)-Pentazocine has been hypothesized to induce analgesia via the κ-opioid (KOP) receptor, although the involvement of other opioid receptor subtypes in the effects of pentazocine remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the μ-opioid (MOP) receptor in thermal, mechanical, and chemical antinociception induced by (-)-pentazocine using MOP receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice. Results (-)-Pentazocine-induced thermal antinociception, assessed by the hot-plate and tail-flick tests, was significantly reduced in heterozygous and abolished in homozygous MOP-KO mice compared with wildtype mice. The results obtained from the (-)-pentazocine-induced mechanical and somatic chemical antinociception experiments, which used the hind-paw pressure and formalin tests, were similar to the results obtained from the thermal antinociception experiments in these mice. However, (-)-pentazocine retained its ability to induce significant visceral chemical antinociception, assessed by the writhing test, in homozygous MOP-KO mice, an effect that was completely blocked by pretreatment with nor-binaltorphimine, a KOP receptor antagonist. In vitro binding and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays showed that (-)-pentazocine possessed higher affinity for KOP and MOP receptors than for δ-opioid receptors. Conclusions The present study demonstrated the abolition of the thermal, mechanical, and somatic chemical antinociceptive effects of (-)-pentazocine and retention of the visceral chemical antinociceptive effects of (-)-pentazocine in MOP-KO mice. These results suggest that the MOP receptor plays a pivotal role in thermal, mechanical, and somatic chemical antinociception induced by (-)-pentazocine, whereas the KOP receptor is involved in visceral chemical antinociception induced by (-)-pentazocine. PMID:21477373

  19. CD47 gene knockout protects against transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Tsuji, Kiyoshi; Xing, Changhong; Yang, Yong-Guang; Wang, Xiaoying; Lo, Eng H

    2009-05-01

    CD47 is a cell surface glycoprotein that helps mediate neutrophil transmigration across blood vessels. The present study was performed to determine whether absence of the CD47 gene decreases focal ischemic brain damage. Mice were subjected to 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion. CD47 knockout mice were compared against matching wildtype mice. CD47 expression was checked by Western blotting. Infarct volume and ischemic brain swelling were quantified with cresyl violet-stained brain sections at 24 and 72 h after ischemia. The tight junction protein claudin-5 was detected by imunohistochemistry. Two surrogate markers of neuroinflammation, brain levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and infiltration of neutrophils, were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Western blots confirmed that CD47 was absent in knockout brains. Ischemia did not appear to upregulate total brain levels of CD47 in WT mice. In CD47 knockout mice, infarct volumes were reduced at 24 and 72 h after ischemia, and hemispheric swelling was decreased at 72 h. Loss of claudin-5 was observed in ischemic WT brain. This effect was ameliorated in CD47 knockout brains. Extravasation of neutrophils into the brain parenchyma was significantly reduced in CD47 knockout mice compared to wildtype mice. MMP-9 appeared to be upregulated in microvessels within ischemic brain. MMP-9 levels were markedly lower in CD47 knockout brains compared to wildtype brains. We conclude that CD47 is broadly involved in neuroinflammation, and this integrin-associated-protein plays a role in promoting MMP-9 upregulaton, neutrophil extravasation, brain swelling and progression of acute ischemic brain injury. PMID:19233173

  20. Impaired Social Behavior in 5-HT3A Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smit-Rigter, Laura A.; Wadman, Wytse J.; van Hooft, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel expressed on interneurons throughout the brain. So far, analysis of the 5-HT3A knockout mouse revealed changes in nociceptive processing and a reduction in anxiety related behavior. Recently, it was shown that the 5-HT3 receptor is also expressed on Cajal-Retzius cells which play a key role in cortical development and that knockout mice lacking this receptor showed aberrant growth of the dendritic tree of cortical layer II/III pyramidal neurons. Other mouse models in which serotonergic signaling was disrupted during development showed similar morphological changes in the cortex, and in addition, also deficits in social behavior. Here, we subjected male and female 5-HT3A knockout mice and their non-transgenic littermates to several tests of social behavior. We found that 5-HT3A knockout mice display impaired social communication in the social transmission of food preference task. Interestingly, we showed that in the social interaction test only female 5-HT3A knockout mice spent less time in reciprocal social interaction starting after 5 min of testing. Moreover, we observed differences in preference for social novelty for male and female 5-HT3A knockout mice during the social approach test. However, no changes in olfaction, exploratory activity and anxiety were detected. These results indicate that the 5-HT3A knockout mouse displays impaired social behavior with specific changes in males and females, reminiscent to other mouse models in which serotonergic signaling is disturbed in the developing brain. PMID:21103015

  1. Transgenic knockout mice with exclusively human sickle hemoglobinand sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paszty, C.; Brion, C.; Manci, E.; Witkowska, E.; Stevens, M.; Narla, M.; Rubin, E.

    1997-06-13

    To create mice expressing exclusively human sicklehemoglobin (HbS), transgenic mice expressing human alpha-, gamma-, andbeta[S]-globin were generated and bred with knockout mice that haddeletions of the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. These sickle cellmice have the major features (irreversibly sickled red cells, anemia,multiorgan pathology) found in humans with sickle cell disease and, assuch, represent a useful in vivo system to accelerate the development ofimproved therapies for this common genetic disease.

  2. Comparison of nociceptive behavior in prostaglandin E, F, D, prostacyclin and thromboxane receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Popp, Laura; Häussler, Annett; Olliges, Anke; Nüsing, Rolf; Narumiya, Shuh; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2009-08-01

    Antagonist at specific prostaglandin receptors might provide analgesia with a more favourable toxicity profile compared with cyclooxygenase inhibitors. We analyzed nociceptive responses in prostaglandin D, E, F, prostacyclin and thromboxane receptor knockout mice and mice deficient of cyclooxygenase 1 or 2 to evaluate the contribution of individual prostaglandin receptors for heat, mechanical and formalin-evoked pain. None of the knockouts was uniformly protected from all of these pain stimuli but COX-1 and EP4 receptor knockouts presented with reduced heat pain and EP3 receptor and COX-2 knockout mice had reduced licking responses in the 2nd phase of the formalin assay. This was accompanied with reduced c-Fos immunoreactivity in the spinal cord dorsal horn in EP3 knockouts. Oppositely, heat pain sensitivity was increased in FP, EP1 and EP1+3 double mutant mice possibly due to a loss of FP or EP1 receptor mediated central control of thermal pain sensitivity. Deficiency of either EP2 or DP1 was associated with increased formalin-evoked flinching responses and c-Fos IR in dorsal horn neurons suggesting facilitated spinal cord pain reflex circuity. Thromboxane and prostacyclin receptor knockout mice showed normal pain behavior in all tests. The results suggest a differential, pain-stimulus and site-specific contribution of specific PG-receptors for the processing of the nociceptive stimuli, a differential modulation of nociceptive responses by COX-1 and COX-2 derived prostaglandins and compensatory and/or developmental adaptations in mice lacking specific PG receptors. PMID:18938093

  3. The alcohol-induced locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release is suppressed in ghrelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jerlhag, Elisabet; Landgren, Sara; Egecioglu, Emil; Dickson, Suzanne L; Engel, Jörgen A

    2011-06-01

    Ghrelin, the first endogenous ligand for the type 1A growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1A), plays a role in energy balance, feeding behavior, and reward. Previously, we showed that pharmacologic and genetic suppression of the GHS-R1A attenuates the alcohol-induced stimulation, accumbal dopamine release, and conditioned place preference as well as alcohol consumption in mice, implying that the GHS-R1A is required for alcohol reward. The present study further elucidates the role of ghrelin for alcohol-induced dopamine release in nucleus accumbens and locomotor stimulation by means of ghrelin knockout mice. We found that the ability of alcohol to increase accumbal dopamine release in wild-type mice is not observed in ghrelin knockout mice. Furthermore, alcohol induced a locomotor stimulation in the wild-type mice and ghrelin knockout mice; however, the locomotor stimulation in homozygote mice was significantly lower than in the wild-type mice. The present series of experiments suggest that endogenous ghrelin may be required for the ability of alcohol to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. PMID:21145690

  4. Behavior training reverses asymmetry in hippocampal transcriptome of the cav3.2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ni-Chun; Huang, Ying-Hsueh; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung; Liao, James C; Yang, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chang; Liu, Ingrid Y

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous Cav3.2 knockout mice, which are defective in the pore-forming subunit of a low voltage activated T-type calcium channel, have been documented to show impaired maintenance of late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and defective retrieval of context-associated fear memory. To investigate the role of Cav3.2 in global gene expression, we performed a microarray transcriptome study on the hippocampi of the Cav3.2-/- mice and their wild-type littermates, either naïve (untrained) or trace fear conditioned. We found a significant left-right asymmetric effect on the hippocampal transcriptome caused by the Cav3.2 knockout. Between the naive Cav3.2-/- and the naive wild-type mice, 3522 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found in the left hippocampus, but only 4 DEGs were found in the right hippocampus. Remarkably, the effect of Cav3.2 knockout was partially reversed by trace fear conditioning. The number of DEGs in the left hippocampus was reduced to 6 in the Cav3.2 knockout mice after trace fear conditioning, compared with the wild-type naïve mice. To our knowledge, these results demonstrate for the first time the asymmetric effects of the Cav3.2 and its partial reversal by behavior training on the hippocampal transcriptome. PMID:25768289

  5. The physiological roles of vesicular GABA transporter during embryonic development: a study using knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) loads GABA and glycine from the neuronal cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles. To address functional importance of VGAT during embryonic development, we generated global VGAT knockout mice and analyzed them. Results VGAT knockouts at embryonic day (E) 18.5 exhibited substantial increases in overall GABA and glycine, but not glutamate, contents in the forebrain. Electrophysiological recordings from E17.5-18.5 spinal cord motoneurons demonstrated that VGAT knockouts presented no spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by GABA and glycine. Histological examination of E18.5 knockout fetuses revealed reductions in the trapezius muscle, hepatic congestion and little alveolar spaces in the lung, indicating that the development of skeletal muscle, liver and lung in these mice was severely affected. Conclusion VGAT is fundamental for the GABA- and/or glycine-mediated transmission that supports embryonic development. VGAT knockout mice will be useful for further investigating the roles of VGAT in normal physiology and pathophysiologic processes. PMID:21190592

  6. Audiograms, gap detection thresholds, and frequency difference limens in cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Toal, Katrina L; Radziwon, Kelly E; Holfoth, David P; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A; Dent, Micheal L

    2016-02-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is found at several stages in the auditory pathway, but its role in hearing is unknown. Hearing abilities were measured in CB1R knockout mice and compared to those of wild-type mice. Operant conditioning and the psychophysical Method of Constant Stimuli were used to measure audiograms, gap detection thresholds, and frequency difference limens in trained mice using the same methods and stimuli as in previous experiments. CB1R knockout mice showed deficits at frequencies above 8 kHz in their audiograms relative to wild-type mice. CB1R knockouts showed enhancements for detecting gaps in low-pass noisebursts relative to wild-type mice, but were similar for other noise conditions. Finally, the two groups of mice did not differ in their frequency discrimination abilities as measured by the frequency difference limens task. These experiments suggest that the CB1R is involved in auditory processing and lay the groundwork for future physiological experiments. PMID:26427583

  7. Reduced baroreceptor sensitivity during hypotension in ANP-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, U; Deliva, R D

    2001-03-01

    We studied baroreflex gain in inactin-anesthetized mice that had been genetically modified to be depleted of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP -/-). Wild-type mice (ANP +/+) served as controls. ANP -/- mice had a significantly higher basal arterial blood pressure (ABP) than ANP +/+ mice [112+/-7 vs. 80+/-5 mmHg (mean +/- SEM)]. Their basal heart rates were not different (491+/-13 vs. 446+/-19 bpm). A third group, composed of ANP +/+ mice only, was rendered acutely hypertensive by an intravenous infusion of arginine vasopressin acetate (0.3 pg bolus followed by 0.3 pg/h) so as to serve as a control for the elevated ABP in the ANP -/- mice. Transient changes in ABP were caused by bolus injections of oxymetazoline hydrochloride (1.5-3 ng) or sodium nitroprusside (20-100 ng). Baroreflex gain was calculated as the ratio of the peak heart rate change that followed the peak change in mean ABP resulting from injection of oxymetazoline or nitroprusside. There were no significant differences among the groups in their responses to transient hypertension. On the other hand, the ANP -/- mice showed a significantly depressed tachycardic response to transient hypotension when compared with the other two groups. We conclude that the ANP -/- mice are unable to increase efferent sympathetic nervous activity adequately above the high basal activity that is a feature of this animal model. PMID:11294595

  8. Atherosclerosis, inflammation and lipoprotein glomerulopathy in kidneys of apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice are bearing considerable structural homology to human atherosclerosis. We hypothesized, that advanced lesion formation in the renal artery is associated with kidney alterations in these mice. Methods Kidneys from apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice at the age of 80 weeks (n = 6) and C57/BL control mice (n = 5) were infused with Microfil, harvested and scanned with micro-CT (12 μm cubic voxels) and Nano-CT (900 nm cubic voxels). We quantitated the total vascular volume using micro-CT. Number and cross-sectional area (μm2) of glomeruli were measured using histology. Results At the age of 80 weeks, the renal total vascular volume fraction decreased significantly (p < 0.001) compared to controls. Moreover, the renal artery showed advanced atherosclerotic lesions with adventitial Vasa vasorum neovascularization. Perivascular inflammation was present in kidneys of apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice, predominantly involved are plasma cells and leucocytes. Glomeruli cross-sectional area (9959 ± 1083 μm2) and number (24.8 ± 4.5) increased in apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mice compared to controls (3533 ± 398 μm2; 17.6 ± 3, respectively), whereas 41% of the total number of glomeruli showed evidence for lipoprotein associated glomerulopathy (LPG). Moreover, immunohistochemistry demonstrated capillary aneurysms of the glomeruli filled with factor 8 containing emboli. Conclusion The reduced intra-renal total vascular volume is associated with systemic atherosclerosis and glomeruli alterations in the apoE-/-/LDL-/- double knockout mouse model. PMID:20727187

  9. Thyrotropin receptor knockout mice: studies on immunological tolerance to a major thyroid autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Pichurin, Pavel N; Pichurina, Oxana; Marians, Russell C; Chen, Chun-Rong; Davies, Terry F; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M

    2004-03-01

    Graves' disease involves a breakdown in self-tolerance to the TSH receptor (TSHR). Central T cell tolerance is established by intrathymic deletion of immature T lymphocytes that bind with high affinity to peptides from autoantigens (like the TSHR) expressed ectopically in the thymus. In TSHR-knockout mice, tolerance cannot be induced to the TSHR, which should, therefore, be a foreign antigen for these animals. To test this hypothesis, TSHR-knockout mice and wild-type controls were vaccinated (three injections) with TSHR DNA or control DNA. TSHR antibodies, measured by ELISA, binding to TSHR-expressing eukaryotic cells, and TSH binding inhibition, developed in approximately 60% of TSHR-knockout mice, not significantly different from 80% in the wild-type mice. Antibody levels were also comparable in the two groups, and both strains recognized the same immunodominant linear antibody epitope at the amino terminus of the TSHR. Splenocyte responses to TSHR protein in culture, measured as interferon-gamma production, were similar in TSHR-knockout and wild-type mice. Moreover, T cells from both strains recognized the same two epitopes from a panel of 29 synthetic peptides encompassing the TSHR ectodomain and extracellular loops. This lack of difference in immune responses in TSHR-knockout and wild-type mice is unexpected and is contrary to observations in other induced animal models of autoimmunity. The importance of our finding is that the TSHR may not be similar to other model proteins used to define the concept of central immune tolerance. PMID:14630711

  10. Germ cell differentiation and synaptonemal complex formation are disrupted in CPEB knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Tay, J; Richter, J D

    2001-08-01

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA binding protein that regulates translation during vertebrate oocyte maturation. Adult female CPEB knockout mice contained vestigial ovaries that were devoid of oocytes; ovaries from mid-gestation embryos contained oocytes that were arrested at the pachytene stage. Male CPEB null mice also contained germ cells arrested at pachytene. The germ cells from the knockout mice harbored fragmented chromatin, suggesting a possible defect in homologous chromosome adhesion or synapsis. Two CPE-containing synaptonemal complex protein mRNAs, which interact with CPEB in vitro and in vivo, contained shortened poly(A) tails and mostly failed to sediment with polysomes in the null mice. Synaptonemal complexes were not detected in these animals. CPEB therefore controls germ cell differentiation by regulating the formation of the synaptonemal complex. PMID:11702780

  11. Altered behavioral development in Nrf2 knockout mice following early postnatal exposure to valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Melody A.; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Kong, Ah-Ng; Wagner, George C

    2015-01-01

    Early exposure to valproic acid results in autism-like neural and behavioral deficits in humans and other animals through oxidative stress-induced neural damage. In the present study, valproic acid was administered to genetically altered mice lacking the Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2) gene on postnatal day 14 (P14). Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces genes that protect against oxidative stress. It was found that valproic acid-treated Nrf2 knockout mice were less active in open field activity chambers, less successful on the rotorod, and had deficits in learning and memory in the Morris water maze compared to the valproic acid-treated wild type mice. Given these results, it appears that Nrf2 knockout mice were more sensitive to the neural damage caused by valproic acid administered during early development. PMID:25454122

  12. Fasting induces ketoacidosis and hypothermia in PDHK2/PDHK4-double-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeoung, Nam Ho; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Wu, Pengfei; Lee, W. N. Paul; Harris, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of PDHK (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase) 2 and 4 in regulation of the PDH complex (pyruvate dehydrogenase complex) was assessed in single- and double-knockout mice. PDHK2 deficiency caused higher PDH complex activity and lower blood glucose levels in the fed, but not the fasted, state. PDHK4 deficiency caused similar effects, but only after fasting. Double deficiency intensified these effects in both the fed and fasted states. PDHK2 deficiency had no effect on glucose tolerance, PDHK4 deficiency produced only a modest effect, but double deficiency caused a marked improvement and also induced lower insulin levels and increased insulin sensitivity. In spite of these beneficial effects, the double-knockout mice were more sensitive than wild-type and single-knockout mice to long-term fasting, succumbing to hypoglycaemia, ketoacidosis and hypothermia. Stable isotope flux analysis indicated that hypoglycaemia was due to a reduced rate of gluconeogenesis and that slightly more glucose was converted into ketone bodies in the double-knockout mice. The findings establish that PDHK2 is more important in the fed state, PDHK4 is more important in the fasted state, and survival during long-term fasting depends upon regulation of the PDH complex by both PDHK2 and PDHK4. PMID:22360721

  13. Blueberries reduce lipid peroxidation and boost antioxidant enzymes in apoe knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ApoE knockout (ApoE-/-) mice fed AIN-93G diet (CD) formulated to contain 1 % freeze-dried whole wild blueberries (CD1 percent BB) were found to have significantly less atherosclerotic lesions in aorta. Biomarkers of lipid peroxidation, including F2-isoprostanes, hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs) ...

  14. SPERM MOTILITY IN HSF1 KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER HEAT SHOCK IS ASSOCIATED WITH FERTILITY DEFICITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPERM MOTILITY IN HSF1 KNOCKOUT MICE AFTER HEAT SHOCK IS ASSOCIATED WITH FERTILITY DEFICITS. L.F. Strader*, S.D. Perreault, J.C. Luft*, and D.J. Dix*. US EPA/ORD, Reproductive Toxicology Div., Research Triangle Park, NC
    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from environm...

  15. Altered anxiety and defensive behaviors in Bax knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Luedke, Angela C; Boucher, Pierre O; Niel, Lee; Holmes, Melissa M

    2013-02-15

    Developmental neuronal cell death is critically regulated by the pro-death protein Bax. Bax-/- mice exhibit increased neuron number, the elimination of several neural sex differences, and altered socio-sexual behaviors. Here we examined the effects of Bax gene deletion on anxiety and defensive behaviors by comparing the responses of male and female wildtype and Bax-/- mice to two different tests. On the elevated plus maze, Bax-/- mice of both sexes made more entries into and spent more time in the outer portion of open arms, indicating decreased anxiety compared to wildtype animals. Next, we exposed mice to two odors: trimethylthiazoline (TMT), an olfactory component of fox feces that rodents find aversive, and butyric acid (BA), an aversive odor without ecological significance. Each odor was presented individually and all animals were tested with both odors in a counterbalanced design. TMT was consistently more aversive than BA across a variety of behaviors (e.g., mice spent less time close to the odor source). Overall, Bax -/- mice showed fewer stretch approaches to both TMT and BA than wildtypes, but they avoided the odor source more (e.g., fewer contacts and less time spent in proximity). Finally, no effect of genotype was seen in baseline olfactory behavior; all mice were able to locate a buried food item, demonstrating that Bax-/- mice do not have impaired olfaction per se. Collectively, these data suggest a change in strategy with anxiety and defensive behaviors in Bax-/- mice, indicating that alterations in cell number affect more general mechanisms of fear and anxiety in addition to behaviors directly related to reproduction. PMID:23142367

  16. Kv4.2 Knockout Mice Have Hippocampal-Dependent Learning and Memory Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Joaquin N.; Brewster, Amy L.; Spencer, Corinne M.; Anderson, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Kv4.2 channels contribute to the transient, outward K[superscript +] current (A-type current) in hippocampal dendrites, and modulation of this current substantially alters dendritic excitability. Using Kv4.2 knockout (KO) mice, we examined the role of Kv4.2 in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. We found that Kv4.2 KO mice showed a deficit…

  17. Generation of ER{alpha}-floxed and knockout mice using the Cre/LoxP system

    SciTech Connect

    Antonson, P.; Omoto, Y.; Humire, P.; Gustafsson, J.-A.

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ER{alpha} floxed and knockout mice were generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the ER{alpha} gene results in sterility in both male and female mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ER{alpha}{sup -/-} mice have ovaries with hemorrhagic follicles and hypoplastic uterus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Female ER{alpha}{sup -/-} mice develop obesity. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates a range of physiological processes in response to estrogens. In order to study its biological role, we generated a floxed ER{alpha} mouse line that can be used to knock out ER{alpha} in selected tissues by using the Cre/LoxP system. In this study, we established a new ER{alpha} knockout mouse line by crossing the floxed ER{alpha} mice with Cre deleter mice. Here we show that genetic disruption of the ER{alpha} gene in all tissues results in sterility in both male and female mice. Histological examination of uterus and ovaries revealed a dramatically atrophic uterus and hemorrhagic cysts in the ovary. These results suggest that infertility in female mice is the result of functional defects of the reproductive tract. Moreover, female knockout mice are hyperglycemic, develop obesity and at the age of 4 months the body weight of these mice was more than 20% higher compared to wild type littermates and this difference increased over time. Our results demonstrate that ER{alpha} is necessary for reproductive tract development and has important functions as a regulator of metabolism in females.

  18. Neurolysin Knockout Mice Generation and Initial Phenotype Characterization*

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Diogo M. L. P.; Castro, Leandro M.; Rosa Neto, José C.; Seelaender, Marilia; Neves, Rodrigo X.; Oliveira, Vitor; Forti, Fábio L.; Iwai, Leo K.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Todiras, Mihail; Schadock, Ines; Barros, Carlos C.; Bader, Michael; Ferro, Emer S.

    2014-01-01

    The oligopeptidase neurolysin (EC 3.4.24.16; Nln) was first identified in rat brain synaptic membranes and shown to ubiquitously participate in the catabolism of bioactive peptides such as neurotensin and bradykinin. Recently, it was suggested that Nln reduction could improve insulin sensitivity. Here, we have shown that Nln KO mice have increased glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and gluconeogenesis. KO mice have increased liver mRNA for several genes related to gluconeogenesis. Isotopic label semiquantitative peptidomic analysis suggests an increase in specific intracellular peptides in gastrocnemius and epididymal adipose tissue, which likely is involved with the increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in the KO mice. These results suggest the exciting new possibility that Nln is a key enzyme for energy metabolism and could be a novel therapeutic target to improve glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity. PMID:24719317

  19. Targeted Mybpc3 Knock-Out Mice with Cardiac Hypertrophy Exhibit Structural Mitral Valve Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Daniel P.; Neamatalla, Hany; Norris, Russell A.; Levine, Robert A.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Vignier, Nicolas; Kang, Kevin H.; Nguyen, Quangtung; Bruneval, Patrick; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Messas, Emmanuel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; de Vlaming, Annemarieke; Markwald, Roger; Carrier, Lucie; Hagège, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    MYBPC3 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is frequently associated with mitral valve (MV) pathology. We reasoned that increased MV size is caused by localized growth factors with paracrine effects. We used high-resolution echocardiography to compare Mybpc3-null, heterozygous, and wild-type mice (n = 84, aged 3–6 months) and micro-CT for MV volume (n = 6, age 6 months). Mybpc3-null mice showed left ventricular hypertrophy, dilation, and systolic dysfunction compared to heterozygous and wild-type mice, but no systolic anterior motion of the MV or left ventricular outflow obstruction. Compared to wild-type mice, echocardiographic anterior leaflet length (adjusted for left ventricular size) was greatest in Mybpc3-null mice (1.92 ± 0.08 vs. 1.72 ± 0.08 mm, p < 0.001), as was combined leaflet thickness (0.23 ± 0.04 vs. 0.15 ± 0.02 mm, p < 0.001). Micro-CT analyses of Mybpc3-null mice demonstrated increased MV volume (0.47 ± 0.06 vs. 0.15 ± 0.06 mm3, p = 0.018) and thickness (0.35 ± 0.04 vs. 0.12 ± 0.04 mm, p = 0.002), coincident with increased markers of TGFβ activity compared to heterozygous and wild-type littermates. Similarly, excised MV from a patient with MYBPC3 mutation showed increased TGFβ activity. We conclude that MYBPC3 deficiency causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with increased MV leaflet length and thickness despite the absence of left ventricular outflow-tract obstruction, in parallel with increased TGFβ activity. MV changes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be due to paracrine effects, which represent targets for therapeutic studies. PMID:26819945

  20. Cnga2 Knockout Mice Display Alzheimer's-Like Behavior Abnormities and Pathological Changes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ao-Ji; Liu, En-Jie; Huang, He-Zhou; Hu, Yu; Li, Ke; Lu, Youming; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is recognized as a potential risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have reported previously that olfactory deprivation by olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) induced Alzheimer's-like pathological changes and behavioral abnormalities. However, the acute OBX model undergoes surgical-induced brain parenchyma loss and unexpected massive hemorrhage so that it cannot fully mimic the progressive olfactory loss and neurodegeneration in AD. Here, we employed the mice loss of cyclic nucleotide-gated channel alpha 2 (Cnga2) which is critical for olfactory sensory transduction, to investigate the role of olfactory dysfunction in AD pathological process. We found that impaired learning and memory abilities, loss of dendrite spines, as well as decrement of synaptic proteins were displayed in Cnga2 knockout mice. Moreover, Aβ overproduction, tau hyperphosphorylation, and somatodendritic translocation were also found in Cnga2 knockout mice. Our findings suggest that progressive olfactory loss leads to Alzheimer's-like behavior abnormities and pathological changes. PMID:26377105

  1. Defective excitation-contraction coupling is partially responsible for impaired contractility in hindlimb muscles of Stac3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaofei; Doering, Jonathan; Grange, Robert W; Jiang, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    The Stac3 gene is exclusively expressed in skeletal muscle, and Stac3 knockout is perinatal lethal in mice. Previous data from Stac3-deleted diaphragms indicated that Stac3-deleted skeletal muscle could not contract because of defective excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. In this study, we determined the contractility of Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle. In response to frequent electrostimulation, Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contracted but the maximal tension generated was only 20% of that in control (wild type or heterozygous) muscle (P < 0.05). In response to high [K(+)], caffeine, and 4-chloro-m-cresol (4-CMC), the maximal tensions generated in Stac3-deleted muscle were 29% (P < 0.05), 58% (P = 0.08), and 55% (P < 0.05) of those in control muscle, respectively. In response to 4-CMC or caffeine, over 90% of myotubes formed from control myoblasts contracted, but only 60% of myotubes formed from Stac3-deleted myoblasts contracted (P = 0.05). However, in response to 4-CMC or caffeine, similar increases in intracellular calcium concentration were observed in Stac3-deleted and control myotubes. Gene expression and histological analyses revealed that Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contained more slow type-like fibers than control muscle. These data together confirm a critical role of STAC3 in EC coupling but also suggest that STAC3 may have additional functions in skeletal muscle, at least in the hindlimb muscle. PMID:27184118

  2. Defective excitation-contraction coupling is partially responsible for impaired contractility in hindlimb muscles of Stac3 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Xiaofei; Doering, Jonathan; Grange, Robert W.; Jiang, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    The Stac3 gene is exclusively expressed in skeletal muscle, and Stac3 knockout is perinatal lethal in mice. Previous data from Stac3-deleted diaphragms indicated that Stac3-deleted skeletal muscle could not contract because of defective excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. In this study, we determined the contractility of Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle. In response to frequent electrostimulation, Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contracted but the maximal tension generated was only 20% of that in control (wild type or heterozygous) muscle (P < 0.05). In response to high [K+], caffeine, and 4-chloro-m-cresol (4-CMC), the maximal tensions generated in Stac3-deleted muscle were 29% (P < 0.05), 58% (P = 0.08), and 55% (P < 0.05) of those in control muscle, respectively. In response to 4-CMC or caffeine, over 90% of myotubes formed from control myoblasts contracted, but only 60% of myotubes formed from Stac3-deleted myoblasts contracted (P = 0.05). However, in response to 4-CMC or caffeine, similar increases in intracellular calcium concentration were observed in Stac3-deleted and control myotubes. Gene expression and histological analyses revealed that Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contained more slow type-like fibers than control muscle. These data together confirm a critical role of STAC3 in EC coupling but also suggest that STAC3 may have additional functions in skeletal muscle, at least in the hindlimb muscle. PMID:27184118

  3. Arginine utilization of citrulline synthesis in arginase II knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthesis of citrulline (Cit) from arginine (Arg) in the small intestine depends on the activity of arginase II (ARG2). To test the hypothesis that Arg is the main dietary precursor for Cit synthesis, despite the lack of ARG2, tracer studies were conducted in WT and ARG2 ko conscious mice. WT mi...

  4. Tumor suppressor gene co-operativity in compound Patched1 and Suppressor of fused heterozygous mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Svärd, Jessica; Rozell, Björn; Toftgård, Rune; Teglund, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway is central to the development of certain tumor types, including medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Patched1 (Ptch1) and Suppressor of fused (Sufu) are two essential negative regulators of the pathway with tumor suppressor activity. Ptch1+/− mice are predisposed to developing medulloblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma, while Sufu+/− mice develop a skin phenotype characterized by basaloid epidermal proliferations. Here, we have studied tumor development in Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− mice to determine the effect of compound heterozygosity on the onset, incidence, and spectrum of tumors. We found significantly more (2.3-fold) basaloid proliferations in Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− compared to Sufu+/− female, but not male, mice. For medulloblastoma, the cumulative one-year incidence was 1.5-fold higher in Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− compared to Ptch1+/− female mice but this strong trend was not statistically significant. Together this suggests a weak genetic interaction of the two tumor suppressor genes. We noted a few rhabdomyosarcomas and pancreatic cysts in the Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− mice, but the numbers were not significantly different from the single heterozygous mice. Hydrocephalus developed in ∼20% of the Ptch1+/− and Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− but not in Sufu+/− mice. Interestingly, most of the medulloblastomas from the Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− mice had lost expression of the remaining Ptch1 wild-type allele but not the Sufu wild-type allele. On the contrary, Sufu as well as Gli1 and Gli2 expression was upregulated in the medulloblastomas compared to adult cerebellum in Ptch1+/− and Sufu+/−Ptch1+/− mice. This suggests that Sufu expression may be regulated by Hedgehog pathway activity and could constitute another negative feedback loop in the pathway. PMID:18781608

  5. FMR1 Knockout mice: A model to study fragile X mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, B.A.; Bakker, C.E.; Reyniers, E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most frequent form of inherited mental retardation in humans with an incidence of 1 in 1250 males and 1 in 2500 females. The clinical syndrome includes moderate to severe mental retardation, autistic behavior, macroorchidism, and facial features, such as long face with mandibular prognathism and large, everted ears. The molecular basis for this disease is a large expansion of a triplet repeat (CGG){sub n} in the 5{prime} untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. Due to this large expansion of the CGG repeat, the promoter region becomes methylated and the FMR1 gene is subsequently silenced. Hardly anything is known about the physiologic function of FMR1 and the pathologic mechanisms leading to these symptoms. Since the FMR1 gene is highly conserved in the mouse, we used the mouse to design a knockout model for the fragile X syndrome. These knockout mice lacking Fmrp have normal litter size suggesting that FMR1 is not essential in human gametogenesis and embryonic development. The knockout mice show the abnormalities also seen in the affected organs of human patients. Mutant mice show a gradual development through time of macroorchidism. In the knockout mice we observed cognitive defects in the form of deficits in learning (as shown by the hidden platform Morris water maze task) and behavioral abnormalities such as increased exploratory behavior and hyperactivity. Therefore this knockout mouse may serve as a valuable tool in studying the role of FMR1 in the fragile X syndrome and may serve as a model to elucidate the mechanisms involved in macroorchidism, abnormal behavior, and mental retardation.

  6. Delayed Wound Healing in Keratin 6a Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Sonja M.; Bundman, Donnie S.; Roop, Dennis R.

    2000-01-01

    Keratin 6 (K6) expression in the epidermis has two components: constitutive expression in the innermost layer of the outer root sheath (ORS) of hair follicles and inducible expression in the interfollicular epidermis in response to stressful stimuli such as wounding. Mice express two K6 isoforms, MK6a and MK6b. To gain insight into the functional significance of these isoforms, we generated MK6a-deficient mice through mouse embryonic stem cell technology. Upon wounding, MK6a was induced in the outer ORS and the interfollicular epidermis including the basal cell layer of MK6a+/+ mice, whereas MK6b induction in MK6a−/− mice was restricted to the suprabasal layers of the epidermis. After superficial wounding of the epidermis by tape stripping, MK6a−/− mice showed a delay in reepithelialization from the hair follicle. However, the healing of full-thickness skin wounds was not impaired in MK6a−/− animals. Migration and proliferation of MK6a−/− keratinocytes were not impaired in vitro. Furthermore, the migrating and the proliferating keratinocytes of full-thickness wounds in MK6a−/− animals expressed neither MK6a nor MK6b. These data indicate that MK6a does not play a major role in keratinocyte proliferation or migration but point to a role in the activation of follicular keratinocytes after wounding. This study represents the first report of a keratin null mutation that results in a wound healing defect. PMID:10866680

  7. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Jeroen J. T.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Seijkens, Tom; Bot, Ilze; Wijnands, Erwin; Beckers, Linda; Westra, Marijke M.; Bot, Martine; Busch, Matthias; Bermudez, Beatriz; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis is deemed instrumental in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. It is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g., CCR2 and CCR5), the activity of which is controlled by G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this study, we analyzed the effect of hematopoietic deficiency of a potent regulator kinase of chemotaxis (GRK2) on atherogenesis. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr−/−) mice with heterozygous hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency, generated by bone marrow transplantation (n=15), displayed a dramatic attenuation of plaque development, with 79% reduction in necrotic core and increased macrophage content. Circulating monocytes decreased and granulocytes increased in GRK2+/− chimeras, which could be attributed to diminished granulocyte colony-forming units in bone marrow. Collectively, these data pointed to myeloid cells as major mediators of the impaired atherogenic response in GRK2+/− chimeras. LDLr−/− mice with macrophage/granulocyte-specific GRK2 deficiency (LysM-Cre GRK2flox/flox; n=8) failed to mimic the aforementioned phenotype, acquitting these cells as major responsible subsets for GRK2 deficiency-associated atheroprotection. To conclude, even partial hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency prevents atherosclerotic lesion progression beyond the fatty streak stage, identifying hematopoietic GRK2 as a potential target for intervention in atherosclerosis.—Otten, J. J. T., de Jager, S. C. A., Kavelaars, A., Seijkens, T., Bot, I., Wijnands, E., Beckers, L., Westra, M. M., Bot, M., Busch, M., Bermudez, B., van Berkel, T. J. C., Heijnen, C. J., Biessen, E. A. L. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice. PMID:23047899

  8. Hyperaldosteronism after decreased renal K+ excretion in KCNMB2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Casper K; Jensen, Iben S; Sorensen, Mads V; de Bruijn, Pauline I; Bleich, Markus; Praetorius, Helle A; Leipziger, Jens

    2016-05-15

    The kidney is the primary organ ensuring K(+) homeostasis. K(+) is secreted into the urine in the distal tubule by two mechanisms: by the renal outer medullary K(+) channel (Kir1.1) and by the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (KCa1.1). Here, we report a novel knockout mouse of the β2-subunit of the KCa1.1 channel (KCNMB2), which displays hyperaldosteronism after decreased renal K(+) excretion. KCNMB2(-/-) mice displayed hyperaldosteronism, normal plasma K(+) concentration, and produced dilute urine with decreased K(+) concentration. The normokalemia indicated that hyperaldosteronism did not result from primary aldosteronism. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system was also ruled out as renal renin mRNA expression was reduced in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. Renal K(+) excretion rates were similar in the two genotypes; however, KCNMB2(-/-) mice required elevated plasma aldosterone to achieve K(+) balance. Blockade of the mineralocorticoid receptor with eplerenone triggered mild hyperkalemia and unmasked reduced renal K(+) excretion in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. Knockout mice for the α-subunit of the KCa1.1 channel (KCNMA1(-/-) mice) have hyperaldosteronism, are hypertensive, and lack flow-induced K(+) secretion. KCNMB2(-/-) mice share the phenotypic traits of normokalemia and hyperaldosteronism with KCNMA1(-/-) mice but were normotensive and displayed intact flow-induced K(+) secretion. Despite elevated plasma aldosterone, KNCMB2(-/-) mice did not display salt-sensitive hypertension and were able to decrease plasma aldosterone on a high-Na(+) diet, although plasma aldosterone remained elevated in KCNMB2(-/-) mice. In summary, KCNMB2(-/-) mice have a reduced ability to excrete K(+) into the urine but achieve K(+) balance through an aldosterone-mediated, β2-independent mechanism. The phenotype of KCNMB2 mice was similar but milder than the phenotype of KCNMA1(-/-) mice. PMID:26962098

  9. Suppression of diet-induced atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice overexpressing lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, M; Ishibashi, S; Inaba, T; Yagyu, H; Harada, K; Osuga, J I; Ohashi, K; Yazaki, Y; Yamada, N

    1996-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a key enzyme in the hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Conflicting results have been reported concerning its role in atherogenesis. To determine the effects of the overexpressed LPL on diet-induced atherosclerosis, we have generated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice that overexpressed human LPL transgene (LPL/LDLRKO) and compared their plasma lipoproteins and atherosclerosis with those in nonexpressing LDLR-knockout mice (LDLRKO). On a normal chow diet, LPL/LDLRKO mice showed marked suppression of mean plasma triglyceride levels (32 versus 236 mg/dl) and modest decrease in mean cholesterol levels (300 versus 386 mg/dl) as compared with LDLRKO mice. Larger lipoprotein particles of intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL)/LDL were selectively reduced in LPL/LDLRKO mice. On an atherogenic diet, both mice exhibited severe hypercholesterolemia. But, mean plasma cholesterol levels in LPL/ LDLRKO mice were still suppressed as compared with that in LDLRKO mice (1357 versus 2187 mg/dl). Marked reduction in a larger subfraction of IDL/LDL, which conceivably corresponds to remnant lipoproteins, was observed in the LPL/LDLRKO mice. LDLRKO mice developed severe fatty streak lesions in the aortic sinus after feeding with the atherogenic diet for 8 weeks. In contrast, mean lesion area in the LPL/LDLRKO mice was 18-fold smaller than that in LDLRKO mice. We suggest that the altered lipoprotein profile, in particular the reduced level of remnant lipoproteins, is mainly responsible for the protection by LPL against atherosclerosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8692976

  10. DNA fragmentation factor 45 knockout mice exhibit longer memory retention in the novel object recognition task compared to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Slane McQuade, Jill M; Vorhees, Charles V; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Jianhua

    2002-06-01

    Apoptosis is an important process in the development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). To study the role of DNA fragmentation factor 45 (DFF45/ICAD) in CNS function, we previously generated DFF45 knockout mice. We found that whereas they exhibit apparently normal CNS development, DFF45 knockout mice exhibit an increased number of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and enhanced spatial learning and memory compared to wild-type mice in a Morris water maze test. In this study, we examined the performance of the DFF45 knockout mice in a novel object recognition task to measure short-term nonspatial memory that is believed to depend on the hippocampal formation. Both wild-type and DFF45 knockout mice exhibited novel object recognition 1 h posttraining. However, whereas wild-type mice no longer did so, DFF45 knockout mice were still able to differentiate the novel versus the familiar object 3 h posttraining. The longer memory retention in DFF45 knockout mice did not last up to 24 h as neither wild-type nor DFF45 knockout mice demonstrated novel object recognition 24 h posttraining. These results suggest that a lack of DFF45 facilitates hippocampus-dependent nonspatial memory, as well as hippocampus-dependent spatial memory. PMID:12044605

  11. Myeloid Deletion of α1AMPK Exacerbates Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Knockout (LDLRKO) Mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiang; Cui, Xin; Wu, Rui; Zha, Lin; Wang, Xianfeng; Parks, John S; Yu, Liqing; Shi, Hang; Xue, Bingzhong

    2016-06-01

    Macrophage inflammation marks all stages of atherogenesis, and AMPK is a regulator of macrophage inflammation. We therefore generated myeloid α1AMPK knockout (MAKO) mice on the LDL receptor knockout (LDLRKO) background to investigate whether myeloid deletion of α1AMPK exacerbates atherosclerosis. When fed an atherogenic diet, MAKO/LDLRKO mice displayed exacerbated atherosclerosis compared with LDLRKO mice. To determine the underlying pathophysiological pathways, we characterized macrophage inflammation/chemotaxis and lipid/cholesterol metabolism in MAKO/LDLRKO mice. Myeloid deletion of α1AMPK increased macrophage inflammatory gene expression and enhanced macrophage migration and adhesion to endothelial cells. Remarkably, MAKO/LDLRKO mice also displayed higher composition of circulating chemotaxically active Ly-6C(high) monocytes, enhanced atherosclerotic plaque chemokine expression, and monocyte recruitment into plaques, leading to increased atherosclerotic plaque macrophage content and inflammation. MAKO/LDLRKO mice also exhibited higher plasma LDL and VLDL cholesterol content, increased circulating apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels, and higher liver apoB expression. We conclude that macrophage α1AMPK deficiency promotes atherogenesis in LDLRKO mice and is associated with enhanced macrophage inflammation and hypercholesterolemia and that macrophage α1AMPK may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26822081

  12. Otoancorin Knockout Mice Reveal Inertia is the Force for Hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weddell, Thomas; Legan, P. Kevin; Lukashkina, Victoria A.; Goodyear, Richard J.; Welstead, Lindsy; Petit, Chistine; Russell, Ian J.; Lukashkin, Andrei N.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that in Otoa-/- mice, in which the inner-ear-specific protein otoancorin is absent, excitation of the outer hair cells and cochlear amplification is normal. This finding is remarkable because the tectorial membrane (TM), although remaining functionally attached to the outer hair cell bundles, is completely detached from the spiral limbus. Therefore, as in ancestral vertebrate auditory organs, where inertia provides the excitatory force to the hair cells, it is the inertia of the TM that must be important for exciting the outer hair cells, setting the sensitivity of their transducer conductance, and determining the precise timing of cochlear amplification.

  13. Dopamine-dependent CB1 receptor dysfunction at corticostriatal synapses in homozygous PINK1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Madeo, G; Schirinzi, T; Maltese, M; Martella, G; Rapino, C; Fezza, F; Mastrangelo, N; Bonsi, P; Maccarrone, M; Pisani, A

    2016-02-01

    Recessive mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene cause early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the interaction between endocannabinoid (eCB) and dopaminergic transmission at corticostriatal synapses in PINK1 deficient mice. Whole-cell patch-clamp and conventional recordings of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) were made from slices of PINK1(-/-), heterozygous PINK1(+/-) mice and wild-type littermates (PINK1(+/+)). In PINK1(+/+) mice, CB1 receptor (CB1R) activation reduced spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). Likewise, CB1R agonists (ACEA, WIN55,212-3 and HU210) induced a dose-dependent reduction of cortically-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potential (eEPSP) amplitude. While CB1R agonists retained their inhibitory effect in heterozygous PINK1(+/-) mice, conversely, in PINK1(-/-) mice they failed to modulate sEPSC amplitude. Similarly, CB1R activation failed to reduce eEPSP amplitude in PINK1(-/-) mice. Parallel biochemical measurements revealed no significant difference in the levels of the two main eCBs, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA) in PINK1(-/-) striata. Similarly, no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of both fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), responsible for eCB hydrolysis. Instead, a significant reduction of binding ability of CB1R agonists was found in PINK1(-/-) mice. Notably, the CB1R-dependent inhibition of synaptic activity was restored either by amphetamine or after chronic treatment with the D2 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole. Additionally, CB1R binding activity returned to control levels after chronic pretreatment with quinpirole. Consistent with the hypothesis of a close interplay with dopaminergic neurotransmission, our findings show a CB1R dysfunction at corticostriatal synapses in PINK1(-/-), but not in PINK1(+/-) mice, and provide a mechanistic link to the distinct plasticity deficits observed in both genotypes. PMID

  14. Lack of stress responses to long-term effects of corticosterone in Caps2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Yuriko; Shinoda, Yo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Kojima, Masami; Wakana, Shigeharu; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is associated with anxiety and depressive disorders, and can cause weight gain. Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CAPS2) is involved in insulin release. Caps2 knockout (KO) mice exhibit decreased body weight, reduced glucose-induced insulin release, and abnormal psychiatric behaviors. We chronically administered the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT), which induces anxiety/depressive-like behavior and normally increases plasma insulin levels, via the drinking water for 10 weeks, and we examined the stress response in KO mice. Chronic CORT exposure inhibited stress-induced serum CORT elevation in wild-type (WT) mice, but not in KO mice. Poor weight gain in CORT-treated animals was observed until week 6 in WT mice, but persisted for the entire duration of the experiment in KO mice, although there is no difference in drug*genotype interaction. Among KO mice, food consumption was unchanged, while water consumption was higher, over the duration of the experiment in CORT-treated animals, compared with untreated animals. Moreover, serum insulin and leptin levels were increased in CORT-treated WT mice, but not in KO mice. Lastly, both WT and KO mice displayed anxiety/depressive-like behavior after CORT administration. These results suggest that Caps2 KO mice have altered endocrine responses to CORT administration, while maintaining CORT-induced anxiety/depressive-like behavior. PMID:25754523

  15. Beta2-adrenergic activity modulates vascular tone regulation in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, S.; Pinna, C.; Busnelli, M.; Cinquanta, P.; Rigamonti, E.; Ganzetti, G.S.; Dellera, F.; Sala, A.; Calabresi, L.; Franceschini, G.; Parolini, C.; Chiesa, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, generally a predisposing factor for premature coronary heart disease. The evidence of accelerated atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient subjects is however controversial. In this study, the effect of LCAT deficiency on vascular tone and endothelial function was investigated in LCAT knockout mice, which reproduce the human lipoprotein phenotype. Aortas from wild-type (Lcatwt) and LCAT knockout (LcatKO) mice exposed to noradrenaline showed reduced contractility in LcatKO mice (P < 0.005), whereas acetylcholine exposure showed a lower NO-dependent relaxation in LcatKO mice (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR and Western blotting analyses suggested an adequate eNOS expression in LcatKO mouse aortas. Real-time PCR analysis indicated increased expression of β2-adrenergic receptors vs wild-type mice. Aorta stimulation with noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol, to abolish the β-mediated relaxation, showed the same contractile response in the two mouse lines. Furthermore, propranolol pretreatment of mouse aortas exposed to L-NAME prevented the difference in responses between Lcatwt and LcatKO mice. The results indicate that LCAT deficiency leads to increased β2-adrenergic relaxation and to a consequently decreased NO-mediated vasodilation that can be reversed to guarantee a correct vascular tone. The present study suggests that LCAT deficiency is not associated with an impaired vascular reactivity. PMID:26254103

  16. Beta2-adrenergic activity modulates vascular tone regulation in lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Manzini, S; Pinna, C; Busnelli, M; Cinquanta, P; Rigamonti, E; Ganzetti, G S; Dellera, F; Sala, A; Calabresi, L; Franceschini, G; Parolini, C; Chiesa, G

    2015-11-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, generally a predisposing factor for premature coronary heart disease. The evidence of accelerated atherosclerosis in LCAT-deficient subjects is however controversial. In this study, the effect of LCAT deficiency on vascular tone and endothelial function was investigated in LCAT knockout mice, which reproduce the human lipoprotein phenotype. Aortas from wild-type (Lcat(wt)) and LCAT knockout (Lcat(KO)) mice exposed to noradrenaline showed reduced contractility in Lcat(KO) mice (P<0.005), whereas acetylcholine exposure showed a lower NO-dependent relaxation in Lcat(KO) mice (P<0.05). Quantitative PCR and Western blotting analyses suggested an adequate eNOS expression in Lcat(KO) mouse aortas. Real-time PCR analysis indicated increased expression of β2-adrenergic receptors vs wild-type mice. Aorta stimulation with noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol, to abolish the β-mediated relaxation, showed the same contractile response in the two mouse lines. Furthermore, propranolol pretreatment of mouse aortas exposed to L-NAME prevented the difference in responses between Lcat(wt) and Lcat(KO) mice. The results indicate that LCAT deficiency leads to increased β2-adrenergic relaxation and to a consequently decreased NO-mediated vasodilation that can be reversed to guarantee a correct vascular tone. The present study suggests that LCAT deficiency is not associated with an impaired vascular reactivity. PMID:26254103

  17. Wholemount imaging reveals abnormalities of the aqueous outflow pathway and corneal vascularity in Foxc1 and Bmp4 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Elizabeth L; Kidson, Susan H

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the FOXC1/Foxc1 gene in humans and mice and Bmp4 in mice are associated with congenital anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) and the development of the aqueous outflow structures throughout the limbus. The aim of this study was to advance our understanding of anterior segment abnormalities in mouse models of ASD using a 3-D imaging approach. Holistic imaging information combined with quantitative measurements were carried out on PECAM-1 stained individual components of the aqueous outflow vessels and corneal vasculature of Foxc1(+/-) on the C57BL/6Jx129 and ICR backgrounds, Bmp4(+/-) ICR mice, and wildtype mice from each background. In both wildtype and heterozygotes, singular, bifurcated and plexus forms of Schlemm's canal were noted. Of note, missing portions of the canal were seen in the heterozygous groups but not in wildtype animals. In general, we found the number of collector channels to be reduced in both heterozygotes. Lastly, we found a significant increase in the complexity of the corneal arcades and their penetration into the cornea in heterozygotes as compared with wild types. In conclusion, our 3-D imaging studies have revealed a more complex arrangement of both the aqueous vessels and corneal arcades in Foxc1(+/-) and Bmp4(+/-) heterozygotes, and further advance our understanding of how such abnormalities could impact on IOP and the aetiology of glaucoma. PMID:27068508

  18. Oxytocin knockout mice demonstrate enhanced intake of sweet and nonsweet carbohydrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Rinaman, Linda; Vollmer, Regis R; Amico, Janet A

    2007-05-01

    Oxytocin knockout (OT KO) mice display enhanced intake of nutritive and nonnutritive sweet solutions (i.e., sucrose and saccharin) compared with wild-type (WT) mice of the same C57BL/6 background strain. The present study further investigated the differential behavioral response of OT KO and WT mice to sucrose solutions and also examined intake preferences of OT KO and WT mice for palatable but nonsweet isocaloric solutions of carbohydrate and fat. A progressive ratio operant licking procedure demonstrated that OT KO and WT mice display a similar motivational drive to consume 10% sucrose. A series of two-bottle intake tests revealed that OT KO mice consume significantly larger amounts of both sweet and nonsweet carbohydrate solutions (i.e., sucrose, Polycose, and cornstarch) compared with WT cohorts. Intake pattern analyses revealed that OT KO mice overconsume carbohydrate solutions by initiating more drinking bouts compared with WT mice; bout sizes did not differ between the genotypes. In contrast, OT KO and WT mice did not differ in their intake of Intralipid, a palatable soybean oil emulsion. These findings indicate that the absence of OT in mice does not affect their appetitive drive to consume palatable sucrose solutions. Instead, the absence of OT may increase daily intake of palatable sweet and nonsweet solutions of carbohydrate (but not fat) by selectively blunting or masking processes that contribute to postingestive satiety. PMID:17272659

  19. Generating double knockout mice to model genetic intervention for diabetic cardiomyopathy in humans.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Vishalakshi; Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Singh, Shree Ram; Mishra, Paras Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a rapidly increasing disease that enhances the chances of heart failure twofold to fourfold (as compared to age and sex matched nondiabetics) and becomes a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There are two broad classifications of diabetes: type1 diabetes (T1D) and type2 diabetes (T2D). Several mice models mimic both T1D and T2D in humans. However, the genetic intervention to ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy in these mice often requires creating double knockout (DKO). In order to assess the therapeutic potential of a gene, that specific gene is either overexpressed (transgenic expression) or abrogated (knockout) in the diabetic mice. If the genetic mice model for diabetes is used, it is necessary to create DKO with transgenic/knockout of the target gene to investigate the specific role of that gene in pathological cardiac remodeling in diabetics. One of the important genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in diabetes is matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp9). Mmp9 is a collagenase that remains latent in healthy hearts but induced in diabetic hearts. Activated Mmp9 degrades extracellular matrix (ECM) and increases matrix turnover causing cardiac fibrosis that leads to heart failure. Insulin2 mutant (Ins2+/-) Akita is a genetic model for T1D that becomes diabetic spontaneously at the age of 3-4 weeks and show robust hyperglycemia at the age of 10-12 weeks. It is a chronic model of T1D. In Ins2+/- Akita, Mmp9 is induced. To investigate the specific role of Mmp9 in diabetic hearts, it is necessary to create diabetic mice where Mmp9 gene is deleted. Here, we describe the method to generate Ins2+/-/Mmp9-/- (DKO) mice to determine whether the abrogation of Mmp9 ameliorates diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25064116

  20. CAF1-knockout mice are more susceptive to lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Xin; Li, Jia-Shu; Hu, Rong; Li, Xiao-Min; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The carbon catabolite repressor protein 4 (CCR4)–negative on TATA (NOT) complex includes multiple subunits and is conserved in the eukaryotic cells. The CCR4–NOT complex can regulate gene expression at different levels. Two subunits of the CCR4–NOT complex, CCR4 and CCR4-associated factor 1 (CAF1), possess deadenylase activity. In yeast, the deadenylase activity is mainly provided by the CCR4 subunit; however, the deadenylase activity is provided by both CCR4 and CAF1 in other eukaryotes. A previous study reported that CAF1 but not CCR4 is required for the decay of a reporter mRNA with AU-rich elements. Our previous study showed that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. Both ICAM-1 and IL-8 play crucial roles in acute lung injury. In the present study, we examined the effects of CAF1 deficiency on IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression and acute lung injury in mice. Here we showed that there were no differences between the wild-type and CAF1-knockout mice on phenotypes. The lung histology and protein and mRNA levels of IL-8 and ICAM-1 in unstimulated wild-type mice were comparable to those in unstimulated CAF1-knockout mice. However, lipopolysaccharide stimulation led to more severe lung histological injury and greatly higher IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in CAF1-knockout mice compared to the wild-type mice. These results, together with our previous study, suggest that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in vivo and affects the progression of acute lung injury. PMID:27358572

  1. Long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of fragile X knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Godfraind, J.M.; Reyniers, E.; De Boulle, K.

    1996-08-09

    To gain more insight in the physiological function of the fragile X gene (FMR1) and the mechanisms leading to fragile X syndrome, the Fmr1 gene has been inactivated in mice by gene targeting techniques. In the Morris water maze test, the Fmr1 knockout mice learn to find the hidden platform nearly as well as the control animals, but show impaired performance after the position of the platform has been modified. As malperformance in the Morris water maze test has been associated with impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), electrophysiological studies were performed in hippocampal slices of Fmr1 knockout mice to check for the presence of LTP. Judged by field extracellular excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings in the CA1 hippocampal area, Fmr1 knockout mice express LTP to a similar extent as their wild type littermates during the first 1-2 hr after high frequency stimulation. Also, short-term potentiation (STP) was similar in both types of mice. To investigate whether Fmr1 is involved in the latter stages of LTP as an immediate early gene, we compared Fmr1 mRNA quantities on northern blots after chemical induction of seizures. A transient increase in the transcription of immediate early genes is thought to be essential for the maintenance of LTP. As no increase in Fmr1 mRNA could be detected, neither in cortex nor in total brain, during the first 2{1/2} hr after pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures, it is unlikely that Fmr1 is an immediate early gene in mice. In conclusion, we found no evidence for a function of FMR1 in STP or LTP. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  2. What Have We Learned from Glycosyltransferase Knockouts in Mice?

    PubMed

    Stanley, Pamela

    2016-08-14

    There are five major classes of glycan including N- and O-glycans, glycosaminoglycans, glycosphingolipids, and glycophosphatidylinositol anchors, all expressed at the molecular frontier of each mammalian cell. Numerous biological consequences of altering the expression of mammalian glycans are understood at a mechanistic level, but many more remain to be characterized. Mouse mutants with deleted, defective, or misexpressed genes that encode activities necessary for glycosylation have led the way to identifying key functions of glycans in biology. However, with the advent of exome sequencing, humans with mutations in genes involved in glycosylation are also revealing specific requirements for glycans in mammalian development. The aim of this review is to summarize glycosylation genes that are necessary for mouse embryonic development, pathway-specific glycosylation genes whose deletion leads to postnatal morbidity, and glycosylation genes for which effects are mild, but perturbation of the organism may reveal functional consequences. General strategies for generating and interpreting the phenotype of mice with glycosylation defects are discussed in relation to human congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). PMID:27040397

  3. Global Nav1.7 Knockout Mice Recapitulate the Phenotype of Human Congenital Indifference to Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Jacinthe; Smith, Sarah; Matson, David J.; Johnson, Danielle; Nye, Kim; Couture, Lauren; Feric, Elma; Yin, Ruoyuan; Moyer, Bryan D.; Peterson, Matthew L.; Rottman, James B.; Beiler, Rudolph J.; Malmberg, Annika B.; McDonough, Stefan I.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical genetic studies have shown that loss of Nav1.7 function leads to the complete loss of acute pain perception. The global deletion is reported lethal in mice, however, and studies of mice with promoter-specific deletions of Nav1.7 have suggested that the role of Nav1.7 in pain transduction depends on the precise form of pain. We developed genetic and animal husbandry strategies that overcame the neonatal-lethal phenotype and enabled construction of a global Nav1.7 knockout mouse. Knockouts were anatomically normal, reached adulthood, and had phenotype wholly analogous to human congenital indifference to pain (CIP): compared to littermates, knockouts showed no defects in mechanical sensitivity or overall movement yet were completely insensitive to painful tactile, thermal, and chemical stimuli and were anosmic. Knockouts also showed no painful behaviors resulting from peripheral injection of nonselective sodium channel activators, did not develop complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia, and were insensitive to intra-dermal histamine injection. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current recorded from cell bodies of isolated sensory neurons and the mechanically-evoked spiking of C-fibers in a skin-nerve preparation each were reduced but not eliminated in tissue from knockouts compared to littermates. Results support a role for Nav1.7 that is conserved between rodents and humans and suggest several possibly translatable biomarkers for the study of Nav1.7-targeted therapeutics. Results further suggest that Nav1.7 may retain its key role in persistent as well as acute forms of pain. PMID:25188265

  4. Phosphorylation of 4EBP by oral leucine administration was suppressed in the skeletal muscle of PGC-1α knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoji; Minami, Kimiko; Matsuda, Junichiro; Sawada, Naoki; Miura, Shinji; Kamei, Yasutomi

    2016-01-01

    Leucine is known to increase mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4EBP. In this study, leucine was administered to skeletal muscle-PGC-1α knockout mice. We observed attenuated 4EBP phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle, but not in the liver, of the PGC-1α knockout mice. These data suggest that skeletal muscle-PGC-1α is important for leucine-mediated mTOR activation and protein biosynthesis. PMID:26745679

  5. Romk1 Knockout Mice Do Not Produce Bartter Phenotype but Exhibit Impaired K Excretion.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Yan, Qingshang; Lu, Ming; Wan, Laxiang; Hu, Haiyan; Guo, Junhua; Boulpaep, Emile; Wang, WenHui; Giebisch, Gerhard; Hebert, Steven C; Wang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    Romk knock-out mice show a similar phenotype to Bartter syndrome of salt wasting and dehydration due to reduced Na-K-2Cl-cotransporter activity. At least three ROMK isoforms have been identified in the kidney; however, unique functions of any of the isoforms in nephron segments are still poorly understood. We have generated a mouse deficient only in Romk1 by selective deletion of the Romk1-specific first exon using an ES cell Cre-LoxP strategy and examined the renal phenotypes, ion transporter expression, ROMK channel activity, and localization under normal and high K intake. Unlike Romk(-/-) mice, there was no Bartter phenotype with reduced NKCC2 activity and increased NCC expression in Romk1(-/-) mice. The small conductance K channel (SK) activity showed no difference of channel properties or gating in the collecting tubule between Romk1(+/+) and Romk1(-/-) mice. High K intake increased SK channel number per patch and increased the ROMK channel intensity in the apical membrane of the collecting tubule in Romk1(+/+), but such regulation by high K intake was diminished with significant hyperkalemia in Romk1(-/-) mice. We conclude that 1) animal knockouts of ROMK1 do not produce Bartter phenotype. 2) There is no functional linking of ROMK1 and NKCC2 in the TAL. 3) ROMK1 is critical in response to high K intake-stimulated K(+) secretion in the collecting tubule. PMID:26728465

  6. NQO1-Knockout Mice Are Highly Sensitive to Clostridium Difficile Toxin A-Induced Enteritis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seung Taek; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Dae Hong; Lu, Li Fang; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Yoon, I Na; Hwang, Jae Sam; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Shong, Minho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Ho

    2016-08-28

    Clostridium difficile toxin A causes acute gut inflammation in animals and humans. It is known to downregulate the tight junctions between colonic epithelial cells, allowing luminal contents to access body tissues and trigger acute immune responses. However, it is not yet known whether this loss of the barrier function is a critical factor in the progression of toxin A-induced pseudomembranous colitis. We previously showed that NADH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) KO (knockout) mice spontaneously display weak gut inflammation and a marked loss of colonic epithelial tight junctions. Moreover, NQO1 KO mice exhibited highly increased inflammatory responses compared with NQO1 WT (wild-type) control mice when subjected to DSS-induced experimental colitis. Here, we tested whether toxin A could also trigger more severe inflammatory responses in NQO1 KO mice compared with NQO1 WT mice. Indeed, our results show that C. difficile toxin A-mediated enteritis is significantly enhanced in NQO1 KO mice compared with NQO1 WT mice. The levels of fluid secretion, villus disruption, and epithelial cell apoptosis were also higher in toxin A-treated NQO1 KO mice compared with WT mice. The previous and present results collectively show that NQO1 is involved in the formation of tight junctions in the small intestine, and that defects in NQO1 enhance C. difficile toxin A-induced acute inflammatory responses, presumably via the loss of epithelial cell tight junctions. PMID:27116994

  7. Impairment of social and emotional behaviors in Cadm1-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Yuki; Fujita, Eriko; Yu, Zhiling; Yamagata, Takanori; Momoi, Mariko Y; Momoi, Takashi; Onaka, Tatsushi

    2010-06-01

    Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, mediates synaptic cell adhesion. Missense mutations in the CADM1 gene have been identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients. In the present study, we examined emotional behaviors, social behaviors and motor performances in Cadm1-knockout (KO) mice. Cadm1-KO mice showed increased anxiety-related behavior in open-field and light-dark transition tests. Social behaviors of Cadm1-KO mice were impaired in social interaction, resident-intruder and social memory/recognition tests. Furthermore, motor coordination and gait of Cadm1-KO mice were impaired in rotarod and footprint tests. Our study demonstrates that CADM1 plays roles in regulating emotional behaviors, social behaviors and motor performances, and that CADM1 has important implications for psychiatric disorders with disruptions in social behavior, such as autism. PMID:20450890

  8. Protective effects of statin on cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis in adrenomedullin-knockout mice treated with angiotensin II and high salt loading.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Chii; Fukuda, Noboru; Jumabay, Medet; Saito, Kosuke; Matsumoto, Taro; Ueno, Takahiro; Soma, Masayoshi; Matsumoto, Koichi; Shimosawa, Tatsuo

    2011-03-01

    Statins exert pleiotropic effects, including antioxidative and cellular protective effects. Endogenous adrenomedullin (AM) induces anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and proangiogenic effects. We examined the effects of simvastatin on cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis in AM heterozygous knockout (AM(+/-)) mice treated with angiotensin (Ang) II and high salt loading. Seven-week-old AM(+/-) mice were infused with Ang II while on a high-salt diet with or without simvastatin for 2 weeks. Hearts were stained by hematoxylin-eosin or Masson's trichrome, and were immunostained with isolectin B(4) and α-smooth muscle actin antibodies. Expression of c-Kit and Sca-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) was evaluated by real-time PCR analysis. Apoptotic cells in hearts were identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Hearts from Ang II/salt loading AM(+/-) mice showed marked perivascular fibrosis around coronary arteries. Treatment with simvastatin significantly inhibited the fibrosis around coronary arteries in Ang II/salt-loading AM(+/-) mice. Expression of c-Kit and Sca-1 mRNAs in hearts from Ang II/salt-loading AM(+/-) mice was significantly lower than in hearts from wild-type mice. Treatment with simvastatin significantly increased the suppressed expression of c-Kit and Sca-1 mRNAs. In addition, treatment with simvastatin significantly increased the number of isolectin B(4)-positive capillary arteries in hearts from Ang II/salt-loading AM(+/-) mice. Ang II/high salt significantly increased apoptotic cells in hearts from AM(+/-) mice; this trend was reversed by treatment with simvastatin. Thus, statins have potent cardioprotective effects that may be associated with anti-fibrotic, proangiogenic and anti-apoptotic effects in Ang II/salt-loading AM(+/-) mice. PMID:21160482

  9. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model. PMID:27354540

  10. Hearing dysfunction in heterozygous Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ mice, a model for Waardenburg syndrome type 2 and Tietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ni, Christina; Zhang, Deming; Beyer, Lisa A; Halsey, Karin E; Fukui, Hideto; Raphael, Yehoash; Dolan, David F; Hornyak, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The human deafness-pigmentation syndromes, Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2a, and Tietz syndrome are characterized by profound deafness but only partial cutaneous pigmentary abnormalities. Both syndromes are caused by mutations in MITF. To illuminate differences between cutaneous and otic melanocytes in these syndromes, their development and survival in heterozygous Microphthalmia-White (Mitf(Mi-wh) /+) mice were studied and hearing function of these mice characterized. Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ mice have a profound hearing deficit, characterized by elevated auditory brainstem response thresholds, reduced distortion product otoacoustic emissions, absent endocochlear potential, loss of outer hair cells, and stria vascularis abnormalities. Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ embryos have fewer melanoblasts during embryonic development than their wild-type littermates. Although cochlear melanocytes are present at birth, they disappear from the Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ cochlea between P1 and P7. These findings may provide insight into the mechanism of melanocyte and hearing loss in human deafness-pigmentation syndromes such as WS and Tietz syndrome and illustrate differences between otic and follicular melanocytes. PMID:23020089

  11. Nitrotyrosinylation, Remodeling and Endothelial-Myocyte Uncoupling in iNOS, Cystathionine Beta Synthase (CBS) Knockouts and iNOS/CBS Double Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Soumi; Kumar, Munish; Sen, Utpal; Mishra, Paras K.; Tyagi, Neetu; Metreveli, Naira; Lominadze, David; Rodriguez, Walter; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2009-01-01

    Increased levels of homocysteine (Hcy), recognized as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), were associated with cardiovascular diseases. There was controversy regarding the detrimental versus cardio protective role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in ischemic heart disease. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the Hcy generated nitrotyrosine by inducing the endothelial nitric oxide synthase, causing endothelial-myocyte (E–M) coupling. To differentiate the role of iNOS versus constitutive nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and nNOS) in Hcy-mediated nitrotyrosine generation and matrix remodeling in cardiac dysfunction, left ventricular (LV) tissue was analyzed from cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) heterozygote knockout, iNOS homozygote knockout, CBS−/+/iNOS−/− double knockout, and wild-type (WT) mice. The levels of nitrotyrosine, MMP-2 and -9 (zymographic analysis), and fibrosis (by trichrome stain) were measured. The endothelial-myocyte function was determined in cardiac rings. In CBS−/+ mice, homocysteine was elevated and in iNOS−/− mice, nitric oxide was significantly reduced. The nitrotyrosine and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels were elevated in double knockout and CBS−/+ as compared to WT mice. Although MMP-2 levels were similar in CBS−/+, iNOS−/−, and CBS−/+/iNOS−/−, the levels were three- to fourfold higher than WT. The levels of collagen were similar in CBS−/+ and iNOS−/−, but they were threefold higher than WT. Interesting, the levels of collagen increased sixfold in double knockouts, compared to WT, suggesting synergism between high Hcy and lack of iNOS. Left ventricular hypertrophy was exaggerated in the iNOS−/− and double knockout, and mildly increased in the CBS−/+, compared to WT mice. The endothelial-dependent relaxation was attenuated to the same extent in the CBS−/+ and iNOS−/−, compared to WT, but it was robustly blunted in double knockouts. The results concluded that homocysteine

  12. Myo5b knockout mice as a model of microvillus inclusion disease

    PubMed Central

    Cartón-García, Fernando; Overeem, Arend W.; Nieto, Rocio; Bazzocco, Sarah; Dopeso, Higinio; Macaya, Irati; Bilic, Josipa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Schwartz, Simo; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Arango, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Inherited MYO5B mutations have recently been associated with microvillus inclusion disease (MVID), an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by intractable, life-threatening, watery diarrhea appearing shortly after birth. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease and development of novel therapeutic approaches is hampered by the lack of animal models. In this study we describe the phenotype of a novel mouse model with targeted inactivation of Myo5b. Myo5b knockout mice show perinatal mortality, diarrhea and the characteristic mislocalization of apical and basolateral plasma membrane markers in enterocytes. Moreover, in transmission electron preparations, we observed microvillus atrophy and the presence of microvillus inclusion bodies. Importantly, Myo5b knockout embryos at day 20 of gestation already display all these structural defects, indicating that they are tissue autonomous rather than secondary to environmental cues, such as the long-term absence of nutrients in the intestine. Myo5b knockout mice closely resemble the phenotype of MVID patients and constitute a useful model to further investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of this disease and to preclinically assess the efficacy of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26201991

  13. ARGINASE ENZYMES IN ISOLATED AIRWAYS FROM NORMAL AND NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE 2-KNOCKOUT MICE EXPOSED TO OVALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Michael S.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Last, Jerold A.

    2009-01-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, L-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses---inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration--were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, Nω-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the NOS2

  14. Arginase enzymes in isolated airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Jennifer M; Franzi, Lisa M; Linderholm, Angela L; Last, Michael S; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Last, Jerold A

    2009-02-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, l-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses - inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration - were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, Nomega-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the

  15. Arginase enzymes in isolated airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Michael S.; Kenyon, Nicholas J. Last, Jerold A.

    2009-02-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, L-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses - inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration - were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, N{omega}-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the

  16. Behavioral and pharmacological phenotypes of brain-specific diacylglycerol kinase δ-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Takako; Takato, Tamae; Lu, Qiang; Sakai, Hiromichi; Bando, Kana; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Sakane, Fumio

    2016-10-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is a lipid-metabolizing enzyme that phosphorylates diacylglycerol to produce phosphatidic acid. Previously, we reported that the δ isozyme of DGK was abundantly expressed in the mouse brain. However, the functions of DGKδ in the brain are still unclear. Because conventional DGKδ-knockout (KO) mice die within 24h after birth, we have generated brain-specific conditional DGKδ-KO mice to circumvent the lethality. In the novel object recognition test, the number of contacts in the DGKδ-KO mice to novel and familiar objects was greatly increased compared to the control mice, indicating that the DGKδ-KO mice showed irrational contacts with objects such as compulsive checking. In the marble burying test, which is used for analyzing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)-like phenotypes, the DGKδ-KO mice buried more marbles than the control mice. Additionally, these phenotypes were significantly alleviated by the administration of an OCD remedy, fluoxetine. These results indicate that the DGKδ-KO mice showed OCD-like behaviors. Moreover, the number of long axon/neurites increased in both DGKδ-KO primary cortical neurons and DGKδ-knockdown neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells compared to control cells. Conversely, overexpression of DGKδ decreased the number of long axon/neurites of Neuro-2a cells. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that a deficiency of DGKδ induces OCD-like behavior through enhancing axon/neurite outgrowth. PMID:27423518

  17. Granzyme B degrades extracellular matrix and contributes to delayed wound closure in apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, P R; Wu, D; Granville, D J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and excessive protease activity have a major role in the persistence of non-healing wounds. Granzyme B (GzmB) is a serine protease expressed during chronic inflammation that, in conjunction with perforin, has a well-established role in initiating apoptotic cell death. GzmB is also capable of acting extracellularly, independent of perforin and can degrade several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that are critical during wound healing. We used apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout (AKO) mice as a novel model of chronic inflammation and impaired wound healing to investigate the role of GzmB in chronic wounds. Wild-type and AKO mice were grown to 7 weeks (young) or 37 weeks (old) of age on a regular chow or high-fat diet (HFD), given a 1-cm diameter full thickness wound on their mid dorsum and allowed to heal for 16 days. Old AKO mice fed a HFD exhibited reduced wound closure, delayed contraction, chronic inflammation and altered ECM remodeling. Conversely, GzmB/ApoE double knockout mice displayed improved wound closure and contraction rates. In addition, murine GzmB was found to degrade both fibronectin and vitronectin derived from healthy mouse granulation tissue. In addition, GzmB-mediated degradation of fibronectin generated a fragment similar in size to that observed in non-healing mouse wounds. These results provide the first direct evidence that GzmB contributes to chronic wound healing in part through degradation of ECM. PMID:23912712

  18. Upregulation of GSK3β Contributes to Brain Disorders in Elderly REGγ-knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yiqing; Meng, Bo; Dong, Hao; Jing, Tiantian; Wu, Nan; Yang, Yingying; Huang, Lan; Moses, Robb E; O'Malley, Bert W; Mei, Bing; Li, Xiaotao

    2016-04-01

    GSK3β regulates some functions of the brain, but the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of GSK3β protein stability remain ambiguous. REGγ, an important proteasome activator for ubiquitin-independent protein degradation, has been shown to degrade certain intact proteins and is involved in the regulation of important biological processes. Here we demonstrate that REGγ promotes the degradation of GSK3β protein in vitro and in vivo. With increased GSK3β activity, REGγ knockout (REGγ-/-) mice exhibit late-onset sensorimotor gating and cognitive deficiencies including decreased working memory, hyperlocomotion, increased stereotype, defective prepulse inhibition (PPI), and disability in nest building, at the age of 8 months or older. Inhibition of GSK3β rescued the compromised PPI phenotypes and working memory deficiency in the knockout mice. Also, we found an age-dependent decrease in the trypsin-like proteasomal activity in REGγ-/- mice brains, which may be reflective of a lack of degradation of GSK3β. Collectively, our findings reveal a novel regulatory pathway in which the REGγ-proteasome controls the steady-state level of GSK3β protein. Dysfunction in this non-canonical proteasome degradation pathway may contribute to the sensorimotor gating deficiency and cognitive disorders in aging mice. PMID:26370326

  19. Differential proteomic analysis of STAT6 knockout mice reveals new regulatory function in liver lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Iff, Joël; Wang, Wei; Sajic, Tatjana; Oudry, Nathalie; Gueneau, Estelle; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel; Szanto, Ildiko

    2009-10-01

    Increased inflammatory signaling is a key feature of metabolic disorders. In this context, the role of increased pro-inflammatory signals has been extensively studied. By contrast, no efforts have been dedicated to study the contrasting scenario: the attenuation of anti-inflammatory signals and their role in metabolic homeostasis. IL-4 and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory cytokines signaling through the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6). Our study was aimed at evaluating the lack of STAT6 signaling on liver homeostasis. To this end we analyzed the liver proteome of wild type and STAT6 knock-out mice using 2D nanoscale LC-MS/MS with iTRAQ labeling technique. The coordinated changes in proteins identified by this quantitative proteome analysis indicated disturbed lipid homeostasis and a state of hepatocellular stress. Most significantly, the expression of the liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) was increased in the knock-out mice. In line with the elevated FABP1 expression we found latent liver lipid accumulation in the STAT6-deficient mice which was further aggravated when mice were challenged by a high fat diet. In conclusion, our study revealed a so far uncharacterized role for STAT6 in regulating liver lipid homeostasis and demonstrates the importance of anti-inflammatory signaling in the defense against the development of liver steatosis. PMID:19663508

  20. Impaired lipid accumulation in the liver of Tsc2-heterozygous mice during liver regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Obayashi, Yoko; Campbell, Jean S.; Fausto, Nelson; Yeung, Raymond S.

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Tuberin phosphorylation correlated with mTOR activation in early liver regeneration. •Liver regeneration in the Tsc2+/− mice was not enhanced. •The Tsc2+/− livers failed to accumulate lipid bodies during liver regeneration. •Mortality rate increased in Tsc2+/− mice after partial hepatectomy. •Tuberin plays a critical role in hepatic lipid accumulation to support regeneration. -- Abstract: Tuberin is a negative regulator of mTOR pathway. To investigate the function of tuberin during liver regeneration, we performed 70% hepatectomy on wild-type and Tsc2+/− mice. We found the tuberin phosphorylation correlated with mTOR activation during early liver regeneration in wild-type mice. However, liver regeneration in the Tsc2+/− mice was not enhanced. Instead, the Tsc2+/− livers failed to accumulate lipid bodies, and this was accompanied by increased mortality. These findings suggest that tuberin plays a critical role in liver energy balance by regulating hepatocellular lipid accumulation during early liver regeneration. These effects may influence the role of mTORC1 on cell growth and proliferation.

  1. Gomafu lncRNA knockout mice exhibit mild hyperactivity with enhanced responsiveness to the psychostimulant methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Joanna Y.; Sone, Masamitsu; Nashiki, Chieko; Pan, Qun; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Yanaka, Kaori; Abe, Takaya; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The long noncoding RNA Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is thought to function in retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and the control of alternative splicing. To further investigate physiological functions of Gomafu, we created mouse knockout (KO) model that completely lacks the Gomafu gene. The KO mice did not exhibit any developmental deficits. However, behavioral tests revealed that the KO mice are hyperactive. This hyperactive behavior was enhanced when the KO mice were treated with the psychostimulant methamphetamine, which was associated with an increase in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. RNA sequencing analyses identified a small number of genes affected by the deficiency of Gomafu, a subset of which are known to have important neurobiological functions. These observations suggest that Gomafu modifies mouse behavior thorough a mild modulation of gene expression and/or alternative splicing of target genes. PMID:27251103

  2. Gomafu lncRNA knockout mice exhibit mild hyperactivity with enhanced responsiveness to the psychostimulant methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ip, Joanna Y; Sone, Masamitsu; Nashiki, Chieko; Pan, Qun; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Yanaka, Kaori; Abe, Takaya; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The long noncoding RNA Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is thought to function in retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and the control of alternative splicing. To further investigate physiological functions of Gomafu, we created mouse knockout (KO) model that completely lacks the Gomafu gene. The KO mice did not exhibit any developmental deficits. However, behavioral tests revealed that the KO mice are hyperactive. This hyperactive behavior was enhanced when the KO mice were treated with the psychostimulant methamphetamine, which was associated with an increase in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. RNA sequencing analyses identified a small number of genes affected by the deficiency of Gomafu, a subset of which are known to have important neurobiological functions. These observations suggest that Gomafu modifies mouse behavior thorough a mild modulation of gene expression and/or alternative splicing of target genes. PMID:27251103

  3. Host resistance of CD18 knockout mice against systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huaizhu; Prince, Joseph E.; Brayton, Cory F.; Shah, Chirayu; Zeve, Daniel; Gregory, Stephen H.; Smith, C. Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2003-01-01

    Mice with targeted mutations of CD18, the common beta2 subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins, have leukocytosis, impaired transendothelial neutrophil emigration, and reduced host defense to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive extracellular bacterium. Previous studies using blocking monoclonal antibodies suggested roles for CD18 and CD11b in hepatic neutrophil recruitment and host innate response to Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive intracellular bacterium. We induced systemic listeriosis in CD18 knockout (CD18-ko) and wild-type (WT) mice by tail vein injection with Listeria. By 14 days postinjection (dpi), 8 of 10 WT mice died, compared with 2 of 10 CD18-ko mice (P < 0.01). Quantitative organ culture showed that numbers of Listeria organisms in livers and spleens were similar in both groups at 20 min postinfection. By 3, 5, and 7 dpi, however, numbers of Listeria organisms were significantly lower in livers and spleens of CD18-ko mice than in WT mice. Histopathology showed that following Listeria infection, CD18-ko mice had milder inflammatory and necrotizing lesions in both spleens and livers than did WT mice. Cytokine assays indicated that baseline interleukin-1beta and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were higher in CD18-ko mice than in WT mice and that CD18-ko splenocytes produced higher levels of interleukin-1beta and G-CSF than WT splenocytes under the same amount of Listeria stimulation. These findings show that CD18 is not an absolute requirement for antilisterial innate immunity or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. We propose that the absence of CD18 in the mice results in the priming of innate immunity, as evidenced by elevated cytokine expression, and neutrophilic leukocytosis, which augments antilisterial defense.

  4. Host Resistance of CD18 Knockout Mice against Systemic Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huaizhu; Prince, Joseph E.; Brayton, Cory F.; Shah, Chirayu; Zeve, Daniel; Gregory, Stephen H.; Smith, C. Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2003-01-01

    Mice with targeted mutations of CD18, the common β2 subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins, have leukocytosis, impaired transendothelial neutrophil emigration, and reduced host defense to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive extracellular bacterium. Previous studies using blocking monoclonal antibodies suggested roles for CD18 and CD11b in hepatic neutrophil recruitment and host innate response to Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive intracellular bacterium. We induced systemic listeriosis in CD18 knockout (CD18-ko) and wild-type (WT) mice by tail vein injection with Listeria. By 14 days postinjection (dpi), 8 of 10 WT mice died, compared with 2 of 10 CD18-ko mice (P < 0.01). Quantitative organ culture showed that numbers of Listeria organisms in livers and spleens were similar in both groups at 20 min postinfection. By 3, 5, and 7 dpi, however, numbers of Listeria organisms were significantly lower in livers and spleens of CD18-ko mice than in WT mice. Histopathology showed that following Listeria infection, CD18-ko mice had milder inflammatory and necrotizing lesions in both spleens and livers than did WT mice. Cytokine assays indicated that baseline interleukin-1β and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were higher in CD18-ko mice than in WT mice and that CD18-ko splenocytes produced higher levels of interleukin-1β and G-CSF than WT splenocytes under the same amount of Listeria stimulation. These findings show that CD18 is not an absolute requirement for antilisterial innate immunity or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. We propose that the absence of CD18 in the mice results in the priming of innate immunity, as evidenced by elevated cytokine expression, and neutrophilic leukocytosis, which augments antilisterial defense. PMID:14500519

  5. Formation of prostamides from anandamide in FAAH knockout mice analyzed by HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weber, Allan; Ni, Jinsong; Ling, Kah-Hiing John; Acheampong, Andrew; Tang-Liu, Diane D-S; Burk, Robert; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Woodward, David

    2004-04-01

    We investigated the formation of PGF(2alpha) 1-ethanolamide, PGE(2) 1-ethanolamide, and PGD(2) 1-ethanolamide (prostamides F(2alpha), E(2), and D(2), respectively) in liver, lung, kidney, and small intestine after a single intravenous bolus administration of 50 mg/kg of anandamide to normal and fatty acid amide hydrolase knockout (FAAH -/-) male mice. One group of three normal mice was not dosed (naïve) while another group of three normal mice received a bolus intravenous injection of 50 mg/kg of anandamide. Three FAAH -/- mice also received an intravenous injection of 50 mg/kg of anandamide. After 30 min, the lung, liver, kidney, and small intestine were harvested and processed by liquid-liquid extraction. The concentrations of prostamide F(2alpha), prostamide E(2), prostamide D(2), and anandamide were determined by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Prostamide F(2alpha) was detected in tissues in FAAH -/- mice after administration of anandamide. Concentrations of anandamide, prostamide E(2), and prostamide D(2) in liver, kidney, lung, and small intestine were much higher in the anandamide-treated FAAH -/- mice than those of the anandamide-treated control mice. This report demonstrates that prostamides, including prostamide F(2alpha), were formed in vivo from anandamide, potentially by the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway when the competing FAAH pathway is lacking. PMID:14729864

  6. The Effect of Different Photoperiods in Circadian Rhythms of Per3 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, D. S.; van der Veen, D. R.; Gonçalves, B. S. B.; Tufik, S.; von Schantz, M.; Archer, S. N.; Pedrazzoli, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the circadian behavioural responses of mice carrying a functional knockout of the Per3 gene (Per3−/−) to different light : dark (L : D) cycles. Male adult wild-type (WT) and Per3−/− mice were kept under 12-hour light : 12-hour dark conditions (12L : 12D) and then transferred to either a short or long photoperiod and subsequently released into total darkness. All mice were exposed to both conditions, and behavioural activity data were acquired through running wheel activity and analysed for circadian characteristics during these conditions. We observed that, during the transition from 12L : 12D to 16L : 8D, Per3−/− mice take approximately one additional day to synchronise to the new L : D cycle compared to WT mice. Under these long photoperiod conditions, Per3−/− mice were more active in the light phase. Our results suggest that Per3−/− mice are less sensitive to light. The data presented here provides further evidence that Per3 is involved in the suppression of behavioural activity in direct response to light. PMID:24982860

  7. Ethanol self-administration in serotonin transporter knockout mice: unconstrained demand and elasticity.

    PubMed

    Lamb, R J; Daws, L C

    2013-10-01

    Low serotonin function is associated with alcoholism, leading to speculation that increasing serotonin function could decrease ethanol consumption. Mice with one or two deletions of the serotonin transporter (SERT) gene have increased extracellular serotonin. To examine the relationship between SERT genotype and motivation for alcohol, we compared ethanol self-administration in mice with zero (knockout, KO), one (HET) or two copies (WT) of the SERT gene. All three genotypes learned to self-administer ethanol. The SSRI, fluvoxamine, decreased responding for ethanol in the HET and WT, but not the KO mice. When tested under a progressive ratio schedule, KO mice had lower breakpoints than HET or WT. As work requirements were increased across sessions, behavioral economic analysis of ethanol self-administration indicated that the decreased breakpoint in KO as compared to HET or WT mice was a result of lower levels of unconstrained demand, rather than differences in elasticity, i.e. the proportional decreases in ethanol earned with increasing work requirements were similar across genotypes. The difference in unconstrained demand was unlikely to result from motor or general motivational factors, as both WT and KO mice responded at high levels for a 50% condensed milk solution. As elasticity is hypothesized to measure essential value, these results indicate that KO value ethanol similarly to WT or HET mice despite having lower break points for ethanol. PMID:23927813

  8. Learning, memory and long-term potentiation are altered in Nedd4 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Camera, Daria; Coleman, Harold A; Parkington, Helena C; Jenkins, Trisha A; Pow, David V; Boase, Natasha; Kumar, Sharad; Poronnik, Philip

    2016-04-15

    The consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory involves changing protein level and activity for the synaptic plasticity required for long-term potentiation (LTP). AMPA receptor trafficking is a key determinant of LTP and recently ubiquitination by Nedd4 has been shown to play an important role via direct action on the GluA1 subunit, although the physiological relevance of these findings are yet to be determined. We therefore investigated learning and memory in Nedd4(+/-) mice that have a 50% reduction in levels of Nedd4. These mice showed decreased long-term spatial memory as evidenced by significant increases in the time taken to learn the location of and subsequently find a platform in the Morris water maze. In contrast, there were no significant differences between Nedd4(+/+) and Nedd4(+/-) mice in terms of short-term spatial memory in a Y-maze test. Nedd4(+/-) mice also displayed a significant reduction in post-synaptic LTP measured in hippocampal brain slices. Immunofluorescence of Nedd4 in the hippocampus confirmed its expression in hippocampal neurons of the CA1 region. These findings indicate that reducing Nedd4 protein by 50% significantly impairs LTP and long-term memory thereby demonstrating an important role for Nedd4 in these processes. PMID:26821291

  9. Tectorial Membrane Material Properties in TectaY1870C/+ Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Kinuko; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Gu, Jianwen Wendy; Richardson, Guy P.; Freeman, Dennis M.; Aranyosi, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The solid component of the tectorial membrane (TM) is a porous matrix made up of the radial collagen fibers and the striated sheet matrix. The striated sheet matrix is believed to contribute to shear impedance in both the radial and longitudinal directions, but the molecular mechanisms involved have not been determined. A missense mutation in Tecta, a gene that encodes for the α-tectorin protein in the striated sheet matrix, causes a 60-dB threshold shift in mice with relatively little reduction in outer hair cell amplification. Here, we show that this threshold shift is coupled to changes in shear impedance, response to osmotic pressure, and concentration of fixed charge of the TM. In TectaY1870C/+ mice, the tectorin content of the TM was reduced, as was the content of glycoconjugates reacting with the lectin wheat germ agglutinin. Charge measurements showed a decrease in fixed charge concentration from −6.4±1.4 mmol/L in wild-types to −2.1±0.7 mmol/L in TectaY1870C/+ TMs. TMs from TectaY1870C/+ mice showed little volume change in response to osmotic pressure compared to those of wild-type mice. The magnitude of both radial and longitudinal TM shear impedance was reduced by 10±1.6 dB in TectaY1870C/+ mice. However, the phase of shear impedance was unchanged. These changes are consistent with an increase in the porosity of the TM and a corresponding decrease of the solid fraction. Mechanisms by which these changes can affect the coupling between outer and inner hair cells are discussed. PMID:21081075

  10. Sex-dependence of anxiety-like behavior in cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Mallory E; Ressler, Kerry J

    2016-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest women are at increased risk for developing anxiety and depression, although the mechanisms for this sex/gender difference remain incompletely understood. Pre-clinical studies have begun to investigate sex-dependent emotional learning and behavior in rodents, particularly as it relates to psychopathology; however, information about how gonadal hormones interact with the central nervous system is limited. We observe greater anxiety-like behavior in male mice with global knockout of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (Cnr1) compared to male, wild-type controls as measured by percent open arm entries on an elevated plus maze test. A similar increase in anxiety-like behavior, however, is not observed when comparing female Cnr1 knockouts to female wild-type subjects. Although, ovariectomy in female mice did not reverse this effect, both male and female adult mice with normative development were sensitive to Cnr1 antagonist-mediated increases in anxiety-like behavior. Together, these data support an interaction between sex, potentially mediated by gonadal hormones, and the endocannabinoid system at an early stage of development that is critical for establishing adult anxiety-like behavior. PMID:26684509

  11. Phenotypic screening of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma} receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdin, Anna Karin; Surve, Vikas V.; Joensson, Marie; Bjursell, Mikael; Edenro, Anne; Schuelke, Meint; Saad, Alaa; Bjurstroem, Sivert; Lundgren, Elisabeth Jensen; Snaith, Michael; Fransson-Steen, Ronny; Toernell, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad . E-mail: mohammad.bohlooly@astrazeneca.com

    2006-10-20

    Using the mouse as a model organism in pharmaceutical research presents unique advantages as its physiology in many ways resembles the human physiology, it also has a relatively short generation time, low breeding and maintenance costs, and is available in a wide variety of inbred strains. The ability to genetically modify mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mouse models that better mimic human disease is another advantage. In the present study, a comprehensive phenotypic screening protocol is applied to elucidate the phenotype of a novel mouse knockout model of hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4-{gamma}. HNF4-{gamma} is expressed in the kidneys, gut, pancreas, and testis. First level of the screen is aimed at general health, morphologic appearance, normal cage behaviour, and gross neurological functions. The second level of the screen looks at metabolic characteristics and lung function. The third level of the screen investigates behaviour more in-depth and the fourth level consists of a thorough pathological characterisation, blood chemistry, haematology, and bone marrow analysis. When compared with littermate wild-type mice (HNF4-{gamma}{sup +/+}), the HNF4-{gamma} knockout (HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-}) mice had lowered energy expenditure and locomotor activity during night time that resulted in a higher body weight despite having reduced intake of food and water. HNF4-{gamma}{sup -/-} mice were less inclined to build nest and were found to spend more time in a passive state during the forced swim test.

  12. NRMT1 knockout mice exhibit phenotypes associated with impaired DNA repair and premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Tooley, John G.; Van Hoose, Patrick M.; Wang, Eugenia; Cheng, Alan; Cole, Marsha P.; Tooley, Christine E. Schaner

    2015-01-01

    Though defective genome maintenance and DNA repair have long been know to promote phenotypes of premature aging, the role protein methylation plays in these processes is only now emerging. We have recently identified the first N-terminal methyltransferase, NRMT1, which regulates protein-DNA interactions and is necessary for both accurate mitotic division and nucleotide excision repair. To demonstrate if complete loss of NRMT1 subsequently resulted in developmental or aging phenotypes, we constructed the first NRMT1 knockout (Nrmt1−/−) mouse. The majority of these mice die shortly after birth. However, the ones that survive exhibit decreased body size, female-specific infertility, kyphosis, decreased mitochondrial function, and early-onset liver degeneration; phenotypes characteristic of other mouse models deficient in DNA repair. The livers from Nrmt1−/− mice produce less reactive oxygen species (ROS) than wild type controls, and Nrmt1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts show a decreased capacity for handling oxidative damage. This indicates that decreased mitochondrial function may benefit Nrmt1−/− mice and protect them from excess internal ROS and subsequent DNA damage. These studies position the NRMT1 knockout mouse as a useful new system for studying the effects of genomic instability and defective DNA damage repair on organismal and tissue-specific aging. PMID:25843235

  13. Mup-knockout mice generated through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion for use in urinary protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haixia; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shan; Lu, Guangqing; Zhang, Hongjuan; Zhuang, Yinghua; Wang, Yue; Dong, Mengqiu; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Xingang; Wang, Peng; Yu, Lei; Wang, Fengchao; Chen, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Major urinary proteins (MUPs) are the most abundant protein species in mouse urine, accounting for more than 90% of total protein content. Twenty-one Mup genes and 21 pseudogenes are clustered in a region of around 2 megabase pairs (Mbp) on chromosome 4. A Mup-knockout mouse model would greatly facilitate researches in the field of proteomic analysis of mouse urine. Here, we report the successful knockout of the Mup gene cluster of 2.2 Mbp using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Homozygous Mup-knockout mice survived to adulthood and exhibited no obvious defects. The patterns of the proteomes of non-MUP urinary proteins in homozygous Mup-knockout mice were similar to those of wild-type mice judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect non-MUP urinary protein was significantly enhanced in Mup-knockout mice. In short, we have developed a Mup-knockout mouse model. This mouse model will be useful for the research of urinary biomarker testing that may have relevance for humans. PMID:26851484

  14. The protective role of tacrine and donepezil in the retina of acetylcholinesterase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yun-Min; Cai, Li; Shao, Yi; Xu, Man; Yi, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of different concentrations of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors tacrine and donepezil on retinal protection in AChE+/− mice (AChE knockout mice) of various ages. METHODS Cultured ARPE-19 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at concentrations of 0, 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 µmol/L and protein levels were measured using Western blot. Intraperitoneal injections of tacrine and donepezil (0.1 mg/mL, 0.2 mg/mL and 0.4 mg/mL) were respectively given to AChE+/− mice aged 2mo and 4mo and wild-type S129 mice for 7d; phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered to the control group. The mice were sacrificed after 30d by in vitro cardiac perfusion and retinal samples were taken. AChE-deficient mice were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using specific genotyping protocols obtained from the Jackson Laboratory website. H&E staining, immunofluorescence and Western blot were performed to observe AChE protein expression changes in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer. RESULTS Different concentrations of H2O2 induced AChE expression during RPE cell apoptosis. AChE+/− mice retina were thinner than those in wild-type mice (P<0.05); the retinal structure was still intact at 2mo but became thinner with increasing age (P<0.05); furthermore, AChE+/− mice developed more slowly than wild-type mice (P<0.05). Increased concentrations of tacrine and donepezil did not significantly improve the protection of the retina function and morphology (P>0.05). CONCLUSION In vivo, tacrine and donepezil can inhibit the expression of AChE; the decrease of AChE expression in the retina is beneficial for the development of the retina. PMID:26558196

  15. Altered Morphology and Function of the Lacrimal Functional Unit in Protein Kinase Cα Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Li, Zhijie; Basti, Surendra; Farley, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Protein kinase C (PKC) α plays a major role in the parasympathetic neural stimulation of lacrimal gland (LG) secretion. It also has been reported to have antiapoptotic properties and to promote cell survival. Therefore, the hypothesis for the present study was that PKCα knockout (−/−) mice have impaired ocular surface–lacrimal gland signaling, rendering them susceptible to desiccating stress and impaired corneal epithelial wound healing. In this study, the lacrimal function unit (LFU) and the stressed wound-healing response were examined in PKCα−/− mice. Methods. In PKCα+/+ control mice and PKCα−/− mice, tear production, osmolarity, and clearance rate were evaluated before and after experimental desiccating stress. Histology and immunofluorescent staining of PKC and epidermal growth factor were performed in tissues of the LFU. Cornified envelope (CE) precursor protein expression and cell proliferation were evaluated. The time course of healing and degree of neutrophil infiltration was evaluated after corneal epithelial wounding. Results. Compared with the PKCα+/+ mice, the PKCα−/− mice were noted to have significantly increased lacrimal gland weight, with enlarged, carbohydrate-rich, PAS-positive acinar cells; increased corneal epithelia permeability, with reduced CE expression; and larger conjunctival epithelial goblet cells. The PKCα−/− mice showed more rapid corneal epithelial healing, with less neutrophil infiltration and fewer proliferating cells than did the PKCα+/+ mice. Conclusions. The PKCα−/− mice showed lower tear production, which appeared to be caused by impaired secretion by the LG and conjunctival goblet cells. Despite their altered tear dynamics, the PKCα−/− mice demonstrated more rapid corneal epithelial wound healing, perhaps due to decreased neutrophil infiltration. PMID:20505191

  16. Impact of food restriction and cocaine on locomotion in ghrelin- and ghrelin-receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Shane; Zeckler, Rosie Albarran; Buckman, Sam; Thompson, Jeff; Hart, Nigel; Wellman, Paul J; Smith, Roy G

    2011-07-01

    Food restriction (FR) augments the behavioral and reinforcing effects of psychomotor stimulants such as cocaine or amphetamine; effects that may be related to the capacity of FR to increase plasma levels of ghrelin (GHR), a 28-amino acid orexigenenic peptide linked to activation of brain dopamine systems. The present study used wild-type (WT) mice or mutant mice sustaining knockout of either GHR [GHR((-/-)) ] or of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor [GHS-R((-/-)) ] and subjected to FR or not to evaluate the role of GHR and GHS-R in cocaine-stimulated locomotion. WT, GHR((-/-)) , and GHS-R((-/-)) mice were either restricted to 60% of baseline caloric intake or allowed to free-feed (FF). Mice were treated with 0, 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg cocaine on separate test days (in random dose order) and forward locomotion was recorded on each drug day for 45 minutes after drug dosing. Food (and water) was available immediately after (but not during) each activity test. For FF mice, there was no interaction between cocaine and GHR status on locomotion. FR-WT mice treated with saline exhibited significant increases in anticipatory locomotion (relative to FF-WT mice), whereas FR-GHS-R((-/-)) mice did not. Cocaine significantly increased locomotion in FR-GHR((-/-)) and FR-GHS-R((-/-)) mice to the levels noted in FR-WT mice. These results suggest that GHS-R activity, but not GHR activity, is required for FR to augment food-associated anticipatory locomotion, but do not support the contention that GHR pathways are required for the capacity of FR to augment the acute effect of cocaine on locomotion. PMID:21054685

  17. Salivary Gland Dysplasia in Fgf10 Heterozygous Mice: A New Mouse Model of Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    May, A.J.; Chatzeli, L.; Proctor, G.B.; Tucker, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Xerostomia, or chronic dry mouth, is a common syndrome caused by a lack of saliva that can lead to severe eating difficulties, dental caries and oral candida infections. The prevalence of xerostomia increases with age and affects approximately 30% of people aged 65 or older. Given the large numbers of sufferers, and the potential increase in incidence given our aging population, it is important to understand the complex mechanisms that drive hyposalivation and the consequences for the dentition and oral mucosa. From this study we propose the Fgf10 +/- mouse as a model to investigate xerostomia. By following embryonic salivary gland development, in vivo and in vitro, we show that a reduction in Fgf10 causes a delay in branching of salivary glands. This leads to hypoplasia of the glands, a phenotype that is not rescued postnatally or by adulthood in both male and female Fgf10 +/- mice. Histological analysis of the glands showed no obvious defect in cellular differentiation or acini/ductal arrangements, however there was a significant reduction in their size and weight. Analysis of saliva secretion showed that hypoplasia of the glands led to a significant reduction in saliva production in Fgf10 +/- adults, giving rise to a reduced saliva pellicle in the oral cavity of these mice. Mature mice were shown to drink more and in many cases had severe tooth wear. The Fgf10 +/- mouse is therefore a useful model to explore the causes and effects of xerostomia.

  18. Disruption of PPT1 or PPT2 causes neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Praveena; Soyombo, Abigail A.; Atashband, Armita; Wisniewski, Krystyna E.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Hammer, Robert E.; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2001-01-01

    PPT1 and PPT2 encode two lysosomal thioesterases that catalyze the hydrolysis of long chain fatty acyl CoAs. In addition to this function, PPT1 (palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1) hydrolyzes fatty acids from modified cysteine residues in proteins that are undergoing degradation in the lysosome. PPT1 deficiency in humans causes a neurodegenerative disorder, infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (also known as infantile Batten disease). In the current work, we engineered disruptions in the PPT1 and PPT2 genes to create “knockout” mice that were deficient in either enzyme. Both lines of mice were viable and fertile. However, both lines developed spasticity (a “clasping” phenotype) at a median age of 21 wk and 29 wk, respectively. Motor abnormalities progressed in the PPT1 knockout mice, leading to death by 10 mo of age. In contrast, the majority of PPT2 mice were alive at 12 mo. Myoclonic jerking and seizures were prominent in the PPT1 mice. Autofluorescent storage material was striking throughout the brains of both strains of mice. Neuronal loss and apoptosis were particularly prominent in PPT1-deficient brains. These studies provide a mouse model for infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and further suggest that PPT2 serves a role in the brain that is not carried out by PPT1. PMID:11717424

  19. Resistance of R-Ras knockout mice to skin tumour induction

    PubMed Central

    May, Ulrike; Prince, Stuart; Vähätupa, Maria; Laitinen, Anni M.; Nieminen, Katriina; Uusitalo-Järvinen, Hannele; Järvinen, Tero A. H.

    2015-01-01

    The R-ras gene encodes a small GTPase that is a member of the Ras family. Despite close sequence similarities, R-Ras is functionally distinct from the prototypic Ras proteins; no transformative activity and no activating mutations of R-Ras in human malignancies have been reported for it. R-Ras activity appears inhibitory towards tumour proliferation and invasion, and to promote cellular quiescence. Contrary to this, using mice with a deletion of the R-ras gene, we found that R-Ras facilitates DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumour induction. The tumours appeared in wild-type (WT) mice on average 6 weeks earlier than in R-Ras knockout (R-Ras KO) mice. WT mice developed almost 6 times more tumours than R-Ras KO mice. Despite strong R-Ras protein expression in the dermal blood vessels, no R-Ras could be detected in the epidermis from where the tumours arose. The DMBA/TPA skin tumourigenesis-model is highly dependent upon inflammation, and we found a greatly attenuated skin inflammatory response to DMBA/TPA-treatment in the R-Ras KO mice in the context of leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, these data suggest that despite its characterised role in promoting cellular quiescence, R-Ras is pro-tumourigenic in the DMBA/TPA tumour model and important for the inflammatory response to DMBA/TPA treatment. PMID:26133397

  20. PON3 knockout mice are susceptible to obesity, gallstone formation, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Diana M; Yu, Janet M; Vergnes, Laurent; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Champion, Matthew D; Devarajan, Asokan; Zhang, Peixiang; Castellani, Lawrence W; Brindley, David N; Jamey, Carole; Auwerx, Johan; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Ford, David A; Reue, Karen; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-04-01

    We report the engineering and characterization of paraoxonase-3 knockout mice (Pon3KO). The mice were generally healthy but exhibited quantitative alterations in bile acid metabolism and a 37% increased body weight compared to the wild-type mice on a high fat diet. PON3 was enriched in the mitochondria-associated membrane fraction of hepatocytes. PON3 deficiency resulted in impaired mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial superoxide levels, and increased hepatic expression of inflammatory genes. PON3 deficiency did not influence atherosclerosis development on an apolipoprotein E null hyperlipidemic background, but it did lead to a significant 60% increase in atherosclerotic lesion size in Pon3KO mice on the C57BL/6J background when fed a cholate-cholesterol diet. On the diet, the Pon3KO had significantly increased plasma intermediate-density lipoprotein/LDL cholesterol and bile acid levels. They also exhibited significantly elevated levels of hepatotoxicity markers in circulation, a 58% increase in gallstone weight, a 40% increase in hepatic cholesterol level, and increased mortality. Furthermore, Pon3KO mice exhibited decreased hepatic bile acid synthesis and decreased bile acid levels in the small intestine compared with wild-type mice. Our study suggests a role for PON3 in the metabolism of lipid and bile acid as well as protection against atherosclerosis, gallstone disease, and obesity. PMID:25477283

  1. Maneb causes pro-oxidant effects in the hippocampus of Nrf2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kurzatkowski, Daniela M; Trombetta, Louis D

    2013-09-01

    The effects of maneb were investigated in C57BL/6 Nrf2 wildtype and knockout mice. Treated KO mice showed significant weight loss as compared to WT counterparts. ICPAAS analysis demonstrated a significant increase in manganese concentration in the tissues of treated KO mice as compared to WT. Biochemical analysis revealed significant decreases of antioxidants including glutathione, glutathione reductase and heme oxygenase-1. Levels of TBARS were significantly increased in hippocampal tissue in Nrf2 KO mice at the 30 and 60mg doses. qPCR demonstrated that the only gene mediated by the Nrf2 transcription pathway that was significantly modulated by at least 1.5 fold was glutathione peroxidase 4. GPX4 was significantly upregulated in Nrf2 WT mice treated with 30mg/kg maneb and significantly downregulated in Nrf2 KO mice treated with the same dose. Microscopy revealed neuronal pyknosis and eosinophilia of the cytoplasm in the hippocampi of both WT and KO animals treated with 60mg/kg maneb. PMID:23764462

  2. Generation of a conditional knockout allele for the NFAT5 gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The osmosensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5), also known as tonicity enhancer element binding protein (TonEBP) plays a crucial role in protection of renal medullary cells against hyperosmotic stress, urinary concentration, the adaptive immune response, and other physiological systems. Since it is also important for development, conventional homozygous-null mutations result in perinatal death, which hinders the analysis of NFAT5 function in specific tissues in vivo. Here we describe the generation of mice with a conditional-null allele, in which loxP sites are inserted around exon 4. Mice harboring the floxed allele (NFAT5(flx) ) were mated to a strain expressing a tamoxifen-inducible derivative of the Cre-recombinase (Cre (+)) under the control of the ubiqitinC promoter. The resultant homozygous conditional knockout mice (Cre (+) NFAT5 (flx/flx) ) are viable, fertile, and show normal expression of NFAT5 and NFAT5 target genes, indicating that the conditional alleles retain their wild-type function. Induction of Cre-mediated recombination by administration of tamoxifen in 8-week-old mice resulted in a decrease in NFAT5 expression of about 70-90% in all tested tissues (renal cortex, renal outer medulla, renal inner medulla, heart, lung, spleen, skeletal muscle). Accordingly, the expression of the NFAT5 target genes aldose reductase and heat shock protein 70 in the renal medulla was also significantly decreased. Mice harboring this conditional knockout allele should be useful in future studies for gaining a better understanding of tissue and cell-type specific functions of NFAT5 in adult animals under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25601839

  3. Heterozygous ambra1 deficiency in mice: a genetic trait with autism-like behavior restricted to the female gender.

    PubMed

    Dere, Ekrem; Dahm, Liane; Lu, Derek; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Ju, Anes; Tantra, Martesa; Kästner, Anne; Chowdhury, Kamal; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    Autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental conditions affecting around 0.5% of the population across cultures, with a male/female ratio of approximately 4:1. Phenotypically, ASD are characterized by social interaction and communication deficits, restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, and reduced cognitive flexibility. Identified causes converge at the level of the synapse, ranging from mutation of synaptic genes to quantitative alterations in synaptic protein expression, e.g., through compromised transcriptional or translational control. We wondered whether reduced turnover and degradation of synapses, due to deregulated autophagy, would lead to similar phenotypical consequences. Ambra1, strongly expressed in cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, is a positive regulator of Beclin1, a principal player in autophagosome formation. While homozygosity of the Ambra1 null mutation causes embryonic lethality, heterozygous mice with reduced Ambra1 expression are viable, reproduce normally, and lack any immediately obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, comprehensive behavioral characterization of these mice revealed an autism-like phenotype in Ambra1 (+/-) females only, including compromised communication and social interactions, a tendency of enhanced stereotypies/repetitive behaviors, and impaired cognitive flexibility. Reduced ultrasound communication was found in adults as well as pups, which achieved otherwise normal neurodevelopmental milestones. These features were all absent in male Ambra1 (+/-) mice. As a first hint explaining this gender difference, we found a much stronger reduction of Ambra1 protein in the cortex of Ambra1 (+/-) females compared to males. To conclude, Ambra1 deficiency can induce an autism-like phenotype. The restriction to the female gender of autism-generation by a defined genetic trait is unique thus far and warrants further investigation. PMID:24904333

  4. Heterozygous Ambra1 Deficiency in Mice: A Genetic Trait with Autism-Like Behavior Restricted to the Female Gender

    PubMed Central

    Dere, Ekrem; Dahm, Liane; Lu, Derek; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Ju, Anes; Tantra, Martesa; Kästner, Anne; Chowdhury, Kamal; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    Autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental conditions affecting around 0.5% of the population across cultures, with a male/female ratio of approximately 4:1. Phenotypically, ASD are characterized by social interaction and communication deficits, restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, and reduced cognitive flexibility. Identified causes converge at the level of the synapse, ranging from mutation of synaptic genes to quantitative alterations in synaptic protein expression, e.g., through compromised transcriptional or translational control. We wondered whether reduced turnover and degradation of synapses, due to deregulated autophagy, would lead to similar phenotypical consequences. Ambra1, strongly expressed in cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, is a positive regulator of Beclin1, a principal player in autophagosome formation. While homozygosity of the Ambra1 null mutation causes embryonic lethality, heterozygous mice with reduced Ambra1 expression are viable, reproduce normally, and lack any immediately obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, comprehensive behavioral characterization of these mice revealed an autism-like phenotype in Ambra1+/− females only, including compromised communication and social interactions, a tendency of enhanced stereotypies/repetitive behaviors, and impaired cognitive flexibility. Reduced ultrasound communication was found in adults as well as pups, which achieved otherwise normal neurodevelopmental milestones. These features were all absent in male Ambra1+/− mice. As a first hint explaining this gender difference, we found a much stronger reduction of Ambra1 protein in the cortex of Ambra1+/− females compared to males. To conclude, Ambra1 deficiency can induce an autism-like phenotype. The restriction to the female gender of autism-generation by a defined genetic trait is unique thus far and warrants further investigation. PMID:24904333

  5. Subchronic exposure to ethyl tertiary butyl ether resulting in genetic damage in Aldh2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zuquan; Suda, Megumi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Mei, Nan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Wang, Rui-Sheng

    2013-09-15

    Ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) is biofuel additive recently used in Japan and some other countries. Limited evidence shows that ETBE has low toxicity. Acetaldehyde (AA), however, as one primary metabolite of ETBE, is clearly genotoxic and has been considered to be a potential carcinogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ALDH2 gene on ETBE-induced genotoxicity and metabolism of its metabolites after inhalation exposure to ETBE. A group of wild-type (WT) and Aldh2 knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 500ppm ETBE for 1-6h, and the blood concentrations of ETBE metabolites, including AA, tert-butyl alcohol and 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, were measured. Another group of mice of WT and KO were exposed to 0, 500, 1750, or 5000ppm ETBE for 6h/day with 5 days per weeks for 13 weeks. Genotoxic effects of ETBE in these mice were measured by the alkaline comet assay, 8-hydroxyguanine DNA-glycosylase modified comet assay and micronucleus test. With short-term exposure to ETBE, the blood concentrations of all the three metabolites in KO mice were significantly higher than the corresponding concentrations of those in WT mice of both sexes. After subchronic exposure to ETBE, there was significant increase in DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner in KO male mice, while only 5000ppm exposure significantly increased DNA damage in male WT mice. Overall, there was a significant sex difference in genetic damage in both genetic types of mice. These results showed that ALDH2 is involved in the detoxification of ETBE and lack of enzyme activity may greatly increase the sensitivity to the genotoxic effects of ETBE, and male mice were more sensitive than females. PMID:23810710

  6. Protein Degradation and Quality Control in Cells from Laforin and Malin Knockout Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Garyali, Punitee; Segvich, Dyann M.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Lafora disease is a progressive myoclonus epilepsy caused by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes that encode a glycogen phosphatase, laforin, and an E3 ubiquitin ligase, malin, respectively. Lafora disease is characterized by accumulation of insoluble, poorly branched, hyperphosphorylated glycogen in brain, muscle, heart, and liver. The laforin-malin complex has been proposed to play a role in the regulation of glycogen metabolism and protein quality control. We evaluated three arms of the protein degradation/quality control process (the autophago-lysosomal pathway, the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Epm2a−/−, Epm2b−/−, and Epm2a−/− Epm2b−/− mice. The levels of LC3-II, a marker of autophagy, were decreased in all knock-out cells as compared with wild type even though they still showed a slight response to starvation and rapamycin. Furthermore, ribosomal protein S6 kinase and S6 phosphorylation were increased. Under basal conditions there was no effect on the levels of ubiquitinated proteins in the knock-out cells, but ubiquitinated protein degradation was decreased during starvation or stress. Lack of malin (Epm2b−/− and Epm2a−/− Epm2b−/− cells) but not laforin (Epm2a−/− cells) decreased LAMP1, a lysosomal marker. CHOP expression was similar in wild type and knock-out cells under basal conditions or with ER stress-inducing agents. In conclusion, both laforin and malin knock-out cells display mTOR-dependent autophagy defects and reduced proteasomal activity but no defects in the ER stress response. We speculate that these defects may be secondary to glycogen overaccumulation. This study also suggests a malin function independent of laforin, possibly in lysosomal biogenesis and/or lysosomal glycogen disposal. PMID:24914213

  7. Radiation induces genomic instability and mammary ductal dysplasia in Atm heterozygous mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, M. M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Yu, Y.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R. C.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome resulting from the inheritance of two defective copies of the ATM gene that includes among its stigmata radiosensitivity and cancer susceptibility. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that although women with a single defective copy of ATM (AT heterozygotes) appear clinically normal, they may never the less have an increased relative risk of developing breast cancer. Whether they are at increased risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from medical exposures to ionizing radiation is unknown. We have used a murine model of AT to investigate the effect of a single defective Atm allele, the murine homologue of ATM, on the susceptibility of mammary epithelial cells to radiation-induced transformation. Here we report that mammary epithelial cells from irradiated mice with one copy of Atm truncated in the PI-3 kinase domain were susceptible to radiation-induced genomic instability and generated a 10% incidence of dysplastic mammary ducts when transplanted into syngenic recipients, whereas cells from Atm(+/+) mice were stable and formed only normal ducts. Since radiation-induced ductal dysplasia is a precursor to mammary cancer, the results indicate that AT heterozygosity increases susceptibility to radiogenic breast cancer in this murine model system.

  8. Intragastric fat self-administration is impaired in GPR40/120 double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Anthony; Touzani, Khalid; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Mice acquire strong preferences for flavors paired with intragastric (IG) fat infusions. This IG fat conditioning is attenuated in double knockout (DoKO) mice missing GPR40 and GPR120 fatty acid receptors. Here we determined if GPR40/120 DoKO mice are also impaired in IG fat self-administration in an operant lick task. In daily 1-h sessions the mice were trained with a sipper spout that contained dry food pellets; licks on the spout triggered infusions of IG fat (Intralipid). The training sessions were followed by test sessions with an empty spout. GPR40/120 DoKO mice self-infused more 20% fat than wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice in training with a food-baited spout (2.4 vs. 2.0 kcal/h) but self-infused less 20% fat than WT mice in empty spout tests (1.2 vs. 1.7 kcal/h). The DoKO mice also self-infused less 5% fat than WT mice (0.6 vs. 1.3 kcal/h) although both groups emitted more licks for 5% fat than 20% fat. The DoKO and WT mice did not differ, however, in their self-infusion of 12.5% glucose (1.5 vs. 1.6 kcal/h), which is isocaloric to 5% fat. A second 5% IL test showed that the DoKO mice reverted to a reduced self-infusion compared to WT mice. When the infusion was shifted to water, WT mice reduced licking in the first extinction session, whereas DoKO mice were less sensitive to the absence of infused fat. Our results indicate that post-oral GPR40/120 signaling is not required to process IG fat infusions in food-baited spout training sessions but contributes to post-oral fat reinforcement in empty spout tests and flavor conditioning tests. PMID:25911263

  9. Intragastric fat self-administration is impaired in GPR40/120 double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Touzani, Khalid; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Mice acquire strong preferences for flavors paired with intragastric (IG) fat infusions. This IG fat conditioning is attenuated in double knockout (DoKO) mice missing GPR40 and GPR120 fatty acid receptors. Here we determined if GPR40/120 DoKO mice are also impaired in IG fat self-administration in an operant lick task. In daily 1-h sessions the mice were trained with a sipper spout that contained dry food pellets; licks on the spout triggered infusions of IG fat (Intralipid). The training sessions were followed by test sessions with an empty spout. GPR40/120 DoKO mice self-infused more 20% fat than wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice in training with a food-baited spout (2.4 vs. 2.0kcal/h) but self-infused less 20% fat than WT mice in empty spout tests (1.2 vs. 1.7kcal/h). The DoKO mice also self-infused less 5% fat than WT mice (0.6 vs. 1.3kcal/h) although both groups emitted more licks for 5% fat than 20% fat. The DoKO and WT mice did not differ, however, in their self-infusion of 12.5% glucose (1.5 vs. 1.6kcal/h), which is isocaloric to 5% fat. A second 5% IL test showed that the DoKO mice reverted to a reduced self-infusion compared to WT mice. When the infusion was shifted to water, WT mice reduced licking in the first extinction session, whereas DoKO mice were less sensitive to the absence of infused fat. Our results indicate that post-oral GPR40/120 signaling is not required to process IG fat infusions in food-baited spout training sessions but contributes to post-oral fat reinforcement in empty spout tests and flavor conditioning tests. PMID:25911263

  10. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  11. Activity of Pontine Neurons during Sleep and Cataplexy in Hypocretin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thankachan, Stephen; Kaur, Satvinder; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a human sleep disorder resulting from the loss of neurons containing the neuropeptide orexin, also known as hypocretin. Cataplexy, which is a sudden loss of muscle tone during waking, is an important diagnostic symptom of narcolepsy. In humans and canines with narcolepsy, cataplexy is considered to be a separate and distinct behavioral state. However, in the mouse model of the disease this issue is not resolved. The present study monitored the activity of forty four neurons in the rostral pons in hypocretin knock-out mice. Majority of the neurons were active during wake and REM sleep, while four neurons were selectively active during REM sleep. All of these neurons were less active during cataplexy compared with REM sleep. Thus, although cataplexy and REM sleep share many common features, including the muscle atonia, cataplexy is a distinct state in mice. PMID:19193905

  12. Normal gonadotropin production and fertility in gonadotrope-specific Bmpr1a knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Ying; Ongaro, Luisina; Boehm, Ulrich; Kaartinen, Vesa; Mishina, Yuji; Bernard, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) synthesis is regulated by transforming growth factorβsuperfamily ligands, most notably the activins and inhibins. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) also regulate FSHβ subunit (Fshb) expression in immortalized murine gonadotrope-like LβT2 cells and in primary murine or ovine primary pituitary cultures. BMP2 signals preferentially via the BMP type I receptor, BMPR1A, to stimulate murine Fshb transcription in vitro Here, we used a Cre-lox approach to assess BMPR1A's role in FSH synthesis in mice in vivo Gonadotrope-specific Bmpr1a knockout animals developed normally and had reproductive organ weights comparable with those of controls. Knockouts were fertile, with normal serum gonadotropins and pituitary gonadotropin subunit mRNA expression. Cre-mediated recombination of the floxed Bmpr1a allele was efficient and specific, as indicated by PCR analysis of diverse tissues and isolated gonadotrope cells. Furthermore, BMP2 stimulation of inhibitor of DNA binding 3 expression was impaired in gonadotropes isolated from Bmpr1a knockout mice, confirming the loss of functional receptor protein in these cells. Treatment of purified gonadotropes with small-molecule inhibitors of BMPR1A (and the related receptors BMPR1B and ACVR1) suppressed Fshb mRNA expression, suggesting that an autocrine BMP-like molecule might regulate FSH synthesis. However, deletion of Bmpr1a and Acvr1 in cultured pituitary cells did not alter Fshb expression, indicating that the inhibitors had off-target effects. In sum, BMPs or related ligands acting via BMPR1A or ACVR1 are unlikely to play direct physiological roles in FSH synthesis by murine gonadotrope cells. PMID:27029473

  13. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Simon, Karen L.; Kirby, Martha R.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg) obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO) mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT) controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS. PMID:26448644

  14. Autonomic regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in IL-4 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Pál, E; Yamamura, T; Tabira, T

    1999-12-01

    The effect of chemical sympathectomy induced with 6-hydroxydopamine (OHDA) on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was studied in wild type and IL-4-/- C57BL/6 (B6) mice. When actively sensitized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide, control B6 mice developed a mild form of EAE with full recovery. The sympathectomized mice developed paralysis with higher maximum disease score and did not recover completely, indicating that the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) down-modulates the process of EAE. Unexpectedly, however, sympathectomy resulted in suppression of EAE in IL-4-/- mice, implying that control of actively induced EAE by the SNS depends on the genetic background of mice. We also induced EAE by passive transfer of MOG35-55-reactive lymph node cells, and this disease was augmented by sympathectomy in both wild type and knockout animals. Further experiments showed that changes in T cell populations and the activity of antigen presenting cells might be responsible for the altered immune response and clinical course after sympathetic ablation. Our studies indicate that the absence of a single cytokine can severely alter nervous-immune system interactions. PMID:10695725

  15. Taste responses to sweet stimuli in alpha-gustducin knockout and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Vicktoria; Damak, Sami; Margolskee, Robert F; Hellekant, Göran

    2006-07-01

    The importance of alpha-gustducin in sweet taste transduction is based on data obtained with sucrose and the artificial sweetener SC45647. Here we studied the role of alpha-gustducin in sweet taste. We compared the behavioral and electrophysiological responses of alpha-gustducin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice to 11 different sweeteners, representing carbohydrates, artificial sweeteners, and sweet amino acids. In behavioral experiments, over 48-h preference ratios were measured in two-bottle preference tests. In electrophysiological experiments, integrated responses of chorda tympani (CT) and glossopharyngeal (NG) nerves were recorded. We found that preference ratios of the KO mice were significantly lower than those of WT for acesulfame-K, dulcin, fructose, NC00174, D-phenylalanine, L-proline, D-tryptophan, saccharin, SC45647, sucrose, but not neotame. The nerve responses to all sweeteners, except neotame, were smaller in the KO mice than in the WT mice. The differences between the responses in WT and KO mice were more pronounced in the CT than in the NG. These data indicate that alpha-gustducin participates in the transduction of the sweet taste in general. PMID:16740645

  16. Epilepsy in Dcx Knockout Mice Associated with Discrete Lamination Defects and Enhanced Excitability in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Cécile; Germain, Johanne; Dinh Tuy, Françoise Phan; Verstraeten, Soraya; Alvarez, Chantal; Métin, Christine; Chelly, Jamel; Giros, Bruno; Miles, Richard; Depaulis, Antoine; Francis, Fiona

    2008-01-01

    Patients with Doublecortin (DCX) mutations have severe cortical malformations associated with mental retardation and epilepsy. Dcx knockout (KO) mice show no major isocortical abnormalities, but have discrete hippocampal defects. We questioned the functional consequences of these defects and report here that Dcx KO mice are hyperactive and exhibit spontaneous convulsive seizures. Changes in neuropeptide Y and calbindin expression, consistent with seizure occurrence, were detected in a large proportion of KO animals, and convulsants, including kainate and pentylenetetrazole, also induced seizures more readily in KO mice. We show that the dysplastic CA3 region in KO hippocampal slices generates sharp wave-like activities and possesses a lower threshold for epileptiform events. Video-EEG monitoring also demonstrated that spontaneous seizures were initiated in the hippocampus. Similarly, seizures in human patients mutated for DCX can show a primary involvement of the temporal lobe. In conclusion, seizures in Dcx KO mice are likely to be due to abnormal synaptic transmission involving heterotopic cells in the hippocampus and these mice may therefore provide a useful model to further study how lamination defects underlie the genesis of epileptiform activities. PMID:18575605

  17. Apolipoprotein E knockout induced inflammatory responses related to microglia in neonatal mice brain via astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yimei; Xu, Xiaohua; Dou, Hongbo; Hua, Ying; Xu, Jinwen; Hui, Xu

    2015-01-01

    More and more evidences suggestted that ApoE plays an important role in modulating the systemic and central nervous inflammatory responses. However, there is a lack of exacted mechanism of ApoE. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether apolipoprotein E (ApoE) induced inflammatory responses and apoptosis in neonatal mice brain from ApoE deficient (ApoE-/-) and wildtype (WT). Compared to control group, the microglia cell from ApoE-/- mice showed more severe inflammation and cell death such as iNOS and IL-1β. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory such as TGF-β, IL-10 from microglia and astrocytes in ApoE-/- mice were decreased. On the other way, TGF-β from astrocytes can inhibit inflammation factors secretion from microglia. Our findings suggested that the anti- inflammation factor such as IL-10 mainly from microglia and TGF-β mainly from astrocyte is significant decreased after Loss of ApoE function in ApoE-/- mice which induced severe inflammation. Furthrtmore, anti- inflammation factor such as IL-10 and TGF-β Therefore, we conclude that apolipoprotein E knockout induced inflammatory responses related to microglia in neonatal mice brain via astrocytes. PMID:25785051

  18. Memantine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, improves working memory deficits in DGKβ knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kakefuda, Kenichi; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) β is a type 1 isozyme of the DGK family. We previously reported that DGKβ was deeply involved in neurite spine formation, and DGKβ knockout (KO) mice exhibited behavioral abnormalities concerning spine formation, such as cognitive, emotional, and attentional impairment. Moreover, some of these abnormalities were ameliorated by the administration of a mood stabilizer. However, there is no data about how memory-improving drugs used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease affect DGKβ KO mice. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of an anti-Alzheimer's drug, memantine on the working memory deficit observed in DGKβ KO mice. In the Y-maze test, the administration of memantine significantly improved working memory of DGKβ KO mice. We also found that the expression levels of the NR2A and NR2B N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits were increased in the prefrontal cortex, but decreased in the hippocampus of DGKβ KO mice. These altered expression levels of NR2 subunits might be related to the effect of an NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine. Taken together, these findings may support the hypothesis that DGKβ has a pivotal role in cognitive function. PMID:27495014

  19. Reduced ethanol consumption and preference in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Armando G; Nguyen, Chinh T Q; Ahmadi-Tehrani, Dara; Morrisett, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a neuropeptide implicated in addiction to drugs of abuse. Several studies have characterized the role of CART in addiction to psychostimulants, but few have examined the role of CART in alcohol use disorders including alcoholism. The current study utilized a CART knockout (KO) mouse model to investigate the role of CART in ethanol appetitive behaviors. A two-bottle choice, unlimited-access paradigm was used to compare ethanol appetitive behaviors between CART wild type (WT) and KO mice. The mice were presented with an ethanol solution (3%-21%) and water, each concentration for 4 days, and their consumption was measured daily. Consumption of quinine (bitter) and saccharin (sweet) solutions was measured following the ethanol preference tests. In addition, ethanol metabolism rates and ethanol sensitivity were compared between genotypes. CART KO mice consumed and preferred ethanol less than their WT counterparts in both sexes. This genotype effect could not be attributed to differences in bitter or sweet taste perception or ethanol metabolism rates. There was also no difference in ethanol sensitivity in male mice; however, CART KO female mice showed a greater ethanol sensitivity than the WT females. Taken together, these data demonstrate a role for CART in ethanol appetitive behaviors and as a possible therapeutic drug target for alcoholism and abstinence enhancement. PMID:22823101

  20. Reduced inflammatory threshold indicates skin barrier defect in transglutaminase 3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bognar, Peter; Nemeth, Ilona; Mayer, Balazs; Haluszka, Dora; Wikonkal, Norbert; Ostorhazi, Eszter; John, Susan; Paulsson, Mats; Smyth, Neil; Pasztoi, Maria; Buzas, Edit I; Szipocs, Robert; Kolonics, Attila; Temesvari, Erzsebet; Karpati, Sarolta

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a transglutaminase 3 knockout (TGM3/KO) mouse was generated that showed impaired hair development, but no gross defects in the epidermal barrier, although increased fragility of isolated corneocytes was demonstrated. Here we investigated the functionality of skin barrier in vivo by percutaneous sensitization to FITC in TGM3/KO (n=64) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice (n=36). Cutaneous inflammation was evaluated by mouse ear swelling test (MEST), histology, serum IgE levels, and by flow cytometry from draining lymph nodes. Inflammation-induced significant MEST difference (P<0.0001) was detected between KO and WT mice and was supported also by histopathology. A significant increase of CD4+ CD25+-activated T cells (P<0.01) and elevated serum IgE levels (P<0.05) in KO mice indicated more the development of FITC sensitization than an irritative reaction. Propionibacter acnes-induced intracutaneous inflammation showed no difference (P=0.2254) between the reactivity of WT and KO immune system. As in vivo tracer, FITC penetration from skin surface followed by two-photon microscopy demonstrated a more invasive percutaneous penetration in KO mice. The clinically uninvolved skin in TGM3/KO mice showed impaired barrier function and higher susceptibility to FITC sensitization indicating that TGM3 has a significant contribution to the functionally intact cutaneous barrier. PMID:23884312

  1. Knockout of Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) attenuates intestinal inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuchen; Viennois, Emilie; Xiao, Bo; Baker, Mark T; Yang, Stephen; Okoro, Ijeoma; Yan, Yutao

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by epithelial barrier disruption and alterations in immune regulation. Ste20-like proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in intestinal inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms need to be defined. Herein, SPAK knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice exhibited significant increases in intestinal transepithelial resistance, a marked decrease in paracellular permeability to fluorescence isothiocyanate-dextran, and altered apical side tight junction sodium ion selectivity, compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, the expression of junction protein, claudin-2, decreased. In contrast, expressions of occludin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and claudin-5 increased significantly, whereas no obvious change of claudin-1, claudin-4, zonula occludens protein 1, and zonula occludens protein 2 expressions was observed. In murine models of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium and trinitrobenzene sulfuric acid, KO mice were more tolerant than wild-type mice, as demonstrated by colonoscopy features, histological characteristics, and myeloperoxidase activities. Consistent with these findings, KO mice showed increased IL-10 levels and decreased proinflammatory cytokine secretion, ameliorated bacterial translocation on treatment with dextran sulfate sodium, and regulation of with no lysine (WNK) kinase activity. Together, these features may reduce epithelial permeability. In conclusion, SPAK deficiency increases intestinal innate immune homeostasis, which is important for control or attenuation of pathological responses in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23499375

  2. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kasahara, Jiro; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Adachi, Minami; Umeda, Masahiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Kondo, Hisatake; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain sensitivity, prepulse inhibition, attention, or depression-like behavior. Consistent with previous reports, CaMKIV KO mice exhibited impaired retention in a fear conditioning test 28 days after training. In contrast, however, CaMKIV KO mice did not show any testing performance deficits in passive avoidance, one of the most commonly used fear memory paradigms, 28 days after training, suggesting that remote fear memory is intact. CaMKIV KO mice exhibited intact spatial reference memory learning in the Barnes circular maze, and normal spatial working memory in an eight-arm radial maze. CaMKIV KO mice also showed mildly decreased anxiety-like behavior, suggesting that CaMKIV is involved in regulating emotional behavior. These findings indicate that CaMKIV might not be essential for fear memory or spatial memory, although it is possible that the activities of other neural mechanisms or signaling pathways compensate for the CaMKIV deficiency. PMID:20209163

  3. Sustained acceleration of colonic transit following chronic homotypic stress in oxytocin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Babygirija, Reji; Bülbül, Mehmet; Cerjak, Diana; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2011-05-01

    Acute restraint stress delays gastric emptying and accelerates colonic transit via central corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in rats. In contrast, central oxytocin has anxiolytic effects and attenuates the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in response to stress. Our recent study showed that up regulated oxytocin expression attenuates hypothalamic CRF expression and restores impaired gastric motility following chronic homotypic stress in mice. We studied the effects of acute and chronic homotypic stress on colonic transit and hypothalamic CRF mRNA expression in wild type (WT) and oxytocin knockout (OXT-KO) mice. Colonic transit was measured following acute restraint stress or chronic homotypic stress (repeated restraint stress for 5 consecutive days). (51)Cr was injected via a catheter into the proximal colon. Ninety minutes after restraint stress loading, the entire colon was removed. The geometric center (GC) was calculated to evaluate colonic transit. Expression of CRF mRNA in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) was measured by real time RT-PCR. Colonic transit was significantly accelerated following acute stress in WT (GC=8.1±0.8; n=7) and OXT KO mice (GC=9.4±0.3; n=7). The accelerated colonic transit was significantly attenuated in WT mice (GC=6.6±0.5; n=9) following chronic homotypic stress while it was still accelerated in OXT KO mice (GC=9.3±0.5; n=8). The increase in CRF mRNA expression at the SON was much greater in OXT-KO mice, compared to WT mice following chronic homotypic stress. It is suggested that oxytocin plays a pivotal role in mediating the adaptation mechanism following chronic homotypic stress in mice. PMID:21439349

  4. Impaired striatum-dependent behavior in GASP-1-knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Mathis, C; Bott, J-B; Candusso, M-P; Simonin, F; Cassel, J-C

    2011-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1) is suspected to play a key role in recycling and degradation of several GPCRs. In a previous study, we have shown that GASP-1-knock-out (GASP-1-KO) mice displayed deficits in acquiring a cocaine self-administration task, associated with an exacerbated down-regulation of striatal dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors. Among several possibilities, GASP-1 deficiency could have impaired memory processes underlying the acquisition of the operant conditioning task. Therefore, the present study investigated cognitive performances of GASP-1-KO mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) in a broad variety of memory tasks. Consistent with a deficit in procedural memory, GASP-1-KO mice showed delayed acquisition of a food-reinforced bar-press task. During water-maze training in hidden- or visible-platform paradigms, mutant and WT mice acquired the tasks at the same rate. However, GASP-1 mice exhibited persistent thigmotaxic swimming, longer distance to the platform, and reduced swim speed. There was no deficit in several tasks requiring simple behavioral responses (Barnes maze, object recognition and passive avoidance tasks). Thus, the ability to acquire and/or express complex responses seems affected in GASP-1-deficient mice. Hippocampal functions were preserved, as the retention of an acquired memory in spatial tasks remained unaffected. The pattern of behavioral deficits observed in GASP-1-KO mice is coherent with current knowledge on the role of striatal GPCRs in acquisition/expression of skilled behavior and in motivation. Together with the previous findings, the so far established phenotype of GASP-1-KO mice makes them a potentially exciting tool to study striatal functions. PMID:21091868

  5. Kv4.2 knockout mice have hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Brewster, Amy L; Spencer, Corinne M; Anderson, Anne E

    2012-05-01

    Kv4.2 channels contribute to the transient, outward K(+) current (A-type current) in hippocampal dendrites, and modulation of this current substantially alters dendritic excitability. Using Kv4.2 knockout (KO) mice, we examined the role of Kv4.2 in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. We found that Kv4.2 KO mice showed a deficit in the learning phase of the Morris water maze (MWM) and significant impairment in the probe trial compared with wild type (WT). Kv4.2 KO mice also demonstrated a specific deficit in contextual learning in the fear-conditioning test, without impairment in the conditioned stimulus or new context condition. Kv4.2 KO mice had normal activity, anxiety levels, and prepulse inhibition compared with WT mice. A compensatory increase in tonic inhibition has been previously described in hippocampal slice recordings from Kv4.2 KO mice. In an attempt to decipher whether increased tonic inhibition contributed to the learning and memory deficits in Kv4.2 KO mice, we administered picrotoxin to block GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R), and thereby tonic inhibition. This manipulation had no effect on behavior in the WT or KO mice. Furthermore, total protein levels of the α5 or δ GABA(A)R subunits, which contribute to tonic inhibition, were unchanged in hippocampus. Overall, our findings add to the growing body of evidence, suggesting an important role for Kv4.2 channels in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. PMID:22505720

  6. Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss is Delayed Following Optic Nerve Crush in NLRP3 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Puyang, Zhen; Feng, Liang; Chen, Hui; Liang, Peiji; Troy, John B.; Liu, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome, a sensor for a variety of pathogen- and host-derived threats, consists of the adaptor ASC (Apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a Caspase Activation and Recruitment Domain (CARD)), pro-caspase-1, and NLRP3 (NOD-Like Receptor family Pyrin domain containing 3). NLRP3-induced neuroinflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of eye diseases, but it remains unclear whether activation of NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. Here we examined NLRP3-induced neuroinflammation and RGC survival following partial optic nerve crush (pONC) injury. We showed that NLRP3 was up-regulated in retinal microglial cells following pONC, propagating from the injury site to the optic nerve head and finally the entire retina within one day. Activation of NLRP3-ASC inflammasome led to the up-regulation of caspase-1 and a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In NLRP3 knockout mice, up-regulation of ASC, caspase-1, and IL-1β were all reduced, and, importantly, RGC and axon loss was substantially delayed following pONC injury. The average survival time of RGCs in NLRP3 knockout mice was about one week longer than for control animals. Taken together, our study demonstrated that ablating the NLRP3 gene significantly reduced neuroinflammation and delayed RGC loss after optic nerve crush injury. PMID:26893104

  7. Hesr1 knockout mice exhibit behavioral alterations through the dopaminergic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuke, Satoshi; Minami, Natsumi; Kokubo, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Ayumu; Yasumatsu, Hiroshi; Sasagawa, Noboru; Saga, Yumiko; Tsukahara, Toshifumi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2006-11-15

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional factor Hesr1 gene (hairy and enhancer of split-related 1, also called Hey1/HRT1/CHF2/HERP2) has been identified and characterized as a member of the subfamily of hairy/Enhancer of split, and shown to be involved in cardiovascular and neural development. We report that HESR1 binds directly to a part of the 3' non-coding region of the human dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene and represses the endogenous DAT1 gene in HEK293 cells. To investigate functions of the HESR1 gene in the dopaminergic nervous system in vivo, we analyzed the expressions of dopamine-related genes in the postnatal day 0 whole brains of Hesr1 knockout mice by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Several dopamine-related genes, such as DAT, dopamine receptors D1, D2, D4, and D5, were significantly upregulated. Moreover, young adults of Hesr1 knockout mice showed a decrease in spontaneous locomotor activity and a reduction in exploratory behavior or behavioral responses to novelty in the open-field, and elevated plus-maze tests. These results indicate that the HESR1 gene is related to neuropsychiatric disorders and behavioral traits through the dopaminergic nervous system. PMID:16998899

  8. Necroptotic Cell Death Signaling and Execution Pathway: Lessons from Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Belizário, José; Vieira-Cordeiro, Luiz; Enns, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Under stress conditions, cells in living tissue die by apoptosis or necrosis depending on the activation of the key molecules within a dying cell that either transduce cell survival or death signals that actively destroy the sentenced cell. Multiple extracellular (pH, heat, oxidants, and detergents) or intracellular (DNA damage and Ca2+ overload) stress conditions trigger various types of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasmatic, and mitochondrion-centered signaling events that allow cells to preserve the DNA integrity, protein folding, energetic, ionic and redox homeostasis, thus escaping from injury. Along the transition from reversible to irreversible injury, death signaling is highly heterogeneous and damaged cells may engage autophagy, apoptotic, or necrotic cell death programs. Studies on multiple double- and triple- knockout mice identified caspase-8, flip, and fadd genes as key regulators of embryonic lethality and inflammation. Caspase-8 has a critical role in pro- and antinecrotic signaling pathways leading to the activation of receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), RIPK3, and the mixed kinase domain-like (MLKL) for a convergent execution pathway of necroptosis or regulated necrosis. Here we outline the recent discoveries into how the necrotic cell death execution pathway is engaged in many physiological and pathological outcome based on genetic analysis of knockout mice. PMID:26491219

  9. Foxn1 gene knockout suppresses sexual attractiveness and pheromonal components of male urine in inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Xu; Sun, Lixing; Zhang, Yao-Hua

    2010-01-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis (ICHH) posits that females prefer signals emitted by immunocompetent males over immunocompromised males and that these signals are honest. However, mechanisms of mate choice under an ICHH model may be impacted by levels of genetic variation (inbred animals vs. outbred animals). Here, we conducted 2-choice female preference experiments and chemical analyses of male urine in inbred BALB/c and outbred CD-1 mice, both of which have immunocompromised nude (nu) strains resulting from a Foxn1 gene knockout. We found that inbred BALB/c females but not outbred CD-1 females preferred the urine of healthy males over that of immunocompromised males despite measured differences in the qualities of their urine. There was a clear increase in female-attracting pheromones (such as farnesenes) in the preputial glands and urine metabolites in healthy BALB/c males but no such difference between CD-1 and CD-1 nu males. Therefore, CD-1 male urine failed to provide an honest mate-choice cue for females. Our results suggest that deleterious traits associated with male odor in mice might be jointly affected by the level of inbreeding and immunodeficiency caused by a single-gene knockout. PMID:20019156

  10. Effect of chronic glutathione deficiency on the behavioral phenotype of Gclm-/- knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Curran, Christine P; Nebert, Daniel W; Patel, Krishna V; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V

    2012-07-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress or deficient oxidative stress response in the brain is associated with neurodegenerative disorders and behavioral abnormalities. Previously we generated a knockout mouse line lacking the gene encoding glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Gclm(-/-) knockout (KO) mice are viable and fertile, yet exhibit only 9-35% of wild-type levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in tissues, making them a useful model for chronic GSH depletion. Having the global absence of this gene, KO mice--from the time of conception and throughout postnatal life--experience chronic oxidative stress in all tissues, including brain. Between postnatal day (P) 60 and P100, we carried out behavioral phenotyping tests in adults, comparing male and female Gclm(-/-) with Gclm(-/-) wild-type (WT) littermates. Compared with WT, KO mice exhibited: subnormal anxiety in the elevated zero maze; normal overall exploratory open-field activity, but slightly more activity in the peripheral zones; normal acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition reactions; normal novel object recognition with increased time attending to the stimulus objects; slightly reduced latencies to reach a random marked platform in the Morris water maze; normal spatial learning and memory in multiple phases of the Morris water maze; and significantly greater hyperactivity in response to methamphetamine in the open field. These findings are generally in agreement with two prior studies on these mice and suggest that the brain is remarkably resilient to lowered GSH levels, implying significant reserve capacity to regulate reactive oxygen species-but with regional differences such that anxiety and stimulated locomotor control brain regions might be more vulnerable. PMID:22580179

  11. The paradoxical effects of lead in interferon-gamma knockout BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Donghong; Kasten-Jolly, Jane; Lawrence, David A

    2006-02-01

    It has been reported that lead (Pb) exposure enhances interleukin (IL)-4 and inhibits interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) production in wild-type (WT) BALB/c mice. Here, we examined Pb effects on immunity in IFNgamma knockout (KO) mice. Lead significantly enhanced serum IgG1 anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) levels in WT mice compared to the controls; Pb also increased serum IgG2a anti-KLH levels, but the IgG1:IgG2a ratio was greater with Pb. In addition, total serum IgE levels, but not IgE anti-KLH levels, were increased. In the KO mice, the serum IgG1, IgG2a, IgE anti-KLH, and total IgE levels were significantly lower than those of WT mice. Surprisingly, Pb significantly enhanced IgG1 and IgG2a anti-KLH levels in the KO mice. However, for these mice, unlike the WT mice, Pb caused a greater percentage change in IgG2a than in IgG1 anti-KLH, indicating less skewing toward type-2 immunoglobulins. Lead also enhanced the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in WT mice. Not surprisingly, very low DTH occurred in the KO mice; however, Pb induced a strong KLH-specific DTH response. The in vivo Pb exposure significantly increased in vitro production of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10, but not IFNgamma, IL-2 and IL-12, by KLH-induced WT and KO spleen cells. In contrast to KLH, dinitrofluorobenzene contact hypersensitivity (DNFB CHS) was detected in all groups, and Pb did not affect this response, which suggests that Pb has only a slight effect on CD8+ T cell-related responses. As previously reported, Pb enhances Th2 responses in WT mice; however, in the KO mice, Pb enhanced Th1-related anti-KLH production and a Th2-related DTH. The Pb enhancement of DTH in IFNgamma-deficient mice is likely due to promotion of type-2 cytokines and enhancement of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression. PMID:16280381

  12. Fertility of male and female mice heterozygous for the reciprocal translocation T(7;17)3BKM.

    PubMed

    Koleva, M; Benova, D

    1992-01-01

    The present paper describes the fertility of male and female mice heterozygous for the reciprocal translocation T(7;17)3BKM. This translocation was induced by gamma rays in the spermatozoa of an irradiated parent. It is characterized by "asymmetrical" localization of the breakpoints, distally in Chromosome 7 (7F5) and proximally in Chromosome 17 (17B1). The data presented here relate only those matings in which, for both partners, heterozygosity or normality could be confirmed cytogenetically. The results indicate that both male and female translocation heterozygotes are fertile, their mean litter size being reduced to about 50% of that of normal littermates. This leads to the conclusion that the multivalents mainly undergo either alternate or adjacent-1 2:2 segregation. No viable tertiary trisomics were observed among the progeny of the translocation carriers. Analysis of the frequency of the different types of multivalents in diakinesis-metaphase I spermatocytes showed a significant predominance of chain-type figures (CIV and CIII+I), with chains of four elements (CIV) being more frequent than other configurations. This demonstrates that the small marker chromosome remains attached by one of its segments to the tetravalent. PMID:1486808

  13. Skeletal muscle-specific HMG-CoA reductase knockout mice exhibit rhabdomyolysis: A model for statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Miyahara, Shoko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Ohashi, Ken; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid (MVA); this is the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that synthesizes cholesterol. Statins, HMGCR inhibitors, are widely used as cholesterol-reducing drugs. However, statin-induced myopathy is the most adverse side effect of statins. To eludicate the mechanisms underlying statin the myotoxicity and HMGCR function in the skeletal muscle, we developed the skeletal muscle-specific HMGCR knockout mice. Knockout mice exhibited postnatal myopathy with elevated serum creatine kinase levels and necrosis. Myopathy in knockout mice was completely rescued by the oral administration of MVA. These results suggest that skeletal muscle toxicity caused by statins is dependent on the deficiencies of HMGCR enzyme activity and downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway in skeletal muscles rather than the liver or other organs. PMID:26381177

  14. DENDRITIC SPINE ALTERATIONS IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS AND PARIETAL CORTEX OF ALPHA7 NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Morley, B. J.; Mervis, R. F.

    2013-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is involved in higher cognitive and memory functions, and is associated with the etiology of neurological diseases involving cognitive decline, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesized that spine changes in the α7 knockout might help to explain the behavioral deficits observed in α7 knockout mice and prodromal hippocampal changes in AD. We quantified several measures of dendritic morphology in the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus in Golgi-stained material from wildtype and α7 knockout mice at P24. The most significant difference was a 64% increase in thin (L-type) dendritic spines on the CA1 basilar tree in knockout mice (p < .05). There were small decreases in the number of in N-type (−15%), M-type (−14%) and D-type (−4%) spine densities. The CA1 basilar dendritic tree of knockout mice had significantly less branching in the regions nearthesoma in comparison with wildtype animals (p < .01), but not in the more distal branching. Changes in the configuration of CA1 basilar dendritic spines have been observed in a number of experimental paradigms, suggesting that basilar dendritic spines are highly plastic. One component of cognitive dysfunction may be through α7-modulated GABAergic interneurons synapsing on CA1 basal dendrites. PMID:23270857

  15. Gut Microbiota Is a Key Modulator of Insulin Resistance in TLR 2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Caricilli, Andréa M.; Picardi, Paty K.; de Abreu, Lélia L.; Ueno, Mirian; Prada, Patrícia O.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Hirabara, Sandro Massao; Castoldi, Ângela; Vieira, Pedro; Camara, Niels O. S.; Curi, Rui; Carvalheira, José B.; Saad, Mário J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors and host genetics interact to control the gut microbiota, which may have a role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. TLR2-deficient mice, under germ-free conditions, are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance. It is possible that the presence of gut microbiota could reverse the phenotype of an animal, inducing insulin resistance in an animal genetically determined to have increased insulin sensitivity, such as the TLR2 KO mice. In the present study, we investigated the influence of gut microbiota on metabolic parameters, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and signaling of TLR2-deficient mice. We investigated the gut microbiota (by metagenomics), the metabolic characteristics, and insulin signaling in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice in a non-germ free facility. Results showed that the loss of TLR2 in conventionalized mice results in a phenotype reminiscent of metabolic syndrome, characterized by differences in the gut microbiota, with a 3-fold increase in Firmicutes and a slight increase in Bacteroidetes compared with controls. These changes in gut microbiota were accompanied by an increase in LPS absorption, subclinical inflammation, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and later, obesity. In addition, this sequence of events was reproduced in WT mice by microbiota transplantation and was also reversed by antibiotics. At the molecular level the mechanism was unique, with activation of TLR4 associated with ER stress and JNK activation, but no activation of the IKKβ-IκB-NFκB pathway. Our data also showed that in TLR2 KO mice there was a reduction in regulatory T cell in visceral fat, suggesting that this modulation may also contribute to the insulin resistance of these animals. Our results emphasize the role of microbiota in the complex network of molecular and cellular interactions that link genotype to phenotype and have potential implications for common human disorders involving obesity, diabetes, and even other

  16. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wortwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia; Dencker, Ditte; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Molander, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system and involved in regulation of cholinergic and dopaminergic transmission. Here we investigate, for the first time, the role of the M4 receptor in alcohol consumption using M4 knockout (M4(-/-)) and wild-type (M4(+/+)) mice. Experimentally naïve M4(-/-) and M4(+/+) mice were trained to orally self-administer 5%, 8% and 10% alcohol in 60min sessions, 6 days/week, after having undergone a standard sucrose fading training procedure on a fixed ratio schedule. The mice were further subjected to an extinction period followed by a 1 day reinstatement trial. M4(-/-) mice consumed more alcohol at 5% and 8% compared to their M4(+/+) littermates. The highest alcohol concentration used (10%) did not immediately result in divergent drinking patterns, but after 4 weeks of 10% alcohol self-administration, baseline levels as well as a pattern of M4(-/-) mice consuming more alcohol than their M4(+/+) controls were re-established. Moreover, the M4(-/-) mice displayed a reduced capacity to extinguish their alcohol-seeking behavior. Taken together, alcohol consumption is elevated in M4(-/-) mice, indicating that the M4 receptor is involved in mediating the reinforcing effects of alcohol. The M4 receptor should be further explored as a potential target for pharmacological (positive allosteric modulators or future agonists) treatment of alcohol use disorders. PMID:25445043

  17. Acute behavioral effects of nicotine in male and female HINT1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K J; Wang, J B; Barbier, E; Chen, X; Damaj, M I

    2012-11-01

    Human genetic association and brain expression studies, and mouse behavioral and molecular studies implicate a role for the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety. The high comorbidity between smoking and psychiatric disorders, schizophrenia in particular, is well established. Associations with schizophrenia and HINT1 are also sex specific, with effects more predominant in males; however, it is unknown if sex differences associated with the gene extend to other phenotypes. Thus, in this study, using a battery of behavioral tests, we elucidated the role of HINT1 in acute nicotine-mediated behaviors using male and female HINT1 wild-type (+/+) and knockout (-/-) mice. The results show that male HINT1 -/- mice were less sensitive to acute nicotine-induced antinociception in the tail-flick, but not hot-plate test. At low nicotine doses, male and female HINT1 -/- mice were less sensitive to nicotine-induced hypomotility, although the effect was more pronounced in females. Baseline differences in locomotor activity observed in male HINT1 +/+ and -/- mice were absent in females. Nicotine did not produce an anxiolytic effect in male HINT1 -/- mice, but rather an anxiogenic response. Diazepam also failed to induce an anxiolytic response in these mice, suggesting a general anxiety phenotype not specific to nicotine. Differences in anxiety-like behavior were not observed in female mice. These results further support a role for HINT1 in nicotine-mediated behaviors and suggest that alterations in the gene may have differential effects on phenotype in males and females. PMID:22827509

  18. Effect of mineralocorticoid treatment in mice with collecting duct-specific knockout of endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Lynch, I Jeanette; Welch, Amanda K; Gumz, Michelle L; Kohan, Donald E; Cain, Brian D; Wingo, Charles S

    2015-12-15

    Aldosterone increases blood pressure (BP) by stimulating sodium (Na) reabsorption within the distal nephron and collecting duct (CD). Aldosterone also stimulates endothelin-1 (ET-1) production that acts within the CD to inhibit Na reabsorption via a negative feedback mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that this renal aldosterone-endothelin feedback system regulates electrolyte balance and BP by comparing the effect of a high-salt (NaCl) diet and mineralocorticoid stimulation in control and CD-specific ET-1 knockout (CD ET-1 KO) mice. Metabolic balance and radiotelemetric BP were measured before and after treatment with desoxycorticosterone pivalate (DOCP) in mice fed a high-salt diet with saline to drink. CD ET-1 KO mice consumed more high-salt diet and saline and had greater urine output than controls. CD ET-1 KO mice exhibited increased BP and greater fluid retention and body weight than controls on a high-salt diet. DOCP with high-salt feeding further increased BP in CD ET-1 KO mice, and by the end of the study the CD ET-1 KO mice were substantially hypernatremic. Unlike controls, CD ET-1 KO mice failed to respond acutely or escape from DOCP treatment. We conclude that local ET-1 production in the CD is required for the appropriate renal response to Na loading and that lack of local ET-1 results in abnormal fluid and electrolyte handling when challenged with a high-salt diet and with DOCP treatment. Additionally, local ET-1 production is necessary, under these experimental conditions, for renal compensation to and escape from the chronic effects of mineralocorticoids. PMID:26400543

  19. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase knockout mice have alterations in dopamine signaling and are hypersensitive to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Schank, Jesse R; Ventura, Rossella; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Alcaro, Antonio; Cole, Charlene D; Liles, L Cameron; Seeman, Philip; Weinshenker, David

    2006-10-01

    Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that the noradrenergic system provides both direct and indirect excitatory drive onto midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons. We used DA beta-hydroxylase (DBH) knockout (Dbh-/-) mice that lack norepinephrine (NE) to determine the consequences of chronic NE deficiency on midbrain DA neuron function in vivo. Basal extracellular DA levels were significantly attenuated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate putamen (CP), but not prefrontal cortex (PFC), of Dbh-/- mice, while amphetamine-induced DA release was absent in the NAc and attenuated in the CP and PFC. The decrease in dopaminergic tone was associated with a profound increase in the density of high-affinity state D1 and D2 DA receptors in the NAc and CP, while DA receptors in the PFC were relatively unaffected. As a behavioral consequence of these neurochemical changes, Dbh-/- mice were hypersensitive to the psychomotor, rewarding, and aversive effects of cocaine, as measured by locomotor activity and conditioned place preference. Antagonists of DA, but not 5-HT, receptors attenuated the locomotor hypersensitivity to cocaine in Dbh-/- mice. As DBH activity in humans is genetically controlled and the DBH inhibitor disulfiram has shown promise as a pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence, these results have implications for the influence of genetic and pharmacological DBH inhibition on DA system function and drug addiction. PMID:16395294

  20. The effects of cannabinoids on contextual conditioned fear in CB1 knockout and CD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Mikics, Eva; Dombi, Timea; Barsvári, Beáta; Varga, Balázs; Ledent, Catherine; Freund, Tamás F; Haller, József

    2006-05-01

    We studied the effects of cannabinoids on contextual conditioned fear responses. CB1 knockout and wild-type (CD1) mice were exposed to a brief session of electric shocks, and their behavior was studied in the same context 24 h later. In wild-type mice, shock exposure increased freezing and resting, and decreased locomotion and exploration. The genetic disruption of the CB1 receptor abolished the conditioned fear response. The CB1 antagonist AM-251 reduced the peak of the conditioned fear response when applied 30 min before behavioral testing (i.e. 24 h after shocks) in CD1 (wild-type) mice. The cannabinoid agonist WIN-55,212-2 markedly increased the conditioned fear response in CD1 mice, the effect of which was potently antagonized by AM-251. Thus, cannabinoid receptor activation appears to strongly promote the expression of contextual conditioned fear. In earlier experiments, cannabinoids did not interfere with the expression of cue-induced conditioned fear but strongly promoted its extinction. Considering the primordial role of the amygdala in simple associative learning (e.g. in cue-induced fear) and the role of the hippocampus in learning more complex stimulus relationships (e.g. in contextual fear), the present and earlier findings are not necessarily contradictory, but suggest that cannabinoid signaling plays different roles in the two structures. Data are interpreted in terms of the potential involvement of cannabinoids in trauma-induced behavioral changes. PMID:16572000

  1. Age-dependent neonatal intracerebral hemorrhage in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Philippe; Omouendze, Priscilla L; Roy, Vincent; Dourmap, Nathalie; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Carmeliet, Peter; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Marret, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    Intracerebral-intraventricular hemorrhages (ICH/IVH) in very preterm neonates are responsible for high mortality and subsequent disabilities. In humans, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) initiates fibrinolysis and activates endoluminal-endothelial receptors; dysfunction of the t-PA inhibitor (PAI-1) results in recurrent hemorrhages. We used PAI-1 knockout (PAI-1) mice to examine the role of t-PA in age-dependent intracranial hemorrhages as a possible model of preterm ICH/IVH. Intracortical injection of 2 μL of phosphate-buffered saline produced a small traumatic injury and a high rate of hemorrhage in PAI-1 pups at postnatal day 3 (P3) or P5, whereas it had no effect in wild-type neonates. This resulted in white matter and cortical lesions, ventricle enlargement, hyperlocomotion, and altered cortical levels of serotonin and dopamine in the adult PAI mice. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockers, plasmin- and matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors reduced hemorrhage and tissue lesions. In contrast to P3 to P5, no significant hemorrhages were induced in P10 PAI-1 pups and there were no behavioral or neurochemical alterations in adulthood. These data suggest that microvascular immaturity up to P5 in mice is a determinant factor required for t-PA-dependent vascular rupture. Neonatal PAI-1 mice could be a useful ICH/IVH model for studying the ontogenic window of vascular immaturity and vascular protection against later neurodisabilities. PMID:24709679

  2. Hypersomnolence and reduced activity in pan-leptin receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuping; He, Junyun; Kastin, Abba J.; Hsuchou, Hung; Pan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Excessive obesity correlates with hypersomnolence and impaired cognitive function, presumably induced by metabolic factors and cytokines. Production of the adipokine leptin correlates with the amount of adiposity, and leptin has been shown to promote sleep. To determine whether leptin plays a major role in the hypersomnolence of obesity, we measured sleep architecture in pan-leptin receptor knockout (POKO) mice that do not respond to leptin because of the production of a mutant, non-signaling receptor. The obese POKO mice had more non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and less waking time than their littermate controls. This was mainly seen during the light span, although increased bouts of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were also seen in the dark span. The increase of NREM sleep correlated with the extent of obesity. The POKO mice also had decreased locomotor activity and more immobility in the open field test, but there was no increase of forced immobility nor reduction of sucrose intake as would be seen in depression. The increased NREM sleep and reduced locomotor activity in the POKO mice suggest that it was obesity, rather than leptin signaling, that played a predominant role in altering sleep architecture and activity. PMID:23955775

  3. Cognitive abnormalities and hippocampal alterations in monoamine oxidase A and B knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chanpreet; Bortolato, Marco; Bali, Namrata; Godar, Sean C.; Scott, Anna L.; Chen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard F.; Shih, Jean C.

    2013-01-01

    The monoamine oxidase isoenzymes (MAOs) A and B play important roles in the homeostasis of monoaminergic neurotransmitters. The combined deficiency of MAO A and B results in significantly elevated levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), norepinephrine, dopamine, and β-phenylethylamine; in humans and mice, these neurochemical changes are accompanied by neurodevelopmental perturbations as well as autistic-like responses. Ample evidence indicates that normal levels of monoamines in the hippocampus, amygdala, frontal cortex, and cerebellum are required for the integrity of learning and memory. Thus, in the present study, the cognitive status of MAO A/B knockout (KO) mice was examined with a wide array of behavioral tests. In comparison with male wild-type littermates, MAO A/B KO mice exhibited abnormally high and overgeneralized fear conditioning and enhanced eye-blink conditioning. These alterations were accompanied by significant increases in hippocampal long-term potentiation and alterations in the relative expression of NMDA glutamate receptor subunits. Our data suggest that chronic elevations of monoamines, because of the absence of MAO A and MAO B, cause functional alterations that are accompanied with changes in the cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The characteristics exhibited by MAO A/B KO mice highlight the potential of these animals as a useful tool to provide further insight into the molecular bases of disorders associated with abnormal monoaminergic profiles. PMID:23858446

  4. αβγ-Synuclein triple knockout mice reveal age-dependent neuronal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Greten-Harrison, Becket; Polydoro, Manuela; Morimoto-Tomita, Megumi; Diao, Ling; Williams, Andrew M.; Nie, Esther H.; Makani, Sachin; Tian, Ning; Castillo, Pablo E.; Buchman, Vladimir L.; Chandra, Sreeganga S.

    2010-01-01

    Synucleins are a vertebrate-specific family of abundant neuronal proteins. They comprise three closely related members, α-, β-, and γ-synuclein. α-Synuclein has been the focus of intense attention since mutations in it were identified as a cause for familial Parkinson's disease. Despite their disease relevance, the normal physiological function of synucleins has remained elusive. To address this, we generated and characterized αβγ-synuclein knockout mice, which lack all members of this protein family. Deletion of synucleins causes alterations in synaptic structure and transmission, age-dependent neuronal dysfunction, as well as diminished survival. Abrogation of synuclein expression decreased excitatory synapse size by ∼30% both in vivo and in vitro, revealing that synucleins are important determinants of presynaptic terminal size. Young synuclein null mice show improved basic transmission, whereas older mice show a pronounced decrement. The late onset phenotypes in synuclein null mice were not due to a loss of synapses or neurons but rather reflect specific changes in synaptic protein composition and axonal structure. Our results demonstrate that synucleins contribute importantly to the long-term operation of the nervous system and that alterations in their physiological function could contribute to the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:20974939

  5. Increased sensitivity of apolipoprotein E knockout mice to copper-induced oxidative injury to the liver.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Li, Bin; Zhao, Ran-ran; Zhang, Hui-feng; Zhen, Chao; Guo, Li

    2015-04-10

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotypes are related to clinical presentations in patients with Wilson's disease, indicating that ApoE may play an important role in the disease. However, our understanding of the role of ApoE in Wilson's disease is limited. High copper concentration in Wilson's disease induces excessive generation of free oxygen radicals. Meanwhile, ApoE proteins possess antioxidant effects. We therefore determined whether copper-induced oxidative damage differ in the liver of wild-type and ApoE knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Both wild-type and ApoE(-/-) mice were intragastrically administered with 0.2 mL of copper sulfate pentahydrate (200 mg/kg; a total dose of 4 mg/d) or the same volume of saline daily for 12 weeks, respectively. Copper and oxidative stress markers in the liver tissue and in the serum were assessed. Our results showed that, compared with the wild-type mice administered with copper, TBARS as a marker of lipid peroxidation, the expression of oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, and quinone 1 (NQO1) significantly increased in the ApoE(-/-) mice administered with copper, meanwhile superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly decreased. Thus, it is concluded that ApoE may protect the liver from copper-induced oxidative damage in Wilson's disease. PMID:25749341

  6. Masticatory HyperMuscularity is not related to Reduced Cranial Volume in Myostatin-Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cray, James; Kneib, Jared; Vecchione, Lisa; Byron, Craig; Cooper, Gregory M.; Losee, Joseph E.; Siegel, Michael I.; Hamrick, Mark W.; Sciote, James J.; Mooney, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested recently that masticatory muscle size reduction in humans resulted in greater encephalization through decreased compressive forces on the cranial vault. Following this logic, if masticatory muscle size were increased, then a reduction in brain growth should also occur. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis using a myostatin (GDF-8) knockout mouse model. Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, and individuals lacking this gene show significant hypermuscularity. Sixty-two (32 wild-type and 30 GDF-8 −/− knockout), 1, 28, 56 and 180 day old CD-1 mice were used. Body and masseter muscle weights were collected following dissection and standardized lateral and dorsoventral cephalographs were obtained. Cephalometric landmarks were identified on the radiographs and cranial volume was calculated. Mean differences were assessed using a two-way ANOVA. KO mice had significantly greater body and masseter weights beginning at 28 days compared to WT controls. No significant differences in cranial volumes were noted between KO and WT. Muscle weight was not significantly correlated with cranial volume in 1, 28, or 180 day old mice. Muscle weights exhibited a positive correlation with cranial volume at 56 days. Results demonstrate that masticatory hypermuscularity is not associated with reduced cranial volume. In contrast, there is abundant data demonstrating the opposite, brain growth determines cranial vault growth and masticatory apparatus only affects ectocranial morphology. The results presented here do not support the hypothesis that a reduction in masticatory musculature relaxed compressive forces on the cranial vault allowing for greater encephalization. PMID:21618442

  7. Exacerbated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotype in Cln1/5 double-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Tea; Schmiedt, Mia-Lisa; Wong, Andrew M.; Kyttälä, Aija; Soronen, Jarkko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Tyynelä, Jaana; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Jalanko, Anu

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Both CLN1 and CLN5 deficiencies lead to severe neurodegenerative diseases of childhood, known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The broadly similar phenotypes of NCL mouse models, and the potential for interactions between NCL proteins, raise the possibility of shared or convergent disease mechanisms. To begin addressing these issues, we have developed a new mouse model lacking both Cln1 and Cln5 genes. These double-knockout (Cln1/5 dko) mice were fertile, showing a slight decrease in expected Mendelian breeding ratios, as well as impaired embryoid body formation by induced pluripotent stem cells derived from Cln1/5 dko fibroblasts. Typical disease manifestations of the NCLs, i.e. seizures and motor dysfunction, were detected at the age of 3 months, earlier than in either single knockout mouse. Pathological analyses revealed a similar exacerbation and earlier onset of disease in Cln1/5 dko mice, which exhibited a pronounced accumulation of autofluorescent storage material. Cortical demyelination and more pronounced glial activation in cortical and thalamic regions was followed by cortical neuron loss. Alterations in lipid metabolism in Cln1/5 dko showed a specific increase in plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity. Finally, gene expression profiling of Cln1/5 dko cortex revealed defects in myelination and immune response pathways, with a prominent downregulation of α-synuclein in Cln1/5 dko mouse brains. The simultaneous loss of both Cln1 and Cln5 genes might enhance the typical pathological phenotypes of these mice by disrupting or downregulating shared or convergent pathogenic pathways, which could potentially include interactions of CLN1 and CLN5. PMID:23065637

  8. MKP-1 knockout does not prevent glucocorticoid-induced bone disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Maria M; Cato, Andrew C B; Ferris, William F; de Wet, Heidi; Horsch, Kay; Hough, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GCOP) is predominantly caused by inhibition of bone formation, resulting from a decrease in osteoblast numbers. Employing mouse (MBA-15.4) and human (MG-63) osteoblast cell lines, we previously found that the glucocorticoid (GC) dexamethasone (Dex) inhibits cellular proliferation as well as activation of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway, essential for mitogenesis in these cells, and that both these effects could be reversed by the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor vanadate. In a rat model of GCOP, the GC-induced changes in bone formation, mass, and strength could be prevented by vanadate cotreatment, suggesting that the GC effects on bone were mediated by one or more PTPs. Employing phosphatase inhibitors, qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and overexpression/knockdown experiments, we concluded that MKP-1 was upregulated by Dex, that this correlated with the dephosphorylation of ERK, and that it largely mediated the in vitro effects of GCs on bone. To confirm the pivotal role of MKP-1 in vivo, we investigated the effects of the GC methylprednisolone on the quantitative bone histology of wild-type (WT) and MKP-1 homozygous knockout (MKP-1(-/-)) mice. In WT mice, static bone histology revealed that GC administration for 28 days decreased osteoid surfaces, volumes, and osteoblast numbers. Dynamic histology, following time-spaced tetracycline labeling, confirmed a significant GC-induced reduction in osteoblast appositional rate and bone formation rate. However, identical results were obtained in MKP-1 knockout mice, suggesting that in these animals upregulation of MKP-1 by GCs cannot be regarded as the sole mediator of the GC effects on bone. PMID:21698455

  9. Effect of chronic glutathione deficiency on the behavioral phenotype of Gclm(−/−) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Curran, Christine P.; Nebert, Daniel W.; Patel, Krishna V.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress or deficient oxidative stress response in the brain is associated with neurodegenerative disorders and behavioral abnormalities. Previously we generated a knockout mouse line lacking the gene encoding γ-glutamylcysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Gclm(−/−) knockout (KO) mice are viable and fertile, yet exhibit only 9–35% of wild-type levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in tissues, making them a useful model for chronic GSH depletion. Having the global absence of this gene, KO mice—from the time of conception and throughout postnatal life—experience chronic oxidative stress in all tissues, including brain. Between postnatal day (P) 60 and P100, we carried out behavioral phenotyping tests in adults, comparing male and female Gclm(−/−) with Gclm(+/+) wild-type (WT) littermates. Compared with WT, KO mice exhibited: subnormal anxiety in the elevated zero maze; normal overall exploratory open-field activity, but slightly more activity in the peripheral zones; normal acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition reactions; normal novel object recognition with increased time attending to the stimulus objects; slightly reduced latencies to reach a random marked platform in the Morris water maze; normal spatial learning and memory in multiple phases of the Morris water maze; and significantly greater hyperactivity in response to methamphetamine in the open field. These findings are in general agreement with two prior studies on these mice and suggest that the brain is remarkably resilient to lowered GSH levels, implying significant reserve capacity to regulate reactivity oxygen species—but with regional differences such that anxiety and stimulated locomotor control brain regions might be more vulnerable. PMID:22580179

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is altered in the forebrain of Engrailed-2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zunino, G; Messina, A; Sgadò, P; Baj, G; Casarosa, S; Bozzi, Y

    2016-06-01

    Engrailed-2 (En2), a homeodomain transcription factor involved in regionalization and patterning of the midbrain and hindbrain regions has been associated to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). En2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice show ASD-like features accompanied by a significant loss of GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus and neocortex. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a crucial factor for the postnatal development of forebrain GABAergic neurons, and altered GABA signaling has been hypothesized to underlie the symptoms of ASD. Here we sought to determine whether interneuron loss in the En2(-/-) forebrain might be related to altered expression of BDNF and its signaling receptors. We first evaluated the expression of different BDNF mRNA isoforms in the neocortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT) and En2(-/-) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR showed a marked down-regulation of several splicing variants of BDNF mRNA in the neocortex but not hippocampus of adult En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT controls. Accordingly, levels of mature BDNF protein were lower in the neocortex but not hippocampus of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT. Increased levels of phosphorylated TrkB and decreased levels of p75 receptor were also detected in the neocortex of mutant mice. Accordingly, the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and RhoA, two genes regulated via p75 was significantly altered in forebrain areas of mutant mice. These data indicate that BDNF signaling alterations might be involved in the anatomical changes observed in the En2(-/-) forebrain and suggest a pathogenic role of altered BDNF signaling in this mouse model of ASD. PMID:26987954